WorldWideScience

Sample records for static magnetic forces

  1. Magnetic displacement force and torque on dental keepers in the static magnetic field of an MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omatsu, Mika; Obata, Takayuki; Minowa, Kazuyuki; Yokosawa, Koichi; Inagaki, Eri; Ishizaka, Kinya; Shibayama, Koichi; Yamamoto, Toru

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of the static magnetic field of magnetic resonance (MR) scanners on keepers (ie, ferromagnetic stainless steel plate adhered to the abutment tooth of dental magnetic attachments). Magnetically induced displacement force and torque on keepers were measured using 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0 T MR scanners and a method outlined by American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Changes in magnetic flux density before and after exposure to scanner static magnetic field were examined. The maximum magnetically induced displacement forces were calculated to be 10.3 × 10(-2) N at 1.5 T and 13.9 × 10(-2) N at 3.0 T on the cover surface. The maximum torques exerted on the keeper (4 mm in diameter) were 0.83 N × 4 mm at 1.5 T and 0.85 N × 4 mm at 3.0 T. These forces were considerably higher than the gravitational force (7.7 × 10(-4) N) of the keeper but considerably lower than the keeper-root cap proper adhesive force. The keepers' magnetic flux density remained less than that of the Earth. Magnetically induced displacement force and torque on the keeper in the MR scanner do not influence the keeper-root cap proper adhesive force. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Multiple degree-of-freedom force and moment measurement for static propulsion testing using magnetic suspension technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Keith; Bartosh, Blake

    1993-01-01

    Innovative Information Systems (IIS), Inc. is in the process of designing and fabricating a high bandwidth force and moment measuring device (i.e. the Magnetic Thruster Test Stand). This device will use active magnetic suspension to allow direct measurements of the forces and torques generated by the rocket engines of the missile under test. The principle of operation of the Magnetic Thruster Test Stand (MTTS) is based on the ability to perform very precise, high bandwidth force and position measurements on an object suspended in a magnetic field. This ability exists due to the fact that the digital servo control mechanism that performs the magnetic suspension uses high bandwidth (10 kHz) position data (via an eddy-current proximity sensor) to determine the amount of force required to maintain stable suspension at a particular point. This force is converted into required electromagnet coil current, which is then output to a current amplifier driving the coils. A discussion of how the coil current and magnetic gap distance (the distance between the electromagnet and the object being suspended) is used to determine the forces being applied from the suspended assembly is presented.

  3. Static and Dynamic Magnetic Response in Ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-30

    REPORT Final Report: Static and Dynamic Magnetic Response in Ferrofluids 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Ferrofluids are technologically...physics of relaxation phenomena in magnetic nanoparticles. We have done systematic DC and AC magnetization studies of ferrofluids composed of Fe3O4...15. SUBJECT TERMS Magnetic nanoparticles, ferrofluids , susceptibility Hariharan Srikanth University of South Florida - Tampa 4202 East Fowler Ave

  4. Observing the Forces Involved in Static Friction under Static Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Static friction is an important concept in introductory physics. Later in the year students apply their understanding of static friction under more complex conditions of static equilibrium. Traditional lab demonstrations in this case involve exceeding of the maximum level of static friction, resulting in the "onset of motion." (Contains…

  5. Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelmann, Leon

    Principle of MFM In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the magnetic stray field above a very flat specimen, or sample, is detected by placing a small magnetic element, the tip, mounted on a cantilever spring very close to the surface of the sample (Figure 1). Typical dimensions are a cantilever length

  6. Manipulating Cells with Static Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, J. M.; Guevorkian, K.

    2005-07-01

    We review our investigations of the use of static magnetic fields, B, for manipulating cells and cellular processes. We describe how B fields modify the cell division pattern of frog embryos and consequently can be used to probe the pattern determinants. We also observe that magnetic fields modify the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. We describe these modifications and their potential application to investigations of their swimming behavior.

  7. Orienting Paramecium with intense static magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, James M., Jr.; Guevorkian, Karine; Quindel, Carl

    2004-03-01

    Recent experiments on cell division suggest the application of intense static magnetic fields as a novel tool for the manipulation of biological systems [1]. The magnetic field appears to couple to the intrinsic anisotropies in the diamagnetic components of the cells. Here, we present measurements of the intrinsic average diamagnetic anisotropy of the whole single celled ciliate, Paramecium Caudatum. Magnetic fields, 2.5 T Paramecium Caudatum that were suspended in a density matched medium. The organisms align with their long axis parallel to the applied magnetic field. Their intrinsic diamagnetic anisotropy is 3x10-11 in cgs units. We will discuss the implications of these results for employing magnetic fields to probe the behavior of swimming Paramecium. [1] J. M. Valles, Jr. et al., Expt. Cell Res.274, 112-118 (2002).

  8. Magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  9. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  10. Forced magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekstein, G.

    2017-10-01

    This is a tutorial-style selective review explaining basic concepts of forced magnetic reconnection. It is based on a celebrated model of forced reconnection suggested by J. B. Taylor. The standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory of this process has been pioneered by Hahm & Kulsrud (Phys. Fluids, vol. 28, 1985, p. 2412). Here we also discuss several more recent developments related to this problem. These include energetics of forced reconnection, its Hall-mediated regime, and nonlinear effects with the associated onset of the secondary tearing (plasmoid) instability.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  12. Entropic force, holography and thermodynamics for static space-times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konoplya, R.A. [Eberhard-Karls University of Tuebingen, Theoretical Astrophysics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    Recently Verlinde has suggested a new approach to gravity which interprets gravitational interaction as a kind of entropic force. The new approach uses the holographic principle by stating that the information is kept on the holographic screens which coincide with equipotential surfaces. Motivated by this new interpretation of gravity (but not being limited by it) we study equipotential surfaces, the Unruh-Verlinde temperature, energy and acceleration for various static space-times: generic spherically symmetric solutions, axially symmetric black holes immersed in a magnetic field, traversable spherically symmetric wormholes of an arbitrary shape function, system of two and more extremely charged black holes in equilibrium. In particular, we have shown that the Unruh-Verlinde temperature of the holographic screen reaches absolute zero on the wormhole throat independently of the particular form of the wormhole solution. (orig.)

  13. Static and Dynamic Performance Simulation of Direct-Acting Force Motor Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xinghai; Ding, Jianjun; Zheng, Gang; Jiang, Kunpeng; Chen, Dongdong

    2017-07-01

    This work focuses on static and dynamic characteristics of direct-acting force motor valve. First, we analyzed the structure features and operating principle of the Mitsubishi-Hitachi force motor valve (FMV) and the operating principle of its internal permanent-magnet moving-coil force motor magnetic circuit, determined the transfer function of the FMV force motor system, and established a mathematical model for the system. Secondly, we established a static performance analysis model using the AMESIM software and utilized the model in combination with experimental results to analyze the effects of electro-hydraulic servo valve structural parameters on static characteristics. Lastly, we deduced the trajectory equation of the system, established the relationship between dynamic characteristic indexes and structural parameters, and analyzed the effects of different parameter values on the dynamic characteristics of the system. This research can provide a theoretical guidance for designing and manufacturing the FMV body.

  14. Static magnets: what are they and what do they do?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Laakso

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Therapeutic static magnets have gained wide community acceptance for neuromusculoskeletal pain relief in many countries yet, apart from strong anecdotal reports of benefit, there is a paucity of scientific evidence for their use. OBJECTIVES: In this review we describe the physical characteristics of traditional and commonplace unipolar and bipolar static magnets as well as newer quadripolar magnetic arrays; discuss what is known of the physiological effects of static magnets and the strength of the literature; and make suggestions for targeted future research for static magnets in the management of neuromusculoskeletal pain conditions.

  15. Segregated and overlapping neural circuits exist for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Kristina A.; Coombes, Stephen A.; Planetta, Peggy J.; Vaillancourt, David E.

    2011-01-01

    A central topic in sensorimotor neuroscience is the static-dynamic dichotomy that exists throughout the nervous system. Previous work examining motor unit synchronization reports that the activation strategy and timing of motor units differ for static and dynamic tasks. However, it remains unclear whether segregated or overlapping blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity exists in the brain for static and dynamic motor control. This study compared the neural circuits associated with the production of static force to those associated with the production of dynamic force pulses. To that end, healthy young adults (n = 17) completed static and dynamic precision grip force tasks during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Both tasks activated core regions within the visuomotor network, including primary and sensory motor cortices, premotor cortices, multiple visual areas, putamen, and cerebellum. Static force was associated with unique activity in a right-lateralized cortical network including inferior parietal lobe, ventral premotor cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, dynamic force was associated with unique activity in left-lateralized and midline cortical regions, including supplementary motor area, superior parietal lobe, fusiform gyrus, and visual area V3. These findings provide the first neuroimaging evidence supporting a lateralized pattern of brain activity for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force. PMID:22109998

  16. Magnetic vortex nucleation modes in static magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Vaňatka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic vortex nucleation process in nanometer- and micrometer-sized magnetic disks undergoes several phases with distinct spin configurations called the nucleation states. Before formation of the final vortex state, small submicron disks typically proceed through the so-called C-state while the larger micron-sized disks proceed through the more complicated vortex-pair state or the buckling state. This work classifies the nucleation states using micromagnetic simulations and provides evidence for the stability of vortex-pair and buckling states in static magnetic fields using magnetic imaging techniques and electrical transport measurements. Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy and Magnetic Transmission X-ray Microscopy are employed to reveal the details of spin configuration in each of the nucleation states. We further show that it is possible to unambiguously identify these states by electrical measurements via the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. Combination of the electrical transport and magnetic imaging techniques confirms stability of a vortex-antivortex-vortex spin configuration which emerges from the buckling state in static magnetic fields.

  17. Formula for Forced Vibration Analysis of Structures Using Static ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This Paper proposed and examined a formula for forced vibration analysis of structures using static factored response as equivalent dynamic response. Some methods of dynamic analysis are based on using static factored response as equivalent dynamic response thereby excluding the formulation of the equations of ...

  18. Transformation magneto-statics and illusions for magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2014-10-01

    Based on the form-invariant of Maxwell's equations under coordinate transformations, we extend the theory of transformation optics to transformation magneto-statics, which can design magnets through coordinate transformations. Some novel DC magnetic field illusions created by magnets (e.g. rescaling magnets, cancelling magnets and overlapping magnets) are designed and verified by numerical simulations. Our research will open a new door to designing magnets and controlling DC magnetic fields.

  19. The review of cellular effects of a static magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Miyakoshi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of static magnetic fields at the cellular level are reviewed. Past studies have shown that a static magnetic field alone does not have a lethal effect on the basic properties of cell growth and survival under normal culture conditions, regardless of its magnetic density. It has also been shown that cell cycle distribution is not influenced by extremely strong static magnetic fields (up to a maximum of 10 tesla (T. A further area of interest is whether static magnetic fields cause DNA damage, which can be evaluated by determination of the frequency of micronucleus formation. The presence or absence of such micronuclei can confirm whether a particular treatment damages cellular DNA. This method has been used to confirm that a static magnetic field alone has no such effect. However, the frequency of micronucleus formation changes significantly when certain treatments (for example, X-irradiation and mitomycin C are given during exposure to a strong static magnetic field. It has also been reported that treatment with trace amounts of ferrous ions in the cell culture medium and exposure to a static magnetic field increases DNA damage, which is detected using the comet assay. Several reports suggest that a strong static magnetic field may affect the ion transport and the gene expression. In addition, many studies have found a strong magnetic field can induce orientation phenomena in cell culture.

  20. The extended surface forces apparatus. IV. Precision static pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurtenberger, E; Heuberger, M

    2011-10-01

    We report on design and performance of an extended surface forces apparatus (eSFA) built into a pressurized system. The aim of this instrument is to provide control over static pressure and temperature to facilitate direct surface force experiments in equilibrium with fluids at different loci of their phase diagram. We built an autoclave that can bear a miniature eSFA. To avoid mechanical or electrical feedtroughs the miniature apparatus uses an external surface coarse approach stage under ambient conditions. The surface separation is thus pre-adjusted to approximately ~3 μm before sliding the apparatus into the autoclave. Inside the autoclave, the surface separation can be further controlled with a magnetic drive at sub-Ångstrom precision over a 14 μm range. The autoclave pressure can then be set and maintained between 20 mbar and 170 bars with few mbar precision. The autoclave is connected to a specially designed pressurization system to precondition the fluids. The temperature can be controlled between -20 and 60 °C with few mK precision. We demonstrate the operation of the instrument in the case of gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide. Thanks to a consequent decoupling of the eSFA mechanical loop from the autoclave structure, the obtained measurement stability and reproducibility, at elevated pressures, is comparable to the one established for the conventional eSFA, operated under ambient conditions.

  1. The extended surface forces apparatus. IV. Precision static pressure control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurtenberger, E.; Heuberger, M.

    2011-10-01

    We report on design and performance of an extended surface forces apparatus (eSFA) built into a pressurized system. The aim of this instrument is to provide control over static pressure and temperature to facilitate direct surface force experiments in equilibrium with fluids at different loci of their phase diagram. We built an autoclave that can bear a miniature eSFA. To avoid mechanical or electrical feedtroughs the miniature apparatus uses an external surface coarse approach stage under ambient conditions. The surface separation is thus pre-adjusted to approximately ˜3 μm before sliding the apparatus into the autoclave. Inside the autoclave, the surface separation can be further controlled with a magnetic drive at sub-Ångstrom precision over a 14 μm range. The autoclave pressure can then be set and maintained between 20 mbar and 170 bars with few mbar precision. The autoclave is connected to a specially designed pressurization system to precondition the fluids. The temperature can be controlled between -20 and 60 °C with few mK precision. We demonstrate the operation of the instrument in the case of gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide. Thanks to a consequent decoupling of the eSFA mechanical loop from the autoclave structure, the obtained measurement stability and reproducibility, at elevated pressures, is comparable to the one established for the conventional eSFA, operated under ambient conditions.

  2. Resonances of an Oscillating Conductive Pipe Driven by an Alternating Magnetic Field in the Presence of a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladera, Celso L.; Donoso, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    A short conducting pipe that hangs from a weak spring is forced to oscillate by the magnetic field of a surrounding coaxial coil that has been excited by a low-frequency current source in the presence of an additional static magnetic field. Induced oscillating currents appear in the pipe. The pipe motion becomes damped by the dragging forces…

  3. Microscopic FMR Using Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Hammel, P. C.; Wigen, P. E.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a new 3-D imaging technique with ultra-high spatial resolution. This technique, discussed primarily in the context of nuclear magnetic resonance, can also be applied as a microscopic ferromagnetic resonance probe to investigate the distributions of magnetic anisotropy and magnetic exchange interactions within magnetic materials (for example, magnetic multilayer systems). We report the first MRFM experiment on a single crystal Yittrium Iron Garnet film. A non-resonance mode and a family of magneto-static modes were observed in the MRFM spectra. The non-resonance mode is due to the response of the sample magnetization to the applied, time dependent bias field. This will be the main noise source when a magnet is mounted on the cantilever, an arrangement which is necessary in order to perform 3-D imaging in MRFM. The behavior of the magneto-static modes is in qualitative accord with theoretical expectations. The MRFM signal intensity is so large that the experiment is performed under ambient pressure instead of vacuum to reduce the response of the detector (cantilever). This indicates that MRFM will allow micron or sub-micron spatial resolution in studies of a wide variety of magnetic materials.

  4. Ergonomic solutions to support forced static positions at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suszyński Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the available ergonomic constructions used for the support of the musculoskeletal system during static, prolonged work performed in forced positions. Possible evaluation methods are presented as well as ergonomic considerations of work performed in inclined positions, where there is no possibility of influencing the working plane. As a result of the presented work, a set of criteria has been proposed and the requirements for methods which can be used to evaluate the technical constructions supporting the worker during tasks performed in forced and static positions.

  5. Active Magnetic Bearings – Magnetic Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølhede, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Parameter identification procedures and model validation are major steps towards intelligent machines supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB). The ability of measuring the electromagnetic bearing forces, or deriving them from measuring the magnetic flux, strongly contributes to the model...... of the work is the characterization of magnetic forces by using two experimental different experimental approaches. Such approaches are investigated and described in details. A special test rig is designed where the 4 poles - AMB is able to generate forces up to 1900 N. The high precision characterization...... of the magnetic forces are led by using different experimental tests: (I) by using hall sensors mounted directly on the poles (precise measurements of the magnetic flux) and by an auxiliary system, composed of strain gages and flexible beams attached to the rotor; (II) by measuring the input current and bearing...

  6. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  7. The extended surface forces apparatus. IV. Precision static pressure control

    OpenAIRE

    Schurtenberger E; Heuberger M

    2011-01-01

    We report on design and performance of an extended surface forces apparatus (eSFA) built into a pressurized system. The aim of this instrument is to provide control over static pressure and temperature to facilitate direct surface force experiments in equilibrium with fluids at different loci of their phase diagram. We built an autoclave that can bear a miniature eSFA. To avoid mechanical or electrical feedtroughs the miniature apparatus uses an external surface coarse approach stage under am...

  8. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Philip E.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed.

  9. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

    1987-09-08

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

  10. Magnetic Forces on Moving Charges

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    sim drag Simulation Drag-and-Drop Exercise Interactive Media Element This interactive tutorial provides the practice to reinforce the concept of magnetic force of moving charges. The key concepts covered include: The direction of the resultant magnetic force is always perpendicular to the plane defined by the velocity vector of the charge and the magnetic field vector., The direction of motion of the charge is also influenced by the sign/polarity of the charge., If the velocity...

  11. Analysis of PM Magnetization Field Effects on the Unbalanced Magnetic Forces due to Rotor Eccentricity in BLDC Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mahdiuon-Rad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates both static and dynamic eccentricities in single phase brushless DC (BLDC motors and analyzes the effect of the PM magnetization field on unbalanced magnetic forces acting on the rotor. Three common types of PM magnetization field patterns including radial, parallel and sinusoidal magnetizations are considered. In both static and dynamic eccentricities, harmonic components of the unbalanced magnetic forces on the rotor are extracted and analyzed. Based on simulation results, the magnetization fields that produce the lowest and highest unbalanced magnetic forces are determined in rotor eccentricity conditions.

  12. Magnetic Force Microscopy in Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Pablo; Jaafar, Miriam; Gil, Adriana; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Asenjo, Agustina

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to acquire images of magnetic nanostructures in liquid environments is presented. Optimization of the MFM signal acquisition in liquid media is performed and it is applied to characterize the magnetic signal of magnetite nanoparticles. The ability for detecting magnetic nanostructures along with the well-known capabilities of atomic force microscopy in liquids suggests potential applications in fields such as nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, or nanocatalysis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Electromotive force and huge magnetoresistance in magnetic tunnel junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Nam Hai; Ohya, Shinobu; Tanaka, Masaaki; Barnes, Stewart E; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2009-03-26

    The electromotive force (e.m.f.) predicted by Faraday's law reflects the forces acting on the charge, -e, of an electron moving through a device or circuit, and is proportional to the time derivative of the magnetic field. This conventional e.m.f. is usually absent for stationary circuits and static magnetic fields. There are also forces that act on the spin of an electron; it has been recently predicted that, for circuits that are in part composed of ferromagnetic materials, there arises an e.m.f. of spin origin even for a static magnetic field. This e.m.f. can be attributed to a time-varying magnetization of the host material, such as the motion of magnetic domains in a static magnetic field, and reflects the conversion of magnetic to electrical energy. Here we show that such an e.m.f. can indeed be induced by a static magnetic field in magnetic tunnel junctions containing zinc-blende-structured MnAs quantum nanomagnets. The observed e.m.f. operates on a timescale of approximately 10(2)-10(3) seconds and results from the conversion of the magnetic energy of the superparamagnetic MnAs nanomagnets into electrical energy when these magnets undergo magnetic quantum tunnelling. As a consequence, a huge magnetoresistance of up to 100,000 per cent is observed for certain bias voltages. Our results strongly support the contention that, in magnetic nanostructures, Faraday's law of induction must be generalized to account for forces of purely spin origin. The huge magnetoresistance and e.m.f. may find potential applications in high sensitivity magnetic sensors, as well as in new active devices such as 'spin batteries'.

  14. Enhancement of sedimentation and coagulation with static magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Marcin; Dębowski, Marcin; Hajduk, Anna; Rusanowska, Paulina

    2017-11-01

    The static magnetic field can be an alternative method for wastewater treatment. It has been proved that this physical factor, accelerates the biochemical processes, catalyzes advanced oxidation, intensifies anaerobic and aerobic processes or reduces swelling of activated sludge. There are also reports proving the positive impact of the static magnetic field on the coagulation and sedimentation, as well as the conditioning and dewatering of sludge. In order to be applied in larger scale the published results should be verified and confirmed. In the studies, the enhancement of sedimentation by the static magnetic field was observed. The best sedimentation was noted in the experiment, where magnetizers were placed on activated sludge bioreactor and secondary settling tank. No effect of the static magnetic field on coagulation with the utilization of PIX 113 was observed. However, the static magnetic field enhanced coagulation with the utilization of PAX-XL9. The results suggest that increased sedimentation of colloids and activated sludge, can in practice mean a reduction in the size of the necessary equipment for sedimentation with an unchanged efficiency of the process.

  15. Static and dynamic stability of the guidance force in a side-suspended HTS maglev system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dajin; Cui, Chenyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Xiqing; Zhao, Yong

    2017-02-01

    The static and dynamic stability of the guidance force in a side-suspended HTS-PMG (permanent magnetic guideway) system were studied theoretically and experimentally. It is found that there are two types of guidance force that exist in the HTS-PMG system, which are sensitive to the levitation gap and the arrangement of YBCO bulks around the central axis of the PMG. An optimized YBCO array was used to stabilize the system, which enabled a side-suspended HTS-PMG maglev vehicle to run stably at 102 km h-1 on a circular test track with 6.5 m in diameter.

  16. Vitamins and glucose metabolism: The role of static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahbib, Aïda; Ghodbane, Soumaya; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2014-12-01

    This review focuses on our own data and other data from the literature of static magnetic fields (SMF) bioeffects and vitamins and glucose metabolism. Three main areas of investigation have been covered: Static magnetic field and glucose metabolism, static magnetic field and vitamins and the role of vitamins on glucose metabolism. Considering these articles comprehensively, the conclusions are as follows: The primary cause of changes in cells after incubation in external SMF is disruption of free radical metabolism and elevation of their concentration. Such disruption causes oxidative stress leading to an unsteadiness of glucose level and insulin release. Moreover, based on available data, it was concluded that exposure to SMF alters plasma levels of vitamin A, C, D and E; these parameters can take part in disorder of glucose homeostasis and insulin release.

  17. TWO DIMENTIONAL STATIC MAGNETIC ANALYSIS OF RADIAL MAGNETIC BEARING SYSTEMS WITH DIFFERENT STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf ÖNER

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The friction loss of electrical machines is an important problem as like in other rotary machines. In addition, the bearings, where the friction losses occur, also require lubrication at periodic intervals and need to be maintained. In this study, to minimize the friction loss of electrical motor, two dimentional static magnetic analysis of radial magnetic bearing systems with different structures are performed and compared with each other; also, magnetic bearing system with four-pole is realized and applied to an induction motor. In simulation, the forces applied to the rotor of induction motor from designed magnetic bearing system are calculated in a computer by using FEMM software package. In application, when comparing designed magnetic bearing system with mechanical bearings up to the revolution of 350 rpm, it was observed that the loss of no-load operating condition of induction motor is decreased about 15 % with magnetic bearing system. In addition to this, mechanical noisy of the motor is also decreased considerably.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  19. Static magnetic field concentration and enhancement using magnetic materials with positive permeability

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a novel compressor for static magnetic fields is proposed based on finite embedded transformation optics. When the DC magnetic field passes through the designed device, the magnetic field can be compressed inside the device. After it passes through the device, one can obtain an enhanced static magnetic field behind the output surface of the device (in a free space region). We can also combine our compressor with some other structures to get a higher static magnetic field enhancement in a free space region. In contrast with other devices based on transformation optics for enhancing static magnetic fields, our device is not a closed structure and thus has some special applications (e.g., for controlling magnetic nano-particles for gene and drag delivery). The designed compressor can be constructed by using currently available materials or DC meta-materials with positive permeability. Numerical simulation verifies good performance of our device.

  20. Interferometric methods for mapping static electric and magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pozzi, Giulio; Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The mapping of static electric and magnetic fields using electron probes with a resolution and sensitivity that are sufficient to reveal nanoscale features in materials requires the use of phase-sensitive methods such as the shadow technique, coherent Foucault imaging and the Transport of Intensity......) the model-independent determination of the locations and magnitudes of field sources (electric charges and magnetic dipoles) directly from electron holographic data....

  1. Crystal morphology change by magnetic susceptibility force

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuki, Aiko; Aibara, Shigeo; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-01-01

    We found a change in morphology when lysozyme crystals were grown in a magnetic field. The phenomenon was caused by the magnetic force derived from the magnetic susceptibility gradient. We propose that this force should be called the “magnetic susceptibility force".

  2. Resource Letter BSSMF-1: Biological Sensing of Static Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finegold, Leonard

    2012-10-01

    This Resource Letter provides a guide to the literature on the effects of static (time-invariant) magnetic fields B on life, concentrating on how selected creatures sense/detect B. Journal articles, books, and previous and future electronically accessible media are cited for the following topics: history, the magnetic sensing/detection of B by creatures from bacteria to bugworms to butterflies to bees to birds to bats to bovines to beings (human), some of the mechanisms of effects at the developmental and cellular levels, experimental pitfalls, claimed healing effects of B, some medical uses of magnets, and cosmetics. The field presents a fascinating, evolving saga.

  3. [Magnetic resonance imaging : Recent studies on biological effects of static magnetic and high‑frequency electromagnetic fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pophof, B; Brix, G

    2017-07-01

    During the last few years, new studies on biological effects of strong static magnetic fields and on thermal effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were published. Many of these studies have not yet been included in the current safety recommendations. Scientific publications since 2010 on biological effects of static and electromagnetic fields in MRI were researched and evaluated. New studies confirm older publications that have already described effects of static magnetic fields on sensory organs and the central nervous system, accompanied by sensory perceptions. A new result is the direct effect of Lorentz forces on ionic currents in the semicircular canals of the vestibular system. Recent studies of thermal effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields were focused on the development of anatomically realistic body models and a more precise simulation of exposure scenarios. Strong static magnetic fields can cause unpleasant sensations, in particular, vertigo. In addition, they can influence the performance of the medical staff and thus potentially endanger the patient's safety. As a precaution, medical personnel should move slowly within the field gradient. High-frequency electromagnetic fields lead to an increase in the temperature of patients' tissues and organs. This should be considered especially in patients with restricted thermoregulation and in pregnant women and neonates; in these cases exposure should be kept as low as possible.

  4. MHD Forces in Quasi-Static Evolution, Catastrophe, and ``Failed'' Eruption of Solar Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, James

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the first unified theoretical model of flux rope dynamics---a single set of flux-rope equations in ideal MHD---to describe as one dynamical process the quasi-static evolution, catastrophic transition to eruption, cessation (``failure'') of eruption, and the post-eruption quasi-equilibria. The model is defined by the major radial {\\it and} minor radial equations of motion including pressure. The initial equilibrium is a flux rope in a background plasma with pressure $p_c(Z)$ and an overlying magnetic field $B_c(Z)$. The flux rope is initially force-free, but theevolution is not required to be force- free. A single quasi-static control parameter, the rate of increase in poloidal flux, is used for the entire process. As this parameter is slowly increased, the flux rope rises, following a sequence of quasi-static equilibria. As the apex of the flux rope rises past a critical height $Z_{crt}$, it expands on a dynamical (Alfvénic) timescale. The eruption rapidly ceases, as the stored magnetic energy of eruption is exhausted, and a new equilibrium is established at height $Z_1 > Z_{crt}$. The calculated velocity profile resembles the observed velocity profiles in ``failed'' eruptions including a damped oscillation. In the post-eruption equilibria, the outward hoop force is balanced by the tension of the toroidal self magnetic field and pressure gradient force. Thus, the flux rope does not evolve in a force-free manner. The flux rope may also expand without reaching a new equilibrium, provided a sufficient amount of poloidal flux is injected on the timescale of eruption. This scenario results in a full CME eruption. It is shown that the minor radial expansion critically couples the evolution of the toroidal self-field and pressure gradient force. No parameter regime is found in which the commonly used simplifications---near-equilibrium minor radial expansion, force-free expansion, and constant aspect ratio $R/a$ (e.g., the torus instability equation

  5. Influence of Van Der Waals Force on Static Behavior of Nano/micromirrors Under Capillary Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeenfard, Hamid; Darvishian, Ali; Zohoor, Hassan; Ahmadian, Mohammad Taghi

    2012-07-01

    In the current paper, the effect of van der Waals (vdW) force on the static behavior and pull-in characteristics of nano/micromirrors under capillary force is investigated. At first, the dimensionless equation governing the static behavior of nano/micromirrors is obtained. The dependence of the critical tilting angle on the physical and geometrical parameters of the nano/micromirror and its supporting torsional beams is investigated. It is found that the existence of vdW force can considerably reduce the stability limits of the nano/micromirror. It is also found that rotation angle of the mirror due to capillary force highly depends on the vdW force applied to the mirror. Finally, analytical tool Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) is utilized for prediction of the nano/micromirror behavior under combined capillary and vdW force. It is observed that a sixth order perturbation approximation accurately predicts the rotation angle and stability limits of the mirror. The results of this paper can be used for successful fabrication of nano/micromirrors using wet etching release process where capillary force plays a major role in the system.

  6. Magnetic force microscopy : Quantitative issues in biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passeri, D.; Dong, C.; Reggente, M.; Angeloni, L.; Barteri, M.; Scaramuzzo, F.A.; De Angelis, F.; Marinelli, F.; Antonelli, F.; Rinaldi, F.; Marianecci, C.; Carafa, M.; Sorbo, A.; Sordi, D.; Arends, I.W.C.E.; Rossi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples

  7. Isolated neuron amplitude spike decrease under static magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, María J.; del Moral, A.

    1996-05-01

    Isolated Helix aspersa neurons under strong enough static magnetic fields B (0.07-0.7 T) show a decrease of the spike depolarization voltage of the form ∼exp(αB2), with α dependent on neuron parameters. A tentative model is proposed which explains such behaviour through a deactivation of Na+K+-ATP-ase pumps due to protein superdiamagnetic rotation. Values for the cluster and protein in cluster numbers are estimated.

  8. The Radiation Magnetic Force (FmR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    The detection of Circular Magnetic Field (CMF), associated with electrons movement, not incorporated in theoretical works; is introduced as elements of attraction and repulsion for magnetic force between two conductors carrying electric currents; it also created magnetic force between charged particles and magnetic field, or Lorentz force; CMF contain energy of Electromagnetic Radiation (EM-R); a relationship has been established between the magnetic part of the EM-R, and radiation force, showing the magnetic force as a frequency controlled entity, in which a Radiation Magnetic Force formula is derived, the force embedded EM-Wave, similar to Electromagnetic Radiation Energy given by Planck's formula; the force is accountable for electron removal from atom in the Photoelectric Effects, stabilizing orbital atoms, excitation and ionization atoms, initiating production of secondary EM-R in Compton Effect mechanism; the paper aimed at reviving the wave nature of EM-R, which could reflects in a better understanding of the microscopic-world.

  9. Effect of static magnetic field on experimental dermal wound strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekici, Yahya; Aydogan, Cem; Balcik, Cenk; Haberal, Nihan; Kirnap, Mahir; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2012-05-01

    An animal model. We sought to evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields on cutaneous wound healing. Male Wistar rats were used. Wounds were created on the backs of all rats. Forty of these animals (M group) had NeFeB magnets placed in contact with the incisions, either parallel (Pa) and perpendicular (Pr) to the incision. The other 40 animals (sham [S] group) had nonmagnetized NeFeB bars placed in the same directions as the implanted animals. Half of the animals in each group were killed and assessed for healing on postoperative day 7 and the other half on postoperative day 14. The following assessments were done: gross healing, mechanical strength, and histopathology. Intergroup differences were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U or t test. Values for P less than 0.05 were accepted as significant. There were no differences between the magnetic and sham animals with respect to gross healing parameters. The mechanical strength was different between groups. On postoperative day 14, the MPr14 had significantly higher scores than the other groups. When static, high-power, magnetic fields are placed perpendicular to the wound, increased wound healing occurs in the skin of the experimental model.

  10. The effects of static magnetic fields on bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Ding, Chong; Ren, Li; Zhou, Yimin; Shang, Peng

    2014-05-01

    All the living beings live and evolve under geomagnetic field (25-65 μT). Besides, opportunities for human exposed to different intensities of static magnetic fields (SMF) in the workplace have increased progressively, such SMF range from weak magnetic field (1 T). Given this, numerous scientific studies focus on the health effects and have demonstrated that certain magnetic fields have positive influence on our skeleton systems. Therefore, SMF is considered as a potential physical therapy to improve bone healing and keep bones healthy nowadays. Here, we review the mechanisms of effects of SMF on bone tissue, ranging from physical interactions, animal studies to cellular studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Longitudinal Stretching for Maturation of Vascular Tissues Using Magnetic Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Olsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellular spheroids were studied to determine their use as “bioinks” in the biofabrication of tissue engineered constructs. Specifically, magnetic forces were used to mediate the cyclic longitudinal stretching of tissues composed of Janus magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCSs, as part of a post-processing method for enhancing the deposition and mechanical properties of an extracellular matrix (ECM. The purpose was to accelerate the conventional tissue maturation process via novel post-processing techniques that accelerate the functional, structural, and mechanical mimicking of native tissues. The results of a forty-day study of JMCSs indicated an expression of collagen I, collagen IV, elastin, and fibronectin, which are important vascular ECM proteins. Most notably, the subsequent exposure of fused tissue sheets composed of JMCSs to magnetic forces did not hinder the production of these key proteins. Quantitative results demonstrate that cyclic longitudinal stretching of the tissue sheets mediated by these magnetic forces increased the Young’s modulus and induced collagen fiber alignment over a seven day period, when compared to statically conditioned controls. Specifically, the elastin and collagen content of these dynamically-conditioned sheets were 35- and three-fold greater, respectively, at seven days compared to the statically-conditioned controls at three days. These findings indicate the potential of using magnetic forces in tissue maturation, specifically through the cyclic longitudinal stretching of tissues.

  12. Why is the magnetic force similar to a Coriolis force?

    OpenAIRE

    Royer, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    It is pointed out that the underlying reason why the magnetic force is similar to a Coriolis force is that it is caused by Thomas rotations, induced by successions of non-collinear Lorentz boosts. The magnetic force may even be viewed as a kind of Coriolis force (making perhaps more acceptable the apparent non-existence of magnetic monopoles). We also show that under a change of inertial frames, Faraday lines of force Lorentz contract as if 'etched' in space, while 'Coriolis' terms get added on.

  13. Undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluskin, Efim; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Xu, Joseph Z.

    2016-05-31

    A method and apparatus for implementing dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for undulators are provided. An undulator includes a respective set of magnet arrays, each attached to a strongback, and placed on horizontal slides and positioned parallel relative to each other with a predetermined gap. Magnetic forces are compensated by a set of compensation springs placed along the strongback. The compensation springs are conical springs having exponential-force characteristics that substantially match undulator magnetic forces independently of the predetermined gap. The conical springs are positioned along the length of the magnets.

  14. Resonances of an oscillating conductive pipe driven by an alternating magnetic field in the presence of a static magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladera, Celso L; Donoso, Guillermo, E-mail: clladera@usb.v [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon BolIvar, Apdo. 89000, Caracas 1086 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    A short conducting pipe that hangs from a weak spring is forced to oscillate by the magnetic field of a surrounding coaxial coil that has been excited by a low-frequency current source in the presence of an additional static magnetic field. Induced oscillating currents appear in the pipe. The pipe motion becomes damped by the dragging forces between the induced currents and the static field. This oscillating system presents an interesting set of properties. To start with, it is not a magnet interacting with the oscillating field of a coil. The oscillating pipe is not even a ferromagnet. It is a new and conceptually rich case of a damped forced oscillator whose motion differential equation contains coefficients that depend upon a parameter. Here, we present and analytically explain the case of the small amplitude oscillations of this magneto-mechanical system. The ordinary amplitude and phase resonance curves are theoretically derived and confirmed by the set of experimental results presented. This oscillator is inexpensive and simple to set up, does not require sophisticated instrumentation, and with its interesting analytical model, is recommended either as an undergraduate laboratory experiment, as student project work, or even as a demonstration experiment. In loving memory of our late colleague and friend Professor DarIo Moreno

  15. Static magnetic field reduced exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by spermatozoa using magnetic nanoparticle gene delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katebi, Samira; Esmaeili, Abolghasem, E-mail: aesmaeili@sci.ui.ac.ir; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2016-03-15

    Spermatozoa could introduce exogenous oligonucleotides of interest to the oocyte. The most important reason of low efficiency of sperm mediated gene transfer (SMGT) is low uptake of exogenous DNA by spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of static magnetic field on exogenous oligonucleotide uptake of spermatozoa using magnetofection method. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) associated with the labeled oligonucleotides were used to increase the efficiency of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa. We used high-field/high-gradient magnet (NdFeB) to enhance and accelerate exogenous DNA sedimentation at the spermatozoa surface. Flow cytometry analysis was performed to measure viability and percentage of exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by sperm. Flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa (P<0.001) when spermatozoa were incubated in exogenous oligonucleotide solution and MNPs. However, by applying static magnetic field during magnetofection method, a significant decrease in exogenous oligonucleotide uptake was observed (P<0.05). Findings of this study showed that MNPs were effective to increase exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa; however unlike others studies, static magnetic field, was not only ineffective to enhance exogenous oligonucleotide uptake by rooster spermatozoa but also led to reduction in efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles in gene transfer. - Highlights: • Core/shell type Iron oxide nanoparticles were used as a novel and efficient method. • This method increases exogenous DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa. • Static magnetic field decreased DNA uptake by rooster spermatozoa.

  16. Static Magnetic Response of Non-Fermi-Liquid Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    We consider the response of the density of a fermion ensemble to an applied weak static magnetic field. It is known that, for a noninteracting Fermi gas, this response is fully characterized by the Fermi volume and the Berry curvature on the Fermi surface. Here we show the same result holds for interacting fermions, including a Fermi liquid and a non-Fermi liquid, to all orders in perturbation theory. Our result relies only on the assumption of a well-defined Fermi surface and the general analytic properties of quantum field theory, and is completely model independent.

  17. Magnetic particle separation using controllable magnetic force switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Zunghang [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lee, C.-P. [Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Lai, M.-F., E-mail: mflai@mx.nthu.edu.t [Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2010-01-15

    Magnetic particle separation is very important in biomedical applications. In this study, a magnetic particle microseparator is proposed that uses micro magnets to produce open/closed magnetic flux for switching on/off the separation. When all magnets are magnetized in the same direction, the magnetic force switch for separation is on; almost all magnetic particles are trapped in the channel side walls and the separation rate can reach 95%. When the magnetization directions of adjacent magnets are opposite, the magnetic force switch for separation is off, and most magnetic particles pass through the microchannel without being trapped. For the separation of multi-sized magnetic particles, the proposed microseparator is numerically demonstrated to have high separation rate.

  18. Nonlinear resonance of the rotating circular plate under static loads in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuda; Wang, Tong

    2015-11-01

    The rotating circular plate is widely used in mechanical engineering, meanwhile the plates are often in the electromagnetic field in modern industry with complex loads. In order to study the resonance of a rotating circular plate under static loads in magnetic field, the nonlinear vibration equation about the spinning circular plate is derived according to Hamilton principle. The algebraic expression of the initial deflection and the magneto elastic forced disturbance differential equation are obtained through the application of Galerkin integral method. By mean of modified Multiple scale method, the strongly nonlinear amplitude-frequency response equation in steady state is established. The amplitude frequency characteristic curve and the relationship curve of amplitude changing with the static loads and the excitation force of the plate are obtained according to the numerical calculation. The influence of magnetic induction intensity, the speed of rotation and the static loads on the amplitude and the nonlinear characteristics of the spinning plate are analyzed. The proposed research provides the theory reference for the research of nonlinear resonance of rotating plates in engineering.

  19. Forces Between a Permanent Magnet and a Soft Magnetic Plate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Vokoun, David; De Graef, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Forces between a hard/permanent magnet of arbitrary shape and an ideally soft magnetic plate in close proximity are derived analytically from the image method applied to magnetostatics. We found that the contact force, defined as the force required to detach the hard magnet from the plate......, coincides with that between two identical touching permanent magnets. Furthermore, if the hard and the soft magnets are displaced by some amount, their attraction equals that between two identical permanent magnets displaced by twice that amount. Experimental results are presented that validate...

  20. Effects of static magnetic fields on growth of Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahee, Khouaildi B; Poinapen, Danny

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of magnetic fields on growth of primitive eukaryotes such as the ciliate Paramecium. The latter are known to exhibit interesting characteristics such as electrotaxis, gravitaxis, and membrane excitability not commonly encountered in higher organisms. This preliminary study reports the effects of static magnetic fields on growth of Paramecium caudatum. The microorganisms were either permanently or 24 h on-and-off exposed to North and South polarity magnetic fields of average field gradient 4.3 T/m, for a period of 96 h. The growth rate and lag phase of all exposed populations were not significantly different from control ones exposed to normal geomagnetic field (P > .05). However, a significant negative shift in t(max) (time taken for maximum growth) of 10.5%-12.2% and a significant decrease (P Paramecium growth by triggering early senescence of the population. The mechanisms underlying the small changes in population growth are unknown at this level, but various hypotheses have been suggested, including disorganization of swimming patterns resulting from (i) changes in cell membrane electric potential due to high speed movement through a gradient magnetic field and (ii) thermodynamic effect of anisotropic magnetic energies on cell membrane components affecting functioning of calcium channels. Altered swimming movements could in turn affect highly orchestrated processes such as conjugation, essential for survival of the organisms during development of adverse environmental conditions as thought to occur in the closed culture system used in this study.

  1. Theory of ferromagnetic resonance and static magnetization in ultrathin crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rado, George T.

    1982-07-01

    A theory of the static magnetization orientations θ0 and of the ferromagnetic resonance fields H-->res in ultrathin (res are shown to depend crucially on the magnetocrystalline surface anisotropy, and a generalization of this anisotropy is proposed. The equation of motion of the magnetization is combined with the general exchange boundary condition, and realistic approximations are introduced in order to obtain closed algebraic expressions for θ0 and H-->res. The spatial dependence of the oscillations in the presently calculated resonance modes do not represent spin waves but nondissipative exponential decays perpendicular to the film surfaces. The film thicknesses 2L are so small that the films are "beyond spin-wave cutoff." It is shown that the angular dependence of Hres differs strongly from that predicted by the uniform mode theory and that Hres is a linear function of 1L rather than independent of L. An extension of the theory to somewhat thicker films is also presented.

  2. Magnetic force microscopy of atherosclerotic plaque

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T A Alexeeva; S V Gorobets; O Yu Gorobets; I V Demianenko; O M Lazarenko

    2014-01-01

    In this work by methods of scanning probe microscopy, namely by atomic force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy the fragments of atherosclerotic plaque section of different nature were investigated...

  3. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  4. Static Magnetic Field Therapy: A Critical Review of Treatment Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha P. Colbert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Static magnetic field (SMF therapy, applied via a permanent magnet attached to the skin, is used by people worldwide for self-care. Despite a lack of established SMF dosage and treatment regimens, multiple studies are conducted to evaluate SMF therapy effectiveness. Our objectives in conducting this review are to: (i summarize SMF research conducted in humans; (ii critically evaluate reporting quality of SMF dosages and treatment parameters and (iii propose a set of criteria for reporting SMF treatment parameters in future clinical trials. We searched 27 electronic databases and reference lists. Only English language human studies were included. Excluded were studies of electromagnetic fields, transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnets placed on acupuncture points, animal studies, abstracts, posters and editorials. Data were extracted on clinical indication, study design and 10 essential SMF parameters. Three reviewers assessed quality of reporting and calculated a quality assessment score for each of the 10 treatment parameters. Fifty-six studies were reviewed, 42 conducted in patient populations and 14 in healthy volunteers. The SMF treatment parameters most often and most completely described were site of application, magnet support device and frequency and duration of application. Least often and least completely described were characteristics of the SMF: magnet dimensions, measured field strength and estimated distance of the magnet from the target tissue. Thirty-four (61% of studies failed to provide enough detail about SMF dosage to permit protocol replication by other investigators. Our findings highlight the need to optimize SMF dosing parameters for individual clinical conditions before proceeding to a full-scale clinical trial.

  5. Strong static-magnetic field alters operant responding by rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, M.; Matsuda, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Forty male rats of the Wistar ST strain were trained and observed for Sidman avoidance (SA) for 7 weeks or for discriminative avoidance (DA) for 14 weeks to determine the effects of exposure to a strong static-magnetic field. Before avoidance conditioning was completed, rats in the SA group were exposed to the static field at 0.6 T, 16 h/day for 4 days during the fifth week, and those in the DA group were exposed for 6 h/day for 4 days during the seventh week. In the SA conditioning, frequency of lever-pressing by exposed rats gradually decreased during 1 week of exposure and stayed low for at least 2 weeks after exposure. Frequencies of electric shocks received by the rats increased dramatically during the second day of exposure and consistently stayed higher than those of control rats. In the DA condition, exposed rats responded at lower rates than did control rats throughout the observation period. They received more shocks during the 2 weeks following exposure. The data indicate that performance of avoidance responses was inhibited by a comparatively long exposure to a strong magnetic field.

  6. Levitation Force Properties of Superconducting Magnetic Bearing Using Bulk Magnet

    OpenAIRE

    齋藤, 友基; 荻原, 宏康

    1999-01-01

    Type II superconductors can be trapped fluxes at pinning centers. The fluxes-trapping superconductor behaves like a permanent magnet, which is called a "bulk magnet". It is reported that its magnetic field is stronger than that of a usual permanent magnet. We propose a novel levitation system using two sets of superconductors, one of which used the bulk magnets. In this paper, we compared the levitation forces of a usual levitation system with a permanent magnet and the novel levitation syste...

  7. Static Magnetic Properties of AL800 Garnet Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuharik, J. [Fermilab; Madrak, R. [Fermilab; Makarov, A. [Fermilab; Pellico, W. [Fermilab; Sun, S. [Fermilab; Tan, C. Y. [Fermilab; Terechkine, I. [Fermilab

    2017-05-17

    A second harmonic tunable RF cavity is being devel-oped for the Fermilab Booster. This device, which prom-ises reduction of the particle beam loss at the injection, transition, and extraction stages, employs perpendicularly biased garnet material for frequency tuning. The required range of the tuning is significantly wider than in previously built and tested tunable RF devices. As a result, the mag-netic field in the garnet comes fairly close to the gyromag-netic resonance line at the lower end of the frequency range. The chosen design concept of a tuner for the cavity cannot ensure uniform magnetic field in the garnet mate-rial; thus, it is important to know the static magnetic prop-erties of the material to avoid significant increase in the lo-cal RF loss power density. This report summarizes studies performed at Fermilab to understand variations in the mag-netic properties of the AL800 garnet material used to build the tuner of the cavity.

  8. Magnetic forces between arrays of cylindrical permanent magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vokoun, D.; Tomassetti, G.; Beleggia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Permanent magnet arrays are often employed in a broad range of applications: actuators, sensors, drug targeting and delivery systems, fabrication of self-assembled particles, just to name a few. An estimate of the magnetic forces in play between arrays is required to control devices and fabrication...... procedures. Here, we introduce analytical expressions for calculating the attraction force between two arrays of cylindrical permanent magnets and compare the predictions with experimental data obtained from force measurements with NdFeB magnets. We show that the difference between predicted and measured...... force values is less than 10%....

  9. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Alexandra Paun

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experiments using MG-63 osteoblast-like cells for 3D structures with gradients of pore size helped us to find an optimum pore size between 20–40 µm. Starting from optimized 3D structures, we evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of static magnetic fields of up to 250 mT on cell proliferation and differentiation, by ALP (alkaline phosphatase production, Alizarin Red and osteocalcin secretion measurements. We demonstrated that the synergic effect of 3D structure optimization and static magnetic stimulation enhances the bone regeneration by a factor greater than 2 as compared with the same structure in the absence of a magnetic field.

  10. 3D Biomimetic Magnetic Structures for Static Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Calin, Bogdan Stefanita; Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin; Dinescu, Maria; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo

    2018-02-07

    We designed, fabricated and optimized 3D biomimetic magnetic structures that stimulate the osteogenesis in static magnetic fields. The structures were fabricated by direct laser writing via two-photon polymerization of IP-L780 photopolymer and were based on ellipsoidal, hexagonal units organized in a multilayered architecture. The magnetic activity of the structures was assured by coating with a thin layer of collagen-chitosan-hydroxyapatite-magnetic nanoparticles composite. In vitro experiments using MG-63 osteoblast-like cells for 3D structures with gradients of pore size helped us to find an optimum pore size between 20-40 µm. Starting from optimized 3D structures, we evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively the effects of static magnetic fields of up to 250 mT on cell proliferation and differentiation, by ALP (alkaline phosphatase) production, Alizarin Red and osteocalcin secretion measurements. We demonstrated that the synergic effect of 3D structure optimization and static magnetic stimulation enhances the bone regeneration by a factor greater than 2 as compared with the same structure in the absence of a magnetic field.

  11. Strong static magnetic fields elicit swimming behaviors consistent with direct vestibular stimulation in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan K Ward

    Full Text Available Zebrafish (Danio rerio offer advantages as model animals for studies of inner ear development, genetics and ototoxicity. However, traditional assessment of vestibular function in this species using the vestibulo-ocular reflex requires agar-immobilization of individual fish and specialized video, which are difficult and labor-intensive. We report that using a static magnetic field to directly stimulate the zebrafish labyrinth results in an efficient, quantitative behavioral assay in free-swimming fish. We recently observed that humans have sustained nystagmus in high strength magnetic fields, and we attributed this observation to magnetohydrodynamic forces acting on the labyrinths. Here, fish were individually introduced into the center of a vertical 11.7T magnetic field bore for 2-minute intervals, and their movements were tracked. To assess for heading preference relative to a magnetic field, fish were also placed in a horizontally oriented 4.7T magnet in infrared (IR light. A sub-population was tested again in the magnet after gentamicin bath to ablate lateral line hair cell function. Free-swimming adult zebrafish exhibited markedly altered swimming behavior while in strong static magnetic fields, independent of vision or lateral line function. Two-thirds of fish showed increased swimming velocity or consistent looping/rolling behavior throughout exposure to a strong, vertically oriented magnetic field. Fish also demonstrated altered swimming behavior in a strong horizontally oriented field, demonstrating in most cases preferred swimming direction with respect to the field. These findings could be adapted for 'high-throughput' investigations of the effects of environmental manipulations as well as for changes that occur during development on vestibular function in zebrafish.

  12. Formation mechanism of axial macrosegregation of primary phases induced by a static magnetic field during directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Ren, Zhongming; Moreau, Rene

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the macrosegregation formed by applying magnetic fields is of high commercial importance. This work investigates how static magnetic fields control the solute and primary phase distributions in four directionally solidified alloys (i.e., Al-Cu, Al-Si, Al-Ni and Zn-Cu alloys). Experimental results demonstrate that significant axial macrosegregation of the solute and primary phases (i.e., Al2Cu, Si, Al3Ni and Zn5Cu phases) occurs at the initial solidification stage of the samples. This finding is accompanied by two interface transitions in the mushy zone: quasi planar → sloping → quasi planar. The amplitude of the macrosegregation of the primary phases under the magnetic field is related to the magnetic field intensity, temperature gradient and growth speed. The corresponding numerical simulations present a unidirectional thermoelectric (TE) magnetic convection pattern in the mushy zone as a consequence of the interaction between the magnetic field and TE current. Furthermore, a model is proposed to explain the peculiar macrosegregation phenomenon by considering the effect of the forced TE magnetic convection on the solute distribution. The present study not only offers a new approach to control the solute distribution by applying a static magnetic field but also facilitates the understanding of crystal growth in the solute that is controlled by the static magnetic field during directional solidification.

  13. Model FORC diagrams for hybrid magnetic elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaganov, M.V., E-mail: mikhail.vaganov.sci@gmail.com.ru [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, Perm, 614013 (Russian Federation); Linke, J.; Odenbach, S. [Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, 01062 Germany (Germany); Raikher, Yu.L. [Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, Perm, 614013 (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, 620083 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    We propose a model of hybrid magnetic elastomers filled with a mixture of magnetically soft and magnetically hard microparticles. The magnetically hard particles are described by the Stoner–Wohlfarth model, the magnetically soft phase obeys the Fröhlich–Kennelly equation. The interaction between the two types of particles is described by the mean-field approach. First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams were calculated for different values of the elastomer matrix elasticity. We demonstrate that the diagrams display specific new features, which identify the presence of both a deformable matrix and the two types of magnetic particles. - Highlights: • A model of hybrid magnetic elastomers is proposed. • The magnetically hard particles are described by the Stoner–Wohlfarth model. • The magnetically soft phase obeys the Fröhlich–Kennelly equation. The interaction between the phases is described by the mean-field approach. • FORC diagrams are calculated for different values of the elastomer matrix elasticity.

  14. Magnetic field strength and reproducibility of neodymium magnets useful for transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivadulla, Casto; Foffani, Guglielmo; Oliviero, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in humans reduces the excitability of the motor cortex for a few minutes after the end of stimulation. However, when tSMS is applied in humans, the cortex is at least 2 cm away, so most of the strength of the magnetic field will not reach the target. The main objective of the study was to measure the strength and reproducibility of static magnetic fields produced by commercial neodymium magnets. We measured the strength and reproducibility of static magnetic fields produced by four different types of neodymium cylindrical magnets using a magnetic field-to-voltage transducer. Magnetic field strength depended on magnet size. At distances magnetic field strength was affected by the presence of central holes (potentially useful for recording electroencephalograms). At distances >1.5 cm, the measurements made on the cylinder axis and 1.5 cm off the axis were comparable. The reproducibility of the results (i.e., the consistency of the field strength across magnets of the same size) was very high. These measurements offer a quantitative empirical reference for developing devices useful for tSMS protocols in both humans and animals. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. Avaliação quantitativa das forças laterais da patela: ressonância magnética estática e cinemática Quantitative evaluation of lateral forces on the patella: static and kinematic magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je Hoon Yang

    2007-08-01

    evaluated in both groups. Among the patients the differences between static and kinematic measurements were greater than those found in the volunteers, at 30° and 20° flexion, with bisect offset and lateral patellar displacement. CONCLUSION: Static and kinematic magnetic resonance imaging, when performed in association, demonstrated that the lateral forces being exerted on the patella are higher at a knee flexion at the range between 20° and 30°, particularly in individuals symptomatic for femoropatellar instability.

  16. Verifying Magnetic Force on a Conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    The laboratory measurement of the magnetic force acting on a straight wire of length "l" carrying a current of intensity "i" in a magnetic field "B" is usually made using current balances, which are offered by various physics apparatus suppliers' catalogues. These balances require an adequate magnet and commonly allow only the measurement of the…

  17. Forced response of shrouded blades with a coupled static/dynamic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zucca, Stefano; Gulisano, Andrea; Firrone, Christian Maria

    2011-01-01

    A coupled static-dynamic method is proposed and applied to bladed disks with shrouds, in order to calculate the nonlinear forced response in presence of friction damping in the frequency domain. The novel approach allows to improve the already existing methods, which require a preliminary static analysis

  18. Static tensioning promotes hamstring tendons force relaxation more reliably than cycling tensioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedade, Sérgio Rocha; Dal Fabbro, Inácio Maria; Mischan, Martha Maria; Piedade, Cezar; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    Graft elongation might be a major reason for increased anterior laxity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. This study analyzed the force relaxation values and their stabilization when single strands of the gracilis and semitendinosus tendons underwent cyclic and static tensioning at 2.5% strain level, and compared the efficiency of static and cyclic tensioning in promoting force relaxation. Eighteen gracilis tendons and 18 semitendinosus tendons from nine male cadavers (mean age: 22.44years) were subjected to 10 in vitro cyclic loads at 2.5% strain level, or to a static load at 2.5% strain level. During cyclic loading, the reduction in force values tended to stabilize after the sixth cyclic load, while, in the case of static loading, this stabilization occurred by the second minute. Comparing static and cyclic loading, the gracilis tendon had similar mechanical responses in both conditions, while the semitendinosus tendon showed greater force relaxation in static compared with cyclic loading. Considering that the semitendinosus tendon is the main component of the hamstring graft, its biomechanical response to loading should guide the tensioning protocol. Therefore, static tensioning seems more effective for promoting force relaxation of the semitendinosus tendon than cyclic tensioning. The gracilis tendon showed a similar mechanical response to either tensioning protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Static high-gradient magnetic fields affect the functionality of monocytic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syrovets, T.; Schmidt, Z.; Buechele, B.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Dempsey, N.; Simmet, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-2 ISSN 0892-6638 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : static high-gradient * magnet ic fields * affect the functionality * monocytic cells Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism

  20. Solar Force-free Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wiegelmann

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure and dynamics of the solar corona is dominated by the magnetic field. In most areas in the corona magnetic forces are so dominant that all non-magnetic forces like plasma pressure gradient and gravity can be neglected in the lowest order. This model assumption is called the force-free field assumption, as the Lorentz force vanishes. This can be obtained by either vanishing electric currents (leading to potential fields or the currents are co-aligned with the magnetic field lines. First we discuss a mathematically simpler approach that the magnetic field and currents are proportional with one global constant, the so-called linear force-free field approximation. In the generic case, however, the relation between magnetic fields and electric currents is nonlinear and analytic solutions have been only found for special cases, like 1D or 2D configurations. For constructing realistic nonlinear force-free coronal magnetic field models in 3D, sophisticated numerical computations are required and boundary conditions must be obtained from measurements of the magnetic field vector in the solar photosphere. This approach is currently of large interests, as accurate measurements of the photospheric field become available from ground-based (for example SOLIS and space-born (for example Hinode and SDO instruments. If we can obtain accurate force-free coronal magnetic field models we can calculate the free magnetic energy in the corona, a quantity which is important for the prediction of flares and coronal mass ejections. Knowledge of the 3D structure of magnetic field lines also help us to interpret other coronal observations, e.g., EUV images of the radiating coronal plasma.

  1. Subpiconewton dynamic force spectroscopy using magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruithof, M; Chien, F; de Jager, M; van Noort, J

    2008-03-15

    We introduce a simple method for dynamic force spectroscopy with magnetic tweezers. This method allows application of subpiconewton force and twist control by calibration of the applied force from the height of the magnets. Initial dynamic force spectroscopy experiments on DNA molecules revealed a large hysteresis that is caused by viscous drag on the magnetic bead and will conceal weak interactions. When smaller beads are used, this hysteresis is sufficiently reduced to reveal intramolecular interactions at subpiconewton forces. Compared with typical quasistatic force spectroscopy, a significant reduction of measurement time is achieved, allowing the real-time study of transient structures and reaction intermediates. As a proof of principle, nucleosome-nucleosome interactions on a subsaturated chromatin fiber were analyzed.

  2. Retrospective assessment of exposure to static magnetic fields during production and development of magnetic resonance imaging systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Suzan; Christopher, Yvette; Engels, Hans; Slottje, Pauline; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    At present, the relationship between chronic exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) and health effects is unclear. We developed a task-based deterministic model for estimating historical electromagnetic field exposure from the static B-field (B0) of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, for a

  3. Experimental characterization of jet static forces impacting waste tank components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Waters, E.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company plans to install mixer pumps in doubleshell waste tanks to mobilize and suspend settled sludge to allow eventual retrieval for treatment and permanent storage. The mixer pumps produce high momentum, horizontally directed jets that impact and mobilize the sludge and mix it into slurry for removal. There is concern that the force of the jet may damage tank internal components in its path. Scaled experiments were conducted to characterize the velocity profiles of the floor jet and to quantify the drag coefficients and impact forces for three tank components: radiation dry well, air lift circulator, and steam coil. Jet impact forces were measured on the scaled models at a 4 to 1 range of hydraulically scaled flow rates and a scaled range of distances between discharge nozzle and test component. The test were designed to provide hydraulic similarity between test conditions and expected actual waste tank conditions by using equal Reynolds number the jet maximum velocity impacted the test component. Forces measured on the models were used to calculate expected forces on the full scale components. Correlations of force on the test article versus distance from the nozzle were derived for the radiation dry well and air lift circulator based on the velocity correlation and drag parameter. The force data were also used to derive equivalent drag parameters which accounted for component shape factors including variation of jet impact area on the test article with distance from the nozzle. 8 refs., 44 figs., 42 tabs.

  4. The effect of static magnetic fields and tat peptides on cellular and nuclear uptake of magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carol-Anne M; de la Fuente, Jesus; Pelaz, Beatriz; Furlani, Edward P; Mullin, Margaret; Berry, Catherine C

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are widely used in bioapplications such as imaging (MRI), targeted delivery (drugs/genes) and cell transfection (magnetofection). Historically, the impermeable nature of both the plasma and nuclear membranes hinder potential. Researchers combat this by developing techniques to enhance cellular and nuclear uptake. Two current popular methods are using external magnetic fields to remotely control particle direction or functionalising the nanoparticles with a cell penetrating peptide (e.g. tat); both of which facilitate cell entry. This paper compares the success of both methods in terms of nanoparticle uptake, analysing the type of magnetic forces the particles experience, and determines gross cell response in terms of morphology and structure and changes at the gene level via microarray analysis. Results indicated that both methods enhanced uptake via a caveolin dependent manner, with tat peptide being the more efficient and achieving nuclear uptake. On comparison to control cells, many groups of gene changes were observed in response to the particles. Importantly, the magnetic field also caused many change in gene expression, regardless of the nanoparticles, and appeared to cause F-actin alignment in the cells. Results suggest that static fields should be modelled and analysed prior to application in culture as cells clearly respond appropriately. Furthermore, the use of cell penetrating peptides may prove more beneficial in terms of enhancing uptake and maintaining cell homeostasis than a magnetic field. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Static Response of Microbeams due to Capillary and Electrostatic Forces

    KAUST Repository

    Bataineh, Ahmad M.

    2016-03-07

    Micro-sensors or micro-switches usually operate under the effect of electrostatic force and could face some environmental effects like humidity, which may lead to condensation underneath the beams and create strong capillary forces. Those tiny structures are principally made of microbeams that can undergo instabilities under the effect of those created huge capillary forces. In fact, during the fabrication of microbeams, there is an important step to separate the beam from its substrate (wet etching). After this step, the microstructure is dried, which may causes the onset of some droplets of water trapped underneath the beam that could bring about a huge capillary force pulling it toward its substrate. If this force is bigger than the microbeam\\'s restoring force, it will become stuck to the substrate. This paper investigates the instability scenarios of both clamped-clamped (straight and curved) and cantilever (straight and curled) microbeams under the effect of capillary and/or electrostatic forces. The reduced order modeling (ROM) based on the Galerkin procedure is used to solve the nonlinear beam equations. The non-ideal boundaries are modeled by adding springs. The volume of the fluid between the beam and the substrate underneath it is varied and the relation between the volume of the water and the stability of the beam is shown. An analysis for the factors of which should be taken in to consideration in the fabrication processes to overcome the instability due to huge capillary forces is done. Also the size of the electrode for the electrostatic force is varied to show the effect on the micro-switch stability. A variation of the pull-in voltage with some specific beam parameters and with more than one case of electrode size is shown. It is found that capillary forces have a pronounced effect on the stability of microbeams. It is also found that the pull-in length decreases as the electrode size increases. It is also shown that the pull-in voltage decreases

  6. Exposure to static and time-varying magnetic fields from working in the static magnetic stray fields of MRI scanners : A comprehensive survey in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323043216; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Crozier, Stuart; Vocht, Frank De; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and research staff who work around magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed to the static magnetic stray fields of these scanners. Although the past decade has seen strong developments in the assessment of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from MRI scanners, there

  7. Investigating Recording Patterns Using Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenland, J.P.J.; van Engelen, G.J.P. (Peter); Bernards, Jan P.C.; Bernards, J.P.C.; Cramer, H.A.J.; Cramer, Hugo A.J.

    1993-01-01

    The magnetic force microscope is a valuable tool for the qualitative analysis of local phenomena in magnetic recording media. To study the possibilities for a more quantitative analysis, the MFM results have been compared with recording results. It is shown that such analysis is hampered by the

  8. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy-magnetic force microscopy combination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria; Asenjo, Agustina

    2011-01-01

    .... In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures...

  9. A Steel Wire Stress Measuring Sensor Based on the Static Magnetization by Permanent Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongge Deng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new stress measuring sensor is proposed to evaluate the axial stress in steel wires. Without using excitation and induction coils, the sensor mainly consists of a static magnetization unit made of permanent magnets and a magnetic field measurement unit containing Hall element arrays. Firstly, the principle is illustrated in detail. Under the excitation of the magnetization unit, a spatially varying magnetized region in the steel wire is utilized as the measurement region. Radial and axial magnetic flux densities at different lift-offs in this region are measured by the measurement unit to calculate the differential permeability curve and magnetization curve. Feature parameters extracted from the curves are used to evaluate the axial stress. Secondly, the special stress sensor for Φ5 and Φ7 steel wires is developed accordingly. At last, the performance of the sensor is tested experimentally. Experimental results show that the sensor can measure the magnetization curve accurately with the error in the range of ±6%. Furthermore, the obtained differential permeability at working points 1200 A/m and 10000 A/m change almost linearly with the stress in steel wires, the goodness of linear fits are all higher than 0.987. Thus, the proposed steel wire stress measuring sensor is feasible.

  10. Magnetic force microscopy: quantitative issues in biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel Wce; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells.

  11. Magnetic force microscopy of superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Sharon; Savla, Mayur; Pelekhov, Denis V; Iscru, Daniel F; Selcu, Camelia; Hammel, P Chris; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2008-02-01

    The use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to detect probe-sample interactions from superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vitro in ambient atmospheric conditions is reported here. By using both magnetic and nonmagnetic probes in dynamic lift-mode imaging and by controlling the direction and magnitude of the external magnetic field applied to the samples, it is possible to detect and identify the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The experimental results shown here are in agreement with the estimated sensitivity of the MFM technique. The potential and challenges for localizing nanoscale magnetic domains in biological samples is discussed.

  12. The force synergy of human digits in static and dynamic cylindrical grasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chieh Kuo

    Full Text Available This study explores the force synergy of human digits in both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions. The patterns of digit force distribution, error compensation, and the relationships among digit forces are examined to quantify the synergetic patterns and coordination of multi-finger movements. This study recruited 24 healthy participants to perform cylindrical grasps using a glass simulator under normal grasping and one-finger restricted conditions. Parameters such as the grasping force, patterns of digit force distribution, and the force coefficient of variation are determined. Correlation coefficients and principal component analysis (PCA are used to estimate the synergy strength under the dynamic grasping condition. Specific distribution patterns of digit forces are identified for various conditions. The compensation of adjacent fingers for the force in the normal direction of an absent finger agrees with the principle of error compensation. For digit forces in anti-gravity directions, the distribution patterns vary significantly by participant. The forces exerted by the thumb are closely related to those exerted by other fingers under all conditions. The index-middle and middle-ring finger pairs demonstrate a significant relationship. The PCA results show that the normal forces of digits are highly coordinated. This study reveals that normal force synergy exists under both static and dynamic cylindrical grasping conditions.

  13. Static and dynamic magnetic properties of densely packed magnetic nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmytriiev, O.; Al-Jarah, U. A. S.; Gangmei, P.; Kruglyak, V. V.; Hicken, R. J.; Mahato, B. K.; Rana, B.; Agrawal, M.; Barman, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, S.

    2013-05-01

    The static and dynamic magnetic properties of magnetic nanowire arrays with high packing density (>0.4) and wire diameter much greater than the exchange length have been studied by static and time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements and micromagnetic simulations. The nanowires were formed by electrodeposition within a nanoporous template such that their symmetry axes lay normal to the plane of the substrate. A quantitative and systematic investigation has been made of the static and dynamic properties of the array, which lie between the limiting cases of a single wire and a continuous ferromagnetic thin film. In particular, the competition between anisotropies associated with the shape of the individual nanowires and that of the array as a whole has been studied. Measured and simulated hysteresis loops are largely anhysteretic with zero remanence, and the micromagnetic configuration is such that the net magnetization vanishes in directions orthogonal to the applied field. Simulations of the remanent state reveal antiferromagnetic alignment of the magnetization in adjacent nanowires and the formation of vortex flux closure structures at the ends of each nanowire. The excitation spectra obtained from experiment and micromagnetic simulations are in qualitative agreement for magnetic fields applied both parallel and perpendicular to the axes of the nanowires. For the field parallel to the nanowire axes, there is also good quantitative agreement between experiment and simulation. The resonant frequencies are initially found to decrease as the applied field is increased from remanence. This is the result of a change of mode profile within the plane of the array from nonuniform to uniform as the ground state evolves with increasing applied field. Quantitative differences between experimental and simulated spectra are observed when the field is applied perpendicular to the nanowire axes. The dependence of the magnetic excitation spectra upon the array packing

  14. Magnetic Force Microscopy Images of Magnetic Garnet With Thin-Film Magnetic Tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadas, A.; Moreland, J.; Rice, P.; Katti, R.

    1993-01-01

    We present magnetic force microscopy images of YGdTmGa/YSmTmGa magnetic garnet, usinga thin Fe film deposited on Si_3N_5 tips. We have found correlations between the topography andthe magnetic domain structure. We have observed the domain wall contrast with a iron thin-film tip. We report on domain wall imaging of garnet with magnetic force microscopy.

  15. No modulatory effects by transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of human motor and somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufner, Marco; Brückner, Sabrina; Kammer, Thomas

    Recently, it was reported that the application of a static magnetic field by placing a strong permanent magnet over the scalp for 10 min led to an inhibition of motor cortex excitability for at least 6 min after removing the magnet. When placing the magnet over the somatosensory cortex, a similar inhibitory after effect could be observed as well. Our aim was to replicate the inhibitory effects of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation in the motor and somatosensory system. The modulatory effect of static magnetic field stimulation was investigated in three experiments. In two experiments motor cortex excitability was measured before and after 10 or 15 min of magnet application, respectively. The second experiment included a sham condition and was designed in a double-blinded manner. In a third experiment, paired-pulse SSEPs were measured pre and four times post positioning the magnet over the somatosensory cortex for 10 min on both hemispheres, respectively. The SSEPs of the non stimulated hemisphere served as control condition. We did not observe any systematic effect of the static magnetic field neither on motor cortex excitability nor on SSEPs. Moreover, no SSEP paired-pulse suppression was found. We provide a detailed analysis of possible confounding factors and differences to previous studies on tSMS. After all, our results could not confirm the static magnetic field effect. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Consistency of motor-unit identification during force-varying static contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, M; Jensen, B R; Sjøgaard, G

    2000-01-01

    Due to inter-operator variability, two operators were used to assess the consistency of motor unit (MU) identification during ramp contractions, by the comparison of semi-automatic decompositions of the same recordings. Static shoulder abduction was performed against a force transducer in a posit......Due to inter-operator variability, two operators were used to assess the consistency of motor unit (MU) identification during ramp contractions, by the comparison of semi-automatic decompositions of the same recordings. Static shoulder abduction was performed against a force transducer...

  17. Parametric Resonances of a Conductive Pipe Driven by an Alternating Magnetic Field in the Presence of a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, Guillermo; Ladera, Celso L.

    2012-01-01

    The parametric oscillations of an oscillator driven electromagnetically are presented. The oscillator is a conductive pipe hung from a spring, and driven by the oscillating magnetic field of a surrounding coil in the presence of a static magnetic field. It is an interesting case of parametric oscillations since the pipe is neither a magnet nor a…

  18. Magnetic micropillar sensors for force sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2015-04-13

    A force sensor system consisting of bioinspired, magnetic and highly elastic micropillars integrated on a magnetic field sensing element is reported. The micro-pillars are made of a nanocomposite consisting of magnetic nanowires incorporated into polydimethylsiloxane. The permanent magnetic behavior of the nanowires allows remote operation without an additional magnetic field to magnetize the nanowires, which simplifies miniaturization and system integration. We demonstrate the potential of this concept by realizing a tactile sensing element. The developed sensor element operates at power consumption of 75 μW and has a detection range between 0–120 kPa and a resolution of 2.7 kPa, which can easily be tuned in a wide range.

  19. A COMPARISON OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION MUSCLE FORCE PREDICTIONS DURING WHEELCHAIR PROPULSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Melissa M.; Rankin, Jeffery W.; Neptune, Richard R.; Kaufman, Kenton R.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to compare static and dynamic optimization muscle force and work predictions during the push phase of wheelchair propulsion. A secondary purpose was to compare the differences in predicted shoulder and elbow kinetics and kinematics and handrim forces. The forward dynamics simulation minimized differences between simulated and experimental data (obtained from 10 manual wheelchair users) and muscle co-contraction. For direct comparison between models, the shoulder and elbow muscle moment arms and net joint moments from the dynamic optimization were used as inputs into the static optimization routine. RMS errors between model predictions were calculated to quantify model agreement. There was a wide range of individual muscle force agreement that spanned from poor (26.4 % Fmax error in the middle deltoid) to good (6.4 % Fmax error in the anterior deltoid) in the prime movers of the shoulder. The predicted muscle forces from the static optimization were sufficient to create the appropriate motion and joint moments at the shoulder for the push phase of wheelchair propulsion, but showed deviations in the elbow moment, pronation-supination motion and hand rim forces. These results suggest the static approach does not produce results similar enough to be a replacement for forward dynamics simulations, and care should be taken in choosing the appropriate method for a specific task and set of constraints. Dynamic optimization modeling approaches may be required for motions that are greatly influenced by muscle activation dynamics or that require significant co-contraction. PMID:25282075

  20. Materials processing in a magnetic force opposed to the gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournier, R.F. E-mail: tournier@labs.polycnrs-gre.fr; Beaugnon, E.; Noudem, J.; Rakotoarison, S

    2001-05-01

    High magnetic fields can levitate diamagnetic substances. Conducting paramagnetic liquids can be levitated by combining electromagnetic and magnetic forces. Some recent examples of magnetic processing are given to enlighten some experimental difficulties related to solidification. Levitation appears as a particular magnetic processing. There are other concepts to damp convection in magnetic liquids, to modify and orient the solidified microstructure. An exciting perspective is the convection suppression in a magnetic liquid by using much smaller magnetic forces than the levitation force.

  1. A single magnetic nanocomposite cilia force sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-04-20

    The advancements in fields like robotics and medicine continuously require improvements of sensor devices and more engagement of cooperative sensing technologies. For example, instruments such as tweezers with sensitive force sensory heads could provide the ability to sense a variety of physical quantities in real time, such as the amount and direction of the force applied or the texture of the gripped object. Force sensors with such abilities could be great solutions toward the development of smart surgical tools. In this work, a unique force sensor that can be integrated at the tips of robotic arms or surgical tools is reported. The force sensor consists of a single bioinspired, permanent magnetic and highly elastic nanocomposite cilia integrated on a magnetic field sensing element. The nanocomposite is prepared from permanent magnetic nanowires incorporated into the highly elastic polydimethylsiloxane. We demonstrate the potential of this concept by performing several experiments to show the performance of the force sensor. The developed sensor element has a 200 μm in diameter single cilium with 1:5 aspect ratio and shows a detection range up to 1 mN with a sensitivity of 1.6 Ω/mN and a resolution of 31 μN. The simple fabrication process of the sensor allows easy optimization of the sensor performance to meet the needs of different applications.

  2. Static and Dynamic properties of Cubic Chiral Magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, F.

    2017-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis focuses on chiral magnets, where skyrmion lattices are stablised by magnetic fields. Neutron scattering, magnetisation and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been performed on several typical chiral magnets such as the multiferroic insulator Cu2OSeO3 and

  3. Impact of static magnetic fields on human myoblast cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern-Straeter, Jens; Bonaterra, Gabriel Alejandro; Kassner, Stefan S; Faber, Anne; Sauter, Alexander; Schulz, Johannes D; Hörmann, Karl; Kinscherf, Ralf; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart

    2011-12-01

    Treatment of skeletal muscle loss due to trauma or tumor ablation therapy still lacks a suitable clinical approach. Creation of functional muscle tissue in vitro using the differentiation potential of human satellite cells (myoblasts) is a promising new research field called tissue engineering. Strong differentiation stimuli, which can induce formation of myofibers after cell expansion, have to be identified and evaluated in order to create sufficient amounts of neo-tissue. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of static magnetic fields (SMF) on human satellite cell cultures as one of the preferred stem cell sources in skeletal muscle tissue engineering. Experiments were performed using human satellite cells with and without SMF stimulation after incubation with a culture medium containing low [differentiation medium (DM)] or high [growth medium (GM)] concentrations of growth factors. Proliferation analysis using the alamarBlue assay revealed no significant influence of SMF on cell division. Real-time RT-PCR of the following marker genes was investigated: myogenic factor 5 (MYF5), myogenic differentiation antigen 1 (MYOD1), myogenin (MYOG), skeletal muscle α1 actin (ACTA1), and embryonic (MYH3), perinatal (MYH8) and adult (MYH1) skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain. We detected an influence on marker gene expression by SMF in terms of a down-regulation of the marker genes in cell cultures treated with SMF and DM, but not in cell cultures treated with SMF and GM. Immunocytochemical investigations using antibodies directed against the differentiation markers confirmed the gene expression results and showed an enhancement of maturation after stimulation with GM and SMF. Additional calculation of the fusion index also revealed an increase in myotube formation in cell cultures treated with SMF and GM. Our findings show that the effect of SMF on the process of differentiation depends on the growth factor concentration in the culture medium in human

  4. Dielectric polarization transients in biological tissue moving in a static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Kari; Laakso, Ilkka

    2016-09-01

    Movement of a body in a static magnetic field gives rise to the Lorentz force that induces in the medium both electric currents and dielectric polarization. It is usually assumed that the conductivity of biological tissues is sufficiently high in order to neglect dielectric phenomenon arising from non-equilibrium of polarization charges. However, the permittivity of biological tissues is extremely high and the relaxation time of free charges is relatively low. In this study, we examined the effect of dielectric polarization on the electric field (EF) induced by human movements in a strong magnetic field (MF). Analytic equations for brain and bone equivalent spheres translating and rotating in a uniform MF were derived from Maxwell equations. Several examples were computed by using Fast Fourier Transform to examine transient dielectric effects in a time domain. The results showed that dielectric polarization transients do arise, but in the case of homogeneous medium, they are vanishingly small. In contrast, the local dielectric transients are not vanishingly small in heterogeneous medium. However, due to limited acceleration and deceleration of normal human movements, the transients are relatively small, at maximum a few dozen percent of the EF induced by the change of the magnetic flux. Taking into account the high uncertainty in numerical simulation, the dielectric transients can be neglected in the case of biological materials but not in the case of many non-biological materials of low conductivity. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:409-422, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Elucidating the Function of Penetratin and a Static Magnetic Field in Cellular Uptake of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stirling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs have become important tools in molecular diagnostics, in vivo imaging and improved treatment of disease, with the ultimate aim of producing a more theranostic approach. Due to their small sizes, the nanoparticles can cross most of the biological barriers such as the blood vessels and the blood brain barrier, thus providing ubiquitous access to most tissues. In all biomedical applications maximum nanoparticle uptake into cells is required. Two promising methods employed to this end include functionalization of mNPs with cell-penetrating peptides to promote efficient translocation of cargo into the cell and the use of external magnetic fields for enhanced delivery. This study aimed to compare the effect of both penetratin and a static magnetic field with regards to the cellular uptake of 200 nm magnetic NPs and determine the route of uptake by both methods. Results demonstrated that both techniques increased particle uptake, with penetratin proving more cell specific. Clathrin- medicated endocytosis appeared to be responsible for uptake as shown via PCR and western blot, with Pitstop 2 (known to selectively block clathrin formation blocking particle uptake. Interestingly, it was further shown that a magnetic field was able to reverse or overcome the blocking, suggesting an alternative route of uptake.

  6. Acute Effects of the Different Intensity of Static Stretching on Flexibility and Isometric Muscle Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Matsuo, Shingo; Hatano, Genki; Iwata, Masahiro; Yokoi, Kazuaki; Tsuchida, Wakako; Banno, Yasuhiro; Asai, Yuji

    2017-12-01

    Kataura, S, Suzuki, S, Matsuo, S, Hatano, G, Iwata, M, Yokoi, K, Tsuchida, W, Banno, Y, and Asai, Y. Acute effects of the different intensity of static stretching on flexibility and isometric muscle force. J Strength Cond Res 31(12): 3403-3410, 2017-In various fields, static stretching is commonly performed to improve flexibility, whereas the acute effects of different stretch intensities are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the acute effects of different stretch intensities on flexibility and muscle force. Eighteen healthy participants (9 men and 9 women) performed 180-second static stretches of the right hamstrings at 80, 100, and 120% of maximum tolerable intensity without stretching pain, in random order. The following outcomes were assessed as markers of lower limb function and flexibility: static passive torque (SPT), range of motion (ROM), passive joint (muscle-tendon) stiffness, passive torque (PT) at onset of pain, and isometric muscle force. Static passive torque was significantly decreased after all stretching intensities (p ≤ 0.05). Compared with before stretching at 100 and 120% intensities, ROM and PT were significantly increased after stretching (p ≤ 0.05), and passive stiffness (p = 0.05) and isometric muscle force (p ≤ 0.05) were significantly decreased. In addition, ROM was significantly greater after stretching at 100 and 120% than at 80%, and passive stiffness was significantly lower after 120% than after 80% (p ≤ 0.05). However, all measurements except SPT were unchanged after 80% intensity. There was a weak positive correlation between the intensities of stretching and the relative change for SPT (p ≤ 0.05), a moderate positive correlation with ROM (p ≤ 0.05), and a moderate positive correlation with passive stiffness (p ≤ 0.05). These results indicate that static stretching at greater intensity is more effective for increasing ROM and decreasing passive muscle-tendon stiffness.

  7. Magnetic levitation force between a superconducting bulk magnet and a permanent magnet

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J. J.; He, C. Y.; Meng, L. F.; Li, C.; Han, R. S.; Gao, Z. X.

    2002-01-01

    The current density in a disk-shaped superconducting bulk magnet and the magnetic levitation force exerted on the superconducting bulk magnet by a cylindrical permanent magnet are calculated from first principles. The effect of the superconducting parameters of the superconducting bulk is taken into account by assuming the voltage-current law and the material law. The magnetic levitation force is dominated by the remnant current density, which is induced by switching off the applied magnetizi...

  8. Magnetic Force and Work: An Accessible Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Despite their physics instructors' arguments to the contrary, introductory students can observe situations in which there seems to be compelling evidence for magnetic force doing work. The counterarguments are often highly technical and require physics knowledge beyond the experience of novice students, however. A simple example is presented…

  9. Mechanical manipulation of magnetic nanoparticles by magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinyun; Zhang, Wenxiao; Li, Yiquan; Zhu, Hanxing; Qiu, Renxi; Song, Zhengxun; Wang, Zuobin; Li, Dayou

    2017-12-01

    A method has been developed in this work for the mechanical manipulation of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). A helical curve was designed as the capture path to pick up and remove the target nanoparticle on a mica surface by a magnetic probe based on the magnetic force microscope (MFM). There were magnetic, tangential and pushing forces acting on the target particle during the approaching process when the tip followed the helical curve as the capture path. The magnetic force was significant when the tip was closer to the particle. The target particle can be attached on the surface of the magnetic probe tip and then be picked up after the tip retracted from the mica surface. Theoretical analysis and experimental results were presented for the pick-up and removal of MNPs. With this method, the precision and flexibility of manipulation of MNPs were improved significantly compared to the pushing or sliding of the target object away from the corresponding original location following a planned path.

  10. Static magnetic fields: A summary of biological interactions, potential health effects, and exposure guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    Interest in the mechanisms of interaction and the biological effects of static magnetic fields has increased significantly during the past two decades as a result of the growing number of applications of these fields in research, industry and medicine. A major stimulus for research on the bioeffects of static magnetic fields has been the effort to develop new technologies for energy production and storage that utilize intense magnetic fields (e.g., thermonuclear fusion reactors and superconducting magnet energy storage devices). Interest in the possible biological interactions and health effects of static magnetic fields has also been increased as a result of recent developments in magnetic levitation as a mode of public transportation. In addition, the rapid emergence of magnetic resonance imaging as a new clinical diagnostic procedure has, in recent years, provided a strong rationale for defining the possible biological effects of magnetic fields with high flux densities. In this review, the principal interaction mechanisms of static magnetic fields will be described, and a summary will be given of the present state of knowledge of the biological, environmental, and human health effects of these fields.

  11. Static Scaling on an Interacting Magnetic Nanoparticle System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, T.; Svedlindh, P.; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt

    1998-01-01

    The field dependence of the ac susceptibility of a concentrated frozen ferrofluid containing ultrafine Fe-C particles of monodisperse nature has been analyzed using static scaling. For the first time, a divergent behavior of the nonlinear susceptibility of a dipole-dipole interacting system is de...

  12. Investigating the Magnetic Interaction with Geomag and Tracker Video Analysis: Static Equilibrium and Anharmonic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, P.; Mascheretti, P.; DeAmbrosis, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how simple experiments realizable by using easily found and low-cost materials allow students to explore quantitatively the magnetic interaction thanks to the help of an Open Source Physics tool, the Tracker Video Analysis software. The static equilibrium of a "column" of permanents magnets is carefully investigated by…

  13. Work-related factors associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323043216; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Cambron-Goulet, Évelyne; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aims to identify work-related and personal factors associated with workers' exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) and motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields (TVMF) from MRI scanners. METHODS: Measurements of personal exposure to SMF and TVMF were performed among MRI staff

  14. Working with MRI: An investigation of occupational exposure to strong static magnetic fields and associated symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, K.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) makes use of electromagnetic fields in the non-ionizing radiation frequency ranges. One of them is a continuously present strong static magnetic field (SMF), which extends up to several meters around the scanner. Each time an MRI worker performs tasks near the

  15. Magnet polepiece design for uniform magnetic force on superparamagnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallesen, Todd; Hill, David B; Steen, Matthew; Macosko, Jed C; Bonin, Keith; Holzwarth, George

    2010-07-01

    Here we report construction of a simple electromagnet with novel polepieces which apply a spatially uniform force to superparamagnetic beads in an optical microscope. The wedge-shaped gap was designed to keep partial differential B(x)/ partial differential y constant and B large enough to saturate the bead. We achieved fields of 300-600 mT and constant gradients of 67 T/m over a sample space of 0.5x4 mm(2) in the focal plane of the microscope and 0.05 mm along the microscope optic axis. Within this space the maximum force on a 2.8 microm diameter Dynabead was 12 pN with a spatial variation of approximately 10%. Use of the magnet in a biophysical experiment is illustrated by showing that gliding microtubules propelled by the molecular motor kinesin can be stopped by the force of an attached magnetic bead.

  16. Effect of reciprocating motions around working points on levitation force of superconductor-magnet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jimin; Zhang, Fei; Sun, Tao; Yuan, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Cuiping

    2016-09-01

    In order to simulate vibration around working points in practical operation of superconducting levitation system, magnet in a simple superconductor-magnet system are conducted reciprocating motions around static height in this study. Two YBCO cylindrical samples with different grain orientations are used to investigate the effect of reciprocating motions of magnet on superconducting magnetic force. The c-axis of sample S1 is perpendicular to the top surface while sample S2 is parallel to the top surface. The initial cooling processes for the superconductors include zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and filed-cooled (FC). Compared to the levitation force before reciprocating motions, the ZFC levitation force at static height becomes smaller after reciprocating while the FC force presents opposite phenomenon. It is found that levitation force at static height tends to be stable after several times of reciprocating under ZFC and FC conditions and its time-decay phenomenon is suppressed in some extent, which is meaningful for the practical application of superconducting levitation system. Based on vortex dynamic, some physical discussions are presented to the experimental results.

  17. Geometrical aspects of cylindric magnetic shields in strong static fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiwei, XIA; Wei, LI; Bo, LI; Qingwei, YANG

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), research on a magnetic shield against a strong field has been carried out. In this paper, a cylindric magnetic shield is studied by using the finite element method with a nonlinear magnetization curve. The geometrical aspects of shielding performance are identified and corresponding suggestions for application are provided. Among them, the effects of the edge and cover thickness have not been mentioned elsewhere to our knowledge.

  18. Green function method for calculating properties of static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, S

    2001-10-01

    Given complete information about the normal component of a magnetic field in a plane, it is possible to directly calculate all aspects of the field at any point in a source-free, homogeneous volume above that plane. The magnetic scalar potential, the magnetic field, and its gradient have direct representations as integrals of the boundary data. This paper provides a Green function method for this problem, as well as examples of such calculations. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Linear stability analysis of a levitated nanomagnet in a static magnetic field: Quantum spin stabilized magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, C. C.; Pöchhacker, V.; Cirac, J. I.; Romero-Isart, O.

    2017-10-01

    We theoretically study the levitation of a single magnetic domain nanosphere in an external static magnetic field. We show that, apart from the stability provided by the mechanical rotation of the nanomagnet (as in the classical Levitron), the quantum spin origin of its magnetization provides two additional mechanisms to stably levitate the system. Despite the Earnshaw theorem, such stable phases are present even in the absence of mechanical rotation. For large magnetic fields, the Larmor precession of the quantum magnetic moment stabilizes the system in full analogy with magnetic trapping of a neutral atom. For low magnetic fields, the magnetic anisotropy stabilizes the system via the Einstein-de Haas effect. These results are obtained with a linear stability analysis of a single magnetic domain rigid nanosphere with uniaxial anisotropy in a Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic field.

  20. Effect of static magnetic fields and phloretin on antioxidant defense system of human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna; Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Synowiec-Wojtarowicz, Agnieszka; Orchel, Joanna; Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanisław

    2016-08-01

    The available evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies is deemed not sufficient to draw conclusions about the potential health effects of static magnetic field (SMF) exposure. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the influence of static magnetic fields and phloretin on the redox homeostasis of human dermal fibroblasts. Control fibroblasts and fibroblasts treated with phloretin were subjected to the influence of static magnetic fields. Three chambers with static magnetic fields of different intensities (0.4, 0.55, and 0.7 T) were used in the study. Quantification of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1), microsomal glutathione S-transferase 1 (MGST1), glutathione reductase (GSR), and catalase (CAT) messenger RNAs (mRNAs) was performed by means of real-time reverse transcription PCR (QRT-PCR) technique. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured using a commercially available kit. No significant differences were found in SOD1, SOD2, GPX1, MGST1, GSR, and CAT mRNA levels among the studied groups in comparison to the control culture without phloretin and without the magnet. There were also no changes in SOD, GPx, and CAT activities. In conclusion, our study indicated that static magnetic fields generated by permanent magnets do not exert a negative influence on the oxidative status of human dermal fibroblasts. Based on these studies, it may also be concluded that phloretin does not increase its antioxidant properties under the influence of static magnetic fields. However, SMF-induced modifications at the cellular and molecular level require further clarification.

  1. Learning about static electricity and magnetism in a fourth-grade classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, David Roy

    Students begin to develop mental models to explain electrostatic and magnetic phenomena throughout childhood, middle childhood and high school, although these mental models are often incoherent and unscientific (Borges, Tenico, & Gilbert, 1998; Maloney, 1985). This is a case study of a classroom of grade four students and the mental models of magnetism and static electricity they used during a six-week science unit. The 22 students studied magnetism and static electricity using inquiry activities structured to create an environment where students would be likely to construct powerful scientific ideas (Goldberg & Bendall, 1995). Multiple data sources, including students' writing, student assessments, teacher interviews, student interviews, teacher journals, and classroom video and audio recordings were used to uncover how fourth grade students made sense of static electricity and magnetism before, during, and after instruction. The data were analyzed using a social constructivist framework to determine if students were able to develop target scientific ideas about static electricity and magnetism. In general, students were found to have three core mental models prior to instruction: (1) Static electricity and magnetism are the same "substance"; (2) This substance exists on the surface of a magnet or a charged object and can be rubbed off, and (3) Opposite substances attract. During the activities, students had many opportunities to observe evidence that contradicted these core mental models. Using evidence from direct observations, the students practiced differentiating between evidence and ideas. Through group and class discussions, they developed evidenced-based (scientific) ideas. Final assessments revealed that students were able to construct target ideas such as: (1) static electricity and magnetism are fundamentally different; (2) there are two kinds of static "charge;" (3) magnet-rubbed wires act like a magnet; and (4) opposite substances move toward each

  2. Measuring the Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreman, W.; Huysentruyt, R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a fast and simple method for measuring the magnetic force acting on a current-carrying conductor using a digital balance. Discusses the influence of current intensity and wire length on the magnetic force on the conductor. (JRH)

  3. Retentive force and magnetic flux leakage of magnetic attachment in various keeper and magnetic assembly combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Mikage; Umekawa, Yoshitada; Nagai, Eiich; Ishigami, Tomohiko

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic attachments are commonly used for overdentures. However, it can be difficult to identify and provide the same type and size of magnetic assembly and keeper if a repair becomes necessary. Therefore, the size and type may not match. This study evaluated the retentive force and magnetic flux strength and leakage of magnetic attachments in different combinations of keepers and magnetic assemblies. For 6 magnet-keeper combinations using 4 sizes of magnets (GIGAUSS D400, D600, D800, and D1000) (n=5), retentive force was measured 5 times at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min in a universal testing machine. Magnetic flux strength was measured using a Hall Effect Gaussmeter. Data were statistically analyzed using a 1-way ANOVA, and between-group differences were analyzed with Tukey's HSD post hoc test (α=.05). The mean retentive force of the same-size magnet-keeper combinations was 3.2 N for GIGAUSS D400 and 5.1 N for GIGAUSS D600, but was significantly reduced when using larger magnets (PMagnetic flux leakage was significantly lower for corresponding size combinations. Size differences influence the retentive force and magnetic flux strength of magnetic attachments. Retentive force decreased due to the closed field structure becoming incomplete and due to magnetic field leakage. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Boosting oncolytic adenovirus potency with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresilwised, Nittaya; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Holm, Per Sonne; Holzmüller, Regina; Anton, Martina; Thalhammer, Stefan; Adigüzel, Denis; Döblinger, Markus; Plank, Christian

    2010-08-02

    Oncolytic adenoviruses rank among the most promising innovative agents in cancer therapy. We examined the potential of boosting the efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl520 by associating it with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic-field-guided infection in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells in vitro and upon intratumoral injection in vivo. The virus was complexed by self-assembly with core-shell nanoparticles having a magnetite core of about 10 nm and stabilized by a shell containing 68 mass % lithium 3-[2-(perfluoroalkyl)ethylthio]propionate) and 32 mass % 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine. Optimized virus binding, sufficiently stable in 50% fetal calf serum, was found at nanoparticle-to-virus ratios of 5 fg of Fe per physical virus particle (VP) and above. As estimated from magnetophoretic mobility measurements, 3,600 to 4,500 magnetite nanocrystallites were associated per virus particle. Ultrastructural analysis by electron and atomic force microscopy showed structurally intact viruses surrounded by magnetic particles that occasionally bridged several virus particles. Viral uptake into cells at a given virus dose was enhanced 10-fold compared to nonmagnetic virus when infections were carried out under the influence of a magnetic field. Increased virus internalization resulted in a 10-fold enhancement of the oncolytic potency in terms of the dose required for killing 50% of the target cells (IC(50) value) and an enhancement of 4 orders of magnitude in virus progeny formation at equal input virus doses compared to nonmagnetic viruses. Furthermore, the full oncolytic effect developed within two days postinfection compared with six days in a nonmagnetic virus as a reference. Plotting target cell viability versus internalized virus particles for magnetic and nonmagnetic virus showed that the inherent oncolytic productivity of the virus remained unchanged upon association with magnetic nanoparticles. Hence, we conclude that the mechanism of boosting the

  5. Metrology of electromagnetic static actuation of MEMS microbridge using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczała, M; Majstrzyk, W; Sierakowski, A; Dobrowolski, R; Grabiec, P; Gotszalk, T

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for characterization and calibration of static deflection of electromagnetically and/or thermally actuated micro-electromechanical (MEMS) bridge. The investigated MEMS structure is formed by a silicon nitride bridge and a thin film metal path enabling electromagnetic and/or thermal deflection actuation. We present how static microbridge deflection can be measured using contact mode AFM technology with resolution of 0.05nm in the range of up to tens of nm. We also analyze, for very small structure deflections and under defined and controlled load force varied in the range up to ca. 32nN, properties of thermal and electromagnetical microbridge deflection actuation schemes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Forces between arrays of permanent magnets of basic geometric shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vokoun, D.; Beleggia, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We provide formulas for evaluating the magnetic force between two permanent magnet arrays, regularly spaced over a square lattice. We focus on three basic shapes of magnets constituting the arrays: cylinder, sphere and rectangular prism. When the lattice parameter is large, the expressions can...... be used to calculate the force between two single magnets in a computationally efficient way. The calculations are validated experimentally by measuring the attraction force between two single permanent magnets, where we demonstrate a fair agreement within about 15%....

  7. Fabrication of protein chip by magnetic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-Sung; Jang, Gil-Soo; Hong, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Sup

    2009-12-01

    This research describes a new immobilizing method of many kinds of biomaterials (enzyme, antibody, and DNA) on a transducer array using magnetic force interaction as the short-range force. The method composes two immobilizing steps. In the first step, same biomaterials are immobilized on metal particles. In the second step, the particles are arranged by the fluidic self-assembly method at random on an array. An array immobilized many kinds of the particles become multichannel biosensor. The biosensor can apply to DNA chip, protein chip, multienzyme electrode, and so on. The metal particles and the array were fabricated by micromachining manufacture. The metal particles were multilayer structure (gold, titanium, and nickel). In the array case, sidewalls of patterning nickel dots on an array were covered by thick negative photoresist (SU-8), and the array was magnetized. The array and the particles were mixed in buffer solution, and were arranged by magnetic force interaction. A quarter of total nickel dots were covered by the particles. The binding direction of the particles was controllable, and condition of particles was almost with gold surface on top. The immobilization of the biomaterials to metal particles was able to materialize it by using 3-CPD. This confirmed an activity by the luminol radiation.

  8. The Effect of Static Stretching in Agility and Isokinetic Force at Football Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Sermaxhaj

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cool Down is very important for the recuperation of a football player. The objective of this research is to prove the effect of recuperation with static stretching in agility and isokinetic force at the young football players. This research has taken place between August and November 2015 with a sample of 24 football players of age 15.6±0.4 years, divided in the control group and the experimental group. At first measurements have been initialed body weight 61.1±0.4 kg and body height 175.7±6.4 cm, and agility (20 m zig-zag with and without ball and isokinetic force (peak torque flexion and extension. Both groups of the football players have completed the regular training program. The experimental group (despite the control group during the stage of recuperation (cool down, except the running with slow pace did also carry out the experimental program which did take place through static stretching. Experimental program consisted of 17 exercises bodily static stretching which are applied in the final training session (cool-down. After the experimental phase is finished the participants did undergo the final measures. The conducted results with univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA in two tests (initial and final have shown unimportant statistical values between the control group and the experimental one in the isokinetic force and agility. From the collected results we can conclude the recuperation with static stretching during the cool down has an unimportant statistical impact in the agility and isokinetic force of the young football players.

  9. The Role of Magnetic Forces in Biology and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Bradley J

    2011-01-01

    The Lorentz force (the force acting on currents in a magnetic field) plays an increasingly larger role in techniques to image current and conductivity. This review will summarize several applications involving the Lorentz force, including 1) magneto-acoustic imaging of current, 2) “Hall effect” imaging, 3) ultrasonically-induced Lorentz force imaging of conductivity, 4) magneto-acoustic tomography with magnetic induction, and 5) Lorentz force imaging of action currents using magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:21321309

  10. Dosimetry in clinical static magnetic fields using plastic scintillation detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefanowicz, S.; Latzel, H.; Lindvold, Lars René

    2013-01-01

    To further improve the accuracy of dose delivery to the patient, several projects are pursuing the integration of linear accelerators with magnetic resonance imaging systems. Generally, this is conceived as the next generation of image-guided radiotherapy. For technical and physical reason it is......, however, not clear yet how dosimetry will be conducted as standard methods and might not be easily transferred to systems with clinical magnetic fields. For dosimetry in MRI accelerators, we have tested plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) coupled to optical fibers. They are suitable for real-time and in......-vivo dosimetry in radiation treatments and diagnostics and could be, being all-optical, promising candidates for this application. To study the basic feasibility of using PSDs with organic scintillators in magnetic fields, we measured the response of these dosimeters in presence of magnetic fields up to 1 T...

  11. Ferritin protein imaging and detection by magnetic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Zheng, Bin; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2010-03-14

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to image and detect ferritin proteins and the strength of the magnetic signal is discussed, revealing a large workable lift height between the magnetic tip and the ferritin sample.

  12. Effect of static magnetic fields on the budding of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Shigeki; Naruse, Yujiro; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2010-12-01

    The effect of static magnetic fields on the budding of single yeast cells was investigated using a magnetic circuit that was capable of generating a strong magnetic field (2.93 T) and gradient (6100 T²  m⁻¹). Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells were grown in an aqueous YPD agar in a silica capillary under either a homogeneous or inhomogeneous static magnetic field. Although the size of budding yeast cells was only slightly affected by the magnetic fields after 4 h, the budding angle was clearly affected by the direction of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In the homogeneous magnetic field, the budding direction of daughter yeast cells was mainly oriented in the direction of magnetic field B. However, when subjected to the inhomogeneous magnetic field, the daughter yeast cells tended to bud along the axis of capillary flow in regions where the magnetic gradient, estimated by B(dB/dx), were high. Based on the present experimental results, the possible mechanism for the magnetic effect on the budding direction of daughter yeast cells is theoretically discussed. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. EMG-force relationship during static contraction: effects on sensor placement locations on biceps brachii muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Alqahtani, Mahdi; Altwijri, Omar; Ali, Md Asraf; Islam, Md Anamul

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between surface electromyography (EMG) and force have been the subject of ongoing investigations and remain a subject of controversy. Even under static conditions, the relationships at different sensor placement locations in the biceps brachii (BB) muscle are complex. The aim of this study was to compare the activity and relationship between surface EMG and static force from the BB muscle in terms of three sensor placement locations. Twenty-one right hand dominant male subjects (age 25.3±1.2 years) participated in the study. Surface EMG signals were detected from the subject's right BB muscle. The muscle activation during force was determined as the root mean square (RMS) electromyographic signal normalized to the peak RMS EMG signal of isometric contraction for 10 s. The statistical analysis included linear regression to examine the relationship between EMG amplitude and force of contraction [40-100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)], repeated measures ANOVA to assess differences among the sensor placement locations, and coefficient of variation (CoV) for muscle activity variation. The results demonstrated that when the sensor was placed on the muscle belly, the linear slope coefficient was significantly greater for EMG versus force testing (r2=0.62, P0.05) and upper part of the muscle belly (r2=0.29, PEMG signal activity on the muscle belly had less variability than the upper and lower parts (8.55% vs. 15.12% and 12.86%, respectively). These findings indicate the importance of applying the surface EMG sensor at the appropriate locations that follow muscle fiber orientation of the BB muscle during static contraction. As a result, EMG signals of three different placements may help to understand the difference in the amplitude of the signals due to placement.

  14. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Magnetically Driven Duffing-Type Spring-Magnet Oscillator in the Static Magnetic Field of a Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, Guillermo; Ladera, Celso L.

    2012-01-01

    We study the nonlinear oscillations of a forced and weakly dissipative spring-magnet system moving in the magnetic fields of two fixed coaxial, hollow induction coils. As the first coil is excited with a dc current, both a linear and a cubic magnet-position dependent force appear on the magnet-spring system. The second coil, located below the…

  15. Static field influences on transcranial magnetic stimulation: considerations for TMS in the scanner environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Jeffrey M; Jalinous, Reza; Cantarero, Gabriela L; Desmond, John E

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to simultaneously manipulate and monitor human cortical responses. Although tremendous efforts have been directed at characterizing the impact of TMS on image acquisition, the influence of the scanner's static field on the TMS coil has received limited attention. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of the scanner's static field on TMS. We hypothesized that spatial variations in the static field could account for TMS field variations in the scanner environment. Using an MRI-compatible TMS coil, we estimated TMS field strengths based on TMS-induced voltage changes measured in a search coil. We compared peak field strengths obtained with the TMS coil positioned at different locations (B0 field vs fringe field) and orientations in the static field. We also measured the scanner's static field to derive a field map to account for TMS field variations. TMS field strength scaled depending on coil location and orientation with respect to the static field. Larger TMS field variations were observed in fringe field regions near the gantry as compared to regions inside the bore or further removed from the bore. The scanner's static field also exhibited the greatest spatial variations in fringe field regions near the gantry. The scanner's static field influences TMS fields and spatial variations in the static field correlate with TMS field variations. Coil orientation changes in the B0 field did not result in substantial TMS field variations. TMS field variations can be minimized by delivering TMS in the bore or outside of the 0-70 cm region from the bore entrance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Magnetically Induced Transparency in Cold Magnetized Plasma by Spatially Periodic Magneto-static Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Raanan; Leopold, John G.; Fisher, Amnon; Ron, Amiram

    2011-10-01

    Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) is widely investigated. EIT is a resonance absorption line made transparent due to destructive interference between two atomic transitions. A classical analog to quantum EIT is cold magnetized plasma, which resonantly absorbs electromagnetic radiation at the electron cyclotron frequency. Transparency is induced in such plasma by an additional magnetic field, constant in time and varying in space. The proposed physical mechanism is the coupling of longitudinal plasma modulation to the transverse components of the electromagnetic radiation, canceling the forces acting on the plasma electrons. The plasma frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency are the classical analog of the atomic transition frequencies in quantum EIT. Controllable wave propagation parameters such as transmission amplitude and group velocity are some inherent features of MIT. Theoretical study and experimental results will be presented.

  17. Static fluid magnetic resonance urography in evaluation of ureteral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Ectopic ureters are often very difficult to diagnose with conventional imaging modalities especially in children. Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has been recently investigated as a problem-solving tool for the evaluation of various congenital urogenital anomalies with favorable results. Aim of the work: To ...

  18. Static fluid magnetic resonance urography in evaluation of ureteral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T.Y. Gaweesh

    2012-09-06

    Sep 6, 2012 ... Abstract Introduction: Ectopic ureters are often very difficult to diagnose with conventional imag- ing modalities especially in children. Magnetic resonance urography (MRU) has been recently inves- tigated as a problem-solving tool for the evaluation of various congenital urogenital anomalies with favorable ...

  19. Probing static disorder in Arrhenius kinetics by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Li, Jingyuan; Barel, Itay; Lu, Hui; Berne, Bruce J; Urbakh, Michael; Klafter, Joseph; Fernández, Julio M

    2010-06-22

    The widely used Arrhenius equation describes the kinetics of simple two-state reactions, with the implicit assumption of a single transition state with a well-defined activation energy barrier DeltaE, as the rate-limiting step. However, it has become increasingly clear that the saddle point of the free-energy surface in most reactions is populated by ensembles of conformations, leading to nonexponential kinetics. Here we present a theory that generalizes the Arrhenius equation to include static disorder of conformational degrees of freedom as a function of an external perturbation to fully account for a diverse set of transition states. The effect of a perturbation on static disorder is best examined at the single-molecule level. Here we use force-clamp spectroscopy to study the nonexponential kinetics of single ubiquitin proteins unfolding under force. We find that the measured variance in DeltaE shows both force-dependent and independent components, where the force-dependent component scales with F(2), in excellent agreement with our theory. Our study illustrates a novel adaptation of the classical Arrhenius equation that accounts for the microscopic origins of nonexponential kinetics, which are essential in understanding the rapidly growing body of single-molecule data.

  20. Probing static disorder in Arrhenius kinetics by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Li, Jingyuan; Barel, Itay; Lu, Hui; Berne, Bruce J.; Urbakh, Michael; Klafter, Joseph; Fernández, Julio M.

    2010-01-01

    The widely used Arrhenius equation describes the kinetics of simple two-state reactions, with the implicit assumption of a single transition state with a well-defined activation energy barrier ΔE, as the rate-limiting step. However, it has become increasingly clear that the saddle point of the free-energy surface in most reactions is populated by ensembles of conformations, leading to nonexponential kinetics. Here we present a theory that generalizes the Arrhenius equation to include static disorder of conformational degrees of freedom as a function of an external perturbation to fully account for a diverse set of transition states. The effect of a perturbation on static disorder is best examined at the single-molecule level. Here we use force-clamp spectroscopy to study the nonexponential kinetics of single ubiquitin proteins unfolding under force. We find that the measured variance in ΔE shows both force-dependent and independent components, where the force-dependent component scales with F2, in excellent agreement with our theory. Our study illustrates a novel adaptation of the classical Arrhenius equation that accounts for the microscopic origins of nonexponential kinetics, which are essential in understanding the rapidly growing body of single-molecule data. PMID:20534507

  1. Vehicle Sliding Mode Control with Adaptive Upper Bounds: Static versus Dynamic Allocation to Saturated Tire Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tavasoli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear vehicle control allocation is achieved through distributing the task of vehicle control among individual tire forces, which are constrained to nonlinear saturation conditions. A high-level sliding mode control with adaptive upper bounds is considered to assess the body yaw moment and lateral force for the vehicle motion. The proposed controller only requires the online adaptation of control gains without acquiring the knowledge of upper bounds on system uncertainties. Static and dynamic control allocation approaches have been formulated to distribute high-level control objectives among the system inputs. For static control allocation, the interior-point method is applied to solve the formulated nonlinear optimization problem. Based on the dynamic control allocation method, a dynamic update law is derived to allocate vehicle control to tire forces. The allocated tire forces are fed into a low-level control module, where the applied torque and active steering angle at each wheel are determined through a slip-ratio controller and an inverse tire model. Computer simulations are used to prove the significant effects of the proposed control allocation methods on improving the stability and handling performance. The advantages and limitations of each method have been discussed, and conclusions have been derived.

  2. Influence of static magnetic fields on S. cerevisae biomass growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João B. Muniz

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomass growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DAUFPE-1012 was studied in eight batch fermentations exposed to steady magnetic fields (SMF running at 23ºC (± 1ºC, for 24 h in a double cylindrical tube reactor with synchronic agitation. For every batch, one tube was exposed to 220mT flow intensity SMF, produced by NdFeB rod magnets attached diametrically opposed (N to S magnets on one tube. In the other tube, without magnets, the fermentation occurred in the same conditions. The biomass growth in culture (yeast extract + glucose 2% was monitored by spectrometry to obtain the absorbance and later, the corresponding cell dry weight. The culture glucose concentration was monitored every two hours so as the pH, which was maintained between 4 and 5. As a result, the biomass (g/L increment was 2.5 times greater in magnetized cultures (n=8 as compared with SMF non-exposed cultures (n=8. The differential (SMF-control biomass growth rate (135% was slightly higher than the glucose consumption rate (130 % leading to increased biomass production of the magnetized cells.O crescimento da biomassa da Saccharomyces cerevisiae DAUFPE-1012 foi estudado em oito bateladas de fermentação, cada uma exposta aos campos magnéticos contínuos (CMC, à 23ºC (± 1ºC, durante um período de 24 horas em um reator duplo com agitação sincrônica. Em cada batelada,um tubo foi exposto ao CMC, com 220mT de intensidade de fluxo, produzidos por imãs de NdFeB fixados diametralmente opostos (N para S em um tubo do reator de fermentação. Em outro tubo, sem imãs, a fermentação ocorreu nas mesmas condições. O crescimento da biomassa nas culturas (extrato de fermento + glicose 2% foi monitorado através de espectrometria e correlacionado ao peso seco de levedura. A concentração de glicose nas culturas foi monitorada a cada duas horas e o pH foi mantido entre 4 e 5. Como resultado, a biomassa (g/L aumentou 2,5 vezes nas culturas magnetizadas (n=8 quando comparadas com as

  3. A repulsive magnetic force driven translation micromirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuan; Zuo, Hui; He, Siyuan

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a repulsive magnetic force driven micromirror with large displacement and high surface quality which well solves the limitation of the previous design, i.e. large variation in translation starting position and low repeatability, caused by the touching points between the moving film and substrate before and in operation. The new design utilizes a driving mechanism, i.e. permanent magnet ring above and electromagnet underneath the moving film, to lift the moving film from touching the substrate and generate a repulsive magnetic force (instead of attractive force in the previous design) to push the moving film up and away from the substrate for translation. Due to the touching, the previous design has to pre-oscillate for 20-30 min at 1 Hz before usage (after resting for a few hours) to reduce the starting position variation from ~15 µm to 3-4 µm. Even after the pre-oscillation, the repeatability is still low, which is 14.2% because of the touching in operation. In the design presented in this paper, the touching between the moving film and the substrate is completely eliminated before and in operation. As a result, the starting position of the translating mirror is constant each time and the repeatability is  electromagnet. As an application, the micromirror is used as the movable mirror in a Michelson interferometer to measure the wavelength of a laser beam. The result shows a measurement accuracy of 2.19% for a 532 nm laser beam.

  4. Straintronics-based magnetic tunneling junction: Dynamic and static behavior analysis and material investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barangi, Mahmood; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study the dynamic and static effects of mechanical stress on a straintronics device that includes a piezoelectric film combined with a magnetic tunneling junction. The inverse magnetostriction effect is studied in detail by realizing the varying magnetic susceptibility of the nanomagnet under stress. A dynamic model is developed based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, which provides a platform to simulate the magnetization vector's behavior, critical flipping voltage, and delay properties. Furthermore, by converting the LLG equation into a 2nd order damping differential equation, we develop a proximate approach. This approach predicts the dynamic behavior of the magnetization vector and its dependency on material properties and applied voltage across the device without using sophisticated numerical calculations of the LLG model. Different dynamic and static material properties are observed by simulating five common magnetostrictive materials, including a newly discovered alloy, Galfenol.

  5. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ∼ 1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

  6. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  7. Measurement Performance Assessment: Dynamic Calibration Compared with Static Calibration Method for Roller Tester of Vehicle Brake Force

    OpenAIRE

    Guan Xu; Jian Su; Rong Chen; Hongda Pan; Libin Zhang; Xing Wang

    2014-01-01

    The measurement performance of the roller tester for the vehicle brake force is evaluated by both proposed dynamic calibration and traditional static calibration to find an effective way for ensuring the vehicle safety. Three static parameters, brake force error of a single bench, difference of the left and right benches, and measurement repeatability, are verified to be eligible in the experiments. However, the experimental results of the dynamic calibration prove that the same brake tester ...

  8. Acute effect of static stretching on muscle force in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Demantova Gurjão

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the acute effect of static stretching on the peak rate of force development (PRFD and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC in older women. Ten women (68.5 ± 7.0 years; 70.9 ± 8.1 kg; 159.4 ± 6.0 cm; body mass index: 28.0 ± 3.8 kg/m2 were studied. MVC and PRFD were determined by leg press exercise before and after the control or stretching condition (three sets of 30 seconds of static stretching of the quadriceps on two different days (interval of 24 hours. PRFD was determined as the steepest slope of the curve, calculated within regular windows of 20 milliseconds (∆force/∆time for the first 200 milliseconds after the onset of contraction. MVC was determined as the highest value recorded in each set. Only one condition was tested on each day and the order of application of each condition was determined randomly. The stretching intensity was evaluated by the muscle pain threshold. Four post-condition assessments (post-treatment, 10, 20, and 30 minutes were performed to monitor muscle strength. ANCOVA 2x5, followed by the Scheffé post-hoc test, showed no significant interactions between conditions vs. times (P > 0.05 for PRFD or MVC. In conclusion, acute bouts of static stretching of the quadriceps femoris do not affect the ability of rapid and maximum muscle force production in older women.

  9. An Investigation of the Static Force Balance of a Model Railgun

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    in parallel, the length is perpendicular to the induced magnetic field. Thus the force between the rails can be expressed as ( Halliday and Resnick ...Nuovo Cimento, vol. 7D, pp. 31–45, 1986. Halliday , David, Robert Resnick and Jearl Walker, “Fundamentals of Physics (Parts 1-4)/ Extended (Parts 1-5

  10. From static to rotating to conformal static solutions: rotating imperfect fluid wormholes with(out) electric or magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azreg-Ainou, Mustapha [Baskent University, Department of Mathematics, Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-05-15

    We derive a shortcut stationary metric formula for generating imperfect fluid rotating solutions, in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates, from spherically symmetric static ones. We explore the properties of the curvature scalar and stress-energy tensor for all types of rotating regular solutions we can generate without restricting ourselves to specific examples of regular solutions (regular black holes or wormholes). We show through examples how it is generally possible to generate an imperfect fluid regular rotating solution via radial coordinate transformations. We derive rotating wormholes that are modeled as imperfect fluids and discuss their physical properties. These are independent on the way the stress-energy tensor is interpreted. A solution modeling an imperfect fluid rotating loop black hole is briefly discussed. We then specialize to the recently discussed stable exotic dust Ellis wormhole as emerged in a source-free radial electric or magnetic field, and we generate its, conjecturally stable, rotating counterpart. This turns out to be an exotic imperfect fluid wormhole, and we determine the stress-energy tensor of both the imperfect fluid and the electric or magnetic field. (orig.)

  11. Elliptic annular Josephson tunnel junctions in an external magnetic field: the statics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, Roberto; Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the static properties of one-dimensional planar Josephson tunnel junctions (JTJs) in the most general case of elliptic annuli. We have analyzed the dependence of the critical current in the presence of an external magnetic field applied either in the junction plane or in the ......We have investigated the static properties of one-dimensional planar Josephson tunnel junctions (JTJs) in the most general case of elliptic annuli. We have analyzed the dependence of the critical current in the presence of an external magnetic field applied either in the junction plane...... symmetric electrodes a transverse magnetic field is equivalent to an in-plane field applied in the direction of the current flow. Varying the ellipse eccentricity we reproduce all known results for linear and ring-shaped JTJs. Experimental data on high-quality Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb elliptic annular junctions...

  12. Effects of Static Magnetic Fields on the Physical, Mechanical, and Microstructural Properties of Cement Pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Soto-Bernal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an experimental study carried out to comprehend the physical, mechanical, and microstructural behavior of cement pastes subjected to static magnetic fields while hydrating and setting. The experimental methodology consisted in exposing fresh cement pastes to static magnetic fields at three different magnetic induction strengths: 19.07, 22.22, and 25.37 Gauss. The microstructural characterization makes evident that there are differences in relation to amount and morphology of CSH gel; the amount of CSH is larger and its morphology becomes denser and less porous with higher magnetostatic induction strengths; it also shows the evidence of changes in the mineralogical composition of the hydrated cement pastes. The temperature increasing has no negative effects over the cement paste compressive strength since the magnetostatic field affects the process of hydration through a molecular restructuring process, which makes cement pastes improve microstructurally, with a reduced porosity and a higher mechanical strength.

  13. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Wilgen, John B.; Murphy, Bart L.

    2015-05-19

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a plurality of work-piece separators disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla for supporting and separating a plurality of work-pieces by a preselected, essentially equal spacing, so that, as a first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, a second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  14. On the Mathematical Modeling of Line-Start Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors under Static Eccentricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahem Hussein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Line start permanent magnet synchronous motors experience different types of failures, including static eccentricity. The first step in detecting such failures is the mathematical modeling of the motor under healthy and failed conditions. In this paper, an attempt to develop an accurate mathematical model for this motor under static eccentricity is presented. The model is based on the modified winding function method and coupled magnetic circuits approach. The model parameters are calculated directly from the motor winding layout and its geometry. Static eccentricity effects are considered in the motor inductances calculation. The performance of the line start permanent magnet synchronous motor using the developed mathematical model is investigated using MATLAB/SIMULINK® software (2013b, MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA under healthy and static eccentricity condition for different loading values. A finite element method analysis is conducted to verify the mathematical model results, using the commercial JMAG® software (16.0.02n, JSOL Corporation, Tokyo, Japan. The results show a fine agreement between JMAG® and the developed mathematical model simulation results.

  15. Magnetic clouds and force-free fields with constant alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaga, L. F.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic clouds observed at 1 AU are modeled as cylindrically symmetric, constant alpha force-free magnetic fields. The model satisfactorily explains the types of variations of the magnetic field direction that are observed as a magnetic cloud moves past a spacecraft in terms of the possible orientations of the axis of a magnetic cloud. The model also explains why the magnetic field strength is observed to be higher inside a magnetic cloud than near its boundaries. However, the model predicts that the magnetic field strength profile should be symmetric with respect to the axis of the magnetic cloud, whereas observations show that this is not generally the case.

  16. Nature of the electromagnetic force between classical magnetic dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2017-09-01

    The Lorentz force law of classical electrodynamics states that the force 𝑭𝑭 exerted by the magnetic induction 𝑩𝑩 on a particle of charge 𝑞𝑞 moving with velocity 𝑽𝑽 is given by 𝑭𝑭 = 𝑞𝑞𝑽𝑽 × 𝑩𝑩. Since this force is orthogonal to the direction of motion, the magnetic field is said to be incapable of performing mechanical work. Yet there is no denying that a permanent magnet can readily perform mechanical work by pushing/pulling on another permanent magnet or by attracting pieces of magnetizable material such as scrap iron or iron filings. We explain this apparent contradiction by examining the magnetic Lorentz force acting on an Amperian current loop, which is the model for a magnetic dipole. We then extend the discussion by analyzing the Einstein-Laub model of magnetic dipoles in the presence of external magnetic fields.

  17. Science in a Box. Magnets III: Force Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents ideas to help elementary school educators teach their students about magnetic force fields by observing how iron filings line up around magnets. The article lists materials needed and offers a student page with suggested student activities. (SM)

  18. Electromagnetic Forces in a Hybrid Magnetic-Bearing Switched-Reluctance Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Siebert, Mark W.; Ho, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis and experimental measurement of the electromagnetic force loads on the hybrid rotor in a novel hybrid magnetic-bearing switched-reluctance motor (MBSRM) have been performed. A MBSRM has the combined characteristics of a switched-reluctance motor and a magnetic bearing. The MBSRM discussed in this report has an eight-pole stator and a six-pole hybrid rotor, which is composed of circular and scalloped lamination segments. The hybrid rotor is levitated using only one set of four stator poles, while a second set of four stator poles imparts torque to the scalloped portion of the rotor, which is driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by a processor. Static torque and radial force analysis were done for rotor poles that were oriented to achieve maximum and minimum radial force loads on the rotor. The objective is to assess whether simple one-dimensional magnetic circuit analysis is sufficient for preliminary evaluation of this machine, which may exhibit strong three-dimensional electromagnetic field behavior. Two magnetic circuit geometries, approximating the complex topology of the magnetic fields in and around the hybrid rotor, were employed in formulating the electromagnetic radial force equations. Reasonable agreement between the experimental and the theoretical radial force loads predictions was obtained with typical magnetic bearing derating factors applied to the predictions.

  19. High-force magnetic tweezers with force feedback for biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmannsberger, Philip; Fabry, Ben

    2007-11-01

    Magnetic micromanipulation using magnetic tweezers is a versatile biophysical technique and has been used for single-molecule unfolding, rheology measurements, and studies of force-regulated processes in living cells. This article describes an inexpensive magnetic tweezer setup for the application of precisely controlled forces up to 100 nN onto 5 microm magnetic beads. High precision of the force is achieved by a parametric force calibration method together with a real-time control of the magnetic tweezer position and current. High forces are achieved by bead-magnet distances of only a few micrometers. Applying such high forces can be used to characterize the local viscoelasticity of soft materials in the nonlinear regime, or to study force-regulated processes and mechanochemical signal transduction in living cells. The setup can be easily adapted to any inverted microscope.

  20. May the Magnetic Force Be with You

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Jesse; Richey, Lindsey R.

    2012-01-01

    Although most elementary students have had experiences with magnets, they generally have misconceptions about magnetism (Driver et al. 1994; Burgoon, Heddle, and Duran 2010). For example, students may think magnets can attract all metals or that larger magnets are stronger than smaller magnets. Students often confuse magnets with magnetic…

  1. Variations in Static Force Control and Motor Unit Behavior with Error Amplification Feedback in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ching Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Error amplification (EA feedback is a promising approach to advance visuomotor skill. As error detection and visuomotor processing at short time scales decline with age, this study examined whether older adults could benefit from EA feedback that included higher-frequency information to guide a force-tracking task. Fourteen young and 14 older adults performed low-level static isometric force-tracking with visual guidance of typical visual feedback and EA feedback containing augmented high-frequency errors. Stabilogram diffusion analysis was used to characterize force fluctuation dynamics. Also, the discharge behaviors of motor units and pooled motor unit coherence were assessed following the decomposition of multi-channel surface electromyography (EMG. EA produced different behavioral and neurophysiological impacts on young and older adults. Older adults exhibited inferior task accuracy with EA feedback than with typical visual feedback, but not young adults. Although stabilogram diffusion analysis revealed that EA led to a significant decrease in critical time points for both groups, EA potentiated the critical point of force fluctuations <ΔFc2>, short-term effective diffusion coefficients (Ds, and short-term exponent scaling only for the older adults. Moreover, in older adults, EA added to the size of discharge variability of motor units and discharge regularity of cumulative discharge rate, but suppressed the pooled motor unit coherence in the 13–35 Hz band. Virtual EA alters the strategic balance between open-loop and closed-loop controls for force-tracking. Contrary to expectations, the prevailing use of closed-loop control with EA that contained high-frequency error information enhanced the motor unit discharge variability and undermined the force steadiness in the older group, concerning declines in physiological complexity in the neurobehavioral system and the common drive to the motoneuronal pool against force destabilization.

  2. Effects of head flexion posture on the multidirectional static force capacity of the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Ian; Moglo, Kodjo; Storr, Michael; Pelland, Lucie

    2016-08-01

    Neck muscle force protects vertebral alignment and resists potentially injurious loading of osteoligamentous structures during head impacts. As the majority of neck muscles generate moments about all three planes of motion, it is not clear how the force capacity of the neck might be modulated by direction of force application and head posture. The aim of our study was to measure the multidirectional moment-generating capacity of the neck and to evaluate effects of 20° of head flexion, a common head position in contact sports, on the measured capacity. We conducted a cross-sectional study, with 25 males, 20-30years old, performing maximum voluntary contractions, with ballistic intent, along eight directions, set at 45° intervals in the horizontal plane of the head. Three-dimensional moments at C3 and T1 were calculated using equations of static equilibrium. The variable of interest was the impulse of force generated from 0-50ms. Effects of direction of force application and head posture, neutral and 20° flexion, were evaluated by two-way analysis of variance and linear regression. Impulse of force was lower along diagonal planes, at 45° from the mid-sagittal plane, compared to orthogonal planes (Pflexion produced a 55.2% decrease in impulse capacity at C3 and 45.9% at T1. The risk of injury with head impact would intrinsically be higher along diagonal planes and with a 20° head down position due to a lower moment generating capacity of the neck in the first 50ms of force application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Exposure to static and time-varying magnetic fields from working in the static magnetic stray fields of MRI scanners: a comprehensive survey in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-De Vries, Yvette; Crozier, Stuart; De Vocht, Frank; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Clinical and research staff who work around magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are exposed to the static magnetic stray fields of these scanners. Although the past decade has seen strong developments in the assessment of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from MRI scanners, there is insufficient insight into the exposure variability that characterizes routine MRI work practice. However, this is an essential component of risk assessment and epidemiological studies. This paper describes the results of a measurement survey of shift-based personal exposure to static magnetic fields (SMF) (B) and motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields (dB/dt) among workers at 15 MRI facilities in the Netherlands. With the use of portable magnetic field dosimeters, >400 full-shift and partial shift exposure measurements were collected among various jobs involved in clinical and research MRI. Various full-shift exposure metrics for B and motion-induced dB/dt exposure were calculated from the measurements, including instantaneous peak exposure and time-weighted average (TWA) exposures. We found strong correlations between levels of static (B) and time-varying (dB/dt) exposure (r = 0.88-0.92) and between different metrics (i.e. peak exposure, TWA exposure) to express full-shift exposure (r = 0.69-0.78). On average, participants were exposed to MRI-related SMFs during only 3.7% of their work shift. Average and peak B and dB/dt exposure levels during the work inside the MRI scanner room were highest among technical staff, research staff, and radiographers. Average and peak B exposure levels were lowest among cleaners, while dB/dt levels were lowest among anaesthesiology staff. Although modest exposure variability between workplaces and occupations was observed, variation between individuals of the same occupation was substantial, especially among research staff. This relatively large variability between workers with the same job suggests that exposure classification

  4. Electric and Magnetic Forces between Parallel-Wire Conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, N.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses electric and magnetic forces between parallel-wire conductors and derives, in a simple fashion, order of magnitude estimates of the ratio of the likely electrostatic and electromagnetic forces for a simple parallel-wire balance. (Author/HM)

  5. Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tomishige, Masahiko; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Shibata, Naho; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum was studied by using a superconducting magnet. Around a centre of a round vessel, random swimming at 0 T and aligned swimming parallel to the magnetic field (MF) of 8 T were observed. Near a wall of the vessel, however, swimming round and round along the wall at 0 T and aligned swimming of turning at right angles upon collision with the wall, which was remarkable around 1-4 T, were detected. It was experimentally revealed that the former MF-induced parallel swimming at the vessel centre was caused physicochemically by the parallel magnetic orientation of the cell itself. From magnetic field dependence of the extent of the orientation, the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (χ ∥-χ ⊥) was first obtained to be 3.4× 10-23 emu cell-1 at 298 K for Paramecium caudatum. The orientation of the cell was considered to result from the magnetic orientation of the cell membrane. On the other hand, although mechanisms of the latter swimming near the vessel wall regardless of the absence and presence of the magnetic field are unclear at present, these experimental results indicate that whether the cell exists near the wall alters the magnetic field effect on the swimming in the horizontal magnetic field.

  6. Suppression of drinking by exposure to a high-strength static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, Thomas A; Cassell, Jennifer A; Riccardi, Christina; Kwon, Bumsup; Smith, James C

    2007-01-30

    High-strength static magnetic fields of 7 T and above have been shown to have both immediate and delayed effects on rodents, such as the induction of locomotor circling and the acquisition of conditioned taste aversions. In this study, the acute effects of magnet field exposure on drinking were examined. Exposure to a 14.1-T magnetic field for as little as 5 min significantly decreased the amount of a glucose and saccharin solution (G+S) consumed by water-deprived rats over 10 min. The decreased intake could be accounted for largely, but not entirely, by an increase in the latency of magnet-exposed rats to initiate drinking. When intake was measured for 10-60 min after the initiation of drinking, thus controlling for increased latency, magnet-exposed rats still consumed less G+S than sham-exposed rats. The increased latency was not due simply to an inability of magnet-exposed rats to reach the elevated sipper tube of the G+S bottle, providing rats with long tubes that could be reached without raising their heads normalized intake but latency was still increased. The increased latency and decreased intake appeared to be secondary to somatic effects of magnet exposure, however, because during intraoral infusions magnet-exposed rats consumed the same amount of G+S with the same latency to reject as sham-exposed rats. The suppression of drinking by magnetic field exposure is consistent with the acute effects of other aversive stimuli, such as whole-body rotation, on short-term ingestion. These results add to the evidence that high-static strength magnetic fields can have behavioral effects on rodents.

  7. Experimental studies of protozoan response to intense magnetic fields and forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    Intense static magnetic fields of up to 31 Tesla were used as a novel tool to manipulate the swimming mechanics of unicellular organisms. It is shown that homogenous magnetic fields alter the swimming trajectories of the single cell protozoan Paramecium caudatum, by aligning them parallel to the applied field. Immobile neutrally buoyant paramecia also oriented in magnetic fields with similar rates as the motile ones. It was established that the magneto-orientation is mostly due to the magnetic torques acting on rigid structures in the cell body and therefore the response is a non-biological, passive response. From the orientation rate of paramecia in various magnetic field strengths, the average anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the cell was estimated. It has also been demonstrated that magnetic forces can be used to create increased, decreased and even inverted simulated gravity environments for the investigation of the gravi-responses of single cells. Since the mechanisms by which Earth's gravity affects cell functioning are still not fully understood, a number of methods to simulate different strength gravity environments, such as centrifugation, have been employed. Exploiting the ability to exert magnetic forces on weakly diamagnetic constituents of the cells, we were able to vary the gravity from -8 g to 10 g, where g is Earth's gravity. Investigations of the swimming response of paramecia in these simulated gravities revealed that they actively regulate their swimming speed to oppose the external force. This result is in agreement with centrifugation experiments, confirming the credibility of the technique. Moreover, the Paramecium's swimming ceased in simulated gravity of 10 g, indicating a maximum possible propulsion force of 0.7 nN. The magnetic force technique to simulate gravity is the only earthbound technique that can create increased and decreased simulated gravities in the same experimental setup. These findings establish a general

  8. Enhancement of invertase production by Aspergillus niger OZ-3 using low-intensity static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Mesut; Esim, Nevzat; Genisel, Mucip; Ortucu, Serkan; Hasenekoglu, Ismet; Canli, Ozden; Erdal, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of low-intensity static magnetic fields (SMFs) on invertase activity and growth on different newly identified molds. The most positive effect of SMFs on invertase activity and growth was observed for Aspergillus niger OZ-3. The submerged production of invertase was performed with the spores obtained at the different exposure times (120, 144, 168, and 196 hr) and magnetic field intensities (0.45, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mT). The normal magnetic field of the laboratory was assayed as 0.45 mT (control). Optimization of magnetic field intensity and exposure time significantly increased biomass production and invertase activity compared to 0.45 mT. The maximum invertase activity (51.14 U/mL) and biomass concentration (4.36 g/L) were achieved with the spores obtained at the 144 hr exposure time and 5 mT magnetic field intensity. The effect of low-intensity static magnetic fields (SMFs) on invertase activities of molds was investigated for the first time in the present study. As an additional contribution, a new hyper-invertase-producing mold strain was isolated.

  9. ALICE—An advanced reflectometer for static and dynamic experiments in magnetism at synchrotron radiation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrudan, R; Brüssing, F; Salikhov, R; Meermann, J; Radu, I; Ryll, H; Radu, F; Zabel, H

    2015-06-01

    We report on significant developments of a high vacuum reflectometer (diffractometer) and spectrometer for soft x-ray synchrotron experiments which allows conducting a wide range of static and dynamic experiments. Although the chamber named ALICE was designed for the analysis of magnetic hetero- and nanostructures via resonant magnetic x-ray scattering, the instrument is not limited to this technique. The versatility of the instrument was testified by a series of pilot experiments. Static measurements involve the possibility to use scattering and spectroscopy synchrotron based techniques (photon-in photon-out, photon-in electron-out, and coherent scattering). Dynamic experiments require either laser or magnetic field pulses to excite the spin system followed by x-ray probe in the time domain from nano- to femtosecond delay times. In this temporal range, the demagnetization/remagnetization dynamics and magnetization precession in a number of magnetic materials (metals, alloys, and magnetic multilayers) can be probed in an element specific manner. We demonstrate here the capabilities of the system to host a variety of experiments, featuring ALICE as one of the most versatile and demanded instruments at the Helmholtz Center in Berlin-BESSY II synchrotron center in Berlin, Germany.

  10. ALICE—An advanced reflectometer for static and dynamic experiments in magnetism at synchrotron radiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrudan, R. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin for Materials and Energy, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Brüssing, F.; Salikhov, R.; Meermann, J.; Zabel, H. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Radu, I.; Ryll, H.; Radu, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin for Materials and Energy, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    We report on significant developments of a high vacuum reflectometer (diffractometer) and spectrometer for soft x-ray synchrotron experiments which allows conducting a wide range of static and dynamic experiments. Although the chamber named ALICE was designed for the analysis of magnetic hetero- and nanostructures via resonant magnetic x-ray scattering, the instrument is not limited to this technique. The versatility of the instrument was testified by a series of pilot experiments. Static measurements involve the possibility to use scattering and spectroscopy synchrotron based techniques (photon-in photon-out, photon-in electron-out, and coherent scattering). Dynamic experiments require either laser or magnetic field pulses to excite the spin system followed by x-ray probe in the time domain from nano- to femtosecond delay times. In this temporal range, the demagnetization/remagnetization dynamics and magnetization precession in a number of magnetic materials (metals, alloys, and magnetic multilayers) can be probed in an element specific manner. We demonstrate here the capabilities of the system to host a variety of experiments, featuring ALICE as one of the most versatile and demanded instruments at the Helmholtz Center in Berlin-BESSY II synchrotron center in Berlin, Germany.

  11. A comparative study of dynamically expanding force-free, constant-alpha magnetic configurations with applications to magnetic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Osherovich, V. A.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    We contrast two different solutions of the constant alpha, force-free MHD equation, both of which have been suggested as models for magnetic clouds: a solution in cylindrical coordinates and one in spherical coordinates. In line with the observation that magnetic clouds expand, we generalize these static models and construct their expanding counterparts. We find that expansion introduces in both cases a large asymmetry in the field strength signature which is in the same sense as that seen the the data, i.e. towards the leading edge of the cloud. We then do a least squares fit of the respective models to one-spacecraft data on a magnetic cloud. We find that the fitting routine converges in both cases. However, while purely formally we cannot distinguish between the two models using data from one spacecraft, the field components in the 'spherical' model have features not compatible with data on magnetic clouds.

  12. Acute effect of static exercise on the cardiovascular system: assessment by cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegret, Josep M; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; La Gerche, Andre; Franco-Bonafonte, Luis; Rubio-Pérez, Francisco; Calvo, Nahum; Montero, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    The acute effect of static exercise on the global dynamics of the cardiovascular system is poorly understood. The use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) may be useful for evaluating this effect. A total of 12 healthy individuals underwent CMR imaging at rest and while performing a maximal sustained static exercise (weight elevation with both legs). We analyzed the effects on left and right ventricular function, ascending aorta dynamics, and venous capacitance using standard cine and phase-contrast sequences. We observed excellent reproducibility in the measurements of the images obtained at rest as well as during static exercise. During exercise, we observed reduced left (-35 ± 8 %, p exercise, we noted a tendency toward decreased aortic distensibility and a reduction of ascending aorta systolic expansion. In healthy individuals, an acute maximal static exercise produced a reduction in the left ventricle, right ventricle, and superior vena cava volumes as well as signs of increased aortic stiffness without increasing left ventricular systolic wall stress. CMR is feasible and useful in evaluating the hemodynamic effects of static exercise.

  13. Impact of the Static and Radiofrequency Magnetic Fields Produced by a 7T MR Imager on Metallic Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriso, Kenta; Kobayashi, Takuya; Sasaki, Makoto; Uwano, Ikuko; Kihara, Hidemichi; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    We examined safety issues related to the presence of various metallic dental materials in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 7 tesla. A 7T MR imaging scanner was used to examine 18 kinds of materials, including 8 metals used in dental restorations, 6 osseointegrated dental implants, 2 abutments for dental implants, and 2 magnetic attachment keepers. We assessed translational attraction forces between the static magnetic field and materials via deflection angles read on a tailor-made instrument and compared with those at 3T. Heating effects from radiofrequency during image acquisitions using 6 different sequences were examined by measuring associated temperature changes in agarose-gel phantoms with a fiber-optic thermometer. Deflection angles of the metallic dental materials were significantly larger at 7T than 3T. Among full metal crowns (FMCs), deflection angles were 18.0° for cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys, 13.5° for nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys, and 0° for other materials. Deflection angles of the dental implants and abutments were minimal, ranging from 5.0 to 6.5°, whereas the magnetic attachment keepers were strongly attracted to the field, having deflection angles of 90° or more. Increases in temperature of the FMCs were significant but less than 1°C in every sequence. The dental implant of 50-mm length showed significant but mild temperature increases (up to 1.5°C) when compared with other dental implants and abutments, particularly on sequences with high specific absorption rate values. Although most metallic dental materials showed no apparent translational attraction or heating at 7T, substantial attraction forces on the magnetic attachment keepers suggested potential risks to patients and research participants undergoing MR imaging examinations.

  14. THE EFFECT OF LOW INDUCTIVITY STATIC MAGNETIC FIELD ON SOME PLANT PATHOGEN FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pál NAGY

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Growth and sporulation of phytopathogen microscopic fungi were studied under a static magnetic fi eld. The applied flux densities were 0,1, 0,5 and 1 mT. As a result of our experiments, the magnetic fi eld decreased the growth of colonies by 10 % using this fl ux density region. At the same time, the number of the developed conidia of Alternaria alternata and Curvularia inaequalis increased by 68-133 percent, but the number of Fusarium oxysporum conidia decreased by 79-83 percent.

  15. Static properties of small Josephson tunnel junctions in a transverse magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution in the barrier of small planar Josephson tunnel junctions is numerically simulated in the case when an external magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the barrier plane. The simulations allow for heuristic analytical solutions for the Josephson static phase...... profile from which the dependence of the maximum Josephson current on the applied field amplitude is derived. The most common geometrical configurations are considered and, when possible, the theoretical findings are compared with the experimental data. ©2008 American Institute of Physics...

  16. [Survey of risks related to static magnetic fields in ultra high field MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, H E; von Cramon, D Y

    2008-04-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), substantial improvements with respect to sensitivity are expected due to the development of so-called ultra high field scanners, i. e., whole-body scanners with a magnetic field strength of 7 T or above. Users of this technology need to evaluate this benefit for potential risks since commercially available systems are not certified as a medical device for human use. This review provides a detailed survey of static field bioeffects related to the exposure of subjects being scanned, to occupational exposure, and to exposure of the general public under consideration of current standards and directives. According to present knowledge, it is not expected that exposure of human subjects to static magnetic fields of 7 T implies a specific risk of damage or disease provided that known contraindications are observed. The available database does not permit definition of exact thresholds for harmful effects. However, experience from previous application of ultra high field MRI indicates that transient phenomena, such as vertigo, nausea, metallic taste, or magneto-phosphenes, are more frequently observed. In particular, movements in the field or the gradient of the fringe field seem to lead to detectable effects. Besides such observations, there is a strong demand for systematic investigation of potential interaction mechanisms related to static field exposure during MRI examinations.

  17. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  18. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C; Nagy, Attila

    2008-06-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. Here we describe these techniques and illustrate them with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  19. Lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The lateral restoring force on a magnet levitated above a superconductor is calculated as a function of displacement from its original position at rest using Bean's critical-state model to describe flux pinning. The force is linear for small displacements and saturates at large displacements. In the absence of edge effects the force always attracts the magnet to its original position. Thus it is a restoring force that contributes to the stability of the levitated magnet. In the case of a thick superconductor slab, the origin of the force is a magnetic dipole layer consisting of positive and negative supercurrents induced on the trailing side of the magnet. The qualitative behavior is consistent with experiments reported to date. Effects due to the finite thickness of the superconductor slab and the granular nature of high-Tc materials are also considered.

  20. Design and Demonstration of a Test-Rig for Static Performance-Studies of Permanent Magnet Couplings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, Stig; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Bendixen, Flemming Buus

    2013-01-01

    The design and construction of an easy-to-use test-rig for permanent magnet couplings is presented. Static torque of permanent magnet couplings as a function of angular displacement is measured of permanent magnet couplings through an semi-automated test system. The test-rig is capable of measuring...

  1. Magnetic force microscopy of nano-size magnetic domain ordering in heavy ion irradiated fullerene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Avasthi, D K; Pivin, J C; Papaléo, R M; Tripathi, A; Singh, F; Sulania, I

    2007-06-01

    In the present work, magnetic force microscopy is employed to investigate the magnetic ordering in ion irradiated fullerene films. It is observed that magnetic domain size is approximately 100-200 nm and magnetic signal is stronger at the domain boundaries. Magnetic signal arise in irradiated films is confirmed by magnetic measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device which increases with the ion fluence. The induced magnetism is possibly due to structural defects in the amorphous carbon phase formed by ion irradiation.

  2. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2000-06-01

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a non-negligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analogue of Earnshaw's theorem, in which the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffness at the field-cooling position, independent of the angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM. (author)

  3. Effect of permanent-magnet irregularities in levitation force measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, J. R.

    1999-10-14

    In the measurement of the levitation force between a vertically magnetized permanent magnet (PM) and a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS), PM domains with horizontal components of magnetization are shown to produce a nonnegligible contribution to the levitation force in most systems. Such domains are typically found in all PMs, even in those that exhibit zero net horizontal magnetic moment. Extension of this analysis leads to an HTS analog of Earnshaw's theorem, in which at the field-cooling position the vertical stiffness is equal to the sum of the horizontal stiffnesses, independent of angular distribution of magnetic moments within the PM.

  4. Magnetostatic interactions and forces between cylindrical permanent magnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokoun, David; Beleggia, M.; Heller, Luděk; Šittner, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 321, č. 22 (2009), s. 3758-3763 ISSN 0304-8853 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 46559 - CERINKA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : cylinder * force measurement * magnet ostatic * permanent magnet Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism Impact factor: 1.204, year: 2009

  5. Occupational exposure in MR facilities due to movements in the static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreuccetti, Daniele; Biagi, Laura; Burriesci, Giancarlo; Cannatà, Vittorio; Contessa, Gian Marco; Falsaperla, Rosaria; Genovese, Elisabetta; Lodato, Rossella; Lopresto, Vanni; Merla, Caterina; Napolitano, Antonio; Pinto, Rosanna; Tiberi, Gianluigi; Tosetti, Michela; Zoppetti, Nicola

    2017-11-01

    The exposure of operators moving in the static field of magnetic resonance (MR) facilities was assessed through measurements of the magnetic flux density, which is experienced as variable in time because of the movement. Collected data were processed to allow the comparison with most recent and authoritative safety standards. Measurements of the experienced magnetic flux density B were performed using a probe worn by volunteers moving in MR environments. A total of 55 datasets were acquired nearby a 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T whole body scanners. Three different metrics were applied: the maximum intensity of B, to be compared with 2013/35/EU Directive exposure limit values for static fields; the maximum variation of the vector B on every 3s-interval, for comparison with the ICNIRP-2014 basic restriction aimed at preventing vertigo effects; two weighted-peak indices (for "sensory" and "health" effects: SENS-WP, HLTH-WP), assessing compliance with ICNIRP-2014 and EU Directive recommendations intended to prevent stimulation effects. Peak values of |B| were greater than 2 T in nine of the 55 datasets. All the datasets at 1.5 T and 3 T were compliant with the limit for vertigo effects, whereas six datasets at 7 T turned out to be noncompliant. At 7 T, all 36 datasets were noncompliant for the SENS-WP index and 26 datasets even for the HLTH-WP one. Results demonstrate that compliance with EU Directive limits for static fields does not guarantee compliance with ICNIRP-2014 reference levels and clearly show that movements in the static field could be the key component of the occupational exposure to EMF in MR facilities. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Measurement Performance Assessment: Dynamic Calibration Compared with Static Calibration Method for Roller Tester of Vehicle Brake Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Xu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The measurement performance of the roller tester for the vehicle brake force is evaluated by both proposed dynamic calibration and traditional static calibration to find an effective way for ensuring the vehicle safety. Three static parameters, brake force error of a single bench, difference of the left and right benches, and measurement repeatability, are verified to be eligible in the experiments. However, the experimental results of the dynamic calibration prove that the same brake tester fails on the repeatability with a 10.4% error. The dynamic calibration method improves the measurement performance of the brake tester in practical applications.

  7. Local viscoelastic properties of live cells investigated using dynamic and quasi-static atomic force microscopy methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena, Alexander; Raman, Arvind

    2014-03-04

    The measurement of viscoelasticity of cells in physiological environments with high spatio-temporal resolution is a key goal in cell mechanobiology. Traditionally only the elastic properties have been measured from quasi-static force-distance curves using the atomic force microscope (AFM). Recently, dynamic AFM-based methods have been proposed to map the local in vitro viscoelastic properties of living cells with nanoscale resolution. However, the differences in viscoelastic properties estimated from such dynamic and traditional quasi-static techniques are poorly understood. In this work we quantitatively reconstruct the local force and dissipation gradients (viscoelasticity) on live fibroblast cells in buffer solutions using Lorentz force excited cantilevers and present a careful comparison between mechanical properties (local stiffness and damping) extracted using dynamic and quasi-static force spectroscopy methods. The results highlight the dependence of measured viscoelastic properties on both the frequency at which the chosen technique operates as well as the interactions with subcellular components beyond certain indentation depth, both of which are responsible for differences between the viscoelasticity property maps acquired using the dynamic AFM method against the quasi-static measurements. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of Sod Gene in Response to Static Magnetic Fields in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanini, Raouia; Chatti, Abdelwaheb; Ghorbel, Selma Ben; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    The protective role of superoxide dismutase (SOD) against non-ionizing radiation such as static electromagnetic field (200 mT) has been studied in wild-type and mutant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking cytosolic Mn-SOD (sodM), Fe-SOD (sodB), or both SODs (sodMB). Our results showed that inactivation of sodM and/or sodB genes increases the sensitivity of P. aeruginosa toward stress induced by the static magnetic field (200 mT). Furthermore, our results showed an enhancement of SOD, catalase, and peroxidases after exposure to the magnetic field. However, wild-type cells maintained significantly higher activities of antioxidant enzymes than mutant strains. The malondialdehyde produced by the oxidative degradation of unsaturated lipids and fatty acids showed significant increase in mutant strains compared to the wild-type. The overall results showed that the SOD has a protective role against a stress induced by static electromagnetic field in P. aeruginosa.

  9. Concentric muscle contractions before static stretching minimize, but do not remove, stretch-induced force deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Anthony D; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2010-03-01

    The effects of concentric contractions and passive stretching on musculotendinous stiffness and muscle activity were studied in 18 healthy human volunteers. Passive and concentric plantar flexor joint moment data were recorded on an isokinetic dynamometer with simultaneous electromyogram (EMG) monitoring of the triceps surae, real-time motion analysis of the lower leg, and ultrasound imaging of the Achilles-medial gastrocnemius muscle-tendon junction. The subjects then performed six 8-s ramped maximal voluntary concentric contractions before repeating both the passive and concentric trials. Concentric moment was significantly reduced (6.6%; P static plantar flexor stretches before being retested 2 and 30 min poststretch. A further reduction in concentric joint moment (5.8%; P activity or Achilles tendon stiffness, but a significant increase in muscle operating length and decrease in tendon length was apparent at this range of motion (P stretching, muscle activity significantly recovered to pre-maximal voluntary concentric contractions levels, whereas concentric moment and Achilles tendon stiffness remained depressed. These data show that the performance of maximal concentric contractions can substantially reduce neuromuscular activity and muscle force, but this does not prevent a further stretch-induced loss in active plantar flexor joint moment. Importantly, the different temporal changes in EMG and concentric joint moment indicate that a muscle-based mechanism was likely responsible for the force losses poststretch.

  10. Magnetic anisotropy study of UGe{sub 2}in a static high magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakon, T [Center for Geo-Enviromental Science, Akita University, Akita City, 010-8502 (Japan); Saito, S [Center for Geo-Enviromental Science, Akita University, Akita City, 010-8502 (Japan); Koyama, K [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Awaji, S [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Sato, I [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Nojima, T [Center for Low Temperature Science, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Watanabe, K [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Motokawa, M [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai, 980-8577 (Japan); Sato, N K [Department of Physics, Graduated School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    UGe{sub 2} has orthorhombic C{sub mmm} crystalline symmetry and shows ferromagnetic Heavy-Fermion (HF) Superconductor, which provides superconductivity under pressure in the range from 1.0 GPa to 1.5 GPa. Magnetic field dependence of magnetization shows strong magnetic anisotropy. When a magnetic field is applied parallel to easy axis (a-axis), magnetization presents ferromagnetic behavior. At 4.2 K, which is much lower than the Curie temperature T{sub c} = 54 K. Spontaneous magnetization is 1.4 {mu}{sub B}/U, and the magnetization gradually increase with increasing field. On the contrary, when a field is applied parallel to hard axis (b-axis or c-axis), magnetization increases linearly with increasing magnetic field. As for H//b-axis, magnetization is 0.23 {mu} {sub B}/U even at 27 T. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant is obtained as 230 [T {mu}{sub B}] 3.4[kJ/kg] at 4.2 K. This value is comparable with rare-earth magnet Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}, which is typical strongly correlated ferromagnet.

  11. Recovery of Small-Sized Blood Vessels in Ischemic Bone under Static Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenzhi Xu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of static magnetic field (SMF on the vascularization in bone were evaluated using an ischemic bone model, where rat femoral artery was ligated. Magnetized and unmagnetized samarium–cobalt rods were implanted transcortically into the middle diaphysis of the ischemic femurs. Collateral circulation was evaluated by injection of microspheres into the abdominal aorta at the third week after ligation. It was found that the bone implanted with a magnetized rod showed a larger amount of trapped microspheres than that with an unmagnetized rod at the proximal and the distal region (P < 0.05 proximal region. There were no significant differences at the middle and the distal region. This tendency was similar to that of the bone mineral density in the SMF-exposed ischemic bone.

  12. Possible promotion of neuronal differentiation in fetal rat brain neural progenitor cells after sustained exposure to static magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ishioka, Yukichi; Hirai, Takao; Ozawa, Shusuke; Tachibana, Masaki; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2009-08-15

    We have previously shown significant potentiation of Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, along with decreased microtubules-associated protein-2 (MAP2) expression, in hippocampal neurons cultured under static magnetism without cell death. In this study, we investigated the effects of static magnetism on the functionality of neural progenitor cells endowed to proliferate for self-replication and differentiate into neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial lineages. Neural progenitor cells were isolated from embryonic rat neocortex and hippocampus, followed by culture under static magnetism at 100 mT and subsequent determination of the number of cells immunoreactive for a marker protein of particular progeny lineages. Static magnetism not only significantly decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells without affecting cell viability, but also promoted differentiation into cells immunoreactive for MAP2 with a concomitant decrease in that for an astroglial marker, irrespective of the presence of differentiation inducers. In neural progenitors cultured under static magnetism, a significant increase was seen in mRNA expression of several activator-type proneural genes, such as Mash1, Math1, and Math3, together with decreased mRNA expression of the repressor type Hes5. These results suggest that sustained static magnetism could suppress proliferation for self-renewal and facilitate differentiation into neurons through promoted expression of activator-type proneural genes by progenitor cells in fetal rat brain.

  13. Field Distribution of Transcranial Static Magnetic Stimulation in Realistic Human Head Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharayil, Joseph J; Goetz, Stefan M; Bernabei, John M; Peterchev, Angel V

    2017-10-10

    The objective of this work was to characterize the magnetic field (B-field) that arises in a human brain model from the application of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS). The spatial distribution of the B-field magnitude and gradient of a cylindrical, 5.08 cm × 2.54 cm NdFeB magnet were simulated in air and in a human head model using the finite element method and calibrated with measurements in air. The B-field was simulated for magnet placements over prefrontal, motor, sensory, and visual cortex targets. The impact of magnetic susceptibility of head tissues on the B-field was quantified. Peak B-field magnitude and gradient respectively ranged from 179-245 mT and from 13.3-19.0 T/m across the cortical targets. B-field magnitude, focality, and gradient decreased with magnet-cortex distance. The variation in B-field strength and gradient across the anatomical targets largely arose from the magnet-cortex distance. Head magnetic susceptibilities had negligible impact on the B-field characteristics. The half-maximum focality of the tSMS B-field ranged from 7-12 cm3 . This is the first presentation and characterization of the three-dimensional (3D) spatial distribution of the B-field generated in a human brain model by tSMS. These data can provide quantitative dosing guidance for tSMS applications across various cortical targets and subjects. The finding that the B-field gradient is high near the magnet edges should be considered in studies where neural tissue is placed close to the magnet. The observation that susceptibility has negligible effects confirms assumptions in the literature. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  14. Attractive force of castable iron-platinum magnetic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, I; Tanaka, Y; Fukunaga, H; Hisatsune, K; Atsuta, M

    2001-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the attractive force of cast Fe-Pt alloys of varying compositions to dental iron-neodymium-boron magnets. Ingots of Fe-40 at%Pt, Fe-38 at%Pt, Fe-37 at%Pt and Fe-36 at%Pt alloys were cast in pattern molds for dental magnetic attachment keepers. The attractive forces of the cast Fe-Pt alloy keepers and magnetic stainless steel keepers to dental Fe(14)Nd(2)B magnets (MAGFIT and HICOREX) were measured and statistically evaluated. The saturation magnetization of each Fe-Pt alloy was determined by recording the hysteresis loop using a vibrating sample magnetometer under a magnetic field of 1.6 MA/m. Decreasing the Pt percentage increased the saturation magnetization value and resulted in an increase of the attractive force to each magnet. There was no statistical difference (p>0.05) in attractive force between the Fe-36 at%Pt alloy specimens and the stainless steel keepers for both magnets. A definite correlation between Pt percentage and the value of saturation magnetization was also found (r(2)=-1.000). The Fe-Pt alloys with less than Fe-39.5 at%Pt produced high saturation magnetization values and great attractive force to the magnet, and thus, they have the potential to serve as magnetic attachment keepers. Of the Fe-Pt alloys tested, Fe-36 at%Pt seemed to be the best composition for making magnetic attachment keepers.

  15. Functionalized Akiyama tips for magnetic force microscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Markus; Barzola-Quiquia, José; Esquinazi, Pablo D.; Sangiao, Soraya; De Teresa, José M.; Meijer, Jan; Abel, Bernd

    2017-12-01

    In this work we have used focused electron beam induced deposition of cobalt to functionalize atomic force microscopy Akiyama tips for application in magnetic force microscopy. The grown tips have a content of  ≈ 90~% Co after exposure to ambient air. The magnetic tips were characterized using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In order to investigate the magnetic properties, current loops were prepared by electron beam lithography. Measurements at room temperature as well as 4.2~K were carried out and the coercive field of  ≈6.8 mT of the Co tip was estimated by applying several external fields in the opposite direction of the tip magnetization. Magnetic Akiyama tips open new possibilities for wide-range temperature magnetic force microscopy measurements.

  16. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, James; Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Samuel; Mihalusova, Mariana

    2003-03-01

    We have commissioned a superconducting solenoid based apparatus designed to exert strong magnetic body forces on biological specimens and other organic materials in ambient environmental conditions for extended periods. In its room temperature bore, it can produce a maximum magnetic field-field gradient product of 16 T^2-cm-1 which is sufficient to levitate frog embryos Xenopus Laevis[1]. We will discuss how we are applying these magnetic body forces to probe the known influences of gravitational forces on frog embryos and the swimming behavior of Paramecium Caudatum. In the process, we will describe a novel method for measuring the diamagnetic susceptibilities of specimens such as paramecia.

  17. On the resistive diffusion of force-free magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, B. C.

    1980-01-01

    Reid and Laing (1979) conjectured on the general behavior of resistive force-free magnetic fields in a slab model following a numerical study. However, the basic properties of resistive force-free magnetic fields had been established previously. Some results from the previous work are extended to show that the conjecture of Reid and Laing is incorrect. A general analytic treatment of the problem provides the correct physical properties that Reid and Laing were unable to deduce from their numerical solutions. A criticism is also given of the results presented in another numerical study treating cylindrical resistive force-free magnetic fields, by the same authors.

  18. Effect of magnetization process on levitation force between a superconducting disk and a permanent magnet

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, L.; Hou, Y.; He, C. Y.; Gao, Z. X.; Xiao, L.; Ren, H. T.; Jiao, Y. L.; Zheng, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    The levitation forces between a permanent magnet and a coaxial superconducting disk after different magnetization processes are measured. Significant effect of the magnetization process on the levitation force is observed. Theoretical calculations of levitation force based on the critical state model with temperature and field-dependent critical current density, and the heat dissipation due to the flux motion are in perfect agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Functionalization of atomic force microscopy Akiyama tips for magnetic force microscopy measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Stiller, Markus; Barzola-Quiquia, Jose; Esquinazi, Pablo D.; Sangiao, Soraya; De Teresa, Jose M.; Meijer, Jan; Abel, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    In this work we have used focused electron beam induced deposition of cobalt to functionalize atomic force microscopy Akiyama tips for application in magnetic force microscopy. The grown tips have a content of 90% Co after exposure to ambient air. The magnetic tips were characterized using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In order to investigate the magnetic properties, current loops were prepared by electron beam lithography. Measurements at room tempera...

  20. Effect of static magnetic field on the oxygen production of Scenedesmus obliquus cultivated in municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Renjie; Jin, Wenbiao; Xi, Tingting; Yang, Qian; Han, Song-Fang; Abomohra, Abd El-Fatah

    2015-12-01

    Algal-bacterial symbiotic system, with biological synergism of physiological functions of both algae and bacteria, has been proposed for cultivation of microalgae in municipal wastewater for biomass production and wastewater treatment. The algal-bacterial symbiotic system can enhance dissolved oxygen production which enhances bacterial growth and catabolism of pollutants in wastewater. Therefore, the oxygen production efficiency of microalgae in algal-bacterial systems is considered as the key factor influencing the wastewater treatment efficiency. In the present study, we have proposed a novel approach which uses static magnetic field to enhance algal growth and oxygen production rate with low operational cost and non-toxic secondary pollution. The performance of oxygen production with the magnetic field was evaluated using Scenedesmus obliquus grown in municipal wastewater and was calculated based on the change in dissolved oxygen concentration. Results indicated that magnetic treatment stimulates both algal growth and oxygen production. Application of 1000 GS of magnetic field once at logarithmic growth phase for 0.5 h increased the chlorophyll-a content by 11.5% over the control after 6 days of growth. In addition, magnetization enhanced the oxygen production rate by 24.6% over the control. Results of the study confirmed that application of a proper magnetic field could reduce the energy consumption required for aeration during the degradation of organic matter in municipal wastewater in algal-bacterial symbiotic systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of Unbalanced Magnetic Force in Magnetic Geared Machine Using Analytical Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic structure of the magnetic geared machine (MGM) may induce a significant unbalanced magnetic force (UMF). However, few methods have been developed to theoretically reveal the essential reasons for this issue in the MGM. In this paper, an analytical method based on an air....... Second, the magnetic field distribution in the MGM is modeled by an exact subdomain method, which allows the magnetic forces to be calculated quantitatively. The magnetic forces in two MGMs are then studied under no-load and full-load conditions. Finally, the finite-element calculation confirms...

  2. Lorentz Body Force Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz force induced by a traveling magnetic field (TMF) in a cylindrical container has been calculated. The force can be used to control flow in dectrically conducting melts and the direction of the magnetic field and resulting flow can be reversed. A TMF can be used to partially cancel flow driven by buoyancy. The penetration of the field into the cylinder decreases as the frequency increases, and there exists an optimal value of frequency for which the resulting force is a maximum. Expressions for the Lorentz force in the limiting cases of low frequency and infinite cylinder are also given and compared to the numerical calculations.

  3. Magnetic forces between arrays of cylindrical permanent magnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokoun, David; Tomassetti, G.; Beleggia, M.; Stachiv, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 323, č. 1 (2011), s. 55-60 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnet ism * permanent magnet s Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism Impact factor: 1.780, year: 2011

  4. Improving heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles by pre-orientation of particles in a static three tesla magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Mathias M., E-mail: Mathias.Beck@tum.de [Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lammel, Christian [Institute for Machine Tools and Industrial Management, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gleich, Bernhard [Institute of Medical Engineering, Technical University of Munich, Boltzmannstr. 11, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    Inductive heating of electrically insulating materials like fiberglass reinforced thermoplastics (FRTP) without susceptors is not possible. However, due to their low thermal conductivity a volumetric heat generation method is advisable to reach short heating times to melt this material for reshaping. This can be done with magnetic nanoparticles as susceptors within the thermoplastic of the FRTP using Néel relaxation. During the heating process the particle's magnetic moment rotates with the field while the particle itself is fixed within the thermoplastic. Therefore the heat dissipation of each particle depends on its orientation within the field. To achieve the maximum heat generation of the particles we pre-oriented the particles within a plastic at the best angle to the applied AC field for induction. To do this, five mass percent nanoparticles were dispersed in an epoxy resin, which was then hardened at room temperature in a static three Tesla magnetic field. After its solidification the heating behavior of the sample was compared to a reference sample, which was hardened without a field. The oriented particles showed an increased heating rate when oriented parallel to the applied AC field. The absorption rate was 3.3 times as high as the undirected reference sample. When the alternating electromagnetic field was perpendicular to the oriented particles, the specific absorption rate was similar to that of the reference sample. We compare this result with theory and with calculations from literature, and conduct a numerical simulation. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticles are aligned using a static three tesla magnetic field. • Inductive heating depends on the particles pre-orientation in a solid matrix. • Alignment increases the heat generation significantly.

  5. Explicit time-reversible orbit integration in Particle In Cell codes with static homogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patacchini, L.; Hutchinson, I. H.

    2009-04-01

    A new explicit time-reversible orbit integrator for the equations of motion in a static homogeneous magnetic field - called Cyclotronic integrator - is presented. Like Spreiter and Walter's Taylor expansion algorithm, for sufficiently weak electric field gradients this second order method does not require a fine resolution of the Larmor motion; it has however the essential advantage of being symplectic, hence time-reversible. The Cyclotronic integrator is only subject to a linear stability constraint ( ΩΔ t Democritus can reduce the cost of orbit integration by up to a factor of ten.

  6. The force analysis for superparamagnetic nanoparticles-based gene delivery in an oscillating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jiajia [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China); Shi, Zongqian, E-mail: zqshi@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China); Jia, Shenli [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28 Xianning West Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China); Zhang, Pengbo [Department of Anesthesiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University School of Medicine, No.157 West 5 Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710004 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Due to the peculiar magnetic properties and the ability to function in cell-level biological interaction, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMNP) have been being the attractive carrier for gene delivery. The superparamagnetic nanoparticles with surface-bound gene vector can be attracted to the surface of cells by the Kelvin force provided by external magnetic field. In this article, the influence of the oscillating magnetic field on the characteristics of magnetofection is studied in terms of the magnetophoretic velocity. The magnetic field of a cylindrical permanent magnet is calculated by equivalent current source (ECS) method, and the Kelvin force is derived by using the effective moment method. The results show that the static magnetic field accelerates the sedimentation of the particles, and drives the particles inward towards the axis of the magnet. Based on the investigation of the magnetophoretic velocity of the particle under horizontally oscillating magnetic field, an oscillating velocity within the amplitude of the magnet oscillation is observed. Furthermore, simulation results indicate that the oscillating amplitude plays an important role in regulating the active region, where the particles may present oscillating motion. The analysis of the magnetophoretic velocity gives us an insight into the physical mechanism of the magnetofection. It's also helpful to the optimal design of the magnetofection system. - Highlights: • We compare the results of the ECS method and FEA method with the commercial software, Ansys. • We analyze the physic mechanism of the oscillating motion of the particles in the presence of an oscillating magnet. • We discuss the influence of the oscillating amplitude of the magnet on the behavior of the particle.

  7. Evaluation of occupational exposure to static magnetic field in a chloralkali plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Coobineh

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: An observational cross sectional study was conducted to determine iflong term exposure to static magnetic fields could be related to findings of medical examinations.Method: Health data were obtained for 20 workers who spent a major portion of their workdaysin the magnetic fields produced by the direct current through large electrolytic cells. These datawere compared to those of a control group of 21 workers. Intensity of magnetic fields weremeasured in the cell room and the Time weighted Average (TWA exposure to magnetic field wascalculated for each job classification.Results: Maximum and minimum intensities in mTwere found to be 16.99 and 0.46, respectively,which were well below the permissible level. Maximum TWAexposure to magnetic field wasfound to be 47.59 mTWhich were observed. Comparing the ECG, EEG, blood Pressure and pulseratesbetween the two groups showed no statistically significant differences. Clinical findingshowed that fatigue and nervousness complain were be higher in the case group and weresignificantly different between the two groups.Conclusion: We did not see statistical significant differences between case and control groups inECG, EEG, blood pressure and pulse-rates. We have seen statistically differences in the fatigue(P<0.01 and nervousness (P<0.01 complain of these two groups. We suggest that it may benecessary to choose a value of than 60 mT (TLV-TWA, so that the complains of fatigue andnervousness will be reduce.

  8. Influence of static magnetic fields up to 700 mT and dihydrochalcones on the antioxidant response in fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synowiec-Wojtarowicz, Agnieszka; Kimsa-Dudek, Magdalena; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna; Kurzeja, Ewa; Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanisław

    2017-03-21

    The effects of a static magnetic field (SMF) and the dihydrochalcones phloretin and phloridzin on the redox homeostasis of fibroblasts were investigated. The aim of the present study was to determine the redox homeostasis of fibroblasts that were simultaneously exposed to a static magnetic field and the dihydrochalcones phloretin and phloridzin. The fibroblasts were cultured for 72 h in special magnetic test chambers at different moderate intensities (0.4, 0.55 and 0.7 T). In this report, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), glutathione transferase (GST); the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and total antioxidant status were measured using commercially available kits. We did not observe any impairment in the redox balance in cells in fibroblasts that were only exposed to static magnetic fields of different intensities or In fibroblast cultured with dihydrochalcones and exposed to static magnetic field increase the SOD, GPx, GST activities and MDA concentration. Our investigations revealed that the activities of SOD, GPx, GST and the concentration of MDA that were determined for the fibroblasts that were cultured with dihydrochalcones were higher in the presence of a static magnetic field. Our results indicated that exposure to SMF (0.7 T) with dihydrochalcones induces oxidative stress in fibroblasts.

  9. Static force field representation of environments based on agents' nonlinear motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Damian; Betancourt, Alejandro; Marcenaro, Lucio; Regazzoni, Carlo

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a methodology that aims at the incremental representation of areas inside environments in terms of attractive forces. It is proposed a parametric representation of velocity fields ruling the dynamics of moving agents. It is assumed that attractive spots in the environment are responsible for modifying the motion of agents. A switching model is used to describe near and far velocity fields, which in turn are used to learn attractive characteristics of environments. The effect of such areas is considered radial over all the scene. Based on the estimation of attractive areas, a map that describes their effects in terms of their localizations, ranges of action, and intensities is derived in an online way. Information of static attractive areas is added dynamically into a set of filters that describes possible interactions between moving agents and an environment. The proposed approach is first evaluated on synthetic data; posteriorly, the method is applied on real trajectories coming from moving pedestrians in an indoor environment.

  10. Static frictional force and surface roughness of various bracket and wire combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Umal H; Bhad-Patil, Wasundhara A

    2011-01-01

    During sliding mechanics, frictional resistance is an important counterforce to orthodontic tooth movement, which must be controlled to allow application of light, continuous forces. We investigated the static frictional resistance between 3 modern orthodontic brackets-ceramic with gold-palladium slot, ceramic, and stainless steel-and 4 archwires (0.019 × 0.025-in)-stainless steel, nickel-titanium, titanium-molybdenum alloy (TMA), and low-friction colored TMA. All tests were carried out in a dry state on a universal testing machine. Surface topography of bracket slots and archwires was studied by using a scanning electron microscope and quantified by using a surface roughness testing machine (profilometer). In the scanning electron microscope measurements, the smoothest surface was the ceramic gold-palladium bracket and stainless steel wire. The profilometer quantified the surface roughness, which also was lowest for the ceramic gold-palladium bracket and stainless steel wire. The ceramic bracket with the gold-palladium slot showed the least frictional values in all combinations and could be a promising alternative to solve the problem of friction. Frictional values for colored TMA were comparable with stainless steel wires and might be a good alternative during space closure in sliding mechanics. Ceramic with gold-palladium slot bracket and colored TMA archwire seem to be a good alternative to stainless steel in space closure with sliding mechanics. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields and recently updated safety guidelines for strong static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2011-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to artificial and naturally occurring magnetic fields that originate from many different sources. We review recent studies that examine the biological effects of and medical applications involving electromagnetic fields, review the properties of static and pulsed electromagnetic fields that affect biological systems, describe the use of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with an anticancer agent as an example of a medical application that incorporates an electromagnetic field, and discuss the recently updated safety guidelines for static electromagnetic fields. The most notable modifications to the 2009 International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines are the increased exposure limits, especially for those who work with or near electromagnetic fields (occupational exposure limits). The recommended increases in exposure were determined using recent scientific evidence obtained from animal and human studies. Several studies since the 1994 publication of the guidelines have examined the effects on humans after exposure to high static electromagnetic fields (up to 9.4 tesla), but additional research is needed to ascertain further the safety of strong electromagnetic fields.

  12. Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.E.; Kelman, B.J.; Weigel, R.J. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    Although background levels of atmospheric electric and geomagnetic field levels are extremely low, over the past several decades, human beings and other life forms on this planet have been subjected to a dramatically changing electromagnetic milieu. An exponential increase in exposure to electromagnetic fields has occurred, largely because of such technological advances as the growth of electrical power generation and transmission systems, the increased use of wireless communications, and the use of radar. In addition, electromagnetic field generating devices have proliferated in industrial plants, office buildings, homes, public transportation systems, and elsewhere. Although significant increases have occurred in electromagnetic field strenghths spanning all frequency ranges, this symposium addresses only the impact of these fields at static and extremely low frequencies (ELF), primarily 50 and 60 Hz. This volume contains the proceedings of the symposium entitled /open quotes/Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields/close quotes/. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for discussions of all aspects of research on the interaction of static and ELF electromagnetic fields with biological systems. These systems include simple biophysical models, cell and organ preparations, whole animals, and man. Dosimetry, exposure system design, and artifacts in ELF bioeffects research were also addressed, along with current investigations that examine fundamental mechanisms of interactions between the fields and biological processes. Papers are indexed separately.

  13. Design of Static Wireless Charging System for Electric Vehicles with Focus on Magnetic Coupling and Emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Tushar

    Static wireless charging using resonant inductive principle offers environmental friendly, comfortable and automatic charging solution for electric vehicles. This technology as of now is nascent with few products on the market and leading companies and universities actively engaged in research....... On similar lines, a pioneer PhD project was undertaken in 2012 at Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University with objectives of improving system design and developing high power density (weight and dimensions), low cost and low magnetic emissions power inductors for this application. This thesis...... of wireless charging systems mostly consist of the coils and passive shielding materials and are different from inductors used in other industrial and consumer applications as majority of magnetic flux passes through air. The first objective in the inductor design is to explain effect of the shielding...

  14. Electrons acceleration in a TE 113 cylindrical cavity affected by a static inhomogeneous magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Vergara, V.; González, J. D.; Beltrán, J. R.; Orozco, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    The relativistic dynamics of an electron accelerated in a cylindrical cavity mode TE 113 in the presence of a static inhomogeneous magnetic field is studied. This type of acceleration is known as Spatial AutoResonance Acceleration (SARA). The magnetic field profile is such that it keeps the phase difference between the electric microwave field and the electron velocity vector within the acceleration phase band. We study the dynamic of the electron through simulations of the relativistic Newton-Lorentz equation. Numerical experiments with TE 113 cylindrical microwave fields of a frequency of 2.45GHz and an amplitude of the order of 7kV/cm show that it is possible accelerate the electrons up to energies of the order of 300keV. This energy is about of 30% higher than those obtained in previous studies by using the TE 112 mode.

  15. Lack of effect of moderate-duration static stretching on plantar flexor force production and series compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavan, Dale; Coleman, David R; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2012-03-01

    The effects of an acute bout of moderate-duration static stretching on plantar flexor force production, series compliance of the muscle-tendon unit, and levels of neuromuscular activation were examined. Eighteen active individuals (9 men and 9 women) performed four 45-s static plantar flexor stretches and a time-matched control of no stretch (where subjects remained seated in the dynamometer for 4 min with no stretch being performed). Measures of peak isometric moment, rate of force development, neuromuscular activation (interpolated twitch technique and electromyography), twitch force characteristics, passive moment during stretch, and tendon elongation during maximal voluntary contractions were taken before and after the stretching. Despite a significant stress-relaxation response during stretch (9.3%, Pactivation (interpolated twitch: P=0.86; electromyography: P=0.09; effect size 0.02), or tendon elongation (P=0.61; effect size 0.07) after stretching. Twitch characteristics were also unchanged after stretching, although there was a reduction in the rate of twitch torque relaxation (RR(t); Pstatic stretching did not impair the force generating capacity of the plantar flexors or negatively affect muscle-tendon mechanical properties. Static stretching may not always have detrimental consequences for force production. Thus, clinicians may be able to apply moderate-duration stretches to patients without risk of reducing muscular performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Contact-free experimental determination of the static flexural spring constant of cantilever sensors using a microfluidic force tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Parkin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanocantilevers are employed in atomic force microscopy (AFM and in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS as sensing elements. They enable nanomechanical measurements, are essential for the characterization of nanomaterials, and form an integral part of many nanoscale devices. Despite the fact that numerous methods described in the literature can be applied to determine the static flexural spring constant of micro- and nanocantilever sensors, experimental techniques that do not require contact between the sensor and a surface at some point during the calibration process are still the exception rather than the rule. We describe a noncontact method using a microfluidic force tool that produces accurate forces and demonstrate that this, in combination with a thermal noise spectrum, can provide the static flexural spring constant for cantilever sensors of different geometric shapes over a wide range of spring constant values (≈0.8–160 N/m.

  17. ANALYSIS OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2006-05-29

    A comprehensive examination of theoretical models for the friction force, in use by the electron cooling community, was performed. Here, they present their insights about the models gained as a result of comparison between the friction force formulas and direct numerical simulations, as well as studies of the cooling process as a whole.

  18. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  19. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otabe, E S; Kuroki, S; Nikawa, J [Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu Iizuka Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y [Fukuoka University, 8-19-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Ooba, T [Fukuoka Industrial Technology Center, 1465-5 Aikawa-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 839-0861 (Japan); Kiso, K [Fukuoka Regional Taxation Bureau, 2-11-1 Hakataekihigashi, Hakata-ku Fukuoka, 812-8547 (Japan); Hayashi, H [Kyushu Power Electric, 2-1-47 Shiobaru Minami-ku Fukuoka 815-8520 (Japan)], E-mail: otabe@cse.kyutech.ac.jp

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 {+-}0.2 x 10{sup 6}/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, {rho}, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by {rho} = {rho}o exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  20. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Increase the Gel Signal in Partially Hydrated DPPC/DMPC Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available NIt was recently reported that static magnetic fields increase lipid order in the hydrophobic membrane core of dehydrated native plant plasma membranes [Poinapen, Soft Matter 9:6804-6813, 2013]. As plasma membranes are multicomponent, highly complex structures, in order to elucidate the origin of this effect, we prepared model membranes consisting of a lipid species with low and high melting temperature. By controlling the temperature, bilayers coexisting of small gel and fluid domains were prepared as a basic model for the plasma membrane core. We studied molecular order in mixed lipid membranes made of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC using neutron diffraction in the presence of strong static magnetic fields up to 3.5 T. The contribution of the hydrophobic membrane core was highlighted through deuterium labeling the lipid acyl chains. There was no observable effect on lipid organization in fluid or gel domains at high hydration of the membranes. However, lipid order was found to be enhanced at a reduced relative humidity of 43%: a magnetic field of 3.5 T led to an increase of the gel signal in the diffraction patterns of 5%. While all biological materials have weak diamagnetic properties, the corresponding energy is too small to compete against thermal disorder or viscous effects in the case of lipid molecules. We tentatively propose that the interaction between the fatty acid chains’ electric moment and the external magnetic field is driving the lipid tails in the hydrophobic membrane core into a better ordered state.

  1. X-ray dynamic observation of cervical degenerative disease induced by unbalanced dynamic and static forces in rats 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua; Huang, Yongjing; Nong, Luming; Xu, Nanwei; Gao, Gongming; Zhou, Dong

    2017-09-01

    To investigate dynamically the X-ray appearance of cervical degenerative disease induced by unbalanced dynamic and static forces in rats. A total of 60 Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into test (n=45) and control (n=15) groups, which were randomly subdivided into the one-, three- and six-month post-operative groups. The test group included 10, 15 and 20 rats at the respective corresponding post-operative stage and the control group included five rats at each time-point. By excising cervicodorsal muscles, interspinous ligaments and supraspinous ligament of rats in the test group, the balance of dynamic and static forces on cervical vertebrae was disrupted to establish a rat model of cervical degeneration. Spinal X-ray images were acquired, and intervertebral disc space and intervertebral foramen size were measured at one, three and six months post-operation. The results were analyzed and compared among groups. Cervical dynamic and static imbalance accelerated the appearance of cervical degenerative disease on X-ray. Cervical degenerative disease may be induced by unbalanced dynamic and static forces in rats.

  2. A new concept in magnetic force microscope cantilevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, A.G.; van Dijk, A.C.J.; Heskamp, I.R.; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.; Hadjipanayis, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a new design of dedicated magnetic force microscope (MFM) cantilever is presented. In this design, the cantilever and the magnetic tip are realized in an integrated manufacturing process. The use of silicon micromachining techniques enables batch fabrication of several hundred

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy at millikelvin temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, Arthur Mattheus Johannes den

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a technique which combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with scanning probe microscopy (SPM). The final goal is to develop this technique to such a level that the atomic structure of a virus or protein can be revealed by this microscope. This

  4. Forces between a permanent magnet and a soft magnetic plate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beleggia, M.; Vokoun, David; DeGraef, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 5 (2012), 0500204/1-0500204/4 ISSN 1949-307X R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP108/12/P111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : electromagnetics * hard magnet ic materials * soft magnet ic materials Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=6313974

  5. Magnetically-Driven Quantum Heat Engines: The Quasi-Static Limit of Their Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Muñoz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a quantum heat engine (QHEN has been discussed in the literature, not only due to its intrinsic scientific interest, but also as an alternative to efficiently recover, on a nanoscale device, thermal energy in the form of useful work. The quantum character of a QHEN relies, for instance, on the fact that any of its intermediate states is determined by a density matrix operator. In particular, this matrix can represent a mixed state. For a classical heat engine, a theoretical upper bound for its efficiency is obtained by analyzing its quasi-static operation along a cycle drawn by a sequence of quasi-equilibrium states. A similar analysis can be carried out for a quantum engine, where quasi-static processes are driven by the evolution of ensemble-averaged observables, via variation of the corresponding operators or of the density matrix itself on a tunable physical parameter. We recently proposed two new conceptual designs for a magnetically-driven quantum engine, where the tunable parameter is the intensity of an external magnetic field. Along this article, we shall present the general quantum thermodynamics formalism developed in order to analyze this type of QHEN, and moreover, we shall apply it to describe the theoretical efficiency of two different practical implementations of this concept: an array of semiconductor quantum dots and an ensemble of graphene flakes submitted to mechanical tension.

  6. Microscopic derivation of electromagnetic force density in magnetic dielectric media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shevchenko, A.; Hoenders, B. J.

    2010-01-01

    Macroscopic force density imposed on a linear isotropic magnetic dielectric medium by an arbitrary electromagnetic field is derived by spatially averaging the microscopic Lorentz force density. The obtained expression differs from the commonly used expressions, but the energy-momentum tensor derived

  7. Probing Gravitational Sensitivity in Biological Systems Using Magnetic Body Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Wurzel, Sam; Mihalusova, Mariana; Valles, Jim

    2003-01-01

    At Brown University, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means to simulate variable gravity body forces on biological systems. This tool promises new means to probe gravi-sensing and the gravi-response of biological systems. It also has the potential as a technique for screening future systems for space flight experiments.

  8. Magnetic compression in gastrointestinal and bilioenteric anastomosis: how much force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Tadhg; Ríordáin, Mícheál G Ó; Cahill, Ronan A; Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig

    2014-02-01

    The concept of compression alimentary anastomosis is well established. Recently, magnetic axial alignment pressures have been encompassed within such device constructs. We quantify the magnetic compression force and pressure required to successfully achieve gastrointestinal and bilioenteric anastomosis by in-depth interrogation of the reported literature. Reports of successful deployment and proof of anastomotic patency on survival were scrutinized to quantify the necessary dimensions and strengths of magnetic devices in (a) gastroenteral anastomosis in live porcine models and (b) bilioenteric anastomosis in the clinical setting. Using a calculatory tool developed for this work (magnetic force determination algorithm, MAGDA), ideal magnetic force and compression pressure were quantified from successful reports with regard to their variance by intermagnet separation. Optimized ranges for both compression force and pressure were determined for successful porcine gastroenteral and clinical bilioenteric anastomoses. For gastroenteral anastomoses (porcine investigations), an optimized compression force between 2.55 and 3.57 kg at 2-mm intermagnet separation is recommended. The associated compression pressure should not exceed 60 N/cm(2). Successful bilioenteric anastomoses is best clinically achieved with intermagnet compression of 18 to 31 g and associated pressures between 1 and 3.5 N/mm(2) (at 2-mm intermagnet separation). The creation of magnetic compression anastomoses using permanent magnets demonstrates a remarkable resilience to variations in magnetic force and pressure exertion. However, inappropriate selection of compression characteristics and magnet dimensions may incur difficulties. Recommendations of this work and the availability of the free online tool (http://magda.ucc.ie/) may facilitate a factor of robustness in the design and refinement of future devices.

  9. Extending the range for force calibration in magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daldrop, Peter; Brutzer, Hergen; Huhle, Alexander; Kauert, Dominik J; Seidel, Ralf

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic tweezers are a wide-spread tool used to study the mechanics and the function of a large variety of biomolecules and biomolecular machines. This tool uses a magnetic particle and a strong magnetic field gradient to apply defined forces to the molecule of interest. Forces are typically quantified by analyzing the lateral fluctuations of the biomolecule-tethered particle in the direction perpendicular to the applied force. Since the magnetic field pins the anisotropy axis of the particle, the lateral fluctuations follow the geometry of a pendulum with a short pendulum length along and a long pendulum length perpendicular to the field lines. Typically, the short pendulum geometry is used for force calibration by power-spectral-density (PSD) analysis, because the movement of the bead in this direction can be approximated by a simple translational motion. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the fluctuations according to the long pendulum geometry and show that for this direction, both the translational and the rotational motions of the particle have to be considered. We provide analytical formulas for the PSD of this coupled system that agree well with PSDs obtained in experiments and simulations and that finally allow a faithful quantification of the magnetic force for the long pendulum geometry. We furthermore demonstrate that this methodology allows the calibration of much larger forces than the short pendulum geometry in a tether-length-dependent manner. In addition, the accuracy of determination of the absolute force is improved. Our force calibration based on the long pendulum geometry will facilitate high-resolution magnetic-tweezers experiments that rely on short molecules and large forces, as well as highly parallelized measurements that use low frame rates. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ball lightning as a force-free magnetic knot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranada; Soler; Trueba

    2000-11-01

    The stability of fireballs in a recent model of ball lightning is studied. It is shown that the balls shine while relaxing in an almost quiescent expansion, and that three effects contribute to their stability: (i) the formation in each one during a process of Taylor relaxation of a force-free magnetic field, a concept introduced in 1954 in order to explain the existence of large magnetic fields and currents in stable configurations of astrophysical plasmas; (ii) the so called Alfven conditions in magnetohydrodynamics; and (iii) the approximate conservation of the helicity integral. The force-free fields that appear are termed "knots" because their magnetic lines are closed and linked.

  11. EXPERIMENTAL BENCHMARKING OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; GALNANDER, B.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; LOFNES, T.; SIDORIN, A.O.; SMIRNOV, A.V.; ZIEMANN, V.

    2005-09-18

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires accurate description of the friction force. A series of measurements were performed at CELSIUS with the goal to provide accurate data needed for the benchmarking of theories and simulations. Some results of accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  12. Force Measurements in Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, Alexander; Shapovalov, George; Prohorov, Nikolay

    1996-01-01

    The description of an infrared telemetry system for measurement of drag forces in Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) is presented. This system includes a drag force sensor, electronic pack and transmitter placed in the model which is of special construction, and receiver with a microprocessor-based measuring device, placed outside of the test section. Piezosensitive resonators as sensitive elements and non-magnetic steel as the material for the force sensor are used. The main features of the proposed system for load measurements are discussed and the main characteristics are presented.

  13. Levitation of diamagnetic liquid droplet by means of magnetic force; Jikiryoku ni yoru hanjisei ekiteki no fuyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisaki, M.; Naito, S.; Nakagawa, M.; Oshima, S.; Yamane, R. [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Yamaguchi, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Park, M.

    1997-02-25

    To establish the levitation and fixation technology of diamagnetic liquid droplet by means of static magnetic field, model experiments and numerical simulation were conducted using silicone oil and magnetic fluid. This is a fundamental study for the development of new manufacturing method of nonconducting materials and for the drug transportation and fixation technique in blood vessels. Permanent magnets with a shape of circular cylinder were set so as to coincide the center axis and face at the same magnetic pole, to form a nonuniform magnetic field. A test container was placed between the magnets and filled with magnetic fluid. The silicone oil was injected in the magnetic fluid using syringe. Droplets with susceptibility lower than that of surrounding medium were stably levitated by the magnetic force towards the center with lower magnetic field. The state of liquid droplet levitation was affected by the magnetic field strength, magnetic field distribution, susceptibility of surrounding medium, susceptibility and volume of liquid droplets, difference in density between droplets and surrounding medium, and surface tension of magnetic fluid. The levitation state of liquid droplet was reproduced through the numerical simulation. In the case of constant magnetic field distribution, position and shape of droplet levitation were controlled by the Weber number, a ratio of magnetic pressure and apparent gravity. 11 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Magnetic forces in high-Tc superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    In September 1987, researchers at Cornell levitated a small rotor on superconducting bearings at 10,000 rpm. In April 1989, a speed of 120,000 rpm was achieved in a passive bearing with no active control. The bearing material used was YBa2Cu307. There is no evidence that the rotation speed has any significant effect on the lift force. Magnetic force measurements between a permanent rare-earth magnet and high T(sub c) superconducting material versus vertical and lateral displacements were made. A large hysteresis loop results for large displacements, while minor loops result for small displacements. These minor loops seem to give a slope proportional to the magnetic stiffness, and are probably indicative of flux pinning forces. Experiments of rotary speed versus time show a linear decay in a vacuum. Measurements of magnetic dipole over a high-T(sub c) superconducting disc of YBCO show that the lateral vibrations of levitated rotors were measured which indicates that transverse flux motion in the superconductor will create dissipation. As a result of these force measurements, an optimum shape for the superconductor bearing pads which gives good lateral and axial stability was designed. Recent force measurements on melt-quench processed superconductors indicate a substantial increase in levitation force and magnetic stiffness over free sintered materials. As a result, application of high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings are beginning to show great promise at this time.

  15. Interaction Forces Between Multiple Bodies in a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    Some of the results from experiments to determine the interaction forces between multiple bodies in a magnetic field are presented in this paper. It is shown how the force values and the force directions depend on the configuration of the bodies, their relative positions to each other, and the vector of the primary magnetic field. A number of efficient new automatic loading and assembly machines, as well as manipulators and robots, have been created based on the relationship between bodies and magnetic fields. A few of these patented magnetic devices are presented. The concepts involved open a new way to design universal grippers for robot and other kinds of mechanisms for the manipulation of objects. Some of these concepts can be used for space applications.

  16. Effects of middle ear quasi-static stiffness on sound transmission quantified by a novel 3-axis optical force sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrev, Ivo; Sim, Jae Hoon; Aqtashi, Baktash; Huber, Alexander M; Linder, Thomas; Röösli, Christof

    2018-01-01

    Intra-operative quantification of the ossicle mobility could provide valuable feedback for the current status of the patient's conductive hearing. However, current methods for evaluation of middle ear mobility are mostly limited to the surgeon's subjective impression through manual palpation of the ossicles. This study investigates how middle ear transfer function is affected by stapes quasi-static stiffness of the ossicular chain. The stiffness of the middle ear is induced by a) using a novel fiber-optic 3-axis force sensor to quantify the quasi-static stiffness of the middle ear, and b) by artificial reduction of stapes mobility due to drying of the middle ear. Middle ear transfer function, defined as the ratio of the stapes footplate velocity versus the ear canal sound pressure, was measured with a single point LDV in two conditions. First, a controlled palpation force was applied at the stapes head in two in-plane (superior-inferior or posterior-anterior) directions, and at the incus lenticular process near the incudostapedial joint in the piston (lateral-medial) direction with a novel 3-axis PalpEar force sensor (Sensoptic, Losone, Switzerland), while the corresponding quasi-static displacement of the contact point was measured via a 3-axis micrometer stage. The palpation force was applied sequentially, step-wise in the range of 0.1-20 gF (1-200 mN). Second, measurements were repeated with various stages of stapes fixation, simulated by pre-load on the stapes head or drying of the temporal bone, and with severe ossicle immobilization, simulated by gluing of the stapes footplate. Simulated stapes fixation (forced drying of 5-15 min) severely decreases (20-30 dB) the low frequency (4 kHz) response. Stapes immobilization (gluing of the footplate) severely reduces (20-40 dB) the low and mid frequency response (force (Force-displacement measurements around the incudostapedial joint showed quasi-static stiffness in the range of 200-500 N/m for normal middle

  17. STUDY OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STABILITY OF THIN-WALLED BARS EXCITED BY PERIODICAL AXIAL EXTERNAL FORCES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora Maria PASĂRE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In these paper, starting from the relations for the displacements and spinning the transversal section of a bar with thin walls of sections opened expressed by the corresponding influence functions and introducing the components of the exterior forces distributed and the moments of the exterior forces distributed due to the inertia forces, the exciting axial forces together with the following effect of these and of the reaction forces of the elastic environment for leaning it may reach to the system of the equations of parametric vibrations under the form of three integral equation These equations may serve for the study of vibrations of the bars, to study the static stability and to study the dynamic stability

  18. Contact forces between a particle and a wet wall at both quasi-static and dynamic state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The contact regime of particle-wall is investigated by the atomic force microscope (AFM and theoretical models. First, AFM is used to measure the cohesive force between a micron-sized grain and a glass plate at quasi-static state under various humidity. It is found out that the cohesive force starts to grow slowly and suddenly increase rapidly beyond a critical Relative Humidity (RH. Second, mathematical models of contacting forces are presented to depict the dynamic process that a particle impacts on a wet wall. Then the energy loss of a falling grain is calculated in comparison with the models and the experimental data from the previous references. The simulation results show that the force models presented here are adaptive for both low and high viscosity fluid films with different thickness.

  19. Magnetic force microscopy of thin film media for high density magnetic recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porthun, Steffen; Porthun, S.; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper discusses various aspect of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) for use in the field of high density magnetic recording. After an introduction of the most important magnetic imaging techniques, an overview is given of the operation and theory of MFM. The developments in instrumentation, MFM

  20. Switching Magnetization Magnetic Force Microscopy — An Alternative to Conventional Lift-Mode MFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambel, Vladimír; Gregušová, Dagmar; Eliáš, Peter; Fedor, Ján; Kostič, Ivan; Maňka, Ján; Ballo, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In the paper we present an overview of the latest progress in the conventional lift-mode magnetic force microscopy (MFM) technique, achieved by advanced MFM tips and by lowering the lift height. Although smaller lift height offers improved spatial resolution, we show that lowered tip-sample distance mixes magnetic, atomic and electric forces. We describe an alternative to the lift-mode procedure - Switching Magnetization Magnetic Force Microscopy [SM-MFM], which is based on two-pass scanning in tapping mode AFM with reversed tip magnetization between the scans. We propose design and calculate the magnetic properties of such SM-MFM tips. For best performance the tips must exhibit low magnetic moment, low switching field, and single-domain state at remanence. The switching field of such tips is calculated for Permalloy hexagons.

  1. Levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J.; Gong, Y. M.; Wang, G.; Zhou, D. J.; Zhao, L. F.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying high and low magnetic fields generated from a superconducting magnet were investigated. The magnetic field intensity of the superconducting magnet was measured when the exciting current was 90 A. The magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field were both calculated. The YBCO bulk was cooled by liquid nitrogen in field-cooling (FC) and zero-field-cooling (ZFC) condition. The results showed that the levitation forces increased with increasing the magnetic field intensity. Moreover, the levitation forces were more dependent on magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field than magnetic field intensity.

  2. Magnetic forces in high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, F. C.

    1990-01-01

    In September 1987 research at Cornell levitated a small rotor on superconducting bearing at 10,000 rpm. In April 1989 a speed of 120,000 rpm was achieved in a passive bearing with no active control. The bearing material used was YBa2Cu3O7. There is no evidence that the rotation speed has any significant effect on the lift force. Magnetic force measurements between a permanent rare-earth magnet and high T(sub c) superconducting material versus vertical and lateral displacements were made. A large hysteresis loop results for large displacements, while minor loops result for small displacements. These minor loops seem to give a slope proportional to the magnetic stiffness, and are probably indicative of flux pinning forces. Experiments of rotary speed versus time show a linear decay in a vacuum. Measurements of magnetic drag forces of a magnetic dipole over a high-T(sub c) superconducting disc of YBCO show that the drag force reaches a constant value, independent of the speed. Dampling of lateral vibrations of levitated rotors were measured which indicates that transverse flux motion in the superconductor will create dissipation. As a result of these force measurements, an optimum shape for the superconductor bearing pads which gives good lateral and axial stability was designed. Recent force measurements on melt-quench processed superconductors indicate a substantial increase in levitation force and magnetic stiffness over free sintered materials. As a result, application of high-T(sub c) superconducting bearings are beginning to show great promise at this time.

  3. Effect of a static magnetic fields and fluoride ions on the antioxidant defense system of mice fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzeja, Ewa; Synowiec-Wojtarowicz, Agnieszka; Stec, Małgorzata; Glinka, Marek; Gawron, Stanisław; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna

    2013-07-18

    The results of studies on the biological influence of magnetic fields are controversial and do not provide clear answers regarding their impact on cell functioning. Fluoride compounds are substances that influence free radical processes, which occur when the reactive forms of oxygen are present. It is not known whether static magnetic fields (SMF) cause any changes in fluoride assimilation or activity. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the potential relationship between magnetic field exposure to, and the antioxidant system of, fibroblasts cultured with fluoride ions. Three chambers with static magnetic fields of different intensities (0.4, 0.6, and 0.7 T) were used in this work. Fluoride ions were added at a concentration of 0.12 mM, which did not cause the precipitation of calcium or magnesium. The results of this study show that static magnetic fields reduce the oxidative stress caused by fluoride ions and normalize the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT). Static magnetic fields modify the energy state of fibroblasts, causing an increase in the ATP concentration and a decrease in the MDA concentration. These results suggest that exposure to fluoride and an SMF improves the tolerance of cells to the oxidative stress induced by fluoride ions.

  4. Effect of a Static Magnetic Fields and Fluoride Ions on the Antioxidant Defense System of Mice Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pawłowska-Góral

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the biological influence of magnetic fields are controversial and do not provide clear answers regarding their impact on cell functioning. Fluoride compounds are substances that influence free radical processes, which occur when the reactive forms of oxygen are present. It is not known whether static magnetic fields (SMF cause any changes in fluoride assimilation or activity. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the potential relationship between magnetic field exposure to, and the antioxidant system of, fibroblasts cultured with fluoride ions. Three chambers with static magnetic fields of different intensities (0.4, 0.6, and 0.7 T were used in this work. Fluoride ions were added at a concentration of 0.12 mM, which did not cause the precipitation of calcium or magnesium. The results of this study show that static magnetic fields reduce the oxidative stress caused by fluoride ions and normalize the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase (CAT. Static magnetic fields modify the energy state of fibroblasts, causing an increase in the ATP concentration and a decrease in the MDA concentration. These results suggest that exposure to fluoride and an SMF improves the tolerance of cells to the oxidative stress induced by fluoride ions.

  5. The change in retentive force of magnetic attachment by abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanjin; Tawada, Yasuyuki; Hata, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Fumihiko

    2008-07-01

    Magnets are frequently applied to removable dentures as retentive attachments. A magnet-retained removable overdenture might be slightly shifted from side to side by eccentric movement in the mouth, and the surface of magnetic attachment may be worn as a result. However, the relationship between the retentive force of magnetic attachment and its surface abrasion has not been reported. The purpose of this research is to investigate this relationship. Ten Mgfit DX 400 magnetic attachments for natural tooth roots were used for this experiment. The magnetic attachments were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin, and ten pairs of specimens were fabricated. A 5-mm repeated gliding motion was applied on each pair of specimens until 30 000, 50 000, or 90 000 cycles had been achieved. The abrasion machine was under 5 kg loading, and the slide speed was 60 times/min. The retentive force of magnetic attachment was measured with a tension gauge at (1) before gliding; (2) after 30 000 gliding cycles; (3)after 50 000 gliding cycles; or (4) after 90 000 gliding cycles. The average change of retentive force of ten magnetic attachments after 30 000, 50 000, and 90 000 gliding cycles was 0.016 N, 0.003 N, and -0.008 N, respectively. The change was statistically analyzed using a paired-sample t test, which showed that the number of gliding cycles did not affect the retentive force of magnetic attachment significantly. The surface of magnetic attachment after gliding was observed by a microscope, and the abrasion of this attachment surface is clearly seen.

  6. Forces between arrays of permanent magnets of basic geometric shapes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokoun, David; Beleggia, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 350, JAN (2014), s. 174-178 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : permanent magnet * cylindrical magnet * attraction force * magnet ostatic interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism Impact factor: 1.970, year: 2014 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0304885313006732/1-s2.0-S0304885313006732-main.pdf?_tid=f6840b24-5115-11e3-9237-00000aab0f6b&acdnat=1384864232_323ac87712560a07

  7. Detecting the gravitational sensitivity of Paramecium caudatum using magnetic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2006-03-01

    Under normal conditions, Paramecium cells regulate their swimming speed in response to the pN level mechanical force of gravity. This regulation, known as gravikinesis, is more pronounced when the external force is increased by methods such as centrifugation. Here we present a novel technique that simulates gravity fields using the interactions between strong inhomogeneous magnetic fields and cells. We are able to achieve variable gravities spanning from 10xg to -8xg; where g is earth's gravity. Our experiments show that the swimming speed regulation of Paramecium caudatum to magnetically simulated gravity is a true physiological response. In addition, they reveal a maximum propulsion force for paramecia. This advance establishes a general technique for applying continuously variable forces to cells or cell populations suitable for exploring their force transduction mechanisms.

  8. Moment switching in nanotube magnetic force probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirtley, J.R.; Deng, Z.; Luan, L.; Yenilmez, E.; Dai, H.; Moler, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic images of high density vertically recorded media using metal-coated carbon nanotube tips exhibit a doubling of the spatial frequency under some conditions (Deng et al 2004 Appl. Phys. Lett. 85 6263). Here we demonstrate that this spatial frequency doubling is due to the switching of the

  9. Magnetic Force Microscopy of Nanostructured Co/Pt Multilayer Films with Perpendicular Magnetization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolaeva, O L; Gusev, N S; Skorohodov, E V; Petrov, Yu V; Sapozhnikov, M V; Mironov, V L

    2017-09-05

    We present the results of magnetic force microscopy investigations of domain structures in multilayer [Co (0.5 nm)/Pt (1 nm)]₅ thin film structures (denoted hereafter as Co/Pt) modified by additional Co capping layers and by ion irradiation. It is demonstrated that a Co capping layer essentially changes the domain structure and decreases the threshold of magnetization reversal, due to the formation of noncollinear magnetization in Co/Pt. It is shown that local irradiation with a focused He⁺ ion beam enables the formation of regions with decreased easy-axis anisotropy (magnetic bubbles) that have the inverse magnetization direction in the demagnetized state of Co/Pt. The experimental results demonstrate that the magnetic bubbles can be switched using a probe of a magnetic force microscope. The possible application of these effects for the development of magnetic logic and data storage systems is discussed.

  10. Ultrasensitive Inertial and Force Sensors with Diamagnetically Levitated Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat-Camps, J.; Teo, C.; Rusconi, C. C.; Wieczorek, W.; Romero-Isart, O.

    2017-09-01

    We theoretically show that a magnet can be stably levitated on top of a punctured superconductor sheet in the Meissner state without applying any external field. The trapping potential created by such induced-only superconducting currents is characterized for magnetic spheres ranging from tens of nanometers to tens of millimeters. Such a diamagnetically levitated magnet is predicted to be extremely well isolated from the environment. We propose to use it as an ultrasensitive force and inertial sensor. A magnetomechanical readout of its displacement can be performed by using superconducting quantum interference devices. An analysis using current technology shows that force and acceleration sensitivities on the order of 10-23 N /√{Hz } (for a 100-nm magnet) and 10-14 g /√{Hz } (for a 10-mm magnet) might be within reach in a cryogenic environment. Such remarkable sensitivities, both in force and acceleration, can be used for a variety of purposes, from designing ultrasensitive inertial sensors for technological applications (e.g., gravimetry, avionics, and space industry), to scientific investigations on measuring Casimir forces of magnetic origin and gravitational physics.

  11. Effects of carbohydrate supplementation on force output and time to exhaustion during static leg contractions superimposed with electromyostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Benjamin; Brown, Stanley P; Webb, Heather E; Kavazis, Andreas N

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of carbohydrate ingestion on force output and time to exhaustion using single leg static contractions superimposed with brief periods of electromyostimulation. Six trained male subjects participated in a randomized, counterbalanced, double-blind study. The subjects were randomly assigned to placebo (PL) or carbohydrate (CHO). The subjects in CHO consumed 1 g of carbohydrate per kilogram of body mass loading dose and 0.17 g of carbohydrate per kilogram of body mass every 6 minutes during the exercise protocol. The PL received an equal volume of a solution made of saccharin and aspartame. The exercise protocol consisted of repeated 20-second static contractions of quadriceps muscle at 50% maximal voluntary contraction followed by 40-second rest until failure occurred. Importantly, the force output during quadriceps maximal voluntary contraction strength with superimposed electromyostimulation was measured in the beginning and every 5 minutes during the last 3 seconds of static contractions throughout the exercise protocol. Venous blood samples were taken preexercise, immediately postexercise, and at 5 minutes postexercise and analyzed for blood lactate. Our results indicate that time to exhaustion (PL = 16.0 ± 8.1 minutes; CHO = 29.0 ± 13.1 minutes) and force output (PL = 3,638.7 ± 524.5 N; CHO = 5,540.1 ± 726.1 N) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in CHO compared with that in PL. Data suggest that carbohydrate ingestion before and during static muscle contractions can increase force output and increase time to exhaustion. Therefore, our data suggest that carbohydrate supplementation before and during resistance exercise might help increase the training volume of athletes.

  12. Static Eccentricity Fault Recognition in Three-Phase Line Start Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Karami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is dedicated to investigating static eccentricity in a three-phase LSPMSM. The modeling of LSPMSM with static eccentricity between stator and rotor is developed using finite element method (FEM. The analytical expression for the permeance and flux components of nonuniform air-gap due to static eccentricity fault is discussed. Various indexes for static eccentricity detection using stator current signal of IM and permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM are presented. Since LSPMSM is composed of a rotor which is a combination of these two motors, the ability of these features is evaluated for static eccentricity diagnosis in LSPMSM. The simulated stator current signal of LSPMSM in the presence of static eccentricity is analyzed in frequency domain using power spectral density (PSD. It is demonstrated that static eccentricity fault generates a series of low frequency harmonic components in the form of sidebands around the fundamental frequency. Moreover, the amplitudes of these components increase in proportion to the fault severity. According to the mentioned observations, an accurate frequency pattern is specified for static eccentricity detection in three-phase LSPMSM.

  13. Effect of static magnetic field on electricity production and wastewater treatment in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qinqin; Zhou, Shaoqi

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a magnetic field (MF) on electricity production and wastewater treatment in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been investigated. Electricity production capacity could be improved by the application of a low-intensity static MF. When a MF of 50 mT was applied to MFCs, the maximum voltage, total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency increased from 523 ± 2 to 553 ± 2 mV, ∼93 to ∼96 %, and ∼80 to >90 %, respectively, while the start-up time and coulombic efficiency decreased from 16 to 10 days and ∼50 to ∼43 %, respectively. The MF effects were immediate, reversible, and not long lasting, and negative effects on electricity generation and COD removal seemed to occur after the MF was removed. The start-up and voltage output were less affected by the MF direction. Nitrogen compounds in magnetic MFCs were nitrified more thoroughly; furthermore, a higher proportion of electrochemically inactive microorganisms were found in magnetic systems. TP was effectively removed by the co-effects of microbe absorption and chemical precipitation. Chemical precipitates were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope capable of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) to be a mixture of phosphate, carbonate, and hydroxyl compounds.

  14. Therapeutic Effects of Static Magnetic Field on Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of static magnetic field (SMF on cutaneous wound healing of Streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats. Methods. 20 STZ-induced diabetic rats were randomly divided into two groups (10 in each group: diabetic rats with SMF exposure group which were exposed to SMF by gluing one magnetic disk of 230 mT intensity and diabetic rats with sham SMF exposure group (sham group. 10 normal Wistar rats were used as the control group. One open circular wound with 2 cm diameter in the dorsum was generated on both normal and diabetic rats and then covered with sterile gauzes. Wound healing was evaluated by wound area reduction rate, mean time to wound closure, and wound tensile strength. Results. The wound area reduction rate in diabetic rats in comparison with the control group was significantly decreased (P<0.01. Compared with sham magnet group, diabetic rats under 230 mT SMF exposure demonstrated significantly accelerated wound area reduction rate on postoperative days 7, 14, and 21 and decreased gross time to wound closure (P<0.05, as well as dramatically higher wound tissue strength (P<0.05 on 21st day. Conclusion. 230 mT SMF promoted the healing of skin wound in diabetic rats and may provide a non-invasive therapeutic tool for impaired wound healing of diabetic patients.

  15. Improving heat generation of magnetic nanoparticles by pre-orientation of particles in a static three tesla magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Mathias M.; Lammel, Christian; Gleich, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Inductive heating of electrically insulating materials like fiberglass reinforced thermoplastics (FRTP) without susceptors is not possible. However, due to their low thermal conductivity a volumetric heat generation method is advisable to reach short heating times to melt this material for reshaping. This can be done with magnetic nanoparticles as susceptors within the thermoplastic of the FRTP using Néel relaxation. During the heating process the particle's magnetic moment rotates with the field while the particle itself is fixed within the thermoplastic. Therefore the heat dissipation of each particle depends on its orientation within the field. To achieve the maximum heat generation of the particles we pre-oriented the particles within a plastic at the best angle to the applied AC field for induction. To do this, five mass percent nanoparticles were dispersed in an epoxy resin, which was then hardened at room temperature in a static three Tesla magnetic field. After its solidification the heating behavior of the sample was compared to a reference sample, which was hardened without a field. The oriented particles showed an increased heating rate when oriented parallel to the applied AC field. The absorption rate was 3.3 times as high as the undirected reference sample. When the alternating electromagnetic field was perpendicular to the oriented particles, the specific absorption rate was similar to that of the reference sample. We compare this result with theory and with calculations from literature, and conduct a numerical simulation.

  16. Experimental Contribution to High-Precision Characterization of Magnetic Forces in Active Magnetic Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølhede, Klaus; Santos, Ilmar

    2007-01-01

    Parameter identification procedures and model validation are major steps toward intelligent machines supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB). The ability of measuring the electromagnetic bearing forces, or deriving them from measuring the magnetic flux, strongly contributes to the model...... contribution of the work is the characterization of magnetic forces by using two different experimental approaches. Such approaches are investigated and described in detail. A special test rig is designed where the four pole AMB is able to generate forces up to 1900 N. The high-precision characterization...... of the magnetic forces is conducted using different experimental tests: (i) by using hall sensors mounted directly on the poles (precise measurements of the magnetic flux) and by an auxiliary system, composed of strain gages and flexible beams attached to the rotor (ii) by measuring the input current and bearing...

  17. The role of static magnetic resonance urography in the evaluation of obstructive uropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusami, Prakash; Bhuvaneswari, Venkatesan; Elangovan, Sundararajan; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N; Ramesh, Ananthakrishnan

    2013-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of static magnetic resonance urography (MRU) in hydronephrosis and to compare parameters of hydronephrosis in MRU with intravenous urography (IVU). Sixty-nine patients were included in this study of which 55 patients with a total of 63 hydronephrotic units underwent both IVU and MRU. MRU was performed on a 1.5 T scanner using heavily T2-weighted sequences. The level, grade, and cause of obstruction on each modality were interpreted by 2 radiologists. These were compared with the final diagnosis based on other appropriate modalities including imaging, intraoperative and histopathologic diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity MRU in detecting hydronephrosis were 95% and 100%, respectively. In determining the level of obstruction, the strength of agreement between IVU and MRU using kappa statistics was κ = 0.66, which corresponds to a good level of agreement. The Spearman correlation coefficient for the grade of hydronephrosis on MRU and IVU was 0.92 (95% confidence interval 0.86-0.95), with a P value of IVU and in 93.8% of the cases by MRU. Along with a high sensitivity and specificity in detecting the presence, level, and grade of hydronephrosis, MRU without contrast also shows a good agreement with IVU. Static MRU can reliably replace IVU when the latter is contraindicated or technically difficult. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Static properties of small Josephson tunnel junctions in an oblique magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, Roberto; Aarøe, Morten; Mygind, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed experimental investigation of the static properties of planar Josephson tunnel junctions in presence of a uniform external magnetic field applied in an arbitrary orientation with respect to the barrier plane. We considered annular junctions, as well as rectangular...... junctions (having both overlap and cross-type geometries) with different barrier aspect ratios. It is shown how most of the experimental findings in an oblique field can be reproduced invoking the superposition principle to combine the classical behavior of electrically small junctions in an in-plane field...... together with the small junction behavior in a transverse field that we recently published [R. Monaco , J. Appl. Phys. 104, 023906 (2008)]. We show that the presence of a transverse field may have important consequences, which could be either voluntarily exploited in applications or present an unwanted...

  19. Correlations Between Magnetic Flux and Levitation Force of HTS Bulk Above a Permanent Magnet Guideway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Zheng, Jun; Zheng, Botian; Qian, Nan; Li, Haitao; Li, Jipeng; Deng, Zigang

    2017-10-01

    In order to clarify the correlations between magnetic flux and levitation force of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk, we measured the magnetic flux density on bottom and top surfaces of a bulk superconductor while vertically moving above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG). The levitation force of the bulk superconductor was measured simultaneously. In this study, the HTS bulk was moved down and up for three times between field-cooling position and working position above the PMG, followed by a relaxation measurement of 300 s at the minimum height position. During the whole processes, the magnetic flux density and levitation force of the bulk superconductor were recorded and collected by a multipoint magnetic field measurement platform and a self-developed maglev measurement system, respectively. The magnetic flux density on the bottom surface reflected the induced field in the superconductor bulk, while on the top, it reveals the penetrated magnetic flux. The results show that the magnetic flux density and levitation force of the bulk superconductor are in direct correlation from the viewpoint of inner supercurrent. In general, this work is instructive for understanding the connection of the magnetic flux density, the inner current density and the levitation behavior of HTS bulk employed in a maglev system. Meanwhile, this magnetic flux density measurement method has enriched present experimental evaluation methods of maglev system.

  20. Basic features of a charged particle dynamics in a laser beam with static axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubik, A.; Małachowski, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, the trajectory and kinetic energy of a charged particle, subjected to interaction from a laser beam containing an additionally applied external static axial magnetic field, have been analyzed. We give the rigorous analytical solutions of the dynamic equations. The obtained analytical solutions have been verified by performing calculations using the derived solutions and the well known Runge-Kutta procedure for solving original dynamic equations. Both methods gave the same results. The simulation results have been obtained and presented in graphical form using the derived solutions. Apart from the laser beam, we show the results for a maser beam. The obtained analytical solutions enabled us to perform a quantitative illustration, in a graphical form of the impact of many parameters on the shape, dimensions and the motion direction along a trajectory. The kinetic energy of electrons has also been studied and the energy oscillations in time with a period equal to the one of a particle rotation have been found. We show the appearance of, so-called, stationary trajectories (hypocycloid or epicycloid) which are the projections of the real trajectory onto the (x, y) plane. Increase in laser or maser beam intensity results in the increase in particle's trajectory dimension which was found to be proportional to the amplitude of the electric field of the electromagnetic wave. However, external magnetic field increases the results in shrinking of the trajectories. Performed studies show that not only amplitude of the electric field but also the static axial magnetic field plays a crucial role in the acceleration process of a charged particle. At the authors of this paper best knowledge, the precise analytical solutions and theoretical analysis of the trajectories and energy gains by the charged particles accelerated in the laser beam and magnetic field are lacking in up to date publications. The authors have an intention to clarify partly some important aspects

  1. Magnets in an electric field: hidden forces and momentum conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Francis

    2017-06-01

    In 1967 Shockley and James addressed the situation of a magnet in an electric field. The magnet is at rest and contains electromagnetic momentum, but there was no obvious mechanical momentum to balance this for momentum conservation. They concluded that some sort of mechanical momentum, which they called "hidden momentum", was contained in the magnet and ascribed this momentum to relativistic effects, a contention that was apparently confirmed by Coleman and Van Vleck. Since then, a magnetic dipole in an electric field has been considered to have this new form of momentum, but this view ignores the electromagnetic forces that arise when an electric field is applied to a magnet or a magnet is formed in an electric field. The electromagnetic forces result in the magnet-charge system gaining electromagnetic momentum and an equal and opposite amount of mechanical momentum so that it is moving in its original rest frame. This moving reference frame is erroneously taken to be the rest frame in studies that purport to show hidden momentum. Here I examine the analysis of Shockley and James and of Coleman and Van Vleck and consider a model of a magnetic dipole formed in a uniform electric field. These calculations show no hidden momentum.

  2. Experimental verification and analytical calculation of unbalanced magnetic force in permanent magnet machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Hun Shin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an exact analytical solution based on Fourier analysis is proposed to compute the unbalanced magnetic force in a permanent magnet machine. The magnetic field solutions are obtained by using a magnetic vector potential and by selecting the appropriate boundary conditions. Based on these field solutions, the force characteristics are also determined analytically. All analytical results were extensively validated with nonlinear two-dimensional finite element analysis and experimental results. Using proposed method, we investigated the influence on the UMF according to machine parameters. Therefore, the proposed method should be very useful in initial design and optimization process of PM machines for UMF analysis.

  3. Manipulation and identification of objects by magnetic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Benjamin

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the results of research and engineering design activities over the past 20 years in the area of identification and manipulation of objects by magnetic forces. The relationship is discussed between the properties of objects and the parameters of magnetic fields, with the view toward being able to create forces for efficient manipulation and identification of different kinds of parts. Some of this information, particularly regarding nonferromagnetic materials, is relatively new and can be used to solve a variety of engineering problems by creating new types of automation systems. Topics covered include identification and orientation of bodies by magnetostatic and electrodynamic forces, electromagnetic recognition and orientation of nonsymmetric parts, and assembly and position control of parts by electromagnetic forces.

  4. Equilibrium force balance and eruptive instabilities in solar-relevant laboratory magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Belova, E. V.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Jara-Almonte, J.

    2013-10-01

    Quasi-statically driven line-tied magnetic flux ropes are studied in the context of storage-and-release eruptions in the solar corona. The Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) facility is utilized to produce these arched low- β flux ropes. Detailed in situ magnetic measurements and supporting MHD simulations permit quantitative analysis of the plasma behavior. We find that the orientation of the applied potential magnetic field arcade with respect to the flux rope footpoints (i.e., the electrodes) is key. With an arcade that is aligned parallel to the footpoints, force free currents induced in the expanding flux rope modify the pressure and tension in the arcade to produce a confined, quiescent discharge and a saturated kink instability. In an obliquely aligned arcade, on the other hand, a sigmoidal equilibrium forms that can dynamically erupt. Both the kink instability and the torus instability are studied as candidate eruptive mechanisms--the latter by varying the vertical gradient of the potential field arcade. New 2D magnetic measurements of these equilibrium and eruptive features facilitate comparisons to solar observations and modeling. This research is supported by DoE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization (CMSO).

  5. Force-free magnetic fields solutions, topology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Gerald E

    1996-01-01

    After an introductory chapter concerned with the history of force-free magnetic fields, and the relation of such fields to hydrodynamics and astrophysics, the book examines the limits imposed by the virial theorem for finite force-free configurations. Various techniques are then used to find solutions to the field equations. The fact that the field lines corresponding to these solutions have the common feature of being "twisted", and may be knotted, motivates a discussion of field line topology and the concept of helicity. The topics of field topology, helicity, and magnetic energy in multiply

  6. Magnetic resonance force detection using a membrane resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzaro, N; Ruchotzke, W; Belding, A; Cardellino, J; Blomberg, E C; McCullian, B A; Bhallamudi, V P; Pelekhov, D V; Hammel, P C

    2016-10-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost magnetic resonance imaging instruments would further broaden the substantial impact of this technology. We report highly sensitive detection of magnetic resonance using low-stress silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes. We use these membranes as low-loss, high-frequency mechanical oscillators and find they are able to mechanically detect spin-dependent forces with high sensitivity enabling ultrasensitive magnetic resonance detection. The high force detection sensitivity stems from their high mechanical quality factor Q∼10(6)[1,2] combined with the low mass of the resonator. We use this excellent mechanical force sensitivity to detect the electron spin magnetic resonance using a SiNx membrane as a force detector. The demonstrated force sensitivity at 300K is 4fN/Hz, indicating a potential low temperature (4K) sensitivity of 25aN/Hz. Given their sensitivity, robust construction, large surface area and low cost, SiNx membranes can potentially serve as the central component of a compact room-temperature ESR and NMR instrument having spatial resolution superior to conventional approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental verification of radial magnetic levitation force on the cylindrical magnets in ferrofluid dampers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenming; Wang, Pengkai; Hao, Ruican; Ma, Buchuan

    2017-03-01

    Analytical and numerical calculation methods of the radial magnetic levitation force on the cylindrical magnets in cylindrical vessels filled with ferrofluid was reviewed. An experimental apparatus to measure this force was designed and tailored, which could measure the forces in a range of 0-2.0 N with an accuracy of 0.001 N. After calibrated, this apparatus was used to study the radial magnetic levitation force experimentally. The results showed that the numerical method overestimates this force, while the analytical ones underestimate it. The maximum deviation between the numerical results and the experimental ones was 18.5%, while that between the experimental results with the analytical ones attained 68.5%. The latter deviation narrowed with the lengthening of the magnets. With the aids of the experimental verification of the radial magnetic levitation force, the effect of eccentric distance of magnets on the viscous energy dissipation in ferrofluid dampers could be assessed. It was shown that ignorance of the eccentricity of magnets during the estimation could overestimate the viscous dissipation in ferrofluid dampers.

  8. Magnetic Force Microscopy Observation of Perpendicular Recording Head Remanence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilekrojanavuti, P.; Saengkaew, K.; Cheowanish, I.; Damrongsak, B.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was utilized to observe the magnetic write head remanence, which is the remaining out-of-plane magnetic field on magnetic write heads after a write current is turned off. This remnant field can write unwanted tracks or erase written tracks on a magnetic media. The write head remanence can also occur from device and slider fabrication, either by applying current to the write coil during the inspection or biasing the external magnetic field to magnetic recording heads. This remanence can attract magnetic nanoparticles, which is suspended in cleaning water or surrounding air, and cause device contamination. MFM images were used to examine locations of the remnant field on the surface of magnetic recording heads. Experimental results revealed that the remanence occurred mostly on the shield and is dependent on the initial direction of magnetic moments. In addition, we demonstrated a potential use of MFM imaging to investigate effects of different etching gases on the head remanence.

  9. Emittance growth due to static and radiative space charge forces in an electron bunch compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Talman

    2009-01-01

    2004 FEL Conference, pp. 18–21, MOCOS05, available at http://www.JACoW.org], a code with similar capabilities. For this comparison an appropriately new, 50 MeV, “standard chicane” is introduced. Unlike CSRTrack (which neglects vertical forces the present simulation shows substantial growth of vertical emittance. But “turning off” vertical forces in the UAL code (to match the CSRTrack treatment brings the two codes into excellent agreement. (iii Results are also obtained for 5 GeV electrons passing through a previously introduced “standard chicane” [Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, CSR Workshop, Berlin 2002, http://www.desy.de/csr] [of the sort needed for linear colliders and free electron lasers (FEL’s currently under design or construction]. Relatively little emittance growth is predicted for typical bunch parameters at such high electron energy. Results are obtained for both round beams and ribbon beams (like those actually needed in practice. Little or no excess emittance growth is found for ribbon bunches compared to round bunches of the same charge and bunch width. The UAL string space charge formulation (like TraFic4 and CSRTrack avoids the regularization step (subtracting the free-space space charge force which is required (to remove divergence in some methods. Also, by avoiding the need to calculate a retarded-time, four-dimensional field history, the computation time needed for realistic bunch evolution calculations is modest. Some theories of bunch dilution, because they ascribe emittance growth entirely to CSR, break down at low energy. In the present treatment, as well as CSR, all free-space Coulomb and magnetic space charge forces (but not image forces, and also the centrifugal space charge force (CSCF are included. Charge-dependent beam steering due to CSCF, as observed recently by Beutner et al. [B. Beutner et al., in Proceedings of FEL Conference, BESSY, Berlin, Germany, 2006, MOPPH009], is also investigated.

  10. Electronic orbital response of regular extended and infinite periodic systems to magnetic fields. I. Theoretical foundations for static case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springborg, Michael; Molayem, Mohammad; Kirtman, Bernard

    2017-09-01

    A theoretical treatment for the orbital response of an infinite, periodic system to a static, homogeneous, magnetic field is presented. It is assumed that the system of interest has an energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied orbitals and a zero Chern number. In contrast to earlier studies, we do not utilize a perturbation expansion, although we do assume the field is sufficiently weak that the occurrence of Landau levels can be ignored. The theory is developed by analyzing results for large, finite systems and also by comparing with the analogous treatment of an electrostatic field. The resulting many-electron Hamilton operator is forced to be hermitian, but hermiticity is not preserved, in general, for the subsequently derived single-particle operators that determine the electronic orbitals. However, we demonstrate that when focusing on the canonical solutions to the single-particle equations, hermiticity is preserved. The issue of gauge-origin dependence of approximate solutions is addressed. Our approach is compared with several previously proposed treatments, whereby limitations in some of the latter are identified.

  11. Electronic orbital response of regular extended and infinite periodic systems to magnetic fields. I. Theoretical foundations for static case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springborg, Michael; Molayem, Mohammad; Kirtman, Bernard

    2017-09-14

    A theoretical treatment for the orbital response of an infinite, periodic system to a static, homogeneous, magnetic field is presented. It is assumed that the system of interest has an energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied orbitals and a zero Chern number. In contrast to earlier studies, we do not utilize a perturbation expansion, although we do assume the field is sufficiently weak that the occurrence of Landau levels can be ignored. The theory is developed by analyzing results for large, finite systems and also by comparing with the analogous treatment of an electrostatic field. The resulting many-electron Hamilton operator is forced to be hermitian, but hermiticity is not preserved, in general, for the subsequently derived single-particle operators that determine the electronic orbitals. However, we demonstrate that when focusing on the canonical solutions to the single-particle equations, hermiticity is preserved. The issue of gauge-origin dependence of approximate solutions is addressed. Our approach is compared with several previously proposed treatments, whereby limitations in some of the latter are identified.

  12. Static and quasi-elastic small angle neutron scattering on biocompatible ionic ferrofluids: magnetic and hydrodynamic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Gazeau, F; Dubois, E; Perzynski, R

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of ionic magnetic fluids (MFs), based on ferrite nanoparticles, dispersed at pH approx 7 either in H sub 2 O or in D sub 2 O. Polarized and non-polarized static small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments in zero magnetic field allow us to study both the magnetic and the nuclear contributions to the neutron scattering. The magnetic interparticle attraction is probed separately from the global thermodynamic repulsion and compares well to direct magnetic susceptibility measurements. The magnetic interparticle correlation is in these fluid samples independent of the probed spatial scale. In contrast, a spatial dependence of the interparticle correlation is evidenced at large PHI by the nuclear structure factor. A model of magnetic interaction quantitatively explains the under-field anisotropy of the SANS nuclear contribution. In a quasi-elastic neutron spin-echo experiment, we probe the Brownian dynamics of translation of the nanoparticles in the range 1.3 sup<=...

  13. Effects of a 4.7 T static magnetic field on fetal development in ICR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Uchida, Soshi; Norimura, Toshiyuki [Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    In order to determine the effects of a 4.7 T static magnetic field (SMF) on fetal development in mice, we evaluated fetal teratogenesis and endochondral ossification following exposure in utero. Pregnant ICR mice were exposed to a 4.7 T SMF from day 7.5 to 9.5 of gestation in a whole-body dose, and sacrificed on day 18.5 of gestation. We examined with incidence of prenatal death, external malformations and fetal skeletal malformations. There were no significant differences observed in the incidence of prenatal death and/or malformations between SMF-exposed mice and control mice. Further, we evaluated the immunoreactivity for the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is implicated in angiogenesis and osteogenesis, in the sternum of fetal mice following magnetic exposure. Our studies also indicated that on day 16.5 of gestation following SMF exposure, the immunoreactivity for VEGF was increased compared to unexposed controls. However, it was decreased in the exposed group compared to the control group on day 18.5 of gestation. DNA and proteoglycan (PG) synthesis were also measured in rabbit costal growth plate chondrocytes in vitro. No significant differences were observed in DNA synthesis between the SMF exposed chondrocytes and the control chondrocytes; however, PG synthesis in SMF exposed chondrocytes increased compared to the controls. Based on these results, we suggest that while SMF exposure promoted the endochondral ossification of chondrocytes, it did not induce any harmful effects on fetal development in ICR mice. (author)

  14. Bioeffects of Static Magnetic Fields: Oxidative Stress, Genotoxic Effects, and Cancer Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Ghodbane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of static magnetic fields (SMFs with living organisms is a rapidly growing field of investigation. The magnetic fields (MFs effect observed with radical pair recombination is one of the well-known mechanisms by which MFs interact with biological systems. Exposure to SMF can increase the activity, concentration, and life time of paramagnetic free radicals, which might cause oxidative stress, genetic mutation, and/or apoptosis. Current evidence suggests that cell proliferation can be influenced by a treatment with both SMFs and anticancer drugs. It has been recently found that SMFs can enhance the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic drugs; this may provide a new strategy for cancer therapy. This review focuses on our own data and other data from the literature of SMFs bioeffects. Three main areas of investigation have been covered: free radical generation and oxidative stress, apoptosis and genotoxicity, and cancer. After an introduction on SMF classification and medical applications, the basic phenomena to understand the bioeffects are described. The scientific literature is summarized, integrated, and critically analyzed with the help of authoritative reviews by recognized experts; international safety guidelines are also cited.

  15. Abstract: Theory of ferromagnetic resonance and static magnetization in ultrathin crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rado, George T.

    1982-03-01

    A theory of the static magnetization orientations ϑ0 and of the ferromagnetic resonance fields Hres in ultrathin (50 Å) monocrystalline films is presented. Both ϑ0 and Hres are shown to depend crucially on the magnetocrystalline surface anisotropy, and a generalization of this anisotropy is proposed. The equation-of-motion of the magnetization is combined with the general exchange boundary condition, and realistic approximations are introduced in order to obtain closed algebraic expressions for ϑ0 and Hres. The spatial dependence of the oscillations in the presently calculated resonance modes do not represent spin waves but nondissipative exponential decays perpendicular to the film surfaces. The film thicknesses 2L are so small that the films are ''beyond spin wave cutoff.'' It is shown that the angular dependence of Hres differs strongly from that predicted by the uniform mode theory and that Hres is a linear function of 1/L rather than independent of L. An extension of the theory to somewhat thicker films is also presented. A full account of this work has been submitted to Physical Review B.

  16. Three-axis force actuator for a magnetic bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondhalekar, Vijay (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention features a three-axis force actuator that axially, radially and rotatably supports a bearing member for frictionless rotation about an axis of rotation generally coincident with a Z-axis. Also featured is a magnetic bearing having such an actuator. The actuator includes an inner member, a magnetic member and a pole assembly having a ring member and four pole extending therefrom. The poles are equi-angular spaced from each other and radially spaced about the Z-axis. The inner member extends along the Z-axis and is a highly magnetic permeable material. The magnetic member is formed about the inner member outer surface, extends along the Z-axis and is configured so one magnetic pole polarity is located at its outer surface and the other polarity pole is located at its inner surface. Preferably, the magnetic member is a radially magnetized permanent magnet. The inner surface of the ring member is magnetically coupled to the magnetic member and a face of each pole is coupled to the bearing member. The magnetic member, the pole assembly, the inner member and the bearing member cooperate to generate a magnetic field that radially and rotatably supports a rotating member secured to the bearing member. The actuator further includes a plurality of electromagnetic coils. Preferably, a coil is formed about each pole and at least 2 coils are formed about the inner member. When energized, the electromagnetic coils generate a modulated magnetic field that stabilizes the rotating member in the desired operational position.

  17. Thermal Conductivity Measurement of Molten Cu-Co Alloy Using an Electromagnetic Levitator Superimposed with a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yuki; Takahashi, Ryuji; Shoji, Eita; Kubo, Masaki; Tsukada, Takao; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of molten Cu-Co alloy with different compositions around the liquidus line temperature was measured by the periodic laser-heating method using an electromagnetic levitator superimposed with a static magnetic field to suppress convection in a levitated droplet sample. During the measurement, a static magnetic field of 10 T was applied to the levitated droplet. To confirm that the strength of the static magnetic field was sufficient to suppress convection in the droplet, numerical simulations were performed for the flow and thermal fields in an electromagnetically levitated droplet under a static magnetic field, and moreover, for the periodic laser-heating method to determine the thermal conductivity. It was found that the thermal conductivity of molten Cu-Co alloy increased gradually with increasing Cu composition up to 80 at. pct, beyond which it increased markedly and reached that of pure Cu. In addition, it was found that the composition dependence of the thermal conductivity can be explainable by the Wiedemann-Franz law.

  18. Antiferromagnetism in the organic conductor bis-tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene hexafluoroarsenate [(TMTSF)2AsF6]: Static magnetic susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kell; Tomkiewicz, Yaffa; Bechgaard, Klaus

    1982-01-01

    The anisotropy in the static magnetic susceptibility of bis-tetramethyltetraselenafulvalene hexafluoroarsenate [(TMTSF)2AsF6] has been investigated above and below the metal-to-insulator transition for a range of fields between 0.5 and 30 kG. The results are consistent with the expectations of a ...

  19. Theorem: A Static Magnetic N-pole Becomes an Oscillating Electric N-pole in a Cosmic Axion Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Christopher T. [Fermilab

    2016-06-15

    We show for the classical Maxwell equations, including the axion electromagnetic anomaly source term, that a cosmic axion field induces an oscillating electric N-moment for any static magnetic N-moment. This is a straightforward result, accessible to anyone who has taken a first year graduate course in electrodynamics.

  20. Vertically polarizing undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Strelnikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of the R&D program of the LCLS-II project, a novel 3.4-meter-long undulator prototype with horizontal magnetic field and dynamic force compensation has recently been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS. Previous steps in this development were the shorter 0.8-meter-long and 2.8-meter-long prototypes. Extensive mechanical and magnetic testing were carried out for each prototype, and each prototype was magnetically tuned using magnetic shims. The resulting performance of the 3.4-meter-long undulator prototype meets all requirements for the LCLS-II insertion device, including limits on the field integrals, phase errors, higher-order magnetic moments, and electron-beam trajectory for all operational gaps, as well as the reproducibility and accuracy of the gap settings.

  1. Oral structure nonspeech motor control in normal, dysarthric, aphasic and apraxic speakers: isometric force and static position control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, M R; Weismer, G; Adams, S; Mulligan, M

    1990-06-01

    This study investigated the isometric force and static position control of the upper lip, lower lip, tongue, jaw, and finger in four subject groups (normal control, apraxia of speech, conduction aphasia, and ataxic dysarthria) at two force and displacement levels. Results from both the force and position tasks suggested that the apraxic and dysarthric groups tended to produce significantly greater instability than the normal group, although the pattern of instability across articulators was not systematic within or across the force and position experiments for subjects within or between groups. The conduction aphasic group produced force and position stability that typically was not significantly different from any of the remaining three groups, suggesting that their force and position stability as indexed in the present study fell somewhere between that of the normal group and the apraxic and dysarthric groups. It is suggested that other analyses of force and position control, such as descriptive accounts of the trial-by-trial time histories, might shed additional light on the speech and orofacial sensorimotor control deficits in persons with apraxia, dysarthria, and conduction aphasia.

  2. Fractionation of Magnetic Microspheres in a Microfluidic Spiral: Interplay between Magnetic and Hydrodynamic Forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dutz

    Full Text Available Magnetic forces and curvature-induced hydrodynamic drag have both been studied and employed in continuous microfluidic particle separation and enrichment schemes. Here we combine the two. We investigate consequences of applying an outwardly directed magnetic force to a dilute suspension of magnetic microspheres circulating in a spiral microfluidic channel. This force is realized with an array of permanent magnets arranged to produce a magnetic field with octupolar symmetry about the spiral axis. At low flow rates particles cluster around an apparent streamline of the flow near the outer wall of the turn. At high flow rates this equilibrium is disrupted by the induced secondary (Dean flow and a new equilibrium is established near the inner wall of the turn. A model incorporating key forces involved in establishing these equilibria is described, and is used to extract quantitative information about the magnitude of local Dean drag forces from experimental data. Steady-state fractionation of suspensions by particle size under the combined influence of magnetic and hydrodynamic forces is demonstrated. Extensions of this work could lead to new continuous microscale particle sorting and enrichment processes with improved fidelity and specificity.

  3. Fractionation of Magnetic Microspheres in a Microfluidic Spiral: Interplay between Magnetic and Hydrodynamic Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutz, S; Hayden, M E; Häfeli, U O

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic forces and curvature-induced hydrodynamic drag have both been studied and employed in continuous microfluidic particle separation and enrichment schemes. Here we combine the two. We investigate consequences of applying an outwardly directed magnetic force to a dilute suspension of magnetic microspheres circulating in a spiral microfluidic channel. This force is realized with an array of permanent magnets arranged to produce a magnetic field with octupolar symmetry about the spiral axis. At low flow rates particles cluster around an apparent streamline of the flow near the outer wall of the turn. At high flow rates this equilibrium is disrupted by the induced secondary (Dean) flow and a new equilibrium is established near the inner wall of the turn. A model incorporating key forces involved in establishing these equilibria is described, and is used to extract quantitative information about the magnitude of local Dean drag forces from experimental data. Steady-state fractionation of suspensions by particle size under the combined influence of magnetic and hydrodynamic forces is demonstrated. Extensions of this work could lead to new continuous microscale particle sorting and enrichment processes with improved fidelity and specificity.

  4. Multiplexed single-molecule force proteolysis measurements using magnetic tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Arjun S; Chai, Jack; Dunn, Alexander R

    2012-07-25

    The generation and detection of mechanical forces is a ubiquitous aspect of cell physiology, with direct relevance to cancer metastasis(1), atherogenesis(2) and wound healing(3). In each of these examples, cells both exert force on their surroundings and simultaneously enzymatically remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). The effect of forces on ECM has thus become an area of considerable interest due to its likely biological and medical importance(4-7). Single molecule techniques such as optical trapping(8), atomic force microscopy(9), and magnetic tweezers(10,11) allow researchers to probe the function of enzymes at a molecular level by exerting forces on individual proteins. Of these techniques, magnetic tweezers (MT) are notable for their low cost and high throughput. MT exert forces in the range of ~1-100 pN and can provide millisecond temporal resolution, qualities that are well matched to the study of enzyme mechanism at the single-molecule level(12). Here we report a highly parallelizable MT assay to study the effect of force on the proteolysis of single protein molecules. We present the specific example of the proteolysis of a trimeric collagen peptide by matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1); however, this assay can be easily adapted to study other substrates and proteases.

  5. Various aspects of magnetic field influence on forced convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pleskacz Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flows in the channels of various geometry can be found everywhere in industrial or daily life applications. They are used to deliver media to certain locations or they are the place where heat may be exchanged. For Authors both points of view are interesting. The enhancement methods for heat transfer during the forced convection are demanded due to a technological development and tendency to miniaturization. At the same time it is also worth to find mechanisms that would help to avoid negative effects like pressure losses or sedimentation in the channel flows. This paper shows and discuss various aspects of magnetic field influence on forced convection. A mathematical model consisted of the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations. In the momentum conservation equation magnetic force term was included. In order to calculate this magnetic force Biot-Savart’s law was utilized. Numerical analysis was performed with the usage of commonly applied software. However, userdefined functions were implemented. The results revealed that both temperature and velocity fields were influenced by the strong magnetic field.

  6. Update on the OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; McQueen, Fiona M; Bird, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an important biomarker across a range of rheumatological diseases. At the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 11 meeting, the MRI task force continued its work of developing and improving the use of MRI outcomes for use in clinical trials...

  7. Design of force-cooled conductors for large fusion magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresner, L.; Lue, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Conductors cooled by supercritical helium in forced convection are under active consideration for large toroidal fusion magnets. One of the central problems in designing such force cooled conductors is to maintain an adequate stability margin while keeping the pumping power tolerably low. A method has been developed for minimizing the pumping power for fixed stability by optimally choosing the matrix-to-superconductor and the metal-to-helium ratios. Such optimized conductors reduce pumping power requirements for fusion size magnets to acceptable limits. Furthermore, the mass flow and hence pumping losses can be varied through a magnet according to the local magnetic field and magnitude of desired stability margin. Force cooled conductors give flexibility in operation, permitting, for example, higher fields to be obtained than originally intended by lowering the bath temperature or increasing the pumping power or both. This flexibility is only available if the pumping power is low to begin with. Scaling laws for the pumping requirement and stability margin as functions of operating current density, number of strands and such physical parameters as stabilizer resistivity and critical current density, have been proved. Numerical examples will be given for design of conductors intended for use in large toroidal fusion magnet systems.

  8. Magnetic force microscopy study on wide adjacent track erasure in perpendicular magnetic write heads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruksasakchai, P.; Saengkaew, K.; Cheowanish, I.; Damrongsak, B.

    2017-09-01

    We used a phase-contrast magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to observe and analyze the failure of magnetic write heads due to the WATEr problem, which limits the off-track performance. During MFM imaging, the magnetic write head was energized by a DC current. The induced out-of-plane magnetic field was then detected by scanning a MFM probe across the surface of the magnetic write head. MFM images were then mapped with WATEr measured results from a spin stand method. Results showed that WATEr effect can be generated by several factors, i.e. the structure of magnetic domains and walls from material discontinuities and the magnetic field leakage at different locations on magnetic write heads. Understanding WATEr mechanisms is useful for design and process development engineers.

  9. The Influence of Static and Rotating Magnetic Fields on Heat and Mass Transfer in Silicon Floating Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, A.; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Szofran, F. R.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in float-zone processing are strongly influenced by convective flows in the zone. They are caused by buoyancy convection, thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection, or artificial sources such as rotation and radio-frequency heating. Flows in conducting melts can be controlled by the use of magnetic fields, either by damping fluid motion with static fields or by generating a defined flow with rotating fields. The possibilities of using static and rotating magnetic fields in silicon floating-zone growth have been investigated by experiments in axial static fields up to 5 T and in transverse rotating magnetic fields up to 7.5 mT. Static fields of a few 100 mT already suppress most striations but are detrimental to the radial segregation by introducing a coring effect. A complete suppression of dopant striations caused by time-dependent thermocapillary convection and a reduction of the coring to insignificant values, combined with a shift of the axial segregation profile toward a more diffusion-limited case, is possible with static fields greater than or equal to 1 T. However, under certain conditions the use of high axial magnetic fields can lead to the appearance of a new type of pronounced dopant striations, caused by thermoelectromagnetic convection. The use of a transverse rotating magnetic field influences the microscopic segregation at quite low inductions, of the order of a few millitesla. The field shifts time- dependent flows and the resulting striation patterns from a broad range of low frequencies at high amplitudes to a few high frequencies at low amplitudes.

  10. Static and dynamic magnetic properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl-based stripe arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmeguenai, M., E-mail: belmeguenai.mohamed@univ-paris13.fr [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris XIII-Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Gabor, M.S. [Center for Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28 RO-400114, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Zighem, F. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris XIII-Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Berling, D. [IS2M, CNRS-LRC 7228, Université de Haute-Alsace, 68057 Mulhouse-Cedex (France); Roussigné, Y. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris XIII-Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Petrisor, T. [Center for Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28 RO-400114, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Chérif, S.M. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris XIII-Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Tiusan, C. [Center for Superconductivity, Spintronics and Surface Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Str. Memorandumului No. 28 RO-400114, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS, Université de Nancy, BP 70239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Brinza, O.; Moch, P. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris XIII-Sorbonne Paris Cité, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2016-02-01

    25 nm to 50 nm Co{sub 2}FeAl (CFA) thick wire arrays with varying widths and spacing have been patterned from continuous CFA films deposited on MgO(001) using e-beam lithography and Ar ion milling. Magneto-optical Kerr effect, transverse bias initial inverse susceptibility and torque measurements reveal that the in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the wires is dominantly monitored by a uniaxial term, in contrast with the continuous films where it is governed by the superposition of a fourfold term and of a smaller uniaxial term. The microstrip ferromagnetic resonance spectra performed using a magnetic field H, applied in the plane of the studied sample along various directions, or perpendicularly to this plane, gave us access to various quantized modes originating from the patterning. In addition, Brillouin light scattering also exhibits quantized modes. A large part of the experimental observations can be quantitatively interpreted as resulting from the demagnetizing terms induced by the geometrical patterning. However, the presented model, simply built on the effect of the demagnetizing field, is not able to give account of all the quantized modes present in the resonance spectra. When H is parallel to the wires, a more complete description is used: it considers the wave-vector quantization induced by the patterning. For the magnetic modes concerned by both approaches, the correspondence between the 2 models is easily established. When H is not parallel to the wires quantitative descriptions of the behavior of the field dependence of the observed modes still can often be performed. Finally, in all the studied patterned samples, the uniform magnetic mode, termed “film mode”, relative to the parent continuous film is observed by ferromagnetic resonance: such a behavior, which has been reported previously, remains to be completely interpreted. - Highlights: • The static and dynamic properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl wire arrays have been studied. • Microstrip

  11. Static and dynamic stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tishin, A.M.; Spichkin, Yu.I.; Bohr, Jakob

    1999-01-01

    can display themselves in static magnetostriction deformations (this effect is not considered here) and in the changing of the magnetic state under mechanical stress. The latter causes variation of the magnetic phase transition temperatures, magnetization and magnetic structures, and leads...

  12. Cooling force on ions in a magnetized electron plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrachya B. Nersisyan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Electron cooling is a well-established method to improve the phase space quality of ion beams in storage rings. In the common rest frame of the ion and the electron beam, the ion is subjected to a drag force and it experiences a loss or a gain of energy which eventually reduces the energy spread of the ion beam. A calculation of this process is complicated as the electron velocity distribution is anisotropic and the cooling process takes place in a magnetic field which guides the electrons. In this paper the cooling force is calculated in a model of binary collisions (BC between ions and magnetized electrons, in which the Coulomb interaction is treated up to second order as a perturbation to the helical motion of the electrons. The calculations are done with the help of an improved BC theory which is uniformly valid for any strength of the magnetic field and where the second-order two-body forces are treated in the interaction in Fourier space without specifying the interaction potential. The cooling force is explicitly calculated for a regularized and screened potential which is both of finite range and less singular than the Coulomb interaction at the origin. Closed expressions are derived for monochromatic electron beams, which are folded with the velocity distributions of the electrons and ions. The resulting cooling force is evaluated for anisotropic Maxwell velocity distributions of the electrons and ions.

  13. Dilation of force-free magnetic flux tubes. [solar magnetic field profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenthal, S.

    1977-01-01

    A general study is presented of the mapping functions which relate the magnetic-field profiles across a force-free rope in segments subjected to various external pressures. The results reveal that if the external pressure falls below a certain critical level (dependent on the flux-current relation which defines the tube), the magnetic profile consists of an invariant core sheathed in a layer permeated by an azimuthal magnetic field.

  14. The magnetic mirror force in plasma fluid models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    In the past decade, there have been several attempts to include the magnetic mirror force in the equation of motion for a plasma in a fluid formalism. In the process, some confusion has been evident regarding when and how this should be done. This problem has been addressed in the literature, but these treatments appear to have been forgotten or misunderstood. The mathematical arguments are summarized so that the physical consequences are readily perceived. It is shown that for an isotropic plasma fluid, in the direction parallel or anti-parallel to a magnetic field, the forces associated with a diverging magnetic field cancel out. Only for anisotropies in the fluid properties does the diverging field influence the plasma dynamics.

  15. Experimental Contribution to High Precision Characterization of Magnetic Forces in Active Magnetic Bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølhede, Klaus; Santos, Ilmar

    2006-01-01

    contribution of the work is the characterization of magnetic forces by using two different experimental approaches. Such approaches are investigated and described in detail. A special test rig is designed where the 4 pole - AMB is able to generate forces up to 1900 N. The high precision characterization...

  16. An analysis of force-reduced toroidal magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, J.L.; Amm, B.C.; Schwartz, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Superconductors alleviate the problem of Joule losses in electromagnetic devices, but an upper limit on large-scale electromagnets remains the difficulty in supporting the Lorentz forces within such a magnet. The problem is magnified if the materials are brittle, such as a ceramic superconductor. Recently, the authors discussed a possible solution to this problem: electromagnets with a force-reduced winding. Producing such a phenomenon may greatly reduce the size and support needed. Force-free finite geometries are not possible due to the limits of the Virial theorem, but present-day magnet support masses are up to an order of magnitude greater than the Virial limit. Here the authors present results from finite element calculations indicating that this design offers substantial improvement over conventional approaches.

  17. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  18. Effect of a static magnetic field on silicon transport in liquid phase diffusion growth of SiGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, N.; Dost, S. [Crystal Growth Laboratory, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    Liquid phase diffusion experiments have been performed without and with the application of a 0.4 T static magnetic field using a three-zone DC furnace system. SiGe crystals were grown from the germanium side for a period of 72 h. Experiments have led to the growth of single crystal sections varying from 0 to 10 mm thicknesses. Examination of the processed samples (single and polycrystalline sections) has shown that the effect of the applied static magnetic field is significant. It alters the temperature distribution in the system, reduces mass transport in the melt, and leads to a much lower growth rate. The initial curved growth interface was slightly flattened under the effect of magnetic field. There were no growth striations in the single crystal sections of the samples. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. An investigation into force-moment calibration techniques applicable to a magnetic suspension and balance system. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskins, Jonathan

    1988-01-01

    The problem of determining the forces and moments acting on a wind tunnel model suspended in a Magnetic Suspension and Balance System is addressed. Two calibration methods were investigated for three types of model cores, i.e., Alnico, Samarium-Cobalt, and a superconducting solenoid. Both methods involve calibrating the currents in the electromagnetic array against known forces and moments. The first is a static calibration method using calibration weights and a system of pulleys. The other method, dynamic calibration, involves oscillating the model and using its inertia to provide calibration forces and moments. Static calibration data, found to produce the most reliable results, is presented for three degrees of freedom at 0, 15, and -10 deg angle of attack. Theoretical calculations are hampered by the inability to represent iron-cored electromagnets. Dynamic calibrations, despite being quicker and easier to perform, are not as accurate as static calibrations. Data for dynamic calibrations at 0 and 15 deg is compared with the relevant static data acquired. Distortion of oscillation traces is cited as a major source of error in dynamic calibrations.

  20. Acute effect of static exercise in patients with aortic regurgitation assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: role of left ventricular remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegret, Josep M; Martinez-Micaelo, Neus; La Gerche, Andre; Franco-Bonafonte, Luis; Rubio-Pérez, Francisco; Calvo, Nahum; Montero, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    In patients with aortic regurgitation (AR), the effect of static exercise (SE) on global ventricular function and AR severity has not been previously studied. Resting and SE cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) were prospectively performed in 23 asymptomatic patients with AR. During SE, we observed a decrease in regurgitant volume in both end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volume in both ventricles, as well as a slight decrease in LV ejection fraction (EF). Interestingly, responses varied depending on the degree of LV remodelling. Among patients with a greater degree of LV remodelling, we observed a decrease in LVEF (56 ± 4 % at rest vs 48 ± 7 % during SE, p = 0.001) as a result of a lower decrease in LVESV (with respect to LVEDV. Among patients with a lower degree of LV remodelling, LVEF remained unchanged. RVEF remained unchanged in both groups. In patients with AR, SE provoked a reduction in preload, LV stroke volume, and regurgitant volume. In those patients with higher LV remodelling, we observed a decrease in LVEF, suggesting a lower LV contractile reserve. • In patients with aortic regurgitation, static exercise reduced preload volume. • In patients with aortic regurgitation, static exercise reduced stroke volume. • In patients with aortic regurgitation, static exercise reduced regurgitant volume. • In patients with greater remodelling, static exercise unmasked a lower contractile reserve. • Effect of static exercise on aortic regurgitation was assessed by cardiac MR.

  1. Direction-Dependent Effects of Combined Static and ELF Magnetic Fields on Cell Proliferation and Superoxide Radical Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naarala, Jonne; Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; McClure, Ian; Chavarriaga, Cristina; Juutilainen, Jukka; Martino, Carlos F

    2017-01-01

    Proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells was stimulated by a nearly vertical 60 or 120 μT static magnetic field (MF) in comparison to cells that were shielded against MFs. When the static field was combined with an extremely low frequency (ELF) MF (18 Hz, 30 μT), proliferation was suppressed by a horizontal but not by a vertical ELF field. As these results suggested that the effects of an ELF MF depend on its direction in relation to the static MF, independent experiments were carried out to confirm such dependence using 50 Hz MFs and a different experimental model. Cytosolic superoxide level in rat glioma C6 cells exposed in the presence of a nearly vertical 33 μT static MF was increased by a horizontal 50 Hz, 30 μT MF, but not affected by a vertical 50 Hz MF. The results suggest that a weak ELF MF may interact with the static geomagnetic field in producing biological effects, but the effect depends on the relative directions of the static and ELF MFs.

  2. Dielectrophoresis-magnetophoresis force driven magnetic nanoparticle movement in transformer oil based magnetic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Chul; Lee, Sangyoup

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic fluid is a stable colloidal mixture contained magnetic nanoparticles coated with a surfactant. Recently, it was found that the fluid has properties to increase heat transfer and dielectric characteristics due to the added magnetic nanoparticles in transformer oils. The magnetic nanoparticles in the fluid experience an electrical force directed toward the place of maximum electric field strength when the electric field is applied. And when the external magnetic field is applied, the magnetic nanoparticles form long chains oriented along the direction of the field. The behaviors of magnetic nanoparticles in both the fields must play an important role in changing the heat transfer and dielectric characteristics of the fluids. In this study, we visualized the movement of magnetic nanoparticles influenced by both the fields applied in-situ. It was found that the magnetic nanoparticles travel in the region near the electrode by the electric field and form long chains along the field direction by the magnetic field. It can be inferred that the movement of magnetic nanoparticles appears by both the fields, and the breakdown voltage of transformer oil based magnetic fluids might be influenced according to the dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles.

  3. Temporal and Spatial Relationship of Flare Signatures and the Force-free Coronal Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmann, J. K.; Veronig, A.; Su, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the plasma and magnetic environment of active region NOAA 11261 on 2011 August 2 around a GOES M1.4 flare/CME (SOL2011-08-02T06:19). We compare coronal emission at the (extreme) ultraviolet and X-ray wavelengths, using SDO AIA and RHESSI images, in order to identify the relative timing and locations of reconnection-related sources. We trace flare ribbon signatures at ultraviolet wavelengths in order to pin down the intersection of previously reconnected flaring loops in the lower solar atmosphere. These locations are used to calculate field lines from three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear force-free magnetic field models, established on the basis of SDO HMI photospheric vector magnetic field maps. Using this procedure, we analyze the quasi-static time evolution of the coronal model magnetic field previously involved in magnetic reconnection. This allows us, for the first time, to estimate the elevation speed of the current sheet’s lower tip during an on-disk observed flare as a few kilometers per second. A comparison to post-flare loops observed later above the limb in STEREO EUVI images supports this velocity estimate. Furthermore, we provide evidence for an implosion of parts of the flaring coronal model magnetic field, and identify the corresponding coronal sub-volumes associated with the loss of magnetic energy. Finally, we spatially relate the build up of magnetic energy in the 3D models to highly sheared fields, established due to the dynamic relative motions of polarity patches within the active region.

  4. Probing static disorder in Arrhenius kinetics by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Li, Jingyuan; Barel, Itay; Lu, Hui; Berne, Bruce J.; Urbakh, Michael; Klafter, Joseph; Fernández, Julio M.

    2010-01-01

    The widely used Arrhenius equation describes the kinetics of simple two-state reactions, with the implicit assumption of a single transition state with a well-defined activation energy barrier ΔE, as the rate-limiting step. However, it has become increasingly clear that the saddle point of the free-energy surface in most reactions is populated by ensembles of conformations, leading to nonexponential kinetics. Here we present a theory that generalizes the Arrhenius equation to include static d...

  5. A New Scale Factor Adjustment Method for Magnetic Force Feedback Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqing Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A new and simple method to adjust the scale factor of a magnetic force feedback accelerometer is presented, which could be used in developing a rotating accelerometer gravity gradient instrument (GGI. Adjusting and matching the acceleration-to-current transfer function of the four accelerometers automatically is one of the basic and necessary technologies for rejecting the common mode accelerations in the development of GGI. In order to adjust the scale factor of the magnetic force rebalance accelerometer, an external current is injected and combined with the normal feedback current; they are then applied together to the torque coil of the magnetic actuator. The injected current could be varied proportionally according to the external adjustment needs, and the change in the acceleration-to-current transfer function then realized dynamically. The new adjustment method has the advantages of no extra assembly and ease of operation. Changes in the scale factors range from 33% smaller to 100% larger are verified experimentally by adjusting the different external coefficients. The static noise of the used accelerometer is compared under conditions with and without the injecting current, and the experimental results find no change at the current noise level, which further confirms the validity of the presented method.

  6. Force-free magnetic fields - Is there a 'loss of equilibrium'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines concept in solar physics that is known as loss of equilibrium in which a sequence of force-free magnetic fields, said to represent a possible quasi-static evolution of solar magnetic fields, reaches a critical configuration beyond which no acceptable solution of the prescribed form exists. This concept is used to explain eruptive phenomena ranging from solar flares to coronal mass ejections. Certain sequences of force-free configurations are discussed that exhibit a loss of equilibrium, and it is argued that the concept is devoid of physical significance since each sequence is defined a way that does not represent an acceptable thought experiment. For example, the sequence may be defined in terms of a global constraint on the boundary conditions, or the evolution of the sequence may require the creation of mgnetic flux that is not connected to the photosphere and is not present in the original configuration. The global constraints typically occur in using the so-called generating function method. An acceptance thought experiment is proposed to specify the field configuration in terms of photospheric boundary conditions comprising the normal component of the field and the field-line connectivity. Consider a magnetic-field sequence that, when described in terms of a generating function, exhibits a loss of equilibrium and show that, when one instead defines the sequence in terms of the corresponding boundary conditions, the sequence is well behaved.

  7. Magnetic Microposts as an Approach to Apply Forces to Living Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nathan J. Sniadecki; Alexandre Anguelouch; Michael T. Yang; Corinne M. Lamb; Zhijun Liu; Stuart B. Kirschner; Yaohua Liu; Daniel H. Reich; Christopher S. Chen

    2007-01-01

    .... To study the cellular response to forces separately, we applied external forces to cells via microfabricated magnetic posts containing cobalt nanowires interspersed among an array of elastomeric...

  8. Chapter 16: Magnetic manipulation for force measurements in cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim O'Brien, E; Cribb, Jeremy; Marshburn, David; Taylor, Russell M; Superfine, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Life is a mechanical process. Cells, tissues, and bodies must act within their environments to grow, divide, move, communicate, and defend themselves. The stiffness and viscosity of cells and biologic materials will vary depending upon a wide variety of variables including for example environmental conditions, activation of signaling pathways, stage of development, gene expression. By pushing and pulling cells or materials such as mucus or extracellular matrix, one can learn about their mechanical properties. By varying the conditions, signaling pathways or genetic background, one can also assess how the response of the cell or material is modulated by that pathway. Magnetic particles are available commercially in many useful sizes, magnetic contents, and surface chemistries. The variety of surface chemistries allow forces to be applied to a specimen through specific linkages such as receptors or particular proteins, allowing the biologist to ask fundamental questions about the role of those linkages in the transduction of force or motion. In this chapter, we discuss the use of a magnetic system designed to apply a wide range of forces and force patterns fully integrated into a high numerical aperture inverted fluorescence microscope. Fine, thin and flat magnetic poles allow the use of high magnification microscope objectives, and flexible software to control the direction and pattern of applied forces supports a variety of experimental situations. The system can be coupled with simple video acquisition for medium-bandwidth, two-dimensional particle tracking. Alternatively, the system can be coupled with a laser tracking and position feedback system for higher resolution, high bandwidth, three-dimensional tracking.

  9. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

    2012-04-01

    benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011

  10. Static Magnetic Field Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Pulp Cells by Affecting Cell Membrane Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chih Hsieh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the causes of dental pulpitis is lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced inflammatory response. Following pulp tissue inflammation, odontoblasts, dental pulp cells (DPCs, and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs will activate and repair damaged tissue to maintain homeostasis. However, when LPS infection is too serious, dental repair is impossible and disease may progress to irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether static magnetic field (SMF can attenuate inflammatory response of dental pulp cells challenged with LPS. In methodology, dental pulp cells were isolated from extracted teeth. The population of DPSCs in the cultured DPCs was identified by phenotypes and multilineage differentiation. The effects of 0.4 T SMF on DPCs were observed through MTT assay and fluorescent anisotropy assay. Our results showed that the SMF exposure had no effect on surface markers or multilineage differentiation capability. However, SMF exposure increases cell viability by 15%. In addition, SMF increased cell membrane rigidity which is directly related to higher fluorescent anisotropy. In the LPS-challenged condition, DPCs treated with SMF demonstrated a higher tolerance to LPS-induced inflammatory response when compared to untreated controls. According to these results, we suggest that 0.4 T SMF attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response to DPCs by changing cell membrane stability.

  11. Demicellization of Polyethylene Oxide in Water Solution under Static Magnetic Field Exposure Studied by FTIR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Calabrò

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available FTIR spectroscopy was used to investigate the alterations of the vibration bands in the mid-infrared region of Polyethylene oxide in aqueous solution at 25 mg/mL concentration under exposure up to 4 h to a static magnetic field at 200 mT. FTIR spectroscopic analysis of PEO solution in the range 3500–1000 cm−1 evidenced the stretching vibrations of ether band, C–H symmetric-antisymmetric and bending vibrations of methylene groups, and the C–O–C stretching band. A significant decrease in intensity of symmetric and asymmetric stretching CH2 vibration bands occurred after 2 h and 4 h of exposure, followed by a significant decrease in intensity of scissoring bending in plane CH2 vibration around 1465 cm−1. Finally, the C–O–C stretching band around 1080 cm−1 increased in intensity after 4 h of exposure. This result can be attributed to the increase of formation of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding that occurred in PEO aqueous solution after SMF exposure, due to the reorientation of PEO chain after exposure to SMF. In this scenario, the observed decrease in intensity of CH2 vibration bands can be understood as well considering that the reorientation of PEO chain under the applied SMF induces PEO demicellization.

  12. Efficacy of Static Magnetic Field for Locomotor Activity of Experimental Osteopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Taniguchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the effectiveness of applying a static magnetic field (SMF for increasing bone mineral density (BMD, we assessed the degree of osteopenia by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA, the metabolism measuring system, and histological examination of bone tissue in an ovariectomized (OVX rat model. Thirty-six female Wistar rats (8 weeks old, 160–180 g were divided into three groups. The rats in the OVX-M group were exposed to SMF for 12 weeks after ovariectomy. The ovariectomized rats in the OVX-D group were not exposed to SMF as a control. The rats in the normal group received neither ovariectomy nor exposure to SMF. Twelve-week exposure to SMF in the OVX-M group inhibited the reduction in BMD that was observed in the OVX-D group. Moreover, in the OVX rats, before exposure to SMF, there was no clear difference in the level of locomotor activity between the active and resting phases, and the pattern of locomotor activity was irregular. After exposure of OVX rats to SMF, the pattern of locomotor activity became diphasic with clear active and resting phases, as was observed in the normal group. In the OVX-M group, the continuity of the trabecular bone was maintained more favorably and bone mass was higher than the respective parameters in the OVX-D group. These results demonstrate that exposure to SMF increased the level of locomotor activity in OVX rats, thereby increasing BMD.

  13. Study on Application of Static Magnetic Field for Adjuvant Arthritis Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Taniguchi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the effectiveness of the application of static magnetic field (SMF on pain relief, we performed a study on rats with adjuvant arthritis (AA. Sixty female Sprague–Dawley (SD rats (age: 6 weeks, body weight: approximately 160 g were divided into three groups [SMF-treated AA rats (Group I, non-SMF-treated AA rats (Group II and control rats (Group III]. The SD rats were injected in the left hind leg with 0.6 mg/0.05 ml Mycobacterium butyrium to induce AA. The rats were bred for 6 months as chronic pain model. Thereafter, the AA rats were or were not exposed to SMF for 12 weeks. We assessed the changes in the tail surface temperature, locomotor activity, serum inflammatory marker and bone mineral density (BMD using thermography, a metabolism measuring system and the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA method, respectively. The tail surface temperature, locomotor activity and femoral BMD of the SMF-exposed AA rats were significantly higher than those of the non-SMF-exposed AA rats, and the serum inflammatory marker was significantly lower. These findings suggest that the pain relief effects are primarily due to the increased blood circulation caused by the rise in the tail surface temperature. Moreover, the pain relief effects increased with activity and BMD of the AA rats.

  14. Prospects of airflow control by a gliding arc in a static magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcon, N; Benard, N; Braud, P; Touchard, G; Moreau, E [Laboratoire d' Etudes Aerodynamiques (LEA), Universite de Poitiers, ENSMA, CNRS Bld Marie et Pierre Curie, Teleport 2, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Mizuno, A [Toyohashi University of Technology, Japan, Hibarigaoka, Tempaku-cho, Toyoashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2008-10-21

    The electrical properties of a gliding arc operating in air at atmospheric pressure are studied to evaluate its possible applications to flow control. The electromechanical behaviour of the discharge travelling at 4 m s{sup -1} along diverging electrodes in a static magnetic field is analysed in detail. Two different methods are proposed to evaluate the velocity of the arc. An initial estimation is based on the arc current evolution during its transit and additional information is gained from fast digital imaging with a CCD camera. The displacement of the arc observed with short exposure time corroborates the electrical measurement and also exhibits the existence of luminous points on the cathode that can slow down the arc motion. In addition, a particle image velocimetry system is used to investigate the interaction between the gliding arc and the surrounding air. The displacement of the low current glidarc creates a low velocity convection (around 0.2 m s{sup -1}) in the gas and also generate faster structures up to 1 m s{sup -1} directly in front of the discharge. These electromechanical effects could be used to manipulate the boundary layer region of various aerodynamic shapes.

  15. On the unsteady-motion theory of magnetic forces for maglev

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Cai, Y.

    1993-11-01

    Motion-dependent magnetic forces are the key elements in the study of magnetically levitated vehicle (maglev) system dynamics. In the past, most maglev-system designs were based on a quasisteady-motion theory of magnetic forces. This report presents an experimental and analytical study that will enhance our understanding of the role of unsteady-motion-dependent magnetic forces and demonstrate an experimental technique that can be used to measure those unsteady magnetic forces directly. The experimental technique provides a useful tool to measure motion-dependent magnetic forces for the prediction and control of maglev systems.

  16. A magnetic force microscopy study of the magnetic reversal of a single Fe nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T; Wang, Y; Fu, Y; Hasegawa, T; Li, F S; Saito, H; Ishio, S

    2009-03-11

    The magnetization reversal properties of a single 60 nm diameter Fe nanowire were investigated with an in-field magnetic force microscope (MFM). MFM images were observed in a successively decreasing applied field, at various angles between the applied field and the nanowire axis. The results show that the magnetization undergoes a sharp reversal at various angles. When the applied field deviates from the nanowire axis, before complete magnetization reversal, a coherent rotation of magnetic moments inside the nanowire and a stable vortex state at the end of the nanowire are exhibited. The angle dependence of the switching field can be closely described by a curling model, despite the fact the magnetization reversal process is not identical to this model.

  17. Enhancing and targeting nucleic acid delivery by magnetic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Christian; Anton, Martina; Rudolph, Carsten; Rosenecker, Joseph; Krötz, Florian

    2003-08-01

    Insufficient contact of inherently highly active nucleic acid delivery systems with target cells is a primary reason for their often observed limited efficacy. Physical methods of targeting can overcome this limitation and reduce the risk of undesired side effects due to non-target site delivery. The authors and others have developed a novel means of physical targeting, exploiting magnetic force acting on nucleic acid vectors associated with magnetic particles in order to mediate the rapid contact of vectors with target cells. Here, the principles of magnetic drug and nucleic acid delivery are reviewed, and the facts and potentials of the technique for research and therapeutic applications are discussed. Magnetically enhanced nucleic acid delivery - magnetofection - is universally applicable to viral and non-viral vectors, is extraordinarily rapid, simple and yields saturation level transfection at low dose in vitro. The method is useful for site-specific vector targeting in vivo. Exploiting the full potential of the technique requires an interdisciplinary research effort in magnetic field physics, magnetic particle chemistry, pharmaceutical formulation and medical application.

  18. Evolving force-free magnetic fields. III - States of nonequilibrium and the preflare stage. [in solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, B. C.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers whether a neighboring magnetostatic equilibrium exists to allow a magnetic field initially in a force-free configuration to accommodate any imposed weak pressure. The following problem is treated. The foot points of the field are fixed and the plasma is frozen into the field lines under the approximation of infinite electrical conductivity. A weak pressure is introduced. It is determined infinitesimal plasma displacements exist to adjust the field lines to a new equilibrium without changing the field line connectivity. The analysis is carried out for the bipolar force-free fields forming one of two evolutionary sequences modeling the development of the preflare stage. It was found that for the force-free field corresponding to the quasi-static stage of evolution, the neighboring magnetostatic equilibrium always exists and the imposed gas pressure can be accommodated with a slight departure of the field from being exactly force free.

  19. Equilibrium of magnetic fields with arbitrary interweaving of the lines of force. I - Discontinuities in the torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1986-01-01

    Consideration is given to the static force-free equilibrium of a magnetic field in which all of the lines of force connect without knotting between parallel planes. The field is formed by continuous deformation from an initial uniform field, and is conventiently described in terms of the scalar function psi, which is the stream function for the incompressible wrapping and interweaving of the lines of force. Local compression and expansion of the lines of force is described in terms of the scalar function Phi. Equilibrium in the field requires satisfaction of two independent equations which cannot be accomplished without the full freedom of both psi and Phi. It is shown that discontinuities in the torsional characteristics of the lines occur when psi is predetermined by an arbitrary pattern. Discontinuities in the winding pattern of the lines can lead to discontinuities in the associated current sheets.

  20. Force-free magnetic fields - The magneto-frictional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W. H.; Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    The problem under discussion is that of calculating magnetic field configurations in which the Lorentz force j x B is everywhere zero, subject to specified boundary conditions. We choose to represent the magnetic field in terms of Clebsch variables in the form B = grad alpha x grad beta. These variables are constant on any field line so that each field line is labeled by the corresponding values of alpha and beta. When the field is described in this way, the most appropriate choice of boundary conditions is to specify the values of alpha and beta on the bounding surface. We show that such field configurations may be calculated by a magneto-frictional method. We imagine that the field lines move through a stationary medium, and that each element of magnetic field is subject to a frictional force parallel to and opposing the velocity of the field line. This concept leads to an iteration procedure for modifying the variables alpha and beta, that tends asymptotically towards the force-free state. We apply the method first to a simple problem in two rectangular dimensions, and then to a problem of cylindrical symmetry that was previously discussed by Barnes and Sturrock (1972). In one important respect, our new results differ from the earlier results of Barnes and Sturrock, and we conclude that the earlier article was in error.

  1. High Force Magnetic Levitation Using Magnetized Superconducting Bulks as a Field Source for Bearing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A.; Giunchi, G.; Albisetti, A. Figini; Shi, Y.; Hopkins, S. C.; Palka, R.; Cardwell, D. A.; Glowacki, B. A.

    The ability of high temperature superconducting bulks to trap magnetic fields of several tesla allows them to generate very high levitation force. This paper reports the development of a bulk-bulk superconducting rotary bearing design which uses superconducting bulks on both the rotor and the stator. An evaluation is made of the effectiveness of pulsed fields for magnetizing bulks. Modeling of the bulks using the perfectly trapped flux model is also reported to assess the limits of the bearing design. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a (RE)BCO-MgB2 bulk bearing capable of force densities of the order of 100N/cm2. The design and construction of a unique system capable of magnetizing a 25 mm (RE)BCO bulk and measuring levitation force between this bulk and a coaxial MgB2 hollow cylinder is outlined.

  2. Magnetic force induced tristability for dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Qiang; Li, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Zou, Hong-Xiang; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) with three stable states. By introducing magnetic forces and coupling them with two cone dielectric elastomer (DE) films, an inherent tristability for the DEA is obtained with a compact design. It is easy to switch between the three stable states by controlling the voltages applied to the DE films. A theoretical model of the system’s potential energy that contains the free energy of the DEs and the potential energy of the applied magnetic field was developed for the tristable mechanism. The experimental results demonstrate that controllable transitions between the three stable states can be achieved with this design by applying over-critical voltages to the various DE films. The maximum dynamic range of the DEA can exceed 53.8% of the total length of the device and the DE’s creep speed was accelerated under the action of the magnetic field.

  3. Force-free magnetic fields - Generating functions and footpoint displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Richard; Verma, Ritu

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents analytic and numerical calculations that explore equilibrium sequences of bipolar force-free magnetic fields in relation to displacments of their magnetic footpoints. It is shown that the appearance of magnetic islands - sometimes interpreted as marking the loss of equilibrium in models of the solar atmosphere - is likely associated only with physically unrealistic footpoint displacements such as infinite separation or 'tearing' of the model photosphere. The work suggests that the loss of equilibrium in bipolar configurations, sometimes proposed as a mechanism for eruptive solar events, probably requires either fully three-dimensional field configurations or nonzero plasma pressure. The results apply only to fields that are strictly bipolar, and do not rule out equilibrium loss in more complex structures such as quadrupolar fields.

  4. The rate of separation of magnetic lines of force in a random magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The mixing of magnetic lines of force, as represented by their rate of separation, as a function of distance along the magnetic field, is considered with emphasis on neighboring lines of force. This effect is particularly important in understanding the transport of charged particles perpendicular to the average magnetic field. The calculation is carried out in the approximation that the separation changes by an amount small compared with the correlation scale normal to the field, in a distance along the field of a few correlation scales. It is found that the rate of separation is very sensitive to the precise form of the power spectrum. Application to the interplanetary and interstellar magnetic fields is discussed, and it is shown that in some cases field lines, much closer together than the correlation scale, separate at a rate which is effectively as rapid as if they were many correlation lengths apart.

  5. Force analysis of magnetic bearings with power-saving controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Most magnetic bearing control schemes use a bias current with a superimposed control current to linearize the relationship between the control current and the force it delivers. For most operating conditions, the existence of the bias current requires more power than alternative methods that do not use conventional bias. Two such methods are examined which diminish or eliminate bias current. In the typical bias control scheme it is found that for a harmonic control force command into a voltage limited transconductance amplifier, the desired force output is obtained only up to certain combinations of force amplitude and frequency. Above these values, the force amplitude is reduced and a phase lag occurs. The power saving alternative control schemes typically exhibit such deficiencies at even lower command frequencies and amplitudes. To assess the severity of these effects, a time history analysis of the force output is performed for the bias method and the alternative methods. Results of the analysis show that the alternative approaches may be viable. The various control methods examined were mathematically modeled using nondimensionalized variables to facilitate comparison of the various methods.

  6. Static magnetic fields inhibit proliferation and disperse subcellular localization of gamma complex protein3 in cultured C2C12 myoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SeungChan; Im, Wooseok

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic fields may delay the rate of cell cycle progression, and there are reports that magnetic fields induce neurite outgrowth in cultured neuronal cells. To demonstrate whether magnetic field also effects on myoblast cells in cell growth, C2C12 cell lines were cultured and 2000G static magnetic field was applied. After 48 h of incubation, both the WST-1 assay (0.01 magnetic fields inhibit the proliferation of cultured C2C12 cells. Immunocytochemistry for alpha and tubulin gamma complex protein (TUBA and GCP3) was made and applying a static magnetic field-dispersed tubulin GCP3 formation, a intracellular apparatus for tubulin structuring in cell division. This protein expression was not altered by western blot. This study indicates that applying a static magnetic field alters the subcellular localizing of GCP3, and may delay the cell growth in cultured C2C12 myoblast cells.

  7. Effect of static deformation and external forces on the oscillations of levitated droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayana, P. V. R.; Bayazitoglu, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The oscillations of an aspherical droplet subjected to different external forces are considered. For an arbitrary shape deformation, it is shown that the frequency spectrum splits into (2l - 1) peaks for a mode l oscillation, and the splitting of the frequency spectrum is calculated for mode 2, 3, and 4 oscillations. The deformation is then treated as a consequence of a general external force, and the frequency split is obtained in terms of the external force parameters. Droplets levitated by acoustic, electromagnetic, and combined acoustic-electromagnetic forces are considered in particular, and it is shown that the effects of asphericity adequately explain the splitting of the frequency spectrum observed commonly in experiments. The interpretation of spectra with regard to accurate surface tension measurement using the oscillations of levitated droplets is discussed, and the results applied to some previous experimental results. It is shown that the accuracy of surface tension measurements can improve if the asphericity caused by the levitating force, and the resulting frequency split, are taken into account.

  8. Static Metrological Characterization of a Ferrimagnetic Resonance Transducer for Real-Time Magnetic Field Markers in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Arpaia, P; Caspers, F; Golluccio, G; Petrone, C

    2011-01-01

    The metrological characterization of a magnetic field transducer based on ferrimagnetic resonance for real-time markers in particle accelerators is reported. The transducer is designed to measure the magnetic field with an uncertainty of ± 10-5 T. A case study on the new real-time field monitoring system for the CERN accelerators highlighting the performance improvement achieved through the new ferrimagnetic transducer is described. Preliminary experimental results of the characterization for static and dynamic fields are discussed.

  9. Soil Greenhouse Gas Flux Measurements with Automated and Manual Static Chambers, Forced Diffusion Chamber, and Concentration Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, L.; Oikawa, P. Y.; Géli, M.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Knox, S. H.; Nickerson, N.; McArthur, G.; Creelman, C.; Saad, N.; Alstad, K. P.; Arata, C.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Silver, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate measurements of soil greenhouse gas fluxes are critical for determining the role of ecosystem dynamics, both natural and managed, in climate change. We compared concentration profile methods with static, forced diffusion, and automated flux chambers using a combination of infrared gas analyzers (IRGA), gas chromatography, and cavity ring-down laser absorption spectroscopy (Picarro G2508) during field campaigns in managed ecosystems in California. At a drained peatland pasture site, we observed large differences between methods (fluxes ranged between 2-15 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). However, low temporal/high spatial replication measurements (manual LI6400 chamber measurements; n=6 collars) encompassed the full range of CO2 fluxes observed across all other methods. This suggests that the majority of variability in CO2 emissions was due to high spatial variation in soil respiration and not due to methodological differences across measurement systems. At a dry upland pasture site, water, nitrate solution and manure were applied during the experimental period to expand the range of greenhouse fluxes. Preliminary results showed good agreement of gas fluxes between static and automatic chamber sampling. We observed large CO2 and N2O fluxes after manure application with both methods. The two chamber types were highly significantly correlated for N2O (slope=0.74, r2=0.94). Mean CH4 fluxes measured by static chambers was -0.36 μg cm-2 h-1, similar to the -0.57 μg cm-2 h-1 measured by the automatic chamber and Picarro analyzer during the study period. Overall, our results suggest that both automated and static chamber methods are in good agreement, but automated chambers are advantageous for capturing diel dynamics and pulse responses to experimental treatments. Our results also highlight the importance of spatial replication, which can be difficult to achieve using expensive automated chambers. We suggest future research efforts to seek a combination of high spatially

  10. High resolution magnetic force microscopy using focused ion beam modified tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, G.N.; Siekman, Martin Herman; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscope tips coated by the thermal evaporation of a magnetic 30 nm thick Co film have been modified by focused ion beam milling with Ga+ ions to produce tips suitable for magnetic force microscopy. Such tips possess a planar magnetic element with high magnetic shape anisotropy, an

  11. The Role of Moderate Static Magnetic Fields on Biomineralization of Osteoblasts on Sulfonated Polystryene Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X Ba; M Hadjiargyrou; E DiMasi; Y Meng; M Simon; Z Tan; M Rafailovich

    2011-12-31

    We have investigated the effects of moderate static magnetic fields (SMFs) on murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts, and found that they enhance proliferations and promote differentiation. The increase in proliferation rates in response to SMFs was greater in cultures grown on partially sulfonated polytstyrene (SPS, degree of sulfonation: 33%) than in cultures grown on tissue culture plastic. We have previously shown that when the degree of sulfonation exceeded a critical value (12%) [1], spontaneous fibrillogenesis occured which allowed for direct observation of the ECM fibrillar organization under the influence of external fields. We found that the ECM produced in cultures grown on the SPS in the presence of the SMFs assembled into a lattice with larger dimensions than the ECM of the cultures grown in the absence of SMFs. During the early stages of the biomineralization process (day 7), the SMF exposed cultures also templated mineral deposition more rapidly than the control cultures. The rapid response is attributed to orientation of diamagnetic ECM proteins already present in the serum, which could then initiate further cellular signaling. SMFs also influenced late stage osteoblast differentiation as measured by the increased rate of osteocalcin secretion and gene expression beginning 15 days after SFM exposure. This correlated with a large increase in mineral deposition, and in cell modulus. GIXD and EDXS analysis confirmed early deposition of crystalline hydroxyapatite. Previous studies on the effects of moderate SMF had focused on cellular gene and protein expression, but did not consider the organization of the ECM fibers. Our ability to form these fibers has allowed us explore this additional effect and highlight its significance in the initiation of the biomineralization process.

  12. Effect of self-induced magnetic force in a coronal loop transient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, T.; Dryer, M.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of the self-induced magnetic force in a section of a model coronal loop is examined and it is found that an axial current produces a pointwise magnetic force in the direction toward the axis of the loop. The direction of the pointwise magnetic force indicates that the effect of this force, acting alone, is to cause a contraction of the cross section of the magnetic loop toward the axis, but not the translation motion of the loop as a whole. It is concluded that forces other than the self-induced magnetic force, such as thermal force of pressure gradient or extra-induced magnetic force of magnetic buoyancy, must be involved in the acceleration mechanisms for the heliocentrifugal motion of coronal transients.

  13. The self-force on a non-minimally coupled static scalar charge outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Demian H J; Tsokaros, Antonios A; Wiseman, Alan G [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2007-03-07

    The finite part of the self-force on a static, non-minimally coupled scalar test charge outside a Schwarzschild black hole is zero. This result is determined from the work required to slowly raise or lower the charge through an infinitesimal distance. Unlike similar force calculations for minimally-coupled scalar charges or electric charges, we find that we must account for a flux of field energy that passes through the horizon and changes the mass and area of the black hole when the charge is displaced. This occurs even for an arbitrarily slow displacement of the non-minimally coupled scalar charge. For a positive coupling constant, the area of the hole increases when the charge is lowered and decreases when the charge is raised. The fact that the self-force vanishes for a static, non-minimally coupled scalar charge in Schwarzschild spacetime agrees with a simple prediction of the Quinn-Wald axioms. However, Zel'nikov and Frolov computed a non-vanishing self-force for a non-minimally coupled charge. Our method of calculation closely parallels the derivation of Zel'nikov and Frolov, and we show that their omission of this unusual flux is responsible for their (incorrect) result. When the flux is accounted for, the self-force vanishes. This correction eliminates a potential counter example to the Quinn-Wald axioms. The fact that the area of the black hole changes when the charge is displaced brings up two interesting questions that did not arise in similar calculations for static electric charges and minimally coupled scalar charges. (1) How can we reconcile a decrease in the area of the black hole horizon with the area theorem which concludes that {delta}Area{sub horizon} {>=} 0? The key hypothesis of the area theorem is that the stress-energy tensor must satisfy a null-energy condition T{sup {alpha}}{sup {beta}}l{sub {alpha}}l{sub {beta}} {>=} 0 for any null vector l{sub {alpha}}. We explicitly show that the stress-energy associated with a non

  14. The effect of low static magnetic field on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential of human adipose stromal/stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marędziak, Monika, E-mail: monika.maredziak@gmail.com [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland); Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Śmieszek, Agnieszka, E-mail: smieszek.agnieszka@gmail.com [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Faculty of Biology, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland); Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A., E-mail: krtomaszewski@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow (Poland); Lewandowski, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.lewandowski@pwr.wroc.pl [Institute of Materials Science and Applied Mechanics, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wroclaw (Poland); Marycz, Krzysztof, E-mail: krzysztofmarycz@interia.pl [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wrocław (Poland); Faculty of Biology, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Wrocław (Poland)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of static magnetic field (SMF) on the osteogenic properties of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). In this study in seven days viability assay we examined the impact of SMF on cells proliferation rate, population doubling time, and ability to form single-cell derived colonies. We have also examined cells' morphology, ultrastructure and osteogenic properties on the protein as well as mRNA level. We established a complex approach, which enabled us to obtain information about SMF and hASCs potential in the context of differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. We demonstrated that SMF enhances both viability and osteogenic properties of hASCs through higher proliferation factor and shorter population doubling time. We have also observed asymmetrically positioned nuclei and organelles after SMF exposition. With regards to osteogenic properties we observed increased levels of osteogenic markers i.e. osteopontin, osteocalcin and increased ability to form osteonodules with positive reaction to Alizarin Red dye. We have also shown that SMF besides enhancing osteogenic properties of hASCs, simultaneously decreases their ability to differentiate into adipogenic lineage. Our results clearly show a direct influence of SMF on the osteogenic potential of hASCs. These results provide key insights into the role of SMF on their cellular fate and properties. - Graphical abstract: Influence of static magnetic field on viability and differentiation properties of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells. Abbreviations: SMF – static magnetic field; hASCs – human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells; PF – proliferation factor; PDT – population doubling time; CFU-E –> colony forming unit efficiency; OPN – osteopontin; OCL – osteocalcin; Col – collagen type I; BMP-2 – bone morphogenetic protein 2; Ca – calcium; P – phosphorus. - Highlights: • Effects of static

  15. Magnetic resonance force microscopy using ferromagnetic resonance of a magnetic tip excited by microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yukinori; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The present work proposes magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) based on ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) modulation of a magnetic tip using microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator instead of using conventional microwave irradiation by an external antenna. In this MRFM, the coaxial resonator is electrically connected to the magnetic cantilever tip, which enables simple implementation of FMR excitation of a magnetic tip in conventional magnetic force microscopy. The FMR frequency of the tip can be easily extracted from the reflection spectrum of a transmission line connected to the magnetic tip. The excitation of tip FMR is confirmed from the microwave frequency dependence of the mechanical response of the tip oscillation. This MRFM is effective for extracting the magnetic interaction force near a sample surface without perturbation of its magnetic state. Nanometer-scale imaging of magnetic domain structures on a demagnetized thin-film permanent magnet is successfully demonstrated.

  16. A three-dimensional finite element evaluation of magnetic attachment attractive force and the influence of the magnetic circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumano, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Yoshinori; Kanbara, Ryo; Takada, Yukyo; Ochiai, Kent T; Tanaka, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    The finite element method has been considered to be excellent evaluative technique to study magnetic circuit optimization. The present study analyzed and quantitatively evaluated the different effects of magnetic circuit on attractive force and magnetic flux density using a three-dimensional finite element method for comparative evaluation. The diameter of a non-magnetic material in the shield disk of a magnetic assembly was variably increased by 0.1 mm to a maximum 2.0 mm in this study design. The analysis results demonstrate that attractive force increases until the diameter of the non-magnetic spacing material reaches a diameter of 0.5 mm where it peaks and then decreases as the overall diameter increases over 0.5 mm. The present analysis suggested that the attractive force for a magnetic attachment is optimized with an appropriate magnetic assembly shield disk diameter using a non-magnetic material to effectively change the magnetic circuit efficiency and resulting retention.

  17. Magnetic forces acting on molten drops in gas metal arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L. A.; Eagar, T. W.; Lang, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    In gas metal arc welding, magnetic forces arising from the interaction of the welding current with its own magnetic field play an important role in the detachment of drops from the molten welding electrode. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. In this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of the axial magnetic force from experimentally measured drop shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces when a drop detaches from the electrode.

  18. Altered gravitational forces affect the development of the static vestibuloocular reflex in fish (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, C; Esseling, K; Horn, E

    2001-01-01

    Young fish (Oreochromis mossambicus) were exposed to microgravity (micro g) for 9 to 10 days during space missions STS-55 and STS-84, or to hypergravity (hg) for 9 days. Young animals (stages 11-12), which had not yet developed the roll-induced static vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) at micro g- and hg-onset, and older ones (stages 14-16), which had already developed the rVOR, were used. For several weeks afterwards, the rVOR was recorded after termination of mug and hg. Here are the main results: (1) In the stage 11-12 fish, the rVOR gain (response angle/roll angle) measured for roll angles 15 degrees, 30 degrees, and 45 degrees was not affected by microgravity if animals were rolled from the horizontal to the inclined posture, but was increased significantly if animals were rolled in the opposite manner. The rVOR amplitude (maximal eye movement during a complete 360 degrees roll) of micro g animals increased significantly by 25% compared to 1g controls during the first postflight week, but decreased to the control level during the second postflight week. Microgravity had no effect in stage 14-16 fish on either rVOR gain or amplitude. (2) After 3g exposure, both rVOR gain and amplitude were significantly reduced for both stage 11-12 and stage 15 fish. One g readaptation was completed during the second post-3g week. Hypergravity at 2 or 2.5 g had no effect. (3) Hypergravity at all three levels tested (2g, 2.5g, and 3g) accelerated the morphological development as assessed by external morphological markers. Exposure to micro g- or 3g-periods during an early developmental period modifies the physiological properties of the neuronal network underlying the static rVOR; in susceptible developmental stages, these modifications include sensitization by microgravity and desensitization by hypergravity. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Effects of high-intensity static magnetic fields on a root-based bioreactor system for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Maria Elena; Massa, Silvia; Lopresto, Vanni; Pinto, Rosanna; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2017-11-01

    Static magnetic fields created by superconducting magnets have been proposed as an effective solution to protect spacecrafts and planetary stations from cosmic radiations. This shield can deflect high-energy particles exerting injurious effects on living organisms, including plants. In fact, plant systems are becoming increasingly interesting for space adaptation studies, being useful not only as food source but also as sink of bioactive molecules in future bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS). However, the application of protective magnetic shields would generate inside space habitats residual magnetic fields, of the order of few hundreds milli Tesla, whose effect on plant systems is poorly known. To simulate the exposure conditions of these residual magnetic fields in shielded environment, devices generating high-intensity static magnetic field (SMF) were comparatively evaluated in blind exposure experiments (250 mT, 500 mT and sham -no SMF-). The effects of these SMFs were assayed on tomato cultures (hairy roots) previously engineered to produce anthocyanins, known for their anti-oxidant properties and possibly useful in the setting of BLSS. Hairy roots exposed for periods ranging from 24 h to 11 days were morphometrically analyzed to measure their growth and corresponding molecular changes were assessed by a differential proteomic approach. After disclosing blind exposure protocol, a stringent statistical elaboration revealed the absence of significant differences in the soluble proteome, perfectly matching phenotypic results. These experimental evidences demonstrate that the identified plant system well tolerates the exposure to these magnetic fields. Results hereby described reinforce the notion of using this plant organ culture as a tool in ground-based experiments simulating space and planetary environments, in a perspective of using tomato 'hairy root' cultures as bioreactor of ready-to-use bioactive molecules during future long-term space missions.

  20. Effects of high-intensity static magnetic fields on a root-based bioreactor system for space applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Maria Elena; Massa, Silvia; Lopresto, Vanni; Pinto, Rosanna; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Desiderio, Angiola

    2017-11-01

    Static magnetic fields created by superconducting magnets have been proposed as an effective solution to protect spacecrafts and planetary stations from cosmic radiations. This shield can deflect high-energy particles exerting injurious effects on living organisms, including plants. In fact, plant systems are becoming increasingly interesting for space adaptation studies, being useful not only as food source but also as sink of bioactive molecules in future bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS). However, the application of protective magnetic shields would generate inside space habitats residual magnetic fields, of the order of few hundreds milli Tesla, whose effect on plant systems is poorly known. To simulate the exposure conditions of these residual magnetic fields in shielded environment, devices generating high-intensity static magnetic field (SMF) were comparatively evaluated in blind exposure experiments (250 mT, 500 mT and sham -no SMF-). The effects of these SMFs were assayed on tomato cultures (hairy roots) previously engineered to produce anthocyanins, known for their anti-oxidant properties and possibly useful in the setting of BLSS. Hairy roots exposed for periods ranging from 24 h to 11 days were morphometrically analyzed to measure their growth and corresponding molecular changes were assessed by a differential proteomic approach. After disclosing blind exposure protocol, a stringent statistical elaboration revealed the absence of significant differences in the soluble proteome, perfectly matching phenotypic results. These experimental evidences demonstrate that the identified plant system well tolerates the exposure to these magnetic fields. Results hereby described reinforce the notion of using this plant organ culture as a tool in ground-based experiments simulating space and planetary environments, in a perspective of using tomato 'hairy root' cultures as bioreactor of ready-to-use bioactive molecules during future long-term space

  1. Influence of 340 mT static magnetic field on germination potential and mid-infrared spectrum of wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćirković, Saša; Bačić, Jasmina; Paunović, Novica; Popović, Tamara B; Trbovich, Alexander M; Romčević, Nebojša; Ristić-Djurović, Jasna L

    2017-10-01

    In a number of studies, a static magnetic field was observed to positively influence the growing process of various plants; however, the effect has not yet been related to possible structural changes. We investigate if the static magnetic field that improves germination of wheat also alters wheat's near-infrared spectrum. Two groups of seeds were exposed to 340 mT for 16 h cumulatively. The first group was exposed 8 days for 2 h per day, while the second group was exposed 4 h per day for 4 consecutive days. One half of each of the exposed seed groups as well as of the unexposed control groups was sown, and the other half was used for mid-infrared spectra measurements. The sown seeds were monitored for 3 weeks after sowing. Germination of the groups exposed to the magnetic field was faster compared to corresponding non-exposed groups that were grown under the same conditions. The magnetic field exposure caused the enhancement of one OH peak at 3,369 cm(-1) and two CO peaks at 1,662 cm(-1) and 1,740 cm(-1) in the mid-infrared spectrum. The effect was more pronounced for the 4 day, 4 h/day exposure. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:533-540, 2017.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Distinct Nature of Static and Dynamic Magnetic Stripes in Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, H.; Holm, S. L.; Lǎcǎtuşu, M.-E.; Rømer, A. T.; Bertelsen, M.; Boehm, M.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Grivel, J.-C.; Emery, S. B.; Udby, L.; Wells, B. O.; Lefmann, K.

    2018-01-01

    We present detailed neutron scattering studies of the static and dynamic stripes in an optimally doped high-temperature superconductor, La2 CuO4 +y . We observe that the dynamic stripes do not disperse towards the static stripes in the limit of vanishing energy transfer. Therefore, the dynamic stripes observed in neutron scattering experiments are not the Goldstone modes associated with the broken symmetry of the simultaneously observed static stripes, and the signals originate from different domains in the sample. These observations support real-space electronic phase separation in the crystal, where the static stripes in one phase are pinned versions of the dynamic stripes in the other, having slightly different periods. Our results explain earlier observations of unusual dispersions in underdoped La2 -xSrx CuO4 (x =0.07 ) and La2 -xBax CuO4 (x =0.095 ).

  3. Centrifugal Force Based Magnetic Micro-Pump Driven by Rotating Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Hashi, S.; Ishiyama, K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a centrifugal force based magnetic micro-pump for the pumping of blood. Most blood pumps are driven by an electrical motor with wired control. To develop a wireless and battery-free blood pump, the proposed pump is controlled by external rotating magnetic fields with a synchronized impeller. Synchronization occurs because the rotor is divided into multi-stage impeller parts and NdFeB permanent magnet. Finally, liquid is discharged by the centrifugal force of multi-stage impeller. The proposed pump length is 30 mm long and19 mm in diameter which much smaller than currently pumps; however, its pumping ability satisfies the requirement for a blood pump. The maximum pressure is 120 mmHg and the maximum flow rate is 5000ml/min at 100 Hz. The advantage of the proposed pump is that the general mechanical problems of a normal blood pump are eliminated by the proposed driving mechanism.

  4. Externally Applied Static Magnetic Field Enhances Cardiac Retention and Functional Benefit of Magnetically Iron-Labeled Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Infarcted Hearts

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jian; Xiang, Bo; Deng, Jixian; Lin, Hung-Yu; Zheng, Dayang; Freed, Darren H.; Arora, Rakesh C.; Tian, Ganghong

    2016-01-01

    Although adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) hold the promise of effective therapy for myocardial infarction (MI), low cardiac retention of implanted ASCs has hindered their therapeutic efficiency. We investigated whether an externally applied static magnetic field (SMF) enhanced cardiac localization of “magnetic” ASCs preloaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and further improved heart function recovery. In conclusion, the SMF increased the cardiac retention of implanted...

  5. Variable force, eddy-current or magnetic damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, R. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An object of the invention is to provide variable damping for resonant vibrations which may occur at different rotational speeds in the range of rpms in which a rotating machine is operated. A variable force damper in accordance with the invention includes a rotating mass carried on a shaft which is supported by a bearing in a resilient cage. The cage is attached to a support plate whose rim extends into an annular groove in a housing. Variable damping is effected by tabs of electrically conducting nonmagnetic material which extend radially from the cage. The tabs at an index position lie between the pole face of respective C shaped magnets. The magnets are attached by cantilever spring members to the housing.

  6. Non-force-free solar magnetic fields in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, R. H.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Wu, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to examine a class of non-force-free fields analytically. Specifically, magnetic fields in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium with a plasma in a gravitational field are treated in an approximation of two independent variables but three vector components. Spherical coordinates are emphasized, although the formal results for cylindrical and Cartesian coordinates are presented in the appendices. Formal solutions for the magnetic-field components are obtained in terms of the plasma variables, and field line equations are derived. A final equation governing the plasma variables is then obtained. Procedures are developed for analyzing this equation and obtaining sets of self-consistent particular solutions to the governing equations; a number of such sets of solutions are presented. As an example, one solution set is examined, illustrating the application of the results to the analysis of solar observational data.

  7. Nonlinear Modeling of Forced Magnetic Reconnection with Transient Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidler, Matthew T.; Callen, James D.; Hegna, Chris C.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2017-10-01

    Externally applied 3D magnetic fields in tokamaks can penetrate into the plasma and lead to forced magnetic reconnection, and hence magnetic islands, on resonant surfaces. Analytic theory has been reasonably successful in describing many aspects of this paradigm with regard to describing the time asymptotic-steady state. However, understanding the nonlinear evolution into a low-slip, field-penetrated state, especially how MHD events such as sawteeth and ELMs precipitate this transition, is in its early development. We present nonlinear computations employing the extended-MHD code NIMROD, building on previous work by incorporating a temporally varying external perturbation as a simple model for an MHD event that produces resonant magnetic signals. A parametric series of proof-of-principle computations and accompanying analytical theory characterize the transition into a mode-locked state with an emphasis on detailing the temporal evolution properties. Supported by DOE OFES Grants DE-FG02-92ER54139, DE-FG02-86ER53218, and the U.S. DOE FES Postdoctoral Research program administered by ORISE and managed by ORAU under DOE contract DE-SC0014664.

  8. Resolution theory and static- and frequency dependent cross-talk in piezoresponse force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, Stephen [ORNL; Guo, Senli [ORNL; Kumar, Amit [ORNL; Rodriguez, Brian [University College, Dublin; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Probing materials functionality locally by scanning probe microscopy requires reliable framework for identifying the target signal and separating it from the effects of surface morphology and instrument non-idealities, i.e. instrumental and topographical cross-talk. Here we develop the linear resolution theory framework to describe the cross-talk effects, and apply it for elucidation of frequency dependent cross-talk mechanisms in the Piezoresponse Force Microscopy. The use of band excitation method allows electromechanical/electrical and mechanical/topographic signals to be unambiguously separated. The applicability of functional fit approach and multivariate statistical analysis methods for data identification in band excitation SPM is explored.

  9. Resolution theory, and static and frequency-dependent cross-talk in piezoresponse force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, S; Guo, S; Kumar, A; Kalinin, S V [The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Rodriguez, B J [Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Proksch, R [Asylum Research, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States)

    2010-10-08

    Probing the functionality of materials locally by means of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) requires a reliable framework for identifying the target signal and separating it from the effects of surface morphology and instrument non-idealities, e.g. instrumental and topographical cross-talk. Here we develop a linear resolution theory framework in order to describe the cross-talk effects, and apply it for elucidation of frequency-dependent cross-talk mechanisms in piezoresponse force microscopy. The use of a band excitation method allows electromechanical/electrical and mechanical/topographic signals to be unambiguously separated. The applicability of a functional fit approach and multivariate statistical analysis methods for identification of data in band excitation SPM is explored.

  10. Haptic device development based on electro static force of cellulose electro active paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Gyu-young; Kim, Sang-Youn; Jang, Sang-Dong; Kim, Dong-Gu; Kim, Jaehwan

    2011-04-01

    Haptic is one of well-considered device which is suitable for demanding virtual reality applications such as medical equipment, mobile devices, the online marketing and so on. Nowadays, many of concepts for haptic devices have been suggested to meet the demand of industries. Cellulose has received much attention as an emerging smart material, named as electro-active paper (EAPap). The EAPap is attractive for mobile haptic devices due to its unique characteristics in terms of low actuation power, suitability for thin devices and transparency. In this paper, we suggest a new concept of haptic actuator with the use of cellulose EAPap. Its performance is evaluated depending on various actuation conditions. As a result, cellulose electrostatic force actuator shows a large output displacement and fast response, which is suitable for mobile haptic devices.

  11. The effect of an external magnetic force on cell adhesion and proliferation of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamae Toshio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the strategy for tissue regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for transplantation, it is necessary that MSCs be accumulated and kept in the target area. To accumulate MSCs effectively, we developed a novel technique for a magnetic targeting system with magnetically labeled MSCs and an external magnetic force. In this study, we examined the effect of an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs in terms of cell adhesion and proliferation. Methods Magnetically labeled MSCs were plated at the bottom of an insert under the influence of an external magnetic force for 1 hour. Then the inserts were turned upside down for between 1 and 24 hours, and the number of MSCs which had fallen from the membrane was counted. The gene expression of MSCs affected magnetic force was analyzed with microarray. In the control group, the same procedure was done without the external magnetic force. Results At 1 hour after the inserts were turned upside down, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was significantly smaller than that in the control group, indicating enhanced cell adhesion. At 24 hours, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was also significantly smaller than that in control group. In the magnetic group, integrin alpha2, alpha6, beta3 BP, intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 were upregulated. At 1, 2 and 3 weeks after incubation, there was no statistical significant difference in the numbers of MSCs in the magnetic group and control group. Conclusions The results indicate that an external magnetic force for 1 hour enhances cell adhesion of MSCs. Moreover, there is no difference in cell proliferation after using an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs.

  12. Modelling of magnetic fluid support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashtovoi, V.G. E-mail: bashv@reol1.itmo.by; Bossis, G.; Kabachnikov, D.N.; Krakov, M.S.; Volkova, O

    2002-11-01

    One kind of elastic magnetic fluid support representing the magnetic fluid drop with permanent magnet inside is investigated experimentally and numerically. The dependencies between the magneto static force in support and the geometrical parameters and properties of the magnet and the magnetic fluid are established.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging. Recent studies on biological effects of static magnetic and high-frequency electromagnetic fields; Magnetresonanztomographie. Neuere Studien zur biologischen Wirkung statischer Magnetfelder und hochfrequenter elektromagnetischer Felder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pophof, B. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Abteilung fuer Wirkungen und Risiken ionisierender und nichtionisierender Strahlung, Oberschleissheim/Neuherberg (Germany); Brix, G. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Abteilung fuer medizinischen und beruflichen Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim/Neuherberg (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    During the last few years, new studies on biological effects of strong static magnetic fields and on thermal effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were published. Many of these studies have not yet been included in the current safety recommendations. Scientific publications since 2010 on biological effects of static and electromagnetic fields in MRI were researched and evaluated. New studies confirm older publications that have already described effects of static magnetic fields on sensory organs and the central nervous system, accompanied by sensory perceptions. A new result is the direct effect of Lorentz forces on ionic currents in the semicircular canals of the vestibular system. Recent studies of thermal effects of high-frequency electromagnetic fields were focused on the development of anatomically realistic body models and a more precise simulation of exposure scenarios. Strong static magnetic fields can cause unpleasant sensations, in particular, vertigo. In addition, they can influence the performance of the medical staff and thus potentially endanger the patient's safety. As a precaution, medical personnel should move slowly within the field gradient. High-frequency electromagnetic fields lead to an increase in the temperature of patients' tissues and organs. This should be considered especially in patients with restricted thermoregulation and in pregnant women and neonates; in these cases exposure should be kept as low as possible. (orig.) [German] In den letzten Jahren wurden neue Studien zu biologischen Wirkungen starker statischer Magnetfelder und zu thermischen Effekten hochfrequenter elektromagnetischer Feldern, wie sie bei der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) verwendet werden, publiziert. Viele dieser Studien sind noch nicht in aktuelle Sicherheitsempfehlungen eingeflossen. Wissenschaftliche Publikationen ab dem Jahr 2010 zur biologischen Wirkung statischer und elektromagnetischer Felder

  14. Lateral and levitation forces between a small magnet and superconducting sphere and the stability of the magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khateeb, Hasan; Nuseirat, Mutazz; Ayoub, Nabil

    2010-03-01

    Based on a dipole-dipole interaction model, we obtained analytical expressions for the levitation and lateral forces act on a small magnet for asymmetric magnet/spherical superconductor system. The obtained formulas are written in terms of the radius of the superconductor as well as the height and the orientation of the magnetic moment of the magnet. The levitation force is linearly dependent of the lateral displacement whereas the lateral force is independent of the lateral displacement. Both the levitation and lateral forces are varying solinoudally with the polar and azimuthal angle of the orientation of the moment of the magnet. The stability of the magnet has been studied for special orientation of the moment of the magnet.

  15. Magnetic Field Equivalent Current Analysis-Based Radial Force Control for Bearingless Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huangqiu Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bearingless permanent magnet synchronous motors (BPMSMs, with all advantages of permanent magnet motors (PMSMs and magnetic bearings, have become an important research direction in the bearingless motor field. To realize a stable suspension for the BPMSM, accurate decoupling control between the electromagnetic torque and radial suspension force is indispensable. In this paper, a concise and reliable analysis method based on a magnetic field equivalent current is presented. By this analysis method, the operation principle is analyzed theoretically, and the necessary conditions to produce a stable radial suspension force are confirmed. In addition, mathematical models of the torque and radial suspension force are established which is verified by the finite element analysis (FEA software ANSYS. Finally, an experimental prototype of a 2-4 poles surface-mounted BPMSM is tested with the customized control strategy. The simulation and experimental results have shown that the motor has good rotation and suspension performance, and validated the accuracy of the proposed analysis method and the feasibility of the control strategy.

  16. Analysis of the magnetic field, force, and torque for two-dimensional Halbach cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Smith, Anders; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden

    2010-01-01

    for a two dimensional Halbach cylinder are derived. The remanent flux density of a Halbach magnet is characterized by the integer p. For a number of applications the force and torque between two concentric Halbach cylinders are important. These quantities are calculated and the force is shown to be zero...... except for the case where p for the inner magnet is one minus p for the outer magnet. Also the force is shown never to be balancing. The torque is shown to be zero unless the inner magnet p is equal to minus the outer magnet p. Thus there can never be a force and a torque in the same system....

  17. Test-retest repeatability of human speech biomarkers from static and real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töger, Johannes; Sorensen, Tanner; Somandepalli, Krishna; Toutios, Asterios; Lingala, Sajan Goud; Narayanan, Shrikanth; Nayak, Krishna

    2017-05-01

    Static anatomical and real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (RT-MRI) of the upper airway is a valuable method for studying speech production in research and clinical settings. The test-retest repeatability of quantitative imaging biomarkers is an important parameter, since it limits the effect sizes and intragroup differences that can be studied. Therefore, this study aims to present a framework for determining the test-retest repeatability of quantitative speech biomarkers from static MRI and RT-MRI, and apply the framework to healthy volunteers. Subjects (n = 8, 4 females, 4 males) are imaged in two scans on the same day, including static images and dynamic RT-MRI of speech tasks. The inter-study agreement is quantified using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and mean within-subject standard deviation (σe). Inter-study agreement is strong to very strong for static measures (ICC: min/median/max 0.71/0.89/0.98, σe: 0.90/2.20/6.72 mm), poor to strong for dynamic RT-MRI measures of articulator motion range (ICC: 0.26/0.75/0.90, σe: 1.6/2.5/3.6 mm), and poor to very strong for velocities (ICC: 0.21/0.56/0.93, σe: 2.2/4.4/16.7 cm/s). In conclusion, this study characterizes repeatability of static and dynamic MRI-derived speech biomarkers using state-of-the-art imaging. The introduced framework can be used to guide future development of speech biomarkers. Test-retest MRI data are provided free for research use.

  18. Exposure to static magnetic field stimulates quorum sensing circuit in luminescent Vibrio strains of the Harveyi clade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelfia Talà

    Full Text Available In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule.

  19. How Can Magnetic Forces Do Work? Investigating the Problem with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, Pasquale; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2013-01-01

    We present a sequence of activities aimed at promoting both learning about magnetic forces and students' reflection about the conceptual bridge between magnetic forces on a moving charge and on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field. The activity sequence, designed for students in high school or on introductory physics courses, has been…

  20. Magnetic moment of solar plasma and the Kelvin force: -The driving force of plasma up-flow -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, Kiyoto

    2017-04-01

    Thermal plasma in the solar atmosphere is magnetized (diamagnetic). The magnetic moment does not disappear by collisions because complete gyration is not a necessary condition to have magnetic moment. Magnetized fluid is subjected to Kelvin force in non-uniform magnetic field. Generally, magnetic field strength decreases upwards in the solar atmosphere, hence the Kelvin force is directed upwards along the field. This force is not included in the fluid treatment of MHD. By adding the Kelvin force to the MHD equation of motion, we can expect temperature dependent plasma flows along the field which are reported by many observations. The temperature dependence of the flow speed is explained by temperature dependence of magnetic moment. From the observed parameters, we can infer physical parameters in the solar atmosphere such as scale length of the magnetic field strength and the friction force acting on the flowing plasma. In case of closed magnetic field lines, loop-top concentration of hot plasma is expected which is frequently observed.

  1. Underlying Physics of Conductive Polymer Composites and Force Sensing Resistors (FSRs) under Static Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Conductive polymer composites are manufactured by randomly dispersing conductive particles along an insulating polymer matrix. Several authors have attempted to model the piezoresistive response of conductive polymer composites. However, all the proposed models rely upon experimental measurements of the electrical resistance at rest state. Similarly, the models available in literature assume a voltage-independent resistance and a stress-independent area for tunneling conduction. With the aim of developing and validating a more comprehensive model, a test bench capable of exerting controlled forces has been developed. Commercially available sensors—which are manufactured from conductive polymer composites—have been tested at different voltages and stresses, and a model has been derived on the basis of equations for the quantum tunneling conduction through thin insulating film layers. The resistance contribution from the contact resistance has been included in the model together with the resistance contribution from the conductive particles. The proposed model embraces a voltage-dependent behavior for the composite resistance, and a stress-dependent behavior for the tunneling conduction area. The proposed model is capable of predicting sensor current based upon information from the sourcing voltage and the applied stress. This study uses a physical (non-phenomenological) approach for all the phenomena discussed here. PMID:28906467

  2. Underlying Physics of Conductive Polymer Composites and Force Sensing Resistors (FSRs) under Static Loading Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Madrid, Leonel; Palacio, Carlos A; Matute, Arnaldo; Parra Vargas, Carlos A

    2017-09-14

    Conductive polymer composites are manufactured by randomly dispersing conductive particles along an insulating polymer matrix. Several authors have attempted to model the piezoresistive response of conductive polymer composites. However, all the proposed models rely upon experimental measurements of the electrical resistance at rest state. Similarly, the models available in literature assume a voltage-independent resistance and a stress-independent area for tunneling conduction. With the aim of developing and validating a more comprehensive model, a test bench capable of exerting controlled forces has been developed. Commercially available sensors-which are manufactured from conductive polymer composites-have been tested at different voltages and stresses, and a model has been derived on the basis of equations for the quantum tunneling conduction through thin insulating film layers. The resistance contribution from the contact resistance has been included in the model together with the resistance contribution from the conductive particles. The proposed model embraces a voltage-dependent behavior for the composite resistance, and a stress-dependent behavior for the tunneling conduction area. The proposed model is capable of predicting sensor current based upon information from the sourcing voltage and the applied stress. This study uses a physical (non-phenomenological) approach for all the phenomena discussed here.

  3. Orientation of sea urchin sperms in static magnetic fields: Compared to human sperms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnini, Lama; Dairi, Maheen

    In this study we report on magnetic orientation of sea urchin and human sperms. The sea urchin and human sperms became oriented parallel to the magnetic field (1 T maximum). The human sperms were totally oriented with magnetic field at about 600 mT. However, the sea urchin sperms show different behavior due to morphological differences between them and the human sperms.

  4. Strength and Power Training Effects on Lower Limb Force, Functional Capacity, and Static and Dynamic Balance in Older Female Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Paula Born; Pereira, Gleber; Lodovico, Angélica; Bento, Paulo C B; Rodacki, André L F

    2016-03-03

    It has been proposed that muscle power is more effective to prevent falls than muscle force production capacity, as rapid reactions are required to allow the postural control. This study aimed to compare the effects of strength and power training on lower limb force, functional capacity, and static and dynamic balance in older female adults. Thirty-seven volunteered healthy women had been allocated into the strength-training group (n = 14; 69 ± 7.3 years, 155 ± 5.6 cm, 72 ± 9.7 kg), the power-training group (n = 12; 67 ± 7.4 years, 153 ± 5.5 cm, 67.2 ± 7 kg), and control group (n = 11; 65 ± 3.1 years, 154 ± 5.6 cm, 70.9 ± 3 kg). After 12 weeks of training, the strength-training and power-training groups increased significantly maximum dynamic strength (29% and 27%), isometric strength (26% and 37%), and step total time (13% and 14%, dynamic balance), respectively. However, only the power-training group increased the rate of torque development (55%) and the functional capacity in 30-second chair stand (22%) and in time up and go tests (-10%). Empirically, power training may reduce the risk of injuries due to lower loads compared to strength training, and consequently, the physical effort demand during the training session is lower. Therefore, power training should be recommended as attractive training stimuli to improve lower limb force, functional capacity, and postural control of older female adults.

  5. Tornado-like flows driven by magnetic body forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbeth, Gunter; Grants, Ilmars; Vogt, Tobias; Eckert, Sven

    2014-11-01

    Alternating magnetic fields produce well-defined flow-independent body forces in electrically conducting media. This property is used to construct a laboratory analogue of the Fiedler chamber with a room-temperature liquid metal as working fluid. A continuously applied rotating magnetic field (RMF) provides the source of the angular momentum. A pulse of a much stronger travelling magnetic field drives a converging flow at the metal surface, which focuses this angular momentum towards the axis of the container. The resulting vortex is studied experimentally and numerically. In a certain range of the ratio of both driving actions the axial velocity changes its direction in the vortex core, resembling the subsidence in an eye of a tropical cyclone or a large tornado. During the initial deterministic spin-up stage the vortex is well described by axisymmetric direct numerical simulation. Being strong enough the flow develops a funnel-shaped surface depression that enables visual observation of the vortex structure. As the RMF strength is increased the eyewall diameter grows until it breaks down to multiple vortices. A number of further observed similarities to tornado-like vortices will be discussed. The work is supported by the German Helmholtz Association in frame of the LIMTECH alliance.

  6. Microrheology of growing Escherichia coli biofilms investigated by using magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Tiansheng; Gong, Xiangjun; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2016-12-01

    Microrheology of growing biofilms provides insightful information about its structural evolution and properties. In this study, the authors have investigated the microrheology of Escherichia coli (strain HCB1) biofilms at different indentation depth (δ) by using magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy as a function of disturbing frequency (f). As δ increases, the dynamic stiffness (ks) for the biofilms in the early stage significantly increases. However, it levels off when the biofilms are matured. The facts indicate that the biofilms change from inhomogeneous to homogeneous in structure. Moreover, ks is scaled to f, which coincides with the rheology of soft glasses. The exponent increases with the incubation time, indicating the fluidization of biofilms. In contrast, the upper layer of the matured biofilms is solidlike in that the storage modulus is always larger than the loss modulus, and its viscoelasticity is slightly influenced by the shear stress.

  7. Study on a high thrust force bi-double-sided permanent magnet linear synchronous motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Tong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A high thrust force bi-double-sided permanent magnet linear synchronous motor used in gantry-type five-axis machining center is designed and its performance was tested in this article. This motor is the subproject of Chinese National Science and Technology Major Project named as “development of domestic large thrust linear motor used in high-speed gantry-type five-axis machining center project” jointly participated by enterprises and universities. According to the requirement of the application environment and motor performance parameters, the linear motor’s basic dimensions, form of windings, and magnet arrangement are preliminarily specified through theoretical analysis and calculation. To verify the correctness of the result of the calculation, the finite element model of the motor is established. The static and dynamic characteristics of the motor are studied and analyzed through the finite element method, and the initial scheme is revised. The prototype of the motor is manufactured based on the final revised structure parameters, and the performance of the motor is fully tested using the evaluation platform for direct-drive motor component. Experimental test results meet the design requirements and show the effectiveness of design method and process.

  8. The magnetic resonance force microscope: A new microscopic probe of magnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Midzor, M.; Roukes, M.L. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Wigen, P.E. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Childress, J.R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1997-08-06

    The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) marries the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), to produce a three-dimensional imaging instrument with high, potentially atomic-scale, resolution. The principle of the MRFM has been successfully demonstrated in numerous experiments. By virtue of its unique capabilities the MRFM shows promise to make important contributions in fields ranging from three-dimensional materials characterization to bio-molecular structure determination. Here the authors focus on its application to the characterization and study of layered magnetic materials; the ability to illuminate the properties of buried interfaces in such materials is a particularly important goal. While sensitivity and spatial resolution are currently still far from their theoretical limits, they are nonetheless comparable to or superior to that achievable in conventional MRI. Further improvement of the MRFM will involve operation at lower temperature, application of larger field gradients, introduction of advanced mechanical resonators and improved reduction of the spurious coupling when the magnet is on the resonator.

  9. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co50Fe50 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We studied the magnetization reversal mechanism of single-layered Co50Fe50 nanomagnets by mea- suring the magnetization reversal and using the micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization reversal strongly depends on the thickness of the nanomagnets. In the remanent state, the magnetic force ...

  10. Numerical computation of the restoring force in a cylindrical bearing containing magnetic liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greconici Marian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Present paper deals with the second order of magnetic levitation, applied to a cylindrical bearing holding a magnetized shaft and the magnetic liquid The magnetic restoring force acting on the shaft of the cylindrical bearing. was numerically evaluated, the liquid being considered a nonlinear medium.

  11. High resolution magnetic force microscopy: instrumentation and application for recording media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porthun, Steffen; Porthun, S.

    This thesis describes aspects of the use of magnetic force microscopy for the study of magnetic recording media. The maximum achievable storage density in magnetic recording is limited by the magnetic reversal behaviour of the medium and by the stability of the written information. The shape and

  12. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co50Fe50 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We studied the magnetization reversal mechanism of single-layered Co50Fe50 nanomagnets by measuring the magnetization reversal and using the micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization reversal strongly depends on the thickness of the nanomagnets. In the remanent state, the magnetic force microscopy studies ...

  13. Normal Spectral Emissivity Measurement of Molten Cu-Co Alloy Using an Electromagnetic Levitator Superimposed with a Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Shoya; Nakamura, Yuki; Sugioka, Ken-Ichi; Kubo, Masaki; Tsukada, Takao; Uchikoshi, Masahito; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    The normal spectral emissivity of molten Cu-Co alloy with different compositions was measured in the wavelength range of 780 nm to 920 nm and in the temperature range of 1430 K to 1770 K including the undercooled condition by an electromagnetic levitator superimposed with a static magnetic field. The emissivity was determined as the ratio of the radiance from a levitated molten Cu-Co droplet measured by a spectrometer to the radiance from a blackbody calculated by Planck's law at a given temperature, where a static magnetic field of 2.5 T to 4.5 T was applied to the levitated droplet to suppress the surface oscillation and translational motion of the sample. We found little temperature dependence of the normal spectral emissivity of molten Cu-Co alloy. Concerning the composition dependence, the emissivity decreased markedly above 80 at%Cu and reached that of pure Cu, although its dependence was low between 20 at%Cu and 80 at%Cu. In addition, this composition dependence of the emissivity of molten Cu-Co alloy can be explained well by the Drude free-electron model.

  14. Levitation force on a permanent magnet over a superconducting plane: Modified critical-state model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z.J.

    1997-08-01

    The authors consider a model system of a permanent magnet above a semi-infinite superconductor. They introduce a modified critical-state model, and carry out derivations of the levitation force acting on the magnet. A key feature of the modification allows the current density to be less than the critical value. The theoretical results show an exponential relationship between the force and the distance. Analytical expressions are developed for permanent magnets in the form of a point dipole, a tip of a magnetic force microscope, and a cylindrical magnet. In the latter case, the exponential relationship has been observed in numerous experiments but without previous interpretation.

  15. Control of forced vibrations of mechanical structures by an electromagnetic controller with a permanent magnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, George Juraj; Darula, Radoslav; Sorokin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of an electromagnetic vibration controller is presented. The analyzed device consists of a pot-type iron core with a coil and a permanent magnet as a source of constant magnetic flux. The magnetic circuit is closed by a yoke, excited by an external harmonic mechanical force....... The so generated magnetic flux variation induces alternating voltage in the electric circuit, which is dissipated in a shunt resistor. The induced current driven through the coil generates magnetic force, which damps the excitation force and changes the damped natural frequency of the oscillatory system...

  16. Static force fields simulations of reduced CeO2 (110) surface: Structure and adsorption of H2O molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, Serge; Meunier, Cathy

    2018-02-01

    The CeO2(110) surface properties are largely involved in the catalysis, energy and biological phenomenon. The Static Force Fields simulations are able to describe large atomic systems surface even if no information on the electronic structure can be obtained. We employ those simulations to study the formation of the neutral 2 CeCe‧ VO•• cluster. We focus on seven different cluster configurations and find that the defect formation energy is the lower for the 1N-2N configurations. Two geometries are possible, as it is the case for the ab initio studies, the in plane and the more stable bridging one. We evidence the modifications of the surface energy and the Potential Energy Surface due to the presence of the 2 CeCe‧ VO•• defect. The physical adsorption of a water molecule is calculated and the geometry described for all the cluster configurations. The H2O molecule physisorption stabilizes the Ce(110) surface and the presence of the 2 CeCe‧ VO•• defect increases this effect.

  17. Behavioral Effects on Rats of Motion within a High Static Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, Thomas A.; Carella, Lee; Gonzalez, Dani; Janowitz, Ilana; Mueller, Anthony; Mueller, Kathleen; Neth, Bryan; Smith, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Some human subjects report vestibular disturbances such as vertigo, apparent motion, and nausea around or within high strength MRI systems operating at 4 T to 9.4 T. These vestibular effects have been ascribed to the consequences of movement through the high magnetic field. We have previously found that exposure to magnetic fields above 7 T suppresses rearing, causes locomotor circling, and induces conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in rodents. The present experiments were designed to test the effects on rats of motion through the magnetic field of the 14.1 T superconducting magnet. In experiment 1, we compared the effects of multiple rapid insertions and removals from the center of the magnet to the effects of continuous exposure. Repeated traversal of the magnetic field gradient with only momentary exposure to 14.1 T was sufficient to suppress rearing and induce a significant CTA. Repeated insertion and removal from the magnet, however, did not have a greater effect than a single 30-min exposure on either acute locomotor behavior or CTA acquisition. Prolonged exposure was required to induce locomotor circling. In the second series of experiments, we controlled the rate of insertion and removal by means of an electric motor. Locomotor circling appeared to be dependent on the speed of insertion and removal, but the suppression of rearing and the acquisition of CTA were independent of speed of insertion and removal. In experiment 3, we inserted rats into the center of the magnet and then rotated them about their rostral-caudal axis during a 30-min 14.1 T exposure. Rotation within the magnet did not modulate the behavioral effects of exposure. We conclude that, in rats, movement through the steep gradient of a high magnetic field has some behavioral effects, but sustained exposure to the homogenous center of the field is required for the full behavioral consequences. PMID:21118699

  18. Effect on germination and early growth characteristics in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds exposed to static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashisth, Ananta; Nagarajan, Shantha

    2010-01-15

    Seeds of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) were exposed in batches to static magnetic fields of strength from 0 to 250mT in steps of 50mT for 1-4h in steps of 1h. Treatment of sunflower seeds in these magnetic fields increased the speed of germination, seedling length and seedling dry weight under laboratory germination tests. Of the various treatments, 50 and 200mT for 2h yielded the peak performance. Exposure of seeds to magnetic fields improved seed coat membrane integrity and reduced the cellular leakage and electrical conductivity. Treated seeds planted in soil resulted in statistically higher seedling dry weight, root length, root surface area and root volume in 1-month-old seedlings. In germinating seeds, enzyme activities of alpha-amylase, dehydrogenase and protease were significantly higher in treated seeds in contrast to controls. The higher enzyme activity in magnetic-field-treated sunflower seeds could be triggering the fast germination and early vigor of seedlings.

  19. Moderate strength (0.23-0.28 T) static magnetic fields (SMF) modulate signaling and differentiation in human embryonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyun; Sarje, Anshu; Che, Pao-Lin; Yarema, Kevin J

    2009-08-04

    Compelling evidence exists that magnetic fields modulate living systems. To date, however, rigorous studies have focused on identifying the molecular-level biosensor (e.g., radical ion pairs or membranes) or on the behavior of whole animals leaving a gap in understanding how molecular effects are translated into tissue-wide and organism-level responses. This study begins to bridge this gulf by investigating static magnetic fields (SMF) through global mRNA profiling in human embryonic cells coupled with software analysis to identify the affected signaling pathways. Software analysis of gene expression in cells exposed to 0.23-0.28 T SMF showed that nine signaling networks responded to SMF; of these, detailed biochemical validation was performed for the network linked to the inflammatory cytokine IL-6. We found the short-term (magnetic exposure is transduced from a plausible molecular biosensor (lipid membranes) to cell-level responses that include differentiation toward neural lineages. In addition, SMF provided a stimulus that uncovered new relationships - that exist even in the absence of magnetic fields - between gangliosides, the time-dependent regulation of IL-6 signaling by these glycosphingolipids, and the fate of embryonic cells.

  20. Accumulation of magnetically labeled rat mesenchymal stem cells using an external magnetic force, and their potential for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Toshihiro; Ochi, Mitsuo; Yasunaga, Yuji; Adachi, Nobuo; Yanada, Shinobu

    2008-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of a novel mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) delivery system using magnetic beads and an external magnetic force, and investigated the osteogenic potential of MSCs coupled with magnetic beads in vitro. MSCs were isolated from the bone marrow of 8-week-old Sprague Dawley green fluorescent protein rats, and expanded in a monolayer culture system. Magnetic beads (Ferri Sphere 100C) with carboxyl groups on the surface were conjugated to anti-rat CD44 mouse monoclonal antibodies by an amide linkage. Expanded MSCs were then combined with the magnetic beads and the MSC-magnetic bead complexes were seeded onto phi100 mm dishes at low density (5 x 10(3) cells/dish) with or without the influence of an external magnetic force provided by a neodymium magnet and supplemented with osteogenic differentiation medium. The complexes could be accumulated effectively by the influence of the external magnetic force. Moreover, the complexes could also differentiate into the osteogenic lineage in the monolayer culture system, as verified by alizarin red staining and RT-PCR for alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expression. These findings clearly demonstrate the possibility of a novel cell delivery system using MSCs with magnetic beads and an external magnetic force for bone regeneration. If this treatment option is established, it will be minimally invasive when compared to conventional treatments. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Thin yttrium iron garnet films grown by pulsed laser deposition: Crystal structure, static, and dynamic magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, N. S., E-mail: nsokolov@fl.ioffe.ru; Fedorov, V. V.; Korovin, A. M.; Suturin, S. M.; Baranov, D. A.; Gastev, S. V.; Krichevtsov, B. B.; Bursian, V. E.; Lutsev, L. V. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Maksimova, K. Yu.; Grunin, A. I. [Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, Kaliningrad 236041 (Russian Federation); Tabuchi, M. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2016-01-14

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to grow thin (10–84 nm) epitaxial layers of Yttrium Iron Garnet Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YIG) on (111)–oriented Gadolinium Gallium Garnet substrates at different growth conditions. Atomic force microscopy showed flat surface morphology both on micrometer and nanometer scales. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the films are coherent with the substrate in the interface plane. The interplane distance in the [111] direction was found to be by 1.2% larger than expected for YIG stoichiometric pseudomorphic film indicating presence of rhombohedral distortion in this direction. Polar Kerr effect and ferromagnetic resonance measurements showed existence of additional magnetic anisotropy, which adds to the demagnetizing field to keep magnetization vector in the film plane. The origin of the magnetic anisotropy is related to the strain in YIG films observed by XRD. Magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements revealed important role of magnetization rotation during magnetization reversal. An unusual fine structure of microwave magnetic resonance spectra has been observed in the film grown at reduced (0.5 mTorr) oxygen pressure. Surface spin wave propagation has been demonstrated in the in-plane magnetized films.

  2. Weighted-peak assessment of occupational exposure due to MRI gradient fields and movements in a nonhomogeneous static magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreuccetti, D; Contessa, G M; Falsaperla, R; Lodato, R; Pinto, R; Zoppetti, N; Rossi, P

    2013-01-01

    A procedure for assessing occupational exposure due to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gradient magnetic fields and movement-induced effects in the static magnetic field is proposed and tested. The procedure was based on the application of the weighted-peak method in time domain. It was tested in two 1.5 T total-body and one 3 T head-only scanner MRI facilities in Rome (Italy). Exposure due to switched gradient fields was evaluated in locations inside the magnet room where operators usually stay during particular medical procedures (e.g., cardiac examinations of anesthetized patients); MRI sequences were selected to approach as far as possible a representative worst case exposure scenario. Movement-induced effects were evaluated considering the actual movements of volunteer operators during work activity, by measuring the perceived time-varying magnetic field by a head-worn probe. The analysis of results was based on ICNIRP 1998 and 2010 guidelines, following a weighted-peak approach and including an ad hoc extension to the latter ones, needed to verify compliance in the frequency range 0-1 Hz. Exposures due to switched gradient fields in 1.5 T MRI scanners mostly resulted noncompliant with ICNIRP 1998 occupational reference levels, being, at the same time, always compliant with ICNIRP 2010 ones. Gradient field levels and ICNIRP indexes were significantly lower for the 3 T unit, due to its small dimensions, as that unit was a head-only scanner. Movement-induced effects resulted potentially noncompliant only in the case the operator moved the head inside the bore of a 1.5 T scanner. The procedure had proven to be a sound approach to exposure assessment in MRI. Its testing allowed to draw some general considerations about exposures to gradient magnetic fields and movement-induced effects.

  3. Induced magnetic force in human heads exposed to 4 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruiliang; Wang, Gene-Jack; Goldstein, Rita Z; Caparelli, Elisabeth C; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S; Tomasi, Dardo

    2010-04-01

    To map the distribution of the magnetic force induced in the human head during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 4 T for a large group of healthy volunteers. The magnetic field distribution in the head of 100 men and 18 women was mapped using phase mapping techniques. Statistical parametric mapping methods using a family-wise error (FWE) corrected threshold P magnetic force. The strength of the magnetic force density in the head was lower than 11.5 +/- 5.3 N/m(3) (right eyeball). The strength of the magnetic force density induced in occipital cortex varied linearly with the x-rotation (pitch) angle. We found that the induced magnetic force is highly significant in the eyeballs, orbitofrontal and temporal cortices, subcallosal gyrus, anterior cingulate as well as midbrain and brainstem (pons), regardless of subjects' age or gender. The maximum induced magnetic force was 6 x 10(5) times weaker than the gravitational force; thus, biological effects of the magnetic force during imaging are not expected to be significant. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. A magnetic force sensor on a catheter tip for minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzipirpiridis, G; Erne, P; Ergeneman, O; Pane, S; Nelson, B J

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a magnetically guided catheter for minimally invasive surgery (MIS) with a magnetic force sensing tip. The force sensing element utilizes a magnetic Hall sensor and a miniature permanent magnet mounted on a flexible encapsulation acting as the sensing membrane. It is capable of high sensitivity and robust force measurements suitable for in-vivo applications. A second larger magnet placed on the catheter allows the catheter to be guided by applying magnetic fields. Precise orientation control can be achieved with an external magnetic manipulation system. The proposed device can be used in many applications of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) to detect forces applied on tissue during procedures or to characterize different types of tissue for diagnosis.

  5. Levitation and lateral forces between a point magnetic dipole and a superconducting sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, M. Al-Khateeb; M, K. Alqadi; F, Y. Alzoubi; B, Albiss; M, K. Hasan (Qaseer; N, Y. Ayoub

    2016-05-01

    The dipole-dipole interaction model is employed to investigate the angular dependence of the levitation and lateral forces acting on a small magnet in an anti-symmetric magnet/superconducting sphere system. Breaking the symmetry of the system enables us to study the lateral force which is important in the stability of the magnet above a superconducting sphere in the Meissner state. Under the assumption that the lateral displacement of the magnet is small compared to the physical dimensions of our proposed system, analytical expressions are obtained for the levitation and lateral forces as a function of the geometrical parameters of the superconductor as well as the height, the lateral displacement, and the orientation of the magnetic moment of the magnet. The dependence of the levitation force on the height of the levitating magnet is similar to that in the symmetric magnet/superconducting sphere system within the range of proposed lateral displacements. It is found that the levitation force is linearly dependent on the lateral displacement whereas the lateral force is independent of this displacement. A sinusoidal variation of both forces as a function of the polar and azimuthal angles specifying the orientation of the magnetic moment is observed. The relationship between the stability and the orientation of the magnetic moment is discussed for different orientations.

  6. Chronic Exposure to Static Magnetic Fields from Magnetic Resonance Imaging Devices Deserves Screening for Osteoporosis and Vitamin D Levels: A Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun R. Gungor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Technicians often receive chronic magnetic exposures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI devices, mainly due to static magnetic fields (SMFs. Here, we ascertain the biological effects of chronic exposure to SMFs from MRI devices on the bone quality using rats exposed to SMFs in MRI examining rooms. Eighteen Wistar albino male rats were randomly assigned to SMF exposure (A, sham (B, and control (C groups. Group A rats were positioned within 50 centimeters of the bore of the magnet of 1.5 T MRI machine during the nighttime for 8 weeks. We collected blood samples for biochemical analysis, and bone tissue samples for electron microscopic and histological analysis. The mean vitamin D level in Group A was lower than in the other groups (p = 0.002. The mean cortical thickness, the mean trabecular wall thickness, and number of trabeculae per 1 mm2 were significantly lower in Group A (p = 0.003. TUNEL assay revealed that apoptosis of osteocytes were significantly greater in Group A than the other groups (p = 0.005. The effect of SMFs in chronic exposure is related to movement within the magnetic field that induces low-frequency fields within the tissues. These fields can exceed the exposure limits necessary to deteriorate bone microstructure and vitamin D metabolism.

  7. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Liaw, Peter K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector, captured at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Here, G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to the traditional heterodyne-based MFM on model systems, including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet and the electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode-coupling phenomena. Finally, we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any atomic force microscopy platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties, as well as their mutual interactions.

  8. Imaging characteristics of "dynamic" versus "static" spondylolisthesis: analysis using magnetic resonance imaging and flexion/extension films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Jesse L; Chen, Antonia F; Lee, Joon Y

    2014-09-01

    Traditionally, the "dynamic" and "static" types of spondylolisthesis have been lumped into a single group in the literature. The goal of this study was to define the radiographic characteristics of "dynamic" and "static" spondylolisthesis with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and flexion/extension radiographs. Describe the characteristic findings present on MRI and flexion/extension radiographs that are associated with dynamic versus static spondylolisthesis. Retrospective radiographic/imaging study. From 2009 to 2011, patients who underwent elective primary posterior spinal fusion for the diagnosis of spondylolisthesis had their plain films assessed for the degree of spondylolisthesis and were designated "dynamic" or "static," as defined by historical measures. Axial and sagittal T2 MRIs were evaluated for associated facet fluid (FF), facet cysts, interspinous fluid (ISF), and facet hypertrophy. These finding were then statistically evaluated for associations between dynamic and static spondylolisthesis on flexion/extension radiographs and characteristic MRI findings. Ninety patients were included in the study with 114 levels examined for spondylolisthesis. Patients with greater than 3 mm of instability on flexion/extension films were more likely to have FF (p=.018) and ISF (pspondylolisthesis on the sagittal MRI reconstruction. If ISF was present on MRI, there was a positive predictive value of 69.0% that there would be greater than 3 mm instability on flexion/extension films. Absence of FF on MRI had a positive predictive value of 75.6% for instability less than 3 mm on flexion/extension films. In the presence of ISF on MRI, the likelihood ratio of finding more than 3 mm of instability on flexion/extension films was 3.68. The presence of FF on MRI had a likelihood ratio of 1.43 for instability. A total of 36.8% of all spondylolisthesis reduced when supine on MRI. The presence of FF and/or ISF is associated with instability greater than 3 mm in flexion

  9. Visualization and quantification of magnetic nanoparticles into vesicular systems by combined atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, C. [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161, Rome (Italy); Department of Physics, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Corsetti, S.; Passeri, D. [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161, Rome (Italy); Rossi, M. [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences for Engineering, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Via A. Scarpa 16, 00161, Rome (Italy); Research Center for Nanotechnology applied to Engineering of SAPIENZA University of Rome (CNIS), Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Carafa, M.; Marianecci, C., E-mail: carlotta.marianecci@uniroma1.it [Department of Drug Chemistry and Technologies, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Pantanella, F. [Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, SAPIENZA University of Rome, Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Research Center for Nanotechnology applied to Engineering of SAPIENZA University of Rome (CNIS), Piazzale A. Moro 5, 00185, Rome (Italy); Rinaldi, F.; Ingallina, C. [Center for Life Nano Science @ Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Viale Regina Elena 291, 00161, Rome (Italy); Sorbo, A. [Department of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161, Rome (Italy)

    2015-06-23

    We report a phenomenological approach for the quantification of the diameter of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) incorporated in non-ionic surfactant vesicles (niosomes) using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). After a simple specimen preparation, i.e., by putting a drop of solution containing MNPs-loaded niosomes on flat substrates, topography and MFM phase images are collected. To attempt the quantification of the diameter of entrapped MNPs, the method is calibrated on the sole MNPs deposited on the same substrates by analyzing the MFM signal as a function of the MNP diameter (at fixed tip-sample distance) and of the tip-sample distance (for selected MNPs). After calibration, the effective diameter of the MNPs entrapped in some niosomes is quantitatively deduced from MFM images.

  10. Electromagnetic force and torque on magnetic and negative-index scatterers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumet, Patrick C; Rahmani, Adel

    2009-02-16

    We derive the analytic expressions of the electromagnetic force and torque on a dipolar particle, with arbitrary dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability. We then develop a general framework, based on the coupled dipole method, for computing the electromagnetic force and torque experienced by an object with arbitrary shape, dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability.

  11. The CantiClever: A Dedicated Probe for Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bos, A.G.; Heskamp, I.R.; Heskamp, Iwan; Siekman, Martin Herman; Abelmann, Leon; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    We present a new cantilever for magnetic-force microscopy (MFM), the CantiClever, which is not derived from atomic-force microscopy (AFM) probes but optimized for MFM. Our design integrates the cantilever and the magnetic tip in a single manufacturing process with the use of silicon microma-chining

  12. Effects of a static inhomogeneous magnetic field acting on a laser-produced carbon plasma plume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Favre

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We present time- and space-resolved observations of the dynamics of a laser-produced carbon plasma, propagating in a sub-Tesla inhomogeneous magnetic field, with both, axial and radial field gradients. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 340 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, with a fluence of 7 J/cm2, is used to generate the plasma from a solid graphite target, in vacuum. The magnetic field is produced using two coaxial sets of two NeFeB ring magnets, parallel to the laser target surface. The diagnostics include plasma imaging with 50 ns time resolution, spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy and Faraday cup. Based on our observations, evidence of radial and axial plasma confinement due to magnetic field gradients is presented. Formation of C2 molecules, previously observed in the presence of a low pressure neutral gas background, and enhanced on-axis ion flux, are ascribed to finite Larmor radius effects and reduced radial transport due to the presence of the magnetic field.

  13. [The influence of heat treatment on retention force of magnetic attachments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Wen-jie; Weng, Wei-min

    2011-10-01

    To study the influence of heat treatment on retention force of magnetic attachments. Three groups of magnetic attachments (including 10 Magfit EX 400W, 10 Magfit EX 600W, 10 Magfit EX 800W) were fixed on universal test machine respectively. The retention force of each attachment was measured. After heat treatment, their retention force was measured again. The difference of retention force before and after heat treatment was compared using SPSS11.0 software package. The average retention force of magnetic attachments (Magfit EX 400W) was (1.58±0.12)N before heat treatment and (1.64±0.11)N after heat treatment. The average retention force of magnetic attachments (Magfit EX 600W) was (2.67±0.19)N before heat treatment and (2.65±0.14)N after heat treatment.The average retention force of magnetic attachments (Magfit EX 800W) was (3.02±0.25)N before heat treatment and (3.02±0.24)N after heat treatment. The retention force of magnetic attachments had no significant change after heat treatment (P>0.05). The magnetic attachments can be treated by waterbath heart treatment in the clinic without significant change of their retention force.

  14. FTIR investigation of the effects of ultra-strong static magnetic field on the secondary structures of protein in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zichao; Hu, Xing; Zhao, Xusheng; Ren, Zhongming; Ding, Guoji

    2009-07-01

    Secondary structures of protein in Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus) exposed to the ultra-strong static magnetic field (SMF) were investigated by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Difference index D value of amide I (1600-1700 cm -1) showed that the ultra-strong magnetic field had little impact on S. aureus, but had strong impact on E. coli. The results indicated that 3.46-9.92% of the disorder coils in the secondary structures of protein in E. coli were turned into α-helices under SMF while applying deconvolution and curve fitting to amide I. At the same time, intermolecular β-sheets transforming into intramolecular ones suggested that cohesion among protein molecules had been destroyed and intramolecular hydrogen bonds strengthened. All the differences among the compositions of protein's secondary structures in E. coli were mostly due to the varying degrees of various proteins affected by the magnetic field. The results may provide new insights into the structural changes of proteins induced by the SMF.

  15. APPLICATION OF MULTILAYER FILM CONFIGURATION TO PROTECT PHOTOMULTIPLIER AGAINST EXTERNAL STATIC MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Batische

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of the screening constant magnetic field is multi-layered film screens system of NiFe/Cu, formed on the cylindrical housing of photomultiplier tubes, and compared with screen-based steel material – brand 80NHS permalloy. It is shown that the most effective is the screen on the basis of the multilayered film screens, which provide shielding effectiveness value 8–10 in magnetic fields with induction of 0,1–1 mT, and 80–100 – in magnetic fields with induction of 2–4 mT , which is 4–5 times higher than for the screen of the material 80NHS.

  16. Response of pain to static magnetic fields in postpolio patients: a double-blind pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallbona, C; Hazlewood, C F; Jurida, G

    1997-11-01

    To determine if the chronic pain frequently presented by postpolio patients can be relieved by application of magnetic fields applied directly over an identified pain trigger point. Double-blind randomized clinical trial. The postpolio clinic of a large rehabilitation hospital. Fifty patients with diagnosed postpolio syndrome who reported muscular or arthritic-like pain. Application of active or placebo 300 to 500 Gauss magnetic devices to the affected area for 45 minutes. Score on the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Patients who received the active device experienced an average pain score decrease of 4.4 +/- 3.1 (p postpolio subjects.

  17. Static Magnetic Proximity Effect in Pt/NiFe2O4 and Pt/Fe Bilayers Investigated by X-Ray Resonant Magnetic Reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschel, T; Klewe, C; Schmalhorst, J-M; Bertram, F; Kuschel, O; Schemme, T; Wollschläger, J; Francoual, S; Strempfer, J; Gupta, A; Meinert, M; Götz, G; Meier, D; Reiss, G

    2015-08-28

    The spin polarization of Pt in Pt/NiFe2O4 and Pt/Fe bilayers is studied by interface-sensitive x-ray resonant magnetic reflectivity to investigate static magnetic proximity effects. The asymmetry ratio of the reflectivity is measured at the Pt L3 absorption edge using circular polarized x-rays for opposite directions of the magnetization at room temperature. The results of the 2% asymmetry ratio for Pt/Fe bilayers are independent of the Pt thickness between 1.8 and 20 nm. By comparison with ab initio calculations, the maximum magnetic moment per spin polarized Pt atom at the interface is determined to be (0.6±0.1)  μB for Pt/Fe. For Pt/NiFe2O4 the asymmetry ratio drops below the sensitivity limit of 0.02  μB per Pt atom. Therefore, we conclude, that the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect recently observed in Pt/NiFe2O4 is not influenced by a proximity induced anomalous Nernst effect.

  18. Effect of Static Magnetic Field on the Rate of Proliferation and Viability in HeLa Cancer Cells and Normal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shams

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The increasing use of the electromagnetic devices in daily life leads to higher electromagnetic filed effects. The effects on the organic systems are contradictory and controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different intensities and durations of the static magnetic fields on the living cells and their proliferation rate. Materials & Methods: In the applied study, two HeLa cancer cell lines and human fibroblast natural cells were studied. At first, the cells were cultured on DMEN medium. Three magnetic intensities (7, 14, and 21T and two durations (24 and 48h were used, and the cells were treated by static magnetic field. The living cell percentage and cell proliferation rate were assessed by MTT method. Trypan blue was used in staining. And an optical microscope was used in enumeration. Data was analyzed by Graphpad Prism 5 using one-way ANOVA. Findings: The higher the static magnetic field and the more the duration were, the lesser the percentage of living cells and cell proliferation, showing a significant reduction in the HeLa cancer cells, while it was insignificant in the fibroblast natural cells. The highest reduction in the living cell percentage and cell proliferation rate was in 48-hour 21T (p<0.05. Conclusion: The static magnetic field affects the HeLa cancer cells more than the fibroblast cells. The higher the field intensity and the more the duration are, the lesser the alive cell percentage and cell proliferation rate.

  19. QUASI-STATIC MODEL OF MAGNETICALLY COLLIMATED JETS AND RADIO LOBES. II. JET STRUCTURE AND STABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fowler, T. Kenneth [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hooper, E. Bickford [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); McClenaghan, Joseph; Lin, Zhihong [University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    This is the second in a series of companion papers showing that when an efficient dynamo can be maintained by accretion disks around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei, it can lead to the formation of a powerful, magnetically driven, and mediated helix that could explain both the observed radio jet/lobe structures and ultimately the enormous power inferred from the observed ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. In the first paper, we showed self-consistently that minimizing viscous dissipation in the disk naturally leads to jets of maximum power with boundary conditions known to yield jets as a low-density, magnetically collimated tower, consistent with observational constraints of wire-like currents at distances far from the black hole. In this paper we show that these magnetic towers remain collimated as they grow in length at nonrelativistic velocities. Differences with relativistic jet models are explained by three-dimensional magnetic structures derived from a detailed examination of stability properties of the tower model, including a broad diffuse pinch with current profiles predicted by a detailed jet solution outside the collimated central column treated as an electric circuit. We justify our model in part by the derived jet dimensions in reasonable agreement with observations. Using these jet properties, we also discuss the implications for relativistic particle acceleration in nonrelativistically moving jets. The appendices justify the low jet densities yielding our results and speculate how to reconcile our nonrelativistic treatment with general relativistic MHD simulations.

  20. Low mass planet migration in magnetically torqued dead zones - I. Static migration torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Colin P.; Nelson, Richard P.; Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan; Gressel, Oliver; Lyra, Wladimir

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by models suggesting that the inner planet forming regions of protoplanetary discs are predominantly lacking in viscosity-inducing turbulence, and are possibly threaded by Hall-effect generated large-scale horizontal magnetic fields, we examine the dynamics of the corotation region of a low-mass planet in such an environment. The corotation torque in an inviscid, isothermal, dead zone ought to saturate, with the libration region becoming both symmetrical and of a uniform vortensity, leading to fast inward migration driven by the Lindblad torques alone. However, in such a low viscosity situation, the material on librating streamlines essentially preserves its vortensity. If there is relative radial motion between the disc gas and the planet, the librating streamlines will no longer be symmetrical. Hence, if the gas is torqued by a large-scale magnetic field so that it undergoes a net inflow or outflow past the planet, driving evolution of the vortensity and inducing asymmetry of the corotation region, the corotation torque can grow, leading to a positive torque. In this paper, we treat this effect by applying a symmetry argument to the previously studied case of a migrating planet in an inviscid disc. Our results show that the corotation torque due to a laminar Hall-induced magnetic field in a dead zone behaves quite differently from that studied previously for a viscous disc. Furthermore, the magnetic field induced corotation torque and the dynamical corotation torque in a low viscosity disc can be regarded as one unified effect.

  1. Static Magnetic Field Effects on Impaired Peripheral Vasomotion in Conscious Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenzhi Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the SMF effects on hemodynamics in the caudal artery-ligated rat as an in vivo ischemia model using noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS combined with power spectral analysis by fast Fourier transform. Male Wistar rats in the growth stage (10 weeks old were randomly assigned into four groups: (i intact and nonoperated cage control (n=20; (ii ligated alone (n=20; (iii ligated and implanted with a nonmagnetized rod (sham magnet; n=22; and (vi ligated and implanted with a magnetized rod (n=22. After caudal artery ligation, a magnetized or unmagnetized rod (maximum magnetic flux density of 160 mT was implanted transcortically into the middle diaphysis of the fifth caudal vertebra. During the experimental period of 7 weeks, NIRS measurements were performed in 3- , 5- , and 7-week sessions and the vasomotion amplitude and frequency were analyzed by fast Fourier transform. Exposure for 3–7 weeks to the SMF significantly contracted the increased vasomotion amplitude in the ischemic area. These results suggest that SMF may have a regulatory effect on rhythmic vasomotion in the ischemic area by smoothing the vasomotion amplitude in the early stage of the wound healing process.

  2. Static Magnetic Field Effects on Impaired Peripheral Vasomotion in Conscious Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Hideyuki; Hatano, Naoya; Tomita, Naohide; Ikada, Yoshito

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the SMF effects on hemodynamics in the caudal artery-ligated rat as an in vivo ischemia model using noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with power spectral analysis by fast Fourier transform. Male Wistar rats in the growth stage (10 weeks old) were randomly assigned into four groups: (i) intact and nonoperated cage control (n = 20); (ii) ligated alone (n = 20); (iii) ligated and implanted with a nonmagnetized rod (sham magnet; n = 22); and (vi) ligated and implanted with a magnetized rod (n = 22). After caudal artery ligation, a magnetized or unmagnetized rod (maximum magnetic flux density of 160 mT) was implanted transcortically into the middle diaphysis of the fifth caudal vertebra. During the experimental period of 7 weeks, NIRS measurements were performed in 3- , 5- , and 7-week sessions and the vasomotion amplitude and frequency were analyzed by fast Fourier transform. Exposure for 3–7 weeks to the SMF significantly contracted the increased vasomotion amplitude in the ischemic area. These results suggest that SMF may have a regulatory effect on rhythmic vasomotion in the ischemic area by smoothing the vasomotion amplitude in the early stage of the wound healing process. PMID:24454512

  3. Probing the Nano-Skyrmion Lattice on Fe/Ir(111) with Magnetic Exchange Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenz, Josef; Köhler, Arne; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2017-07-28

    We demonstrate that the magnetic nano-Skyrmion lattice on the Fe monolayer on Ir(111) and the positions of the Fe atoms can be resolved simultaneously using magnetic exchange force microscopy. Thus, the relation between magnetic and atomic structure can be determined straightforwardly by evaluating the Fourier transformation of the real space image data. We further show that the magnetic contrast can be mapped on a Heisenberg-like magnetic interaction between tip and sample spins. Since our imaging technique is based on measuring forces, our observation paves the way to study Skyrmions or other complex spin textures on insulating sample systems with atomic resolution.

  4. Transverse forces in the CBETA v6/v6.5 magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-06-16

    These 2D transverse force calculations were done for the following Halbach magnet types in the CBETA design as it currently stands (an implementation of the April 10, 2017 lattice). These magnets are made out of two longitudinally-­stacked layers of permanent magnet blocks.

  5. Force-free magnetic-field structures and their role in solar activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, C. W.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic-field structures in solar active regions are expected to be substantially force-free. A method is proposed for calculating such structures by numerical methods. The method is applied to the study of the magnetic-field pattern associated with a sunspot of one polarity surrounded by a magnetic region of opposite polarity when the sunspot rotates with respect to the surrounding region. Rotation introduces a toroidal component of magnetic field, and the associated pressure leads to inflation of the magnetic field pattern. If the differential rotation exceeds about 180 deg, the force-free magnetic field has energy greater than that of an open magnetic-field configuration with the same photospheric boundary conditions. It is concluded that, beyond this point, the force-free field structure is metastable and can be converted into an open field structure by an explosive MHD instability.

  6. Forces in a 3D magnetic field of conducting current contours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stancheva Rumena

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with 3D magnetic field analysis of conducting current contours. The magnetic field and forces were calculated analytically and by FEM applying the Comsol Multiphysics package. Forces were calculated by the Maxwell stress tensor and by volume force density. Numerical results for real and ideal contours with the same linear dimensions are discussed. Comparison between analytical and numerical data shows satisfactory agreement.

  7. Effect of static magnetic fields on the metamorphosis of frogs; Kaeru no hentai katei ni oyobosu jiba no eikyo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiwaki, O. [Hiroshima City University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1996-01-20

    The effect of static magnetic fields on the metamorphosis of frogs was investigated to examine the effect of static magnetic fields on the internal secretion system and nerve system in a living body. In this experiment, the growth and metamorphosis of a Rana Japonica`s larva are inhibited inside the vessel in which a magnet whose upper surface is the N pole was put at the bottom. However, no remarkable change was recognized when a magnet whose upper surface is the S pole was put at the bottom. For a bullfrog, the same result as described above was obtained. The experiment result shows that the vertical upward fields inhibit the growth and metamorphosis of a frog`s larva, but the vertical downward fields do not remarkably act on them. As a result of this experiment, the growth and metamorphosis of a frog are considered to act on the internal secretion system of a tadpole in static magnetic fields when the control by thyroxin is considered. Since the existence of action varies depending on the polarity of vertical magnetic fields, the magnet in a living body is judged to be associated with the internal secretion system of a tadpole. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Statically determined slip-line field solution for the axial forming force estimation in the radial-axial ring rolling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliato, Luca; Berti, Guido A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a statically determined slip-line solution algorithm is proposed for the calculation of the axial forming force in the radial-axial ring rolling process of flat rings. The developed solution is implemented in an Excel spreadsheet for the construction of the slip-line field and the calculation of the pressure factor to be used in the force model. The comparison between analytical solution and authors' FE simulation allows stating that the developed model supersedes the previous literature ones and proves the reliability of the proposed approach.

  9. A study on the changes in attractive force of magnetic attachments for overdenture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Han-Wool; Cho, In-Ho; Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Choi, Yu-Sung

    2016-02-01

    Although magnetic attachment is used frequently for overdenture, it is reported that attractive force can be decreased by abrasion and corrosion. The purpose of this study was to establish the clinical basis about considerations and long term prognosis of overdenture using magnetic attachments by investigating the change in attractive force of magnetic attachment applied to the patients. Among the patients treated with overdenture using magnetic attachments in Dankook University Dental Hospital, attractive force records of 61 magnetic attachments of 20 subjects who re-visited from July 2013 to June 2014 were analyzed. Dental magnet tester (Aichi Micro Intelligent Co., Aichi, Japan) was used for measurement. The magnetic attachments used in this study were Magfit IP-B Flat, Magfit DX400, Magfit DX600 and Magfit DX800 (Aichi Steel Co., Aichi, Japan) filled with Neodymium (NdFeB), a rare-earth magnet. Reduction ratio of attractive force had no significant correlation with conditional variables to which attachments were applied, and was higher when the maintenance period was longer (Pforce was significantly higher in the subject group in which attachments were used over 9 years than within 9 years (Pmagnetic attachments showed detachment of keeper or assembly. Attractive force of magnetic attachment is maintained regardless of conditional variables and reduction ratio increased as the maintenance period became longer. Further study on adhesive material, attachment method and design improvement to prevent detachment of magnetic attachment is needed.

  10. Magnetic domain structures and stray fields of individual elongated magnetite grains revealed by magnetic force microscopy (MFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Stipp, S. L. S.; McEnroe, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    In order to clarify the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic magnetic features of a rock, we applied magnetic force microscopy (MFM) as a local probe on a sample with an intense natural remanent magnetisation, a norite from Heskestad, Norway. We studied in detail seven magnetite (Fe3O...

  11. d⩾5 magnetized static, balanced black holes with S{sup 2}×S{sup d−4} event horizon topology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen, E-mail: eugen.radu@uni-oldenburg.de

    2013-06-10

    We construct static, nonextremal black hole solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell equations in d=6,7 spacetime dimensions, with an event horizon of S{sup 2}×S{sup d−4} topology. These configurations are asymptotically flat, the U(1) field being purely magnetic, with a spherical distribution of monopole charges but no net charge measured at infinity. They can be viewed as generalizations of the d=5 static dipole black ring, sharing its basic properties, in particular the presence of a conical singularity. The magnetized version of these solutions is constructed by applying a Harrison transformation, which puts them into an external magnetic field. For d=5,6,7, balanced configurations approaching asymptotically a Melvin universe background are found for a critical value of the background magnetic field.

  12. Biological effects of static magnetic fields: a selective review with emphasis on risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterly, C. E.

    1982-04-01

    Rather than focusing on literature per se, the current study determines the status of magnetic field information that is applicable to risk assessment. Hence, an attempt is made to identify both the literature that is useful to the goal of risk assessment and a framework within which risk assessment methodologies can be derived. From this selected review, it is concluded that three areas exist for which adequate information can be found to begin modelling: disease induction, reproduction and development, and cardiovascular response. The first two are supported by a combination of positive and negative findings and the last by a calculational technique which utilizes the physically well-known principle of flow retardation for a conducting fluid moving through a magnetic field.

  13. Oscillation of a diamagnetic liquid bubble suspended by magnetic force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, R. E-mail: yamane@kokushikan.ac.jp; Tomita, S.; Mai, J.; Park, M.K.; Oshima, S

    2002-11-01

    The levitation of the diamagnetic liquid droplet with the strong magnetic field is experimentally simulated, using the magnetic fluid as the surrounding fluid in place of air or gas, and the water bubble is levitated with the conventional permanent magnet. When the stepwise magnetic field is superposed, the suspended bubble behaves as a typical step response with the overshoot and viscous damping. The effects of the volume of the bubble, the strength of the magnetic field and the concentration of the magnetic fluid are investigated.

  14. Different types of ferrite thin films as magnetic cantilever coating for magnetic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koblischka, M.R., E-mail: m.koblischka@mx.uni-saarland.d [Institute of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, P.O. Box 151150, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Kirsch, M.; Pfeifer, R.; Getlawi, S. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, P.O. Box 151150, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Rigato, F.; Fontcuberta, J. [Departamento di Magnetisme, CSIC, Bellaterra (Spain); Sulzbach, T. [Nanoworld services GmbH, Schottkystrasse 10, d-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Hartmann, U. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, P.O. Box 151150, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Different types of ferrites are employed in the form of thin films as magnetic coating on cantilevers for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) use. This is especially needed for cantilevers employed in high-frequency MFM (HF-MFM), where stray fields of hard disk recording heads are investigated. Our experiments show that we can operate HF-MFM successfully at carrier frequencies up 2 GHz using such ferrite-coated cantilevers. Thin films of two ferrites, NiZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel ferrite and Co{sub 2} Z-type hexaferrite (Ba{sub 3}Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 24}O{sub 41}, BCFO) were prepared by RF sputtering. As a basis for these probes, we employ commercial micromachined silicon cantilevers. Additionally, films on Si (1 0 0) and Si (1 1 1)-oriented substrates with a thickness up to 100 nm were prepared for analysis purposes, enabling the optimization of the sputter process. For a high spatial resolution of MFM, however, thinner magnetic coatings are required. Therefore, the third type, c, was prepared by laser-ablation with a thickness of 30 nm, also directly onto the Si without additional buffer layer.

  15. From static to dynamic mapping of chromospheric magnetism - FIRS and SPIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Lin, Haosheng

    2014-06-01

    Advancements in theoretical forward modeling and observational techniques now allow the mapping of the chromospheric magnetic field vector in some regions. We report on full maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbra within NOAA AR 11408. These maps are derived from full Stokes observations of the He I triplet at 1083 nm, which show both Zeeman and atomic-level polarization signatures. Yet, due to the long time to acquire these observations with the slit-based Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS), our measurements primarily probe long-lived chromospheric structures, albeit at very high polarization sensitivity. The fast temporal scales remain difficult to probe with conventional slit-based spectropolarimeters. Alternatively, SPIES is an instrument based on a birefringent fiber optic IFU, designed to multiplex a two-dimensional spatial field with high spectral resolution spectropolarimetry, and is an ideal tool for probing small-scale, dynamic magnetic features. We will present movies of the dynamic chromosphere acquired from SPIES across a sunspot and its fine-scaled superpenumbra.

  16. Torsional resonance mode magnetic force microscopy: enabling higher lateral resolution magnetic imaging without topography-related effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaidatzis, A; García-Martín, J M

    2013-04-26

    We present experimental work that reveals the benefits of performing magnetic force microscopy measurements employing the torsional resonance mode of cantilever oscillation. This approach provides two clear advantages: the ability of performing magnetic imaging without topography-related interference and the significant lateral resolution improvement (approximately 15%). We believe that this work demonstrates a significant improvement to a versatile magnetic imaging technique widely used in academia and in industry.

  17. Static magnetic fields aggravate the effects of ionizing radiation on cell cycle progression in bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Amir Sabet; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Ghanati, Faezeh; Heshmati, Emran; Tavasoli, Zeinab; Jahromi, Azadeh Manoochehri

    2010-02-01

    In order to evaluate the influence of static magnetic fields (SMF) on the progression of cell cycle as a monitor of presumptive genotoxicity of these fields, the effects of a 15 mT SMF on cell cycle progression in rat bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) were examined. The cells were divided into two groups. One group encountered SMF alone for 5h continuously but the other group exposed with X ray before treatment with SMF. The population of cells did not show any significant difference in the first group but the second group that was exposed with acute radiation before encountering SMF showed a significant increase in the number of cells in G(2)/M phase. So SMF has intensified the effects of X ray, where SMF alone, did not had any detectable influence on cell cycle. These findings suggest that magnetic fields (MF) play their role by increasing the effects of genotoxic agents and because of the greater concentration of free radicals in the presence of radical pair producers, this effect is better detectable.

  18. Direct measurement and microscale mapping of nanoNewton to milliNewton magnetic forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Velez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the direct measurement and mapping of magnetic forces/fields with microscale spatial resolution by combining a commercial microforce sensing probe with a thin-film permanent micromagnet. The main motivation of this work is to fill a critical metrology gap with a technology for direct measurement of magnetic forces from nN to 10’s of mN with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. This capability is ideal for measuring forces (which are linked to magnetic field gradients produced by small-scale magnetic and electromagnetic devices including sensors, actuators, MEMS, micromotors, microfluidics, biomedical devices. This new measuring technique is validated by comparison of measured forces from small permanent magnets with the analytical models.

  19. Process and device for the separation of fragments of liberated ferrous scrap from not liberated ferrous scrap fragments by means of a static magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, P.C.; Berkhout, S.P.M.; Fraunholcz, O.N.

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a process and device for the separation of fragments of liberated ferrous scrap from not liberated ferrous scrap fragments by means of a static magnet, wherein a mixture of said liberated ferrous and not liberated ferrous fragments is fed onto a continuous conveyor belt

  20. Exposure to static magnetic fields and risk of accidents among a cohort of workers from a medical imaging device manufacturing facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Suzan; Slottje, Pauline; Portengen, Lützen; Kromhout, Hans

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the association between occupational MRI-related static magnetic fields (SMF) exposure and the occurrence of accidents. METHODS: Recent and career SMF exposure was assessed by linking a retrospective job exposure matrix to payroll based job histories, for a cohort of (former)

  1. Occupational exposure of healthcare and research staff to static magnetic stray fields from 1.5-7 Tesla MRI scanners is associated with reporting of transient symptoms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Kristel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323043216; Christopher-de Vries, Yvette; Mason, Catherine K; de Vocht, Frank; Portengen, Lützen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269224742; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Limited data is available about incidence of acute transient symptoms associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners. We aimed to assess the incidence of these symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with MRI scanners, and their

  2. Measuring single cardiac myocyte contractile force via moving a magnetic bead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shizhuo; Zhang, Xueqian; Zhan, Chun; Wu, Juntao; Xu, Jinchao; Cheung, Joseph

    2005-02-01

    One of the biggest problems of heart failure is the heart's inability to effectively pump blood to meet the body's demands, which may be caused by disease-induced alterations in contraction properties (such as contractile force and Young's modulus). Thus, it is very important to measure contractile properties at single cardiac myocyte level that can lay the foundation for quantitatively understanding the mechanism of heart failure and understanding molecular alterations in diseased heart cells. In this article, we report a novel single cardiac myocyte contractile force measurement technique based on moving a magnetic bead. The measuring system is mainly composed of 1), a high-power inverted microscope with video output and edge detection; and 2), a moving magnetic bead based magnetic force loading module. The main measurement procedures are as follows: 1), record maximal displacement of single cardiac myocyte during contraction; 2), attach a magnetic bead on one end of the myocyte that will move with myocyte during the contraction; 3), repeat step 1 and record contraction processes under different magnitudes of magnetic force loading by adjusting the magnetic field applied on the magnetic bead; and 4), derive the myocyte contractile force base on the maximal displacement of cell contraction and magnetic loading force. The major advantages of this unique approach are: 1), measuring the force without direct connections to the cell specimen (i.e., "remote sensing", a noninvasive/minimally invasive approach); 2), high sensitivity and large dynamic range (force measurement range: from pico Newton to micro Newton); 3), a convenient and cost-effective approach; and 4), more importantly, it can be used to study the contractile properties of heart cells under different levels of external loading forces by adjusting the magnitude of applied magnetic field, which is very important for studying disease induced alterations in contraction properties. Experimental results

  3. Vertical Magnetic Levitation Force Measurement on Single Crystal YBaCuO Bulk at Different Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Sukru; Guner, Sait Baris; Ozturk, Kemal; Ozturk, Ozgur

    Magnetic levitation force measurements of HTS samples are performed with the use of liquid nitrogen. It is both convenient and cheap. However, the temperature of the sample cannot be changed (77 K) and there is problem of frost. So, it is necessary to build another type of system to measure the levitation force high Tc superconductor at different temperatures. In this study, we fabricated YBaCuO superconducting by top-seeding-melting-growth (TSMG) technique and measured vertical forces of them at FC (Field Cooling) and ZFC (Zero Field Cooling) regimes by using our new designed magnetic levitation force measurement system. It was used to investigate the three-dimensional levitation force and lateral force in the levitation system consisting of a cylindrical magnet and a permanent cylindrical superconductor at different temperatures (37, 47, 57, 67 and 77 K).

  4. Design and damping force characterization of a new magnetorheological damper activated by permanent magnet flux dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Hoon; Han, Chulhee; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2018-01-01

    This work proposes a novel type of tunable magnetorheological (MR) damper operated based solely on the location of a permanent magnet incorporated into the piston. To create a larger damping force variation in comparison with the previous model, a different design configuration of the permanent-magnet-based MR (PMMR) damper is introduced to provide magnetic flux dispersion in two magnetic circuits by utilizing two materials with different magnetic reluctance. After discussing the design configuration and some advantages of the newly designed mechanism, the magnetic dispersion principle is analyzed through both the formulated analytical model of the magnetic circuit and the computer simulation based on the magnetic finite element method. Sequentially, the principal design parameters of the damper are determined and fabricated. Then, experiments are conducted to evaluate the variation in damping force depending on the location of the magnet. It is demonstrated that the new design and magnetic dispersion concept are valid showing higher damping force than the previous model. In addition, a curved structure of the two materials is further fabricated and tested to realize the linearity of the damping force variation.

  5. The influence of static magnetic fields on canine and equine mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marędziak, Monika; Marycz, Krzysztof; Smieszek, Agnieszka; Lewandowski, Daniel; Toker, Nezir Yaşar

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the proliferation rate and morphological changes of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells of canine and equine origin (Eq- and CaAdMSC). Investigated cells were exposed to a static magnetic field (MF) with the intensity of 0.5 T. Proliferation activity of cells was determined with the Alamar Blue assay. Obtained results, normalized in respect to the control culture, showed that EqAdMSC exposed to MF maintained a high proliferation status, whereas proliferation activity of CaAdMSC cultured in the presence of MF was decreased. Estimations of population doubling time (PDT) also revealed that EqAdMSCs exposed to static MF achieved a twofold increase in the total number of cells in a shorter amount of time than the control culture. The PDT value obtained for investigated CaAdMSCs indicated that MF exposure resulted in the prolongation of population doubling time. Morphology of cells and cellular composition was investigated using a light inverted microscope and a fluorescent microscope. A scanning electron microscope was used for microvesicles (MVs) imaging. Obtained results showed that both cell types maintained fibroblastic morphology and did not reveal signs of apoptosis or necrosis. However, the MF had an influence on the MVs secretion. While EqAdMSCs propagated in the presence of MF were characterized by the abundant MVs presence, CaAdMSCs revealed poor secretory activity. The approach presented provides complex analysis, which enables one to determine changes in equine and canine cytophysiology.

  6. Contactless grasp of a magnetic particle in a fluid and its application to quantifications of forces affecting its behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokura, S., E-mail: susumu_tokura@ihi.co.jp [Corporate Research and Development, IHI Corporation, 1 Shin-Nakahara, Isogo, Yokohama, Kanagawa 235-8501 (Japan); Department of Electrical Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto-Daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Hara, M.; Kawaguchi, N. [Corporate Research and Development, IHI Corporation, 1 Shin-Nakahara, Isogo, Yokohama, Kanagawa 235-8501 (Japan); Amemiya, N. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto-Daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    In this study, the contactless grasp of a magnetic particle suspended in a fluid at rest or in motion by coil current control, and a method for estimating these forces quantitatively were developed. Four electromagnets were used to apply magnetic fields to magnetic ferrite particles (diameter, 300 nm–300 µm) in a fluid in a vessel. Particle-tracking velocimetry with high-speed image processing was used to visualize the behavior of the magnetic particles in the fluid. In addition, contactless grasp of a magnetic particle using the feedback control was accomplished. Furthermore, by making the magnetic force and the resultant force of the other forces affecting a magnetic particle be in balance, the vertical and horizontal forces affecting the minute magnetic particle, such as the viscous force or the magnetic force between magnetized particles, could be estimated quantitatively from the current in the coil of each electromagnet, without any physical contact with the particle itself. These results constitute useful information for studies on the issues in the handling of micro- or nano-particles. - Highlights: • Four electromagnets are used to apply magnetic field to magnetic ferrite particles. • Motion of magnetic particles suspended in a resting or flowing fluid is visualized. • Contactless grasp of a magnetic particle using feedback control was accomplished. • Vertical and horizontal forces affecting a particle can be estimated quantitatively. • Force between magnetized particles which approach to each other was measured.

  7. The electrically detected magnetic resonance microscope: combining conductive atomic force microscopy with electrically detected magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Konrad; Hauer, Benedikt; Stoib, Benedikt; Trautwein, Markus; Matich, Sonja; Huebl, Hans; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Finger, Friedhelm; Bittl, Robert; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S

    2013-10-01

    We present the design and implementation of a scanning probe microscope, which combines electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and (photo-)conductive atomic force microscopy ((p)cAFM). The integration of a 3-loop 2-gap X-band microwave resonator into an AFM allows the use of conductive AFM tips as a movable contact for EDMR experiments. The optical readout of the AFM cantilever is based on an infrared laser to avoid disturbances of current measurements by absorption of straylight of the detection laser. Using amorphous silicon thin film samples with varying defect densities, the capability to detect a spatial EDMR contrast is demonstrated. Resonant current changes as low as 20 fA can be detected, allowing the method to realize a spin sensitivity of 8×10(6)spins/√Hz at room temperature.

  8. Data on force-dependent structural changes of chromatin fibers measured with magnetic tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Tso Chien

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The compaction of chromatin fibers regulates the accessibility of embedded DNA, highly associated with transcriptional activities [1]. Single molecule force spectroscopy has revealed the great details of the structural changes of chromatin fibers in the presence of external exerted force [2–7]. However, most of the studies focus on a specific force regime [2,3,8,9]. The data here show force-extension (FE traces of chromatin fibers as measured with magnetic tweezers, covering the force regime from 0 pN to 27 pN. Those traces provide information for further studies at varied force regimes.

  9. Lightweight-compact variable-gap undulator with force cancellation system based on multipole monolithic magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Ryota; Kagamihata, Akihiro; Seike, Takamitsu; Kishimoto, Hikaru; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    A lightweight-compact variable-gap undulator (LCVGU) having the force-cancellation system based on the multipole monolithic magnets (MMMs) has been developed. The LCVGU is free from the heavy mechanical frames, which is a fundamental element specific to conventional variable-gap undulators (VGUs) because of a strong attractive force, and thus the cost and time for construction and installation are expected to be significantly reduced; the MMMs counteract the strong attractive force in a cost-effective manner. Results of mechanical tests and magnetic-field measurements of two prototype LCVGUs equipped with the proposed force cancellation system have revealed the comparable performance with the conventional VGUs.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF CO-FE MAGNETIC FILMS FABRICATED BY GALVANO-STATIC ELECTRODEPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ghaferi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, nanocrystalline Co-Fe coatings were electrodeposited on copper substrate. The influence of current density on different properties of the films at two pH levels was investigated. All the coatings showed nodular structure with rougher morphology at higher current densities. Due to anomalous deposition at higher current density, the amount of iron content increased and reached its maximum value at about 50 wt.% for the coating obtained from pH 5. X-ray diffraction patterns showed hcp structure as the dominant phase. However, by increasing current density at lower pH value, a double phase structure containing fcc+hcp phases was detected. It was observed that current density has a positive effect on grain refinement. However, coarser grains would obtain at lower pH value. Microhardness measurements showed that, there is a direct relationship between grain size and microhardness. Moreover, microstructure in double phase structure films can influence microhardness more dominantly. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM measurements indicated that the saturation magnetic is proportion to deposited iron content and reached its maximum value at about 1512 emu/cm3. It was cleared that grain size, phase structure and chemical composition can affect coercivity of the films effectively.

  11. A Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Quantum Computer with Tellurium Donors in Silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, G. P.; Doolen, G. D.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM)-based nuclear spin quantum computer using tellurium impurities in silicon. This approach to quantum computing combines the well-developed silicon technology with expected advances in MRFM.

  12. The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the Coriolis force on the stability of rotating magnetic stars in hydrostatic equilibrium is investigated by using the method of the energy principle. It is shown that this effect is to inhibit the onset of instability.

  13. Drag and Lift Forces Between a Rotating Conductive Sphere and a Cylindrical Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Modeling the interaction between a non-uniform magnetic field and a rotating conductive object allows study of the drag force which is used in applications such as eddy current braking and linear induction motors as well as the transition to a repulsive force that is the basis for magnetic levitation systems. Here, we study the interaction between a non-uniform field generated by a cylindrical magnet and a rotating conductive sphere. Each eddy current in the sphere generates a magnetic field which in turn generates another eddy current, eventually feeding back on itself. A two step mathematics process is developed to find a closed form solution in terms of only two eddy currents. However, the complete solution requires decomposition of the magnetic field into a summation of spherical harmonics, making it more suitable for a graduate level electromagnetism lecture or lab. Finally, the forces associated with these currents are calculated and then verified experimentally.

  14. Separation of binary granular mixtures under vibration and differential magnetic levitation force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catherall, A T; López-Alcaraz, P; Sánchez, P; Swift, Michael R; King, P J

    2005-02-01

    The application of both a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient to a diamagnetic or paramagnetic material can produce a vertical force that acts in concert with the force of gravity. We consider a binary granular mixture in which the two components have different magnetic susceptibilities and therefore experience different effective forces of gravity when subjected to an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Under vertical vibration, such a mixture may rapidly separate into regions almost pure in the two components. We investigate the conditions for this behavior, studying the speed and completeness of separation as a function of differential effective gravity and the frequency and amplitude of vibration. The influence of the cohesive magnetic dipole-dipole interactions on the separation process is also investigated. In our studies insight is gained through the use of a molecular dynamics simulation model.

  15. Detecting the magnetic response of iron oxide capped organosilane nanostructures using magnetic sample modulation and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie-Ren; Lewandowski, Brian R; Xu, Song; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-06-15

    A new imaging strategy using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated for mapping magnetic domains at size regimes below 100 nm. The AFM-based imaging mode is referred to as magnetic sample modulation (MSM), since the flux of an AC-generated electromagnetic field is used to induce physical movement of magnetic nanomaterials on surfaces during imaging. The AFM is operated in contact mode using a soft, nonmagnetic tip to detect the physical motion of the sample. By slowly scanning an AFM probe across a vibrating area of the sample, the frequency and amplitude of vibration induced by the magnetic field is tracked by changes in tip deflection. Thus, the AFM tip serves as a force and motion sensor for mapping the vibrational response of magnetic nanomaterials. Essentially, MSM is a hybrid of contact mode AFM combined with selective modulation of magnetic domains. The positional feedback loop for MSM imaging is the same as that used for force modulation and contact mode AFM; however, the vibration of the sample is analyzed using channels of a lock-in amplifier. The investigations are facilitated by nanofabrication methods combining particle lithography with organic vapor deposition and electroless deposition of iron oxide, to prepare designed test platforms of magnetic materials at nanometer length scales. Custom test platforms furnished suitable surfaces for MSM characterizations at the level of individual metal nanostructures.

  16. General method for calculating the self-induced magnetic force of an axisymmetric toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbio, S.; Rubinacci, G. (Naples Univ. (Italy). Ist. Elettrotecnico)

    1984-06-01

    A method is presented for computing the class of axisymmetric current distributions flowing in a torus whose peripheral surface is a flux surface for the magnetic field produced by the current itself. The method allows the correct calculation of the 'self-induced' magnetic forces arising from the interaction between these currents and their own field. The general expression for the self-induced force is given and an approximate formula is presented in the large aspect-ratio limit.

  17. FEM Analysis of Magnetic Field and Forces in Area ARC Fault of Autotransformer HV Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koteras Dariusz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the electric arc fault in the high voltage winding turn of the power autotransformer has been investigated. 3D magnetic field distributions in the leakage domain and electrodynamic forces acting on high voltage winding have been calculated. Finite Element Method was used for the magnetic flux density simulation. The elctrodynamic force value under the fault exceed significantly the nominal mechanical stresses of the winding.

  18. Static magnetic field (SMF) sensing of the P(723)/P(689) photosynthetic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Chakraborty, Madhurima; Raja, Sufi O; Ghosh, Avijit; Dasgupta, Maitrayee; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2014-12-01

    Moderate intensity SMF have been shown to act as a controller of the protic potential in the coherent milieu of the thylakoid membranes. SMF of the order of 60-500 mT induces memory-like effect in photosystem I (PSI, P723) emission with a correlated oscillation of photosystem II (PSII, P689) fluorescence emission at a temperature of 77 K. The observed magnetic perturbation that affects the thylakoid photon capture circuitry was also found to be associated with the bio-energetic machinery of the thylakoid membranes. At normal pH, SMF causes an enhancement of PSI fluorescence emission intensity (P723/P689 > 1), followed by a slow relaxation on the removal of SMF. The enhancement of the PSI fluorescence intensity also occurs under no-field condition, if either the pH of the medium is lowered, or protonophores, such as carbonyl cyanide chlorophenylhydrazine or nigericin are added (P723/P689≥ 2). If SMF was applied under such a low pH condition or in the presence of protonophore, a reverse effect, particularly, a reduction of the enhanced PSI emission was observed. Because SMF is essentially equivalent to a spin perturbation, the observed effects can be explained in terms of spin re-organization, illustrating a memory effect via membrane re-alignment and assembly. The mimicry of conventional uncouplers by SMF is also notable; the essential difference being the reversibility and manoeuvrability of the latter (SMF). Finally, the effect implies numerous possibilities of externally regulating the photon capture and proton circulation in the thylakoid membranes using controlled SMF.

  19. A flexible automatically adaptive surface nuclear magnetic resonance modelling and inversion framework incorporating complex data and static dephasing dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Trevor P.

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (sNMR) is the only geophysical technique that can directly and non-invasively detect the presence of subsurface liquid water. The method has established itself as valuable tool for hydrologists and groundwater managers owing to the fact that both porosity and hydraulic conductivity estimates can be made using this technique. Although sNMR has enormous potential, there are many challenges with the technique which hinder it's more widespread adoption. For these reasons sNMR has primarily been used as a 1D groundwater sounding tool, although there exist myriad other applications for a method directly sensitive to liquid water. Simultaneously inverting the entire complex dataset as well as the employment of arrays of separated transmitter and receiver coils and integration with other geophysical methods can help to overcome these limitations. This requires modelling algorithms that can accommodate a widely varying set of survey configurations and scenarios. I present the innovative use of sNMR applied to two geotechnical problems: volcanic landslide hazard characterization on Mt. Baker, Washington and the monitoring of internal erosion in earthen embankments. These applications necessitated the development of a general modelling framework capable of handling arbitrary positioned transmitter and receiver coils as well as 3D water distribution. The advantages of comprehensive (whole dataset) inversion of the entire sNMR record have been established for time-domain inversions. However, these inversions are memory intensive and struggle to fit the phase portion of the dataset-necessitating the regretful dismissal of this valuable information. I instead consider the sNMR inversion problem in the frequency-domain for the first time. There are several benefits: effectively lossless compression, and the ability to easily incorporate and solve for static dephasing dynamics caused by magnetic field inhomogeneities. This has allowed for the

  20. Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ann. N.; Anderson, Richard E.; Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

  1. The size effect on the magnetic levitation force of MgB2 bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaskan, B.; Koparan, E. T.; Güner, S. B.; Celik, S.; Yanmaz, E.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the size effect on the magnetic levitation performance of disk-shaped MgB2 bulk superconductors and permanent magnets was investigated. MgB2 samples with varying diameters of 13 mm, 15 mm and 18 mm, each of which were 2 g in mass, were prepared by two-step solid state reaction method. Vertical levitation force measurements under both zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) regimes were carried out at different temperatures of 20, 24 and 28 K. It was determined that the levitation force of the MgB2 strongly depends on both the diameters of the sample and the permanent magnet. In ZFC regime, the maximum levitation force value for the permanent magnet and the sample 18 mm in diameters reached to the 8.41 N at 20 K. In addition, in FC regime, attractive and repulsive force increased with increasing diameters of the sample and the permanent magnet. In that, the sample with 18 mm in diameter showed the highest attractive force value -3.46 N at 20 K and FC regime. The results obtained in this study are very useful in magnetic levitation devices as there is no detailed study on the size of superconductors and permanent magnets.

  2. Non-thermal radio frequency and static magnetic fields increase rate of hemoglobin deoxygenation in a cell-free preparation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Muehsam

    Full Text Available The growing body of clinical and experimental data regarding electromagnetic field (EMF bioeffects and their therapeutic applications has contributed to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of action. This study reports that two EMF modalities currently in clinical use, a pulse-modulated radiofrequency (PRF signal, and a static magnetic field (SMF, applied independently, increased the rate of deoxygenation of human hemoglobin (Hb in a cell-free assay. Deoxygenation of Hb was initiated using the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT in an assay that allowed the time for deoxygenation to be controlled (from several min to several hours by adjusting the relative concentrations of DTT and Hb. The time course of Hb deoxygenation was observed using visible light spectroscopy. Exposure for 10-30 min to either PRF or SMF increased the rate of deoxygenation occurring several min to several hours after the end of EMF exposure. The sensitivity and biochemical simplicity of the assay developed here suggest a new research tool that may help to further the understanding of basic biophysical EMF transduction mechanisms. If the results of this study were to be shown to occur at the cellular and tissue level, EMF-enhanced oxygen availability would be one of the mechanisms by which clinically relevant EMF-mediated enhancement of growth and repair processes could occur.

  3. Quantitative guidelines for force calibration through spectral analysis of magnetic tweezers data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J W; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; Lipfert, Jan; Dekker, Nynke H

    2010-08-09

    Single-molecule techniques are powerful tools that can be used to study the kinetics and mechanics of a variety of enzymes and their complexes. Force spectroscopy, for example, can be used to control the force applied to a single molecule and thereby facilitate the investigation of real-time nucleic acid-protein interactions. In magnetic tweezers, which offer straightforward control and compatibility with fluorescence measurements or parallel tracking modes, force-measurement typically relies on the analysis of positional fluctuations through video microscopy. Significant errors in force estimates, however, may arise from incorrect spectral analysis of the Brownian motion in the magnetic tweezers. Here we investigated physical and analytical optimization procedures that can be used to improve the range over which forces can be reliably measured. To systematically probe the limitations of magnetic tweezers spectral analysis, we have developed a magnetic tweezers simulator, whose outcome was validated with experimental data. Using this simulator, we evaluate methods to correctly perform force experiments and provide guidelines for correct force calibration under configurations that can be encountered in typical magnetic tweezers experiments. 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A New Type of Magnetic Actuator Capable of Wall-Climbing Movement Using Inertia Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yaguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new type of a magnetic actuator that operates on a resonance energy of a mass-spring model by using an electromagnetic force. The magnetic actuator is moved by the difference in an inertia force during one period of vibration. Experimental result demonstrates that a horizontal speed of the magnetic actuator was 7.4 mm/s with load mass of 50 g. We considered a method of a cable-free movement of the actuator by using two iron rails and four permanent magnets. The magnetic actuator is able to move stably a ceiling plane and a wall plane. This actuator is able to move on the plane of the magnetic materials only a function generator and a power amplifier.

  5. Electron beam fabrication and characterization of high- resolution magnetic force microscopy tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhrig, M.; Rührig, M.; Porthun, S.; Porthun, S.; Lodder, J.C.; Mc vitie, S.; Heyderman, L.J.; Johnston, A.B.; Chapman, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    The stray field, magnetic microstructure, and switching behavior of high‐resolution electron beam fabricated thin film tips for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) are investigated with different imaging modes in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). As the tiny smooth carbon needles covered with a

  6. Direct visualization and identification of biofunctionalized nanoparticles using a magnetic atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Stephan; Glöckl, Gunnar; Weitschies, Werner; Helm, Christiane A

    2011-09-14

    Because of its outstanding ability to image and manipulate single molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) established itself as a fundamental technique in nanobiotechnology. (1) We present a new modality that distinguishes single nanoparticles by the surrounding magnetic field gradient. Diamagnetic gold and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles become discernible under ambient conditions. Images of proteins, magnetolabeled with nanoparticles, demonstrate the first steps toward a magnetic analogue to fluorescence microscopy, which combines nanoscale lateral resolution of AFM with unambiguous detection of magnetic markers.

  7. Static magnets: what are they and what do they do? Magnetos estáticos: o que são e para que servem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Laakso

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Therapeutic static magnets have gained wide community acceptance for neuromusculoskeletal pain relief in many countries yet, apart from strong anecdotal reports of benefit, there is a paucity of scientific evidence for their use. OBJECTIVES: In this review we describe the physical characteristics of traditional and commonplace unipolar and bipolar static magnets as well as newer quadripolar magnetic arrays; discuss what is known of the physiological effects of static magnets and the strength of the literature; and make suggestions for targeted future research for static magnets in the management of neuromusculoskeletal pain conditions.INTRODUÇÃO: A magnetoterapia estática conquistou ampla aceitação da comunidade para alívio da dor neuromusculoesquelética em diversos países. No entanto, com exceção de relatórios anedóticos de seus benefícios, há uma grande escassez de evidências científicas para seu uso. OBJETIVOS: Nesta revisão, descrevemos as características físicas dos tradicionais magnetos estáticos unipolares e bipolares comuns, assim como os mais recentes conjuntos magnéticos quadripolares; discutimos o que se conhece sobre os efeitos fisiológicos da magnetoterapia estática e o suporte da literatura; e fazemos sugestões para futuras pesquisas direcionadas à magnetoterapia estática no controle de condições de dor neuromusculoesquelética.

  8. The generation of MHD waves by forced turbulence in a weakly magnetized fluid. [in solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the fluctuating buoyancy force on wave generation in a weakly magnetized plasma is considered. As expected, the efficiency of MHD wave generation is enhanced by including this force. However, it remains true that the observed variation of coronal emission at fixed spectral type cannot be accounted for by a wave generation process of the type discussed here.

  9. EFFECTS OF PARTIAL QUANTITATIVE CHANGES IN DYNAMIC POWER AND STATIC FORCE OF ATHLETES AGED 15-16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branimir Mikić

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research is to determine the contribution of the exercise equipment and free weights to develop the dynamic power and static power ofa thletes aged 15-16 years. In a sample of 162 subjects (divided into two subgroups-control and experimental group was applied 20 tests for the assessment of dynamic power and static power. T-test results show us statistically significant partial quantitative changes in the studied variables in both subsamples. These changes were in the control group significantly weaker, but in each case statistically significant. Based on these results we conclude that each carefully planned program of activities designed to target kinesiology operators, appropriate scale and intensity of the set based on the results of the test input dijagnostičnog leads to a transformation of the expected effects of the training process.

  10. Forces on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field: the macro-micro connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, R.; Kneubil, F. B.; Robilotta, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    The classic problem of determining the force on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field is critically analysed. A common explanation found in many introductory textbooks is to represent the force on the wire as the sum of the forces on charge carriers. In this approach neither the nature of the forces involved nor their application points are fully discussed. In this paper we provide an alternative microscopic explanation that is suitable for introductory electromagnetism courses at university level. By considering the wire as a superposition of a positive and a negative cylindrical charge distributions, we show that the electrons are subject to both magnetic and electric forces, whereas the ionic lattice of the metal is dragged by an electric force. Furthermore, an analysis of the orders of magnitude involved in the problem gives counterintuitive results with valuable educational potential. We argue that this approach allows one to discuss different aspects of the physical knowledge, which are relevant in physics education.

  11. Forces on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field: the macro-micro connection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avelar Sotomaior Karam, Ricardo; Kneubil, Fabiana; Robilotta, Manoel

    2017-01-01

    The classic problem of determining the force on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field is critically analysed. A common explanation found in many introductory textbooks is to represent the force on the wire as the sum of the forces on charge carriers. In this approach neither the nature...... distributions, we show that the electrons are subject to both magnetic and electric forces, whereas the ionic lattice of the metal is dragged by an electric force. Furthermore, an analysis of the orders of magnitude involved in the problem gives counterintuitive results with valuable educational potential. We...... of the forces involved nor their application points are fully discussed. In this paper we provide an alternative microscopic explanation that is suitable for introductory electromagnetism courses at university level. By considering the wire as a superposition of a positive and a negative cylindrical charge...

  12. Behavior of Particle Depots in Molten Silicon During Float-Zone Growth in Strong Static Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauss, T.; SorgenFrei, T.; Croell, A.; Azizi, M.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.; Volz, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the photovoltaics industry, the largest market share is represented by solar cells made from multicrystalline silicon, which is grown by directional solidification. During the growth process, the silicon melt is in contact with the silicon nitride coated crucible walls and the furnace atmosphere which contains carbon monoxide. The dissolution of the crucible coating, the carbon bearing gas, and the carbon already present in the feedstock, lead to the precipitation of silicon carbide, and silicon nitride, at later stages of the growth process. The precipitation of Si3N4 and SiC particles of up to several hundred micrometers in diameter leads to severe problems during the wire sawing process for wafering the ingots. Furthermore the growth of the silicon grains can be negatively influenced by the presence of particles, which act as nucleation sources and lead to a grit structure of small grains and are sources for dislocations. If doped with Nitrogen from the dissolved crucible coating, SiC is a semi conductive material, and can act as a shunt, short circuiting parts of the solar cell. For these reasons, the incorporation of such particles needs to be avoided. In this contribution we performed model experiments in which the transport of intentionally added SiC particles and their interaction with the solid-liquid interface during float zone growth of silicon in strong steady magnetic fields was investigated. SiC particles of 7µm and 60µm size are placed in single crystal silicon [100] and [111] rods of 8mm diameter. This is achieved by drilling a hole of 2mm diameter, filling in the particles and closing the hole by melting the surface of the rod until a film of silicon covers the hole. The samples are processed under a vacuum of 1x10(exp -5) mbar or better, to prevent gas inclusions. An oxide layer to suppress Marangoni convection is applied by wet oxidation. Experiments without and with static magnetic field are carried out to investigate the influence of melt

  13. Magnetic Signals of High-Temperature Superconductor Bulk During the Levitation Force Measurement Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Zheng, Jun; Qian, Nan; Che, Tong; Zheng, Botian; Jin, Liwei; Deng, Zigang

    2017-05-01

    In order to study the commonly neglected magnetic field information in the course of levitation force measurement process in a superconducting maglev system, a multipoint magnetic field measurement platform was employed to acquire magnetic signals of a bulk high-Tc superconductor on both the top and the bottom surface. Working conditions including field cooling (FC) and zero field cooling were investigated for these vertical down and up motions above a permanent magnet guideway performed on a HTS maglev measurement system. We have discussed the magnetic flux variation process based on the Bean model. A magnetic hysteresis effect similar to the levitation force hysteresis loop of the bulk superconductor was displayed and analyzed in this paper. What is more valuable, there exists some available magnetic flux on the top surface of the bulk superconductor, and the proportion is as high as 62.42% in the FC condition, which provides an experimental hint to design the superconductor bulk and the applied field for practical use in a more efficient way. In particular, this work reveals real-time magnetic flux variation of the bulk superconductor in the levitation application, which is the other important information in contrast to the macroscopic levitation and guidance force investigations in previous studies, and it enriches the existing research methods. The results are significant for understanding the magnetic characteristic of superconductors, and they can contribute to optimize the present HTS maglev system design.

  14. Linear force-free magnetic fields for solar extrapolation and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, G. Allen

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the interconnection of the various linear force-free magnetic field formulations, the specific phenomenological and topological parameters of these formulations, and their usefulness. Particularly, the limitations and usefulness of linear force-free fields are discussed. Specific field configurations are related to magnetographic interpretation. The relationship of the integral and Fourier procedures is shown explicitly. The physical interpretation of linear force-free fields is shown by analytic models and from the Marshall Space Flight Center solar vector magnetograms.

  15. A Miniature Magnetic-Force-Based Three-Axis AC Magnetic Sensor with Piezoelectric/Vibrational Energy-Harvesting Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chiao-Fang; Yeh, Po-Chen; Chung, Tien-Kan

    2017-02-08

    In this paper, we demonstrate a miniature magnetic-force-based, three-axis, AC magnetic sensor with piezoelectric/vibrational energy-harvesting functions. For magnetic sensing, the sensor employs a magnetic-mechanical-piezoelectric configuration (which uses magnetic force and torque, a compact, single, mechanical mechanism, and the piezoelectric effect) to convert x-axis and y-axis in-plane and z-axis magnetic fields into piezoelectric voltage outputs. Under the x-axis magnetic field (sine-wave, 100 Hz, 0.2-3.2 gauss) and the z-axis magnetic field (sine-wave, 142 Hz, 0.2-3.2 gauss), the voltage output with the sensitivity of the sensor are 1.13-26.15 mV with 8.79 mV/gauss and 1.31-8.92 mV with 2.63 mV/gauss, respectively. In addition, through this configuration, the sensor can harness ambient vibrational energy, i.e., possessing piezoelectric/vibrational energy-harvesting functions. Under x-axis vibration (sine-wave, 100 Hz, 3.5 g) and z-axis vibration (sine-wave, 142 Hz, 3.8 g), the root-mean-square voltage output with power output of the sensor is 439 mV with 0.333 μW and 138 mV with 0.051 μW, respectively. These results show that the sensor, using this configuration, successfully achieves three-axis magnetic field sensing and three-axis vibration energy-harvesting. Due to these features, the three-axis AC magnetic sensor could be an important design reference in order to develop future three-axis AC magnetic sensors, which possess energy-harvesting functions, for practical industrial applications, such as intelligent vehicle/traffic monitoring, processes monitoring, security systems, and so on.

  16. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  17. On some properties of force-free magnetic fields in infinite regions of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for solving boundary value problems (BVP) for a force free magnetic field (FFF) in infinite space are presented. A priori inequalities are defined which must be satisfied by the force-free equations. It is shown that upper bounds may be calculated for the magnetic energy of the region provided the value of the magnetic normal component at the boundary of the region can be shown to decay sufficiently fast at infinity. The results are employed to prove a nonexistence theorem for the BVP for the FFF in the spatial region. The implications of the theory for modeling the origins of solar flares are discussed.

  18. Alternating Magnetic Field Forces for Satellite Formation Flying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stnaley O.

    2012-01-01

    Selected future space missions, such as large aperture telescopes and multi-component interferometers, will require the precise positioning of a number of isolated satellites, yet many of the suggested approaches for providing satellites positioning forces have serious limitations. In this paper we propose a new approach, capable of providing both position and orientation forces, that resolves or alleviates many of these problems. We show that by using alternating fields and currents that finely-controlled forces can be induced on the satellites, which can be individually selected through frequency allocation. We also show, through analysis and experiment, that near field operation is feasible and can provide sufficient force and the necessary degrees of freedom to accurately position and orient small satellites relative to one another. In particular, the case of a telescope with a large number of free mirrors is developed to provide an example of the concept. We. also discuss the far field extension of this concept.

  19. A multiplexed magnetic tweezer with precision particle tracking and bi-directional force control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith C; Clemmens, Emilie; Mahmoud, Hani; Kirkpatrick, Robin; Vizcarra, Juan C; Thomas, Wendy E

    2017-01-01

    In the past two decades, methods have been developed to measure the mechanical properties of single biomolecules. One of these methods, Magnetic tweezers, is amenable to aquisition of data on many single molecules simultaneously, but to take full advantage of this "multiplexing" ability, it is necessary to simultaneously incorprorate many capabilities that ahve been only demonstrated separately. Our custom built magnetic tweezer combines high multiplexing, precision bead tracking, and bi-directional force control into a flexible and stable platform for examining single molecule behavior. This was accomplished using electromagnets, which provide high temporal control of force while achieving force levels similar to permanent magnets via large paramagnetic beads. Here we describe the instrument and its ability to apply 2-260 pN of force on up to 120 beads simultaneously, with a maximum spatial precision of 12 nm using a variety of bead sizes and experimental techniques. We also demonstrate a novel method for increasing the precision of force estimations on heterogeneous paramagnetic beads using a combination of density separation and bi-directional force correlation which reduces the coefficient of variation of force from 27% to 6%. We then use the instrument to examine the force dependence of uncoiling and recoiling velocity of type 1 fimbriae from Eschericia coli (E. coli) bacteria, and see similar results to previous studies. This platform provides a simple, effective, and flexible method for efficiently gathering single molecule force spectroscopy measurements.

  20. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: The NMR-CUFF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windt, Carel W.; Soltner, Helmut; Dusschoten, Dagmar van; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5 mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings.

  1. Nonlinear force-free magnetic fields: Calculation and applicatin to astrophysics. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-Hong

    1987-01-01

    The problem concerned in this work is that of calculating magnetic field configurations in which the Lorentz force (vector)j x (vector)B is everywhere zero, subject to specified boundary conditions. The magnetic field is represented in terms of Clebsch variables in the form (vector)B = del alpha x del beta. These variables are constant on any field line. The most appropriate choice of boundary conditions is to specify the values of alpha and beta on the bounding surface. It is proposed that the field lines move in the direction of local Lorentz force and relax towards a force-free field configuration. This concept leads to an iteration procedure for modifying the variables alpha and beta that tends asymptotically towards the force-free state. This method is first applied to a simple problem in two rectangular dimensions; the calculation shows that the convergence of magnetic field energy to a minimum state (force-free) is close to exponential. This method is then applied to study some astrophysical force-free magnetic fields, such as the structures and evolution of magnetic fields of rotating sunspots and accretion disks. The implication of the results, as related to the mechanisms of solar flares, extragalactic radio sources and radio jets, are discussed.

  2. Bilayer properties of giant magnetic liposomes formed by cationic pyridine amphiphile and probed by active deformation under magnetic forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrichenko, O; Erglis, K; Cēbers, A; Plotniece, A; Pajuste, K; Béalle, G; Ménager, Ch; Dubois, E; Perzynski, R

    2013-01-01

    We synthesize giant magnetic liposomes by a reverse-phase evaporation method (REV) using a new self-assembling Cationic Pyridine Amphiphile (CPA) derived from 1,4-dihydropyridine as liposome-forming agent and a magnetic ferrofluid based on γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles. Having in view the potential interest of CPA in targeted transport by magnetic forces, the mechanical elastic properties of such bilayers are here directly investigated in vesicles loaded with magnetic nanoparticles. Bending elastic modulus K(b) ∼ 0.2 to 5k(B)T and pre-stress τ ∼ 3.2 to 12.10(-6) erg/cm(2) are deduced from the under-field deformations of the giant magnetic liposomes. The obtained K(b) values are discussed in terms of A. Wurgers's theory.

  3. Performance enhancement of a Lorentz force velocimeter using a buoyancy-compensated magnet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, R.; Leineweber, J.; Resagk, C.

    2015-07-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a highly feasible method for measuring flow rate in a pipe or a duct. This method has been established for liquid metal flows but also for electrolytes such as saltwater. A decrease in electrical conductivity of the medium causes a decrease of the Lorentz force which needs to be resolved, affecting the accuracy of the measurement. We use an electrical force compensation (EFC) balance for the determination of the tiny force signals in a test channel filled with electrolyte solution. It is used in a 90°-rotated orientation with a magnet system hanging vertically on its load bar. The thin coupling elements of its parallel guiding system limit the mass of the magnets to 1 kg. To overcome this restriction, which limits the magnetic flux density and hence the Lorentz forces, a weight force compensation mechanism is developed. Therefore, different methods such as air bearing are conceivable, but for the elimination of additional horizontal force components which would disturb the force signal, only compensation by lift force provided by buoyancy is reasonable. We present a swimming body setup that will allow larger magnet systems than before, because a large amount of the weight force will be compensated by this lift force. Thus the implementation of this concept has to be made with respect to hydrodynamical and mechanical stability. This is necessary to avoid overturning of the swimming body setup and to prevent inelastic deformation. Additionally, the issue will be presented and discussed whether thermal convection around the lifting body diminishes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) significantly or not.

  4. Magnetic energy dissipation in force-free jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Konigl, Arieh

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that a magnetic pressure-dominated, supersonic jet which expands or contracts in response to variations in the confining external pressure can dissipate magnetic energy through field-line reconnection as it relaxes to a minimum-energy configuration. In order for a continuous dissipation to occur, the effective reconnection time must be a fraction of the expansion time. The dissipation rate for the axisymmetric minimum-energy field configuration is analytically derived. The results indicate that the field relaxation process could be a viable mechanism for powering the synchrotron emission in extragalactic jets if the reconnection time is substantially shorter than the nominal resistive tearing time in the jet.

  5. Magnetic Field, Force, and Inductance Computations for an Axially Symmetric Solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.; Immer, Christopher D.; Simpson, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The pumping of liquid oxygen (LOX) by magnetic fields (B field), using an array of electromagnets, is a current topic of research and development at Kennedy Space Center, FL. Oxygen is paramagnetic so that LOX, like a ferrofluid, can be forced in the direction of a B field gradient. It is well known that liquid oxygen has a sufficient magnetic susceptibility that a strong magnetic gradient can lift it in the earth's gravitational field. It has been proposed that this phenomenon can be utilized in transporting (i.e., pumping) LOX not only on earth, but on Mars and in the weightlessness of space. In order to design and evaluate such a magnetic pumping system, it is essential to compute the magnetic and force fields, as well as inductance, of various types of electromagnets (solenoids). In this application, it is assumed that the solenoids are air wrapped, and that the current is essentially time independent.

  6. Pain-inhibiting inhomogeneous static magnetic field fails to influence locomotor activity and anxiety behavior in mice: no interference between magnetic field- and morphine-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    László, János; Tímár, Júlia; Gyarmati, Zsuzsanna; Fürst, Zsuzsanna; Gyires, Klára

    2009-06-30

    We wanted to demonstrate (i) in the writhing test in mice, whether there was a prolonged analgesic effect induced by an inhomogeneous static magnetic field (SMF) exposure; (ii) whether SMF had an effect on the analgesic effect induced by 0.5mg/kgs.c. administered morphine, on the behavioral patterns, and on the hyperlocomotion-inducing effect of morphine. A magnetic exposure system developed by the present authors was used with peak-to-peak flux densities in the 2-754mT range. The writhing test was used for the assessment of pain. An elevated plus maze and a Conducta System was used for studying the anxiogenic or anxyolitic effect in mice, and the locomotor activity, respectively. We looked for the difference in the number of writhings and in the behavioral patterns between treated (s.c. morphine and/or SMF exposure) and control animals, respectively. (i) The antinociceptive effect could be identified 10-30min following SMF exposition in the writhing test in mice. (ii) SMF failed to affect the morphine-induced antinociception, the behavioral patterns in either type of tests, and the hyperlocomotion-inducing effect of morphine. (i) The long-lasting antinociceptive effect of SMF allows experiments under conditions, when in situ application of the SMF-producing device would be technically difficult or impossible; or where it would disturb the experiments. (ii) The results of behavioral tests with freely moving mice in or in the vicinity of inhomogeneous SMFs are not affected by the SMF in the applied flux density range. (iii) Morphine in treated subjects is not interacting with the inhomogeneous SMFs in the applied flux density range.

  7. The effect of a static magnetic field on the morphometric characteristics of neurosecretory neurons and corpora allata in the pupae of yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor (Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric-Mataruga, Vesna; Prolic, Zlatko; Nenadovic, Vera; Vlahovic, Milena; Mrdakovic, Marija

    2008-02-01

    The morphometric characteristics of A1 and A2 protocerebral neurosecretory neurons (cell and nuclei size, number of nucleoli in the nuclei); corpora allata size, nuclei size, cell number, were investigated in the pupae of yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor (L.), exposed to a strong static magnetic field of 320 mT maximum induction (10,000 times higher than the Earth's). The experimental groups of Tenebrio molitor pupae were: A control group exposed only to natural magnetic field and sacrificed at the eighth day of pupal development (C); and pupae kept in a strong static magnetic field for eight days and then sacrificed (MF). Serial brain cross-sections were stained using the Alcian Blue Floxin technique. All the parameters were analyzed and measurements were performed using an image processing and analysis system (Leica, Cambridge, UK) linked to a Leica DMLB light microscope (program is QWin - Leica's Quantimet Windows-based image analysis tool kit). The values of morphometric parameters of neurosecretory neurons and corpora allata were significantly increased after exposure of the pupae to the strong magnetic field. The strong magnetic field influence characteristics of protocerebral neurosecretory neurons and corpora allata in the late Tenebrio molitor pupae.

  8. A study of the formation of magnetically active solid dispersions of phenacetin using atomic and magnetic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmanova, Liana Stanislavovna; Ziganshin, Marat Akhmedovich; Gorbatchuk, Valery Vilenovich; Ziganshina, Sufia Askhatovna; Bizyaev, Dmitry Anatolevich; Bukharaev, Anastas Akhmetovich; Mukhametzyanov, Timur Anvarovich; Gerasimov, Alexander Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    A lot of pharmaceutical substances have a poor solubility that limits their absorption and distribution to the targeted sites to elicit the desired action without causing untoward effects on healthy cells or tissues. For such drugs, new modes of delivery have to be developed for efficient and effective delivery of the drug to the target site. Formation of magnetically active solid dispersion of such drugs could be a useful approach to addressing this problem because they combine targeted delivery and good solubility. In this work, the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the solid dispersion of polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 950-1050 g/mol and phenacetin was studied using atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. The distribution of nanoparticles was found to be uniform in studied composites. Magnetically active solid dispersions may find application in the production of the capsulated drug delivery systems with enhanced solubility parameters.

  9. A study of the formation of magnetically active solid dispersions of phenacetin using atomic and magnetic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Stanislavovna Usmanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of pharmaceutical substances have a poor solubility that limits their absorption and distribution to the targeted sites to elicit the desired action without causing untoward effects on healthy cells or tissues. For such drugs, new modes of delivery have to be developed for efficient and effective delivery of the drug to the target site. Formation of magnetically active solid dispersion of such drugs could be a useful approach to addressing this problem because they combine targeted delivery and good solubility. In this work, the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in the solid dispersion of polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight 950-1050 g/mol and phenacetin was studied using atomic force and magnetic force microscopy. The distribution of nanoparticles was found to be uniform in studied composites. Magnetically active solid dispersions may find application in the production of the capsulated drug delivery systems with enhanced solubility parameters.

  10. Statics with MATLAB

    CERN Document Server

    Marghitu, Dan B; Madsen, Nels H

    2013-01-01

    Engineering mechanics involves the development of mathematical models of the physical world. Statics addresses the forces acting on and in mechanical objects and systems. Statics with MATLAB®  develops an understanding of the mechanical behavior of complex engineering structures and components using MATLAB®  to execute numerical calculations and to facilitate analytical calculations.   MATLAB® is presented and introduced as a highly convenient tool to solve problems for theory and applications in statics. Included are example problems to demonstrate the MATLAB® syntax and to also introduce specific functions dealing with statics. These explanations are reinforced through figures generated with MATLAB® and the extra material available online which includes the special functions described. This detailed introduction and application of MATLAB® to the field of statics makes Statics with MATLAB® a useful tool for instruction as well as self study,  highlighting the use of symbolic MATLAB® for both theo...

  11. Evaluation of the attractive force of different types of new-generation magnetic attachment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Hakan; Coskun, M Emre; Akin, E Gulsah; Ozdemir, A Kemal

    2011-03-01

    Rare earth magnets have been used in prosthodontics, but their tendency for corrosion in the oral cavity and insufficient attractive forces limit long-term clinical application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the attractive force of different types of new-generation magnetic attachment systems. The attractive force of the neodymium-iron-boron (Nd-Fe-B) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnetic attachment systems, including closed-field (Hilop and Hicorex) and open-field (Dyna and Steco) systems, was measured in a universal testing machine (n=5). The data were statistically evaluated with 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test (α=.05). The closed-field systems exhibited greater (Pforce than the open-field systems. Moreover, there was a statistically significant difference in attractive force between Nd-Fe-B and Sm-Co magnets (Pforce was found with the Hilop system (9.2 N), and the lowest force was found with the Steco system (2.3 N). The new generation of Nd-Fe-B closed-field magnets, along with improved technology, provides sufficient denture retention for clinical application. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Benchmark study of magnetic induction codes forced by ocean tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velímský, Jakub; Einšpigel, David; Grayver, Alexander; Irrgang, Christopher; Kuvshinov, Alexei; Martinec, Zdeněk; Petereit, Johannes; Šachl, Libor; Saynisch, Jan; Tyler, Robert

    2017-04-01

    We present a benchmark of magnetic induction codes driven by the ocean tidal flows. We concentrate on the principal lunar semi-diurnal tide M2, using the state-of-the-art TPXO8-atlas ocean flow model. We assess the effect of the two-dimensional thin-layer approximation, and the effect of self-induction. Large lateral variations of ocean electrical conductivity are assumed. For the underlaying Earth's mantle we consider either a realistic one-dimensional conductivity profile, or use a perfect insulator approximation. Various numerical techniques are compared, including weak formulation in the spherical harmonic domain, contracting integral equations, and finite differences, both in the frequency and time domains. We compare the maps of magnetic field components at the ocean surface, as well as the spherical harmonic power spectra.

  13. Experimental signature of the attractive Coulomb force between positive and negative magnetic monopoles in spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, C.; Giblin, S. R.; Lhotel, E.; Prabhakaran, D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Matsuhira, K.; Bramwell, S. T.

    2016-07-01

    A non-Ohmic current that grows exponentially with the square root of applied electric field is well known from thermionic field emission (the Schottky effect), electrolytes (the second Wien effect) and semiconductors (the Poole-Frenkel effect). It is a universal signature of the attractive Coulomb force between positive and negative electrical charges, which is revealed as the charges are driven in opposite directions by the force of an applied electric field. Here we apply thermal quenches to spin ice to prepare metastable populations of bound pairs of positive and negative emergent magnetic monopoles at millikelvin temperatures. We find that the application of a magnetic field results in a universal exponential-root field growth of magnetic current, thus confirming the microscopic Coulomb force between the magnetic monopole quasiparticles and establishing a magnetic analogue of the Poole-Frenkel effect. At temperatures above 300 mK, gradual restoration of kinetic monopole equilibria causes the non-Ohmic current to smoothly evolve into the high-field Wien effect for magnetic monopoles, as confirmed by comparison to a recent and rigorous theory of the Wien effect in spin ice. Our results extend the universality of the exponential-root field form into magnetism and illustrate the power of emergent particle kinetics to describe far-from-equilibrium response in complex systems.

  14. Efficacy of a trunk orthosis with joints providing resistive force on low-back load in elderly persons during static standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuhira, Junji; Matsudaira, Ko; Yasui, Tadashi; Iijima, Shinno; Ito, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Postural alignment of elderly people becomes poor due to aging, possibly leading to low-back pain and spinal deformity. Although there are several interventions for treating these conditions, no previous study has reported the effectiveness of a spinal orthosis or lumbosacral orthosis (LSO) in healthy elderly people without specific spinal deformity. We therefore developed a trunk orthosis to decrease low-back muscle activity while training good postural alignment through resistive force provided by joints with springs (here, called the ORF, which stands for orthosis with joints providing resistive force) as a preventive method against abnormal posture and low-back pain in healthy elderly persons. Fifteen community-dwelling elderly men participated in this study. Participants stood freely for 10 seconds in a laboratory setting under three conditions: without an orthosis, with the ORF, and with an LSO. The Damen corset LSO was selected as it is frequently prescribed for patients with low-back pain. Postural alignment during static standing was recorded using a three-dimensional motion capture system employing infrared cameras. Two force plates were used to record center of pressure. Electromyograms were obtained for bilateral erector spinae (ES), left internal abdominal oblique, and right gluteus medius muscles. Pelvis forward tilt angle tended to increase while wearing the ORF and decrease while wearing the LSO, but these results were not significant compared to no orthosis. Thorax extension angle and thorax angle on pelvis coordinate system significantly increased while wearing the ORF compared to the other two conditions. ES activity significantly decreased while wearing the ORF compared to the other two conditions. Internal oblique activity was significantly smaller while wearing the LSO than with no orthosis. Center of pressure did not significantly differ among the conditions. The ORF significantly improved trunk alignment and decreased ES activity in healthy

  15. Efficacy of a trunk orthosis with joints providing resistive force on low-back load in elderly persons during static standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuhira, Junji; Matsudaira, Ko; Yasui, Tadashi; Iijima, Shinno; Ito, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Postural alignment of elderly people becomes poor due to aging, possibly leading to low-back pain and spinal deformity. Although there are several interventions for treating these conditions, no previous study has reported the effectiveness of a spinal orthosis or lumbosacral orthosis (LSO) in healthy elderly people without specific spinal deformity. We therefore developed a trunk orthosis to decrease low-back muscle activity while training good postural alignment through resistive force provided by joints with springs (here, called the ORF, which stands for orthosis with joints providing resistive force) as a preventive method against abnormal posture and low-back pain in healthy elderly persons. Patients and methods Fifteen community-dwelling elderly men participated in this study. Participants stood freely for 10 seconds in a laboratory setting under three conditions: without an orthosis, with the ORF, and with an LSO. The Damen corset LSO was selected as it is frequently prescribed for patients with low-back pain. Postural alignment during static standing was recorded using a three-dimensional motion capture system employing infrared cameras. Two force plates were used to record center of pressure. Electromyograms were obtained for bilateral erector spinae (ES), left internal abdominal oblique, and right gluteus medius muscles. Results Pelvis forward tilt angle tended to increase while wearing the ORF and decrease while wearing the LSO, but these results were not significant compared to no orthosis. Thorax extension angle and thorax angle on pelvis coordinate system significantly increased while wearing the ORF compared to the other two conditions. ES activity significantly decreased while wearing the ORF compared to the other two conditions. Internal oblique activity was significantly smaller while wearing the LSO than with no orthosis. Center of pressure did not significantly differ among the conditions. Conclusion The ORF significantly improved trunk

  16. Magnetic force microscopy image of Co-Cr-Ta layer in perpendicular magnetic tape at high linear recording density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, K.; Taguchi, R.; Miyashita, E.; Numazawa, J.; Ohshima, H.

    1997-04-01

    In this study, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was used to investigate the recording capability of a perpendicular magnetic tape at a higher linear recording density. Perpendicular magnetic tapes with polyimide base sheets 10 μm thick were fabricated by a facing-target sputtering system [H. Yoshimoto, K. Kuga, Y. Yoneda, and J. Numazawa, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 148, 357 (1995)]. A Co-Cr-Ta (200 nm) monolayered tape with a base sheet of excellent surface roughness was fabricated. A complete recorded bit pattern of 250 kfci was observed as a MFM image on the tape. A recorded bit pattern of 300 kfci was also observed. A Co-Cr-Ta/Ni-Fe (150/50 nm) multilayered tape was also fabricated. The remnant magnetization state on this tape at 50 kfci was improved by the presence of an underlayer (Ni-Fe) only 50 nm thick. The MFM image at 250 kfci was the same as with a monolayered tape.

  17. Levitation force of small clearance superconductor-magnet system under non-coaxial condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jimin; Jin, Yingze; Yuan, Xiaoyang; Miao, Xusheng

    2017-03-01

    A novel superconducting tilting-pad bearing was proposed for the advanced research of reusable liquid hydrogen turbopump in liquid rocket. The bearing is a combination of superconducting magnetic bearing and hydrodynamic fluid-film bearing. Since the viscosity of cryogenic fuel to activate superconducting state and form hydrodynamic fluid-film is very low, bearing clearance will be very small. This study focuses on the investigation of superconducting levitation force in this kind of small clearance superconductor-magnet system. Based on Bean critical state model and three-dimensional finite element method, an analysis method is presented to obtain the levitation force under such situation. Since the complicated operational conditions and structural arrangement for application in liquid rocket, center lines of bulk superconductor and magnet rotor will usually be in non-coaxial state. Superconducting levitation forces in axial direction and radial direction under non-coaxial situation are also analyzed by the presented method.

  18. Dynamics of the Bogie of Maglev Train with Distributed Magnetic Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaozong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model of the bogie of maglev train with distributed magnetic forces and four identical levitating controllers is formulated. The vertical, pitching, and rolling degree of freedom of the electromagnet modules and their coupling are considered. The frequency responses of the bogie to track irregularity are investigated with numerical simulation. The results tell us that there are resonances related to the first electromagnetic suspension whose frequencies are determined by the control parameters. A comparative analysis has been carried out between the models with distributed or concentrated magnetic forces. The comparison indicates that simplifying the distributed magnetic force to concentrated one degenerates the dynamic behavior of the maglev bogie, especially resulting in overestimated resonances of the first electromagnetic suspension of maglev trains. The results also indicate that those resonances only occur on specific wavelengths of irregularity that relate to the length of the electromagnets.

  19. Magnetic flux ropes in the Venus ionosphere - In situ observations of force-free structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elphic, R. C.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Brace, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    Force-free magnetic structures with cylindrical geometry appear under a variety of conditions in nature. Filamentary helical magnetic structures are observed to be associated with prominences and flares in the solar atmosphere, and can arise in superconductors and laboratory plasmas. Another example of cylindrcal quasi-force-free configurations appears to exist in the Venus ionosphere. Magnetic flux ropes with diameters of approximately 20-30 km have been observed by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter to be a nearly ubiquitous feature of the dayside Venus ionosphere. Models of flux ropes suggest that many of these structures tend to be quasi-force-free, while others are correlated with pressure variations in the ambient thermal plasma.

  20. Magnetic resonance force microscopy of paramagnetic electron spins at millikelvin temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinante, A; Wijts, G; Usenko, O; Schinkelshoek, L; Oosterkamp, T H

    2011-12-06

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a powerful technique to detect a small number of spins that relies on force detection by an ultrasoft magnetically tipped cantilever and selective magnetic resonance manipulation of the spins. MRFM would greatly benefit from ultralow temperature operation, because of lower thermomechanical noise and increased thermal spin polarization. Here we demonstrate MRFM operation at temperatures as low as 30 mK, thanks to a recently developed superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based cantilever detection technique, which avoids cantilever overheating. In our experiment, we detect dangling bond paramagnetic centres on a silicon surface down to millikelvin temperatures. Fluctuations of such defects are supposedly linked to 1/f magnetic noise and decoherence in SQUIDs, as well as in several superconducting and single spin qubits. We find evidence that spin diffusion has a key role in the low-temperature spin dynamics.

  1. The force-distance properties of attracting magnetic attachments for tooth movement in combination with clear sequential aligners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Angie; Petocz, Peter; Walsh, William; Darendeliler, M Ali

    2012-11-01

    The demand for clear sequential aligner therapy has increased dramatically in recent years. An improved system utilising small neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) magnetic attachments has been proposed to enhance appliance capabilities. The aim of the investigation was to analyse the force system diagrams produced by small attracting NdFeB magnets to determine, 1) whether the force levels were sufficient to induce tooth movement, 2) the effect of magnet morphology on force characteristics and, 3) the most appropriate magnet dimensions that could be utilised for this application. Twenty-nine NdFeB rectangular magnets of varying dimensions were tested. A Mach-1 universal testing machine (Biosyntech Inc, Quebec, Canada) was used to measure the attractive force of pairs of magnets. Measurements commenced with a magnetic pair in contact and subsequently vertically separated a distance of 10 mm at a speed of 12 mm/minute. For all magnetic configurations four repeat measurements were performed on five magnetic pairs of the same size. The force-distance diagrams for all magnet configurations demonstrated a dramatic decrease in force with increasing magnet separation. Rather than a suggested inverse square law, the experimental data followed an inverse fourth law when an offset determined by a regression analysis was applied to the distance. For the majority of magnets, insignificant forces were attained beyond 2 mm of separation. Magnets with large pole face areas and longer magnetic axes provided the greatest force. A select range of magnet configurations exhibited suitable and reliable attractive forces and therefore could be advocated for prescribed clinical application.

  2. Suspension force control of bearingless permanent magnet slice motor based on flux linkage identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Suming; Zhu, Huangqiu

    2015-07-01

    The control accuracy and dynamic performance of suspension force are confined in the traditional bearingless permanent magnet slice motor (BPMSM) control strategies because the suspension force control is indirectly achieved by adopting a closed loop of displacement only. Besides, the phase information in suspension force control relies on accurate measurement of rotor position, making the control system more complex. In this paper, a new suspension force control strategy with displacement and radial suspension force double closed loops is proposed, the flux linkage of motor windings is identified based on voltage-current model and the flexibility of motor control can be improved greatly. Simulation and experimental results show that the proposed suspension force control strategy is effective to realize the stable operation of the BPMSM. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Design of a superconducting insert to obtain a high and quasi-uniform magnetic force field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, Jean [GREEN, University of Nancy BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Netter, Denis [GREEN, University of Nancy BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Quettier, Lionel [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay (France); Mailfert, Alain [INPL, 2 av de la foret de Haye, 54516 Vandoeuvre (France)

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we study the magnetic force generated by the combination of a solenoid and a superconducting ring insert. We have focused our study on the uniformity of the magnetic force. We use a genetic algorithm to determine the optimal shape of the superconducting ring. We are able to obtain uniformity of 0.5% variance. We also study the influence of several factors on uniformity, such as the critical current of the coil, the ring, and the size of the working area.

  4. Simultaneous Single-Molecule Force and Fluorescence Sampling of DNA Nanostructure Conformations Using Magnetic Tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerich, Felix E; Swoboda, Marko; Kauert, Dominik J; Grieb, M Svea; Hahn, Steffen; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Seidel, Ralf; Schlierf, Michael

    2016-01-13

    We present a hybrid single-molecule technique combining magnetic tweezers and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Through applying external forces to a paramagnetic sphere, we induce conformational changes in DNA nanostructures, which are detected in two output channels simultaneously. First, by tracking a magnetic bead with high spatial and temporal resolution, we observe overall DNA length changes along the force axis. Second, the measured FRET efficiency between two fluorescent probes monitors local conformational changes. The synchronized orthogonal readout in different observation channels will facilitate deciphering the complex mechanisms of biomolecular machines.

  5. Practical limits to the performance of magnetic bearings: Peak force, slew rate, and displacement sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslen, E.; Hermann, P.; Scott, M.; Humphris, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are subject to performance limits which are quite different from those of conventional bearings. These are due in part to the inherent nonlinearity of the device and in part to its electrical nature. Three important nonideal behaviors are presented: peak force capacity, force slew rate limitation, and sensitivity to rotor motion at large displacements. The problem of identifying the dynamic requirements of a magnetic bearing when used to support a known structure subject to known loads is discussed in the context of these limitations. Several simple design tools result from this investigation.

  6. On the numerical computation of nonlinear force-free magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.; Chang, H. M.; Hagyard, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    An algorithm has been developed to extrapolate nonlinear force-free magnetic fields from a source surface, given the proper boundary conditions. The results of this work; describing the mathematical formalism that was developed, the numerical techniques employed, and the stability criteria developed for these numerical schemes are presented. An analytical solution is used for a test case; the results show that the computational accuracy for the case of a nonlinear force-free magnetic field was on the order of a few percent ( 5%).

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of Solar Coronal Dynamics with an Initial Non-force-free Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, A.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Kumar, Sanjay [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur-313001 (India)

    2017-05-01

    The magnetic fields in the solar corona are generally neither force-free nor axisymmetric and have complex dynamics that are difficult to characterize. Here we simulate the topological evolution of solar coronal magnetic field lines (MFLs) using a magnetohydrodynamic model. The simulation is initialized with a non-axisymmetric non-force-free magnetic field that best correlates with the observed vector magnetograms of solar active regions (ARs). To focus on these ideas, simulations are performed for the flaring AR 11283 noted for its complexity and well-documented dynamics. The simulated dynamics develops as the initial Lorentz force pushes the plasma and facilitates successive magnetic reconnections at the two X-type null lines present in the initial field. Importantly, the simulation allows for the spontaneous development of mass flow, unique among contemporary works, that preferentially reconnects field lines at one of the X-type null lines. Consequently, a flux rope consisting of low-lying twisted MFLs, which approximately traces the major polarity inversion line, undergoes an asymmetric monotonic rise. The rise is attributed to a reduction in the magnetic tension force at the region overlying the rope, resulting from the reconnection. A monotonic rise of the rope is in conformity with the standard scenario of flares. Importantly, the simulated dynamics leads to bifurcations of the flux rope, which, being akin to the observed filament bifurcation in AR 11283, establishes the appropriateness of the initial field in describing ARs.

  8. Force characteristic of a magnetic actuator for separable electric connector based on conical airgap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a magnetic actuator for use in a separable electric connector based on conical airgap. The magnetic flux lines in conical airgap are almost vertical to the edge face of the yoke and armature, showing that the actual flux length in conical airgap is smaller than the axial stroke, which reduces magnetic reluctance over large stroke. Parameter improvement is analyzed based on modeling, and optimal results of the magnetic actuator are adopted to improve the rate of force to volume. The experimental results show that there is friction force of 10–12 N existing in the moving armature of the prototype, and the nominal value is in accordance with the simulation one. The results show that the design of conical airgap in the magnetic actuator is available to improve the initial force and reliability of the separating process and has the advantages of compact structure, short transmission, high reliability, large force with 50 N at the initial displacement of 2.5 mm, and fast response with 16.5 ms over the traditional actuator.

  9. Effect of defects, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and shape anisotropy on magnetic structure of iron thin films by magnetic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ke [Washington State University, P.O. BOX 642920, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA; Schreiber, Daniel K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Li, Yulan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Johnson, Bradley R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; McCloy, John [Washington State University, P.O. BOX 642920, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA

    2017-02-10

    Microstructures of magnetic materials, including defects and crystallographic orientations, are known to strongly influence magnetic domain structures. Measurement techniques such as magnetic force microscopy (MFM) thus allow study of correlations between microstructural and magnetic properties. The present work probes effects of anisotropy and artificial defects on the evolution of domain structure with applied field. Single crystal iron thin films on MgO substrates were milled by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) to create different magnetically isolated squares and rectangles in [110] crystallographic orientations, having their easy axis 45° from the sample edge. To investigate domain wall response on encountering non-magnetic defects, a 150 nm diameter hole was created in the center of some samples. By simultaneously varying crystal orientation and shape, both magnetocrystalline anisotropy and shape anisotropy, as well as their interaction, could be studied. Shape anisotropy was found to be important primarily for the longer edge of rectangular samples, which exaggerated the FIB edge effects and provided nucleation sites for spike domains in non-easy axis oriented samples. Center holes acted as pinning sites for domain walls until large applied magnetic fields. The present studies are aimed at deepening the understanding of the propagation of different types of domain walls in the presence of defects and different crystal orientations.

  10. Effect of defects, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and shape anisotropy on magnetic structure of iron thin films by magnetic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microstructures of magnetic materials, including defects and crystallographic orientations, are known to strongly influence magnetic domain structures. Measurement techniques such as magnetic force microscopy (MFM thus allow study of correlations between microstructural and magnetic properties. The present work probes effects of anisotropy and artificial defects on the evolution of domain structure with applied field. Single crystal iron thin films on MgO substrates were milled by Focused Ion Beam (FIB to create different magnetically isolated squares and rectangles in [110] crystallographic orientations, having their easy axis 45° from the sample edge. To investigate domain wall response on encountering non-magnetic defects, a 150 nm diameter hole was created in the center of some samples. By simultaneously varying crystal orientation and shape, both magnetocrystalline anisotropy and shape anisotropy, as well as their interaction, could be studied. Shape anisotropy was found to be important primarily for the longer edge of rectangular samples, which exaggerated the FIB edge effects and provided nucleation sites for spike domains in non-easy axis oriented samples. Center holes acted as pinning sites for domain walls until large applied magnetic fields. The present studies are aimed at deepening the understanding of the propagation of different types of domain walls in the presence of defects and different crystal orientations.

  11. Minor loop dependence of the magnetic forces and stiffness in a PM-HTS levitation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based upon the method of current vector potential and the critical state model of Bean, the vertical and lateral forces with different sizes of minor loop are simulated in two typical cooling conditions when a rectangular permanent magnet (PM above a cylindrical high temperature superconductor (HTS moves vertically and horizontally. The different values of average magnetic stiffness are calculated by various sizes of minor loop changing from 0.1 to 2 mm. The magnetic stiffness with zero traverse is obtained by using the method of linear extrapolation. The simulation results show that the extreme values of forces decrease with increasing size of minor loop. The magnetic hysteresis of the force curves also becomes small as the size of minor loop increases. This means that the vertical and lateral forces are significantly influenced by the size of minor loop because the forces intensely depend on the moving history of the PM. The vertical stiffness at every vertical position when the PM vertically descends to 1 mm is larger than that as the PM vertically ascents to 30 mm. When the PM moves laterally, the lateral stiffness during the PM passing through any horizontal position in the first time almost equal to the value during the PM passing through the same position in the second time in zero-field cooling (ZFC, however, the lateral stiffness in field cooling (FC and the cross stiffness in ZFC and FC are significantly affected by the moving history of the PM.

  12. Minor loop dependence of the magnetic forces and stiffness in a PM-HTS levitation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Li, Chengshan

    2017-12-01

    Based upon the method of current vector potential and the critical state model of Bean, the vertical and lateral forces with different sizes of minor loop are simulated in two typical cooling conditions when a rectangular permanent magnet (PM) above a cylindrical high temperature superconductor (HTS) moves vertically and horizontally. The different values of average magnetic stiffness are calculated by various sizes of minor loop changing from 0.1 to 2 mm. The magnetic stiffness with zero traverse is obtained by using the method of linear extrapolation. The simulation results show that the extreme values of forces decrease with increasing size of minor loop. The magnetic hysteresis of the force curves also becomes small as the size of minor loop increases. This means that the vertical and lateral forces are significantly influenced by the size of minor loop because the forces intensely depend on the moving history of the PM. The vertical stiffness at every vertical position when the PM vertically descends to 1 mm is larger than that as the PM vertically ascents to 30 mm. When the PM moves laterally, the lateral stiffness during the PM passing through any horizontal position in the first time almost equal to the value during the PM passing through the same position in the second time in zero-field cooling (ZFC), however, the lateral stiffness in field cooling (FC) and the cross stiffness in ZFC and FC are significantly affected by the moving history of the PM.

  13. Occupational exposure of healthcare and research staff to static magnetic stray fields from 1.5–7 Tesla MRI scanners is associated with reporting of transient symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-de Vries, Yvette; Mason, Catherine K; de Vocht, Frank; Portengen, Lützen; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Limited data is available about incidence of acute transient symptoms associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners. We aimed to assess the incidence of these symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with MRI scanners, and their association with static magnetic field exposure. Methods We performed an observational study among 361 employees of 14 clinical and research MRI facilities in The Netherlands. Each participant completed a diary during one or more work shifts inside and/or outside the MRI facility, reporting work activities and symptoms (from a list of potentially MRI-related symptoms, complemented with unrelated symptoms) experienced during a working day. We analysed 633 diaries. Exposure categories were defined by strength and type of MRI scanner, using non-MRI shifts as the reference category for statistical analysis. Non-MRI shifts originated from MRI staff who also participated on MRI days, as well as CT radiographers who never worked with MRI. Results Varying per exposure category, symptoms were reported during 16–39% of the MRI work shifts. We observed a positive association between scanner strength and reported symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with closed-bore MRI scanners of 1.5 Tesla (T) and higher (1.5 T OR=1.88; 3.0 T OR=2.14; 7.0 T OR=4.17). This finding was mainly driven by reporting of vertigo and metallic taste. Conclusions The results suggest an exposure-response association between exposure to strong static magnetic fields (and associated motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields) and reporting of transient symptoms on the same day of exposure. Trial registration number 11-032/C PMID:24714654

  14. Probing the Dynamics of Cellular Traction Forces with Magnetic Micropost Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Corinne; Chen, Christopher; Reich, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Mechanical forces on living cells are associated with changes in cellular function. For example, vascular smooth muscle cells are known to undergo a mechanical feedback response to increased stress, which can result in atherosclerosis. We have recently developed a magnetic micropost array, a novel device for measuring cellular traction forces that simultaneously enables the application of localized external forces to cells. The device consists of an array of micrometer scale elastomeric posts that act as force sensors for cells cultured on their tips. An external force is applied to the adherent surface of a cell via a magnetic torque on a cobalt nanowire embedded in a single post. Initial results showed an active and non-local cellular response to applied forces in mouse fibroblast cells.ootnotetextN. Sniadecki, et. al, Proc Natl Acad Sci, 104, 14553 (2007). We will present results on the spatially resolved dynamics of traction forces exerted by smooth muscle cells over time in response to constant and time-varying stimulation. The observation of biochemical and mechanical regulation of the subcellular redistribution of force may allow insights into cellular mechanotransduction and control of cell function.

  15. First Use of Synoptic Vector Magnetograms for Global Nonlinear, Force-Free Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, T.; Wiegelmann, T.; Gosain, S.; MacNeice, P.; Pevtsov, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere is generally thought to provide the energy for much of the activity seen in the solar corona, such as flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), etc. To overcome the unavailability of coronal magnetic field measurements, photospheric magnetic field vector data can be used to reconstruct the coronal field. Currently, there are several modelling techniques being used to calculate three-dimensional field lines into the solar atmosphere. Aims. For the first time, synoptic maps of a photospheric-vector magnetic field synthesized from the vector spectromagnetograph (VSM) on Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) are used to model the coronal magnetic field and estimate free magnetic energy in the global scale. The free energy (i.e., the energy in excess of the potential field energy) is one of the main indicators used in space weather forecasts to predict the eruptivity of active regions. Methods. We solve the nonlinear force-free field equations using an optimization principle in spherical geometry. The resulting threedimensional magnetic fields are used to estimate the magnetic free energy content E(sub free) = E(sub nlfff) - E(sub pot), which is the difference of the magnetic energies between the nonpotential field and the potential field in the global solar corona. For comparison, we overlay the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the atmospheric imaging assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Results. For a single Carrington rotation 2121, we find that the global nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) magnetic energy density is 10.3% higher than the potential one. Most of this free energy is located in active regions.

  16. Detection of applied and ambient forces with a matter-wave magnetic gradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Billy I.; MacKellar, Andrew R.; Halket, James; Gribbon, Anna; Pritchard, Jonathan D.; Arnold, Aidan S.; Riis, Erling; Griffin, Paul F.

    2017-11-01

    An atom interferometer using a Bose-Einstein condensate of 87Rb atoms is utilized for the measurement of magnetic-field gradients. Composite optical pulses are used to construct a spatially symmetric Mach-Zehnder geometry. By using a biased interferometer we demonstrate the ability to measure small residual forces in our system and discriminate between magnetic and inertial effects. These are a residual ambient magnetic-field gradient of 15 ±2 mG/cm and an inertial acceleration of 0.08 ±0.02 m/s2. Our method has important applications in the calibration of precision measurement devices and the reduction of systematic errors.

  17. Magnetization-dependent viscosity in brute-force-polarized liquid 3He

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeulen, G.A.; Schuhl, A.; Joffrin, J.

    1988-01-01

    A new method to measure the magnetization dependence of the viscosity in polarized liquid He3 is presented. The magnetization is obtained by "brute-force polarization" at 45 mK in magnetic fields up to 11 T; it is subsequently destroyed by saturation of the NMR signal. Our result, a relative...... increase of the viscosity of (31.5)×10-3 at 3.9% polarization and a pressure of 30 bars, disagrees with a prediction based on the "nearly metamagnetic" model....

  18. Evaluation of calcium cyanamide addition during co-composting of manure and maize straw in a forced-aeration static-pile system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simujide, Huasai; Aorigele, Chen; Wang, Chun-Jie; Zhang, Tian-Hua; Manda, Bai

    2016-01-01

    Composting is one of the most environmentally friendly treatments to inactivate pathogenic organisms or reduce them to acceptable levels. However, even under thermal conditions, some pathogenic organisms such as E. coli could exist for a long time in composting. Such great persistence may increase the possibility of outbreaks of these organisms and further increase the environmental load. Calcium cyanamide (CaCN2) has recently been recognized to have the fungicidal effect on the pathogens of the soilborne diseases. So, the present study determined the effect of CaCN2 addition on composting progress as an antimicrobial agent and an amendment during forced-aeration static-pile composting of cow manure, which was mainly aimed to inhibit the pathogens that had not been inactivated by heat during composting. The mixtures of dairy cow manure and maize straw with addition of 2 % CaCN2 or no addition were composted for 63 days. The physical, chemical and biological changes in compost mixtures were examined during composting. The data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA procedure from SAS software (version 9.0). The results showed that the addition of CaCN2 significantly increased the maximum temperature and lengthened the duration of the thermophilic phase, and increased the percent T-N but decreased C/N ratio. For microbiological test, the addition of CaCN2 shortened the time to inactivate E. coli, and increased the total average population of thermophilic bacteria but did not significantly influence that of mesophilic bacteria. The results indicated that the addition of CaCN2, at least at the additive content of 2 % could benefit the thermophilic phase and the composting could quickly reach the sanitary standard during the composting of manure with maize straw in a forced-aeration static-pile system. This finding will contribute to solve the feces disposal problems.

  19. Magnetic force analysis and performance of a tri-stable piezoelectric energy harvester under random excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yonggang; Tan, Dan; Liu, Jinjun; Zhang, Yuyang; Fan, Shengbo

    2017-10-01

    Recently, harvesting energy from environment has attracted lots of researchers' interests. Ambient vibrations are deemed as a promising power supply since it can be found almost everywhere. Piezoelectric effect has been exploited to convert mechanical energy to electricity. Nonlinearity techniques are favorable for improving the performance of piezoelectric energy harvesters. This paper focuses on a tri-stable piezoelectric energy harvester (TPEH) with two fixed external magnets. The lumped-parameter method is used to investigate the large-amplitude and broadband voltage response. A method based on equivalent magnetizing current theory is first applied to calculate the magnetic force and the potential function with triple wells. We find that this calculation method for magnetic force is more applicable for different magnet intervals compared with the magnetic dipoles method used before. Once the system parameters are chosen appropriately, large-amplitude interwell motion among three wells can be achieved. In our study, a filtered Gaussian noise within the frequency of 0-120 Hz is selected as harvester's excitation, which is similar with the realistic low-frequency vibration in environment. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the TPEH enhances the output voltage significantly compared to the conventional bi-stable piezoelectric energy harvester (BPEH). Also, the TPEH's frequency bandwidth is further broadened. Besides, it has been proved that the corresponding optimum magnet interval only changes slightly when the excitation intensity varies, therefore there is no need of adjusting the system parameters to meet practical conditions.

  20. Osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells on poly(L-lactide)/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanofibers with static magnetic field exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Organic–inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Shi, Yuzhou; Shan, Dingying; Jia, Wenkai; Duan, Shun [Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Deng, Xuliang [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Yang, Xiaoping, E-mail: yangxp@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic–inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of bone-related cells are modulated by many factors such as scaffold design, growth factor, dynamic culture system, and physical simulation. Nanofibrous structure and moderate-intensity (1 mT–1 T) static magnetic field (SMF) have been identified as capable of stimulating proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Herein, magnetic nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning mixture solutions of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and ferromagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs). The PLLA/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite nanofibers demonstrated homogeneous dispersion of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs, and their magnetism depended on the contents of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. SMF of 100 mT was applied in the culture of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts on pure PLLA and PLLA/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} composite nanofibers for the purpose of studying the effect of SMF on osteogenic differentiation of osteoblastic cells on magnetic nanofibrous scaffolds. On non-magnetic PLLA nanofibers, the application of external SMF could enhance the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. In comparison with pure PLLA nanofibers, the incorporation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs could also promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells in the absence or presence of external SMF. The marriage of magnetic nanofibers and external SMF was found most effective in accelerating every aspect of biological behaviors of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. The findings demonstrated that the magnetic feature of substrate and microenvironment were applicable ways in regulating osteogenesis in bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanofibers containing well-dispersed Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were produced. • Static magnetic field (SMF) was applied to perform the culture of osteoblasts. • Osteogenic differentiation was enhanced on magnetic substrate with exposure to SMF.