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Sample records for state-selective laser excitation

  1. Kinetics studies following state-selective laser excitation

    Keto, J.W.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this contract was the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions relevant to the excited state chemistry observed in discharges. We studied deactivation reactions and excitation transfer in collisions of excited states of xenon and krypton atoms with Ar, Kr, Xe and chlorine. The reactant states were excited selectively in two-photon transitions using tunable u.v. and v.u.v. lasers. Excited states produced by the collision were observed by their fluorescence. Reaction rates were measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measured interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra were obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. Our research then required several categories of experiments in order to fully understand a reaction process: 1. High resolution laser spectroscopy of bound molecules or lineshapes of colliding pairs is used to determine potential curves for reactants. 2. Direct measurements of state-to-state reaction rates were measured by studying the time dependent loss of excited reactants and the time dependent formation of products. 3. The energy selectivity of a laser can be used to excite reactants on an excited surface with controlled internuclear configurations. For free states of reactants (as exist in a gas cell) this has been termed laser assisted reactions, while for initially bound states (as chemically bound reactants or dimers formed in supersonic beams) the experiments have been termed photo-fragmentation spectroscopy

  2. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation

    Keto, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    We have made measurements of state-to-state deactivation cross sections and radiative lifetimes for Xe*(6p,6p',7p) and Kr*(5p) states in xenon and krypton buffer gases. These results are relevant to kinetic models and both excimer lasers and the infrared xenon laser; and they are a significant improvement in the precision of the known radiative lifetimes. This type of experiment can now be compared with recent calculations of state-to-state collisional relaxation in rare-gases by Hickman, Huestis, and Saxon. We have also made significant progress in the study of the electronic spectra of small molecules of the rare gases. Spectra have been obtained for Xe 2 , Xe 3 , Xe 4 , and larger clusters. As guidance for the larger clusters of the rare gases we have obtained the first multiphoton spectra for excitons in condensed xenon. In collaboration with research on the multiphoton spectra of the rare gases, we have continued experiments using synchrotron radiation in collaboration with the University of Hamburg. In experiments there we have observed excitation and fluorescence spectra for single xenon atoms at the surface, within the second layer, and within the bulk of large argon clusters

  3. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation

    Keto, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    During the past year, we have made measurements of state-to-state energy transfer cross sections and radiative lifetimes for Xe*(6p,6p',7p) and Kr*(5p) states in xenon and krypton buffer gases. These results are relevant to kinetic models of both excimer lasers and the infrared xenon laser; and they are a significant improvement in the precision of the known radiative lifetimes. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation: Progress report, March 15, 1988--March 14, 1989

    Keto, J.W.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this contract is the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions following two-photon laser excitation. We have chosen to study reactions of Xe 5p 5 np because of their relevance to the XeCl excimer laser. We are studying deactivation reactions in collisions with heavy atoms such as Ar, Kr, and Xe and reactive collisions with chlorides. The reactants are excited by multiphoton laser absorption. Product channels are observed by their fluorescence, or by laser induced fluorescence using a second color laser. Reaction rates are measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measure interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra are obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. 11 refs. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation: Annual performance report for the period March 15, 1987-March 14, 1988

    Keto, J.W.

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this contract is the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions following two-photon laser excitation. We have specifically been studying reactions of Xe 5p 5 6p because of their relevance to the XeCl excimer laser. We are studying deactivation reactions in collisions with heavy atoms such as Ar, Kr, and Xe and reactive collisions with chlorides. The reactants are excited by multiphoton laser absorption. Product channels are observed by their fluorescence, or in experiments in the coming months by laser induced fluorescence using a second color laser. Reaction rates are measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measure interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra are obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. 4 figs

  6. Classical/quantum correspondence in state selective charge transfer and excitation reactions involving highly charged ions and hydrogen

    Purkait, M

    2009-01-01

    State selective charge transfer and excitation cross sections for collisions of Ne q+ (q = 1-10) with atomic hydrogen are calculated within the framework of Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and Boundary Corrected Continuum Intermediate State (BCCIS) approximation.

  7. High power laser exciter accelerators

    Martin, T.H.

    1975-01-01

    Recent developments in untriggered oil and water switching now permit the construction of compact, high energy density pulsed power sources for laser excitation. These accelerators, developed principally for electron beam fusion studies, appear adaptable to laser excitation and will provide electron beams of 10 13 to 10 14 W in the next several years. The accelerators proposed for e-beam fusion essentially concentrate the available power from the outside edge of a disk into the central region where the electron beam is formed. One of the main problem areas, that of power flow at the vacuum diode insulator, is greatly alleviated by the multiplicity of electron beams that are allowable for laser excitation. A proposal is made whereby the disk-shaped pulsed power sections are stacked vertically to form a series of radially flowing electron beams to excite the laser gas volume. (auth)

  8. Laser excitation spectroscopy of uranium

    Solarz, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Laser excitation spectroscopy, recently applied to uranium enrichment research at LLL, has produced a wealth of new and vitally needed information about the uranium atom and its excited states. Among the data amassed were a large number of cross sections, almost a hundred radiative lifetimes, and many level assignments. Rydberg states, never before observed in uranium or any of the actinides, have been measured and cataloged. This work puts a firm experimental base under laser isotope separation, and permits a choice of the laser frequencies most appropriate for practical uranium enrichment

  9. Fission fragment excited laser system

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  10. Laser amplification in excited dielectrics

    Winkler, Thomas; Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Sarpe, Cristian

    2018-01-01

    Wide-bandgap dielectrics such as glasses or water are transparent at visible and infrared wavelengths. This changes when they are exposed to ultrashort and highly intense laser pulses. Different interaction mechanisms lead to the appearance of various transient nonlinear optical phenomena. Using...... these, the optical properties of dielectrics can be controlled from the transparent to the metal-like state. Here we expand this range by a yet unexplored mechanism in excited dielectrics: amplification. In a two-colour pump-probe experiment, we show that a 400nm femtosecond laser pulse is coherently...

  11. Laser amplification in excited dielectrics

    Winkler, Thomas; Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Sarpe, Cristian; Zielinski, Bastian; Götte, Nadine; Senftleben, Arne; Balling, Peter; Baumert, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Wide-bandgap dielectrics such as glasses or water are transparent at visible and infrared wavelengths. This changes when they are exposed to ultrashort and highly intense laser pulses. Different interaction mechanisms lead to the appearance of various transient nonlinear optical phenomena. Using these, the optical properties of dielectrics can be controlled from the transparent to the metal-like state. Here we expand this range by a yet unexplored mechanism in excited dielectrics: amplification. In a two-colour pump-probe experiment, we show that a 400 nm femtosecond laser pulse is coherently amplified inside an excited sapphire sample on a scale of a few micrometres. Simulations strongly support the proposed two-photon stimulated emission process, which is temporally and spatially controllable. Consequently, we expect applications in all fields that demand strongly localized amplification.

  12. Spectrochemical analysis using laser plasma excitation

    Radziemski, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on analyses of gases, liquids, particles, and surfaces in which laser plasma is used to vaporize and excite a material. The authors present a discussion of the interaction between laser radiation and a solid and some recent analytical results using laser plasma excitation on metals. The use of laser plasmas as an ablation source is also discussed

  13. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Balling, Peter; Frislev, Martin Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We report an approach to modeling the interaction between ultrashort laser pulses and dielectric materials. The model includes the excitation of carriers by the laser through strongfield excitation, collisional excitation, and absorption in the plasma consisting of conduction-band electrons formed...

  14. Electron-beam-excited gas laser research

    Johnson, A.W.; Gerardo, J.B.; Patterson, E.L.; Gerber, R.A.; Rice, J.K.; Bingham, F.W.

    1975-01-01

    Net energy gain in laser fusion places requirements on the laser that are not realized by any existing laser. Utilization of relativistic electron beams (REB's), a relatively new source for the excitation of gas laser media, may lead to new lasers that could satisfy these requirements. Already REB's have been utilized to excite gas laser media and produce gas lasers that have not been produced as successfully any other way. Electron-beam-excitation has produced electronic-transition dimer lasers that have not yet been produced by any other excitation scheme (for example, Xe 2 / sup *(1)/, Kr:O(2 1 S)/sup 2/, KrF/sup *(3)/). In addition, REB's have initiated chemical reactions to produce HF laser radiation with unique and promising results. Relativistic-electron-beam gas-laser research is continuing to lead to new lasers with unique properties. Results of work carried out at Sandia Laboratories in this pioneering effort of electron-beam-excited-gas lasers are reviewed. (U.S.)

  15. Excitation mechanisms in singly ionized krypton laser

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    1982-01-01

    Lifetimes for the low lying 4p 4 4d and 4p 4 5s levels of singly ionized krypton laser are calculated, taking into account configuration interaction effects. The results show that some of these levels are metastable. They also suggest a two step excitation from the ground state of the ion (or the atom) to the upper 4p 4 5p laser levels involving some intermediate metastable states as a possible excitation mechanism. (author)

  16. Flashlamp excited fluid laser amplified

    1976-01-01

    The patent describes a laser amplifier with chambers for containing and amplifying an intensifier medium. It serves the need for a large impulse repetition rate and high intensities as required e.g. for laser isotope separation

  17. Distinct site- and state-selective dissociation of methyl-trifluoroacetate observed in core-electron excitation at the oxygen K-edge region

    Yamanaka, T.; Tabayashi, K.; Maruyama, T.; Harada, C.; Yoshida, H.

    2009-11-01

    Distinct site- and state-selective dissociation following the O1s core-excitation has been found in the gaseous molecules of methyl trifluoroacetate (MTFA). The site- and state-selective dissociation was examined by measuring the branching ratios of dominant CH3+ and CHO+ fragments. The branching ratios from MTFA showed that site-selective dissociation takes place via the excitation from the different atomic sites to the same π*CO resonance state, (O1sCO-1π*CO) and (O1sOMe-1π*CO). A pronounced O1sOMe site-selectivity was identified by a significant increment of CHO+ formation at the (O1sOMe→π*CO) band. The site-selectivity was also justified by an equivalent core approximation using the density functional theory calculation. State-selective dissociation was identified among the (O1sOMe-1π*CO), (O1sOMe-1σ*O-Me) and (O1sOMe-1σ*C-OMe) transitions originated from the same OMe core. State-selective production of CH3+ could be found at the (O1sOMe→σ*O-Me) band, whereas state-selective formation of CHO+ was observed at the (O1sOMe→π*CO) and (O1sOMe→σ*C-OMe) bands.

  18. Collisions in the presence of a laser field and the laser as a tool for state selective preparation of molecular states in collisions

    Hertel, I.V.

    1985-01-01

    In the study of individual collision events laser light can be used to influence or probe the process prior to, during, or after the binary particle interaction. We discuss some problems and particularly challenging possibilities for modifying the collision process in a high, but not too high, laser field. We discuss the possibilities of state selective preparation of quasimolecular Σ and π states in ion-atom collisions, with asymptotically laser optical pumped atomic p-states

  19. Development of longitudinally excited CO2 laser

    Masroon, N. S.; Tanaka, M.; Tei, M.; Uno, K.; Tsuyama, M.; Nakano, H.

    2018-05-01

    Simple, compact, and affordable discharged-pumped CO2 laser controlled by a fast high voltage solid state switch has been developed. In this study, longitudinal excitation scheme has been adapted for simple configuration. In the longitudinal excitation scheme, the discharge is produced along the direction of the laser axis, and the electrodes are well separated with a small discharge cross-section. Triggered spark gap switch is usually used to switch out the high voltage because of simple and low cost. However, the triggered spark gap operates in the arc mode and suffer from recovery problem causing a short life time and low efficiency for high repetition rate operation. As a result, there is now considerable interest in replacing triggered spark gap switch with solid state switches. Solid state switches have significant advantages compared to triggered spark gap switch which include longer service lifetime, low cost and stable high trigger pulse. We have developed simple and low cost fast high voltage solid state switch that consists of series connected-MOSFETs. It has been installed to the longitudinally excited CO2 laser to realize the gap switch less operation. Characteristics of laser oscillation by varying the discharge length, charging voltage, capacitance and gas pressure have been evaluated. Longer discharge length produce high power of laser oscillation. Optimum charging voltage and gas pressure were existed for longitudinally excited CO2 laser.

  20. Asymmetrically excited semiconductor injection laser

    Ladany, I.; Marinelli, D.P.; Kressel, H.; Cannuli, V.M.

    1975-01-01

    A diode laser is improved in order to produce an output in a single longitudinal mode. The laser has a rectangular body with two regions of differing conductivity type material. Extending from one surface of the rectangular body and into one of the regions of differing conductivity material is a third region. Although the third region is composed of the same general conductivity type material as the region into which it extends, it is more highly doped with conductivity modifiers (more conductive). This third region extends along one surface between the ends of the body and is spaced from the sides of the body. An electrical contact stripe is positioned on the one surface so that a portion of its width overlaps a portion of the width of the third region

  1. Final state selection in the 4p photoemission of Rb by combining laser spectroscopy with soft-x-ray photoionization

    Schulz, J.; Tchaplyguine, M.; Rander, T.; Bergersen, H.; Lindblad, A.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Heinaesmaeki, S.; Sankari, R.; Osmekhin, S.; Aksela, S.; Aksela, H.

    2005-01-01

    Fine structure resolved 4p photoemission studies have been performed on free rubidium atoms in the ground state and after excitation into the [Kr]5p 2 P 1/2 and 2 P 3/2 states. The 4p 5 5p final states have been excited in the 4p 6 5s→4p 5 5p conjugate shakeup process from ground state atoms as well as by direct photoemission from laser excited atoms. The relative intensities differ considerably in these three excitation schemes. The differences in the laser excited spectra could be described well using calculations based on the pure jK-coupling scheme. Thereby it was possible to specify the character of the various final states. Furthermore it has been possible to resolve two of the final states whose energy separation is smaller than the experimental resolution by selectively exciting them in a two step scheme, where the laser selects the spin-orbit coupling in the intermediate state and determines the final state coupling after x-ray photoemission

  2. State-selective charge transfer and excitation in ion-ion interactions at intermediate and high energies

    Samanta, R; Purkait, M

    2012-01-01

    Boundary Corrected Continuum Intermediate State (BCCIS) approximation and Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) methods are applied to calculate the charge transfer and excitation cross sections for ion-ion collisions.

  3. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  4. Control of laser pulse waveform in longitudinally excited CO2 laser by adjustment of excitation circuit

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2018-05-01

    In a longitudinally excited CO2 laser that had a 45 cm-long discharge tube with a 1:1:2 mixture of CO2/N2/He gas at a pressure of 3.0 kPa, we realized the generation of a short laser pulse with a spike pulse width of about 200 ns and a pulse tail length of several tens of microseconds, control of the energy ratio of the spike pulse part to the pulse tail part in the short laser pulse, the generation of a long laser pulse with a pulse width of several tens of microseconds, and control of the pulse width in the long laser pulse, by using four types of excitation circuits in which the capacitance was adjusted. In the short laser pulse, the energy ratio was in the range 1:14-1:112. In the long laser pulse, the pulse width was in the range 25.7-82.7 μs.

  5. Introduction to gas lasers with emphasis on selective excitation processes

    Willett, Colin S

    1974-01-01

    Introduction to Gas Lasers: Population Inversion Mechanisms focuses on important processes in gas discharge lasers and basic atomic collision processes that operate in a gas laser. Organized into six chapters, this book first discusses the historical development and basic principles of gas lasers. Subsequent chapters describe the selective excitation processes in gas discharges and the specific neutral, ionized and molecular laser systems. This book will be a valuable reference on the behavior of gas-discharge lasers to anyone already in the field.

  6. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with multiple laser tubes

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-11-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser system that was constituted of two or three laser tubes and a single driving circuit. The multiple laser tubes simultaneously produced almost the same short laser pulses with a spike pulse width of about 164 ns and a pulse tail length of about 74 μs with a single driving circuit. The double-tube system was constituted of two 30 cm-long laser tubes with inner diameters of 13 mm and 16 mm and a single driving circuit with an input energy of 2.18 J. The output energy of the 13 mm-tube was 23.3 mJ, and that of the 16 mm-tube was 21.9 mJ at a gas pressure of 4.2 kPa (CO2:N2:He = 1:1:2). The triple-tube system was constituted of three 30 cm-long laser tubes with inner diameters of 9 mm, 13 mm, and 16 mm and a single driving circuit with an input energy of 2.18 J. The output energy of the 9 mm tube was 15.9 mJ, that of the 13 mm tube was 24.1 mJ, and that of the 16 mm tube was 19.2 mJ at a gas pressure of 4.2 kPa. With the same driving circuit and the same input energy, the total output energies of the multitube laser systems were higher than the output energy of a single-tube system.

  7. Semiclassical treatment of laser excitation of the hydrogen atom

    Billing, Gert D.; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Leforestier, C.

    1992-01-01

    We present an alternative method for studying excitation of atoms in intense laser fields. In the present paper we focus upon the optical harmonic generation by hydrogen atoms.......We present an alternative method for studying excitation of atoms in intense laser fields. In the present paper we focus upon the optical harmonic generation by hydrogen atoms....

  8. Modeling short-pulse laser excitation of dielectric materials

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Sandkamm, Ditte Både; Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical description of ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectric materials based on strong-field excitation in the Keldysh picture combined with a multiple-rateequation model for the electronic excitation including collisional processes is presented. The model includes light attenuation...

  9. Kinetics of excited levels in copper-vapor laser

    Smilanski, I.

    1981-10-01

    A full and representative description of the excited copper level kinetics in a copper-vapor laser is presented. The research was carried out in three stages. The first stage was the development of a representative and reliable measurement cell. A laser tube constructed of refractory materials and an excitation circuit which provides short pulses at a high repetition rate to heat the tube and excite the copper atoms were developed. This stage was also dedicated to characterizing the laser and studying its scaling laws. In the second stage a rapid neasuring system which avoids the problem of spectral line shape was developed. The system is based on the 'hook' method, which utilizes the anomalous dispersion in the vicinity of an atomic line. The light source, a wide band nitrogen-laser-pumped dye laser, ensures a short sampling time, and the recording system, with a television camera face as the recording medium, allows precise data reduction. In the third stage the excited copper level kinetics in a copper vapor laser is measured. The principal conclusions, that only a small part of the energy in the discharge is utilized to populate the upper laser levels and that the lower laser level population is very large at the end of the excitation pulse and cannot be attributed to relaxation of the upper levels, necessitate a new kinetic description of the copper-vapor laser. The laser is not self-terminating; it is activated and terminated by the electrical discharge

  10. Associative ionization of two laser excited Na atoms

    Meijer, H.A.J.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation into the associative ionization of two sodium atoms excited by polarized laser beams is described. It was possible to excite the Na atoms in a velocity-selective way by exploiting the Doppler effect. The excitation of Na to the 3 2 P 3/2 , F=3 level is discussed on the basis of so-called saturation curves. Experiments with seven different combinations of polarization of the two exciting laser beams are described and the results discussed. 86 refs.; 53 figs.; 6 tabs

  11. Modeling pulsed excitation for gas-phase laser diagnostics

    Settersten, Thomas B.; Linne, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    Excitation dynamics for pulsed optical excitation are described with the density-matrix equations and the rate equations for a two-level system. A critical comparison of the two descriptions is made with complete and consistent formalisms that are amenable to the modeling of applied laser-diagnostic techniques. General solutions, resulting from numerical integration of the differential equations describing the excitation process, are compared for collisional conditions that range from the completely coherent limit to the steady-state limit, for which the two formalisms are identical. This analysis demonstrates the failure of the rate equations to correctly describe the transient details of the excitation process outside the steady-state limit. However, reasonable estimates of the resultant population are obtained for nonsaturating (linear) excitation. This comparison provides the laser diagnostician with the means to evaluate the appropriate model for excitation through a simple picture of the breakdown of the rate-equation validity

  12. 201Hg excitation in plasma produced by laser

    Comet, Maxime

    2014-01-01

    The use of high power lasers allows the study of the properties of matter in extreme conditions of temperature and density. Indeed, the interaction of a power laser and a target creates a plasma in which the temperature is high enough to reach important degrees of ionization. These conditions can allow the excitation of the nucleus. A nucleus of interest to study the processes of nuclear excitation is the 201 Hg. This work aims to design an experiment where the 201 Hg excitation will be observed in a plasma produced by a high power laser. The first part of this manuscript presents the calculation of the expected nuclear excitation rates in the plasma. For about ten years, nuclear excitation rates have been calculated using the average atom model. To validate this model a code named ADAM (French acronym for Beyond The Average Atom Model) was developed to calculate the nuclear excitation rates under the DCA (Detailed Configuration Accounting) hypothesis. ADAM allows us to deduce the thermo dynamical domain where the nuclear excitation rates determined with the average atom model are relevant. The second part of this manuscript presents the coupling of the excitation rate calculation with a hydrodynamic code to calculate the number of excited nuclei produced in one laser shot for different laser intensity. Finally, in the last part, first experimental approaches which will be used to design an experiment on a laser installation are presented. These approaches are based on the detection and determination of the amount of multicharged ions obtained far from the target (∼80 cm). For this purpose, an electrostatic analyzer was used. (author) [fr

  13. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies

  14. Lattice dynamics of femtosecond laser-excited antimony

    Abdel-Fattah, Mahmoud Hanafy [Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Bugayev, Aleksey [Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Elsayed-Ali, Hani E., E-mail: helsayed@odu.edu [Applied Research Center, Old Dominion University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is used to probe the lattice dynamics of femtosecond laser-excited antimony thin film. The temporal hierarchies of the intensity and position of diffraction orders are monitored. The femtosecond laser excitation of antimony film was found to lead to initial compression after the laser pulse, which gives way to tension vibrating at new equilibrium displacement. A damped harmonic oscillator model, in which the hot electron-blast force contributes to the driving force of oscillations in lattice spacing, is used to interpret the data. The electron–phonon energy-exchange rate and the electronic Grüneisen parameter were obtained.

  15. Characterization of weakly excited final states by shakedown spectroscopy of laser-excited potassium

    Schulz, J.; Heinaesmaeki, S.; Aksela, S.; Aksela, H.; Sankari, R.; Rander, T.; Lindblad, A.; Bergersen, H.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Kukk, E.

    2006-01-01

    3p shakedown spectra of laser excited potassium atoms as well as direct 3p photoemission of ground state potassium have been studied. These two excitation schemes lead to the same final states and thereby provide a good basis for a detailed study of the 3p 5 (4s3d) 1 configurations of singly ionized potassium and the photoemission processes leading to these configurations. The comparison of direct photoemission from the ground state and conjugate shakedown spectra from 4p 1/2 laser excited potassium made it possible to experimentally determine the character of final states that are only weakly excited in the direct photoemission but have a much higher relative intensity in the shakedown spectrum. Based on considerations of angular momentum and parity conservation the excitation scheme of the final states can be understood

  16. Electron impact excitation and ionization of laser-excited sodium atoms Na*(7d)

    Nienhaus, J.; Dorn, A.; Mehlhorn, W.; Zatsarinny, O.I.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the ejected-electron spectrum following impact excitation and ionization of laser-excited Na * (nl) atoms by 1.5 keV electrons. By means of two-laser excitation 3s → 3p 3/2 → 7d and subsequent cascading transitions about 8% (4%) of the target atoms were in excited states with n > 3 (7d). The experimental ejected-electron spectrum due to the decay of Auger and autoionization states of laser-excited atoms Na * (nl) with n = 4-7 has been fully interpreted by comprehensive calculations of the energies, cross sections and decay probabilities of the corresponding states. The various processes contributing to the ejected-electron spectrum are with decreasing magnitude: 2s ionization leading to 2s2p 6 nl Auger states, 2p → 3s excitation leading to 2p 5 3s( 1 P)nl autoionization states and 2s → 3l' excitation leading to 2s2p 6 3l'( 1 L)nl autoionization states. (Author)

  17. Imaging femtosecond laser-induced electronic excitation in glass

    Mao Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    While substantial progress has been achieved in understanding laser ablation on the nanosecond and picosecond time scales, it remains a considerable challenge to elucidate the underlying mechanisms during femtosecond laser material interactions. We present experimental observations of electronic excitation inside a wide band gap glass during single femtosecond laser pulse (100 fs, 800 nm) irradiation. Using a femtosecond time-resolved imaging technique, we measured the evolution of a laser-induced electronic plasma inside the glass and calculated the electron number density to be on the order of 10 19 cm -3

  18. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Medryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A.; Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available.

  19. Photoluminescence excitation measurements using pressure-tuned laser diodes

    Bercha, Artem; Ivonyak, Yurii; Mędryk, Radosław; Trzeciakowski, Witold A.; Dybała, Filip; Piechal, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Pressure-tuned laser diodes in external cavity were used as tunable sources for photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectroscopy. The method was demonstrated in the 720 nm-1070 nm spectral range using a few commercial laser diodes. The samples for PLE measurements were quantum-well structures grown on GaAs and on InP. The method is superior to standard PLE measurements using titanium sapphire laser because it can be extended to any spectral range where anti-reflection coated laser diodes are available

  20. Improved ion acceleration via laser surface plasma waves excitation

    Bigongiari, A. [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); TIPS/LULI, Université Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilée, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine (France); Raynaud, M. [CEA/DSM/LSI, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Riconda, C. [TIPS/LULI, Université Paris 6, CNRS, CEA, Ecole Polytechnique, 3, rue Galilée, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine (France); Héron, A. [CPHT, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2013-05-15

    The possibility of enhancing the emission of the ions accelerated in the interaction of a high intensity ultra-short (<100 fs) laser pulse with a thin target (<10λ{sub 0}), via surface plasma wave excitation is investigated. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed for laser intensities ranging from 10{sup 19} to 10{sup 20} Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}. The surface wave is resonantly excited by the laser via the coupling with a modulation at the target surface. In the cases where the surface wave is excited, we find an enhancement of the maximum ion energy of a factor ∼2 compared to the cases where the target surface is flat.

  1. Laser pulses for coherent xuv Raman excitation

    Greenman, Loren; Koch, Christiane P.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2015-07-01

    We combine multichannel electronic structure theory with quantum optimal control to derive femtosecond-time-scale Raman pulse sequences that coherently populate a valence excited state. For a neon atom, Raman target populations of up to 13% are obtained. Superpositions of the ground and valence Raman states with a controllable relative phase are found to be reachable with up to 4.5% population and arbitrary phase control facilitated by the pump pulse carrier-envelope phase. Analysis of the optimized pulse structure reveals a sequential mechanism in which the valence excitation is reached via a fast (femtosecond) population transfer through an intermediate resonance state in the continuum rather than avoiding intermediate-state population with simultaneous or counterintuitive (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) pulse sequences. Our results open a route to coupling valence excitations and core-hole excitations in molecules and aggregates that locally address specific atoms and represent an initial step towards realization of multidimensional spectroscopy in the xuv and x-ray regimes.

  2. High power electron beam accelerators for gas laser excitation

    Kelly, J.G.; Martin, T.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1976-06-01

    A preliminary parameter investigation has been used to determine a possible design of a high-power, relativistic electron beam, transversely excited laser. Based on considerations of present and developing pulsed power technology, broad area diode physics and projected laser requirements, an exciter is proposed consisting of a Marx generator, pulse shaping transmission lines, radially converging ring diodes and a laser chamber. The accelerator should be able to deliver approximately 20 kJ of electron energy at 1 MeV to the 10 4 cm 2 cylindrical surface of a laser chamber 1 m long and 0.3 m in diameter in 24 ns with very small azimuthal asymmetry and uniform radial deposition

  3. Thermally excited proton spin-flip laser emission in tokamaks

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.

    1993-07-01

    Based on statistical thermodynamic fluctuation arguments, it is shown here for the first time that thermally excited spin-flip laser emission from the fusion product protons can occur in large tokamak devices that are entering the reactor regime of operation. Existing experimental data from TFTR supports this conjecture, in the sense that these measurements are in complete agreement with the predictions of the quasilinear theory of the spin-flip laser

  4. Excitation mechanisms for XUV and X-ray lasers

    El-Sherbini, T.M.; Arrubban, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    Two excitation mechanisms leading to lasing action in the extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectral regions are proposed. Boron- like ions of Mg VIII, Al IX and Si X plasmas are used as the active laser material. The upper laser level is the metastable 1s 2 2s 2 4p( 2 p) state while the lower level is the short lived 1s 2 2s 2 3d( 2 D) state. (author). 10 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs

  5. Phasing of independent laser channels under impact SBS excitation

    Gordeev, A A; Efimkov, V F; Zubarev, I G; Mikhailov, S I [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-31

    It is shown experimentally that phasing of independent laser channels under impact SBS excitation calls for a stable difference in arm lengths, as in a classical Michelson interferometer. A scheme with automatic compensation for fluctuations of interferometer arm lengths has been proposed and experimentally implemented. This scheme makes it possible to perform stable phasing of two laser channels under standard laboratory conditions. (control of radiation parameters)

  6. Electronic-excitation energy transfer in heterogeneous dye solutions under laser excitation

    Levshin, L.V.; Mukushev, B.T.; Saletskii, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study has been made of electronic-excitation energy transfer (EEET) among dye molecules of different types for different exciting-fight wavelengths and temperatures. Upon selective laser excitation of the donor, the inhomogeneous broadening of molecular levels increases the probability of EEET from the donor to acceptor molecules. The efficiency of this process is directly proportional to the acceptor molecule concentration and is temperature dependent. The EEET is accompanied by the spectral migration of energy among donor molecules, which reduces the fluorescence quantum efficiency of the donor. Increasing the frequency of the exciting light decreases in the donor fluorescence quantum efficiency. An increase in the acceptor molecule concentration results in a decrease of the spectral migration of excitation in the donor molecule system. 5 refs., 5 figs

  7. Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation and damage of dielectric materials

    Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Balling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Ultrashort-pulse laser excitation of dielectrics is an intricate problem due to the strong coupling between the rapidly changing material properties and the light. In the present paper, details of a model based on a multiple-rate-equation description of the conduction band are provided. The model...

  8. Laser excitation kinetic phosphorimetry for uranium analysis

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1983-02-01

    Laser induced phosphorescence with time resolved photon counting detection has been used to measure uranium, as uranyl phosphate, in aqueous solution at room temperature. Demonstrated detection limits are below 10 parts per trillion. Multichannel scaler (MCS) photon counting is used for the rejection of laser and raman scattering, discrimination against prompt fluorescing species such as organics, and to provide a simultaneous determination of the uranyl emission lifetime. The lifetime is then used as a direct (photophysically correct) instrumental correction for matrix quenching and temperature effects. The MCS counting mode also allows rapid measurements (a few seconds at the ppb level, 5 minutes for pptr). Sample volumes of 2 to 3 ml have been used although 1/2 ml would be sufficient. The method has been used for: (1) evaluating uranium contamination in ultrapure solvents and trace analytical procedures, in the low part per trillion range, (2) directly measuring (without chemical pretreatment or separation) urine samples at the 10 ppb level, (3) direct measurements on drinking and ground waters at the sub ppb level, and (4) using oxidative digestion as the only preparation, both urine and brine waters have been measured at the sub ppb level. For the brine water analysis the determined value (0.36 ppb) agreed within 10% of the number determined by U-233 tracer - iron hydroxide coprecipitation - filament source mass spectrometric analysis

  9. Polarization methods for diode laser excitation of solid state lasers

    Holtom, Gary R.

    2008-11-25

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. A Yb-doped gain medium can be used that absorbs light having a first polarization and emits light having a second polarization. Using such pumping with laser cavity dispersion control, pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved.

  10. Atomic excitation and acceleration in strong laser fields

    Zimmermann, H; Eichmann, U

    2016-01-01

    Atomic excitation in the tunneling regime of a strong-field laser–matter interaction has been recently observed. It is conveniently explained by the concept of frustrated tunneling ionization (FTI), which naturally evolves from the well-established tunneling picture followed by classical dynamics of the electron in the combined laser field and Coulomb field of the ionic core. Important predictions of the FTI model such as the n distribution of Rydberg states after strong-field excitation and the dependence on the laser polarization have been confirmed in experiments. The model also establishes a sound basis to understand strong-field acceleration of neutral atoms in strong laser fields. The experimental observation has become possible recently and initiated a variety of experiments such as atomic acceleration in an intense standing wave and the survival of Rydberg states in strong laser fields. Furthermore, the experimental investigations on strong-field dissociation of molecules, where neutral excited fragments after the Coulomb explosion of simple molecules have been observed, can be explained. In this review, we introduce the subject and give an overview over relevant experiments supplemented by new results. (paper)

  11. Mode-locked solid state lasers using diode laser excitation

    Holtom, Gary R [Boston, MA

    2012-03-06

    A mode-locked laser employs a coupled-polarization scheme for efficient longitudinal pumping by reshaped laser diode bars. One or more dielectric polarizers are configured to reflect a pumping wavelength having a first polarization and to reflect a lasing wavelength having a second polarization. An asymmetric cavity provides relatively large beam spot sizes in gain medium to permit efficient coupling to a volume pumped by a laser diode bar. The cavity can include a collimation region with a controlled beam spot size for insertion of a saturable absorber and dispersion components. Beam spot size is selected to provide stable mode locking based on Kerr lensing. Pulse durations of less than 100 fs can be achieved in Yb:KGW.

  12. Theoretical model for a background noise limited laser-excited optical filter for doubled Nd lasers

    Shay, Thomas M.; Garcia, Daniel F.

    1990-01-01

    A simple theoretical model for the calculation of the dependence of filter quantum efficiency versus laser pump power in an atomic Rb vapor laser-excited optical filter is reported. Calculations for Rb filter transitions that can be used to detect the practical and important frequency-doubled Nd lasers are presented. The results of these calculations show the filter's quantum efficiency versus the laser pump power. The required laser pump powers required range from 2.4 to 60 mW/sq cm of filter aperture.

  13. Resonant excitation of uranium atoms by an argon ion laser

    Maeyama, H; Morikawa, M; Aihara, Y; Mochizuki, T; Yamanaka, C [Osaka Univ. (Japan)

    1979-03-01

    Photoionization of uranium atoms by UV lines, 3511 A and 3345 A, of an argon ion laser was observed and attributed due to resonant two-photon ionization. The dependence of the photoion currents on laser power was measured in focusing and non-focusing modes of laser beam, which has enabled us to obtain an absorption cross section and an ionization cross section independently. The orders of magnitude of these cross sections averaged over the fine structure were determined to be 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 2/ and 10/sup -17/ cm/sup 2/ respectively from a rate equation model. Resonance between 3511-A laser line and the absorption line of uranium isotopes was also confirmed by the ionization spectra obtained by near-single-frequency operation of the ion laser, which allowed the isotopic selective excitation of the uranium atoms. The maximum value of the enrichment of /sup 235/U was about 14%. The isotope separation of uranium atoms by this resonant excitation has been discussed.

  14. Investigation of rf plasma light sources for dye laser excitation

    Kendall, J.S.; Jaminet, J.F.

    1975-06-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to assess the applicability of radio frequency (rf) induction heated plasma light sources for potential excitation of continuous dye lasers. Experimental efforts were directed toward development of a continuous light source having spectral flux and emission characteristics approaching that required for pumping organic dye lasers. Analytical studies were performed to investigate (1) methods of pulsing the light source to obtain higher radiant intensity and (2) methods of integrating the source with a reflective cavity for pumping a dye cell. (TFD)

  15. Development of tunable flashlamp excited dye laser system

    Bhanthumnavin, V.; Apikitmata, S.; Kochareon, P.

    1991-01-01

    A tunable flashlamp excited dye laser (FEDL) was successfully developed for the first time in Thailand by Thai scientists at KMIT Thonburi (Bangmod). The Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethyl alcohol was utilized as a laser medium and circulated by a pump through a laser head. The dye cuvette had an inner diameter of 4.0 mm and was 90 mm long. The cavity mirrors M 1 , and M 2 were concave mirrors with reflectivities of 100% and 73% respectively. A power supply of 0-20 kV and current of 0-50 mA charged a capacitor of 0.3 μ f at 10-15 kV which was then discharged via a spark gap through the flashlamp. The output laser wavelengths was tunable from λ = 550-640 nm. It is the first FEDL system, locally developed, which has a tunable wavelength for the laser output. The laser pulse width is about 1.0 μs with energy of 20 mJ and peak power pf 20 KW. The repetition rate of the laser is 1/15 Hz. (author). 14 refs, 7 figs

  16. Electronically excited C 2 from laser photodissociated C 60

    Arepalli, S.; Scott, C. D.; Nikolaev, P.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-03-01

    Spectral and transient emission measurements are made of radiation from products of laser excitation of buckminsterfullerene (C 60) vapor diluted in argon at 973 K. The principal radiation is from the Swan band system of C 2 and, at early times, also from a black-body continuum. Transient measurements indicate two characteristic periods of decay 2 and 50 μs long, with characteristic decay times of ˜0.3 and 5 μs, respectively. The first period is thought to be associated with decomposition and radiative cooling of C 60 molecules or nano-sized carbon particles and the second period continues with decomposition products of laser excited C 60, C 58, C 56, etc.

  17. Diode laser excited optogalvanic spectroscopy of glow discharges

    Barshick, C. M.; Shaw, R. W.; Jennings, L. W.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Young, J. P.; Ramsey, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diode-laser-excited isotopically-selective optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS) of uranium metal, oxide and fluoride in a glow discharge (GD) is presented. The technique is useful for determining 235 U/( 235 U+ 238 U) isotope ratios in these samples. The precision and accuracy of this determination is evaluated, and a study of experimental parameters pertaining to optimization of the measurement is discussed. Application of GD-OGS to other f-transition elements is also described

  18. Diode laser excited optogalvanic spectroscopy of glow discharges

    Barshick, C.M.; Shaw, R.W.; Post-Zwicker, A., Young, J.P.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The development of diode-laser-excited isotopically-selective optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS) of uranium metal, oxide and fluoride in a glow discharge (GD) is presented. The technique is useful for determining isotopic ratios of 235 U/( 235 U + 238 U) in the above samples. The precision and accuracy of this determination is evaluated, and a study of experimental parameters pertaining to optimization of he measurement is discussed. Application of the GD-OGS to other f-transition elements is also described

  19. Search for nuclear excitation by laser-driven electron motion

    Bounds, J.A.; Dyer, P.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that a nucleus may be excited by first exciting the atom's electrons with UV photons. The incident photons couple to the electrons, which would then couple via a virtual photon to the nucleus. As a test case, experiments with 235 U have been performed. A pulsed infrared laser produces an atomic vapor of 235 U which is then bombarded by a high-brightness UV laser beam. The resulting ions are collected. The first excited nuclear state of 235 U has a 26-min half-life and decays by internal conversion, resulting in emission of an atomic electron. These conversion electrons are detected by a channel electron multiplier. An upper limit of 4.0x10 -5 has been obtained for the probability of exciting the nucleus of a 235 U atom that is in the 248-nm UV beam for 700 fs at an irradiance in the range of 1.0x10 15 to 2.5x10 15 W/cm 2

  20. UV Resonant Raman Spectrometer with Multi-Line Laser Excitation

    Lambert, James L.; Kohel, James M.; Kirby, James P.; Morookian, John Michael; Pelletier, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A Raman spectrometer employs two or more UV (ultraviolet) laser wavel engths to generate UV resonant Raman (UVRR) spectra in organic sampl es. Resonant Raman scattering results when the laser excitation is n ear an electronic transition of a molecule, and the enhancement of R aman signals can be several orders of magnitude. In addition, the Ra man cross-section is inversely proportional to the fourth power of t he wavelength, so the UV Raman emission is increased by another fact or of 16, or greater, over visible Raman emissions. The Raman-scatter ed light is collected using a high-resolution broadband spectrograph . Further suppression of the Rayleigh-scattered laser light is provi ded by custom UV notch filters.

  1. Nuclear fission fragment excitation of electronic transition laser media

    Lorents, D.C.; McCusker, M.V.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1976-01-01

    The properties of high energy electronic transition lasers excited by fission fragments are expanded. Specific characteristics of the media including density, excitation rates, wavelength, kinetics, fissile material, scale size, and medium uniformity are assessed. The use of epithermal neutrons, homogeneously mixed fissile material, and special high cross section nuclear isotopes to optimize coupling of the energy to the medium are shown to be important considerations maximizing the scale size, energy deposition, and medium uniformity. A performance limit point of approximately 1000 J/l in approximately 100 μs pulses is established for a large class of systems operating in the near ultraviolet and visible spectral regions. It is demonstrated that e-beam excitation can be used to simulate nuclear pumping conditions to facilitate the search for candidate media. Experimental data for the kinetics of a XeF* laser operating in Ar/Xe/F 2 /UF 6 mixtures are given. These reactor-pumped systems are suitable for scaling to volumes on the order of (meters) 3

  2. New laser-driven nuclear excitation studies. Concepts and proposals

    Drska, L.; Hanus, V.; Sinor, M.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. There has been a great interest in the processes of nuclear excitation and triggering in high-parameter laser-produced plasmas in recent years. A series of papers devoted to the theory of this event has been published. Several experiments have already been attempted to study the excitation of the lowest nuclear levels of medium / high-Z nuclides (Ta 181, U 235 etc.), all the same unsuccessful or inconclusive. In the first part of this paper, the situation will be overviewed and analysis of the reasons of this unsatisfactory state of affairs will be accomplished. Prospects of the possible solving of the problem by using novel / projected laser facilities (esp. LIL / PETAL, XFEL, ELI-Phase) will be outlined. Potential of the future ELI Beam Facility in the Czech Republic in this area will be stressed. In the second part, some proposals for the excitation and triggering studies using combined high-power and high-intensity LIL / PETAL system (2012) with multi-kilojoule and multi-petawatt parameters will be discussed. Results of preliminary simulations supporting the thinking about potential projects will be shown and conditions essential for meaningful effort in this area will be analyzed. Problems of realistic simulations of such experiments will be addressed. Completely novel chances for the excitation / triggering studies would be started by constructed / projected facilities XFEL (coherent X-rays ∼ 12 keV, 2014) and ELI (multi-petawatt Phase 1, 2015). Application of intense / coherent high-energy X-rays and / or intense electron / ion beams allows new experimental schemes, extends the range of nuclides to be studied and (maybe) will enable to test some new triggering methods. In the last part of the presentation some possibilities in point (esp. for ELI Beamlines), will be drawn up. Acknowledgements. This research has been supported by the Research Program no. 6840770022 of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the

  3. Diode laser excited optogalvanic spectroscopy of glow discharges

    Barshick, C.M.; Shaw, R.W.; Jennings, L.W.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Young, J.P.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diode-laser-excited isotopically-selective optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS) of uranium metal, oxide and fluoride in a glow discharge (GD) is presented. The technique is useful for determining 235 U/( 235 U+ 238 U) isotope ratios in these samples. The precision and accuracy of this determination is evaluated, and a study of experimental parameters pertaining to optimization of the measurement is discussed. Application of GD-OGS to other f-transition elements is also described. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of oxide glasses

    Weber, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing was applied to investigate the local fields and interactions of paramagnetic ions in oxide glasses. Studies included the site dependence of energy levels, radiative and nonradiative transition probabilities, homogeneous line broadening, and ion--ion energy transfer of rare earth ions. These results and the experimental techniques are reviewed briefly; the use of paramagnetic ions other than the rare earths is also considered. Recently, laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy was used to investigate modifications in the local structure of lithium borate glass caused by compositional changes and phase separation and the site dependence of nonradiative relaxation of paramagnetic ions by multiphonon processes. These results and their implications are discussed. 6 figures

  5. Laser-excited photoluminescence of three-layer GaAs double-heterostructure laser material

    Nash, F.R.; Dixon, R.W.; Barnes, P.A.; Schumaker, N.E.

    1975-01-01

    The successful fabrication of high-quality DH GaAs lasers from a simplified three-layer structure is reported. A major asset of this structure is the transparency of its final layer to recombination radiation occurring in the active layer, thus permitting the use of nondestructive photoluminescent techniques for material evaluation prior to device fabrication. In the course of photoluminescence investigations on this material the additional important observation has been made that indirect excitation (in which photocarriers are generated in the top ternary layer) has significant advantages over direct excitation (in which photocarriers are generated directly in the active layer). These include (i) the direct measurement of Al concentrations in both upper layers, (ii) the measurements of the minority-carrier diffusion length in the upper layer, (iii) an easily obtained indication of taper in the thickness of the upper layer, and (iv) surprisingly effective excitation of the active layer. By combining direct and indirect excitation it is shown that a clearer understanding of the location and detrimental influences of defects in the GaAs laser structure may be obtained. For example, the width of the region of reduced luminescence associated with many defects is found to be very excitation dependent and is confirmed to arise fr []m reduced active region luminescence. The photoluminescent excitation techniques described should be useful in the study of other heterostructure devices and material systems

  6. Spike latency and response properties of an excitable micropillar laser

    Selmi, F.; Braive, R.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Kuszelewicz, R.; Erneux, T.; Barbay, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present experimental measurements concerning the response of an excitable micropillar laser with saturable absorber to incoherent as well as coherent perturbations. The excitable response is similar to the behavior of spiking neurons but with much faster time scales. It is accompanied by a subnanosecond nonlinear delay that is measured for different bias pump values. This mechanism provides a natural scheme for encoding the strength of an ultrafast stimulus in the response delay of excitable spikes (temporal coding). Moreover, we demonstrate coherent and incoherent perturbations techniques applied to the micropillar with perturbation thresholds in the range of a few femtojoules. Responses to coherent perturbations assess the cascadability of the system. We discuss the physical origin of the responses to single and double perturbations with the help of numerical simulations of the Yamada model and, in particular, unveil possibilities to control the relative refractory period that we recently evidenced in this system. Experimental measurements are compared to both numerical simulations of the Yamada model and analytic expressions obtained in the framework of singular perturbation techniques. This system is thus a good candidate to perform photonic spike processing tasks in the framework of novel neuroinspired computing systems.

  7. Dental hard tissue drilling by longitudinally excited CO2 laser

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2017-07-01

    We developed a longitudinally excited CO2 laser with a long optical cavity and investigated the drilling characteristics of dental hard tissue. The CO2 laser was very simple and consisted of a 45-cm-long alumina ceramic pipe with an inner diameter of 13 mm, a pulse power supply, a step-up transformer, a storage capacitance, a spark gap, and a long optical cavity with a cavity length of 175 cm. The CO2 laser produced a short pulse that had a spike pulse with the width of 337 ns and the energy of 1.9 mJ, a pulse tail with the length of 180 μs and the energy of 37.6 mJ, and a doughnut-like beam. In the investigation, a sample was a natural drying human tooth (enamel and dentine). In a processing system, a ZnSe focusing lens with the focal length of 50 mm was used and the location of the focal plane was that of the sample surface. In 1 pulse irradiation, the drilling characteristics depended on the fluence was investigated. In the enamel and dentin drilling, the drilling depth increased with the fluence. The 1 pulse irradiation with the fluence of 21.5 J/cm2 produced the depth of 79.3 μm in the enamel drilling, and the depth of 152.7 μm in the dentin drilling. The short-pulse CO2 laser produced a deeper drilling depth at a lower fluence than long-pulse CO2 lasers in dental hard tissue processing.

  8. Solar-pumped fiber laser with transverse-excitation geometry

    Masuda, Taizo; Iyoda, Mitsuhiro; Yasumatu, Yuta; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kiyoto; Endo, Masamori

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an extremely low-concentrated solar-pumped laser (SPL) that uses a transversely excited fiber laser geometry. To eliminate the need for precise solar tracking with an aggressive cooling system and to considerably increase the number of laser applications, low-concentration factors in SPLs are highly desired. We investigate the intrinsic low-loss property of SiO2 optical fibers; this property can be used to compensate for the extremely low gain coefficient of the weakly-pumped active medium by sunlight. As part of the experimental setup, a 40-m long Nd3+-doped SiO2 fiber coil was packed in a ring-shaped chamber filled with a sensitizer solution; this solution functioned as a down-shifter. The dichroic top window of the chamber transmitted a wide range of sunlight and reflected the down-shifted photons, confining them to the highly-reflective chamber until they were absorbed by the Nd3+ ions in the active fiber. We demonstrated a lasing threshold that is 10 times the concentration of natural sunlight and two orders of magnitude smaller than that of conventional SPLs.

  9. Photochemical and Spectroscopic Effects Resulting from Excimer Laser Excitation.

    Wang, Xuan Xiao

    a broadband excimer laser operating at 248 nm and 308 nm as the source of excitation. Absolute fluorescence quantum yields for the substances under study were measured at 248 nm using toluene as the fluorescence standard. Fluorescence spectra from species produced from nonlinear photochemical processes were also studied.

  10. Modeling of collisional excited x-ray lasers using short pulse laser pumping

    Sasaki, Akira; Moribayashi, Kengo; Utsumi, Takayuki; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    A simple atomic kinetics model of electron collisional excited x-ray lasers has been developed. The model consists of a collisional radiative model using the average ion model (AIM) and a detailed term accounting (DTA) model of Ni-like Ta. An estimate of plasma condition to produce gain in Ni-like Ta ({lambda}=44A) is given. Use of the plasma confined in a cylinder is proposed to preform a uniform high density plasma from 1-D hydrodynamics calculations. (author)

  11. Laser excitation of the n=3 level of positronium for antihydrogen production

    Aghion, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Bonomi, G; Braunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R S; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Chlouba, K; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Demetrio, A; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ereditato, A; Evans, C; Ferragut, R; Fesel, J; Fontana, A; Forslund, O K; Gerber, S; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S N; Guatieri, F; Haider, S; Holmestad, H; Huse, T; Jernelv, I L; Jordan, E; Kellerbauer, A; Kimura, M; Koetting, T; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lansonneur, P; Lebrun, P; Lehner, S; Liberadzka, J; Malbrunot, C; Mariazzi, S; Marx, L; Matveev, V A; Mazzotta, Z; Nebbia, G; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M K; Pacifico, N; Pagano, D; Penasa, L; Petracek, V; Pistillo, C; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Ravelli, L; Resch, L; Rienacker, B; Røhne, O M; Rotondi, A; Sacerdoti, M; Sandaker, H; Santoro, R; Scampoli, P; Smestad, L; Sorrentino, F; Spacek, M; Storey, J; Strojek, I M; Testera, G; Tietje, I; Vamosi, S; Widmann, E; Yzombard, P; Zmeskal, J; Zurlo, N.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate laser excitation of the n=3 state of positronium (Ps) in vacuum. A specially designed high-efficiency pulsed slow positron beam and single shot positronium annihilation lifetime spectroscopy were used to produce and detect Ps. Pulsed laser excitation of n=3 level at 205 nm was monitored via Ps photoionization induced by a second intense laser pulse at 1064 nm. About 15% of the overall positronium emitted in vacuum was excited to n=3 and photoionized. Saturation of both the n=3 excitation and the following photoionization was observed and is explained by a simple rate equation model. Scanning the laser frequency allowed us to extract the positronium transverse temperature related to the width of the Doppler-broadened line. Moreover, preliminary observation of excitation to Rydberg states (n = 15...17) using n=3 as intermediate level was observed, giving an independent confirmation of efficient excitation to the 33P state.

  12. Laser patterning of transparent polymers assisted by plasmon excitation.

    Elashnikov, R; Trelin, A; Otta, J; Fitl, P; Mares, D; Jerabek, V; Svorcik, V; Lyutakov, O

    2018-06-13

    Plasmon-assisted lithography of thin transparent polymer films, based on polymer mass-redistribution under plasmon excitation, is presented. The plasmon-supported structures were prepared by thermal annealing of thin Ag films sputtered on glass or glass/graphene substrates. Thin films of polymethylmethacrylate, polystyrene and polylactic acid were then spin-coated on the created plasmon-supported structures. Subsequent laser beam writing, at the wavelength corresponding to the position of plasmon absorption, leads to mass redistribution and patterning of the thin polymer films. The prepared structures were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy and confocal and AFM microscopy. The shape of the prepared structures was found to be strongly dependent on the substrate type. The mechanism leading to polymer patterning was examined and attributed to the plasmon-heating. The proposed method makes it possible to create different patterns in polymer films without the need for wet technological stages, powerful light sources or a change in the polymer optical properties.

  13. Development of transient collisional excitation x-ray laser with ultra short-pulse laser

    Kado, Masataka; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Noboru; Tanaka, Momoko; Sukegawa, Kouta; Nagashima, Keisuke; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    We have observed lasing on Ne-like 3s-3p line from titanium (32.4 nm), Ni-like 4p-4d line from silver (13.9 nm) and tin (11.9 nm) with the transient collisional excitation (TCE) scheme that uses combination of a long pre-pulse (∼ns) and a short main pulse (∼ps). A gain coefficient of 23 cm -1 was measured for plasma length up to 4 mm with silver slab targets. We have also observed lasing on Ne-like and Ni-like lines with new TCE scheme that used pico-seconds laser pulse to generate plasma and observed strong improvement of x-ray laser gain coefficient. A gain coefficient of 14 cm -1 was measured for plasma length up to 6 mm with tin targets. (author)

  14. Low-concentrated solar-pumped laser via transverse excitation fiber-laser geometry.

    Masuda, Taizo; Iyoda, Mitsuhiro; Yasumatsu, Yuta; Endo, Masamori

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate an extremely low-concentrated solar-pumped laser (SPL) using a fiber laser with transverse excitation geometry. A low concentration factor is highly desired in SPLs to eliminate the need for precise solar tracking and to considerably increase the practical applications of SPL technology. In this Letter, we have exploited the intrinsic low-loss property of silica fibers to compensate for the extremely low gain coefficient of the weakly pumped active medium. A 40 m long Nd 3+ -doped fiber coil is packed in a ring-shaped chamber filled with a sensitizer solution. We demonstrated a lasing threshold that is 15 times the concentration of natural sunlight and two orders of magnitude smaller than those of conventional SPLs.

  15. Laser Doppler velocimetry based on the optoacoustic effect in a RF-excited CO{sub 2} laser

    Lee, Teaghee; Choi, Jong Woon [Department of Information and Communication, Honam University, Seobong-dong 59-1, Gwansan-gu, Gwangju 506-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Pyung [College of Electronics and Information, Kyunghee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    We present a compact optoacoustic laser Doppler velocimetry method that utilizes the self-mixing effect in a RF-excited CO{sub 2} laser. A portion of a Doppler-shifted laser beam, produced by irradiating a single wavelength laser beam on a moving object, is mixed with an originally existing laser beam inside a laser cavity. The fine change of pressure in the laser cavity modulated by the Doppler-shifted frequency is detected by a condenser microphone in the laser tube. In our studies, the frequency of the Doppler signal due to the optoacoustic effect was detected as high as 50 kHz. Our measurements also confirmed that the signal varied linearly with the velocity of the external scatterer (the moving object) and the cosine of the angle between the laser beam and the velocity vector of the object.

  16. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    Kotaki, Hideyuki

    2002-12-01

    We investigate a mechanism of nonlinear phenomena in laser-plasma interaction, a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. We need to understand and further employ some of these phenomena for our purposes. We measure self-focusing, filamentation, and the anomalous blueshift of the laser pulse. The ionization of gas with the self-focusing causes a broad continuous spectrum with blueshift. The normal blueshift depends on the laser intensity and the plasma density. We, however, have found different phenomenon. The laser spectrum shifts to fixed wavelength independent of the laser power and gas pressure above some critical power. We call the phenomenon 'anomalous blueshift'. The results are explained by the formation of filaments. An intense laser pulse can excite a laser wakefield in plasma. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 10 18 cm -3 is measured with a time-resolved frequency domain interferometer (FDI). The density distribution of the helium gas is measured with a time-resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer to search for the optimum laser focus position and timing in the gas-jet. The results show an accelerating wakefield excitation of 20 GeV/m with good coherency, which is useful for ultrahigh gradient particle acceleration in a compact system. This is the first time-resolved measurement of laser wakefield excitation in a gas-jet plasma. The experimental results are compared with a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation. The pump-probe interferometer system of FDI and the anomalous blueshift will be modified to the optical injection system as a relativistic electron beam injector. In 1D PIC simulation we obtain the results of high quality intense electron beam acceleration. These results illuminate the possibility of a high energy and a high quality electron beam acceleration. (author)

  17. Rydberg excitation of neutral nitric oxide molecules in strong UV and near-IR laser fields

    Lv Hang; Zhang Jun-Feng; Zuo Wan-Long; Xu Hai-Feng; Jin Ming-Xing; Ding Da-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Rydberg state excitations of neutral nitric oxide molecules are studied in strong ultraviolet (UV) and near-infra-red (IR) laser fields using a linear time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer with the pulsed electronic field ionization method. The yield of Rydberg molecules is measured as a function of laser intensity and ellipticity, and the results in UV laser fields are compared with those in near-IR laser fields. The present study provides the first experimental evidence of neutral Rydberg molecules surviving in a strong laser field. The results indicate that a rescattering-after-tunneling process is the main contribution to the formation of Rydberg molecules in strong near-IR laser fields, while multi-photon excitation may play an important role in the strong UV laser fields. (paper)

  18. Broadband Doppler-limited two-photon and stepwise excitation spectroscopy with laser frequency combs

    Hipke, Arthur; Meek, Samuel A.; Ideguchi, Takuro; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    Multiplex two-photon excitation spectroscopy is demonstrated at Doppler-limited resolution. We describe first Fourier-transform two-photon spectroscopy of an atomic sample with two mode-locked laser oscillators in a dual-comb technique. Each transition is uniquely identified by the modulation imparted by the interfering comb excitations. The temporal modulation of the spontaneous two-photon fluorescence is monitored with a single photodetector, and the spectrum of all excited transitions is revealed by a Fourier transform.

  19. Discrete excitation of mode pulses using a diode-pumped solid-state digital laser

    Ngcobo, Sandile

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate novel method of generating discrete excitation of on-demand Lagaurre-Gaussian (LG) mode pulses, in a diode pumped solid-state digital laser. The digital laser comprises of an intra-cavity spatial light...

  20. Near field imaging of transient collisional excitation x-ray laser

    Tanaka, Momoko; Kado, Masataka; Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Sukegawa, Kouta; Lu, Peixiang; Nagashima, Akira; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    We observed the spatial profile of the transient collisional excitation Ni-like Ag laser (λ=13.9 nm) for various plasma lengths using the near field imaging method. The gain coefficient of the x-ray laser was estimated as 24 cm -1 . The gain region was a 50 μm crescent shape and included localized high gain areas. (author)

  1. Enhanced photoemission from laser-excited plasmonic nano-objects in periodic arrays

    Fedorov, N.; Geoffroy, G.; Duchateau, G.; Štolcová, L.; Proška, J.; Novotný, F.; Domonkos, Mária; Jouin, H.; Martin, P.; Raynaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 31 (2016), s. 1-15, č. článku 315301. ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : photoemission * laser excitation * surface plasmon * plasmonics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.649, year: 2016

  2. Ponderomotive dressing of doubly-excited states with intensity-controlled laser light

    Ding Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We laser-dress several doubly-excited states in helium. Tuning the coupling-laser intensity from perturbative to the strong-coupling regime, we are able to measure phases imprinted on the two-electron wavefunctions, and observe a new continuum coupling mechanism.

  3. Plastic lab-on-a-chip for fluorescence excitation with integrated organic semiconductor lasers.

    Vannahme, Christoph; Klinkhammer, Sönke; Lemmer, Uli; Mappes, Timo

    2011-04-25

    Laser light excitation of fluorescent markers offers highly sensitive and specific analysis for bio-medical or chemical analysis. To profit from these advantages for applications in the field or at the point-of-care, a plastic lab-on-a-chip with integrated organic semiconductor lasers is presented here. First order distributed feedback lasers based on the organic semiconductor tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) doped with the laser dye 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyril)-4H-pyrane (DCM), deep ultraviolet induced waveguides, and a nanostructured microfluidic channel are integrated into a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate. A simple and parallel fabrication process is used comprising thermal imprint, DUV exposure, evaporation of the laser material, and sealing by thermal bonding. The excitation of two fluorescent marker model systems including labeled antibodies with light emitted by integrated lasers is demonstrated.

  4. Laser-excited atomic-fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal tube atomization.

    Vera, J A; Leong, M B; Stevenson, C L; Petrucci, G; Winefordner, J D

    1989-12-01

    The performance of graphite-tube electrothermal atomizers is evaluated for laser-excited atomic-fluorescence spectrometry for several elements. Three pulsed laser systems are used to pump tunable dye lasers which subsequently are used to excite Pb, Ga, In, Fe, Ir, and Tl atoms in the hot graphite tube. The dye laser systems used are pumped by nitrogen, copper vapour and Nd:YAG lasers. Detection limits in the femtogram and subfemtogram range are typically obtained for all elements. A commercial graphite-tube furnace is important for the successful utilization of the laser-based method when the determination of trace elements is intended, especially when complicated matrices may be present.

  5. Laser-induced incandescence of suspended particles as a source of excitation of dye luminescence

    Zelensky, S

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of pulsed YAG-Nd sup 3 sup + laser radiation with submicron light-absorbing particles suspended in an aqueous solution of Rhodamine 6G is investigated experimentally. The experiments demonstrate that the laser-induced incandescence of suspended particles excites the luminescence of the dissolved dye molecules. The mechanism of the luminescence excitation consists in the reabsorption of the thermal radiation within the volume of the sample cell. On the ground of this mechanism of excitation, a method of measurement of the luminescence quantum yield is proposed and realized. The method requires the knowledge of the geometrical parameters of the cell and does not require the use of reference samples.

  6. Disorder-induced localization of excitability in an array of coupled lasers

    Lamperti, M.; Perego, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the localization of excitability induced by disorder in an array of coupled semiconductor lasers with a saturable absorber. Through numerical simulations we show that the exponential localization of excitable waves occurs if a certain critical amount of randomness is present in the coupling coefficients among the lasers. The results presented in this Rapid Communication demonstrate that disorder can induce localization in lattices of excitable nonlinear oscillators, and can be of interest in the study of photonics-based random networks, neuromorphic systems, and, by analogy, in biology, in particular, in the investigation of the collective dynamics of neuronal cell populations.

  7. Theory of spin and lattice wave dynamics excited by focused laser pulses

    Shen, Ka; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2018-06-01

    We develop a theory of spin wave dynamics excited by ultrafast focused laser pulses in a magnetic film. We take into account both the volume and surface spin wave modes in the presence of applied, dipolar and magnetic anisotropy fields and include the dependence on laser spot exposure size and magnetic damping. We show that the sound waves generated by local heating by an ultrafast focused laser pulse can excite a wide spectrum of spin waves (on top of a dominant magnon–phonon contribution). Good agreement with recent experiments supports the validity of the model.

  8. Excitation of Accelerating Plasma Waves by Counter-propagating Laser Beams

    Gennady Shvets; Nathaniel J. Fisch; Alexander Pukhov

    2001-01-01

    Generation of accelerating plasma waves using two counter-propagating laser beams is considered. Colliding-beam accelerator requires two laser pulses: the long pump and the short timing beam. We emphasize the similarities and differences between the conventional laser wakefield accelerator and the colliding-beam accelerator (CBA). The highly nonlinear nature of the wake excitation is explained using both nonlinear optics and plasma physics concepts. Two regimes of CBA are considered: (i) the short-pulse regime, where the timing beam is shorter than the plasma period, and (ii) the parametric excitation regime, where the timing beam is longer than the plasma period. Possible future experiments are also outlined

  9. Analysis of UV-excited fluorochromes by flow cytometry using near-ultraviolet laser diodes.

    Telford, William G

    2004-09-01

    Violet laser diodes have become common and reliable laser sources for benchtop flow cytometers. While these lasers are very useful for a variety of violet and some ultraviolet-excited fluorochromes (e.g., DAPI), they do not efficiently excite most UV-stimulated probes. In this study, the next generation of InGaN near-UV laser diodes (NUVLDs) emitting in the 370-375-nm range have been evaluated as laser sources for cuvette-based flow cytometers. Several NUVLDs, ranging in wavelength from 370 to 374 nm and in power level from 1.5 to 10 mW, were mounted on a BD Biosciences LSR II and evaluated for their ability to excite cells labeled with the UV DNA binding dye DAPI, several UV phenotyping fluorochromes (including Alexa Fluor 350, Marina Blue, and quantum dots), and the fluorescent calcium chelator indo-1. NUVLDs at the 8-10-mW power range gave detection sensitivity levels comparable to more powerful solid-state and ion laser sources, using low-fluorescence microsphere beads as measurement standards. NUVLDs at all tested power levels allowed extremely high-resolution DAPI cell cycle analysis, and sources in the 8-10-mW power range excited Alexa Fluor 350, Marina Blue, and a variety of quantum dots at virtually the same signal-to-noise ratios as more powerful UV sources. These evaluations indicate that near-UV laser diodes installed on a cuvette-based flow cytometer performed nearly as well as more powerful solid-state UV lasers on the same instrumentation, and comparably to more powerful ion lasers on a jet-in-air system, and. Despite their limited power, integration of these small and inexpensive lasers into benchtop flow cytometers should allow the use of flow cytometric applications requiring UV excitation on a wide variety of instruments. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    Vankan, P.J.W.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Döbele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has

  11. Investigation of dye laser excitation of atomic systems

    Abate, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A stabilized cw dye laser system and an optical pumping scheme for a sodium atomic beam were developed, and the improvements over previously existing systems are discussed. A method to stabilize both the output intensity and the frequency of the cw dye laser for periods of several hours is described. The fluctuation properties of this laser are investigated by photon counting and two-time correlation measurements. The results show significant departures from the usual single-mode laser theory in the region of threshold and below. The implications of the deviation from accepted theory are discussed. The atomic beam system that was constructed and tested is described. A method of preparing atomic sodium so that it behaves as a simple two-level atom is outlined, and the results of some experiments to study the resonant interaction between the atoms and the dye laser beam are presented

  12. Fluorescence study of some xanthine dyes under stepped laser excitation

    Chirkova, L.V.; Ketsle, G.A.; Ermagambetov, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Paper is devoted to definition of triplet state in molecules of xanthine dyes and study of intramolecular energy circulation. Stepped two-quanta excitation of dyes has been carried out with help of experimental unit. Intensive luminescence activated by excitation of triplet molecules of dyes within triplet-triplet band with wave length of 1060 nm was registered for eosin. Given luminescence spectrally coincides with fast fluorescence. 5 refs., 6 figs

  13. CO2 laser pulse switching by optically excited semiconductors

    Silva, V.L. da.

    1986-01-01

    The construction and the study of a semi-conductor optical switch used for generating short infrared pulses and to analyse the semiconductor characteristics, are presented. The switch response time depends on semiconductor and control laser characteristics. The results obtained using a Ge switch controlled by N 2 , NdYag and Dye lasers are presented. The response time was 50 ns limited by Ge recombination time. The reflectivity increased from 7% to 59% using N 2 laser to control the switch. A simple model for semiconductor optical properties that explain very well the experimental results, is also presented. (author) [pt

  14. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  15. Complete electromagnetically induced transparency in sodium atoms excited by a multimode dye laser

    Alzetta, G.; Gozzini, S.; Lucchesini, A.; Cartaleva, S.; Karaulanov, T.; Marinelli, C.; Moi, L.

    2004-01-01

    Complete electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in sodium vapor is demonstrated experimentally by means of excitation with a broadband multimode dye laser tuned on the D 1 line. One hundred percent transparency is observed by excitation of the Na vapor with circularly polarized laser light. The linear polarization excitation produces, instead, complete destruction of the EIT resonance. For laser power density in the 0.1 to 1 W/cm 2 range, the linewidth of the EIT resonance remains in the interval of 90-400 kHz. This complete transparency of the medium in a narrow frequency interval is interesting for many applications where the enhancement of the refractive index is important and where the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio of the dark resonances allows a more sensitive measurement of weak magnetic fields

  16. Optogalvanic monitoring of collisional transfer of laser excitation energy in a neon RF plasma

    Armstrong, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    The optogalvanic signals produced by pulsed laser excitation of 1s5--2p8 and 1s5-2p9 (Paschen notation) transition by a ∼29 MHz radiofrequency (rf) discharge at ∼5 torr have been investigated. The optogalvanic signal produced by 1s5-2p9 excitations indicates that there is transfer of energy from the 2p9 state to some other state. The state to which this energy is transferred is believed to be mainly the 2p8 state because of the very small energy gap between the 2p9 and 2p8 states. To verify this transfer, the 1s5-2p8 transition was investigated. The similarity of the temporal profiles of the optogalvanic signals in both excitations confirms the collisional transfer of laser excitation energy from 2p9 to 2p8

  17. Desorption of large organic molecules by laser-induced plasmon excitation

    Lee, I.; Callcott, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    Ejection of large organic molecules from surfaces by laser-induced electronic-excited desorption has attracted considerable interest in recent years. In addition to the importance of this effect for fundamental investigations of the ejection process, this desorption technique has been applied to the study of large, fragile molecules by mass spectrometry. In this paper, we present a new method to induce electronic excitation on the metal surface for the desorption of large organic molecules. 3 refs., 3 figs

  18. Thermal Dynamics of Xanthene Dye in Polymer Matrix Excited by Double Pulse Laser Radiation

    Samusev, Ilia; Borkunov, Rodion; Tsarkov, Maksim; Konstantinova, Elizaveta; Antipov, Yury; Demin, Maksim; Bryukhanov, Valery

    2018-01-01

    Double-pulse laser excitation of the eosin and silver nanoparticles embedded into polymer media is known to be a method of electronic-vibrational energy deactivation kinetic process information obtaining and polymer thermal dynamics investigation. We have studied the vibrational relaxation processes in dye molecules (eosin) and nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol after two time-shifted laser pulses with fast and delayed fluorescence kinetics study. In order to simulate thermal and photophysical processes caused by double photon excitation, we solved heat transfer and energy deactivation differential equations numerically. The simulation allowed us to obtain the value of heat conductivity coefficient of polymer matrix.

  19. Ultratrace determination of lead in whole blood using electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Wagner, E P; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1996-09-15

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence has been used to detect lead that was electrothermally atomized from whole blood in a graphite furnace. A 9 kHz repetition rate copper vapor laser pumped dye laser was used to excite the lead at 283.3 nm, and the resulting atomic fluorescence was detected at 405.8 nm. No matrix modification was used other than a 1:21 dilution of the whole blood with high-purity water. Using the atomic fluorescence peak area as the analytical measure and a background correction technique based upon a simultaneous measurement of the transmitted laser intensity, excellent agreement for NIST and CDC certified whole blood reference samples was obtained with aqueous standards. A limit of detection in blood of 10 fg/mL (100 ag absolute) was achieved.

  20. Limit on Excitation and Stabilization of Atoms in Intense Optical Laser Fields.

    Zimmermann, H; Meise, S; Khujakulov, A; Magaña, A; Saenz, A; Eichmann, U

    2018-03-23

    Atomic excitation in strong optical laser fields has been found to take place even at intensities exceeding saturation. The concomitant acceleration of the atom in the focused laser field has been considered a strong link to, if not proof of, the existence of the so-called Kramers-Henneberger (KH) atom, a bound atomic system in an intense laser field. Recent findings have moved the importance of the KH atom from being purely of theoretical interest toward real world applications; for instance, in the context of laser filamentation. Considering this increasing importance, we explore the limits of strong-field excitation in optical fields, which are basically imposed by ionization through the spatial field envelope and the field propagation.

  1. Unstable decay and state selection

    McKane, Alan; Tarlie, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The decay of unstable states when several metastable states are available for occupation is investigated using path-integral techniques. Specifically, a method is described that enables the probabilities with which the metastable states are occupied to be calculated by finding optimal paths, and fluctuations about them, in the weak-noise limit. The method is illustrated on a system described by two coupled Langevin equations, which are found in the study of instabilities in fluid dynamics and superconductivity. The problem involves a subtle interplay between nonlinearities and noise, and a naive approximation scheme that does not take this into account is shown to be unsatisfactory. The use of optimal paths is briefly reviewed and then applied to finding the conditional probability of ending up in one of the metastable states, having begun in the unstable state. There are several aspects of the calculation that distinguish it from most others involving optimal paths: (i) the paths do not begin and end on an attractor, and moreover, the final point is to a large extent arbitrary, (ii) the interplay between the fluctuations and the leading-order contribution are at the heart of the method, and (iii) the final result involves quantities that are not exponentially small in the noise strength. This final result, which gives the probability of a particular state being selected in terms of the parameters of the dynamics, is remarkably simple and agrees well with the results of numerical simulations. The method should be applicable to similar problems in a number of other areas, such as state selection in lasers, activationless chemical reactions, and population dynamics in fluctuating environments

  2. Nuclear Excitation by a Zeptosecond Multi-MeV Laser Pulse

    Weidenmueller, Hans A.

    2011-01-01

    A zeptosecond multi-MeV laser pulse may either excite a ''plasma'' of strongly interacting nucleons or a collective mode. We derive the conditions on laser energy and photon number such that either of these scenarios is realized. We use the nuclear giant dipole resonance as a representative example, and a random-matrix description of the fine-structure states and perturbation theory as tools.

  3. Frontiers in propulsion research: Laser, matter-antimatter, excited helium, energy exchange thermonuclear fusion

    Papailiou, D. D. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Concepts are described that presently appear to have the potential for propulsion applications in the post-1990 era of space technology. The studies are still in progress, and only the current status of investigation is presented. The topics for possible propulsion application are lasers, nuclear fusion, matter-antimatter annihilation, electronically excited helium, energy exchange through the interaction of various fields, laser propagation, and thermonuclear fusion technology.

  4. Plasma diagnostics using laser-excited coupled and transmission ring resonators

    Haas, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper a simple two-level laser model is used to investigate the frequency response of coupled-cavity laser interferometers. It is found that under certain circumstances, often satisfied by molecular gas lasers, the frequency response exhibits a resonant behavior. This behavior severely complicates the interpretation of coupled-cavity laser interferometer measurements of rapidly varying plasmas. To circumvent this limitation a new type of laser interferometer plasma diagnostic with significantly improved time response was developed. In this interferometer the plasma is located in one arm of a transmission ring resonator cavity that is excited by an externally positioned laser. Thus, the laser is decoupled from the interferometer cavity and the time response of the interferometer is then limited by the Q of the ring resonator cavity. This improved time response is acquired without loss of spatial resolution, but requires a more sensitive signal detector since the laser is no longer used as a detector as it is in conventional coupled-cavity laser interferometers. Thus, the new technique incorporates the speed of the Mach--Zender interferometer and the sensitivity of the coupled-cavity laser interferometer. The basic operating principles of this type of interferometer have been verified using a CO 2 laser

  5. Determination of charge on vertically aligned particles in a complex plasma using laser excitations

    Prior, N J; Samarian, A A

    2003-01-01

    Experimental studies on vertical oscillations of few particle vertical structures are described. One and two particle strings were subjected to two types of vertically driven oscillations. The first was electrode driven, which excites the structure as a whole, while the second was laser driven, which excites one particle in the structure only. The latter experiments are highly original, enabling us to excite two vertical resonances in our two particle structures. From the close agreement between our experimental data and theoretical model, several important physical parameters have been estimated, including the charge ratio and the Debye length.

  6. Laser wakefield excitation and measurement by femtosecond longitudinal interferometry

    Siders, C.W.; Le Blanc, S.P.; Fisher, D.; Tajima, T.; Downer, M.C.

    1996-04-01

    Plasma density oscillations (Langmuir waves) in the wake of an intense (I peak ∼ 3 x 10 17 W/cm 2 ) laser pulse (100 fs) are measured with ultrafast time resolution using a longitudinal interferometric technique. Phase shifts consistent with large amplitude (δn e /n e ∼ 1) density waves at the electron plasma frequency were observed in a fully tunnel-ionized He plasma, corresponding to longitudinal electric fields of ∼ 10 GV/m. Strong radial ponderomotive forces enhance the density oscillations. As this technique utilizes a necessary component of any laser-based plasma accelerator, it promises to be a powerful tool for on-line monitoring and control of future plasma-based particle accelerators

  7. Tandem ion mobility spectrometry coupled to laser excitation

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Choi, Chang Min; Clavier, Christian; Barbaire, Marc; Maurelli, Jacques; Dagany, Xavier; MacAleese, Luke; Dugourd, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.dugourd@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière Matière, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Chirot, Fabien [Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2015-09-15

    This manuscript describes a new experimental setup that allows to perform tandem ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements and which is coupled to a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It consists of two 79 cm long drift tubes connected by a dual ion funnel assembly. The setup was built to permit laser irradiation of the ions in the transfer region between the two drift tubes. This geometry allows selecting ions according to their ion mobility in the first drift tube, to irradiate selected ions, and examine the ion mobility of the product ions in the second drift tube. Activation by collision is possible in the same region (between the two tubes) and between the second tube and the time-of-flight. IMS-IMS experiments on Ubiquitin are reported. We selected a given isomer of charge state +7 and explored its structural rearrangement following collisional activation between the two drift tubes. An example of IMS-laser-IMS experiment is reported on eosin Y, where laser irradiation was used to produce radical ions by electron photodetachment starting from doubly deprotonated species. This allowed measuring the collision cross section of the radical photo-product, which cannot be directly produced with an electrospray source.

  8. Experimental studies of laser guiding and wake excitation in plasma channels

    Volfbeyn, P.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1998-06-01

    This thesis presents results of experimental investigations of laser guiding in plasma channels. A new technique for plasma channel creation, the Ignitor-Heater scheme was proposed and experimentally tested in hydrogen and nitrogen. It made use of two laser pulses. The Ignitor, an ultrashort ( 17 W/cm 2 , 75fs laser pulse. The guiding properties and transmission and coupling efficiency were studied as a function of relative position of the channel and the injection pulse focus. Whereas entrance coupling efficiency into the channel was lower than expected, channel coupling to continuum losses were found to be in good agreement with analytical predictions. The authors speculate that increased coupling efficiency can be achieved through better mode matching into the channel. Analytic and numerical one dimensional (1-D), nonrelativistic theory of laser pulse propagation in underdense plasma was presented, in the context of laser wakefield acceleration. The relation between the laser pulse energy depletion, longitudinal laser pulse shape distortion, and changes in the group velocity and center wavelength was explored. 1-D theory was extended to treat the case of a laser exciting a wake in a hollow plasma channel, by making use of an energy conservation argument. Based on the results of this theory, a laser wakefield diagnostic was proposed where, by measuring the changes in phase or spectrum of the driving laser pulse, it is possible to infer the amplitude of the plasma wake

  9. Determination of uranium in geologic materials by laser-excited fluorescence

    McHugh, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    A laser-excited fluorescence method is described for the determination of trace amounts of uranium in rocks and soils. The limit of detection is less than 1 ppm, and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2.6 to 12.5%. The method was evaluated by using known geological reference samples

  10. Determination of heavy metals in polar snow and ice by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Bolshov, M.A.; Boutron, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    The new laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry technique offers unrivalled sensitivity for the determination of trace metals in a wide variety of samples. This has allowed the direct determination of Pb, Cd and Bi in Antarctic and Greenland snow and ice down to the sub pg/g level. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  11. Induction of the 'in vivo' chlorophyll fluorescence excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation

    Zakhidov, Eh.A.; Zakhidov, M.A.; Kasymdzhanov, M.A.; Khabibullaev, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    Inductional changes of fluorescence of the native chlorophyll molecules in plant leaves excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation are studied. The opportunity of controlling of the photosynthesis efficiency through fluorescence response at different rates of the electron flow in charge transfer chain of the photosynthetic apparatus of plant is shown. (author). 13 refs.; 4 refs

  12. Features of the mechanoluminescence of thin metal films, excited by short and long laser pulses

    Banishev, A.F.; Panchenko, V.Ya.; Shishkov, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The results of the study on the deformation-induced luminescence of the fine grain metal films, originating by the impact of the short (submicrosecond) and long (millisecond) laser pulses, are presented. The supposition os made relative to the luminescence excitation mechanism [ru

  13. Oxygen auroral transition laser system excited by collisional and photolytic energy transfer

    Murray, J.R.; Powell, H.T.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1975-06-01

    The properties of laser media involving the auroral transition of atomic oxygen and analogous systems are examined. A discussion of the atomic properties, collisional mechanisms, excitation processes, and collisionally induced radiative phenomena is given. Crossing phenomena play a particularly important role in governing the dynamics of the medium

  14. Single photon excimer laser photodissociation of highly vibrationally excited polyatomic molecules

    Tiee, J.J.; Wampler, F.B.; Rice, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    The ir + uv photodissociation of SF 6 has been performed using CO 2 and ArF lasers. The two-color photolysis significantly enhances the photodissociation process over ArF irradiation alone and is found to preserve the initial isotopic specificity of the ir excitation process

  15. Millimeterwave spectroscopy of active laser plasmas; the excited vibrational states of HCN

    De Lucia, F.C.; Helminger, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    Millimeter and submillimeter microwave techniques have been used for the spectroscopic study of an HCN laser plasma. Forty-seven rotational transitions in 12 excited vibrational states have been observed. Numerous rotational, vibrational, and perturbation parameters have been calculated from these data. A discussion of experimental techniques is included

  16. Investigation of collisional excitation-transfer processes in a plasma by laser perturbation method

    Sakurai, Takeki

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical background and the experimental method of the laser perturbation method applied to the study of collisional excitation transfer process in plasma are explained. The atomic density at some specified level can be evaluated theoretically. By using the theoretical results and the experimentally obtained data, the total attenuation probability, the collisional transfer probability and natural emission probability were estimated. For the experiments, continuous wave laser (cw) and pulse laser are employed. It is possible by using pulse dye laser to observe the attenuation curve directly, and to bring in resonance to any atomic spectra. At the beginning, the experimental studies were made on He-Ne discharge. The pulse dye laser has been used for the excitation of alkali atoms. The first application of pulse laser to the study of plasma physics was the study on He. The cross section of disalignment has also been studied by the laser perturbation. The alignment of atoms, step and cascade transfer, the confinement of radiation and optogalvanic effect are discussed in this paper. (Kato, T.)

  17. Impact of laser excitation intensity on deep UV fluorescence detection in microchip electrophoresis.

    Schulze, Philipp; Ludwig, Martin; Belder, Detlev

    2008-12-01

    A high intensity 266 nm continuous wave (cw-) laser developed for material processing was utilised as an excitation source for sensitive native fluorescence detection of unlabelled compounds in MCE. This 120 mW laser was attached via an optical fibre into a commercial epifluorescence microscope. With this MCE set-up we evaluated the impact of laser power on the S/N of aromatic compounds as well as of proteins. Compared with a previous work which used a 4 mW pulsed laser for excitation, improved S/N for small aromatics and to a lesser extent for proteins could be attained. The LOD of the system was determined down to 24 ng/mL for serotonin (113 nM), 24 ng/mL for propranolol (81 nM), 80 ng/mL for tryptophan (392 nM) and 80 ng/mL for an aromatic diol (475 nM). Sensitive protein detection was obtained at concentrations of 5 microg/mL for lysocyme, trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen (340, 208 and 195 nM, respectively). Finally, a comparison of the cw- with a pulsed 266 nm laser, operating at the same average power, showed a higher attainable sensitivity of the cw-laser. This can be attributed to fluorescence saturation and photobleaching effects of the pulsed laser at high pulse energies.

  18. CL 19: Anisotropy of the electron diffraction from femtosecond Laser excited Bismuth

    Zhou, P.; Ligges, M.; Streubuehr, C.; Brazda, Th.; Payer, Th.; Meyer zu Heringdorf, F.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.; Von der Linde, D.

    2010-01-01

    We report an electron diffraction experiment in Bi in which a linearly polarized E g optical phonon mode is detected after excitation of the material by a femtosecond laser pulse. Bismuth is a semimetal with rhombohedral crystal structure with two atoms in the unit cell. There are two types of optical phonon modes: (i) The totally symmetric A 1g mode which corresponds to a displacement of the atoms along the trigonal (111) direction, and (ii) the doubly degenerate E g mode which represents a motion in the plane perpendicular to (111). The A 1g mode can be coherently excited both by displacive excitation (DE) and by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS). Symmetry properties prevent DE of E g modes leaving ISRS as a likely excitation mechanism. We performed time resolved electron diffraction experiments on femtosecond laser excited Bi membranes of 15 nm thickness which were grown on a NaCl crystal and detached by floating in water. The experimental setup is described elsewhere. The fundamental laser beam (800 nm) was used for the excitation of the Bi films. The films had a crystalline structure with the (111) axis perpendicular to the surface. The electron beam passed perpendicular to the surface through the film. In this geometry the diffraction pattern is insensitive to atomic displacements along the (111) direction, i.e. insensitive to A 1g phonon modes. On the other hand, the excitation of E g modes corresponding to atomic displacements in the plane normal to (111) decreases the intensity of particular diffraction orders. The individual cycles of the E g vibrations (duration 475 fs) could not be resolved because our time resolution about 700 fs was not sufficient. In our experiment excitation beam with a fluence of 1 mJ/cm 2 and variable linear polarization was incident from the backside at an angle of 40 degrees (counter propagating electron and laser beam). The diffraction patterns were recorded as a function of the delay time between laser pump and

  19. Double-sided electron-beam generator for KrF laser excitation

    Schlitt, L.; Swingle, J.

    1980-05-01

    Several laser systems excited by electron beam have been identified as candidates for pump sources for laser fusion applications. The electron beam generators required must be compact, reliable and capable of synchronization with other system components. A KrF laser producing a minimum output of 25 J was needed for the RAPIER (Raman Amplifier Pumped by Intensified Excimer Radiation) system. A double-sided electron beam system was designed and constructed specifically for this purpose and has produced > 35 J of KrF output. Each of the two electron beam machines in the system operates with an rms jitter of 0.4 ns and together occupy approx. 3.5 m 2 of floor space. The successful operation of this laser has engendered requests for a description of the engineering details of this system. This document contains a brief description of the design issues and a full set of engineering drawings for this KrF laser amplifier

  20. Stability of quantum-dot excited-state laser emission under simultaneous ground-state perturbation

    Kaptan, Y., E-mail: yuecel.kaptan@physik.tu-berlin.de; Herzog, B.; Schöps, O.; Kolarczik, M.; Woggon, U.; Owschimikow, N. [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Röhm, A.; Lingnau, B.; Lüdge, K. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schmeckebier, H.; Arsenijević, D.; Bimberg, D. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Mikhelashvili, V.; Eisenstein, G. [Technion Institute of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Haifa (Israel)

    2014-11-10

    The impact of ground state amplification on the laser emission of In(Ga)As quantum dot excited state lasers is studied in time-resolved experiments. We find that a depopulation of the quantum dot ground state is followed by a drop in excited state lasing intensity. The magnitude of the drop is strongly dependent on the wavelength of the depletion pulse and the applied injection current. Numerical simulations based on laser rate equations reproduce the experimental results and explain the wavelength dependence by the different dynamics in lasing and non-lasing sub-ensembles within the inhomogeneously broadened quantum dots. At high injection levels, the observed response even upon perturbation of the lasing sub-ensemble is small and followed by a fast recovery, thus supporting the capacity of fast modulation in dual-state devices.

  1. Thermodynamics of nanosecond nanobubble formation at laser-excited metal nanoparticles

    Siems, A; Weber, S A L; Boneberg, J; Plech, A

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear thermal behavior of laser-heated gold nanoparticles in aqueous suspension is determined by time-resolved optical spectroscopy and x-ray scattering. The nanoparticles can be excited transiently to high lattice temperatures owing to their large absorption cross-section and slow heat dissipation to the surrounding. A consequence is the observation of lattice expansion, changed optical transmission, vapor bubble formation or particle melting. The heat transfer equations are solved for two limiting cases of heat pulses shorter and longer than the characteristic cooling time. The results of pulsed excitation with femtosecond and nanosecond lasers are explained by the theoretical prediction, and the bubble formation is interpreted by a spinodal decomposition at the particle-liquid interface. It is shown that both the laser spectroscopy and x-ray scattering results agree qualitatively and quantitatively, underlining the validity of the comprehensive model.

  2. Laser excited nonresonant fluorescence spectroscopy. Second annual progress report

    Gelbwachs, J.A.; Frueholz, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The relative populations of numerous tin levels populated by collisional energy transfer from an initially laser pumped level were obtained. These populations yield information concerning the relative rates of energy transfer for the various buffer gases studied. The results indicated two distinct energy transfer behaviors. First, for certain tin levels diatomic collision partners produce populations nearly two orders of magnitude higher than when rare gases are present. This behavior is attributed to the effects of near-resonant energy transfer pathways for the E → V/R and V/R → E processes found in the diatomic collision partners. Second, for other tin levels, diatomics and rare gases transfer population approximately at the same rates and more efficiently than in the former case. For these levels the near-resonant pathways can be obscured by means of a more effective energy transfer channel common to both diatomics and rare gases such as by curve crossing mechanisms

  3. Time-resolved UV spectroscopy on ammonia excited by a pulsed CO2 laser

    Holbach, H.

    1980-07-01

    This work investigates the excitation of ammonia by a pulsed CO 2 laser, in particular the processes associated with collisions with argon. It was prompted by two previous observations: the previously reported infrared multiphoton dissociation of NH 3 under nearly collisionless conditions, and the ill understood excitation mechanism of apparently nonresonant low vibrational levels in the presence of Ar. Based on recent spectroscopic data, all vibrational-rotational levels were determined which are simultaneously excited by different CO 2 laser lines. Transitions between the 1 + and 2 - vibrational levels were also taken into account. The linewidth in these calculations was dominated by power broadening, which generates a half width at half maximum of 0.36 cm -1 at the typical power density of 10 MW/cm 2 . In order to reproduce published experimental absorption data, it proved necessary to take account all transitions within a distance of 20 cm -1 from the laser line. This fact implies in most cases the simultaneous population of a large number of vibrational-rotational levels. The population of levels by absorption or by subsequent collisional processes was probed by time-resolved absorption measurement of vibrational bands and their rotational envelope in the near UV. Time resolution (5...10) was sufficient to observe rotational relaxation within individual vibrational levels. Characteristic differences were found for the various excitation lines. (orig.) [de

  4. Radial electron beam laser excitation: the REBLE report

    Ramirez, J.J.; Prestwich, K.R.

    1978-10-01

    The results of an investigation of techniques to generate high-power radially converging electron beams and the application of these beams to gas lasers is discussed. The design and performance of the REBLE accelerator that was developed for this program is presented. Reliable operation of the radial diode has been obtained at levels up to 1 MV, 200 kA, and 20 ns. It has been demonstrated that the anode current density can be made uniform to better than 15% over 1000 cm 2 areas with 100 to 250 A/cm 2 intensities. The measured total and spatially resolved energy deposition of this radial electron beam in various gases is compared with Monte Carlo calculations. In most cases, these codes give an accurate description of the beam transport and energy deposition. With the electron beam pumping xenon gas, the amplitude of xenon excimer radiation (1720 A 0 ) was radially uniform to within the experimental uncertainty. The efficiency of converting deposited electron beam energy to xenon excimer radiation was 20%

  5. Sequential nonadiabatic excitation of large molecules and ions driven by strong laser fields

    Markevitch, Alexei N.; Levis, Robert J.; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Smith, Stanley M.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2004-01-01

    Electronic processes leading to dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules in strong laser fields are investigated experimentally, theoretically, and numerically. Using time-of-flight ion mass spectroscopy, we study the dependence of fragmentation on laser intensity for a series of related molecules and report regular trends in this dependence on the size, symmetry, and electronic structure of a molecule. Based on these data, we develop a model of dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields. The model is built on three elements: (i) nonadiabatic population transfer from the ground electronic state to the excited-state manifold via a doorway (charge-transfer) transition; (ii) exponential enhancement of this transition by collective dynamic polarization of all electrons, and (iii) sequential energy deposition in both neutral molecules and resulting molecular ions. The sequential nonadiabatic excitation is accelerated by a counterintuitive increase of a large molecule's polarizability following its ionization. The generic theory of sequential nonadiabatic excitation forms a basis for quantitative description of various nonlinear processes in polyatomic molecules and ions in strong laser fields

  6. Excitation of hydrogen atom by ultrashort laser pulses in optically dense plasma

    Calisti, A. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, Marseille (France); Astapenko, V.A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudnyi (Russian Federation); Lisitsa, V.S. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudnyi (Russian Federation); Russian Research Center ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-10-15

    The features of excitation of a hydrogen atom by ultrashort laser pulses (USP) with a Gaussian envelope in optically dense plasma at a Lyman-beta transition are studied theoretically. The problem is of interest for diagnostics of optically dense media. USP have two doubtless advantages over conventional laser excitation: (a) the USP carrier frequency is shifted to the region of short wavelengths allowing exciting atoms from the ground state and (b) the wide spectrum of USP allows them to penetrate into optically dense media to much longer distances as compared with monochromatic radiation. As actual realistic cases, two examples are considered: hot rarefied plasma (the coronal limit) and dense cold plasma (the Boltzmann equilibrium). Universal expressions for the total probability of excitation of the transition under consideration are obtained in view of absorption of radiation in a medium. As initial data for the spectral form of a line, the results of calculations by methods of molecular dynamics are used. The probability of excitation of an atom is analysed for different values of problem parameters: the pulse duration, the optical thickness of a medium, and the detuning of the pulse carrier frequency from the eigenfrequency of an electron transition. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Practical Method for engineering Erbium-doped fiber lasers from step-like pulse excitations

    Causado-Buelvas, J D; Gomez-Cardona, N D; Torres, P

    2011-01-01

    A simple method, known as 'easy points', has been applied to the characterization of Erbium-doped fibers, aiming for the engineering of fiber lasers. Using low- optical-power flattop pulse excitations it has been possible to determine both the attenuation coefficients and the intrinsic saturation powers of doped single-mode fibers at 980 and 1550 nm. Laser systems have been projected for which the optimal fiber length and output power have been determined as a function of the input power. Ring and linear laser cavities have been set up, and the characteristics of the output laser have been obtained and compared with the theoretical predictions based on the 'easy points' parameters.

  8. Uv Laser Excitation for Ultra-Sensitive Photoluminescent Dosimetry

    Kastner, J.; Eggenberger, D.; Longnecker, A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); King, D.; Schutt, D. [Radiation Laboratory, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN (United States)

    1967-03-15

    The factor which has limited the sensitivity of photoluminescent dosimetry has been the ''pre-dose'' background which is stimulated during readout by the usual continuous ultra-violet (UV) exposure. The signal-to-noise ratio has only been partially optimized by the selective choice of filters and optical geometry. A microdosimetric system has been conceived and investigated which is potentially capable of sensing extremely low radiation doses (of the order of microrads). This system depends on the little-known fact that the decay time for the visible luminescence, which is a measure of the absorbed dose, is at least ten times longer than the decay of the indistinguishable visible fluorescence (to UV) which is an inherent characteristic of unexposed silver phosphate glasses. The system consists of UV, 3500A, laser beam, with a Pockels cell so that it has complete cut-off in intensity in the order of nanoseconds, and gating circuitry to open the visible light-sensing photomultiplier at a sufficient time delay to prevent it from sensing the ultra-violet or the pre-dose fluorescence which decays within the order of 100 nanoseconds. In this way the signal-to-noise ratio can be vastly improved upon that obtainable by optical means. With this system the authors were easily able to measure quantitatively one milliroentgen of cobalt-60 exposure. They are of the opinion that further improvement in this system should enable them to do track visualization and/or in vivo biological microdosimetry with a spatial resolution of the order of ten microns. (author)

  9. Laser cooling and optical detection of excitations in a LC electrical circuit

    Taylor, J. M.; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg; Marcus, Charles Masamed

    2011-01-01

    We explore a method for laser cooling and optical detection of excitations in a room temperature LC electrical circuit. Our approach uses a nanomechanical oscillator as a transducer between optical and electronic excitations. An experimentally feasible system with the oscillator capacitively...... coupled to the LC and at the same time interacting with light via an optomechanical force is shown to provide strong electromechanical coupling. Conditions for improved sensitivity and quantum limited readout of electrical signals with such an “optical loud speaker” are outlined....

  10. Polarised two-photon excitation of quantum well excitons for manipulation of optically pumped terahertz lasers

    Slavcheva, G., E-mail: gsk23@bath.ac.uk [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kavokin, A.V., E-mail: A.Kavokin@soton.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Spin Optics Laboratory, St. Petersburg State University, 1, Ulyanovskaya 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Optical pumping of excited exciton states in a semiconductor quantum well embedded in a microcavity is a tool for realisation of ultra-compact terahertz (THz) lasers based on stimulated optical transition between excited (2p) and ground (1s) exciton state. We show that the probability of two-photon absorption by a 2p-exciton is strongly dependent on the polarisation of both pumping photons. Five-fold variation of the threshold power for terahertz lasing by switching from circular to co-linear pumping is predicted. We identify photon polarisation configurations for achieving maximum THz photon generation quantum efficiency.

  11. Laser excited fluorescence spectrum of Ho3+:SrF2 single crystal

    Lal, Bansi; Ramachandra Rao, D.

    1980-01-01

    The fluorescence spectrum of Ho 3+ : SrF 2 single crystal excited by the various lines of an Ar + laser, is reported. The three fluorescence groups recorded in the region 5300-7700 A, correspond to the transitions from ( 5 F 4 , 5 S 2 ) to 5 I 8 , 5 F 5 to 5 I 8 , 5 F 3 to 5 I 7 and ( 5 F 4 , 5 S 2 ) to 5 I 7 . Marked changes in the total integrated intensity of the various fluorescence groups with the change in the exciting wavelength are observed. (author)

  12. Photoemission from excited states in rare gas solids by combining synchrotronradiation with a laser

    Bernstorff, S.

    1984-09-01

    A new spectroscopic method has been developed to study excited states in rare gas solids: Excitons and conductionband-states are populated by synchrotron radiation (photon energy hw SR =5 - 30 eV). Subsequently electrons from these bound or conduction band-states are excited above the vacuum level of the solid by a pulsed dye laser (hw L =1.9 - 3.7 eV). This experimental technique was applied to solid Xe, Kr, Ar and Ne. (orig./GSCH)

  13. UV Raman spectroscopy of H2-air flames excited with a narrowband KrF laser

    Shirley, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Raman spectra of H2 and H2O in flames excited by a narrowband KrF excimer laser are reported. Observations are made over a porous-plug, flat-flame burner reacting H2 in air, fuel-rich with nitrogen dilution to control the temperature, and with an H2 diffusion flame. Measurements made from UV Raman spectra show good agreement with measurements made by other means, both for gas temperature and relative major species concentrations. Laser-induced fluorescence interferences arising from OH and O2 are observed in emission near the Raman spectra. These interferences do not preclude Raman measurements, however.

  14. Lifetime measurements in Crsub(I) by laser excitation from the metastable states

    Kwiatkowski, M.; Micali, G.; Werner, K.; Zimmermann, P.

    1981-01-01

    A combination of collisional and laser excitation was used to measure radiative lifetimes in Cr I. By a discharge an atomic beam of metastable atoms in the 3d 5 4sa 5 S, a 5 G, b 5 D, a 3 I, b 1 I and 3d 4 4s 2 a 5 D terms was produced. Spatially separated from the place of collisional excitation laser radiation selectively populated levels belonging to the 3d 5 4p z 5 P, y 5 P, u 5 F, u 5 D, x 3 I, y 1 I, 3d 5 5pz 5 G and 3d 4 4s4px 5 G terms. Time-resolved observation of the reemitted resonance fluorescence yielded the lifetimes of 28 levels. The values are compared with other experimental and theoretical results. (orig.)

  15. Calculation of a CO sub 2 gasdynamic laser with selective thermal excitation and an unstable resonator

    Kuz' min, A.I.; Lavrov, A.V.; Chernysheva, N.V. (Leningradskii Gosudarstvennyi Universitet, Leningrad (USSR))

    1989-03-01

    The problem of calculating an unstable telescopic resonator for a CO{sub 2} gasdynamic laser with selective thermal excitation is studied. Parabolized Navier-Stokes equations and equations of field propagation in the resonator are used to describe the GDL in the geometric optic approximation. The efficiency is studied as a function of the magnification factor and of the distance between the mirrors. 19 refs.

  16. Hydrogen storage in single-wall carbon nano-tubes by means of laser excitation

    Oksengorn, B.

    2010-01-01

    A new mode for hydrogen adsorption and storage in single-wall carbon nano-tubes is used, on the basis of laser excitation. Remember that this method has been useful to obtain, in the case of the fullerene C 60 , many complex C 60 -atoms or C 60 -molecules, where atoms or molecular particles are trapped inside the C 60 -molecules. We think this method might be important to store many hydrogen molecules inside carbon nano-tubes. (author)

  17. The photoluminescence spectra of micropowder of aromatic compounds under ultraviolet laser excitation

    Rakhmatullaev, I.A.; Kurbonov, A.K. et al.; Gorelik, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    The method of diagnostics of aromatic compounds on the example of novocaine, aspirin and anthracene is presented. The method is based on optical detection of photoluminescence spectra at ultraviolet laser (266 nm) excitation. Employing this method the photoluminescence spectra are obtained which allows one to establish the differences of the composition and structure of compounds. The developed method can be used for analysis the quality of the large class of luminescent bioactive structures under the ultraviolet radiation. (authors)

  18. Self-resonant wakefield excitation by intense laser pulse in plasmas

    Andreev, N.E.; Pogosova, A.A.; Gorbunov, L.M.; Ramazashvili, R.R.; Kirsanov, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    It is demonstrated by theoretical analysis and numerical calculations that in an underdense plasma the process of three-dimensional evolution of the short and strong laser pulse (with duration equal to several plasma periods) leads to compression and self-modulation of the pulse, so that during a fairly long period of time beats of pulse amplitude generates resonantly a strong and stable plasma wakefield. The intensity of the wake-field is so high that it can provide a new promising outlook for the plasma based accelerator concept. Linear analysis of dispersion relation predicts that taking into account transverse component of wavenumber considerably increases the growth rate of resonance instability of the pulse. The numerical simulations demonstrate that considered self-focusing and resonant-modulation instability are essentially three dimensional processes. Laser field evolution in each transverse cross section of the pulse is synchronized by the regular structure of plasma wave that is excited by the pulse. The considered effect of resonant modulation has a threshold. For the pulses with the intensity below the threshold the refraction dominates and no modulation appears. The studied phenomenon can be referred to as the Self-Resonant Wakefield (SRWF) excitation that is driven by self-focusing and self-modulation of laser pulse with quite a moderate initial duration. In fact, this method of excitation differs from both suggested in Ref.1 (PBWA) and in Refs.2,3 (LWFA), being even more than the combination of these concepts. Unlike the first scheme it does not require initially the two-frequency laser pulse, since the modulation here appears in the most natural way due to evolution of the pulse. In contrast with the LWFA, the considered SRWF generation scheme gives the possibility to raise the intensity of wake-excitation due to pulse self-focusing ( initial stage) and self modulation (second stage)

  19. Femtosecond laser excitation of dielectric materials: experiments and modeling of optical properties and ablation depths

    Wædegaard, Kristian Juncher; Frislev, Martin Thomas; Balling, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of the interaction between a dielec- tric material and ultrashort laser pulses provides the tem- poral evolution of the electronic excitation and the optical properties of the dielectric. Experimentally determined re- flectances and ablation depths for sapphire are compared...... to the calculations. A decrease in reflectance at high fluences is observed experimentally, which demonstrates the neces- sity of a temperature-dependent electron scattering rate in the model. The comparison thus provides new constraints on the optical parameters of the model....

  20. Excitation of accelerating plasma waves by counter-propagating laser beams

    Shvets, Gennady; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Pukhov, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The conventional approach to exciting high phase velocity waves in plasmas is to employ a laser pulse moving in the direction of the desired particle acceleration. Photon downshifting then causes momentum transfer to the plasma and wave excitation. Novel approaches to plasma wake excitation, colliding-beam accelerator (CBA), which involve photon exchange between the long and short counter-propagating laser beams, are described. Depending on the frequency detuning Δω between beams and duration τ L of the short pulse, there are two approaches to CBA. First approach assumes (τ L ≅2/ω p ). Photons exchanged between the beams deposit their recoil momentum in the plasma driving the plasma wake. Frequency detuning between the beams determines the direction of the photon exchange, thereby controlling the phase of the plasma wake. This phase control can be used for reversing the slippage of the accelerated particles with respect to the wake. A variation on the same theme, super-beatwave accelerator, is also described. In the second approach, a short pulse with τ L >>ω p -1 detuned by Δω∼2ω p from the counter-propagating beam is employed. While parametric excitation of plasma waves by the electromagnetic beatwave at 2ω p of two co-propagating lasers was first predicted by Rosenbluth and Liu [M. N. Rosenbluth and C. S. Liu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 701 (1972)], it is demonstrated that the two excitation beams can be counter-propagating. The advantages of using this geometry (higher instability growth rate, insensitivity to plasma inhomogeneity) are explained, and supporting numerical simulations presented

  1. Laser Raman Spectroscopy with Different Excitation Sources and Extension to Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Md. Wahadoszamen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive Raman spectrometer was used with three different excitation sources (Argon-ion, He-Ne, and Diode lasers operating at 514.5 nm, 633 nm, and 782 nm, resp.. The system was employed to a variety of Raman active compounds. Many of the compounds exhibit very strong fluorescence while being excited with a laser emitting at UV-VIS region, hereby imposing severe limitation to the detection efficiency of the particular Raman system. The Raman system with variable excitation laser sources provided us with a desired flexibility toward the suppression of unwanted fluorescence signal. With this Raman system, we could detect and specify the different vibrational modes of various hazardous organic compounds and some typical dyes (both fluorescent and nonfluorescent. We then compared those results with the ones reported in literature and found the deviation within the range of ±2 cm−1, which indicates reasonable accuracy and usability of the Raman system. Then, the surface enhancement technique of Raman spectrum was employed to the present system. To this end, we used chemically prepared colloidal suspension of silver nanoparticles as substrate and Rhodamine 6G as probe. We could observe significant enhancement of Raman signal from Rhodamine 6G using the colloidal solution of silver nanoparticles the average magnitude of which is estimated to be 103.

  2. Application of adjustable pulse lasers to studying rapid reaction kinetics of excited lanthanide complexing

    Gruzdev, V.P. (Gosudarstvennyj Opticheskij Inst., Leningrad (USSR))

    1983-12-01

    Using some europium (3) ion complexes new possibilities to be opened by application of adjustable pulse lasers for studying rapid reactions of electron-excited metal ion complexing are demonstrated. The 6Zh rhodamine pulse laser is used as a source of nonequilibrium photoexcitation of an array of Eu/sup 3 +/ complexes in the luminescent kinetic spectroscopy method. The following results are obtained: for the first time the rate of reaction of acetate ion substitution for water molecules of an excited (/sup 5/D/sub 0/) ion of Eu/sup 3 +/ was measured to be (0.7+-0.2)x10/sup 7/ s/sup -1/; using direct experiments the lower limit for the rate of transition of one isomeric form of the excited Eu x EDTA complex into another one in an aqueous solution is determined to be 5x10/sup 5/ s/sup -1/ at 295 K; the kinetics of the excitation energy migration beteen aqueous solvates of Eu/sup 3 +/ and EuxEDTA complexes is investigated.

  3. Excitation of high energy levels under laser exposure of suspensions of nanoparticles in liquids

    Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shafeev@kapella.gpi.ru; Simakin, A.V. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bozon-Verduraz, F. [ITODYS, UMR CNRS 7086, Universite Paris 7-Denis Diderot, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 Paris cedex 05 (France); Robert, M. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie Moleculaire, UMR CNRS 7591, Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, 2, place Jussieu, 75251 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2007-12-15

    Laser exposure of suspensions of nanoparticles in liquids leads to excitation of high energy levels in both liquid and nanoparticle material. The emission spectrum of the colloidal solution under exposure of a suspension metallic nanoparticles in water to radiation of a Nd:YAG laser of a picosecond range of pulse duration is discussed. Excitation of nuclear energy levels and neutron release is experimentally studied on the model system of transmutation of Hg into Au that occurs under exposure of Hg nanodrops suspended in D{sub 2}O. The proposed mechanism involves: (i) emission of X-ray photons by Hg nanoparticles upon laser exposure, leading to neutron release from D{sub 2}O, (ii) initiation of Hg {yields} Au transmutation by the capture of neutrons. The effect of transmutation is more pronounced using {sup 196}Hg isotope instead of Hg of natural isotope composition. The influence of laser pulse duration on the degree of transmutation (from fs through ns range) is discussed.

  4. High sensitivity detection of selenium by laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry using electrothermal atomization

    Heitmann, U.; Hese, A.; Schoknecht, G.; Gries, W.

    1995-01-01

    The high sensitivity detection of the trace element selenium is reported. The analytical method applied is Laser Excited Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry using Electrothermal Atomization within a graphite furnace atomizer. For the production of tunable laser radiation in the VUV spectral region a laser system was developed which consists of two dye lasers pumped by a Nd:YAG laser. The laser radiations are subsequently frequency doubled and sum frequency mixed by nonlinear optical KDP or BBO crystals, respectively. The system works with a repetition rate of 20 Hz and provides output energies of up to 100 μJ in the VUV at a pulse duration of 5 ns. The analytical investigations were focused on the detection of selenium in aqueous solutions and samples of human whole blood. From measurements on aqueous standards detection limits of 1.5 ng/l for selenium were obtained, with corresponding absolute detected masses of only 15 fg. The linear dynamic range spanned six orders of magnitude and good precision was achieved. In case of human whole blood samples the recovery was found to be within the range of 96% to 104%. The determination of the selenium content yielded medians of [119.5 ± 17.3] μg/l for 200 frozen blood samples taken in 1988 and [109.1 ± 15.6] μg/l for 103 fresh blood samples. (author)

  5. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    Vankan, P.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D.C.; Doebele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has a bandwith of 0.15 cm -1 . The wavelength of the laser radiation is calibrated by simultaneous recording of the two-photon laser induced fluorescence spectrum of nitric oxide. The excited hydrogen populations are calibrated on the basis of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements. A population distribution is measured in the shock region of a pure hydrogen plasma expansion. The higher rotational levels (J>5) show overpopulation compared to a Boltzmann distribution determined from the lower rotational levels (J≤5)

  6. Probing spatial properties of electronic excitation in water after interaction with temporally shaped femtosecond laser pulses: Experiments and simulations

    Winkler, Thomas; Sarpe, Cristian; Jelzow, Nikolai [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Lillevang, Lasse H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Götte, Nadine; Zielinski, Bastian [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Balling, Peter [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Senftleben, Arne [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany); Baumert, Thomas, E-mail: baumert@physik.uni-kassel.de [Institute of Physics and CINSaT, University of Kassel, Heinrich-Plett-Str. 40, D-34132 Kassel (Germany)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses lead to excitation over smaller area and larger depth in water. • Transient optical properties are measured radially resolved by spectral interference in an imaging geometry. • Radially resolved spectral interference shows indications of nonlinear propagation effects at high fluences. - Abstract: In this work, laser excitation of water under ambient conditions is investigated by radially resolved common-path spectral interferometry. Water, as a sample system for dielectric materials, is excited by ultrashort bandwidth-limited and temporally asymmetric shaped femtosecond laser pulses, where the latter start with an intense main pulse followed by a decaying pulse sequence, i.e. a temporal Airy pulse. Spectral interference in an imaging geometry allows measurements of the transient optical properties integrated along the propagation through the sample but radially resolved with respect to the transverse beam profile. Since the optical properties reflect the dynamics of the free-electron plasma, such measurements reveal the spatial characteristics of the laser excitation. We conclude that temporally asymmetric shaped laser pulses are a promising tool for high-precision laser material processing, as they reduce the transverse area of excitation, but increase the excitation inside the material along the beam propagation.

  7. Comparison of modified driver circuit and capacitor-transfer circuit in longitudinally excited N2 laser.

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Kenshi; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2013-04-01

    We developed a modified driver circuit composed of a capacitance and a spark gap, called a direct-drive circuit, for a longitudinally excited gas laser. The direct-drive circuit uses a large discharge impedance caused by a long discharge length of the longitudinal excitation scheme and eliminates the buffer capacitance used in the traditional capacitor-transfer circuit. We compared the direct-drive circuit and the capacitor-transfer circuit in a longitudinally excited N2 laser (wavelength: 337 nm). Producing high output energy with the capacitor-transfer circuit requires a large storage capacitance and a discharge tube with optimum dimensions (an inner diameter of 4 mm and a length of 10 cm in this work); in contrast, the direct-drive circuit requires a high breakdown voltage, achieved with a small storage capacitance and a large discharge tube. Additionally, for the same input energy of 792 mJ, the maximum output energy of the capacitor-transfer circuit was 174.2 μJ, and that of the direct-drive circuit was 344.7 μJ.

  8. Laser-induced nonsequential double ionization at and above the recollision-excitation-tunneling threshold

    Shaaran, T.; Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.; Nygren, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    We perform a rigorous, semianalytic study of the recollision excitation with subsequent tunneling ionization (RESI) mechanism in laser-induced nonsequential double ionization (NSDI), based on the strong-field approximation. We show that the shapes of the electron momentum distributions carry information about the bound state with which the first electron collides, the bound state to which the second electron is excited, and the type of electron-electron interaction. Furthermore, one may define a driving-field intensity threshold for the RESI physical mechanism. At the threshold, the kinetic energy of the first electron, upon return, is just sufficient to excite the second electron. We compute the distributions for helium and argon in the threshold and above-threshold intensity regimes. In the latter case, we relate our findings to existing experiments. The electron momentum distributions encountered are symmetric with respect to all quadrants of the plane spanned by the momentum components parallel to the laser-field polarization, instead of concentrating on only the second and fourth quadrants. The above-mentioned momentum constraints, together with the strong dependence of the distributions on the bound states involved, may be important for singling out the RESI mechanism in actual physical situations and using NSDI in ultrafast imaging.

  9. Flow angle dependent photoacoustic Doppler power spectra under intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation

    Yu Tong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic Doppler (PAD power spectra showing an evident Doppler shift represent the major characteristics of the continuous wave-excited or burst wave-excited versions of PAD flow measurements. In this paper, the flow angle dependences of the PAD power spectra are investigated using an experiment setup that was established based on intensity-modulated continuous wave laser excitation. The setup has an overall configuration that is similar to a previously reported configuration, but is more sophisticated in that it accurately aligns the laser illumination with the ultrasound detection process, and in that it picks up the correct sample position. In the analysis of the power spectra data, we find that the background power spectra can be extracted by combining the output signals from the two channels of the lock-in amplifier, which is very useful for identification of the PAD power spectra. The power spectra are presented and analyzed in opposite flow directions, at different flow speeds, and at different flow angles. The power spectra at a 90° flow angle show the unique properties of symmetrical shapes due to PAD broadening. For the other flow angles, the smoothed power spectra clearly show a flow angle cosine relationship.

  10. Electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of indium

    Aucelio, R.Q.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A dye laser pumped by a high-repetition-rate copper vapor laser was used as the excitation source to determine indium at parts-per-trillion level by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS). A comparison was made between wall atomization, in pyrolytic and nonpyrolytic graphite tubes, and platform atomization. The influence of several chemical modifiers either in solution or precoated in the graphite tube was evaluated. The influence of several acids and NaOH in the analyte solution was also studied. Optimization of the analytical conditions was carried out to achieve the best signal-to-background ratio and consequently an absolute limit of detection of 1 fg. Some possible interferents of the method were evaluated. The method was evaluated by determining indium in blood, urine, soil, and urban dust samples. Recoveries between 99.17 and 109.17% are reported. A precision of 4.1% at the 10 ng g -1 level in water standards was achieved. copyright 1998 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  11. Surface plasmon-enhanced two-photon excited whispering-gallery modes ultraviolet laser from Zno microwire

    Yunpeng Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The two-photon excited UV laser with narrow line width and high Q value was obtained. The total internal reflection from the four side surfaces of the quadrilateral-ZnO microwire offered the whispering gallery mode (WGM resonant cavity. The UV emission, resonant mechanism, and laser mode characteristics were discussed in detail for this special type of micro-cavity. In addition, in order to enhance the power of the two-photon excited UV laser, the surface plasmon enhancement by the Au nanoparticles was also performed and explained well by the theory of the localized surface plasmon.

  12. Time-resolved laser-excited Shpol'skii spectrometry with a fiber-optic probe and ICCD camera

    Bystol, Adam J.; Campiglia, Andres D.; Gillispie, Gregory D.

    2000-01-01

    Improved methodology for chemical analysis via laser-excited Shpol'skii spectrometry is reported. The complications of traditional methodology for measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature are avoided by freezing the distal end of a bifurcated fiber-optic probe directly into the sample matrix. Emission wavelength-time matrices were rapidly collected by automatically incrementing the gate delay of an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera relative to the laser excitation pulse. The excitation source is a compact frequency-doubled tunable dye laser whose bandwidth (<0.03 nm) is well matched for Shpol'skii spectroscopy. Data reproducibility for quantitative analysis purposes and analytical figures of merit are demonstrated for several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at 77 K. Although not attempted in this study, time-resolved excitation-emission matrices could easily be collected with this instrumental system. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  13. Pulsed laser study of excited states of aromatic molecules absorbed in globular proteins

    Cooper, M.; Thomas, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    Pyrene and several derivatives of pyrene such as pyrene sulfonic acid, and pyrene butyric acid were incorporated into bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution. The pyrene chromophore was subsequently excited by a pulse of uv light (lambda = 3471 A) from a Q switched frequency doubled ruby laser. The lifetime of the pyrene excited singlet and triplet states were monitored by time resolved spectrophotometry. Various molecules, such as O 2 and I - , dissolved in the aqueous phase, diffused into the protein and quenched pyrene excited states. The rates of these reactions were followed under a variety of conditions such as pH and temperature and in the presence of inert additives. The rates of pyrene excited-state quenching were often considerably smaller than the rates observed in simple solutions. A comparison of the rates in the protein and homogeneous solutions gives information on the factors such as temperature, charge, and pH that control the movement of small molecules in and into BSA

  14. Use of a 3-MV proton accelerator for study of noble gases, including laser ionization of excited states

    Hurst, G.S.; Judish, J.P.; Nayfeh, M.H.; Parks, J.E.; Payne, M.G.; Wagner, E.B.

    1974-01-01

    The use of a pulsed 3-MV accelerator to study energy pathways in the noble gases is described. The objectives of pathways research are to obtain (1) information on the spectrum of excited states produced by a charged particle in a noble gas, (2) the rate of decay of the various states through various channels as a function of gas pressure, and (3) the modification of the decay channels due to the introduction of foreign species. A new energy pathways model is presented for helium as a general illustration. A method for the study of excited states, using a laser ionization technique is reported. Use is made of a laser which is tuned to a resonance transition between the desired excited state and some higher excited state. Photons in the same pulse photoionize the higher excited state; thus the ionization current vs photon wavelength has a resonance structure. Absolute yields of selected excited states can be obtained whenever the photon fluence per pulse is large enough to saturate the ionization current. A general summary is given of experimental facilities which include a 3-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, electronics for measuring radiation lifetimes, vacuum ultraviolet spectrometers, and a pulsed laser facility for direct study of excited states. Finally, the relevance of pathways research to (1) the interaction of radiation with matter, (2) the development of gas lasers, and (3) methods of ultrasensitive elemental analysis is pointed out

  15. Experimental study and numerical simulations of the spectral properties of XUV lasers pumped by collisional excitation

    Meng, L.

    2012-01-01

    Improving the knowledge of the spectral and temporal properties of plasma-based XUV lasers is an important issue for the ongoing development of these sources towards significantly higher peak power. The spectral properties of the XUV laser line actually control several physical quantities that are important for applications, such as the minimum duration that can be achieved (Fourier-transform limit). The shortest duration experimentally achieved to-date is ∼1 picosecond. The demonstrated technique of seeding XUV laser plasmas with a coherent femtosecond pulse of high-order harmonic radiation opens new and promising prospects to reduce the duration to a few 100 fs, provided that the gain bandwidth can be kept large enough.XUV lasers pumped by collisional excitation of Ni-like and Ne-like ions have been developed worldwide in hot plasmas created either by fast electrical discharge, or by various types of high-power lasers. This leads to a variety of XUV laser sources with distinct output properties, but also markedly different plasma parameters (density, temperature) in the amplification zone. Hence different spectral properties are expected. The purpose of our work was then to investigate the spectral behaviour of the different types of existing collisional excitation XUV lasers, and to evaluate their potential to support amplification of pulses with duration below 1 ps in a seeded mode.The spectral characterization of plasma-based XUV lasers is challenging because the extremely narrow bandwidth (typically Δλ/λ ∼10 -5 ) lies beyond the resolution limit of existing spectrometers in this spectral range. In our work the narrow linewidth was resolved using a wavefront-division interferometer specifically designed to measure temporal coherence, from which the spectral linewidth is inferred. We have characterized three types of collisional XUV lasers, developed in three different laboratories: transient pumping in Ni-like Mo, capillary discharge pumping in Ne

  16. Infrared emission from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) excited by ultraviolet laser

    Cherchneff, I.; Barker, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The infrared fluorescence spectrum from the C-H stretch modes of vibrationally excited azulene (C10H8), a PAH was measured in the laboratory. PAHs are candidates as carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in many astronomical objects associated with dust and ultraviolet light. In the present experiment, gas phase azulene was excited with light from a 308 nm pulsed laser, and the infrared emission spectrum was time-resolved and wavelength-resolved. Moreover, the infrared absorption spectrum of gas phase azulene was obtained using an FTIR spectrometer. The laboratory emission spectrum resembles observed infrared emission spectra from the interstellar medium, providing support for the hypothesis that PAHs are the responsible carriers. The azulene C-H stretch emission spectrum is more asymmetric than the absorption spectrum, probably due to anharmonicity of levels higher than nu = 1. 36 refs

  17. Quantum coherence generated by interference-induced state selectiveness

    Garreau, Jean Claude

    2001-01-01

    The relations between quantum coherence and quantum interference are discussed. A general method for generation of quantum coherence through interference-induced state selection is introduced and then applied to `simple' atomic systems under two-photon transitions, with applications in quantum optics and laser cooling.

  18. Lifetime measurement of the cesium 6P3/2 state using ultrafast laser-pulse excitation and ionization

    Sell, J. F.; Patterson, B. M.; Ehrenreich, T.; Brooke, G.; Scoville, J.; Knize, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We report a precision measurement of the cesium 6P 3/2 excited-state lifetime. Two collimated, counterpropagating thermal Cs beams cross perpendicularly to femtosecond pulsed laser beams. High timing accuracy is achieved from having excitation and ionization laser pulses which originate from the same mode-locked laser. Using pulse selection we vary the separation in time between excitation and ionization laser pulses while counting the ions produced. We obtain a Cs 6P 3/2 lifetime of 30.460(38) ns, which is a factor of two improvement from previous measurements and with an uncertainty of 0.12%, is one of the most accurate lifetime measurements on record.

  19. Laser-excited Fluorescence And Electron-spin Resonance Of Er3+ In Polycrystalline Alcl3

    Ceotto G.; Pires M.A.; Sanjurjo J.A.; Rettori C.; Barberis G.E.

    1990-01-01

    The green fluorescence transitions among the levels corresponding to the 4S3/2 and 4I15/2 configurations of Er3+ diluted in AlCl3 have been measured using laser excitation. The data allow us to determine the crystalline-field splittings of these levels and, in turn, the spin-Hamiltonian parameters. The electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectrum observed at low temperatures is in good agreement with that expected from these parameters. © 1990 The American Physical Society.

  20. Laser-excited photoemission spectroscopy study of superconducting boron-doped diamond

    K. Ishizaka, R. Eguchi, S. Tsuda, T. Kiss, T. Shimojima, T. Yokoya, S. Shin, T. Togashi, S. Watanabe, C.-T. Chen, C.Q. Zhang, Y. Takano, M. Nagao, I. Sakaguchi, T. Takenouchi and H. Kawarada

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the low-energy electronic state of boron-doped diamond thin film by the laser-excited photoemission spectroscopy. A clear Fermi-edge is observed for samples doped above the semiconductor–metal boundary, together with the characteristic structures at 150×n meV possibly due to the strong electron–lattice coupling effect. In addition, for the superconducting sample, we observed a shift of the leading edge below Tc indicative of a superconducting gap opening. We discuss the electron–lattice coupling and the superconductivity in doped diamond.

  1. Laser excitation of SF6: spectroscopy and coherent pulse propagation effects

    Cantrell, C.D.; Makarov, A.A.; Louisell, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies of coherent propagation effects in SF 6 and other polyatomic molecules are summarized beginning with an account of relevant aspects of the high-resolution spectroscopy of the ν 3 band of SF 6 . A laser pulse propagating in a molecular gas can acquire new frequencies which were not initially present in the pulse, and, in fact, a wave is coherently generated at the frequency of every molecular transition accessible from the initial molecular energy levels. The possible consequences of coherent generation of sidebands for the multiple-photon excitation of SF 6 and other polyatomic molecules are discussed

  2. Dynamics of plasma ions motion in ultra-intense laser-excited plasma wakes

    Zhou Suyun; Li Jing

    2013-01-01

    The effects of heavy ions and protons motion in an ultra-intense laser-driven plasma wake are compared by rebuilding a plasma wake model. It is shown that with the same laser and plasma background electron density n 0 , the heavy ions' motion suppresses wake-field resonant excitation less than the protons' motion in their own plasma wake. Though heavy ions obtain more kinetic energy from the plasma wake, its energy density is less than that of the protons due to the ion density being far less than the proton density. As a result, the total energy of heavy ions obtained from the wake-field is far less than that of protons. The dependence of the kinetic energy and the energy density of protons and heavy ions on n 0 is discussed. (paper)

  3. Nonlinear optical measurements of conducting copolymers of aniline under CW laser excitation

    Pramodini, S.; Poornesh, P.

    2015-08-01

    Synthesis and measurements of third-order optical nonlinearity and optical limiting of conducting copolymers of aniline are presented. Single beam z-scan technique was employed for the nonlinear optical studies. Continuous wave He-Ne laser operating at 633 nm was used as the source of excitation. Copolymer samples exhibited reverse saturable absorption (RSA) process. The nonlinear refraction studies depict that the copolymers exhibit self-defocusing property. The estimated values of βeff, n2 and χ(3) were found to be of the order of 10-2 cm/W, 10-5 esu and 10-7 esu respectively. Self-diffraction rings were observed due to refractive index change when exposed to the laser beam. A good optical limiting and clamping of power of ∼0.9 mW and ∼0.05 mW was observed. Therefore, copolymers of aniline emerge as a potential candidate for photonic device applications.

  4. State-selective electron capture

    Dunford, R.W.; Liu, C.J.; Berry, H.G.; Pardo, R.C.; Raphaelian, M.L.A.

    1988-01-01

    We report results from a new atomic physics program using the Argonne PII ECR ion source which is being built as part of the upgrade of the Argonne Tandem-Linear Accelerator (ATLAS). Our initial experiments have been aimed at studying state-selective electron capture in ion-atom collisions using the technique of Photon Emission Spectroscopy. We are extending existing cross section measurements at low energy ( 6+ and O 7+ on He and H 2 targets in the energy range from 1-105 keV/amu. We also present uv spectra obtained in collisions of O 6+ , O 5+ and N 5+ on a sodium target. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Development of electrical excited CO2-laser with transversal gas flow as well an axial flowed CO2-laser for material treatment, in particular for cutting

    Wollermann-Windgasse, R.; Ackermann, F.

    1987-04-01

    The project describes the development of a new generation of CO 2 -lasers using high frequency discharge (13.56 MHz) for laser excitation by capacitive dielectrical input. HF-excitation has a lot of advantages compared with direct current technology, these are higher electrical input power into the plasma, better homogeneity and stability of discharges. In addition to this, HF-excitation shows excellent possibilities for pulsing and modulation. As a result of this, there are compact powerful laser systems with the possibility of scaling up to the multi-kW-range. The examination included fast transversal flowed as well as fast axial flowed systems. In the end of this project development prototypes with laser output power of 1000 W, 1500 W and 3000 W were available. Detailed attempts of application show that these lasers on grounds of excellent laser output quality and controlability of laser power specifically to each process make possible new ways for material treatment by laser. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Two-photon excited whispering-gallery mode ultraviolet laser from an individual ZnO microneedle

    Zhu, G. P.; Xu, C. X.; Zhu, J.; Lv, C. G.; Cui, Y. P.

    2009-02-01

    Wurtzite structural ZnO microneedles with hexagonal cross section were fabricated by vapor-phase transport method and an individual microneedle was employed as a lasing microcavity. Under excitation of a femtosecond pulse laser with 800 nm wavelength, the ultraviolet (UV) laser emission was obtained, which presented narrow linewidth and high Q value. The UV emission, resonant mechanism, and laser mode characteristics were discussed in detail. The results demonstrated that the UV laser originated from the whispering-gallery mode induced by two-photon absorption assisted by Rabi oscillation.

  7. Determination of ground and excited state dipole moments of dipolar laser dyes by solvatochromic shift method.

    Patil, S K; Wari, M N; Panicker, C Yohannan; Inamdar, S R

    2014-04-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of three medium sized dipolar laser dyes: coumarin 478 (C478), coumarin 519 (C519) and coumarin 523 (C523) have been recorded and studied comprehensively in various solvents at room temperature. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of C478, C519 and C523 show a bathochromic and hypsochromic shifts with increasing solvent polarity indicate that the transitions involved are π→π(∗) and n→π(∗). Onsager radii determined from ab initio calculations were used in the determination of dipole moments. The ground and excited state dipole moments were evaluated by using solvatochromic correlations. It is observed that the dipole moment values of excited states (μe) are higher than corresponding ground state values (μg) for the solvents studied. The ground and excited state dipole moments of these probes computed from ab initio calculations and those determined experimentally are compared and the results are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Equations for the kinetic modeling of supersonically flowing electrically excited lasers

    Lind, R.C.

    1973-01-01

    The equations for the kinetic modeling of a supersonically flowing electrically excited laser system are presented. The work focuses on the use of diatomic gases, in particular carbon monoxide mixtures. The equations presented include the vibrational rate equation which describes the vibrational population distribution, the electron, ion and electronic level rate equations, the gasdynamic equations for an ionized gas in the presence of an applied electric field, and the free electron Boltzmann equation including flow and gradient coupling terms. The model developed accounts for vibration--vibration collisions, vibration-translation collisions, electron-molecule inelastic excitation and superelastic de-excitation collisions, charge particle collisions, ionization and three body recombination collisions, elastic collisions, and radiative decay, all of which take place in such a system. A simplified form of the free electron Boltzmann equation is developed and discussed with emphasis placed on its coupling with the supersonic flow. A brief description of a possible solution procedure for the set of coupled equations is discussed

  9. First-principles calculations of heat capacities of ultrafast laser-excited electrons in metals

    Bévillon, E.; Colombier, J.P.; Recoules, V.; Stoian, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast laser excitation can induce fast increases of the electronic subsystem temperature. The subsequent electronic evolutions in terms of band structure and energy distribution can determine the change of several thermodynamic properties, including one essential for energy deposition; the electronic heat capacity. Using density functional calculations performed at finite electronic temperatures, the electronic heat capacities dependent on electronic temperatures are obtained for a series of metals, including free electron like, transition and noble metals. The effect of exchange and correlation functionals and the presence of semicore electrons on electronic heat capacities are first evaluated and found to be negligible in most cases. Then, we tested the validity of the free electron approaches, varying the number of free electrons per atom. This shows that only simple metals can be correctly fitted with these approaches. For transition metals, the presence of localized d electrons produces a strong deviation toward high energies of the electronic heat capacities, implying that more energy is needed to thermally excite them, compared to free sp electrons. This is attributed to collective excitation effects strengthened by a change of the electronic screening at high temperature

  10. Tuning excitation laser wavelength for secondary resonance in low-intensity phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in-situ analytical measurement of nanoaerosols

    Xiong, Gang; Li, Shuiqing; Tse, Stephen D.

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, a novel low-intensity phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (PS-LIBS) technique has been developed for unique elemental-composition identification of aerosolized nanoparticles, where only the solid-phase nanoparticles break down, forming nanoplasmas, without any surrounding gas-phase breakdown. Additional work has demonstrated that PS-LIBS emissions can be greatly enhanced with secondary resonant excitation by matching the excitation laser wavelength with an atomic transition line in the formed nanoplasma, thereby achieving low limits of detection. In this work, a tunable dye laser is employed to investigate the effects of excitation wavelength and irradiance on in-situ PS-LIBS measurements of TiO2 nanoaerosols. The enhancement factor by resonant excitation can be 220 times greater than that for non-resonant cases under similar conditions. Moreover, the emitted spectra are unique for the selected resonant transition lines for a given element, suggesting the potential to make precise phase-selective and analyte-selective measurements of nanoparticles in a multicomponent multiphase system. The enhancement factor by resonant excitation is highly sensitive to excitation laser wavelength, with narrow excitation spectral windows, i.e., 0.012 to 0.023 nm (FWHM, full width at half maximum) for Ti (I) neutral atomic lines, and 0.051 to 0.139 nm (FWHM) for Ti (II) single-ionized atomic lines. Boltzmann analysis of the emission intensities, temporal response of emissions, and emission dependence on excitation irradiance are investigated to understand aspects of the generated nanoplasmas such as temperature, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and excitation mechanism.

  11. Lifetime measurements of odd-parity high-excitation levels of Sn I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Yanyan; Xu, Jiaxin; Dai, Zhenwen; Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biemont, Emile

    2010-01-01

    Natural radiative lifetimes of 38 odd-parity highly excited levels in neutral tin in the energy range from 43 682.737 to 56 838.68 cm -1 have been measured by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in an atomic beam produced by laser ablation on a solid tin sample. All the levels were excited from the metastable 3 P 1, 2 and 1 D 2 levels in the ground configuration. The second and third harmonics of a dye laser were adopted as the tunable exciting source (207-250 nm). The lifetime results obtained in this paper are in the range from 4.6 to 292 ns and will be useful in extending the set of oscillator strengths available in Sn I.

  12. Lifetime measurements of odd-parity high-excitation levels of Sn I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Zhang, Wei; Feng, Yanyan; Xu, Jiaxin; Dai, Zhenwen [College of Physics, Jilin University and Key Lab of Coherent Light, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy, Ministry of Education, Changchun 130021 (China); Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biemont, Emile, E-mail: dai@jlu.edu.c [Astrophysique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Mons-UMONS, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2010-10-28

    Natural radiative lifetimes of 38 odd-parity highly excited levels in neutral tin in the energy range from 43 682.737 to 56 838.68 cm{sup -1} have been measured by a time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique in an atomic beam produced by laser ablation on a solid tin sample. All the levels were excited from the metastable {sup 3}P{sub 1,} {sub 2} and {sup 1}D{sub 2} levels in the ground configuration. The second and third harmonics of a dye laser were adopted as the tunable exciting source (207-250 nm). The lifetime results obtained in this paper are in the range from 4.6 to 292 ns and will be useful in extending the set of oscillator strengths available in Sn I.

  13. Analysis of Indium Tin Oxide Film Using Argon Fluroide (ArF) Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence of Ablated Plumes.

    Ho, Sut Kam; Garcia, Dario Machado

    2017-04-01

    A two-pulse laser-excited atomic fluorescence (LEAF) technique at 193 nm wavelength was applied to the analysis of indium tin oxide (ITO) layer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. Fluorescence emissions from analytes were induced from plumes generated by first laser pulse. Using this approach, non-selective LEAF can be accomplished for simultaneous multi-element analysis and it overcomes the handicap of strict requirement for laser excitation wavelength. In this study, experimental conditions including laser fluences, times for gating and time delay between pulses were optimized to reveal high sensitivity with minimal sample destruction and penetration. With weak laser fluences of 100 and 125 mJ/cm 2 for 355 and 193 nm pulses, detection limits were estimated to be 0.10% and 0.43% for Sn and In, respectively. In addition, the relation between fluorescence emissions and number of laser shots was investigated; reproducible results were obtained for Sn and In. It shows the feasibility of depth profiling by this technique. Morphologies of samples were characterized at various laser fluences and number of shots to examine the accurate penetration. Images of craters were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate the imperceptible destructiveness of film after laser shot. With such weak laser fluences and minimal destructiveness, this LEAF technique is suitable for thin-film analysis.

  14. Effect of killer impurities on laser-excited barium-doped ZnS phosphors at liquid nitrogen temperature

    Kumar, Sunil; Verma, N. K.; Bhatti, H. S.

    Zinc sulphide phosphors doped with Ba, as well as killer impurities of Fe, Co and Ni, having variable concentrations, were synthesized; and using an ultraviolet laser as the excitation source, decay-curve analyses were done. Various strong emissions in these phosphors were detected and the corresponding excited-state life times were measured at liquid nitrogen temperature. Studies were carried out to see the effect of killer impurities on the phosphorescence excited-state life times. Excited-state life times were found to decrease appreciably (microsecond to nanosecond) with the addition of quenchers. These studies are quite useful and find applications in areas such as optical memories, sensors, luminescent screens, laser-beam detection and alignment, color displays, printing, etc.

  15. Confined longitudinal acoustic phonon modes in free-standing Si membranes coherently excited by femtosecond laser pulses

    Hudert, Florian; Bruchhausen, Axel; Issenmann, Daniel; Schecker, Olivier; Waitz, Reimar; Erbe, Artur; Scheer, Elke; Dekorsy, Thomas; Mlayah, Adnen; Huntzinger, Jean-Roch

    2009-01-01

    In this Rapid Communication we report the first time-resolved measurements of confined acoustic phonon modes in free-standing Si membranes excited by fs laser pulses. Pump-probe experiments using asynchronous optical sampling reveal the impulsive excitation of discrete acoustic modes up to the 19th harmonic order for membranes of two different thicknesses. The modulation of the membrane thickness is measured with fm resolution. The experimental results are compared with a theoretical model in...

  16. Impact of ultrafast demagnetization process on magnetization reversal in L10 FePt revealed using double laser pulse excitation

    Shi, J. Y.; Tang, M.; Zhang, Z.; Ma, L.; Sun, L.; Zhou, C.; Hu, X. F.; Zheng, Z.; Shen, L. Q.; Zhou, S. M.; Wu, Y. Z.; Chen, L. Y.; Zhao, H. B.

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast laser induced magnetization reversal in L10 FePt films with high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was investigated using single- and double-pulse excitations. Single-pulse excitation beyond 10 mJ cm-2 caused magnetization (M) reversal at the applied fields much smaller than the static coercivity of the films. For double-pulse excitation, both coercivity reduction and reversal percentage showed a rapid and large decrease with the increasing time interval (Δt) of the two pulses in the range of 0-2 ps. In this Δt range, the maximum demagnetization (ΔMp) was also strongly attenuated, whereas the integrated demagnetization signals over more than 10 ps, corresponding to the average lattice heat effect, showed little change. These results indicate that laser induced M reversal in FePt films critically relies on ΔMp. Because ΔMp is determined by spin temperature, which is higher than lattice temperature, utilizing an ultrafast laser instead of a continuous-wave laser in laser-assisted M reversal may reduce the overall deposited energy and increase the speed of recording. The effective control of M reversal by slightly tuning the time delay of two laser pulses may also be useful for ultrafast spin manipulation.

  17. Excited State Assignment and Laser Action in π-Conjugated Polymers

    Vardeny, Z. V.

    1998-03-01

    We have applied a variety of ps transient and cw spectroscopies to elucidate the ground and excited electronic states of luminescent and nonluminescent thin films and solutions of π-conjugated polymers. These techniques include photoinduced absorption (PA), photoluminescence (PL), resonant Raman scattering (RRS), electro-absorption (EA), two photon absorption (TPA), and PA detected magnetic resonance. We found that the luminescence efficiency, the resonant and subgap third-order nonlinear optical properties and the RRS dispersion in these polymers are determined by the energies and symmetries of a subset of the excited states, including a series of singlet excitons with odd (B_u) and even (A_g) parity lying below a continuum band. Among them, the lowest Bu exciton (1B_u) and two other dominant Ag excitons (mAg and kA_g) are particularly important in determining the EA, TPA, and excitonic ps PA spectra.(S.V. Frolov, M. Liess, P.A. Lane, W. Gellermann, Z.V. Vardeny, M. Ozaki, and K. Yoshino, Phys. Rev. Lett). 78, 4285 (1997). We also found(M. Ozaki, E. Ehrenfreund, R.E. Benner, T.J. Baron, K. Yoshino, and Z.V. Vardeny, Phys. Rev. Lett). 79, 1762 (1997). that the RRS phonon dispersion with the laser excitation energy is governed by the dependence of lowest Ag exciton (2A_g) on the chain length distribution in the polymer. This leads to stronger RRS dispersion in nonluminescent polymers. Moreover the relative energies of the 1Bu and 2Ag excitons determine the PL quantum efficiency η, regardless of the ground state degeneracy. If E(2A_g) < E(1B_u) then η is small because of the dipole forbidden character of the lowest singlet. We will give examples of nonluminescent polymers which belong to this class with both degenerate and nondegenerate ground state, respectively. On the other hand, if E(1B_u) < E(2A_g) then η is large and the polymer might be considered as active material for display applications. Again we give examples of highly luminescent polymers with

  18. Determination of uranium in sea and ocean waters by a luminescence method with laser excitation

    Preobrazhenskaya, E.B.; Gvgel, E.S.; Stepanov, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper shows that it is possible to determine uranium insea and ocean waters by a luminescence method with laser excitation. Ocean waters with a low content of luminescent ingredients are analyzed directly by freezing at 77 K to eliminate the quenching effect of the chloride ion. The more polluted waters of inland seas are preferably analyzed at T = 293 K in 1 M H 3 PO 4 after the removal of chloride ions by distillation from a sample containing HNO 3 . The background effect is removed by time selection of the luminescent emission of the uranyl ion. Uranium contents were determined for water from the northwest Atlantic and the North and Baltic Seas

  19. Magnetic field effects on electrical parameters of rf excited CO{sub 2} lasers

    Tavassoli, S.H. [Laser Research Institute and Physics Department of Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: h-tavassoli@cc.sbu.ac.ir; Latifi, H. [Laser Research Institute and Physics Department of Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2005-02-14

    In the present Letter a rf excited CO{sub 2} laser embedded in an external, constant, and homogeneous magnetic field is considered. The magnetic field effects on some discharge parameters such as V-I characteristics, impedance of sheaths and positive column of plasma, intensity of visible emission from plasma and thickness of positive column are investigated. There is an increase in thickness of positive column and output power in presence of magnetic field. Magnetic field leads to an increase in the discharge voltage and impedance for lower current densities and a decrease for higher ones. There is a current density in which the magnetic field has no effects on discharge voltage and impedance. There are two peaks on intensity of visible emission from the discharge which at higher magnetic field are pushed out toward the electrodes.

  20. Simultaneous time-space resolved reflectivity and interferometric measurements of dielectrics excited with femtosecond laser pulses

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Haahr-Lillevang, L.; Siegel, J.; Balling, P.; Guizard, S.; Solis, J.

    2017-06-01

    Simultaneous time-and-space resolved reflectivity and interferometric measurements over a temporal span of 300 ps have been performed in fused silica and sapphire samples excited with 800 nm, 120 fs laser pulses at energies slightly and well above the ablation threshold. The experimental results have been simulated in the frame of a multiple-rate equation model including light propagation. The comparison of the temporal evolution of the reflectivity and the interferometric measurements at 400 nm clearly shows that the two techniques interrogate different material volumes during the course of the process. While the former is sensitive to the evolution of the plasma density in a very thin ablating layer at the surface, the second yields an averaged plasma density over a larger volume. It is shown that self-trapped excitons do not appreciably contribute to carrier relaxation in fused silica at fluences above the ablation threshold, most likely due to Coulomb screening effects at large excited carrier densities. For both materials, at fluences well above the ablation threshold, the maximum measured plasma reflectivity shows a saturation behavior consistent with a scattering rate proportional to the plasma density in this fluence regime. Moreover, for both materials and for pulse energies above the ablation threshold and delays in the few tens of picoseconds range, a simultaneous "low reflectivity" and "low transmission" behavior is observed. Although this behavior has been identified in the past as a signature of femtosecond laser-induced ablation, its origin is alternatively discussed in terms of the optical properties of a material undergoing strong isochoric heating, before having time to substantially expand or exchange energy with the surrounding media.

  1. Fluorescence fluctuation of Rhodamine 6G dye for high repetition rate laser excitation

    Singh, Nageshwar; Patel, Hemant K.; Dixit, S.K.; Vora, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fluorescence from Rhodamine 6G dye for stationary and flowing liquid medium, excited by copper vapor laser, operating at 6 kHz pulse repetition frequency, was investigated. Large fluctuations in spectral width (about 5 nm) and spectral intensity in the fluorescence from stationary dye solution were observed, while fluctuations in the spectral width diminish in a flowing dye medium. However, this increases spectral intensity and slightly red shifts the fluorescence peak emission wavelength. Theoretical analysis was carried out to explain the observed results by incorporating the temperature induced refractive index, beam deflection and spectral variation in stationary dye solution. Numerical analysis of thermal load and contour of temperature in the optical pumped region inside the dye cell in stationary, 0.2 and 1.5 m/s flow velocity was also investigated to support our analysis. - Highlights: ► High repetition rate excitation generates inhomogeneity in the gain medium. ► Fluorescence of Rhodamine 6G in stationary and flowing medium was carried out. ► Fluorescence fluctuations lessen in flowing medium in contrast to stationary medium. ► Our theoretical and numerical analysis enlightens the experimented outcome trend.

  2. Quantum efficiency and excited-state relaxation dynamics in neodymium-doped phosphate laser glasses

    Caird, J.A.; Ramponi, A.J.; Staver, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    Radiometrically calibrated spectroscopic techniques employing an integrating-sphere detection system have been used to determine the fluorescence quantum efficiencies for two commercially available Nd 3+ -doped phosphate laser glasses, LG-750 and LG-760. Quantum efficiencies and fluorescence lifetimes were measured for samples with various neodymium concentrations. It is shown that the effects of concentration quenching are accurately described when both resonant nonradiative excitation hopping (the Burshtein model) and annihilation by cross relaxation are accounted for by Foerster--Dexter dipole--dipole energy-transfer theory. The Foerster--Dexter critical range for nonradiative excitation hopping was found to be R DD =11 A, while the critical range for cross relaxation was close to R DA =4 A in these glasses. The quantum efficiency at low Nd 3+ concentrations was (92±5)%, implying a nonradiative relaxation rate of 210±150 s -1 for isolated ions. Improved values for the radiative lifetimes and the stimulated emission cross sections for these glasses were also deduced from the measurements

  3. Analytical model for electromagnetic radiation from a wakefield excited by intense short laser pulses in an unmagnetized plasma

    Chen Ziyu; Chen Shi; Dan Jiakun; Li Jianfeng; Peng Qixian, E-mail: ziyuch@gmail.com [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2011-10-15

    A simple one-dimensional analytical model for electromagnetic emission from an unmagnetized wakefield excited by an intense short-pulse laser in the nonlinear regime has been developed in this paper. The expressions for the spectral and angular distributions of the radiation have been derived. The model suggests that the origin of the radiation can be attributed to the violent sudden acceleration of plasma electrons experiencing the accelerating potential of the laser wakefield. The radiation process could help to provide a qualitative interpretation of existing experimental results, and offers useful information for future laser wakefield experiments.

  4. Analytical model for electromagnetic radiation from a wakefield excited by intense short laser pulses in an unmagnetized plasma

    Chen Ziyu; Chen Shi; Dan Jiakun; Li Jianfeng; Peng Qixian

    2011-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional analytical model for electromagnetic emission from an unmagnetized wakefield excited by an intense short-pulse laser in the nonlinear regime has been developed in this paper. The expressions for the spectral and angular distributions of the radiation have been derived. The model suggests that the origin of the radiation can be attributed to the violent sudden acceleration of plasma electrons experiencing the accelerating potential of the laser wakefield. The radiation process could help to provide a qualitative interpretation of existing experimental results, and offers useful information for future laser wakefield experiments.

  5. Selective excitation of higher-radial-order Laguerre-Gaussian beams using a solid-state digital laser

    Bell, Teboho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Filter (LF) was introduced to only transmit 1064 nm and block the 808 nm pump. The laser beam was transmitted out of the cavity through an output coupler mirror (M3 on Figure 1) and was 1:1 relay imaged using two 125 mm lenses (L3 and L4) to a Photon...; Published December 30, 2016 Citation: Bell T, Ngcobo S (2016) Selective Excitation of Higher-radial-order Laguerre-Gaussian Beams Using a Solid-state Digital Laser. J Laser Opt Photonics 3: 144. doi: 10.4172/2469-410X.1000144 Copyright: © 2016 Bell T, et...

  6. Laser selective cutting of biological tissues by impulsive heat deposition through ultrafast vibrational excitations.

    Franjic, Kresimir; Cowan, Michael L; Kraemer, Darren; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2009-12-07

    Mechanical and thermodynamic responses of biomaterials after impulsive heat deposition through vibrational excitations (IHDVE) are investigated and discussed. Specifically, we demonstrate highly efficient ablation of healthy tooth enamel using 55 ps infrared laser pulses tuned to the vibrational transition of interstitial water and hydroxyapatite around 2.95 microm. The peak intensity at 13 GW/cm(2) was well below the plasma generation threshold and the applied fluence 0.75 J/cm(2) was significantly smaller than the typical ablation thresholds observed with nanosecond and microsecond pulses from Er:YAG lasers operating at the same wavelength. The ablation was performed without adding any superficial water layer at the enamel surface. The total energy deposited per ablated volume was several times smaller than previously reported for non-resonant ultrafast plasma driven ablation with similar pulse durations. No micro-cracking of the ablated surface was observed with a scanning electron microscope. The highly efficient ablation is attributed to an enhanced photomechanical effect due to ultrafast vibrational relaxation into heat and the scattering of powerful ultrafast acoustic transients with random phases off the mesoscopic heterogeneous tissue structures.

  7. Influence of the electric field frequency on the performance of a RF excited CO2 waveguide laser

    Ochkin, V.N.; Witteman, W.J.; Ilukhin, B.I.; Kochetov, I.V.; Peters, P.J.M.; Udalov, Yu.B.; Tskhai, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of the RF frequency on the active media of CO2 waveguide lasers. It is found that the characteristics are improved with increasing RF frequency because the space charge sheath width decreases with increasing excitation frequency. We also found that the sheath

  8. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what

  9. Ultrafast dynamics of laser-pulse excited semiconductors: non-Markovian quantum kinetic equations with nonequilibrium correlations

    V.V.Ignatyuk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-Markovian kinetic equations in the second Born approximation are derived for a two-zone semiconductor excited by a short laser pulse. Both collision dynamics and running nonequilibrium correlations are taken into consideration. The energy balance and relaxation of the system to equilibrium are discussed. Results of numerical solution of the kinetic equations for carriers and phonons are presented.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence with an OPO system. Part II: direct determination of lead content in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF).

    Le Bihan, A; Lijour, Y; Giamarchi, P; Burel-Deschamps, L; Stephan, L

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence was induced by coupling a laser with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to develop an analytical method for the direct determination of lead content, at ultra-trace level, in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF). The optimization of atomization conditions, laser pulse energy, and mainly temporal parameters allowed us to reach a 3 fg detection limit (0.3 ng L(-1)) despite the low repetition rate of the device. The expected error on predicted concentrations of lead, at trace levels, in seawater was below 15%.

  11. Laser excitation of 8-eV electronic states in Th{sup +}. A first pillar of the electronic bridge toward excitation of the Th-229 nucleus

    Herrera-Sancho, Oscar-Andrey

    2012-11-23

    The possibility to realize a nuclear clock based on the optical magnetic dipole transition from the ground state to the low-energy isomeric state in the {sup 229}Th nucleus has motivated experiments and proposals toward highly accurate clocks with trapped ions and highly stable optical frequency standards with Th-doped solids. These systems hold great promise to open a field of research in the borderland between atomic and nuclear physics, which will enable highly sensitive tests of postulates from fundamental physics and also will allow us to coherently excite and control nuclear states, opening a wonderful and intriguing new field in physics. A major experimental obstacle that has to be overcome before any precision spectroscopy can be performed with this system is however the insufficient knowledge on the exact transition energy. The best experimental result so far is an indirect determination from {gamma}-spectroscopy with a relative uncertainty of about 6%. To facilitate the search for the nuclear transition within a wide uncertainty range around 8 eV, we investigate two-photon excitation in the dense electronic level structure of Th{sup +}, which enables the nuclear excitation via a resonantly enhanced inverse electronic bridge process. Experiments on one- and two-photon laser excitation of buffer gas cooled {sup 232}Th{sup +} ions in a radio-frequency ion trap are reported in this thesis. The strongest resonance line at 402 nm from the (6d{sup 2}7s)J=3/2 ground state to the (6d7s7p)J=5/2 state is driven as the first excitation step. Using nanosecond laser pulses in the 250-nm wavelength range for the second step of a two-photon excitation, we have observed seven previously unknown levels in the unexplored region of the electronic level structure around 8 eV. This investigation shows that the Th{sup +} ion seems to be well suited for the search of the isomer transition because both, theory and experimental results, agree on the density of strong transitions

  12. Visible-to-visible four-photon ultrahigh resolution microscopic imaging with 730-nm diode laser excited nanocrystals.

    Wang, Baoju; Zhan, Qiuqiang; Zhao, Yuxiang; Wu, Ruitao; Liu, Jing; He, Sailing

    2016-01-25

    Further development of multiphoton microscopic imaging is confronted with a number of limitations, including high-cost, high complexity and relatively low spatial resolution due to the long excitation wavelength. To overcome these problems, for the first time, we propose visible-to-visible four-photon ultrahigh resolution microscopic imaging by using a common cost-effective 730-nm laser diode to excite the prepared Nd(3+)-sensitized upconversion nanoparticles (Nd(3+)-UCNPs). An ordinary multiphoton scanning microscope system was built using a visible CW diode laser and the lateral imaging resolution as high as 161-nm was achieved via the four-photon upconversion process. The demonstrated large saturation excitation power for Nd(3+)-UCNPs would be more practical and facilitate the four-photon imaging in the application. A sample with fine structure was imaged to demonstrate the advantages of visible-to-visible four-photon ultrahigh resolution microscopic imaging with 730-nm diode laser excited nanocrystals. Combining the uniqueness of UCNPs, the proposed visible-to-visible four-photon imaging would be highly promising and attractive in the field of multiphoton imaging.

  13. Use of synchrotron and laser radiations for present and future photoionization studies in excited atoms and ions

    Wuilleumier, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    The status of experiments in photoionization of atoms in excited states is reviewed, with emphasis given to synchrotron and laser photon sources. A technique for exciting the photoionization spectrum of Na atoms using the flux emitted from the bending magnetic of a storage ring is discussed in detail. Some problems in interpreting photoionization spectrum of Ba in the excited state, due to the presence of higher orders are considered. A design approach for a positron storage ring to produce coherent radiation in the VUV is described. It is shown that combined use of a CW dye laser and the positron storage ring will allow new progress to be made in photoionization studies of excited atoms. Some of the experiments to be carried out using the positron storage ring include: measurements of collisional ionization in rare earth metal atoms of low atomic density; photoionization measurements at lower laser powers, leading to an extension of the CW tunability range; and photoionization studies of multiply charged positive ions. 21 references

  14. Probing the KII 3p54p fine structure by photoelectron spectroscopy of laser-excited potassium

    Meyer, M; Cubaynes, D; Wuilleumier, F J; Heinecke, E; Richter, T; Zimmermann, P; Strakhova, S I; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N

    2006-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra of atomic potassium excited by laser optical pumping into the 3p 6 4p 2 P 1/2 and 2 P 3/2 states are measured with high-energy resolution. The relative intensities of the 3p 5 4p fine-structure lines depend strongly on the initial excitation to one of the 4p spin-orbit components. Similar to the case of sodium, dynamically and quasiforbidden transitions are observed in the photoelectron spectra of potassium. The theoretical predictions of the generalized geometrical model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. (letter to the editor)

  15. Diode laser probe of CO2 vibrational excitation produced by collisions with hot deuterium atoms from the 193 nm excimer laser photolysis D2S

    O'Neill, J.A.; Cai, J.Y.; Flynn, G.W.; Weston, R.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The 193 nm excimer laser photolysis of D 2 S in D 2 S/CO 2 mixtures produces fast deuterium atoms (E/sub TR/approx.2.2 eV) which vibrationally excite CO 2 molecules via inelastic translation--vibration/rotation (T--V/R) energy exchange processes. A high resolution (10 -3 cm -1 ) cw diode laser probe was used to monitor the excitation of ν 3 (antisymmetric stretch) and ν 2 (bend) vibrations in CO 2 . The present results are compared with previous experiments involving hot hydrogen atom excitation of CO 2 in H 2 S/CO 2 mixtures as well as with theoretical calculations of the excitation probability. The probability for excitation of a ν 3 quantum in CO 2 is about 1%--2% per gas kinetic D/CO 2 collision. Bending (ν 2 ) quanta are produced about eight times more efficiently than antisymmetric stretching (ν 3 ) quanta. The thermalization rate for cooling hot D atoms below the threshold for production of a ν 3 vibrational quantum corresponds to less than 2 D*/D 2 S collisions or 15 D*/CO 2 collisions

  16. Energy relaxation in IR laser excited Hg1-xCdxTe

    Storebo, A K; Brudevoll, T; Olsen, O; Norum, O C; Breivik, M

    2009-01-01

    IR laser excitation of Hg l-x Cd x Te by low-fluence femtosecond and high fluence microsecond pulses was explored for the technologically important alloy fractions x ∼ 0.2 and x ∼ 0.28. We have used first principles (LAPW) electronic structure calculations and finite element modelling, supported by Monte Carlo simulation for the description of femtosecond pulse carrier relaxation and the transport parameters. Laser wavelengths considered were 6.4 - 10.6 μm for x ∼ 0.2 and 3.8 - 4.8 μm for x ∼ 0.28, with an incident 1 microsecond pulse fluence of 2 J/cm 2 . Many energy transfer mechanisms are invoked due to the long timescales of the microsecond pulses, and a main challenge is therefore to elucidate how these interplay in situations away from thermal equilibrium. Mechanisms studied include one- and two-photon absorption (OPA and TPA) across the band gap, inter-valence band absorption (IVA) between light- and heavy hole bands, electron-hole recombination/impact ionization, band gap renormalisation, intra-band free carrier absorption (FCA), excess carrier temperatures, non-equilibrium phonon generation, and refractive index changes. In the high fluence case, lattice temperatures evolve considerably during the laser pulse in response to the heated carriers. The chosen photon energies lie just above the band gap at the starting lattice temperature of 77 K, and nonlinear effects therefore dominate as the material heats up and the band gap begins to exceed the photon energy. Because of the low photon energy we must rely on Auger recombination, inter-valence band absorption and free carrier absorption to heat the carrier plasma. Although some Hg l-x Cd x Te material parameters are now relatively well known, existing data for many of the processes are inadequate for cases far away from thermal equilibrium. Furthermore, the role of Auger recombination in relation to non-intrinsic recombination has been a matter of debate lately. In this respect, information from

  17. Excitation and deexcitation of N2 molecular levels. Induced fluorescence by electrons and laser

    Perez Fernandez-Mayoralas, A.

    1989-01-01

    The electron impact excitation followed by fluorescence induced by N 2 -laser absorption was used to study the lifetime of the lowest vibrational level of the B 3 π g electronic state of N 2 . The experimental result of this work is 13 + 1 μs. To measure the lifetime of B 3 π g (v=2,3,5,6,7,8) levels the delayed coincidence method by electron impact was use. The lifetime values were compared with recent experimental and theoretical results. The relative intensi-ties of 3 π g --- A 3 Σ Ω + system bands, in the range (6540-10500 A o ) was measured using a hollow cathode lamp as spectral source. The relative transition moments and its dependence versus the r-centroid was obtained. Total cross sections for electron scattering by N molecules in the range 600 - 5000 eV have been obtained from measurements of the attenuation of a linear electron beam. The results have been compared with available experimental cross sections and with theoretical calculations based on the first Born approximation. (Author)

  18. Transversely Excited Atmospheric CO2 Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy for the Detection of Heavy Metals in Soil

    Khumaeni, A.; Sugito, H.; Setia Budi, W.; Yoyo Wardaya, A.

    2018-01-01

    A rapid detection of heavy metals in soil was presented by the metal-assisted gas plasma method using specific characteristics of a pulsed, transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser. The soil particles were placed in a hole made of acrylic plate. The sample was covered by a to prevent the soil particles from being blown off. The mesh also functioned to initiate a luminous plasma. When a TEA CO2 laser (1500 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the soil sample, passing through the metal mesh, some of the laser energy was used to generate the gas plasma on the mesh surface, and the remaining laser energy was employed to ablate the soil particles. The fine, ablated soil particles moved into the gas plasma region to be dissociated and excited. Using this technique, analysis can be made with reduced sample pretreatment, and therefore a rapid analysis can be performed efficiently. The results proved that the signal to noise ratio (S/N) of the emission spectral lines is much better for the case of the present method (mesh method) compared to the case of standard laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using the pellet method. Rapid detection of heavy metal elements in soil has been successfully carried out. The detection limits of Cu and Hg in soil were estimated to be 3 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. The present method has good potential for rapid and sensitive detection of heavy metals in soil samples.

  19. Control of HOD photodissociation dynamics via bond-selective infrared multiphoton excitation and a femtosecond ultraviolet laser pulse

    Amstrup, Bjarne; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1992-01-01

    moment, excites the molecule to a dissociative electronic state. We consider the HOD molecule which is ideal due to the local mode structure of the vibrational states. It is shown that selective and localized bond stretching can be created in simple laser fields. When such a nonstationary vibrating HOD...... molecule is photodissociated with a short laser pulse (~5 fs) complete selectivity between the channels H+OD and D+OH is observed over the entire absorption band covering these channels. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  20. Process and device for the excitation and selective dissociation by absorption of a laser light and application to isotopic enrichment

    Rigny, Paul.

    1975-01-01

    The description is given of a process for the excitation and selective dissociation by absorption of the monochromatic light emitted by a high power laser. The laser light at frequency ν 1 is beamed on to an isotopic mixture of gaseous molecules, some of these molecules presenting transitions, between two vibration levels corresponding to a given isotope, separated by an energy interval ΔE 1 =2h ν 1 , and the molecules of a given isotopic species are thus preferentially dissociated into several component parts [fr

  1. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states

    Guichard, R.

    2007-12-01

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when ℎω > I p : it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with ℎω p : new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  2. P 8: Table-top instrumentation for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of solids excited by soft X-ray from a laser induced plasma source and/or UV-VIS laser

    Bruza, P.; Fidler, V.; Nikl, M.

    2010-01-01

    The design and use of a novel, table-top UV-VIS luminescence spectrometer with two excitation sources is described: a soft X-ray/XUV pulse excitation from the laser-produced plasma in gas puff target of about 4 ns duration, and a conventional N 2 pulse laser excitation at 337 nm (or any other UV-VIS pulse laser excitation). The XUV plasma source generates photons of either quasi-monochromatic (N target, E = 430 eV) or wide (Ar target, E = 200 ∼ 600 eV) spectral range. A combination of both X-ray/XUV and UV-VIS excitation in one experimental apparatus allows to perform comparative luminescence spectra and kinetics measurements under the same experimental conditions. In order to demonstrate the spectrometer, the UV-VIS luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of cerium doped Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 single crystal (LuAG:Ce) scintillator excited by XUV and UV radiation were acquired. Luminescence of doped Ce 3+ ions was studied under XUV 430 eV excitation from the laser-produced nitrogen plasma, and compared with the luminescence under 337 nm (3,68 eV) UV excitation from nitrogen laser. In the former case the excitation energy is deposited in the LuAG host, while in the latter the 4f-5d transition of Ce 3+ is directly excited. Furthermore, LuAG:Ce single crystals and single crystalline films luminescence decay profiles are compared and discussed. (authors)

  3. Luminescence decay of S Zn::Ag and O Zn:Ga scintillation detectors excited by a pulsed laser

    Romero, L.; Campos, J.

    1981-01-01

    In the present work a high sensitivity experimental set up for luminescence decay measurements in the 1 0 - 1 sec range has been developed. As an application, luminescence light decay In S Zn:Ag and 0Zn:Ga after excitation by a pulsed N 2 laser has been measured. In SZnrAg, measurements of total light decay was compared with donor acceptor pairs theory. In both substances, spectral evolution in the first 15 sec was investigated. (Author) 4 refs

  4. Single-photon cesium Rydberg excitation spectroscopy using 318.6-nm UV laser and room-temperature vapor cell.

    Wang, Jieying; Bai, Jiandong; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2017-09-18

    We demonstrate a single-photon Rydberg excitation spectroscopy of cesium (Cs) atoms in a room-temperature vapor cell. Cs atoms are excited directly from 6S 1/2 ground state to nP 3/2 (n = 70 - 100) Rydberg states with a 318.6 nm ultraviolet (UV) laser, and Rydberg excitation spectra are obtained by transmission enhancement of a probe beam resonant to Cs 6S 1/2 , F = 4 - 6P 3/2 , F' = 5 transition as partial population on F = 4 ground state are transferred to Rydberg state. Analysis reveals that the observed spectra are velocity-selective spectroscopy of Rydberg state, from which the amplitude and linewidth influenced by lasers' Rabi frequency have been investigated. Fitting to energies of Cs nP 3/2 (n = 70 -100) states, the determined quantum defect is 3.56671(42). The demodulated spectra can also be employed as frequency references to stabilize the UV laser frequency to specific Cs Rydberg transition.

  5. Excitation of the hydrogen atom by fast-electron impact in the presence of a laser field

    Bhattacharya, M.; Sinha, C.; Sil, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    An approach has been developed to study the excitation of a ground-state H atom to the n=2 level under the simultaneous action of fast-electron impact and a monochromatic, linearly polarized, homogeneous laser beam. The laser frequency is assumed to be low (soft-photon limit) so that a stationary-state perturbation theory can be applied as is done in the adiabatic theory. An elegant method has been developed in the present work to construct the dressed excited-state wave functions of the H atom using first-order perturbation theory in the parabolic coordinate representation. By virtue of this method, the problem arising due to the degeneracy of the excited states of the H atom has been successfully overcome. The main advantage of the present approach is that the dressed wave function has been obtained in terms of a finite number of Laguerre polynomials instead of an infinite summation occurring in the usual perturbative treatment. The amplitude for direct excitation (without exchange) has been obtained in closed form. Numerical results for differential cross sections are presented for individual excitations to different Stark manifolds as well as for excitations to the n=2 level at high energies (100 and 200 eV) and for field directions both parallel and perpendicular to the incident electron momentum. Extension to a higher order of perturbation is also possible in the present approach for the construction of the dressed states, and the electron-exchange effect can also be taken into account without any further approximation

  6. Excitation of the hydrogen atom by fast-electron impact in the presence of a laser field

    Bhattacharya, Manabesh; Sinha, C.; Sil, N. C.

    1991-08-01

    An approach has been developed to study the excitation of a ground-state H atom to the n=2 level under the simultaneous action of fast-electron impact and a monochromatic, linearly polarized, homogeneous laser beam. The laser frequency is assumed to be low (soft-photon limit) so that a stationary-state perturbation theory can be applied as is done in the adiabatic theory. An elegant method has been developed in the present work to construct the dressed excited-state wave functions of the H atom using first-order perturbation theory in the parabolic coordinate representation. By virtue of this method, the problem arising due to the degeneracy of the excited states of the H atom has been successfully overcome. The main advantage of the present approach is that the dressed wave function has been obtained in terms of a finite number of Laguerre polynomials instead of an infinite summation occurring in the usual perturbative treatment. The amplitude for direct excitation (without exchange) has been obtained in closed form. Numerical results for differential cross sections are presented for individual excitations to different Stark manifolds as well as for excitations to the n=2 level at high energies (100 and 200 eV) and for field directions both parallel and perpendicular to the incident electron momentum. Extension to a higher order of perturbation is also possible in the present approach for the construction of the dressed states, and the electron-exchange effect can also be taken into account without any further approximation.

  7. Development of an electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry procedure for direct measurements of arsenic in diluted serum.

    Swart, D J; Simeonsson, J B

    1999-11-01

    A procedure for the direct determination of arsenic in diluted serum by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS) is reported. Laser radiation needed to excite As at 193.696 and 197.197 nm is generated as the second anti-Stokes stimulated Raman scattering output of a frequency-doubled dye laser operating near 230.5 and 235.5 nm, respectively. Two different LEAFS schemes have been utilized and provide limits of detection of 200-300 fg for As in aqueous standards. When measurements of serum samples diluted 1:10 with deionized water are performed, a stable background signal is observed that can be accounted for by taking measurements with the laser tuned off-wavelength. No As is detected in any of the bovine or human serum samples analyzed. Measurements of 100 pg/mL standard additions of As to a diluted bovine serum sample utilizing either inorganic or organic As species demonstrate a linear relationship of the fluorescence signal to As spike concentration, but exhibit a sensitivity of approximately half that observed in pure aqueous standards. The limit of detection for As in 1:10 diluted serum samples is 65 pg/mL or 650 fg absolute mass, which corresponds to 0.65 ng/mL As in undiluted serum. To our knowledge, the ETA-LEAFS procedure is currently the only one capable of directly measuring As in diluted serum at these levels.

  8. Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET) Velocimetry in Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET), a non-seeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and non-reactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25-nm 100-fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 µJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and non-reactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities and further demonstrate the significantly less-intrusive nature of STARFLEET.

  9. Excitation of low-frequency residual currents at combination frequencies of an ionising two-colour laser pulse

    Vvedenskii, N. V.; Kostin, V. A.; Laryushin, I. D.; Silaev, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the processes of excitation of low-frequency residual currents in a plasma produced through ionisation of gases by two-colour laser pulses in laser-plasma schemes for THz generation. We have developed an analytical approach that allows one to find residual currents in the case when one of the components of a two-colour pulse is weak enough. The derived analytical expressions show that the effective generation of the residual current (and hence the effective THz generation) is possible if the ratio of the frequencies in the two-colour laser pulse is close to a rational fraction with a not very big odd sum of the numerator and denominator. The results of numerical calculations (including those based on the solution of the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation) agree well with the analytical results.

  10. Experimental test of a four-level kinetic model for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer dye lasers

    Costela, A; Munnoz, J M; Douhal, A; Figuera, J M; Acuna, A U [Inst. de Quimica Fisica ' ' Rocasolano' ' , C.S.I.C., Madrid (Spain)

    1989-11-01

    The nanosecond pulses of a dye laser oscillator based on the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer reaction (IPT) of salicylamide and 2'-hydroxylphenyl benzimidazole dyes have been studied as a function of several experimental parameters. To explain the operation of this laser a numerical four-level kinetic model was developed until the lasing properties of these dyes, in the presence of a variable oxygen concentration and pumped with a double pulse technique, could be reproduced. This was possible only by assuming that the efficiency of the laser is controlled by the absorption cross-section of a transient state with a lifetime in the nanosecond-picosecond range, which was tentatively identified as a ground state tautomeric species. (orig.).

  11. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: Excitation and Suppression of the Brain Waves by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS-team Team

    2017-10-01

    The novel study of the laser excitation-suppression of the brain waves is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated multi-photon fiber-laser interaction with the brain parvalbumin (PV) neurons. The repetition frequency matches the low frequency brain waves (5-100 Hz); enabling the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the PV neurons (the generators of the brain wave activity). The tunable fiber laser frequencies are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling the monitoring of the PV neuron-DNA, within the 10s of milliseconds. In medicine, the method can be used as an ``instantaneous-on-off anesthetic.'' Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  12. Studies on production of metastable core-excited atoms by laser-produced x-rays. Final report, 1 October 1984-30 September 1985

    Harris, S.E.; Young, J.F.

    1986-04-01

    The overall objective of the work on this program was to study methods for production of core-excited metastable atoms by laser-generated x-rays. We are interested in the spectroscopy of these levels, their autoionizing and radiative rates, and their metastability in the presence of hot electrons and ions. The concept of using x-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma to excite large densities of energetic excited levels in atoms and ions has been thoroughly experimentally investigated using modest, 100 mJ, plasma-producing lasers. One of the objectives of this work was to verify that these techniques could be scaled up to higher energies, such as 20 J. Thus a major effort this year has been devoted to the design and construction of the high energy (20 J) 1064 nm plasma-forming laser system and the tunable probe/transfer laser

  13. Method of mounting a fuel pellet in a laser-excited fusion reactor

    Hirsch, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for irradiating a target, wherein a single laser light beam from a source and a mirror close to the target are used with aperture means for directing laser light to interact with the target over a broad area of the surface, and for protecting the laser light source

  14. TRACE ANALYSIS BY LASER-EXCITED ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE WITH ATOMIZATION IN A PULSED PLASMA

    Lunyov , O.; Oshemkov , S.; Petrov , A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of plasma atomization for laser fluorescence trace analysis are discussed. Pulsed hot hollow cathode discharge was used for analysis of solutions and powdered samples. The high voltage spark and laser-induced breakdown (laser spark) were used as atomizers of metal-containing atmospheric aerosols. Detection limits were improved by means of temporal background selection.

  15. Ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). Applications in laser surgery, mass spectrometry and towards ultimate limits in biodiagnosis

    Ren, Ling

    2015-07-01

    The prospects for minimally invasive surgery, spatial imaging with mass spectrometry and rapid high throughput biodiagnosis require new means of tissue incision and biomolecule extraction with conserved molecular structure. Towards this aim, a laser ablation process is utilized in this dissertation, which is capable of performing precise tissue incision with minimal collateral damage and extracting intact biological entities with conserved biological functions. The method is based on the recently developed Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL) designed to excite selectively the water vibrational modes under the condition of ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). The basic concept is that the selectively excited water molecules act as propellant to ablate whole biological complexes into the plume, faster than any thermal deleterious effect or fragmentation that would mask molecular identities.The PIRL ablation under DIVE condition is applied for the first time to six types of ocular tissues, rendering precise and minimally invasive incisions in a well-controlled and reproducible way. An eminent demonstration is the contact-free and applanation-free corneal trephination with the PIRL. Mass spectrometry and other analytical techniques show that great abundance of proteins with various molecular weights are extracted from the tissue by the PIRL ablation, and that fragmentation or other chemical alternation does not occur to the proteins in the ablation plume. With various microscope imaging and biochemical analysis methods, nano-scale single protein molecules, viruses and cells in the ablation plume are found to be morphologically and functionally identical to their corresponding controls. The PIRL ablation provides a new means to push the frontiers of laser surgery in ophthalmology and can be applied to resolve chemical activities in situ and in vivo. The most important finding is the conserved nature of the extracted biological entities

  16. Ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). Applications in laser surgery, mass spectrometry and towards ultimate limits in biodiagnosis

    Ren, Ling

    2015-07-15

    The prospects for minimally invasive surgery, spatial imaging with mass spectrometry and rapid high throughput biodiagnosis require new means of tissue incision and biomolecule extraction with conserved molecular structure. Towards this aim, a laser ablation process is utilized in this dissertation, which is capable of performing precise tissue incision with minimal collateral damage and extracting intact biological entities with conserved biological functions. The method is based on the recently developed Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL) designed to excite selectively the water vibrational modes under the condition of ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). The basic concept is that the selectively excited water molecules act as propellant to ablate whole biological complexes into the plume, faster than any thermal deleterious effect or fragmentation that would mask molecular identities.The PIRL ablation under DIVE condition is applied for the first time to six types of ocular tissues, rendering precise and minimally invasive incisions in a well-controlled and reproducible way. An eminent demonstration is the contact-free and applanation-free corneal trephination with the PIRL. Mass spectrometry and other analytical techniques show that great abundance of proteins with various molecular weights are extracted from the tissue by the PIRL ablation, and that fragmentation or other chemical alternation does not occur to the proteins in the ablation plume. With various microscope imaging and biochemical analysis methods, nano-scale single protein molecules, viruses and cells in the ablation plume are found to be morphologically and functionally identical to their corresponding controls. The PIRL ablation provides a new means to push the frontiers of laser surgery in ophthalmology and can be applied to resolve chemical activities in situ and in vivo. The most important finding is the conserved nature of the extracted biological entities

  17. Evaluation of an inductively-coupled plasma with an extended-sleeve torch as an atomization cell for laser-excited fluorescence spectrometry.

    Kosinski, M A; Uchida, H; Winefordner, J D

    1983-05-01

    An inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) with an extended-sleeve torch has been evaluated as an atomization cell for laser-excited fluorescence spectrometry. Limits of detection for 20 lines are given. The detection power is almost equivalent to that obtained by excitation with a hollow-cathode lamp. Interelement effects and spectral interferences are discussed.

  18. Excitation two-center interference and the orbital geometry in laser-induced nonsequential double ionization of diatomic molecules

    Shaaran, T.; Augstein, B. B.; Figueira de Morisson Faria, C.

    2011-01-01

    We address the influence of the molecular orbital geometry and of the molecular alignment with respect to the laser-field polarization on laser-induced nonsequential double ionization of diatomic molecules for different molecular species, namely N 2 and Li 2 . We focus on the recollision excitation with subsequent tunneling ionization (RESI) mechanism, in which the first electron, upon return, promotes the second electron to an excited state, from where it subsequently tunnels. We assume that both electrons are initially in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and that the second electron is excited to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO). We show that the electron-momentum distributions exhibit interference maxima and minima due to the electron emission at spatially separated centers. We provide generalized analytical expressions for such maxima or minima, which take into account s-p mixing and the orbital geometry. The patterns caused by the two-center interference are sharpest for vanishing alignment angle and get washed out as this parameter increases. Apart from that, there exist features due to the geometry of the LUMO, which may be observed for a wide range of alignment angles. Such features manifest themselves as the suppression of probability density in specific momentum regions due to the shape of the LUMO wave function, or as an overall decrease in the RESI yield due to the presence of nodal planes.

  19. Even-parity resonances with synchrotron radiation from Laser Excited Lithium at 1s^22p State

    Huang, Ming-Tie; Wehlitz, Ralf

    2010-03-01

    Correlated many-body dynamics is still one of the unsolved fundamental problems in physics. Such correlation effects can be most clearly studied in processes involving single atoms for their simplicity.Lithium, being the simplest open shell atom, has been under a lot of study. Most of the studies focused on ground state lithium. However, only odd parity resonances can be populated through single photon (synchrotron radiation) absorption from ground state lithium (1s^22s). Lithium atoms, after being laser excited to the 1s^22p state, allow the study of even parity resonances. We have measured some of the even parity resonances of lithium for resonant energies below 64 eV. A single-mode diode laser is used to excite lithium from 1s^22s ground state to 1s^22p (^2P3/2) state. Photoions resulting from the interaction between the excited lithium and synchrotron radiation were analyzed and collected by an ion time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer with a Z- stack channel plate detector. The Li^+ ion yield was recorded while scanning the undulator along with the monochromator. The energy scans have been analyzed regarding resonance energies and parameters of the Fano profiles. Our results for the observed resonances will be presented.

  20. Cavitation and shock waves emission on the rigid boundary of water under mid-IR nanosecond laser pulse excitation

    Pushkin, A. V.; Bychkov, A. S.; Karabutov, A. A.; Potemkin, F. V.

    2018-06-01

    The processes of conversion of light energy into mechanical energy under mid-IR nanosecond laser excitation on a rigid boundary of water are investigated. Strong water absorption of Q-switched Cr:Yb:Ho:YSGG (2.85 µm, 6 mJ, 45 ns) laser radiation provides rapid energy deposition of ~8 kJ cm‑3 accompanied with strong mechanical transients. The evolution of shock waves and cavitation bubbles is studied using the technique of shadowgraphy and acoustic measurements, and the conversion efficiency into these energy channels for various laser fluence (0.75–2.0 J cm‑2) is calculated. For 6 mJ laser pulse with fluence of 2.0 J cm‑2, the conversion into shock wave energy reaches 67%. The major part of the shock wave energy (92%) is dissipated when the shock front travels the first 250 µm, and the remaining 8% is transferred to the acoustic far field. The calculated pressure in the vicinity of water-silicon interface is 0.9 GPa. Cavitation efficiency is significantly less and reaches up to 5% of the light energy. The results of the current study could be used in laser parameters optimization for micromachining and biological tissue ablation.

  1. Electron-spin polarization of photoions produced through photoionization from the laser-excited triplet state of Sr

    Yonekura, Nobuaki; Nakajima, Takashi; Matsuo, Yukari; Kobayashi, Tohru; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu

    2004-01-01

    We report the detailed experimental study on the production of electron-spin-polarized Sr + ions through one-photon resonant two-photon ionization via laser-excited 5s5p 3 P 1 (M J =+1) of Sr atoms produced by laser-ablation. We have experimentally confirmed that the use of laser-ablation for the production of Sr atoms prior to photoionization does not affect the electron-spin polarization. We have found that the degree of electron-spin polarization is 64±9%, which is in good agreement with our recent theoretical prediction. As we discuss in detail, we infer, from a simple analysis, that photoelectrons, being the counterpart of electron-spin-polarized Sr + ions, have approximately the same degree of electron-spin polarization. Our experimental results demonstrate that the combined use of laser-ablation technique and pulsed lasers for photoionization would be a compact and effective way to realize a pulsed source for spin-polarized ions and electrons for the studies of various spin-dependent dynamics in chemical physics

  2. Abnormal photothermal effect of laser radiation on highly defect oxide bronze nanoparticles under the sub-threshold excitation of absorption

    Gulyaev, P.; Kotvanova, M.; Omelchenko, A.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanism of abnormal photo-thermal effect of laser radiation on nanoparticles of oxide bronzes has been proposed in this paper. The basic features of the observed effect are: a) sub-threshold absorption of laser radiation by the excitation of donor-like levels formed in the energy gap due to superficial defects of the oxide bronze nano-crystals; b) an interband radiationless transition of energy of excitation on deep triplet levels and c) consequent recombination occurring at the plasmon absorption. K or Na atoms thermally intercalated to the octahedral crystal structure of TiO2 in the wave SHS combustion generate acceptor levels in the gap. The prepared oxide bronzes of the non-stoichiometric composition NaxTiO2 and KxTiO2 were examined by high resolution TEM, and then grinded in a planetary mill with powerful dispersion energy density up to 4000 J/g. This made it possible to obtain nanoparticles about 50 nm with high surface defect density (1017-1019 cm-2 at a depth of 10 nm). High photo-thermal effect of laser radiation on the defect nanocrystals observed after its impregnation into cartilaginous tissue exceeds 7 times in comparison with the intact ones.

  3. Remotely Exploring Deeper-Into-Matter by Non-Contact Detection of Audible Transients Excited by Laser Radiation

    Javier Moros

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic spectroscopic approach to detect contents within different packaging, with substantially wider applicability than other currently available subsurface spectroscopies, is presented. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG (neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet pulsed laser (13 ns pulse length operated at 1 Hz was used to generate the sound field of a two-component system at a distance of 50 cm. The acoustic emission was captured using a unidirectional microphone and analyzed in the frequency domain. The focused laser pulse hitting the system, with intensity above that necessary to ablate the irradiated surface, transferred an impulsive force which led the structure to vibrate. Acoustic airborne transients were directly radiated by the vibrating elastic structure of the outer component that excited the surrounding air in contact with. However, under boundary conditions, sound field is modulated by the inner component that modified the dynamical integrity of the system. Thus, the resulting frequency spectra are useful indicators of the concealed content that influences the contributions originating from the wall of the container. High-quality acoustic spectra could be recorded from a gas (air, liquid (water, and solid (sand placed inside opaque chemical-resistant polypropylene and stainless steel sample containers. Discussion about effects of laser excitation energy and sampling position on the acoustic emission events is reported. Acoustic spectroscopy may complement the other subsurface alternative spectroscopies, severely limited by their inherent optical requirements for numerous detection scenarios.

  4. Comparison of optical feedback dynamics of InAs/GaAs quantum-dot lasers emitting solely on ground or excited states.

    Lin, Lyu-Chih; Chen, Chih-Ying; Huang, Heming; Arsenijević, Dejan; Bimberg, Dieter; Grillot, Frédéric; Lin, Fan-Yi

    2018-01-15

    We experimentally compare the dynamics of InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers under optical feedback emitting exclusively on ground states (GSs) or excited states (ESs). By varying the feedback parameters and putting focus either on their short or long cavity regions, various periodic and chaotic oscillatory states are found. The GS laser is shown to be more resistant to feedback, benefiting from its strong relaxation oscillation damping. In contrast, the ES laser can easily be driven into complex dynamics. While the GS laser is of importance for the development of isolator-free transmitters, the ES laser is essential for applications taking advantages of chaos.

  5. State-selective imaging of cold atoms

    Sheludko, D.V.; Bell, S.C.; Anderson, R.; Hofmann, C.S.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; Scholten, R.E.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic coherence phenomena are usually investigated using single beam techniques without spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate state-selective imaging of cold 85Rb atoms in a three-level ladder system, where the atomic refractive index is sensitive to the quantum coherence state of the atoms. We

  6. Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy of rabbit nasal septal cartilage following Nd:YAG-laser-mediated stress relaxation

    Kim, Charlton C.; Wallace, Vincent P.; Coleno, Mariah L.; Dao, Xavier; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Wong, Brian J.

    2000-04-01

    Laser irradiation of hyaline cartilage result in stable shape changes due to temperature dependent stress relaxation. In this study, we determined the structural changes in chondrocytes within rabbit nasal septal cartilage tissue over a 12-day period using a two-photon laser scanning microscope (TPM) following Nd:YAG laser irradiation. During laser irradiation surface temperature, stress relaxation, and diffuse reflectance, were measured dynamically. Each specimen received one or two sequential laser exposures. The cartilage reached a peak surface temperature of about 61 degrees C during irradiation. Cartilage denatured in 50 percent EtOH was used as a positive control. TPM was performed to detect the fluorescence emission from the chondrocytes. Images of chondrocytes were obtained at depths up to 150 microns, immediately following laser exposure, and also following 12 days in culture. Few differences in the pattern or intensity of fluorescence was observed between controls and irradiated specimens imaged immediately following exposure, regardless of the number of laser pulses. However, following twelve days in tissue culture, the irradiated specimens increase, whereas the native tissue diminishes, in intensity and distribution of fluorescence in the cytoplasm. In contrast, the positive control shows only extracellular matrices and empty lacuna, feature consistent with cell membrane lysis.

  7. Efficient plasma and bubble generation underwater by an optimized laser excitation and its application for liquid analyses by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Lazic, Violeta; Jovicevic, Sonja; Fantoni, Roberta; Colao, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements were performed on bulk water solutions by applying a double-pulse excitation from a Q-Switched (QS) Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064 nm. In order to optimize the LIBS signal, laser pulse energies were varied through changing of the QS trigger delays with respect to the flash-lamp trigger. We had noted that reduction of the first pulse energy from 92 mJ to 72 mJ drastically improves the signal, although the second pulse energy was also lowered from 214 mJ to 144 mJ. With lower pulse energies, limit of detection (LOD) for Mg in pure water was reduced for one order of magnitude (34 ppb instead of 210 ppb). In order to explain such a phenomenon, we studied the dynamics of the gas bubble generated after the first laser pulse through measurements of the HeNe laser light scattered on the bubble. The influence of laser energy on underwater bubble and plasma formation and corresponding plasma emission intensity were also studied by photographic technique. From the results obtained, we conclude that the optimal first pulse energy should be kept close to the plasma elongation threshold, in our case about 65 mJ, where the gas bubble has its maximum lateral expansion and the secondary plasma is still well-localized. The importance of a multi-pulse sequence on the LIBS signal was also analyzed, where the pulse sequence after the first QS aperture was produced by operating the laser close to the lasing threshold, with the consequent generation of relaxation oscillations. Low-energy multi-pulses might keep the bubble expansion large prior to the probing pulse, but preventing the formation of secondary weak plasmas in multiple sites, which reduces the LIBS signal. The short interval between the pre-pulses and the probing pulse is another reason for the observed LIBS signal enhancement

  8. Two-photon excitation laser scanning microscopy of porcine nasal septal cartilage following Nd:YAG laser-mediated stress relaxation

    Kim, Charlton C.; Wallace, Vincent P.; Rasouli, Alexandre; Coleno, Mariah L.; Dao, Xavier; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Wong, Brian J.

    2000-05-01

    Laser irradiation of hyaline cartilage result in stable shape changes due to temperature dependent stress relaxation. In this study, we determined the structural changes in chondrocytes within porcine nasal septal cartilage tissue over a 4-day period using a two-photon laser scanning microscope (TPM) following Nd:YAG laser irradiation (lambda equals 1.32 micrometer) using parameters that result in mechanical stress relaxation (6.0 W, 5.4 mm spot diameter). TPM excitation (780 nm) result in induction of fluorescence from endogenous agents such as NADH, NADPH, and flavoproteins in the 400 - 500 nm spectral region. During laser irradiation diffuse reflectance (from a probe HeNe laser, (lambda) equals 632.8 nm), surface temperature, and stress relaxation were measured dynamically. Each specimen received one, two, or three sequential laser exposures (average irradiation times of 5, 6, and 8 seconds). The cartilage reached a peak surface temperature of about 70 degrees Celsius during irradiation. Cartilage denatured in 50% EtOH (20 minutes) was used as a positive control. TPM was performed using a mode-locked 780 nm Titanium:Sapphire (Ti:Al203) beam with a, 63X, 1.2 N.A. water immersion objective (working distance of 200 mm) to detect the fluorescence emission from the chondrocytes. Images of chondrocytes were obtained at depths up to 150 microns (lateral resolution equals 35 micrometer X 35 micrometer). Images were obtained immediately following laser exposure, and also after 4 days in culture. In both cases, the irradiated and non-irradiated specimens do not show any discernible difference in general shape or auto fluorescence. In contrast, positive controls (immersed in 50% ethanol), show markedly increased fluorescence relative to both the native and irradiated specimens, in the cytoplasmic region.

  9. Nuclear excitation via the motion of electrons in a strong laser field

    Berger, J.F.; Gogny, D.; Weiss, M.S.

    1987-12-01

    A method of switching from a nuclear isomeric state to a lasing state is examined. A semi-classical model of laser-electron-nuclear coupling is developed. In it the electrons are treated as free in the external field of the laser, but with initial conditions corresponding to their atomic orbits. Application is made to testing this model in 235 U and to the design criteria of a gamma-ray laser. 14 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Study of mode-converted and directly-excited ion Bernstein waves by CO2 laser scattering in Alcator C

    Takase, Y.; Fiore, C.L.; McDermott, F.S.; Moody, J.D.; Porkolab, M.; Shepard, T.; Squire, J.

    1987-01-01

    Mode-converted and directly excited ion Bernstein waves (IBW) were studied using CO 2 laser scattering in the Alcator C tokamak. During the ICRF fast wave heating experiments, mode-converted IBW was observed on the high-field side of the resonance in both second harmonic and minority heating regimes. By comparing the relative scattered powers from the two antennas separated by 180 0 toroidally, an increased toroidal wave damping with increasing density was inferred. In the IBW heating experiments, optimum direct excitation is obtained when an ion-cyclotron harmonic layer is located just behind the antenna. Wave absorption at the ω = 3Ω/sub D/ = 1.5Ω/sub H/ layer was directly observed. Edge ion heating was inferred from the IBW dispersion when this absorption layer was located in the plasma periphery, which may be responsible for the observed improvement in particle confinement

  11. Laser-excited luminescence of trace Nd3+ impurity in LaBr3 revealed by Raman spectroscopy

    Yu, Jinqiu; Cui, Lei; He, Huaqiang; Hu, Yunsheng; Wu, Hao; Zeng, Jia; Liu, Yuzhu

    2012-10-01

    Unexpected additional bands with obvious non-vibrational features were observed in Raman spectra of LaBr3. Extensive study was carried out to reveal the origin of these bands. Results indicate that the additional bands correspond to laser-excited luminescence of trace Nd3+ impurity unintentionally introduced from the La2O3 raw material, which was further confirmed by Raman spectra of specially prepared Nd3+-doped LaBr3 and LaOBr samples. The luminescence properties of Nd3+ in different matrix were compared and discussed. The ultrasensitivity of Raman spectroscopy in detecting trace luminescent lanthanide ions shows good potential for analytical applications.

  12. Application of laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation into atomic hydrogen density measurement in reactive plasmas

    Kajiwara, Toshinori; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Hee Je; Park, Won Zoo; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Density profiles of hydrogen atoms in reactive plasmas of hydrogen and methane gases were measured, for the first time, using the laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation of Lyman beta transition and observation at the Balmer alpha radiation. Absolute density determinations showed atomic densities of around 3 x 10 17 m -3 , or the degree of dissociation to be 10 -4 . Densities along the axis perpendicular to the RF electrode showed peaked profiles, which were due to the balance of atomic hydrogen production by electron impact on molecules against diffusion loss to the walls. (author)

  13. Isotopically selective RIMS of rare radionuclides by double-resonance excitation with cw lasers

    Bushaw, B.A.; Munley, J.T.

    1990-09-01

    Double-resonance, Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (RIMS) using two single-frequency dye lasers and a CO 2 laser for photoionization has been shown to be both extremely sensitive and highly selective. Measurements on the radioisotope 210 Pb have demonstrated optical selectivity in excess of 10 9 and detection limits of less than 1 femtogram

  14. Acoustic waves in transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser discharges: effect on performance and reduction techniques

    von Bergmann, HM

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented on the influence of acoustic waves on the performance of high-repetition-rate TEA CO2 lasers. It is shown that acoustic waves generated inside the laser cavity lead to nonuniform discharges, resulting in a deterioration...

  15. Excitation of plasmonic waves in metal-dielectric structures by a laser beam using holography principles

    Ignatov, A. I.; Merzlikin, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    A method for development of gratings for effective excitation of surface plasmonic waves using holography principles has been proposed and theoretically analyzed. For the case of a plasmonic wave in a dielectric layer on metal, the proposed volume hologram is 1.7 times more effective than the simple grating of slits in the dielectric layer with the optimized period and slits' width. The advantage of the hologram over the optimized grating is in the refractive index distribution that accounts phase relationships between an exciting and an excited waves more correctly. The proposed holographic method is universal. As expected, this can be extended for effective excitation of different types of optical surface waves and modes of optical waveguides.

  16. Using axicons for depth discrimination in excitation-emission laser scanning imaging systems

    Iglesias, Ignacio

    2017-10-01

    Besides generating good approximations to zero-order Bessel beams, an axicon lens coupled to a spatial filter can be used to collect light while preserving information on the depth coordinate of the source location. To demonstrate the principle, we describe an experimental excitation-emission fluorescence imaging system that uses an axicon twice: to generate an excitation Bessel beam and to collect the emitted light.

  17. Сomparative Analysis of 0.266 and 0.355 µm Fluorescence Excitation Wavelengths for Laser Fluores-Cence Monitoring of Oil Pollution Detection

    M. L. Belov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The on-line detection of pipeline spillage is really essential for the fast oil spill response to the ecological and economical consequences. However existing on-line pipelines spillage detection systems have a sensibility of 0.2 – 1 % of pipe flow and do not detect the smaller-sized spillages.For unpeopled or sparsely populated regions an advanced technique for detection of pipeline spillages (including low-intensity ones is to monitor oil pollution (petroleum spills on the earth surface along the pipeline using, for example, an air drone.The laser remote sensing method is an effective method to detect the pipelines spillage.The paper is dedicated to development of laser fluorescence detection method of oil pollution. The remote sensing laser method to monitor oil pollution is based on the fluorescence excitation of oil in UV spectral band and on the data record of the earth surface laser-induced fluorescence radiation.For laser fluorescence method of monitoring oil pollution the paper presents a comparative analysis  of 0.266 and 0.355 µm wavelengths of the fluorescence excitation in terms of earth atmosphere propagation, eye-safety, laser characteristics, and petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency.It is shown that in terms of eye-safety, laser characteristics, and propagation in the earth atmosphere a 0.355 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has a sure advantage.In the context of petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency a 0.266 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has the advantage, but this advantage depends heavily on the petroleum base. For low-sulfur (sweet oil for instance,  it is not that big.At large, in solving the task of oil pollution detection because of the oil pipeline spillages the 0.355 µm wavelength of fluorescence excitation ought to be preferable. However, when creating a monitoring system for the pipeline with a specific petroleum base the irreversible decision depends on the

  18. Probing defect states in polycrystalline GaN grown on Si(111) by sub-bandgap laser-excited scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Hsiao, F.-M.; Schnedler, M.; Portz, V.; Huang, Y.-C.; Huang, B.-C.; Shih, M.-C.; Chang, C.-W.; Tu, L.-W.; Eisele, H.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.; Chiu, Y.-P.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the potential of sub-bandgap laser-excited cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate the presence of defect states in semiconductors. The characterization method is illustrated on GaN layers grown on Si(111) substrates without intentional buffer layers. According to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, the GaN layers consist of nanoscale wurtzite and zincblende crystallites with varying crystal orientations and hence contain high defect state densities. In order to discriminate between band-to-band excitation and defect state excitations, we use sub-bandgap laser excitation. We probe a clear increase in the tunnel current at positive sample voltages during sub-bandgap laser illumination for the GaN layer with high defect density, but no effect is found for high quality GaN epitaxial layers. This demonstrates the excitation of free charge carriers at defect states. Thus, sub-bandgap laser-excited scanning tunneling spectroscopy is a powerful complimentary characterization tool for defect states.

  19. Comparison of laser diode response to pulsed electrical and radiative excitations

    Baggio, J.; Rainsant, J.M.; D'hose, C.; Lalande, P.; Musseau, O.; Leray, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have studied the electrical and optical response of two laser diodes under transient irradiation. Both diodes exhibit a positive photocurrent, which adds to the bias current, and a decrease of the optical power until extinction when dose rate is increased. Direct carrier generation in the laser cavity is a second order phenomena. The diode overall response is driven by both the substrate photocurrent and the transient conduction of current confinement regions, which decrease the net current density in the cavity and switches-off the laser emission. This behavior is in good agreement with pulsed electrical characterizations and 2D simulations

  20. Phased laser diode array permits selective excitation of ultrasonic guided waves in coated bone-mimicking tubes

    Moilanen, Petro; Salmi, Ari; Kilappa, Vantte; Zhao, Zuomin; Timonen, Jussi; Hæggström, Edward

    2017-10-01

    This paper validates simulation predictions, which state that specific modes could be enhanced in quantitative ultrasonic bone testing. Tunable selection of ultrasonic guided wave excitation is useful in non-destructive testing since it permits the mediation of energy into diagnostically useful modes while reducing the energy mediated into disturbing contributions. For instance, it is often challenging to distinguish and extract the useful modes from ultrasound signals measured in bone covered by a soft tissue. We show that a laser diode array can selectively excite ultrasound in bone mimicking phantoms. A fiber-coupled diode array (4 elements) illuminated two solid tubes (2-3 mm wall thickness) embraced by an opaque soft-tissue mimicking elastomer coating (5 mm thick). A predetermined time delay matching the selected mode and frequency was employed between the outputs of the elements. The generated ultrasound was detected by a 215 kHz piezo receiver. Our results suggest that this array reduces the disturbances caused by the elastomer cover and so pave way to permit non-contacting in vivo guided wave ultrasound assessment of human bones. The implementation is small, inexpensive, and robust in comparison with the conventional pulsed lasers.

  1. Magnon Accumulation by Clocked Laser Excitation as Source of Long-Range Spin Waves in Transparent Magnetic Films

    M. Jäckl

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Optical tools are promising for spin-wave generation because of the possibilities of ultrafast manipulation and local excitation. However, a single laser pulse can inject spin waves (SWs only with a broad frequency spectrum, resulting in short propagation distances and low wave amplitudes. Here, we excite a magnetic garnet film by a train of fs-laser pulses with a 1-GHz repetition rate so that the pulse separation is shorter than the decay time of magnetic modes, which allows us to achieve a collective impact on the magnetization and establish a quasistationary source of spin waves, namely, a coherent accumulation of magnons (“magnon cloud”. This approach has several appealing features: (i The magnon source is tunable, (ii the SW amplitude can be significantly enhanced, (iii the SW spectrum is quite narrow, providing long-distance propagation, (iv the periodic pumping results in an almost constant-in-time SW amplitude for the distances larger than 20  μm away from the source, and (v the SW emission shows pronounced directionality. These results expand the capabilities of ultrafast coherent optical control of magnetization and pave the way for applications in data processing, including the quantum regime. The quasistationary magnon accumulation might also be of interest for applications in magnon Bose-Einstein condensates.

  2. Imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry for determination of mercury in seawater.

    Le Bihan, Alain; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-06-15

    In this study, direct determination of mercury at the nanogram per liter level in the complex seawater matrix by imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ITR-ETA-LEAFS) is described. In the case of mercury, the use of a nonresonant line for fluorescence detection with only one laser excitation is not possible. For measurements at the 253.652 nm resonant line, scattering phenomena have been minimized by eliminating the simultaneous vaporization of salts and by using temporal resolution and the imaging mode of the camera. Electrothermal conditions (0.1 M oxalic acid as matrix modifier, low atomization temperature) have been optimized in order to suppress chemical interferences and to obtain a good separation of specific signal and seawater background signal. For ETA-LEAFS, a specific response has been obtained for Hg with the use of time resolution. Moreover, an important improvement of the detection limit has been obtained by selecting, from the furnace image, pixels collecting the lowest number of scattered photons. Using optimal experimental conditions, a detection limit of 10 ng L(-1) for 10 μL of sample, close to the lowest concentration level of total Hg in the open ocean, has been obtained.

  3. Semi-analytical fluid study of the laser wake field excitation in the strong intensity regime

    Jovanović, D., E-mail: djovanov@ipb.ac.rs [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Fedele, R., E-mail: renato.fedele@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Belić, M., E-mail: milivoj.belic@qatar.tamu.edu [Texas A & M University at Qatar, Doha (Qatar); De Nicola, S., E-mail: sergio.denicola@spin.cnr.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S' Angelo, Napoli (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the interaction of a multi-petawatt, pancake-shaped laser pulse with an unmagnetized plasma. The study has been performed in the ultrarelativistic regime of electron jitter velocities, in which the plasma electrons are almost completely expelled from the pulse region. The calculations are applied to a laser wake field acceleration scheme with specifications that may be available in the next generation of Ti:Sa lasers and with the use of recently developed pulse compression techniques. A set of novel nonlinear equations is derived using a three-timescale description, with an intermediate timescale associated with the nonlinear phase of the electromagnetic wave and with the spatial bending of its wave front. They describe, on an equal footing, both the strong and the moderate laser intensity regimes, pertinent to the core and to the edges of the pulse.

  4. Inertial displacement of a domain wall excited by ultra-short circularly polarized laser pulses

    Janda, Tomáš; Roy, P.E.; Otxoa, R.M.; Šobáň, Zbyněk; Ramsay, A.; Irvine, A.C.; Trojánek, F.; Surynek, M.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Němec, P.; Jungwirth, Tomáš; Wunderlich, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, May (2017), 1-7, č. článku 15226. ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015087; GA ČR GB14-37427G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 610115 - SC2 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : spintronics * domain walls Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  5. A pulsed oxygen - iodine chemical laser excited by a longitudinal electric discharge

    Vagin, Nikolai P; Yuryshev, Nikolai N

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of the energy parameters of an oxygen - iodine chemical laser with a bulk generation of iodine atoms in a longitudinal electric discharge on the length of the discharge gap is studied for various discharge energies and voltages and various working mixture compositions (at constant oxygen and iodine pressures). Analyses of the results suggests that temperature effects account for a twofold decrease in the specific energy yield for the lasing initiated by a longitudinal electric discharge compared to the photolytic initiation. (lasers)

  6. Optimal initiation of electronic excited state mediated intramolecular H-transfer in malonaldehyde by UV-laser pulses

    Nandipati, K. R.; Singh, H.; Nagaprasad Reddy, S.; Kumar, K. A.; Mahapatra, S.

    2014-12-01

    Optimally controlled initiation of intramolecular H-transfer in malonaldehyde is accomplished by designing a sequence of ultrashort (~80 fs) down-chirped pump-dump ultra violet (UV)-laser pulses through an optically bright electronic excited [ S 2 ( π π ∗)] state as a mediator. The sequence of such laser pulses is theoretically synthesized within the framework of optimal control theory (OCT) and employing the well-known pump-dump scheme of Tannor and Rice [D.J. Tannor, S.A. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 83, 5013 (1985)]. In the OCT, the control task is framed as the maximization of cost functional defined in terms of an objective function along with the constraints on the field intensity and system dynamics. The latter is monitored by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The initial guess, laser driven dynamics and the optimized pulse structure (i.e., the spectral content and temporal profile) followed by associated mechanism involved in fulfilling the control task are examined in detail and discussed. A comparative account of the dynamical outcomes within the Condon approximation for the transition dipole moment versus its more realistic value calculated ab initio is also presented.

  7. Resonance Raman scattering of β-carotene solution excited by visible laser beams into second singlet state.

    Lu, Luyao; Shi, Lingyan; Secor, Jeff; Alfano, Robert

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to use self-absorption correction to determine the Raman enhancement of β-carotene. The Raman spectra of β-carotene solutions were measured using 488nm, 514nm, 532nm and 633nm laser beams, which exhibited significant resonance Raman (RR) enhancement when the laser energy approaches the electronic transition energy from S 0 to S 2 state. The Raman intensity and the actual resonance Raman gain without self-absorption from S 2 state by β-carotene were also obtained to evaluate the effect of self-absorption on RR scattering. Moreover, we observed the Raman intensity strength followed the absorption spectra. Our study found that, although 488nm and 514nm pumps seemed better for stronger RR enhancement, 532nm would be the optimum Raman pump laser with moderate RR enhancement due to reduced fluorescence and self-absorption. The 532nm excitation will be helpful for applying resonance Raman spectroscopy to investigate biological molecules in tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of novel solvent extraction system by utilizing the metal ions excitation with ultraviolet pulse laser

    Saeki, Morihisa; Sasaki, Yuji; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Novel liquid-liquid extraction technique was developed using ultraviolet pulse laser. The liquid-liquid system was composed of pure water and the 1-octanol solution of EuCl 3 and TODGA (TODGA = N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-diglycolamide). The Eu 3+ ion, which was formed to be the Eu 3+ (TODGA) n complex in 1-octanol, was reduced to Eu 2+ by irradiation of fourth harmonic of Nd:YAG laser (266 nm). The Eu 2+ ion was stabilized by addition of 15-Crown-5 (15C5). The observation by in-situ emission spectroscopy showed that the Eu 2+ ion reduced by the 266 nm-laser irradiation resulted in back-extraction of Eu from the 1-octanol solution to the water. The emission spectrum observed in 1-octanol suggested the change from the Eu 3+ (TODGA) n to the Eu 2+ (15C5) m complex after the reduction by the 266 nm laser. Time dependence of the concentration of Eu 2+ (15C5) m was investigated at the aqueous phase, the organic one and their interface. The results suggest that (1) rapid formation of Eu 2+ (15C5) m in 1-octanol after the irradiation of the 266 nm laser, (2) slow diffusion of Eu 2+ (15C5) m in 1-octanol, and (3) existence of time-lag between the formation of Eu 2+ (15C5) m in 1-octanol and its back-extraction to the water. (author)

  9. Initial Atomic Motion Immediately Following Femtosecond-Laser Excitation in Phase-Change Materials.

    Matsubara, E; Okada, S; Ichitsubo, T; Kawaguchi, T; Hirata, A; Guan, P F; Tokuda, K; Tanimura, K; Matsunaga, T; Chen, M W; Yamada, N

    2016-09-23

    Despite the fact that phase-change materials are widely used for data storage, no consensus exists on the unique mechanism of their ultrafast phase change and its accompanied large and rapid optical change. By using the pump-probe observation method combining a femtosecond optical laser and an x-ray free-electron laser, we substantiate experimentally that, in both GeTe and Ge_{2}Sb_{2}Te_{5} crystals, rattling motion of mainly Ge atoms takes place with keeping the off-center position just after femtosecond-optical-laser irradiation, which eventually leads to a higher symmetry or disordered state. This very initial rattling motion in the undistorted lattice can be related to instantaneous optical change due to the loss of resonant bonding that characterizes GeTe-based phase change materials. Based on the amorphous structure derived by first-principles molecular dynamics simulation, we infer a plausible ultrafast amorphization mechanism via nonmelting.

  10. Table-top instrumentation for time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of solids excited by nanosecond pulse of soft X-ray source and/or UV laser

    Bruza, Petr; Fidler, Vlastimil; Nikl, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The practical applicability of the rare-earth doped scintillators in high-speed detectors is limited by the slow decay components in the temporal response of a scintillator. The study of origin and properties of material defects that induce the slow decay components is of major importance for the development of new scintillation materials. We present a table-top, time-domain UV-VIS luminescence spectrometer, featuring extended time and input sensitivity ranges and two excitation sources. The combination of both soft X-ray/XUV and UV excitation source allows the comparative measurements of luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of scintillators to be performed under the same experimental conditions. The luminescence of emission centers of a doped scintillator can be induced by conventional N 2 laser pulse, while the complete scintillation process can be initiated by a soft X-ray/XUV pulse excitation from the laser-produced plasma in gas puff target of 4 ns duration. In order to demonstrate the spectrometer, the UV-VIS luminescence spectra and decay kinetics of cerium doped Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 single crystal (LuAG:Ce) scintillator excited by XUV and UV radiation were acquired. Luminescence of the doped Ce 3+ ions was studied under 2.88 nm (430 eV) XUV excitation from the laser-produced nitrogen plasma, and compared with the luminescence under 337 nm (3.68 eV) UV excitation from nitrogen laser. In the former case the excitation energy is deposited in the LuAG host, while in the latter the 4f-5d 2 transition of Ce 3+ is directly excited. Furthermore, YAG:Ce and LuAG:Ce single crystals luminescence decay profiles are compared and discussed.

  11. A combined remote Raman and LIBS instrument for characterizing minerals with 532 nm laser excitation.

    Sharma, Shiv K; Misra, Anupam K; Lucey, Paul G; Lentz, Rachel C F

    2009-08-01

    The authors have developed an integrated remote Raman and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system for measuring both the Raman and LIBS spectra of minerals with a single 532 nm laser line of 35 mJ/pulse and 20 Hz. The instrument has been used for analyzing both Raman and LIBS spectra of carbonates, sulfates, hydrous and anhydrous silicates, and iron oxide minerals in air. These experiments demonstrate that by focusing a frequency-doubled 532 nm Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam with a 10x beam expander to a 529-microm diameter spot on a mineral surface located at 9 m, it is possible to measure simultaneously both the remote Raman and LIBS spectra of calcite, gypsum and olivine by adjusting the laser power electronically. The spectra of calcite, gypsum, and olivine contain fingerprint Raman lines; however, it was not possible to measure the remote Raman spectra of magnetite and hematite at 9 m because of strong absorption of 532 nm laser radiation and low intensities of Raman lines from these minerals. The remote LIBS spectra of both magnetite and hematite contain common iron emission lines but show difference in the minor amount of Li present in these two minerals. Remote Raman and LIBS spectra of a number of carbonates, sulfates, feldspars and phyllosilicates at a distance of 9 m were measured with a 532-nm laser operating at 35 mJ/pulse and by changing photon flux density at the sample by varying the spot diameter from 10 mm for Raman to 530 microm for LIBS measurements. The complementary nature of these spectra is highlighted and discussed. The combined Raman and LIBS system can also be re-configured to perform micro-Raman and micro-LIBS analyses, which have applications in trace/residue analysis and analysis of very small samples in the nano-gram range.

  12. High-resolution K-shell spectra from laser excited molybdenum plasmas

    Szabo C.I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available X-ray spectra from Molybdenum plasmas were recorded by a Cauchois-type cylindrically bent Transmission Crystal Spectrometer (TCS. The absolutely calibrated spectrometer provides an unprecedented resolution of inner shell transitions (K x-ray radiation. This tool allows us to resolve individual lines from different charge states existing inside the laser-produced plasma. The inner shell transitions from highly charged Molybdenum shown in this report have never been resolved before in such detail in a laser-produced plasma.

  13. Suppressed speckle contrast of blue light emission out of white lamp with phosphors excited by blue laser diodes for high-brightness lighting applications

    Kinoshita, Junichi; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Takeda, Yuji; Ueno, Misaki; Kawasaki, Yoji; Matsuba, Yoshiaki; Heike, Atsushi

    2012-11-01

    The speckle contrast of blue light emission out of high-brightness white lamps using phosphors excited by InGaN/GaN blue laser diodes is evaluated as a measure of coherence. As a result, speckle contrast of as low as 1.7%, the same level as a blue light emitting diode, is obtained. This implies that the original blue laser light can be converted into incoherent light through lamp structures without any dynamic mechanisms. This unique speckle-free performance is considered to be realized by multiple scattering inside the lamp structure, the multi-longitudinal mode operation of the blue laser diodes, and the use of multiple laser diodes. Such almost-incoherent white lamps can be applied for general lighting without any nuisance of speckle noise and should be categorized as lamps rather than lasers in terms of laser safety regulation.

  14. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation for detection of hydrogen atoms in a periphery region of high temperature plasmas

    Kim, Hee-Je; Kajiwara, Toshinori; Motoyama, Sumio; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo

    1989-01-01

    For measurements of atomic hydrogen density in the periphery region of high temperature plasmas, laser fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS) by two-photon excitation (1s-3s, 3d) was developed. Based upon the theoretical estimates for laser source requirements, which indicated the laser energy and spectral width to be more than 10 mJ (assuming the pulse duration of 10 ns) and several tens of picometers around the wavelength of 205.1 nm, respectively, the first Stokes generation in deuterium gas of ArF laser output was adopted and shown to have the necessary performance. Through the LFS experiment employing the laser source, the minimum detectable limit of atomic hydrogen, normalized by a laser power and an observing solid angle, was demonstrated to be 1 x 10 14 [m -3 · MW · sr], which is usually sufficient for the above purpose, and the accuracy of the density determination was shown to be within a factor 2. (author)

  15. TDDFT investigation of excitation of water tetramer under femtosecond laser pulse irradiation

    Wang, Zhiping; Xu, Xuefen; Zhang, Fengshou; Qian, Chaoyi

    2018-04-01

    We study the static properties of water tetramer in ground state, the optical absorption spectra and ultrafast nonadiabatic dynamical response of water tetramer to short and intense laser pulses with different intensities by a real-space, real-time implementation of time-dependent density functional theory coupled to molecular dynamics (TDDFT-MD) nonadiabatically. The calculated results are in good agreement with available values in literature. Four typical irradiated scenarios of water tetramer in laser field, which are “normal vibration,” “break and reorganization,” “fragmentation and new formation” and “pure fragmentation”, are explored by discussing the ionization, the bond lengths of OH bonds and hydrogen bonds and the kinetic energy of ions. The dynamic simulation shows that the reaction channel of water tetramer can really be controlled by choosing appropriate laser parameters referring to the optical absorption spectra and hydrogen ions play an important role in the reaction channel. Furthermore, it is found that the laser intensity affects the kinetic energy of ejected protons more than that of the remaining fragments and all dynamic processes are somehow directly related to the velocity of departing protons.

  16. Parametric Excitations of Fast Plasma Waves by Counter-propagating Laser Beams

    Shvets, G.; Fisch, N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Short- and long-wavelength plasma waves can become strongly coupled in the presence of two counter-propagating laser pump pulses detuned by twice the cold plasma frequency. What makes this four-wave interaction important is that the growth rate of the plasma waves occurs much faster than in the more obvious co-propagating geometry

  17. Detection and speciation of transuranium elements in synthetic groundwater via pulsed-laser excitation

    Beitz, J.V.; Bowers, D.L.; Doxtader, M.M.; Maroni, V.A.; Reed, D.T.

    1987-01-01

    High sensitivity methods for detection and speciation of complexed transuranium ions in synthetic basalt groundwater, and simplified analogs, are being developed which exploit advances in pulsed laser technology. The first demonstration of high sensitivity detection of a transuranium ion at temperatures significantly above ambient is reported using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). The existence of enhanced LPAS signal amplitudes with increasing temperature in aqueous solution is confirmed in LPAS spectra recorded at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using micromolar concentrations of /sup 241/Am/sup 3+/. A detection sensitivity of 8.5 parts per trillion (weight basis) of /sup 244/Cm/sup 3+/ in a simplified basalt groundwater at 22 C has been achieved using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF). This corresponds to 1 x 10/sup 8/ Cm/sup 3+/ ions in the laser beam. The detailed spectroscopic information obtained by this method points to the existence of previously unobserved Cm/sup 3+/ species. A brief assessment of the applicability and sensitivity of LPAS and LIF methods for speciating transuranium ions in near-neutral pH aqueous solution, such as the groundwater expected in a basalt nuclear waste repository, is presented. 27 refs., 3 figs

  18. A DC excited waveguide multibeam CO2 laser using high frequency ...

    High power industrial multibeam CO2 lasers consist of a large number of closely packed ... by producing pre-ionization using an auxiliary high frequency pulsed ... of few kilowatts output power, multibeam technique is used [2]. .... gas mixture of CO2, N2 and He enters in each discharge tube individually from .... Commercial.

  19. Problems of saturation of the excitation and creation of irreversible changes in solid after laser irradiation

    Sakhnyuk, L.A.; Trokhimchuck, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    The problem of modeling of processes of the irreversible interaction light and solid is discussed. This problem is connected with the processes of the saturation the excitation of respective scattering centers. The possible cascades of these processes are analyzed. The correlation between nonequilibrium and irreversible phenomena are analyzed. Two-dimensional sphalerite lattice of InSb was used for the kinetic modeling of the hierarchic processes of saturation of the excitation respective chemical bonds. The cascade characteristics of these processes were estimated for the cylindrical form of 'zone of energy scattering' of photon. The comparative analyses these results with results, which were received with the help straight method and method the spherical form of 'zone of energy scattering' of photon, is represented too. The good concordance of experimental and theoretical data was received. (authors)

  20. Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence and Ionization in a Graphite Furnace for the Determination of Metals and Nonmetals

    Butcher, David James

    1990-01-01

    Here is reported novel instrumentation for atomic spectrometry that combined the use of a pulsed laser system as the light source and an electrothermal atomizer as the atom cell. The main goal of the research was to develop instrumentation that was more sensitive for elemental analysis than commercially available instruments and could be used to determine elements in real sample matrices. Laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS) in an electrothermal atomizer (ETA) was compared to ETA atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for the determination of thallium, manganese, and lead in food and agricultural standard reference materials (SRMs). Compared to ETA AAS, ETA LEAFS has a longer linear dynamic range (LDR) (5-7 orders of magnitude compared to 2-3 orders of magnitude) and higher sensitivity (10 ^{-16} to 10^{ -14} g as compared to 10^{ -13} to 10^{-11} g). Consequently, ETA LEAFS allows elemental analysis to be done over a wider range of concentrations with less dilution steps. Thallium was accurately determined in biological samples by ETA LEAFS at amounts five to one hundred times below the ETA AAS detection limit. ETA AAS and ETA LEAFS were compared for the determination of lead and manganese, and in general, the accuracies and precisions of ETA AAS were the same, with typical precisions between 3% and 6%. Fluorine was determined using laser excited molecular fluorescence spectrometry (LEMOFS) in an ETA. Molecular fluorescence from magnesium fluoride was collected, and the detection limit of 0.3 pg fluorine was two to six orders of magnitude more sensitive than other methods commonly used for the determination of fluorine. Significant interferences from ions were observed, but the sensitivity was high enough that fluorine could be determined in freeze dried urine SRMs by diluting the samples by a factor of one hundred to remove the interferences. Laser enhanced ionization (LEI) in an ETA was used for the determination of metals. For thallium, indium

  1. State selective dynamics of molecules, clusters, and nanostructures

    John W. Keto

    2005-01-01

    Early objectives of this grant were: (1) Measure two-photon excitation of even parity excitons in liquid an solid xenon, (2) Study state-to-state energy transfer between two-photon laser excited states or rare-gas atoms to other rare has atoms, (3) study reactive half-collisions between xenon and chlorine leading to the XeCl* B state, (4) measure the spectra of ro-vibrational states of cluster ions and radicals formed in high-pressure discharges and to study their dynamics, (5) measure the surface and bulk electronic states of nanoparticles produced by a unique method of synthesis--laser ablation of microspheres (LAM). Using near-field and microluminescence techniques, we obtained spectra of single nanocrystals to compare with spectra obtained in a supersonic jet apparatus using resonance excitation followed by photoionization (REMPI) with time-of-flight mass analysis. These materials combine the functional advantages obtained from the size-tunable properties of nanocomposite materials with the fabrication and direct-write advantages of NPs manufactured by LAM. We demonstrated that CdSe nanoparticles produced by LAM were efficient fluorescers, even when deposited dry on sapphire substrates. Si nanoparticles were fluorescent when captured in ethylene glycol. We also obtained efficient fluorescence from Er doped phosphate glass nanoparticles which have application to gain waveguides in integrated optics or to nanoslush lasers. We used a femptosecond laser to study the nonlinear spectra of NC composites. We are currently measuring fluorescence and second and third-order susceptibilities of composites of Ag, Si, and GaN nanoparticles encapsulated within thin films of sapphire or SiO2

  2. State selective dynamics of molecules, clusters, and nanostructures

    Keto, John W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Early objectives of this grant were: (1) Measure two-photon excitation of even parity excitons in liquid an solid xenon, (2) Study state-to-state energy transver between two-photon laser excited states or rare-gas atoms to other rare has atoms, (3) study reactive half-collisions between xenon and chlorine leading to the XeCl* B state, (4) measure the spectra of ro-vibrational states of cluster ions and radicals formed in high-pressure discharges and to study their dynamics, (5) measure the surface and bulk electronic states of nanoparticles produced by a unique method of synthesis--laser ablation of microspheres (LAM). Using near-field and microluminescence techniques, we obtained spectra of single nanocrystals to compare with spectra obtained in a supersonic jet apparatus using resonance excitation followed by photoionization (REMPI) with time-of-flight mass analysis. These materials combine the functional advantages obtained from the size-tunable properties of nanocomposite materials with the fabrication and direct-write advantages of NPs manufactured by LAM. We demostrated that CdSe nanoparticles produced by LAM were efficiient fluorescers, even when deposited dry on sapphire substrates. Si nanoparticles were fluorescent when captured in ethylene glycol. We also obtiained efficient fluorescence from Er doped phosphate glass nanopartiicles which have application to gain wafeguides in integrated optics or to nanoslush lasers. We used a femptosecond laser to study the nonlinear spectra of NC composites. We are currently measuring fluorescence and second and third-order susceptibilities of composites of Ag, Si, and GaN nanoparticles encapsulated within thin films of sapphire or SiO 2.

  3. Photo excitation and laser detachment of C60 − anions in a storage ring

    Støchkel, Kristian; Andersen, Jens Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    (REMPED) has been repeated both at room temperature and with the trap cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. However, wavelength dependence of the overlap of the strongly focused laser beam with the ion beam introduces distortions of the absorption spectrum. We have therefore applied a new method......, combining the IR light with a slightly delayed, powerful UV pulse (266 nm). After absorption of three UV photons, the ions decay by delayed (thermal) electron emission, and time spectra are recorded for varying wavelength. The fraction of ions heated by absorption of a single IR photon is then extracted...... level, is much weaker in the new measurements and could be an H g vibrational sideband. Also earlier studies of direct laser detachment from C60 − in the storage ring ASTRID have been revisited, with ions cooled by liquid nitrogen in the ion trap. We confirm the previous measurement with a determination...

  4. Tunable organic distributed feedback dye laser device excited through Förster mechanism

    Tsutsumi, Naoto; Hinode, Taiki

    2017-03-01

    Tunable organic distributed feedback (DFB) dye laser performances are re-investigated and characterized. The slab-type waveguide DFB device consists of air/active layer/glass substrate. Active layer consisted of tris(8-quinolinolato)aluminum (Alq3), 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM) dye, and polystyrene (PS) matrix. Effective energy transfer from Alq3 to DCM through Förster mechanism enhances the laser emission. Slope efficiency in the range of 4.9 and 10% is observed at pump energy region higher than 0.10-0.15 mJ cm-2 (lower threshold), which is due to the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and lasing. Typical slope efficiency for lasing in the range of 2.0 and 3.0% is observed at pump energy region higher than 0.25-0.30 mJ cm-2 (higher threshold). The tuning wavelength for the laser emission is ranged from 620 to 645 nm depending on the ASE region.

  5. Determination of mercury in microwave-digested soil by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization.

    Pagano, S T; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1994-12-01

    A sample digestion procedure was developed which employs microwave heating of soil and sediment in concentrated nitric acid in a high-pressure closed vessel. Complete dissolution of mercury into the sample solution occurs within 5 min at 59 W/vessel without loss of analyte through overpressurization. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization (LEAFS-ETA) was used as the detection method. The scheme uses a two-step excitation, with lambda(1) = 253.7 nm and lambda(2) = 435.8 nm. Direct line fluorescence was measured at 546.2 nm. The absolute instrumental limit of detection was 14 fg; 1.4 pg/ml with a 10 mul sample injection. The recoveries of mercury in two spiked samples were 94 and 98%. The SRM 8406 (Mercury in River Sediment) was digested and analyzed for mercury, and the results (58.4 +/- 1.8 ng/g) agreed well with the reference value of 60 ng/g. The results obtained by LEAFS-ETA with microwave sample digestion are in good agreement with those found by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with EPA Series Method 245.5 sample digestion, which is one of the most commonly used methods for the determination of mercury in soil.

  6. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  7. Investigation of excited states populations density of Hall thruster plasma in three dimensions by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Krivoruchko, D. D.; Skrylev, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article deals with investigation of the excited states populations distribution of a low-temperature xenon plasma in the thruster with closed electron drift at 300 W operating conditions were investigated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) over the 350-1100 nm range. Seven xenon ions (Xe II) transitions were analyzed, while for neutral atoms (Xe I) just three transitions were explored, since the majority of Xe I emission falls into the ultraviolet or infrared part of the spectrum and are difficult to measure. The necessary spontaneous emission probabilities (Einstein coefficients) were calculated. Measurements of the excited state distribution were made for points (volume of about 12 mm3) all over the plane perpendicular to thruster axis in four positions on it (5, 10, 50 and 100 mm). Measured LIF signal intensity have differences for each location of researched point (due to anisotropy of thruster plume), however the structure of states populations distribution persisted at plume and is violated at the thruster exit plane and cathode area. Measured distributions show that for describing plasma of Hall thruster one needs to use a multilevel kinetic model, classic model can be used just for far plume region or for specific electron transitions.

  8. Investigations of the potential functions of weakly bound diatomic molecules and laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization

    Goble, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Three variations on the Dunham series expansion function of the potential of a diatomic molecule are compared. The differences among these expansions lie in the choice of the expansion variable, lambda. The functional form of these variables are lambda/sub s/ = l-r/sub e//r for the Simon-Parr-Finlan version, lambda/sub T/ - 1-(r/sub e//r)/sup p/ for that of Thakkar, and lambda/sub H/ = 1-exp(-rho(r/r/sub e/-1) for that of Huffaker. A wide selection of molecular systems are examined. It is found that, for potentials in excess of thirty kcal/mole, the Huffaker expansion provides the best description of the three, extrapolating at large internuclear separation to a value within 10% of the true dissociation energy. For potentials that result from the interaction of excited states, all series expansions show poor behavior away from the equilibrium internuclear separation of the molecule. The series representation of the potentials of weakly bound molecules are examined in more detail. The ground states of BeAr + , HeNe + , NaAr, and Ar 2 and the excited states of HeNe+, NaNe, and NaAr are best described by the Thakkar expansion. Finally, the observation of laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization in a flowing afterglow is reported. The reaction Ar( 3 P 2 ) + Ca + h nu → Ar + Ca + (5p 2 P/sub J/) + e - occurs when the photon energy, h nu, is approximately equal to the energy difference between the metastable argon and one of the fine structure levels of the ion's doublet. By monitoring the cascade fluorescence of the above reaction and comparing it to the flourescence from the field-free process Ar( 3 P 2 ) + Ca → Ar + Ca + (4p 2 P/sub J/) + e - a surprisingly large cross section of 6.7 x 10 3 A 2 is estimated

  9. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  10. Many-body effects in the gain spectra of highly excited quantum-dot lasers

    Schneider, H. C.; Chow, W. W.; Koch, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    Optical gain spectra are computed for quantum dots under high excitation conditions, where there is a non-negligible two-dimensional carrier density surrounding the dots. Using a screened Hartree-Fock theory to describe the influence of the Coulomb interaction, we find different self-energy shifts for the dot and quantum-well transitions. Furthermore, in contrast to the result for quantum-well and bulk systems, the peak gain at the quantum-dot transition computed including Coulomb effects is reduced from its free carrier value

  11. Comparison of various excitation and detection schemes for dye-doped polymeric whispering gallery mode micro-lasers.

    Siegle, Tobias; Kellerer, Jonas; Bonenberger, Marielle; Krämmer, Sarah; Klusmann, Carolin; Müller, Marius; Kalt, Heinz

    2018-02-05

    We compare different excitation and collection configurations based on free-space optics and evanescently coupled tapered fibers for both lasing and fluorescence emission from dye-doped doped polymeric whispering gallery mode (WGM) micro-disk lasers. The focus of the comparison is on the lasing threshold and efficiency of light collection. With the aid of optical fibers, we localize the pump energy to the cavity-mode volume and reduce the necessary pump energy to achieve lasing by two orders of magnitude. When using fibers for detection, the collection efficiency is enhanced by four orders of magnitude compared to a free-space read-out perpendicular to the resonator plane. By enhancing the collection efficiency we are able to record a pronounced modulation of the dye fluorescence under continuous wave (cw) pumping conditions evoked by coupling to the WGMs. Alternatively to fibers as a collection tool, we present a read-out technique based on the detection of in-plane radiated light. We show that this method is especially beneficial in an aqueous environment as well as for size-reduced micro-lasers where radiation is strongly pronounced. Furthermore, we show that this technique allows for the assignment of transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarization to the observed fundamental modes in a water environment by performing polarization-dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. We emphasize the importance of the polarization determination for sensing applications and verify expected differences in the bulk refractive index sensitivity for TE and TM WGMs experimentally.

  12. Laser-excited optical emission response of CdTe quantum dot/polymer nanocomposite under shock compression

    Xiao, Pan [LNM, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Kang, Zhitao; Summers, Christopher J. [Phosphor Technology Center of Excellence, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0826 (United States); Bansihev, Alexandr A.; Christensen, James M.; Dlott, Dana D. [School of Chemical Sciences and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Breidenich, Jennifer; Scripka, David A.; Thadhani, Naresh N. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Zhou, Min, E-mail: min.zhou@gatech.edu [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Laser-driven shock compression experiments and corresponding finite element method simulations are carried out to investigate the blueshift in the optical emission spectra under continuous laser excitation of a dilute composite consisting of 0.15% CdTe quantum dots by weight embedded in polyvinyl alcohol polymer. This material is a potential candidate for use as internal stress sensors. The analyses focus on the time histories of the wavelength blue-shift for shock loading with pressures up to 7.3 GPa. The combined measurements and calculations allow a relation between the wavelength blueshift and pressure for the loading conditions to be extracted. It is found that the blueshift first increases with pressure to a maximum and subsequently decreases with pressure. This trend is different from the monotonic increase of blueshift with pressure observed under conditions of quasistatic hydrostatic compression. Additionally, the blueshift in the shock experiments is much smaller than that in hydrostatic experiments at the same pressure levels. The differences in responses are attributed to the different stress states achieved in the shock and hydrostatic experiments and the time dependence of the mechanical response of the polymer in the composite. The findings offer a potential guide for the design and development of materials for internal stress sensors for shock conditions.

  13. Self-Resonant Plasma Wake-Field Excitation by a Laser-Pulse with a Steep Leading-Edge for Particle-Acceleration

    Goloviznin, V. V.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    The self-modulational instability of a relatively long laser pulse with a power close to or less than the critical power for relativistic self-focusing in plasma is considered. Strong wake-field excitation occurs as the result of a correlated transverse and longitudinal evolution of the pulse. The

  14. Fluorescence from gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a near-UV dye laser. [Decay time,quenching rate,room temperature

    Benetti, P [Pavia Univ. (Italy); Cubeddu, R; Sacchi, C A; Svelto, O; Zaraga, F [Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    1976-06-01

    Preliminary data are reported on the visible fluorescence of gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a dye laser at 374 nm. A decay time of 500 ns at p = 0 and a quenching rate of 5.7 x 10/sup -12/cm/sup 3/molec/sup -1/s/sup -1/ have been measured at room temperature.

  15. Laser-Excited Luminescent Tracers for Planar Concentration Measurements in Gaseous Jets

    Lozano, Antonio

    Tracers currently used in planar laser-induced fluorescence concentration measurements are not ideal for some experimental conditions, e.g., non-reacting turbulent gaseous flows at standard temperature and pressure. In this work, a number of chemicals have been evaluated, through consideration of their physical and photophysical properties, for use as luminescent concentration markers in turbulent gaseous flows. Two selected substances, biacetyl and acetone, have been studied in more detail. Acetone PLIF concentration images have been acquired in a non-reacting air jet, and the results have been compared to similar images obtained seeding with biacetyl. Acetone has proven to be a superior tracer when imaging fluorescence emission. Acetone has also been used as a fuel marker in hydrogen and methane diffusion flames. This single -laser technique enables simultaneous recording of the acetone and OH fluorescence emissions, as well as Mie scattering from ambient air dust particles. Acetone-sensitized, collisionally-induced biacetyl phosphorescence has been used to visualize molecular mixing in gaseous flows. Initial attempts to produce quantitative results with this method through simultaneous imaging of acetone fluorescence and collisionally-induced biacetyl emission, are described. Using laser-induced biacetyl phosphorescence imaging, a data set of cross-cut concentration images has been acquired in a nitrogen coflowing jet (Re = 5,000). The images have been statistically analyzed. Very simple models of the instantaneous concentration profile have been compared to the experimental data. Of all the tested models, a paraboloid has resulted to be the best approximation to the instantaneous 2-D profile. Finally, an experiment to study jet mixing in crossflow using acetone PLIF imaging has been designed. The flow facility has been constructed, and preliminary images obtained with a high quantum efficiency, thinned CCD detector have revealed the presence of jet structures

  16. Special Features of the Optical Absorption and Photoconductivity of Indium Monoselenide Upon Laser Excitation

    Kyazym-Zade, A. G.; Salmanov, V. M.; Guseinov, A. G.; Mamedov, R. M.; Salmanova, A. A.; Akhmedova, F. Sh.

    2018-02-01

    The successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method is used to prepare InSe thin films and InSe nanoparticles. Shapes and sizes of the obtained nanoparticles are investigated using a scanning electron microscope and an atomic force microscope. The main parameters of the examined structures, nanoparticle sizes (4-20 nm), and band gap ( E g = 1.60 eV) for nanoparticles with the least sizes are determined. Superfast (1.5·10-8 s) photocurrent relaxation and stimulated emission with line half-width of 8 Å have been observed upon exposure to laser radiation.

  17. Laser-induced gratings in the gas phase excited via Raman-active transitions

    Kozlov, D N [General Physics Inst., Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bombach, R; Hemmerling, B; Hubschmid, W [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    We report on a new time resolved coherent Raman technique that is based on the generation of thermal gratings following a population change among molecular levels induced by stimulated Raman pumping. This is achieved by spatially and temporally overlapping intensity interference patterns generated independently by two lasers. When this technique is used in carbon dioxide, employing transitions which belong to the Q-branches of the {nu}{sub 1}/2{nu}{sub 2} Fermi dyad, it is possible to investigate molecular energy transfer processes. (author) 2 figs., 10 refs.

  18. [Cleavage of DNA fragments induced by UV nanosecond laser excitation at 193 nm].

    Vtiurina, N N; Grokhovskiĭ, S L; Filimonov, I V; Medvedkov, O I; Nechipurenko, D Iu; Vasil'ev, S A; Nechipurenko, Iu D

    2011-01-01

    The cleavage of dsDNA fragments in aqueous solution after irradiation with UV laser pulses at 193 nm has been studied. Samples were investigated using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The intensity of damage of particular phosphodiester bond after hot alkali treatment was shown to depend on the base pair sequence. It was established that the probability of cleavage is twice higher for sites of DNA containing two or more successively running guanine residues. A possible mechanism of damage to the DNA molecule connected with the migration of holes along the helix is discussed.

  19. High excitation of the species in nitrogen–aluminum plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance microwave discharge of N2 gas and pulsed laser ablation of Al target

    Liang, Peipei; Li, Yanli; Cai, Hua; You, Qinghu; Yang, Xu; Huang, Feiling; Sun, Jian; Xu, Ning; Wu, Jiada

    2014-01-01

    A reactive nitrogen–aluminum plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge of N 2 gas and pulsed laser ablation of an Al target is characterized spectroscopically by time-integrated and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The vibrational and rotational temperatures of N 2 species are determined by spectral simulation. The generated plasma strongly emits radiation from a variety of excited species including ambient nitrogen and ablated aluminum and exhibits unique features in optical emission and temperature evolution compared with the plasmas generated by a pure ECR discharge or by the expansion of the ablation plume. The working N 2 gas is first excited by ECR discharge and the excitation of nitrogen is further enhanced due to the fast expansion of the aluminum plume induced by target ablation, while the excitation of the ablated aluminum is prolonged during the plume expansion in the ECR nitrogen plasma, resulting in the formation of strongly reactive nitrogen–aluminum plasma which contains highly excited species with high vibrational and rotational temperatures. The enhanced intensities and the prolonged duration of the optical emissions of the combined plasma would provide an improved analytical capability for spectrochemical analysis. - Highlights: • ECR discharge and pulsed laser ablation generate highly excited ECR–PLA plasma. • The expansion of PLA plasma results in excitation enhancement of ECR plasma species. • The ECR plasma leads to excitation prolongation of PLA plasma species. • The ECR–PLA plasma emits strong emissions from a variety of excited species. • The ECR–PLA plasma maintains high vibrational–rotational temperatures for a long time

  20. Sampling system for pulsed signals. Study of the radioactive lifetimes of excited 32P1/2 and 32P3/2 states of Na, excited by a tunable dye laser

    Thomas, P.; Campos, J.

    1979-01-01

    A system for sampling and averaging repetitive signals in the order of nanoseconds is discussed. The system uses as storage memory a multichannel analyzer operating in multi scaling mode. This instrument is employed for the measurement of atomic level lifetimes using a dye laser to excite the atoms and is applied to the study of lifetimes of the 3 2 P1/2 and 3 2 P3/2 states of sodium. (Author) 32 refs

  1. Fruit-Enhanced Resistance to Microbial Infection Induced by Selective Laser Excitation

    Alicia G. Gonzálvez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Table grapes were irradiated with laser pulses at two different wavelengths: one selected at 302.1 nm, that is, resonant with the transresveratrol biphoton absorption band, and another selected at 300 nm, that is a nonresonant wavelength where trans-resveratrol two-photon absorption is negligible. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic analyses of the irradiated grapes' skin showed an enhancement of polyphenols' content when the resonant wavelength was employed. Furthermore, microbiological analysis performed with nontreated (control, nonresonant, and resonantly irradiated grapes demonstrated how the last samples developed a significantly lower number of colony forming units. Since the only difference between the two (resonant and nonresonant irradiation conditions was just a couple of nanometres in the employed UV-B laser wavelengths, the germicidal effect should be considered very similar. As a result, the observed difference in the table grape resistance to microbial infection was attributed to a wavelength-dependent-induced photochemistry. Finally, the potentiality of this method to enhance the postharvest health status of table grapes is remarked.

  2. Excitation mechanisms in 1 mJ picosecond laser induced low pressure He plasma and the resulting spectral quality enhancement

    Idris, Nasrullah; Lahna, Kurnia; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Ramli, Muliadi [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, NAD (Indonesia); Suyanto, Hery [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Udayana University, Kampus Bukit Jimbaran, Denpasar 80361, Bali (Indonesia); Marpaung, Alion Mangasi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Jakarta State University, 10 Rawamangun, Jakarta (Indonesia); Pardede, Marincan [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M.H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Village, Tangerang 15811 (Indonesia); Jobiliong, Eric [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Pelita Harapan, 1100 M.H. Thamrin Boulevard, Lippo Village, Tangerang 15811 (Indonesia); Hedwig, Rinda; Lie, Zener Sukra [Department of Computer Engineering, Bina Nusantara University, 9 K.H. Syahdan, Jakarta 14810 (Indonesia); Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40/80 Srengseng Raya, Jakarta 11630 (Indonesia); Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha [Research Center for Physics, Indonesia Institute of Sciences, Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314, Banten (Indonesia); Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik, E-mail: kurnia18@cbn.net.id [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40/80 Srengseng Raya, Jakarta 11630 (Indonesia); Kagawa, Kiichiro [Fukui Science Education Academy, Takagi Chuou 2 choume, Fukui 910-0804 (Japan); Tjia, May On [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40/80 Srengseng Raya, Jakarta 11630 (Indonesia); Physics of Magnetism and Photonics Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, 10 Ganesha, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-06-14

    We report in this paper the results of an experimental study on the spectral and dynamical characteristics of plasma emission induced by 1 mJ picoseconds (ps) Nd-YAG laser using spatially resolved imaging and time resolved measurement of the emission intensities of copper sample. This study has provided the experimental evidence concerning the dynamical characteristics of the excitation mechanisms in various stages of the plasma formation, which largely consolidate the basic scenarios of excitation processes commonly accepted so far. However, it is also clearly shown that the duration of the shock wave excitation process induced by ps laser pulses is much shorter than those observed in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy employing nanosecond laser at higher output energy. This allows the detection of atomic emission due exclusively to He assisted excitation in low pressure He plasma by proper gating of the detection time. Furthermore, the triplet excited state associated with He I 587.6 nm is shown to be the one most likely involved in the process responsible for the excellent spectral quality as evidenced by its application to spectrochemical analysis of a number of samples. The use of very low energy laser pulses also leads to minimal destructive effect marked by the resulted craters of merely about 10 μm diameter and only 10 nm deep. It is especially noteworthy that the excellent emission spectrum of deuterium detected from D-doped titanium sample is free of spectral interference from the undesirable ubiquitous water molecules without a precleaning procedure as applied previously and yielding an impressive detection limit of less than 10 μg/g. Finally, the result of this study also shows a promising application to depth profiling of impurity distribution in the sample investigated.

  3. Numerical study on the selective excitation of Helmholtz-Gauss beams in end-pumped solid-state digital lasers with the control of the laser gain transverse position provided by off-axis end pumping

    Tsai, Ko-Fan; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2018-03-01

    This study proposes a complete and unified method for selective excitation of any specified nearly nondiffracting Helmholtz-Gauss (HzG) beam in end-pumped solid-state digital lasers. Four types of the HzG beams: cosine-Gauss beams, Bessel-Gauss beams, Mathieu-Gauss beams, and, in particular, parabolic-Gauss beams are successfully demonstrated to be generated with the proposed methods. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, parabolic-Gauss beams have not yet been directly generated from any kind of laser system. The numerical results of this study show that one can successfully achieve any lasing HzG beams directly from the solid-state digital lasers with only added control of the laser gain transverse position provided by off-axis end pumping. This study also presents a practical digital laser set-up for easily manipulating off-axis pumping in order to achieve the control of the laser gain transverse gain position in digital lasers. The reported results in this study provide advancement of digital lasers in dynamically generating nondiffracting beams. The control of the digital laser cavity gain position creates the possibility of achieving real-time selection of more laser modes in digital lasers, and it is worth further investigation in the future.

  4. Hydrogen atom excitation in intense attosecond laser field: Gauge dependence of dipole approximation

    Aldarmaa, Ch., E-mail: aldaraa2004@yahoo.com, E-mail: l-xemee@yahoo.com; Khenmedekh, L., E-mail: aldaraa2004@yahoo.com, E-mail: l-xemee@yahoo.com [Theoretical Physics and Simulation Group, School of Materials Technology, MUST (Mongolia); Lkhagva, O. [School of Physics and Electronics, NUM (Mongolia)

    2014-03-24

    It is assumed that, the atomic excitations probability can be calculated using first order perturbation theory and dipole approximations. The validity of the dipole approximations had been examined by comparing the results with the results obtained by exact calculations within the first order perturbation theory[2]. Figure 1 shows the time dependence of the transition probability in the dipole approximation. From these plots it is obvious that, the probabilities obtained in the length gauge are higher than that in the velocity gauge, in the interaction period (−τ/2

  5. Excitation and deexcitation of the Si-H stretching mode in a Si:H with picosecond free electron laser pulses

    Xu, Z.; Fauchet, M.; Rella, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen in amorphous and crystalline silicon has been the topic of intense theoretical and experimental investigations for more than one decade. To better understand how the Si-H bonds interact with the Si matrix and how they can be broken, it would be useful to excite selectively these bonds and monitor the energy flow from the Si-H bonds into the bulk Si modes. One attractive way of exciting the Si-H modes selectively is with an infrared laser tuned to a Si-H vibrational mode. Unfortunately, up to now, this type of experiment had not been possible because of the lack of a laser producing intense, ultrashort pulses that are tunable in the mid infrared. In this presentation, we report the first measurement where a 1 picosecond long laser pulse was used to excite the Si-H stretching modes near 2000 cm -1 and another identical laser pulse was used to measure the deexcitation from that specific vibrational mode. The laser was the Stanford free electron laser generating ∼1 ps-long pulses, tunable in the 5 μm region and focussed to an intensity of ∼1 GW/cm 2 . The pump-probe measurements were performed in transmission at room temperature on several 2 μm thick a-Si:H films deposited on c-Si. Samples with predominant Si-H 1 modes, predominant Si-H n>1 modes and with a mixture of modes were prepared. The laser was tuned on resonance with either of these modes. Immediately after excitation, we observe a bleaching of the infrared absorption, which can be attributed to excitation of the Si-H mode. Beaching is expected since, as a result of anharmonicity, the detuning between the (E 3 - E 2 ) resonance and the (E 2 - E 1 ) resonance is larger than the laser bandwidth. Note that despite the anharmonicity, it should be possible to climb the vibrational ladder due to power broadening

  6. Influence of excited state spatial distributions on plasma diagnostics: Atmospheric pressure laser-induced He-H2 plasma

    Monfared, Shabnam K.; Hüwel, Lutz

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas in helium-hydrogen mixtures with H2 molar concentrations ranging from 0.13% to 19.7% were investigated at times from 1 to 25 μs after formation by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Spatially integrated electron density values are obtained using time resolved optical emission spectroscopic techniques. Depending on mixture concentration and delay time, electron densities vary from almost 1017 cm-3 to about 1014 cm-3. Helium based results agree reasonably well with each other, as do values extracted from the Hα and Hβ emission lines. However, in particular for delays up to about 7 μs and in mixtures with less than 1% hydrogen, large discrepancies are observed between results obtained from the two species. Differences decrease with increasing hydrogen partial pressure and/or increasing delay time. In mixtures with molecular hydrogen fraction of 7% or more, all methods yield electron densities that are in good agreement. These findings seemingly contradict the well-established idea that addition of small amounts of hydrogen for diagnostic purposes does not perturb the plasma. Using Abel inversion analysis of the experimental data and a semi-empirical numerical model, we demonstrate that the major part of the detected discrepancies can be traced to differences in the spatial distributions of excited helium and hydrogen neutrals. The model yields spatially resolved emission intensities and electron density profiles that are in qualitative agreement with experiment. For the test case of a 1% H2 mixture at 5 μs delay, our model suggests that high electron temperatures cause an elevated degree of ionization and thus a reduction of excited hydrogen concentration relative to that of helium near the plasma center. As a result, spatially integrated analysis of hydrogen emission lines leads to oversampling of the plasma perimeter and thus to lower electron density values compared to those obtained from helium lines.

  7. Measurements of excited-state-to-excited-state transition probabilities and photoionization cross-sections using laser-induced fluorescence and photoionization signals

    Shah, M.L.; Sahoo, A.C.; Pulhani, A.K.; Gupta, G.P.; Dikshit, B.; Bhatia, M.S.; Suri, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced photoionization and fluorescence signals were simultaneously observed in atomic samarium using Nd:YAG-pumped dye lasers. Two-color, three-photon photoionization and two-color fluorescence signals were recorded simultaneously as a function of the second-step laser power for two photoionization pathways. The density matrix formalism has been employed to analyze these signals. Two-color laser-induced fluorescence signal depends on the laser powers used for the first and second-step transitions as well as the first and second-step transition probability whereas two-color, three-photon photoionization signal depends on the third-step transition cross-section at the second-step laser wavelength along with the laser powers and transition probability for the first and second-step transitions. Two-color laser-induced fluorescence was used to measure the second-step transition probability. The second-step transition probability obtained was used to infer the photoionization cross-section. Thus, the methodology combining two-color, three-photon photoionization and two-color fluorescence signals in a single experiment has been established for the first time to measure the second-step transition probability as well as the photoionization cross-section. - Highlights: • Laser-induced photoionization and fluorescence signals have been simultaneously observed. • The density matrix formalism has been employed to analyze these signals. • Two-color laser-induced fluorescence was used to measure the second-step transition probability. • The second-step transition probability obtained was used to infer the photoionization cross-section. • Transition probability and photoionization cross-section have been measured in a single experiment

  8. Studies on the optogalvanic effect and isotope-selective excitation of ytterbium in a hollow cathode discharge lamp using a pulsed dye laser.

    Kumar, Pankaj; Kumar, Jitendra; Prakash, Om; Saini, Vinod K; Dixit, Sudhir K; Nakhe, Shankar V

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents studies on the pulsed optogalvanic effect and isotope-selective excitation of Yb 555.648 nm (0 cm(-1) → 17 992.007 cm(-1)) and 581.067 nm (17 992.007 cm(-1) → 35 196.98 cm(-1)) transitions, in a Yb/Ne hollow cathode lamp. The Yb atoms were excited by narrow linewidth (500-1000 MHz) Rh110 and Rh6G dye based pulsed lasers. Optogalvanic signal inversion for ground state transition at 555.648 nm was observed beyond a hollow cathode discharge current of 8.5 mA, in contrast to normal optogalvanic signal at 581.067 nm up to maximum current of 14 mA. The isotope-selective excitation studies of Yb were carried out by recording Doppler limited optogalvanic signals as a function of dye laser wavelength. For the 581.067 nm transition, three even isotopes, (172)Yb, (174)Yb, and (176)Yb, and one odd isotope, (171)Yb, were clearly resolved. These data were compared with selective isotope excitation by 10 MHz linewidth continuous-wave dye laser. For 555.648 nm transition, isotopes were not clearly resolved, although isotope peaks of low modulation were observed.

  9. Studies on linear, nonlinear optical and excited state dynamics of silicon nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser ablation

    Syed Hamad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report results from our studies on the fabrication and characterization of silicon (Si nanoparticles (NPs and nanostructures (NSs achieved through the ablation of Si target in four different liquids using ∼2 picosecond (ps pulses. The consequence of using different liquid media on the ablation of Si target was investigated by studying the surface morphology along with material composition of Si based NPs. The recorded mean sizes of these NPs were ∼9.5 nm, ∼37 nm, ∼45 nm and ∼42 nm obtained in acetone, water, dichloromethane (DCM and chloroform, respectively. The generated NPs were characterized by selected area electron diffraction (SAED, high resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM, Raman spectroscopic techniques and Photoluminescence (PL studies. SAED, HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy data confirmed that the material composition was Si NPs in acetone, Si/SiO2 NPs in water, Si-C NPs in DCM and Si-C NPs in chloroform and all of them were confirmed to be polycrystalline in nature. Surface morphological information of the fabricated Si substrates was obtained using the field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM technique. FESEM data revealed the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS for the case of ablation in acetone and water while random NSs were observed for the case of ablation in DCM and chloroform. Femtosecond (fs nonlinear optical properties and excited state dynamics of these colloidal Si NPs were investigated using the Z-scan and pump-probe techniques with ∼150 fs (100 MHz and ∼70 fs (1 kHz laser pulses, respectively. The fs pump-probe data obtained at 600 nm consisted of single and double exponential decays which were tentatively assigned to electron-electron collisional relaxation (1 ps. Large third order optical nonlinearities (∼10−14 e.s.u. for these colloids have been estimated from Z-scan data at an excitation wavelength of 680 nm suggesting that the colloidal Si NPs find

  10. Studies on linear, nonlinear optical and excited state dynamics of silicon nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser ablation

    Hamad, Syed; Nageswara Rao, S. V. S.; Pathak, A. P. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046, Telangana (India); Krishna Podagatlapalli, G.; Mounika, R.; Venugopal Rao, S., E-mail: soma-venu@yahoo.com, E-mail: soma-venu@uohyd.ac.in [Advanced Center of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046, Telangana (India)

    2015-12-15

    We report results from our studies on the fabrication and characterization of silicon (Si) nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures (NSs) achieved through the ablation of Si target in four different liquids using ∼2 picosecond (ps) pulses. The consequence of using different liquid media on the ablation of Si target was investigated by studying the surface morphology along with material composition of Si based NPs. The recorded mean sizes of these NPs were ∼9.5 nm, ∼37 nm, ∼45 nm and ∼42 nm obtained in acetone, water, dichloromethane (DCM) and chloroform, respectively. The generated NPs were characterized by selected area electron diffraction (SAED), high resolution transmission microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopic techniques and Photoluminescence (PL) studies. SAED, HRTEM and Raman spectroscopy data confirmed that the material composition was Si NPs in acetone, Si/SiO{sub 2} NPs in water, Si-C NPs in DCM and Si-C NPs in chloroform and all of them were confirmed to be polycrystalline in nature. Surface morphological information of the fabricated Si substrates was obtained using the field emission scanning electron microscopic (FESEM) technique. FESEM data revealed the formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) for the case of ablation in acetone and water while random NSs were observed for the case of ablation in DCM and chloroform. Femtosecond (fs) nonlinear optical properties and excited state dynamics of these colloidal Si NPs were investigated using the Z-scan and pump-probe techniques with ∼150 fs (100 MHz) and ∼70 fs (1 kHz) laser pulses, respectively. The fs pump-probe data obtained at 600 nm consisted of single and double exponential decays which were tentatively assigned to electron-electron collisional relaxation (<1 ps) and non-radiative transitions (>1 ps). Large third order optical nonlinearities (∼10{sup −14} e.s.u.) for these colloids have been estimated from Z-scan data at an excitation wavelength of 680 nm

  11. Dental hard tissue modification and removal using sealed transverse excited atmospheric-pressure lasers operating at lambda=9.6 and 10.6 um

    Fried, Daniel; Ragadio, Jerome N.; Akrivou, Maria; Featherstone, John D.; Murray, Michael W.; Dickenson, Kevin M.

    2001-04-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have been shown to be effective for both removal and modification of dental hard tissue for the treatment of dental caries. In this study, sealed transverse excited atmospheric pressure (TEA) laser systems optimally tuned to the highly absorbed 9.6 micrometers wavelength were investigated for application on dental hard tissue. Conventional TEA lasers produce an initial high energy spike at the beginning of the laser pulse of submicrosecond duration followed by a long tail of about 1 - 4 microsecond(s) . The pulse duration is well matched to the 1 - 2 microsecond(s) thermal relaxation time of the deposited laser energy at 9.6 micrometers and effectively heats the enamel to the temperatures required for surface modification at absorbed fluences of less than 0.5 J/cm2. Thus, the heat deposition in the tooth and the corresponding risk of pulpal necrosis from excessive heat accumulation is minimized. At higher fluences, the high peak power of the laser pulse rapidly initiates a plasma that markedly reduces the ablation rate and efficiency, severely limiting applicability for hard tissue ablation. By lengthening the laser pulse to reduce the energy distributed in the initial high energy spike, the plasma threshold can be raised sufficiently to increase the ablation rate by an order of magnitude. This results in a practical and efficient CO2 laser system for caries ablation and surface modification.

  12. Photoionization and trans-to-cis isomerization of β-cyclodextrin-encapsulated azobenzene induced by two-color two-laser-pulse excitation.

    Takeshita, Tatsuya; Hara, Michihiro

    2018-03-15

    Azobenzene (1) and the complex resulting from the incorporation of 1 with cyclodextrin (1/CD) are attractive for light-driven applications such as micromachining and chemical biology tools. The highly sensitive photoresponse of 1 is crucial for light-driven applications containing both 1 and 1/CD to reach their full potential. In this study, we investigated the photoionization and trans-to-cis isomerization of 1/CD induced by one- and two-color two-laser pulse excitation. Photoionization of 1/CD, which was induced by stepwise two-photon absorption, was observed using laser pulse excitation at 266nm. Additionally, simultaneous irradiation with 266 and 532nm laser pulses increased the trans-to-cis isomerization yield (Υ t→c ) by 27%. It was concluded that the increase in Υ t→c was caused by the occurrence of trans-to-cis isomerization in the higher-energy singlet state (S n ), which was reached by S 1 →S n transition induced by laser pulse excitation at 532nm. The results of this study are potentially applicable in light-driven applications such as micromachining and chemical biology tools. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of multi-step excitation schemes for detection of actinides and lanthanides in solutions by luminescence/chemiluminescence laser spectroscopy

    Izosimov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot Curie 6, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    The use of laser radiation with tunable wavelength allows the selective excitation of actinide/lanthanide species with subsequent registration of luminescence/chemiluminescence for their detection. This work is devoted to applications of the time-resolved laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy and time-resolved laser-induced chemiluminescence spectroscopy for the detection of lanthanides and actinides. Results of the experiments on U, Eu, and Sm detection by TRLIF (Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence) method in blood plasma and urine are presented. Data on luminol chemiluminescence in solutions containing Sm(III), U(IV), and Pu(IV) are analyzed. It is shown that appropriate selectivity of lanthanide/actinide detection can be reached when chemiluminescence is initiated by transitions within 4f- or 5f-electron shell of lanthanide/actinide ions corresponding to the visible spectral range. In this case chemiluminescence of chemiluminogen (luminol) arises when the ion of f element is excited by multi-quantum absorption of visible light. The multi-photon scheme of chemiluminescence excitation makes chemiluminescence not only a highly sensitive but also a highly selective tool for the detection of lanthanide/actinide species in solutions. (author)

  14. Investigations of the potential functions of weakly bound diatomic molecules and laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization

    Goble, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Three variations on the Dunham series expansion function of the potential of a diatomic molecule are compared. The differences among these expansions lie in the choice of the expansion variable, lambda. The functional form of these variables are lambda/sub s/ = l-r/sub e//r for the Simon-Parr-Finlan version, lambda/sub T/ - 1-(r/sub e//r)/sup p/ for that of Thakkar, and lambda/sub H/ = 1-exp(-rho(r/r/sub e/-1) for that of Huffaker. A wide selection of molecular systems are examined. It is found that, for potentials in excess of thirty kcal/mole, the Huffaker expansion provides the best description of the three, extrapolating at large internuclear separation to a value within 10% of the true dissociation energy. For potentials that result from the interaction of excited states, all series expansions show poor behavior away from the equilibrium internuclear separation of the molecule. The series representation of the potentials of weakly bound molecules are examined in more detail. The ground states of BeAr/sup +/, HeNe/sup +/, NaAr, and Ar/sub 2/ and the excited states of HeNe+, NaNe, and NaAr are best described by the Thakkar expansion. Finally, the observation of laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization in a flowing afterglow is reported. The reaction Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca + h nu ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(5p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ occurs when the photon energy, h nu, is approximately equal to the energy difference between the metastable argon and one of the fine structure levels of the ion's doublet. By monitoring the cascade fluorescence of the above reaction and comparing it to the flourescence from the field-free process Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(4p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ a surprisingly large cross section of 6.7 x 10/sup 3/ A/sup 2/ is estimated.

  15. Energy relaxation in IR laser excited Hg{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Te

    Storebo, A K; Brudevoll, T [FFI - Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, PO Box 25, NO-2027 Kjeller, Norway NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) (Norway); Olsen, O; Norum, O C [Department of Physics and Department of Electronics and Telecommunications NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Breivik, M, E-mail: asta-katrine.storebo@ffi.n [Department of Electronics and Telecommunications NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2009-11-15

    IR laser excitation of Hg{sub l-x}Cd{sub x}Te by low-fluence femtosecond and high fluence microsecond pulses was explored for the technologically important alloy fractions x {approx} 0.2 and x {approx} 0.28. We have used first principles (LAPW) electronic structure calculations and finite element modelling, supported by Monte Carlo simulation for the description of femtosecond pulse carrier relaxation and the transport parameters. Laser wavelengths considered were 6.4 - 10.6 {mu}m for x {approx} 0.2 and 3.8 - 4.8 {mu}m for x {approx} 0.28, with an incident 1 microsecond pulse fluence of 2 J/cm{sup 2}. Many energy transfer mechanisms are invoked due to the long timescales of the microsecond pulses, and a main challenge is therefore to elucidate how these interplay in situations away from thermal equilibrium. Mechanisms studied include one- and two-photon absorption (OPA and TPA) across the band gap, inter-valence band absorption (IVA) between light- and heavy hole bands, electron-hole recombination/impact ionization, band gap renormalisation, intra-band free carrier absorption (FCA), excess carrier temperatures, non-equilibrium phonon generation, and refractive index changes. In the high fluence case, lattice temperatures evolve considerably during the laser pulse in response to the heated carriers. The chosen photon energies lie just above the band gap at the starting lattice temperature of 77 K, and nonlinear effects therefore dominate as the material heats up and the band gap begins to exceed the photon energy. Because of the low photon energy we must rely on Auger recombination, inter-valence band absorption and free carrier absorption to heat the carrier plasma. Although some Hg{sub l-x}Cd{sub x}Te material parameters are now relatively well known, existing data for many of the processes are inadequate for cases far away from thermal equilibrium. Furthermore, the role of Auger recombination in relation to non-intrinsic recombination has been a matter of debate

  16. New technique for the direct analysis of food powders confined in a small hole using transversely excited atmospheric CO(2) laser-induced gas plasma.

    Khumaeni, Ali; Ramli, Muliadi; Deguchi, Yoji; Lee, Yong Inn; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2008-12-01

    Taking advantage of the differences between the interactions of transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) lasers with metal and with organic powder, a new technique for the direct analysis of food powder samples has been developed. In this technique, the powder samples were placed into a small hole with a diameter of 2 mm and a depth of 3 mm and covered by a metal mesh. The TEA CO(2) laser (1500 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the powder sample surfaces, passing through the metal mesh, at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen gas. It is hypothesized that the small hole functions to confine the powder particles and suppresses the blowing-off of sample, while the metal mesh works as the source of electrons to initiate the strong gas breakdown plasma. The confined powder particles are then ablated by laser irradiation and the ablated particles move into the strong gas breakdown plasma region to be atomized and excited; this method cannot be applied for the case of Nd:YAG lasers because in such case the metal mesh itself was ablated by the laser irradiation. A quantitative analysis of a milk powder sample containing different concentrations of Ca was successfully demonstrated, resulting in a good linear calibration curve with high precision.

  17. Cascade conical refraction for annular pumping of a vortex Nd:YAG laser and selective excitation of low- and high-order Laguerre–Gaussian modes

    Wu, Yongxiao; Wang, Zhongyang; Chen, Sanbin; Shirakwa, Akira; Ueda, Ken-ichi; Li, Jianlang

    2018-05-01

    We proposed an efficient and vortex Nd:YAG laser for selective lasing of low- and high-order vortex modes, in which multiple-ring pump light was originated from cascaded conical refraction of multiple biaxial crystals. In our proof of concept demonstration, we used two-crystal cascade conical refraction to generate two-ring pump light; the mutual intensity ratio and relative separation of the inner ring and outer ring were controlled by rotating the second biaxial crystal and by moving the imaging lens, respectively. As a result, we obtained selective excitation of Laguerre–Gaussian (LG01 and LG03) vortex modes in the end-pump Nd:YAG laser. For LG01-mode output, the laser power reached 439 mW with 52.5% slope efficiency; for LG03-mode output, the laser power reached 160 mW with 41.3% slope efficiency. Our results revealed that the multiple-ring pumping technique based on cascaded conical refraction would pave the way for realization of the efficient and switchable excitation of low- and high-order LG modes in an end-pumped solid-state laser.

  18. Mathematical simulation of the amplification of 1790-nm laser radiation in a nuclear-excited He - Ar plasma containing nanoclusters of uranium compounds

    Kosarev, V. A.; Kuznetsova, E. E.

    2014-02-01

    The possibility of applying dusty active media in nuclearpumped lasers has been considered. The amplification of 1790-nm radiation in a nuclear-excited dusty He - Ar plasma is studied by mathematical simulation. The influence of nanoclusters on the component composition of the medium and the kinetics of the processes occurring in it is analysed using a specially developed kinetic model, including 72 components and more than 400 reactions. An analysis of the results indicates that amplification can in principle be implemented in an active laser He - Ar medium containing 10-nm nanoclusters of metallic uranium and uranium dioxide.

  19. Electron-lattice energy relaxation in laser-excited thin-film Au-insulator heterostructures studied by ultrafast MeV electron diffraction.

    Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Shen, X; Zheng, Q; Chase, T; Coffee, R; Jerman, M; Li, R K; Ligges, M; Makasyuk, I; Mo, M; Reid, A H; Rethfeld, B; Vecchione, T; Weathersby, S P; Dürr, H A; Wang, X J

    2017-09-01

    We apply time-resolved MeV electron diffraction to study the electron-lattice energy relaxation in thin film Au-insulator heterostructures. Through precise measurements of the transient Debye-Waller-factor, the mean-square atomic displacement is directly determined, which allows to quantitatively follow the temporal evolution of the lattice temperature after short pulse laser excitation. Data obtained over an extended range of laser fluences reveal an increased relaxation rate when the film thickness is reduced or the Au-film is capped with an additional insulator top-layer. This behavior is attributed to a cross-interfacial coupling of excited electrons in the Au film to phonons in the adjacent insulator layer(s). Analysis of the data using the two-temperature-model taking explicitly into account the additional energy loss at the interface(s) allows to deduce the relative strength of the two relaxation channels.

  20. Depletion of the excited state population in negative ions using laser photodetachment in a gas-filled RF quadrupole ion guide

    Lindahl, A O; Hanstorp, D [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Forstner, O [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics, Universitaet Wien, Vienna (Austria); Gibson, N D [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Denison University, Granville, OH 43023 (United States); Gottwald, T; Wendt, K [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Havener, C C; Liu, Y, E-mail: Dag.Hanstorp@physics.gu.s [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6368 (United States)

    2010-06-14

    The depopulation of excited states in beams of negatively charged carbon and silicon ions was demonstrated using collisional detachment and laser photodetachment in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion guide filled with helium. The high-lying, loosely bound {sup 2}D excited state in C{sup -} was completely depleted through collisional detachment alone, which was quantitatively determined within 6%. For Si{sup -} the combined signal from the population in the {sup 2}P and {sup 2}D excited states was only partly depleted through collisions in the cooler. The loosely bound {sup 2}P state was likely to be completely depopulated, and the more tightly bound {sup 2}D state was partly depopulated through collisions. 98(2)% of the remaining {sup 2}D population was removed by photodetachment in the cooler using less than 2 W laser power. The total reduction of the excited population in Si{sup -}, including collisional detachment and photodetachment, was estimated to be 99(1)%. Employing this novel technique to produce a pure ground state negative ion beam offers possibilities of enhancing selectivity, as well as accuracy, in high-precision experiments on atomic as well as molecular negative ions.

  1. Magnetic field effects on ultrafast lattice compression dynamics of Si(111) crystal when excited by linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulses

    Hatanaka, Koji; Odaka, Hideho; Ono, Kimitoshi; Fukumura, Hiroshi

    2007-03-01

    Time-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements of Si (111) single crystal are performed when excited by linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulses (780 nm, 260 fs, negatively-chirped, 1 kHz) under a magnetic field (0.47 T). Laser fluence on the sample surface is 40 mJ/cm^2, which is enough lower than the ablation threshold at 200 mJ/cm^2. Probing X-ray pulses of iron characteristic X-ray lines at 0.193604 and 0.193998 nm are generated by focusing femtosecond laser pulses onto audio-cassette tapes in air. Linearly-polarized femtosecond laser pulse irradiation onto Si(111) crystal surface induces transient lattice compression in the picosecond time range, which is confirmed by transient angle shift of X-ray diffraction to higher angles. Little difference of compression dynamics is observed when the laser polarization is changed from p to s-pol. without a magnetic field. On the other hand, under a magnetic field, the lattice compression dynamics changes when the laser is p-polarized which is vertical to the magnetic field vector. These results may be assigned to photo-carrier formation and energy-band distortion.

  2. Comparison of dynamic properties of ground- and excited-state emission in p-doped InAs/GaAs quantum-dot lasers

    Arsenijević, D., E-mail: dejan@sol.physik.tu-berlin.de; Schliwa, A.; Schmeckebier, H.; Stubenrauch, M.; Spiegelberg, M.; Bimberg, D. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Mikhelashvili, V. [Department of Electrical Engineering and The Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Eisenstein, G. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Department of Electrical Engineering and The Russell Berrie Nanotechnology Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2014-05-05

    The dynamic properties of ground- and excited-state emission in InAs/GaAs quantum-dot lasers operating close to 1.31 μm are studied systematically. Under low bias conditions, such devices emit on the ground state, and switch to emission from the excited state under large drive currents. Modification of one facet reflectivity by deposition of a dichroic mirror yields emission at one of the two quantum-dot states under all bias conditions and enables to properly compare the dynamic properties of lasing from the two different initial states. The larger differential gain of the excited state, which follows from its larger degeneracy, as well as its somewhat smaller nonlinear gain compression results in largely improved modulation capabilities. We demonstrate maximum small-signal bandwidths of 10.51 GHz and 16.25 GHz for the ground and excited state, respectively, and correspondingly, large-signal digital modulation capabilities of 15 Gb/s and 22.5 Gb/s. For the excited state, the maximum error-free bit rate is 25 Gb/s.

  3. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra.

    Basavaraja, Jana; Suresh Kumar, H M; Inamdar, S R; Wari, M N

    2016-02-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of π→π⁎ transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (μ(e)). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (μ(e)) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Multi-Pulse Excitation for Underwater Analysis of Copper-Based Alloys Using a Novel Remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) System.

    Guirado, Salvador; Fortes, Francisco J; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the use of multi-pulse excitation has been evaluated as an effective solution to mitigate the preferential ablation of the most volatile elements, namely Sn, Pb, and Zn, observed during laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of copper-based alloys. The novel remote LIBS prototype used in this experiments featured both single-pulse (SP-LIBS) and multi-pulse excitation (MP-LIBS). The remote instrument is capable of performing chemical analysis of submersed materials up to a depth of 50 m. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis was performed at air pressure settings simulating the conditions during a real subsea analysis. A set of five certified bronze standards with variable concentration of Cu, As, Sn, Pb, and Zn were used. In SP-LIBS, signal emission is strongly sensitive to ambient pressure. In this case, fractionation effect was observed. Multi-pulse excitation circumvents the effect of pressure over the quantitative analysis, thus avoiding the fractionation phenomena observed in single pulse LIBS. The use of copper as internal standard minimizes matrix effects and discrepancies due to variation in ablated mass. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence on argon intermediate pressure microwave discharges : measuring the depopulation rates of the 4p and 5p excited levels as induced by electron and atom collisions

    Palomares Linares, J.M.; Graef, W.A.A.D.; Hubner, S.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar is explored by means of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) experiments using the combination of high rep-rate YAG–Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable surfatron induced plasma setup. The high rep-rate favors the photon

  6. Beam experiments with state selected Ne (3P0, 3P2) metastable atoms

    Verheijen, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Metastable rare gas atoms play an important role in all types of plasmas and gas discharges, e.g. in fluorescent lamps and in laser discharges (helium-neon laser or excimer lasers). In this thesis, the metastable states of NeI are studied. First, the theory of excited neon atoms and diatomic molecules is introduced, as well as Penning ionisation. Next, some experimental facilities are described (e.g. the dye laser system). With these instruments, natural lifetime measurements of the 2p fine structure states of NeI are carried out. Results are reported. Finally, total Penning ionisation cross sections are calculated using the optical potential model. (Auth.)

  7. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    Mahmoud S. Dawood

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  8. Research of the elastic waves generated by a pulse laser. Excitation mechanism of elastic waves and application to nondestructive testing; Pulse laser de reikishita danseiha ni kansuru kenkyu. Danseiha reiki no mechanism to hihakai kensa eno oyo

    Cho, H.; Takemoto, M. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Science and Engineering

    1994-07-20

    A bulk wave is generated when a pulse laser is irradiated to the material, and the characteristics of a Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio can be nondestructively estimated from the bulk wave. The generation mechanism of laser ultrasonic waves must be first clarified for such application. In this paper, fundamental research was conducted to study the generation mechanism of the elastic waves excited by a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, and the generation method and characteristics of Rayleigh waves. The following result was obtained. A bulk wave is generated by the disk-like adiabatic expansion near the surface if the laser power is small when a spot-shape pulse laser was irradiated. A bulk wave is generated by the thin disk-like adiabatic expansion beneath the surface due to the thermal diffusion in the depth direction of a base material when the laser power becomes large. Moreover, a bulk wave is generated by the impact force due to abrasion and plasma when the power becomes still larger. The information on the bulk wave characteristics and Rayleigh wave was also obtained. 25 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Comparative study of Nd:YAG laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser-induced gas plasma spectroscopy on chromated copper arsenate preservative-treated wood.

    Khumaeni, Ali; Lie, Zener Sukra; Niki, Hideaki; Lee, Yong Inn; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Wakasugi, Motoomi; Takahashi, Touru; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2012-03-01

    Taking advantage of the specific characteristics of a transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) laser, a sophisticated technique for the analysis of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in wood samples has been developed. In this study, a CCA-treated wood sample with a dimension of 20 mm × 20 mm and a thickness of 2 mm was attached in contact to a nickel plate (20 mm × 20 mm × 0.15 mm), which functions as a subtarget. When the TEA CO(2) laser was successively irradiated onto the wood surface, a hole with a diameter of approximately 2.5 mm was produced inside the sample and the laser beam was directly impinged onto the metal subtarget. Strong and stable gas plasma with a very large diameter of approximately 10 mm was induced once the laser beam had directly struck the metal subtarget. This gas plasma then interacted with the fine particles of the sample inside the hole and finally the particles were effectively dissociated and excited in the gas plasma region. By using this technique, high precision and sensitive analysis of CCA-treated wood sample was realized. A linear calibration curve of Cr was successfully made using the CCA-treated wood sample. The detection limits of Cr, Cu, and As were estimated to be approximately 1, 2, and 15 mg/kg, respectively. In the case of standard LIBS using the Nd:YAG laser, the analytical intensities fluctuate and the detection limit was much lower at approximately one-tenth that of TEA CO(2) laser. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  10. Imaging ultrafast excited state pathways in transition metal complexes by X-ray transient absorption and scattering using X-ray free electron laser source

    Chen, Lin X; Shelby, Megan L; Lestrange, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    This report will describe our recent studies of transition metal complex structural dynamics on the fs and ps time scales using an X-ray free electron laser source, Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Ultrafast XANES spectra at the Ni K-edge of nickel(ii) tetramesitylporphyrin (NiTMP) were measured...... on the low-energy shoulder of the edge, which is aided by the computation of X-ray transitions for postulated excited electronic states. The observed and computed inner shell to valence orbital transition energies demonstrate and quantify the influence of the electronic configuration on specific metal...

  11. State-selective charge transfer cross sections for light ion impact of atomic hydrogen

    Schultz, D. R. [University of North Texas; Stancil, Phillip C. [University of Georgia, Athens; Havener, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the utility of diagnosing plasma properties such as impurity concentration and spatial distribution, and plasma temperature and rotation, by detection of photon emission following capture of electrons from atomic hydrogen to excited states of multiply charged ions, new calculations of state-selective charge transfer involving light ions have been carried out using the atomic orbital close-coupling and the classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods. By comparing these with results of other approaches applicable in a lower impact energy regime, and by benchmarking them using key experimental data, knowledge of the cross sections can be made available across the range parameters needed by fusion plasma diagnostics.

  12. Resonantly enhanced production of excited fragments of gaseous molecules following core-level excitation

    Chen, J.M.; Lu, K.T.; Lee, J.M.; Ho, S.C.; Chang, H.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    2005-01-01

    State-selective dissociation dynamics for the excited fragments of gaseous Si(CH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations have been investigated by resonant photoemission spectroscopy and dispersed UV/optical fluorescence spectroscopy. The main features in the gaseous Si(CH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 fluorescence spectrum are identified as the emission from excited Si*, Si + *, CH* and H*. The core-to-Rydberg excitations at both Si 2p and Cl 2p edges lead to a noteworthy production of not only the excited atomic fragments, neutral and ionic (Si*, Si + *) but also the excited diatomic fragments (CH*). In particular, the excited neutral atomic fragments Si* are significantly reinforced. The experimental results provide deeper insight into the state-selective dissociation dynamics for the excited fragments of molecules via core-level excitation

  13. Investigations on flexural wave propagation and attenuation in a modified one-dimensional acoustic black hole using a laser excitation technique

    Ji, Hongli; Luo, Jing; Qiu, Jinhao; Cheng, Li

    2018-05-01

    Acoustic Black Holes (ABHs), as a new type of passive structure for vibration damping enhancement and noise attenuation, have been drawing increasing attentions of many researchers. Due to the difficulty in manufacturing the sharp edges required by the ABH structures, it is important to understand the wave propagation and attenuation process in the presence of damping layers in non-ideal ABHs with a truncated edge. In this paper, an analytical expression of the wave reflection coefficient in a modified one-dimensional ABH is derived and a time-domain experimental method based on a laser excitation technique is used to visualize the wave propagation. In the experimental studies, the flexural waves in the ABH were excited by a scanning pulse laser and measured by a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV). The incident wave and reflected wave were separated from the measured original wave field and the decrease of the wave velocity in the ABH was exhibited. The reflection coefficient was calculated from the ratio of the amplitude of the reflected wave to that of the incident wave for different ABH parameters and different thicknesses of the damping layer. The measured reflection coefficients were used to identify the unknown coefficients in the theoretical formula. The results confirm that there exists an optimal thickness for the damping layer, which leads to the minimum wave reflection. Based on the laser-induced visualization technique and various signal processing and feature extraction methods, the entire process of the wave propagation in a non-ideal one-dimensional ABH structure can be visualized and scrutinized.

  14. Fluorescence excitation analysis by two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy: a new method to identify fluorescent nanoparticles on histological tissue sections

    Kahn E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Edmond Kahn,1 Nicolas Tissot,3 Perrine Frere,3 Aurélien Dauphin,3 Mohamed Boumhras,2,4 Claude-Marie Bachelet,3 Frédérique Frouin,1 Gérard Lizard21Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM U678/UMR-S UPMC, CHU Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France; 2Equipe Biochimie du Peroxysome, Inflammation et Métabolisme Lipidique EA7270, Faculté des Sciences Gabriel, Université de Bourgogne-INSERM Dijon, France; 3Plateforme d'Imagerie cellulaire, UPMC, Paris, France; 4Laboratory of Biochemistry and Neuroscience, Applied Toxicology Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, Settat, MoroccoAbstract: In the present study, we make use of the ability of two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSMs equipped with tunable lasers to produce spectral excitation image sequences. Furthermore, unmixing, which is usually performed on emission image sequences, is performed on these excitation image sequences. We use factor analysis of medical image sequences (FAMIS, which produces factor images, to unmix spectral image sequences of stained structures in tissue sections to provide images of characterized stained cellular structures. This new approach is applied to histological tissue sections of mouse aorta containing labeled iron nanoparticles stained with Texas Red and counterstained with SYTO13, to obtain visual information about the accumulation of these nanoparticles in the arterial wall. The possible presence of Texas Red is determined using a two-photon CLSM associated with FAMIS via the excitation spectra. Texas Red and SYTO13 are thus differentiated, and corresponding factor images specify their possible presence and cellular localization. In conclusion, the designed protocol shows that sequences of images obtained by excitation in a two-photon CLSM enables characterization of Texas Red-stained nanoparticles and other markers. This methodology offers an alternative and complementary solution to the conventional use of emission

  15. Ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion irradiation: Response of Gd 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 to intense electronic excitation

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Tracy, Cameron L.; Cusick, Alex B.; Abere, Michael J.; Torralva, Ben; Ewing, Rodney C.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2015-04-27

    In order to investigate the response of materials to extreme conditions, there are several approaches to depositing extremely high concentrations of energy into very small volumes of material, including ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. In this study, crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations in cubic Gd2O3 and monoclinic ZrO2 have been investigated using ultrafast laser irradiation. The phases produced by the extreme conditions of irradiation were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Gd2O3 exhibited a cubic-to-monoclinic phase transformation, as evidenced by the appearance of the monoclinic (40$\\bar{2}$), (003), (310), and (112$\\bar{2}$) peaks in the GIXRD pattern and of four Ag and three Bg Raman modes. ZrO2 underwent a monoclinic-to-tetragonal phase transformation, as evidenced by the emergence of the tetragonal (101) peak in the GIXRD pattern and of Eg and A1g Raman modes. The new phases formed by ultrafast laser irradiation are high temperature polymorphs of the two materials. No evidence of amorphization was seen in the GIXRD data, though Raman spectroscopy indicated point defect accumulation. These results are identical to those produced by irradiation with SHIs, which also deposit energy in materials primarily through electronic excitation. The similarity in damage process and material response between ultrafast laser and SHI irradiation suggests a fundamental relationship between these two techniques.

  16. A Raman spectroscopic study of organic matter in interplanetary dust particles and meteorites using multiple wavelength laser excitation

    Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate insoluble organic matter (IOM) from a range of chondritic meteorites, and a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Three monochromatic excitation wavelengths (473 nm, 514 nm, 632 nm) were applied sequentially to assess variations in meteorite and IDP Raman peak parameters (carbon D and G bands) as a function of excitation wavelength (i.e., dispersion). Greatest dispersion occurs in CVs > OCs > CMs > CRs with type 3 chondrites compared at diff...

  17. Experimental investigation of dissociation pathways of cooled HeH+ following valence electron excitation at 32 nm by intense free-electron-laser radiation

    Pedersen, H. B.; Lammich, L.; Domesle, C.; Jordon-Thaden, B.; Ullrich, J.; Wolf, A.; Heber, O.; Treusch, R.; Guerassimova, N.

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation pathways of HeH + have been investigated below the first ionization continuum by photoabsorption at 32 nm, using fragment momentum imaging in a crossed-beams experiment at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Investigations were done both for ions with several vibrational levels excited in the ion source and for ions vibrationally cooled in an electrostatic ion trap prior to the irradiation. The product channels He + (1s)+H(nl) and He(1snl)+H + were separated and the He(1snl)+H + channel was particularly studied by coincidence detection of the He and H + fragments on two separate fragment detectors. At 32 nm excitation, the branching ratio between the product channels was found to be σ He + +H /σ He+H + =0.96±0.11 for vibrationally hot and 1.70±0.48 for vibrationally cold ions. The spectra of kinetic energy releases for both channels revealed that photodissociation at 32 nm leads to high Rydberg states (n > or approx. 3-4) of the emerging atomic fragments irrespective of the initial vibrational excitation of HeH + . The fragment angular distributions showed that dissociation into the He+H + channel mostly (∼70%) proceeds through 1 Π states, while for the He + +H channel 1 Σ and 1 Π states are of about equal importance.

  18. Normal Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic experiments with thin layer chromatography spots of essential amino acids using different laser excitation sources

    István, Krisztina; Keresztury, Gábor; Szép, Andrea

    2003-06-01

    A comparative study of the feasibility and efficiency of Raman spectroscopic detection of thin layer chromatography (TLC) spots of some weak Raman scatterers (essential amino acids, namely, glycine and L-forms of alanine, serine, valine, proline, hydroxyproline, and phenylalanine) was carried out using four different visible and near-infrared (NIR) laser radiations with wavelengths of 532, 633, 785, and 1064 nm. Three types of commercial TLC plates were tested and the possibility of inducing surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by means of Ag-sol was also investigated. The spectra obtained from spotted analytes adsorbed on TLC plates were of very different quality strongly depending on the excitation wavelength, the wetness of the samples, and the compounds examined. The best results were obtained with the simple silica TLC plate, and it has been established that the longest wavelength (lowest energy) NIR excitation of a Nd:YAG laser is definitely more suitable for generating normal Raman scattering of analyte spots than any of the visible radiations. Concerning SERS with application of Ag-sol to the TLC spots, 1-3 orders of magnitude enhancement was observed with wet samples, the greatest with the 532 nm radiation and gradually smaller with the longer wavelength excitations. It is shown, however, that due to severe adsorption-induced spectral distortions and increased sensitivity to microscopic inhomogeneity of the sample, none of the SERS spectra obtained with the dispersive Raman microscope operating in the visible region were superior to the best NIR normal FT-Raman spectra, as far as sample identification is concerned.

  19. Femtosecond pulse laser notch shaping via fiber Bragg grating for the excitation source on the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Oh, Seung Ryeol; Kwon, Won Sik; Kim, Jin Hwan; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2015-03-01

    Single-pulse coherently controlled nonlinear Raman spectroscopy is the simplest method among the coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy systems. In recent research, it has been proven that notch-shaped femtosecond pulse laser can be used to collect the coherent anti-Stokes Raman signals. In this study, we applied a fiber Bragg grating to the notch filtering component on the femtosecond pulse lasers. The experiment was performed incorporating a titanium sapphire femtosecond pulse laser source with a 100 mm length of 780-HP fiber which is inscribed 30 mm of Bragg grating. The fiber Bragg grating has 785 nm Bragg wavelength with 0.9 nm bandwidth. We proved that if the pulse lasers have above a certain level of positive group delay dispersion, it is sufficient to propagate in the fiber Bragg grating without any spectral distortion. After passing through the fiber Bragg grating, the pulse laser is reflected on the chirped mirror for 40 times to make the transform-limited pulse. Finally, the pulse time duration was 37 fs, average power was 50mW, and showed an adequate notch shape. Furthermore, the simulation of third order polarization signal is performed using MATLAB tools and the simulation result shows that spectral characteristic and time duration of the pulse is sufficient to use as an excitation source for single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. In conclusion, the proposed method is more simple and cost-effective than the methods of previous research which use grating pairs and resonant photonic crystal slab.

  20. Low chromatic aberration hexapole for molecular state selection

    Ke, Yi; Deng, Xiao-Bing; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2016-01-01

    In molecular beam state-selection experiments, the electrostatic hexapole acts as an optical lens, imaging molecules from the source to the focus. The molecular longitudinal velocity spread induces the phenomenon of chromatic aberration, which will reduce the state-selection purity. We propose a scheme which can effectively reduce the chromatic aberration by changing the hexapole voltage operating manner. The hexapole is already charged before molecules arrive at the entrance of the hexapole. When molecules are completely inside the hexapole, the voltage is switched off rapidly at an appropriate time. In this manner, faster molecules travel a longer hexapole focusing region than slower molecules. Therefore the focusing positions of molecules with different velocities become close. Numerical trajectory simulations of molecular state selection are carried out, and the results show that this low chromatic aberration hexapole can significantly improve the state purity from 46.2% to 87.0%. (paper)

  1. Excited-state imaging of cold atoms

    Sheludko, D.V.; Bell, S.C.; Vredenbregt, E.J.D.; Scholten, R.E.; Deshmukh, P.C.; Chakraborty, P.; Williams, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated state-selective diffraction contrast imaging (DCI) of cold 85Rb atoms in the first excited (52P3/2) state. Excited-state DCI requires knowledge of the complex refractive index of the atom cloud, which was calculated numerically using a semi-classical model. The Autler-Townes

  2. Dynamical heat transport amplification in a far-field thermal transistor of VO{sub 2} excited with a laser of modulated intensity

    Ordonez-Miranda, Jose, E-mail: jose.ordonez@cnrs.pprime.fr; Ezzahri, Younès; Drevillon, Jérémie; Joulain, Karl [Institut Pprime, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ISAE-ENSMA, F-86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France)

    2016-05-28

    Far-field radiative heat transport in a thermal transistor made up of a vanadium dioxide base excited with a laser of modulated intensity is analytically studied and optimized. This is done by solving the equation of energy conservation for the steady-state and modulated components of the temperature and heat fluxes that the base exchanges with the collector and emitter. The thermal bistability of VO{sub 2} is used to find an explicit condition on the laser intensity required to maximize these heat fluxes to values higher than the incident flux. For a 1 μm-thick base heated with a modulation frequency of 0.5 Hz, it is shown that both the DC and AC components of the heat fluxes are about 4 times the laser intensity, while the AC temperature remains an order of magnitude smaller than the DC one at around 343 K. Higher AC heat fluxes are obtained for thinner bases and/or lower frequencies. Furthermore, we find that out of the bistability temperatures associated with the dielectric-to-metal and metal-to-dielectric transitions of VO{sub 2}, the amplification of the collector-to-base and base-to-emitter heat fluxes is still possible, but at modulation frequencies lower than 0.1 Hz.

  3. Laser isotope separation by selective excited state photochemistry. Annual progress report, March 31, 1976--February 28, 1977

    Zare, R.N.

    1977-03-01

    Experimental results are presented providing insight into the mechanisms of photochemical separation of Cd isotopes by selective excitation of ICl in the presence of halogenated olefins. The types of scrambling reactions that can be expected in isotope separation by scavenging are discussed along with strategies for minimizing such reactions. The experimental results are summarized and the reaction mechanisms are represented by graphic equations

  4. Observation of coherent optical phonons excited by femtosecond laser radiation in Sb films by ultrafast electron diffraction method

    Mironov, B. N.; Kompanets, V. O.; Aseev, S. A., E-mail: isanfemto@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation); Ischenko, A. A. [Moscow Technological University, Institute of High Chemical Technologies (Russian Federation); Kochikov, I. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Misochko, O. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation); Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The generation of coherent optical phonons in a polycrystalline antimony film sample has been investigated using femtosecond electron diffraction method. Phonon vibrations have been induced in the Sb sample by the main harmonic of a femtosecond Ti:Sa laser (λ = 800 nm) and probed by a pulsed ultrashort photoelectron beam synchronized with the pump laser. The diffraction patterns recorded at different times relative to the pump laser pulse display oscillations of electron diffraction intensity corresponding to the frequencies of vibrations of optical phonons: totally symmetric (A{sub 1g}) and twofold degenerate (E{sub g}) phonon modes. The frequencies that correspond to combinations of these phonon modes in the Sb sample have also been experimentally observed.

  5. 1 kHz 3.3 μm Nd:YAG KTiOAsO₄ optical parametric oscillator system for laser ultrasound excitation of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics.

    Puncken, Oliver; Gandara, David Mendoza; Damjanic, Marcin; Mahnke, Peter; Bergmann, Ralf B; Kalms, Michael; Peuser, Peter; Wessels, Peter; Neumann, Jörg; Schnars, Ulf

    2016-02-20

    We present a new laser prototype for laser ultrasonics excitation. The fundamental wavelength of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a repetition rate of 1 kHz is converted to 3.3 μm with a KTiOAsO4 optical parametric oscillator. The achieved pulse energy at 3.3 μm is 1.7 mJ, and the pulse duration at the fundamental wavelength of 1.06 μm has been measured to be 21 ns. The ultrasonic excitation efficiency is about 3.5 times better compared to the application of state-of-the-art CO2 lasers.

  6. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le; James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E.; Redding, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  7. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    Wang, Chuji [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 39759 (United States); Pan, Yong-Le, E-mail: yongle.pan.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Redding, Brandon [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  8. State selective reactions of cosmic dust analogues at cryogenic temperatures

    Perry, James Samuel Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) is the most abundant molecule in interstellar space. It is crucial for initiating all of the chemistry in the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and consequently plays an important role in star formation. However, the amount of H 2 believed to exist in the ISM cannot be accounted for by formation through gas-phase reactions alone. The current, widely accepted theory, is that H 2 forms on the surface of cosmic dust grains. These grains are thought to be composed of amorphous forms of carbon or silicates with temperatures of around 10 K. This thesis describes a new experiment that has been constructed to study H 2 formation on the surface of cosmic dust analogues and presents the initial experimental results. The experiment simulates, through ultra-high vacuum and the use of cryogenics, the conditions of the ISM where cosmic dust grains and H 2 molecules exist. During the experiment, a beam of atomic hydrogen is aimed at a cosmic dust analogue target. H 2 formed on the target's surface is ionised using a laser spectroscopy technique known as Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton lonisation (REMPI) and detected using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The sensitivity of REMPI is such that H 2 molecules can be ionised in selective internal energy states. This allows the rovibrational populations of the H 2 molecules desorbing from the cosmic dust targets to be determined, providing information on the energy budget of the H 2 formation process in the ISM. Preliminary results from the experiment show that H 2 molecules formed on a diamond-like-carbon surface have a significant non-thermal population of excited vibrational and rotational energy states. (author)

  9. Resonance laser-plasma excitation of coherent terahertz phonons in the bulk of fluorine-bearing crystals under high-intensity femtosecond laser irradiation

    Potemkin, F V; Mareev, E I [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khodakovskii, N G [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mikheev, P M

    2013-08-31

    The dynamics of coherent phonons in fluorine-containing crystals was investigated by pump-probe technique in the plasma production regime. Several phonon modes, whose frequencies are overtones of the 0.38-THz fundamental frequency, were simultaneously observed in a lithium fluoride crystal. Phonons with frequencies of 1 and 0.1 THz were discovered in a calcium fluoride crystal and coherent phonons with frequencies of 1 THz and 67 GHz were observed in a barium fluoride crystal. Furthermore, in the latter case the amplitudes of phonon mode oscillations were found to significantly increase 15 ps after laser irradiation. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  10. Laser induced transient absorptions of the excited triplet state of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate. A further study by 248 nm laser photolysis

    Ma Jianhua; Lin Weizheng; Wang Wenfen; Yao Side; Lin Nianyun

    1999-01-01

    Transient absorption spectrum of triplet state of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) in aqueous solution has been investigated using 248 nm (KrF) laser photolysis. A whole transient absorption spectrum with absorption maxim at 380 nm and 580 nm has been assigned to triple AQS from detailed kinetic analysis of decay of 380 nm and 580 nm signals, which is the neat characteristic absorption of triplet AQS reported for the first time. In addition, the difference in feature of the spectrum of triplet AQS in H 2 O and that in CH 3 CN was eliminated by further study using 248 nm laser pulses

  11. Ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion irradiation: Response of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} to intense electronic excitation

    Rittman, Dylan R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Tracy, Cameron L.; Cusick, Alex B.; Abere, Michael J.; Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ewing, Rodney C. [Department of Geological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    In order to investigate the response of materials to extreme conditions, there are several approaches to depositing extremely high concentrations of energy into very small volumes of material, including ultrafast laser and swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. In this study, crystalline-to-crystalline phase transformations in cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} have been investigated using ultrafast laser irradiation. The phases produced by the extreme conditions of irradiation were characterized by grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Raman spectroscopy. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited a cubic-to-monoclinic phase transformation, as evidenced by the appearance of the monoclinic (402{sup ¯}), (003), (310), and (112{sup ¯}) peaks in the GIXRD pattern and of four A{sub g} and three B{sub g} Raman modes. ZrO{sub 2} underwent a monoclinic-to-tetragonal phase transformation, as evidenced by the emergence of the tetragonal (101) peak in the GIXRD pattern and of E{sub g} and A{sub 1g} Raman modes. The new phases formed by ultrafast laser irradiation are high temperature polymorphs of the two materials. No evidence of amorphization was seen in the GIXRD data, though Raman spectroscopy indicated point defect accumulation. These results are identical to those produced by irradiation with SHIs, which also deposit energy in materials primarily through electronic excitation. The similarity in damage process and material response between ultrafast laser and SHI irradiation suggests a fundamental relationship between these two techniques.

  12. Study on excitation of vibrational levels of osmium tetroxide molecule by the continuous CO2 laser radiation

    Kompanets, O.N.; Letokhov, V.S.; Minogin, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of nonlinear infrared absorption in OsO 4 has been studied using a single-frequence continuous-wave CO 2 laser (10.6 μ). Measured are relationships between the OsO 4 absorption coefficient and the laser radiation intensity, the week beam transmission through a cell filled with OsO 4 and the frequency of the intensity modulation of the strong beam which saturates the absorption. It is indicated that the thermal mechanism prevails in OsO 4 bleaching under pressure (>=) 1mm Hg. A strong infrared fluorescence observed and studied at 5.3 and 10.6 μ in the molecular OsO 4 in the field of the high-power CO 2 laser has supplied another proof of the conclusion. The thermal diffusion rate and the coefficient of thermal conductivity for OsO 4 vapours have been determined. It has been revealed that the hot bands represent a significant part in thermal mechanism of the laser radiation absorption by the molecule

  13. Study of photo-activated electron transfer reactions in the first excited singlet state by picosecond and nanosecond laser spectroscopy

    Doizi, Denis

    1983-01-01

    Picosecond laser spectroscopy has been used to study two photo-activated electron transfer reactions: - a bimolecular electron transfer reaction between a sensitizer, DODCI, and an electron acceptor, methylviologen. The two radical ions created with an electron transfer efficiency γ ≅ 0.07 have been identified in picosecond and nanosecond laser absorption spectroscopy by adding selective solutes such as para-benzoquinone (an electron acceptor) or L(+) ascorbic acid (an electron donor). - an intramolecular electron transfer reaction in a triad molecule consisting of a tetra-aryl-porphyrin covalently linked to both a carotenoid and a quinone. The photoinduced charge separation occurs within 30 ps and leads, with a yield of 25 pc, to the formation of a zwitterion whose half-life is 2.5 μs. The experimental results obtained in these two studies show an effective decrease in the recombination rate of the two radical ions created in the encounter pair. (author) [fr

  14. Coherent phonon excitation and linear thermal expansion in structural dynamics and ultrafast electron diffraction of laser-heated metals.

    Tang, Jau

    2008-04-28

    In this study, we examine the ultrafast structural dynamics of metals induced by a femtosecond laser-heating pulse as probed by time-resolved electron diffraction. Using the two-temperature model and the Grüneisen relationship we calculate the electron temperature, phonon temperature, and impulsive force at each atomic site in the slab. Together with the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam anharmonic chain model we calculate changes of bond distance and the peak shift of Bragg spots or Laue rings. A laser-heated thin slab is shown to exhibit "breathing" standing-wave behavior, with a period equal to the round-trip time for sound wave and a wavelength twice the slab thickness. The peak delay time first increases linearly with the thickness (linear thermal expansion due to lattice temperature jump are shown to contribute to the overall structural changes. Differences between these two mechanisms and their dependence on film thickness and other factors are discussed.

  15. Excited argon 1s5 production in micro-hollow cathode discharges for use as potential rare gas laser sources

    Peterson, Richard D.; Eshel, Ben; Rice, Christopher A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2018-02-01

    The diode-pumped rare gas laser (DPRGL) has been suggested as a potential high-gain, high-energy laser which requires densities on the order of 1013 cm-3 at pressures around 1 atmosphere for efficient operation. Argon 1s5 number densities have been measured in micro-hollow cathode discharges with electrode gaps of 127 and 254 μm and hole diameters from 100-400 μm. The dependency of the metastable argon (1s5) density on total gas pressure, electrode gap distance and hole diameter were explored. The measured densities were all in the range of 0.5 - 2 × 1013 cm-3 with the 400 μm hole diameters being the lowest.

  16. Characterization of extreme ultraviolet light-emitting plasmas from a laser-excited fluorine containing liquid polymer jet target

    Abel, B.; Assmann, J.; Faubel, M.; Gaebel, K.; Kranzusch, S.; Lugovoj, E.; Mann, K.; Missalla, T.; Peth, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    The operation of a liquid polymer jet laser-plasma target and the characterization of the absolute x-ray emission in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength window from 9-19 nm is reported. The target is a liquid polymer (perfluoro-polyether) that is exposed to pulsed and focused laser light at 532 nm in the form of a thin, liquid microjet (d=40 to 160 μm) in vacuum. The spectral brightness of the source in the 13 nm range is relatively high because a large fraction of radiative energy is emitted in one single line only, which is assigned to be the 2p-3d F VII doublet at 12.8 nm, with a laser energy conversion efficiency of 0.45% (2π sr, 2% bandwidth) in our initial experiment. A further increase of the relative emission has been found in the wavelength range between 7 and 17 nm when the jet diameter was increased from 40 to 160 μm. The two-dimensional spatial profile of the source plasma (d=40 to 50 μm) has been analyzed with a pinhole camera

  17. A Raman spectroscopic study of organic matter in interplanetary dust particles and meteorites using multiple wavelength laser excitation

    Starkey, N. A.; Franchi, I. A.; Alexander, C. M. O'd.

    2013-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate insoluble organic matter (IOM) from a range of chondritic meteorites, and a suite of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Three monochromatic excitation wavelengths (473 nm, 514 nm, 632 nm) were applied sequentially to assess variations in meteorite and IDP Raman peak parameters (carbon D and G bands) as a function of excitation wavelength (i.e., dispersion). Greatest dispersion occurs in CVs > OCs > CMs > CRs with type 3 chondrites compared at different excitation wavelengths displaying conformable relationships, in contrast to type 2 chondrites. These findings indicate homogeneity in the structural nature of type 3 chondrite IOM, while organic matter (OM) in type 2 chondrites appears to be inherently more heterogeneous. If type 2 and type 3 chondrite IOM shares a common source, then thermal metamorphism may have a homogenizing effect on the originally more heterogeneous OM. IDP Raman G bands fall on an extension of the trend displayed by chondrite IOM, with all IDPs having Raman parameters indicative of very disordered carbon, with almost no overlap with IOM. The dispersion effect displayed by IDPs is most similar to CMs for the G band, but intermediate between CMs and CRs for the D band. The existence of some overlapping Raman features in the IDPs and IOM indicates that their OM may share a common origin, but the IDPs preserve more pristine OM that may have been further disordered by ion irradiation. H, C, and N isotopic data for the IDPs reveal that the disordered carbon in IDPs corresponds with higher δ15N and lower δ13C.

  18. Comparison of a simulated velocity profile of a turbulent boundary layer with measurements obtained by Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET)

    New-Tolley, Matthew; Zhang, Yibin; Shneider, Mikhail; Miles, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Accurate velocimetry measurements of turbulent flows are essential for improving our understanding of turbulent phenomena and validating numerical approaches. Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) is an unseeded molecular tagging method for velocimetry measurements in flows which contain nitrogen. A femtosecond laser pulse is used to ionize and dissociate nitrogen molecules within its focal zone. The decaying plasma fluoresces in the visible and infrared spectrum over a period of microseconds which allows the displacement of the tagged region to be photographed to determine velocity. This study compares the experimental and numerical advection of the tagged region in a turbulent boundary layer generated by a supersonic flow over a flat plate. The tagged region in the simulation is approximated as an infinitely thin cylinder while the flow field is generated using the steady state boundary layer equations with an algebraic turbulence model. This approximation is justified by previous computational analyses, using an unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver, which indicate that the radial perturbations of the tagged region are negligible compared to its translation. This research was conducted with government support from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Dr. Ivett Leyva and the Army Research Office under Dr. Matthew Munson.

  19. Randomized controlled study of excimer laser atherectomy for treatment of femoropopliteal in-stent restenosis: initial results from the EXCITE ISR trial (EXCImer Laser Randomized Controlled Study for Treatment of FemoropopliTEal In-Stent Restenosis).

    Dippel, Eric J; Makam, Prakash; Kovach, Richard; George, Jon C; Patlola, Raghotham; Metzger, D Christopher; Mena-Hurtado, Carlos; Beasley, Robert; Soukas, Peter; Colon-Hernandez, Pedro J; Stark, Matthew A; Walker, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of excimer laser atherectomy (ELA) with adjunctive percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) versus PTA alone for treating patients with chronic peripheral artery disease with femoropopliteal bare nitinol in-stent restenosis (ISR). Femoropopliteal stenting has shown superiority to PTA for lifestyle-limiting claudication and critical limb ischemia, although treating post-stenting artery reobstruction, or ISR, remains challenging. The multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled EXCITE ISR (EXCImer Laser Randomized Controlled Study for Treatment of FemoropopliTEal In-Stent Restenosis) trial was conducted across 40 U.S. centers. Patients with Rutherford Class 1 to 4 and lesions of target lesion length ≥4 cm, vessel diameter 5 to 7 mm were enrolled and randomly divided into ELA + PTA and PTA groups by a 2:1 ratio. The primary efficacy endpoint was target lesion revascularization (TLR) at 6-month follow up. The primary safety endpoint was major adverse event (death, amputation, or TLR) at 30 days post-procedure. Study enrollment was stopped at 250 patients due to early efficacy demonstrated at a prospectively-specified interim analysis. A total of 169 ELA + PTA subjects (62.7% male; mean age 68.5 ± 9.8 years) and 81 PTA patients (61.7% male; mean age 67.8 ± 10.3 years) were enrolled. Mean lesion length was 19.6 ± 12.0 cm versus 19.3 ± 11.9 cm, and 30.5% versus 36.8% of patients exhibited total occlusion. ELA + PTA subjects demonstrated superior procedural success (93.5% vs. 82.7%; p = 0.01) with significantly fewer procedural complications. ELA + PTA and PTA subject 6-month freedom from TLR was 73.5% versus 51.8% (p < 0.005), and 30-day major adverse event rates were 5.8% versus 20.5% (p < 0.001), respectively. ELA + PTA was associated with a 52% reduction in TLR (hazard ratio: 0.48; 95% confidence interval: 0.31 to 0.74). The EXCITE ISR trial is the first large, prospective, randomized study

  20. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states; Excitation et ionisation des atomes d'hydrogene et d'helium par des impulsions laser femtosecondes: approche theorique par des etats de Coulomb-Volkov

    Guichard, R

    2007-12-15

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when {Dirac_h}{omega} > I{sub p}: it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with {Dirac_h}{omega} < I{sub p}: new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  1. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states; Excitation et ionisation des atomes d'hydrogene et d'helium par des impulsions laser femtosecondes: approche theorique par des etats de Coulomb-Volkov

    Guichard, R

    2007-12-15

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when {Dirac_h}{omega} > I{sub p}: it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with {Dirac_h}{omega} < I{sub p}: new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  2. State-selective multireference coupled-cluster theory: In pursuit of property calculation

    Ghose, K.B.; Piecuch, P.; Pal, S.; Adamowicz, L.

    1996-01-01

    In this work, we examine the efficiency of the recently developed [P. Piecuch et al., J. Chem. Phys. 99, 6732 (1993)] state-selective (SS) multi-reference (MR) coupled-cluster (CC) method for calculation of molecular properties. In our earlier papers, we demonstrated that the SSMRCC method with inclusion of single, double, and internal and semi-internal triple excitations [SSCCSD(T) approach] is capable of providing an accurate description of the ground-state potential energy surfaces. In this paper, we present the dipole moment and polarizability values of the HF molecule at equilibrium and stretched geometries calculated using finite field technique and SSCCSD(T) ansatz. The calculations use double zeta quality basis sets with and without polarization functions. Molecular orbital basis sets include both relaxed and nonrelaxed orbitals. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. Non-contact test of coating by means of laser-induced ultrasonic excitation and holographic sound representation

    Crostack, H.A.; Pohl, K.Y.; Radtke, U.

    1991-01-01

    In order to circumvent the problems of introducing and picking off sound, which occur in conventional ultrasonic testing, a completely non-contact test process was developed. The ultrasonic surface wave required for the test is generated without contact by absorption of laser beams. The recording of the ultrasound also occurs by a non-contact holographic interferometry technique, which permits a large scale representation of the sound. Using the example of MCrAlY and ZrO 2 layers, the suitability of the process for testing thermally sprayed coatings on metal substrates is identified. The possibilities and limits of the process for the detection and description of delamination and cracks are shown. (orig.) [de

  4. Toward Rotational State-Selective Photoionization of ThF+ Ions

    Zhou, Yan; Ng, Kia Boon; Gresh, Dan; Cairncross, William; Grau, Matt; Ni, Yiqi; Cornell, Eric; Ye, Jun

    2016-06-01

    ThF+ has been chosen to replace HfF+ for a second-generation measurement of the electric dipole moment of the electron (eEDM). Compared to the currently running HfF+ eEDM experiment, ThF+ has several advantages: (i) the eEDM-sensitive state (3Δ1) is the ground state, which facilitates a long coherence time [1]; (ii) its effective electric field (35 GV/cm) is 50% larger than that of HfF+, which promises a direct increase of the eEDM sensitivity [2]; and (iii) the ionization energy of neutral ThF is lower than its dissociation energy, which introduces greater flexibility in rotational state-selective photoionization via core-nonpenetrating Rydberg states [3]. In this talk, we first present our strategy of preparing and utilizing core-nonpenetrating Rydberg states for rotational state-selective ionization. Then, we report spectroscopic data of laser-induced fluorescence of neutral ThF, which provides critical information for multi-photon ionization spectroscopy. [1] D. N. Gresh, K. C. Cossel, Y. Zhou, J. Ye, E. A. Cornell, Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy, 319 (2016), 1-9 [2] M. Denis, M. S. Nørby, H. J. A. Jensen, A. S. P. Gomes, M. K. Nayak, S. Knecht, T. Fleig, New Journal of Physics, 17 (2015) 043005. [3] Z. J. Jakubek, R. W. Field, Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy 205 (2001) 197-220.

  5. Vibrational-rotational excitation: chemical reactions of vibrationally excited molecules

    Moore, C.B.; Smith, I.W.M.

    1979-03-01

    This review considers a limited number of systems, particularly gas-phase processes. Excited states and their preparation, direct bimolecular reactions, reactions of highly excited molecules, and reactions in condensed phases are discussed. Laser-induced isotope separation applications are mentioned briefly. 109 references

  6. Transient and steady-state selection in the striatal microcircuit

    Adam eTomkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the basal ganglia have been widely studied and implicated in signal processing and action selection, little information is known about the active role the striatal microcircuit plays in action selection in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. To address this knowledge gap we use a large scale three dimensional spiking model of the striatum, combined with a rate coded model of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loop, to asses the computational role the striatum plays in action selection. We identify a robust transient phenomena generated by the striatal microcircuit, which temporarily enhances the difference between two competing cortical inputs. We show that this transient is sufficient to modulate decision making in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuit. We also find that the transient selection originates from a novel adaptation effect in single striatal projection neurons, which is amenable to experimental testing. Finally, we compared transient selection with models implementing classical steady-state selection. We challenged both forms of model to account for recent reports of paradoxically enhanced response selection in Huntington's Disease patients. We found that steady-state selection was uniformly impaired under all simulated Huntington's conditions, but transient selection was enhanced given a sufficient Huntington's-like increase in NMDA receptor sensitivity. Thus our models provide an intriguing hypothesis for the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical cognitive improvements in manifest Huntington's patients.

  7. Cryogenic exciter

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  8. Interrogating the vibrational relaxation of highly excited polyatomics with time-resolved diode laser spectroscopy: C6H6, C6D6, and C6F6+CO2

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Weston, R.E. Jr.; Flynn, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    The vibrational relaxation of highly excited ground state benzene, benzene d 6 , and hexafluorobenzene by CO 2 has been investigated with high resolution diode laser spectroscopy. The vibrationally hot polyatomics are formed by single photon 248 nm excitation to the S 1 state followed by rapid radiationless transitions. It has been found that in all cases less than 1% of the energy initially present in the polyatomics is deposited into the high frequency mode of CO 2 (ν 3 ). An investigation of the CO 2 (00 0 1) nascent rotational distribution under single collision conditions reveals that very little rotational excitation accompanies vibrational energy transfer to the ν 3 mode. The CO 2 (ν 3 ) rotational states can be described by temperatures, T rot , as follows: C 6 H 6 , T rot =360±30 K; C 6 D 6 , T rot =350±35 K and C 6 F 6 , T rot =340±23 K. An estimate of left-angle ΔE right-angle ν3 , the mean energy transferred to the CO 2 ν 3 mode per collision, suggests that as the availability of low frequency modes in the excited molecule increases, less energy is deposited into the high frequency mode of CO 2 . Finally, evidence is presented suggesting that even at moderate laser fluences, the two-photon ionization of benzene can lead to substantial CO 2 ν 3 excitation via electron+CO 2 inelastic collisions

  9. Excited-level lifetimes and hyperfine-structure measurements on ions using collinear laser--ion-beam spectroscopy

    Jin, J.; Church, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The mean lifetimes τ of the Ca II 4p 2 P 1/2 and 4p 2 P 3/2 levels, and the 35 Cl II 4p' 1 F 3 level, have been measured by a variant of the collinear laser--ion-beam lifetime technique applied previously to the Ar II 4p' 2 F 7/2 o level [Jian Jin and D. A. Church, Phys. Rev. A 47, 132 (1993)]. The present results are τ(Ca II, 4p 2 P 1/2 )=7.098(0.020) ns, τ(Ca II, 4p 2 P 3/2 )=6.924(0.019) ns, and τ(Cl II, 4p' 1 F 3 ) =11.17(0.06) ns. The experimental lifetimes of these, plus the Ar II 4p' 2 F 7/2 level, are compared with available recent many-electron calculations. Typically 1%--3% differences between measurement and ab initio theory are found, while certain semiempirical calculations are in better agreement with experiment. Data for other precise lifetime measurements on alkali-metal systems are compared with recent ab initio and semiempirical calculations to provide perspective on the Ca II results. The hyperfine structure of the 35 Cl II 3d' 1 G 4 --4p' 1 F 3 transition was also measured and analyzed in the course of the measurements, with the resulting hyperfine-structure constants: A( 1 F 3 )=301.9(0.5) MHz, B( 1 F 3 )=-6.7(0.8) MHz, A( 1 G 4 )=205.1(0.5) MHz, and B( 1 G 4 )=-3.9(2.4) MHz

  10. X-band EPR setup with THz light excitation of Novosibirsk Free Electron Laser: Goals, means, useful extras

    Veber, Sergey L.; Tumanov, Sergey V.; Fursova, Elena Yu.; Shevchenko, Oleg A.; Getmanov, Yaroslav V.; Scheglov, Mikhail A.; Kubarev, Vitaly V.; Shevchenko, Daria A.; Gorbachev, Iaroslav I.; Salikova, Tatiana V.; Kulipanov, Gennady N.; Ovcharenko, Victor I.; Fedin, Matvey V.

    2018-03-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) station at the Novosibirsk Free Electron Laser (NovoFEL) user facility is described. It is based on X-band (∼9 GHz) EPR spectrometer and operates in both Continuous Wave (CW) and Time-Resolved (TR) modes, each allowing detection of either direct or indirect influence of high-power NovoFEL light (THz and mid-IR) on the spin system under study. The optics components including two parabolic mirrors, shutters, optical chopper and multimodal waveguide allow the light of NovoFEL to be directly fed into the EPR resonator. Characteristics of the NovoFEL radiation, the transmission and polarization-retaining properties of the waveguide used in EPR experiments are presented. The types of proposed experiments accessible using this setup are sketched. In most practical cases the high-power radiation applied to the sample induces its rapid temperature increase (T-jump), which is best visible in TR mode. Although such influence is a by-product of THz radiation, this thermal effect is controllable and can deliberately be used to induce and measure transient signals of arbitrary samples. The advantage of tunable THz radiation is the absence of photo-induced processes in the sample and its high penetration ability, allowing fast heating of a large portion of virtually any sample and inducing intense transients. Such T-jump TR EPR spectroscopy with THz pulses has been previewed for the two test samples, being a useful supplement for the main goals of the created setup.

  11. X-band EPR setup with THz light excitation of Novosibirsk Free Electron Laser: Goals, means, useful extras.

    Veber, Sergey L; Tumanov, Sergey V; Fursova, Elena Yu; Shevchenko, Oleg A; Getmanov, Yaroslav V; Scheglov, Mikhail A; Kubarev, Vitaly V; Shevchenko, Daria A; Gorbachev, Iaroslav I; Salikova, Tatiana V; Kulipanov, Gennady N; Ovcharenko, Victor I; Fedin, Matvey V

    2018-03-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) station at the Novosibirsk Free Electron Laser (NovoFEL) user facility is described. It is based on X-band (∼9 GHz) EPR spectrometer and operates in both Continuous Wave (CW) and Time-Resolved (TR) modes, each allowing detection of either direct or indirect influence of high-power NovoFEL light (THz and mid-IR) on the spin system under study. The optics components including two parabolic mirrors, shutters, optical chopper and multimodal waveguide allow the light of NovoFEL to be directly fed into the EPR resonator. Characteristics of the NovoFEL radiation, the transmission and polarization-retaining properties of the waveguide used in EPR experiments are presented. The types of proposed experiments accessible using this setup are sketched. In most practical cases the high-power radiation applied to the sample induces its rapid temperature increase (T-jump), which is best visible in TR mode. Although such influence is a by-product of THz radiation, this thermal effect is controllable and can deliberately be used to induce and measure transient signals of arbitrary samples. The advantage of tunable THz radiation is the absence of photo-induced processes in the sample and its high penetration ability, allowing fast heating of a large portion of virtually any sample and inducing intense transients. Such T-jump TR EPR spectroscopy with THz pulses has been previewed for the two test samples, being a useful supplement for the main goals of the created setup. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. FY 1997 report on the study on cryogenic aggregate target PLD process by multi-laser excitation for using gaseous materials; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (kitai genryo riyo no tame no taju laser reiki ni yoru gokuteion gyoshutai target PLD process ni kansuru kenkyu)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This paper reports the result in fiscal 1995 of the study on PLD (pulse laser deposition) thin film formation process having been made since 1993. In fiscal 1995, the effect of irradiation of excimer laser and YGA(SHG) on ablation of aggregates of N2, CH4, Ar, Kr and Xe, and the effect of time-delayed irradiation of YGA(SHG) and KrF excimer laser on ablation of N2 aggregate were studied aiming at exciting ablation by cryogenic aggregate alone. Experimental results by a newly developed multi-laser excitation experiment equipment are as follows. Ablation was not caused by KrF excimer laser irradiation, while caused by YGA(SHG) irradiation. Ablation was caused by 1mm thick N2 or CH4 aggregate alone. Kr target was the most promising among rare gas solid targets expected as seed of ablation occurrence. Multi-irradiation showed a different ablation behavior as compared with single YGA(SHG) irradiation, and in some cases, multi-irradiation not increased scattering of particles. Time-delayed multi- irradiation (YGA(SHG) excitation after excimer excitation) was effective. 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Non-equilibrium Modeling of the Fe XVII 3C/3D Line Ratio in an Intense X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Excited Plasma

    Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.; Li, Y.; Fogle, M.; Fontes, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent measurements using an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and an Electron Beam Ion Trap at the Linac Coherent Light Source facility highlighted large discrepancies between the observed and theoretical values for the Fe xvii 3C/3D line intensity ratio. This result raised the question of whether the theoretical oscillator strengths may be significantly in error, due to insufficiencies in the atomic structure calculations. We present time-dependent spectral modeling of this experiment and show that non-equilibrium effects can dramatically reduce the predicted 3C/3D line intensity ratio, compared with that obtained by simply taking the ratio of oscillator strengths. Once these non-equilibrium effects are accounted for, the measured line intensity ratio can be used to determine a revised value for the 3C/3D oscillator strength ratio, giving a range from 3.0 to 3.5. We also provide a framework to narrow this range further, if more precise information about the pulse parameters can be determined. We discuss the implications of the new results for the use of Fe xvii spectral features as astrophysical diagnostics and investigate the importance of time-dependent effects in interpreting XFEL-excited plasmas.

  14. Solid-phase nano-extraction and laser-excited time-resolved Shpol'skii spectroscopy for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in drinking water samples.

    Wang, Huiyong; Yu, Shenjiang; Campiglia, Andres D

    2009-02-15

    A unique method for screening polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in drinking water samples is reported. Water samples (500 microl) are mixed and centrifuged with 950 microl of a commercial solution of 20 nm gold nanoparticles for pollutants extraction. The precipitate is treated with 2 microl of 1-pentanethiol and 48 microl of n-octane, and the supernatant is then analyzed via laser-excited time-resolved Shpol'skii spectroscopy. Fifteen priority pollutants are directly determined at liquid helium temperature (4.2 K) with the aid of a cryogenic fiber-optic probe. Unambiguous pollutant determination is carried out via spectral and lifetime analysis. Limits of detection are at the parts-per-trillion level. Analytical recoveries are similar to those obtained via high-performance liquid chromatography. The simplicity of the experimental procedure, use of microliters of organic solvent, short analysis time, selectivity, and excellent analytical figures of merit demonstrate the advantages of this environmentally friendly approach for routine analysis of numerous samples.

  15. Theoretical and experimental study of the relaxation of excited states of the DCM laser dye. Intra-molecular electron transfer and photo-isomerization. Solvent effects

    Marguet, Sylvie

    1992-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of a styrenic laser dye, the 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-[p-(dimethylamino) styryl]-4H-pyrane or DCM for the characterization of the first electronic states and of the influence of the solvent on efficiencies of different relaxation processes of the first excited state S1 of the DCM. Due to the presence of a combination of a donor group and acceptor group, this compound has interesting properties of intra-molecular charge transfer and of photo-isomerization which highly depend on solvent polarity. Two approaches have been adopted to study these complementary processes: an experimental approach (determination of rate constants of the different deactivation ways of the S1 state by measuring fluorescence quantum efficiencies, photo-isomerization quantum efficiencies, and fluorescence lifetimes of DCM in about twenty solvent of increasing polarity), and a computational approach (a CS-INDO-MRI type quantum chemistry calculation to obtain potential energy curves, charge distributions, and dipolar moments of DCM first electronic states) [fr

  16. Laser excited novel near-infrared photoluminescence bands in fast neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl2O3

    Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad Saliqur; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Xu, Qiu; Evslin, Jarah; Cinausero, Marco

    2016-01-01

    New near-infrared photoluminescence bands were observed in neutron-irradiated spinel single crystal upon excitation by a 532 nm laser. The surface morphology of the unirradiated and fast neutron-irradiated samples was investigated using atomic force microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. Fast neutron-irradiated samples show a strong emission peak at 1685 nm along with weak bands at 1065 and 2365 nm. The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence intensity was also measured. At lower temperatures, the dominant peak at 1685 nm shifts toward lower energy whereas the other peaks remain fixed. Activation energies of luminescence quenching were estimated to be 5.7 and 54.6 meV for the lower and higher temperature regions respectively. - Highlights: • AFM and SPM were conducted to understand surface morphology of the unirrad and neutron-irradiated spinel. • Novel photoluminescence band at 1685 nm along with weak bands at 1065 and 2365 was observed. • Activation energy for luminescence quenching was estimated from Arrhenius equation.

  17. Boltzmann equation analysis of electrons swarm parameters and properties of excited particle number densities in Xe/Ne plasmas. Laser absorption effect; Xe/Ne plasma chudenshi yuso keisu narabi ni reiki ryushisu mitsudo tokusei no Boltzmann hoteishiki kaiseki. Laser ko kyushu koka

    Uchida, S.; Sugawara, H.; Ventzek, P.; Sakai, Y. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    Xe/Ne plasmas are important for plasma display panels and VUV light sources. However, reactions between electrons and excited particles in the mixtures are so complicated that influence of the reactions on the plasma properties is not understood well. In this work, taking account of reactions through which electrons are produced, such as cumulative and Penning ionization, and of transition between excited levels, the electron and excited particle properties in Xe/Ne plasmas are calculated using the Boltzmann equation. The ionization coefficient and electron drift velocity agreed with experimental data. The influence of laser absorption in Xe/Ne plasmas on the plasma properties is also discussed. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Rotational laser cooling of vibrationally and translationally cold molecular ions

    Staanum, Peter; Højbjerre, Klaus; Skyt, Peter Sandegaard

    2010-01-01

    Stationary molecules in well-defined internal states are of broad interest for physics and chemistry. In physics, this includes metrology 1, 2, 3 , quantum computing 4, 5 and many-body quantum mechanics 6, 7 , whereas in chemistry, state-prepared molecular targets are of interest for uni......-molecular reactions with coherent light fields 8, 9 , for quantum-state-selected bi-molecular reactions 10, 11, 12 and for astrochemistry 12 . Here, we demonstrate rotational ground-state cooling of vibrationally and translationally cold MgH+ ions, using a laser-cooling scheme based on excitation of a single...

  19. Coulomb excitation

    McGowan, F.K.; Stelson, P.H.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of Coulomb excitation and a brief review of pertinent treatments of the Coulomb excitation process that are useful for the analysis of experiments are given. Examples demonstrating the scope of nuclear structure information obtainable from gamma spectroscopy are presented. Direct Elambda excitation of 232 Th is discussed in terms of the one phonon octupole vibrational spectrum. B(MI) reduced transition probabilities resulting from Coulomb excitation of odd-A deformed nuclei with heavy ions are presented as a test of the rotational model. The use of gamma ray coincidence and particle-gamma coincidence as tools for investigating Coulomb excitation is discussed. (U.S.)

  20. Lasers

    Milonni, Peter W

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive introduction to the operating principles and applications of lasers. Explains basic principles, including the necessary elements of classical and quantum physics. Provides concise discussions of various laser types including gas, solid state, semiconductor, and free electron lasers, as well as of laser resonators, diffraction, optical coherence, and many applications including holography, phase conjugation, wave mixing, and nonlinear optics. Incorporates many intuitive explanations and practical examples. Discussions are self-contained in a consistent notation and in a style that should appeal to physicists, chemists, optical scientists and engineers.

  1. Laser-diode-excited blue upconversion in Tm3+/Yb3+ -codoped TeO2-Ga2O3-R2O (R=Li, Na, K) glasses.

    Zhao, Chun; Zhang, Qinyuan; Yang, Gangfeng; Jiang, Zhonghong

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on intense blue upconversion in Tm(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped TeO(2)-Ga(2)O(3)-R(2)O(R=Li, Na, K) glasses upon excitation with commercial available laser diode (LD). Effects of alkali ions on the Raman spectra, thermal stability and spectroscopic properties of the tellurite-gallium glasses have also been investigated. Energy transfer and the involved upconversion mechanisms have been discussed. Intense blue upconversion emission centered at 476 nm along with a weak red emission at 650 nm has been observed upon excitation of 977 nm LD, assigned to the transitions of 1G4-->3H6, and 1G4-->3H4 and/or 3F(2,3)-->3H6 of Tm(3+), respectively. The blue upconversion intensity has a cubelike dependence on incident pump laser power, indicating a three-photon process. However, a quadratic dependence of the 476 nm upconversion intensity on the incident pump laser power has been observed when samples under excitation of 808 nm LD due to a two-photon absorption process. Enhanced upconversion luminescence have been observed with replacing K(+) for Na(+) and Li(+).

  2. Sampling system for pulsed signals. Study of the radioactive lifetimes of excited 3{sup 2}P1/2 and 3{sup 2}P3/2 states of Na, excited by a tunable dye laser; Sistema de muestreo para senales pulsadas. Estudio de vidas medias de niveles 3{sup 2} P1/2 y 3{sup 2}P3/2 excitados por un laser de colorantes pulsado

    Thomas, P; Campos, J

    1979-07-01

    A system for sampling and averaging repetitive signals in the order of nanoseconds is discussed. The system uses as storage memory a multichannel analyzer operating in multi scaling mode. This instrument is employed for the measurement of atomic level lifetimes using a dye laser to excite the atoms and is applied to the study of lifetimes of the 3{sup 2}P1/2 and 3{sup 2}P3/2 states of sodium. (Author) 32 refs.

  3. Two-photon excitation of argon

    Pindzola, P.S.; Payne, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    The authors calculate two photon excitation parameters for various excited states of argon assuming the absorption of near resonance broad-bandwidth laser radiation. Results are given for the case of two photons absorbed for the same laser beam as well as the case of absorbing photons of different frequency from each of two laser beams. The authors use multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock wave functions to evaluate the second-order sums over matrix elements. Various experimental laser schemes are suggested for the efficient excitation and subsequent ionization of argon

  4. Spatial discrimination against background with different optical systems for collection of fluorescence in laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with a graphite tube electrothermal atomizer.

    Yuzefovsky, A I; Lonardo, R F; Michel, R G

    1995-07-01

    A single 90 degrees off-axis ellipsoidal mirror fragment was used in a dispersive detection system for electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The performance of the new optical arrangement was compared with those of optical arrangements that employed a plane mirror in combination with biconvex or plano-convex lenses. All the optical arrangements collected fluorescence in a scheme called front surface illustration. BEAM-4, an optical ray tracing program, was used for calculations of spatial ray distributions and optical collection efficiency for the various optical configurations. Experimentally, the best collection efficiency was obtained by use of the ellipsoidal mirror, in qualitative agreement with simulations done by use of the BEAM-4 software. The best detection limit for cobalt with the new optical arrangement was 20 fg, which was a factor of 5 better than that obtained with conventional optical arrangements with otherwise the same instrumentation. The signal-to-background ratio and the fluorescence collection efficiency were also studied as a function of position of the optical components for the various optical arrangements. For both cobalt and phosphorus, the signal-to-background ratio with the new optical arrangement remained stable within 10-20% during +/- 8 mm shifts in the position of the detection system from the focal plane of the optics. Overall, the new optical arrangement offered high collection efficiency, excellent sensitivity, and facile optical alignment due to efficient spatial separation between the fluorescence signal and the background radiation. The advantages of the new optical arrangement were particularly important during measurements in the presence of high levels of blackbody radiation.

  5. Continuum emission of excited sodium dimer

    Pardo, A.; Poyato, J.M.L.; Alonso, J.I.; Rico, F.R.

    1980-01-01

    A study has been made of the behaviour of excited molecular sodium using high-power Ar + laser radiation. A continuum emission was observed in the red wavelength region. This emission was thought to be caused by the formation of excited triatomic molecules. Energy transfer was observed from excited molecules to atoms. (orig.)

  6. Exciter switch

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  7. Reactive quenching of two-photon excited xenon atoms by Cl2

    Bruce, M.R.; Layne, W.B.; Meyer, E.; Keto, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Total binary and tertiary quench rates have been measured for the reaction Xe (5p 5 6p) + Cl 2 at thermal temperatures. Xenon atoms are excited by state-selective, two-photon absorption with a uv laser. The time dependent fluorescence from the excited atom in the IR and from XeCl* (B) product near 308 nm have been measured with subnanosecond time resolution. The decay rates are measured as a function of Cl 2 pressure to 20 Torr and Xe pressure to 400 Torr. The measured reaction rates (k 2 ∼ 10 -9 cm 3 sec -1 ) are consistent with a harpoon model described in a separate paper. We also measure large termolecular reaction rates for collisions with xenon atoms (k 3 ∼ 10 -28 cm 6 sec -1 ). Total product fluorescence has been examined using a gated optical multichannel analyzer. We measure unit branching fractions for high vibrational levels of XeCl* (B) with very little C state fluorescence observed. The measured termolecular rates suggest similar processes will dominate at the high buffer-gas pressures used in XeCl lasers. The effect of these large reactive cross sections for neutral xenon atoms on models of the XeCl laser will be discussed

  8. Experimental Insights into Ground-State Selection of Quantum XY Pyrochlores

    Hallas, Alannah M.; Gaudet, Jonathan; Gaulin, Bruce D.

    2018-03-01

    Extensive experimental investigations of the magnetic structures and excitations in the XY pyrochlores have been carried out over the past decade. Three families of XY pyrochlores have emerged: Yb2B2O7, Er2B2O7, and, most recently, [Formula: see text]Co2F7. In each case, the magnetic cation (either Yb, Er, or Co) exhibits XY anisotropy within the local pyrochlore coordinates, a consequence of crystal field effects. Materials in these families display rich phase behavior and are candidates for exotic ground states, such as quantum spin ice, and exotic ground-state selection via order-by-disorder mechanisms. In this review, we present an experimental summary of the ground-state properties of the XY pyrochlores, including evidence that they are strongly influenced by phase competition. We empirically demonstrate the signatures for phase competition in a frustrated magnet: multiple heat capacity anomalies, suppressed TN or TC, sample- and pressure-dependent ground states, and unconventional spin dynamics.

  9. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence on argon intermediate pressure microwave discharges: Measuring the depopulation rates of the 4p and 5p excited levels as induced by electron and atom collisions

    Palomares, J.M., E-mail: j.m.palomares-linares@tue.nl; Graef, W.A.A.D.; Hübner, S.; Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der, E-mail: jjamvandermullen@gmail.com

    2013-10-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar is explored by means of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) experiments using the combination of high rep-rate YAG–Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable surfatron induced plasma setup. The high rep-rate favors the photon statistics while the low energy per pulse avoids intrusive plasma laser interactions. An analysis shows that, despite the low energy per pulse, saturation can still be achieved even when the geometrical overlap and spectral overlap are optimal. Out of the various studies that can be performed with this setup we confine the current paper to the study of the direct responses to the laser pump action of three 4p and one 5p levels of the Ar system. By changing the plasma in a controlled way one gets for these levels the rates of electron and atom quenching and therewith the total destruction rates of electron and atom collisions. Comparison with literature shows that the classical hard sphere collision rate derived for hydrogen gives a good description for the observed electron quenching (e-quenching) in Ar whereas for heavy particle quenching (a-quenching) this agreement was only found for the 5p level. An important parameter in the study of electron excitation kinetics is the location of the boundary in the atomic system for which the number of electron collisions per radiative life time equals unity. It is observed that for the Ar system this boundary is positioned lower than what is expected on grounds of H-like formulas. - Highlights: • Time resolved laser induced fluorescence at high repetition rate • Decay times as function of pressure, electron density and temperature • Measurement of total electron atom depopulation rates • Reasonable agreement of electron total rates with hard sphere approximations.

  10. Voiced Excitations

    Holzricher, John

    2004-01-01

    To more easily obtain a voiced excitation function for speech characterization, measurements of skin motion, tracheal tube, and vocal fold, motions were made and compared to EM sensor-glottal derived...

  11. Exciting Pools

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  12. Excited states

    Lim, Edward C

    1974-01-01

    Excited States, Volume I reviews radiationless transitions, phosphorescence microwave double resonance through optical spectra in molecular solids, dipole moments in excited states, luminescence of polar molecules, and the problem of interstate interaction in aromatic carbonyl compounds. The book discusses the molecular electronic radiationless transitions; the double resonance techniques and the relaxation mechanisms involving the lowest triplet state of aromatic compounds; as well as the optical spectra and relaxation in molecular solids. The text also describes dipole moments and polarizab

  13. Laser wakefield excitation and measurement on a femtosecond time scale: Theory and experiment. Progress report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    Tajima, T.; Downer, M.

    1994-03-01

    This is a progress report describing work on laser generated wakefields, which can be applied to particle acceleration. The authors have carried out simulation studies in one and two dimensions, and experimental studies of the generation of such fields. The authors also report on the propagation studies of femtosecond laser pulses in atmospheric density gases, and work on developing such high power laser sources, with well controlled pointing and spectral characteristics. The project has involved collaboration with Japanese and Russian researchers

  14. Development of a thermal fatigue test method for thermal barrier coatings by laser excitation using a laser thermal shock facility; Entwicklung eines Pruefverfahrens zur laserinduzierten thermischen Ermuedung thermischer Schutzschichten mittels einer Laser-Thermoschockpruefeinrichtung

    Nies, Daniel

    2012-07-13

    The finite nature of fossil fuel supply and the growing environmental awareness become increasingly stronger motivations for the development of efficient gas turbines and jet engines for power generation or as engines for land-, sea- and water-based vehicles. One concept developed for this purpose are thermal barrier coatings, where the thermal load of components is reduced by applying a ceramic coating onto the components. In this work the possibility to use a laser thermal shock facility for thermo-cyclic testing of thermal barrier coatings is examined. A focused laser beam is used for heating the sample and a homogeneous temperature distribution on the sample surface is achieved by the used trajectory and radial adjusted laser power. The required improvements of the existing testing facility are explained, including the development of a new sample holder and of the testing and evaluation routines for the experiments. For the assessment of the initiation and evolution of damages, acoustic emission and thermographic methods are used. The possibilities and limits of these methods are assessed during the experiments. The work also includes an extensive temperature dependent characterisation of the ceramic material used for the thermal barrier coating. In this part, the measurement of the Young's modulus by a dynamic method is to be highlighted, as this is a rarely used technique. The characterisations show the expected values, except for a lower porosity as expected by the manufacturer and no significant phase changes during isothermal heat treatments. To reach sample surface temperatures above 1000 C, it is necessary to increase the absorption by an additional coating of magnetite. The temperature distribution on the surface is measured by an infrared camera, which is calibrated for this purpose. With the incorporated active air cooling of the sample backside, the temperature gradient can be controlled, but still leaves room for improvements. Already without

  15. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence on argon intermediate pressure microwave discharges: Measuring the depopulation rates of the 4p and 5p excited levels as induced by electron and atom collisions

    Palomares, J. M.; Graef, W. A. A. D.; Hübner, S.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2013-10-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar is explored by means of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) experiments using the combination of high rep-rate YAG-Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable surfatron induced plasma setup. The high rep-rate favors the photon statistics while the low energy per pulse avoids intrusive plasma laser interactions. An analysis shows that, despite the low energy per pulse, saturation can still be achieved even when the geometrical overlap and spectral overlap are optimal. Out of the various studies that can be performed with this setup we confine the current paper to the study of the direct responses to the laser pump action of three 4p and one 5p levels of the Ar system. By changing the plasma in a controlled way one gets for these levels the rates of electron and atom quenching and therewith the total destruction rates of electron and atom collisions. Comparison with literature shows that the classical hard sphere collision rate derived for hydrogen gives a good description for the observed electron quenching (e-quenching) in Ar whereas for heavy particle quenching (a-quenching) this agreement was only found for the 5p level. An important parameter in the study of electron excitation kinetics is the location of the boundary in the atomic system for which the number of electron collisions per radiative life time equals unity. It is observed that for the Ar system this boundary is positioned lower than what is expected on grounds of H-like formulas.

  16. Ion yields in UV-MALDI mass spectrometry as a function of excitation laser wavelength and optical and physico-chemical properties of classical and halogen-substituted MALDI matrixes.

    Soltwisch, Jens; Jaskolla, Thorsten W; Hillenkamp, Franz; Karas, Michael; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2012-08-07

    The laser wavelength constitutes a key parameter in ultraviolet-matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (UV-MALDI-MS). Optimal analytical results are only achieved at laser wavelengths that correspond to a high optical absorption of the matrix. In the presented work, the wavelength dependence and the contribution of matrix proton affinity to the MALDI process were investigated. A tunable dye laser was used to examine the wavelength range between 280 and 355 nm. The peptide and matrix ion signals recorded as a function of these irradiation parameters are displayed in the form of heat maps, a data representation that furnishes multidimensional data interpretation. Matrixes with a range of proton affinities from 809 to 866 kJ/mol were investigated. Among those selected are the standard matrixes 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA) as well as five halogen-substituted cinnamic acid derivatives, including the recently introduced 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (ClCCA) and α-cyano-2,4-difluorocinnamic acid (DiFCCA) matrixes. With the exception of DHB, the highest analyte ion signals were obtained toward the red side of the peak optical absorption in the solid state. A stronger decline of the molecular analyte ion signals generated from the matrixes was consistently observed at the low wavelength side of the peak absorption. This effect is mainly the result of increased fragmentation of both analyte and matrix ions. Optimal use of multiply halogenated matrixes requires adjustment of the excitation wavelength to values below that of the standard MALDI lasers emitting at 355 (Nd:YAG) or 337 nm (N(2) laser). The combined data provide new insights into the UV-MALDI desorption/ionization processes and indicate ways to improve the analytical sensitivity.

  17. Lifetime measurements of highly excited Rydberg states of strontium. Pt. 1

    Kunze, S.; Hohmann, R.; Kluge, H.J.; Lantzsch, J.; Monz, L.; Stenner, J.; Stratmann, K.; Wendt, K.; Zimmer, K. (Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik)

    1993-06-01

    Lifetimes of Rydberg states of triplet-series 5s ns[sup 3]S[sub 1] with n=19-23, 35 and 5s nd[sup 3]D[sub 3] with n=18-20, 23-28 in the spectrum of neutral strontium have been determined. Observation of the exponential decay after excitation by a pulsed laser in a fast atomic beam and subsequent state-selective field ionization was employed. The lifetimes of the states of the [sup 3]S[sub 1]-series show the expected n*[sup 3] dependence on the effective principal quantum number, while the [sup 3]D[sub 3]-series is disturbed by configuration mixing. Furthermore, state re-populations induced by black-body radiation have been observed. (orig.).

  18. Lifetime measurements of highly excited Rydberg states of strontium. Pt. 1

    Kunze, S.; Hohmann, R.; Kluge, H.J.; Lantzsch, J.; Monz, L.; Stenner, J.; Stratmann, K.; Wendt, K.; Zimmer, K.

    1993-01-01

    Lifetimes of Rydberg states of triplet-series 5s ns 3 S 1 with n=19-23, 35 and 5s nd 3 D 3 with n=18-20, 23-28 in the spectrum of neutral strontium have been determined. Observation of the exponential decay after excitation by a pulsed laser in a fast atomic beam and subsequent state-selective field ionization was employed. The lifetimes of the states of the 3 S 1 -series show the expected n* 3 dependence on the effective principal quantum number, while the 3 D 3 -series is disturbed by configuration mixing. Furthermore, state re-populations induced by black-body radiation have been observed. (orig.)

  19. Excited fermions

    Boudjema, F.; Djouadi, A.; Kneur, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    The production of excited fermions with mass above 100 GeV is considered. f→Vf (1) decay widths are calculated where V=γ, Z or W. Excited fermion pair production in e + e - annihilation and in γγ collisions, and single production in e + e - annihilation, eγ and γγ collisions is also discussed. Cross sections are calculated for all these cases. The discovery potential of the NLC at 500 GeV is compared with that of other colliders. (K.A.) 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Harmonics generation of a terahertz wakefield free-electron laser from a dielectric loaded waveguide excited by a direct current electron beam.

    Li, Weiwei; Lu, Yalin; He, Zhigang; Jia, Qika; Wang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    We propose to generate high-power terahertz (THz) radiation from a cylindrical dielectric loaded waveguide (DLW) excited by a direct-current electron beam with the harmonics generation method. The DLW supports a discrete set of modes that can be excited by an electron beam passing through the structure. The interaction of these modes with the co-propagating electron beam results in micro-bunching and the coherent enhancement of the wakefield radiation, which is dominated by the fundamental mode. By properly choosing the parameters of DLW and beam energy, the high order modes can be the harmonics of the fundamental one; thus, high frequency radiation corresponding to the high order modes will benefit from the dominating bunching process at the fundamental eigenfrequency and can also be coherently excited. With the proposed method, high power THz radiation can be obtained with an easily achievable electron beam and a large DLW structure.

  1. S3EPY: a Sparky extension for determination of small scalar couplings from spin-state-selective excitation NMR experiments

    Novák, P.; Žídek, L.; Motáčková, V.; Padrta, P.; Švenková, Alžběta; Nuzillard, J.-M.; Krásný, Libor; Sklenář, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2010), s. 191-197 ISSN 0925-2738 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/0583 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Software * Sparky * Residual dipolar couplings Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.047, year: 2010

  2. New power lasers

    Yamanaka, Masanobu; Daido, Hiroyuki; Imasaki, Kazuo.

    1989-01-01

    As the new power lasers which are expected to exert large extending effect to the fields of advanced science and technology including precision engineering as well as laser nuclear fusion, LD-excited solid laser, X-ray laser and free electron laser are taken up and outlined. Recently, the solid laser using high power output, high efficiency semiconductor laser as the exciting beam source has been developed. This is called laser diode (LD)-excited solid laser, and the heightening of power output and efficiency and the extension of life are planned. Its present status and application to medical use, laser machining, laser soldering and so on are described. In 1960, the laser in visible region appeared, however in 1985, the result of observing induced emission beam by electron collision exciting method was reported in USA. In the wavelength range of 200 A, holography and contact X-ray microscope applications were verified. The various types of soft X-ray laser and the perspective hereafter are shown. The principle of free electron laser is explained. In the free electron laser, wavelength can be changed by varying electron beam energy, the period of wiggler magnetic field and the intensity of magnetic field. Further, high efficiency and large power output are possible. Its present status, application and the perspective hereafter are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Radiation damage in nonmetallic solids under dense electronic excitation

    Itoh, Noriaki; Tanimura, Katsumi; Nakai, Yasuo

    1992-01-01

    Basic processes of radiation damage of insulators by dense electronic excitation are reviewed. First it is pointed out that electronic excitation of nonmetallic solids produces the self-trapped excitons and defect-related metastable states having relatively long lifetimes, and that the excitation of these metastable states, produces stable defects. The effects of irradiation with heavy ions, including track registration, are surveyed on the basis of the microscopic studies. It is pointed out also that the excitation of the metastable states plays a role in laser-induced damage at relatively low fluences, while the laser damage has been reported to be governed by heating of free electrons produced by multiphoton excitation. Difference in the contributions of the excitation of metastable defects to laser-induced damage of surfaces, or laser ablation, and laser-induced bulk damage is stressed. (orig.)

  4. Excited baryons

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested

  5. Excited baryons

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  6. Laser wakefield excitation and measurement on a femtosecond time scale: Theory and experiment. Progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995

    Tajima, T.; Downer, M.

    1995-04-01

    A brief discussion was given for each of the following topics: superluminous wake excitation; photon frequency-shift (photon accelerator) spectroscopy; focusing, diffraction and 2D spectral shift; Raman self-modulation effects; optical preaccelerator; accelerator physics developments; experimental facilities; experimental results--pressure-tunable harmonic generation; experiments in progress--time-domain Rayleigh interferometry; Russian collaboration; and technology transfer.

  7. Laser wakefield excitation and measurement on a femtosecond time scale: Theory and experiment. Progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995

    Tajima, T.; Downer, M.

    1995-04-01

    A brief discussion was given for each of the following topics: superluminous wake excitation; photon frequency-shift (photon accelerator) spectroscopy; focusing, diffraction and 2D spectral shift; Raman self-modulation effects; optical preaccelerator; accelerator physics developments; experimental facilities; experimental results--pressure-tunable harmonic generation; experiments in progress--time-domain Rayleigh interferometry; Russian collaboration; and technology transfer

  8. Multimode optical fibers: steady state mode exciter.

    Ikeda, M; Sugimura, A; Ikegami, T

    1976-09-01

    The steady state mode power distribution of the multimode graded index fiber was measured. A simple and effective steady state mode exciter was fabricated by an etching technique. Its insertion loss was 0.5 dB for an injection laser. Deviation in transmission characteristics of multimode graded index fibers can be avoided by using the steady state mode exciter.

  9. Stimulated emission depletion following two photon excitation

    Marsh, R. J.; Armoogum, D. A.; Bain, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The technique of stimulated emission depletion of fluorescence (STED) from a two photon excited molecular population is demonstrated in the S, excited state of fluorescein in ethylene glycol and methanol. Two photon excitation (pump) is achieved using the partial output of a regeneratively amplified Ti:Sapphire laser in conjunction with an optical parametric amplifier whose tuneable output provides a synchronous depletion (dump) pulse. Time resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy measu...

  10. Experimental evidence of state-selective charge transfer in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2004-01-01

    State-selective charge-transfer behavior was observed for Fe, Cr, Mn and Cu in inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-atomic emission spectrometry. Charge transfer from Ar + to Fe, Cr and Mn is state-selective because of inefficient collisional mixing of the quasiresonant charge-transfer energy levels with nearby levels. This low efficiency is the consequence of differences in electronic configuration of the core electrons. The reason for state-selective charge-transfer behavior to Cu is not clear, although a tentative explanation based on efficiency of intramultiplet and intermultiplet mixing for this special case is offered

  11. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of excited argon and ground-state titanium atoms in pulsed magnetron discharges

    Sushkov, V.; Do, H.T.; Čada, Martin; Hubička, Zdeněk; Hippler, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2013), 1-10 ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/0386; GA ČR GAP108/12/2104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : absorption spectroscopy * diode laser * magnetron * argon metastable * HiPIMS * titanium * time-resolved Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.056, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0963-0252/22/1/015002/

  12. Inter-dependence of the electron beam excitations with the free electron laser stability on the super-ACO storage ring

    Couprie, Marie Emmanuelle; Nutarelli, D; Renault, E; Billardon, M

    1999-01-01

    Storage ring free electron lasers have a complex dynamics as compared to the LINAC driven FEL sources since both the laser and the recirculating electron beam behaviours are involved. Electron beam perturbations can strongly affect the FEL operation (start-up, stability) whereas the FEL can stabilize beam instabilities. Experimental analysis together with simulations are reported here. Improvements of the Super-ACO FEL for users is discussed, and consequences are given in terms of electron beam tolerances for a source development for users.

  13. Adiabatic interpretation of a two-level atom diode, a laser device for unidirectional transmission of ground-state atoms

    Ruschhaupt, A.; Muga, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    We present a generalized two-level scheme for an 'atom diode', namely, a laser device that lets a two-level ground-state atom pass in one direction, say from left to right, but not in the opposite direction. The laser field is composed of two lateral state-selective mirror regions and a central pumping region. We demonstrate the robustness of the scheme and propose a physical realization. It is shown that the inclusion of a counterintuitive laser field blocking the excited atoms on the left side of the device is essential for a perfect diode effect. The reason for this, the diodic behavior, and the robustness may be understood with an adiabatic approximation. The conditions to break down the approximation, which imply also the diode failure, are analyzed

  14. Characteristics of laser-induced plasma under reduced background pressure with Doppler spectroscopy of excited atomic species near the shockwave front

    Dojić, Dejan; Skočić, Miloš; Bukvić, Srdjan

    2018-03-01

    We present measurements of Laser Induced Plasma expansion relying on classical, laterally resolved spectroscopy. Easy observable Doppler splitting of Cu I 324.75 nm spectral line provides measurement of radial expansion velocity in a straightforward way. The measurements are conducted in atmosphere of air, argon and hydrogen at low pressure in the range 20-200 Pa. We found that expansion velocity is linearly decreasing if pressure of surrounding gas increases, with velocity/pressure slope nearly the same for all three gases. Copper atoms have the highest expansion speed in argon ( ∼ 50 km/s) and the smallest speed in air ( ∼ 42 km/s). It is found that expansion velocity increases linearly with irradiance, while intensity of the spectral line is quite insensitive to the laser irradiance.

  15. The energy and temporal characteristics of orthogonal polarized waves generated by a transversely-excited pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser

    Bertel, I.M.; Churakov, V.V.; Petukhov, V.O.; Prokopov, A.P.; Trushin, S.A.; Voitovich, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    The competition of orthogonally-polarized waves with various differences in the wave Q-factors and active medium pressures is studied. The possibility of controlling the parameters of a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser by changing the value of the amplitude anisotropy of the cavity is demonstrated. The duration of the emission pulse for one of two orthogonal polarizations was reduced by virtually 50%.

  16. Detection of salts in soil using transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) carbon dioxide (CO2) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) by the aid of a metal mesh

    Idris, N.; Ramli, M.; Khumaeni, A.; Kurihara, K.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, a nickel metal mesh was used to allow a direct detection of salt in soil sample by LIBS utilizing unique characteristics of a TEA CO2. The metal mesh is placed in the front of the soil sample to prevent the soil sample from blowing off upon focusing the high pulsed laser beam irradiation. LIBS apparatus used in this work is a TEA CO2 laser operated at wavelength of 10.6 μm with pulse energy and duration of 3J and 200 ns, respectively. The laser beam was focused using a ZnSe lens (f = 200 mm) onto soil sample after passing through the metal mesh. The emission spectrum from the induced plasma was detected using an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) system consisting of a 0.32-m-focal length spectrograph with a grating of 1200 graves/mm and a 1024-channel photodiode detector array with a micro-channel plate intensifier. The soil sample used is a standard soil and ordinary soil containing several salts such as Ca, Mg at high concentration. The LIBS experiment was carried out at high pressure surrounding gas of 1 atmosphere. It was observed that by the aid of the metal mesh, strong breakdown gas plasma can be produced just after TEA CO2 laser irradiation on soil sample without significant sample blowing off. It was found that emission lines from salts, Ca (Ca II 393. 3 nm, Ca II 396.3 nm, Ca I 422.5 nm), and also other salts including Mg and Na can clearly be detected with strong emission intensity and narrow spectral width. This result implies that a TEA CO2 LIBS assisted by the metal mesh (metal mesh method) can be used for direct analysis several salts such as Ca, Mg, and Na in soil sample.

  17. Luminescence decay of S Zn::Ag and O Zn:Ga scintillation detectors excited by a pulsed laser; Evolucion temporal de la luminiscencia producida por un laser pulsado de los detectores de centello SZn:Ag y OZn:Ga

    Romero, L.; Campos, J.

    1981-07-01

    In the present work a high sensitivity experimental set up for luminescence decay measurements in the 1 0 {sup -}1 sec range has been developed. As an application, luminescence light decay In S Zn:Ag and 0Zn:Ga after excitation by a pulsed N{sub 2} laser has been measured. In SZnrAg, measurements of total light decay was compared with donor acceptor pairs theory. In both substances, spectral evolution in the first 15 sec was investigated. (Author) 4 refs.

  18. Time-resolved diode laser infrared absorption spectroscopy of the nascent HCl in the infrared laser chemistry of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane

    Dietrich, Peter; Quack, Martin; Seyfang, George

    1990-04-01

    The IR multiphoton excitation and the frequency, fluence and intensity dependence of the IR-laser chemical yields of CF 2ClCH 2Cl have been studied in the fluence range of 1 to 10 J cm -2 yielding a steady-state constant k(st)/ I=0.74×10 6 s -1 MW -1 cm 2 which is approximately independent of intensity. Time-resolved IR absorption spectroscopy with diode laser sources has been used to observe the nascent HCl during the first few 100 ns indicating a population inversion between the levels ν=1, J=4 and ν=2, J=5. At low reactant pressures ( p⩽10 Pa) the time-resolved measurement gives a steady-state rate constant consistent with the theoretical result adjusted to the static yield measurements. The capability of state-selective and time-resolved IR spectroscopy is thus demonstrated, giving real-time determinations of rate constants.

  19. Successive composition of two laser channels upon excitation of He-Ar-Xe (2.03 μm) and Ar-Xe (1.73 μm) mixtures by uranium fission fragments

    Pikulev, A A; Tsvetkov, V M; Sosnin, P V; Sinyanskii, A A

    2009-01-01

    The operation efficiency of the scheme with successive composition of two laser channels upon excitation of the active medium by uranium-235 fission fragments is studied experimentally and numerically. For the He:Ar:Xe = 380:380:1 mixture (at a pressure of 1 atm and the lasing wavelength λ = 2.03 μm) the maximum lasing power of a double channel (1 kW) is almost twice that of a single channel (540 W). Calculations show that in the case of ideal composition (without losses on mirrors) the lasing power of the double channel can be increased to 1.2 kW. For the Ar:Xe = 380:1 mixture (the pressure is 0.5 atm, λ = 1.73 μm) the maximum lasing power of the double channel (620 W) is slightly above that of the single channel (520 W), which is caused by the losses on aluminum mirrors employed for channel doubling and by a negative effect of optical inhomogeneities. In the case of ideal composition, the lasing power can be increased to 830 W. (lasers)

  20. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  1. Photo-excitation of electrons in cytochrome c oxidase as a theory of the mechanism of the increase of ATP production in mitochondria by laser therapy

    Zielke, Andrzej

    2014-02-01

    The hypothesis explains the molecular basis for restoring mitochondrial function by laser therapy. It also explains how laser therapy reverses both excessive oxidation (lack of NADH/FADH2) and excessive reduction (lack of O2) states of cytochrome c oxidase complex. It is proposed that photons interact with heme molecules of cytochrome c oxidase. A molecule of heme contains a porphyrin ring and an atom of iron in the center. The iron atom (Fe) can switch oxidation states back and forth between ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) by accepting or releasing an electron. The porphyrin ring is a complex aromatic molecule that has 26 pi electrons which are "delocalized", spinning in the carbon rings creating a resonating electromagnetic cloud. Photons with similar wavelengths are absorbed by the cloud increasing its energy. The energy is then passed on to the centrally located atom of iron existing in a reduced state (Fe2+). The electrons on the orbits of the iron atom accept this electromagnetic energy, and change orbitals to a higher energetic level. If the energy is sufficient, electrons leave the atom entirely. If this occurs, Fe2+ become oxidized to Fe3+ releasing electrons, thus restoring electron flow and the production of ATP. At the same time, electrons freed from complex IV may have sufficient energy to be picked by NAD+/FADH and re-enter the chain at the complex I or II amplifying the flow of electrons.

  2. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    Zhang Pei [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Baboi, Nicoleta [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Jones, Roger M.; Shinton, Ian R. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cockcroft Institute, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter [Institut fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  3. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R R; Flisgen, T; Glock, H W

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using Higher Order Mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR) and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  4. Laser spectroscopy

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  5. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation

    Chin, See Leang

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond Laser Filamentation gives a comprehensive review of the physics of propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in optical media (principally air) and the applications and challenges of this new technique. This book presents the modern understanding of the physics of femtosecond laser pulse propagation, including unusual new effects such as the self-transformation of the pulse into a white light laser pulse, intensity clamping, the physics of multiple filamentation and competition, and how filaments’ ability to melt glass leads to wave guide writing. The potential applications of laser filamentation in atmospheric sensing and the generation of other electromagnetic pulses from the UV to the radio frequency are treated, together with possible future challenges in the excitation of super-excited states of molecules. Exciting new phenomena such as filament induced ultrafast birefringence and the excitation of molecular rotational wave packets and their multiple revivals in air (gases) will also ...

  6. Multiple pulse traveling wave excitation of neon-like germanium

    Moreno, J. C.; Nilsen, J.; Silva, L. B. da

    1995-01-01

    Traveling wave excitation has been shown to significantly increase the output intensity of the neon-like germanium x-ray laser. The driving laser pulse consisted of three 100 ps Gaussian laser pulses separated by 400 ps. Traveling wave excitation was employed by tilting the wave front of the driving laser by 45 degrees to match the propagation speed of the x-ray laser photons along the length of the target. We show results of experiments with the traveling wave, with no traveling wave, and against the traveling wave and comparisons to a numerical model. Gain was inferred from line intensity measurements at two lengths

  7. Non-contact test of coating by means of laser-induced ultrasonic excitation and holographic sound representation. Beruehrungslose Pruefung von Beschichtungen mittels laserinduzierter Ultraschallanregung und holographischer Schallabbildung

    Crostack, H A; Pohl, K Y [QZ-DO Qualitaetszentrum Dortmund GmbH und Co. KG (Germany); Radtke, U [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Fachgebiet Qualitaetskontrolle

    1991-01-01

    In order to circumvent the problems of introducing and picking off sound, which occur in conventional ultrasonic testing, a completely non-contact test process was developed. The ultrasonic surface wave required for the test is generated without contact by absorption of laser beams. The recording of the ultrasound also occurs by a non-contact holographic interferometry technique, which permits a large scale representation of the sound. Using the example of MCrAlY and ZrO[sub 2] layers, the suitability of the process for testing thermally sprayed coatings on metal substrates is identified. The possibilities and limits of the process for the detection and description of delamination and cracks are shown. (orig.).

  8. Photoionization of excited molecular states using multiphoton excitation techniques

    Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are reported for three photon resonant, four photon ionization of H 2 via the B 1 Σ/sub u/ + , v = 7 (J = 2,4) and C 1 π/sub u'/, v = 0-4 (J = 1) levels and of N 2 via the o 3 1 π/sub u'/, v = 1,2, b 1 π/sub u'/, v = 3-5, and c 1 π/sub u'/, v = 0 levels. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon factors are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization. 23 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  9. Photoionization of excited molecular states using multiphoton excitation techniques

    Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are reported for three photon resonant, four photon ionization of H 2 via the B 1 Σ + /sub u/, v = 7 (J = 2,4) and C 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 0-4 (J = 1) levels and of N 2 via the o 3 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 1,2, b 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 3-5, and c 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 0 levels. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon factors are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization

  10. Nuclear transitions induced by atomic excitations

    Dyer, P.; Bounds, J.A.; Haight, R.C.; Luk, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the two-step pumping scheme for a gamma-ray laser, an essential step is that of exciting the nucleus from a long-lived storage isomer to a nearby short- lived state that then decays to the upper lasing level. An experiment is in progress to induce this transfer by first exciting the atomic electrons with UV photons. The incident photons couple well to the electrons, which then couple via a virtual photon to the nucleus. As a test case, excitation of the 235 U nucleus is being sought, using a high- brightness UV laser. The excited nuclear state, having a 26- minute half-life, decays by internal conversion, resulting in emission of an atomic electron. A pulsed infrared laser produces an atomic beam of 235 U which is then bombarded by the UV laser beam. Ions are collected, and conversion electrons are detected by a channel electron multiplier. In preliminary experiments, an upper limit of 7 x 10 -5 has been obtained for the probability of exciting a 235 U atom in the UV beam for one picosecond at an intensity of about 10 15 W/cm 2 . Experiments with higher sensitivities and at higher UV beam intensities are underway

  11. Excitation of transversely excited CO2 waveguide lasers

    Wood II, O.R.; Smith, P.W.; Adams, C.R.; Maloney, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Using a preionization scheme based on the Malter effect, small-signal gains >5%/cm at 10.6 μm have been produced in a 1-mm 2 -cross-section waveguide CO 2 amplifier at total operating pressures of 100--760 Torr. Comparisons are made between this preionization scheme and those using electron beams

  12. Luminescence from ZnSe excited by picosecond mid-infrared FEL pulses

    Mitsuyu, T.; Suzuki, T.; Tomimasu, T.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed blue band-edge emission from a ZnSe crystal under irradiation of mid-infrared picosecond free electron laser (FEL) pulses. The emission characteristics including spectrum, excitation power dependence, excitation wavelength dependence, and decay time have been investigated. The experimental results have indicated that it is difficult to understand the excitation process by multiphoton excitation, thermal excitation, or excitation through mid-gap levels. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Recent experiments involving highly excited atoms

    Latimer, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    Very large and fragile atoms may be produced by exciting normal atoms with light or by collisions with other atomic particles. Atoms as large as 10 -6 m are now routinely produced in the laboratory and their properties studied. In this review some of the simpler experimental methods available for the production and detection of such atoms are described including tunable dye laser-excitation and field ionization. A few recent experiments which illustrate the collision properties and the effects of electric and and magnetic fields are also described. The relevance of highly excited atoms in other areas of research including radioastronomy and isotope separation are discussed. (author)

  14. Laser Refractography

    Rinkevichyus, B.S; Raskovskaya, I.L

    2010-01-01

    This book describes the basic principles of laser refractography, a flexible new diagnostic tool for measuring optically inhomogeneous media and flows. Laser refractography is based on digital imaging and computer processing of structured laser beam refraction (SLR) in inhomogeneous transparent media. Laser refractograms provide both qualitative and quantitative measurements and can be used for the study of fast and transient processes. In this book, the theoretical basis of refractography is explored in some detail, and experimental setups are described for measurement of transparent media using either 2D (passed radiation) or 3D (scattered radiation) refractograms. Specific examples and applications are discussed, including visualization of the boundary layer near a hot or cold metallic ball in water, and observation of edge effects and microlayers in liquids and gases. As the first book to describe this new and exciting technique, this monograph has broad cross-disciplinary appeal and will be of interest t...

  15. Iterative universal state selective correction for the Brillouin-Wigner multireference coupled-cluster theory

    Banik, Subrata; Ravichandran, Lalitha; Brabec, J.; Hubač, I.; Kowalski, K.; Pittner, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 142, č. 11 (2015), s. 114106 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13117; GA ČR GAP208/11/2222 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : QUADRUPLY EXCITED CLUSTERS * QUASI-DEGENERATE STATES * DOUBLE-EXCITATION MODEL Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.894, year: 2015

  16. Infrared laser system

    Cantrell, C.D.; Carbone, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture

  17. Efficiency of local surface plasmon polariton excitation on ridges

    Radko, Ilya; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    We investigate experimentally and numerically the efficiency of surface plasmon polariton excitation by a focused laser beam using gold ridges. The dependence of the efficiency on geometrical parameters of ridges and wavelength dependence are examined. The experimental measurements accomplished...

  18. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  19. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  20. Properties of excited xenon atoms in a plasma display panel

    Uhm, Han S.; Hong, Byoung H.; Oh, Phil Y.; Choi, Eun H.

    2009-01-01

    The luminance efficiency of a plasma display panel is directly related to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light that is emitted from excited xenon (Xe) atoms and molecules. It is therefore necessary to investigate the properties of excited xenon atoms. This study presents experimental data associated with the behavior of excited xenon atoms in a PDP discharge cell and compares the data with the theoretical results obtained using an analytical model. The properties of excited xenon atoms in the discharge cells of a plasma display panel are investigated by measuring the excited atom density through the use of laser absorption spectroscopy. The density of the excited xenon atoms increases from zero, reaches its peak, and decreases with time in the discharge cells. The profile of the excited xenon atoms is also studied in terms of the xenon mole fraction. The typical density of the excited xenon atoms in the metastable state is on the order of 10 13 atoms per cubic cm.

  1. Indigenous development of a 2 kW RF-excited fast axial flow CO2 ...

    used for various new scientific applications in addition to laser material ... prototyping and surface hardening, these lasers are still preferred to Nd:YAG, fibre ... Laser head: The high-power RF-excited FAF CO2 laser system developed by us.

  2. vuv fluorescence from selective high-order multiphoton excitation of N2

    Coffee, Ryan N.; Gibson, George N.

    2004-01-01

    Recent fluorescence studies suggest that ultrashort pulse laser excitation may be highly selective. Selective high-intensity laser excitation holds important consequences for the physics of multiphoton processes. To establish the extent of this selectivity, we performed a detailed comparative study of the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence resulting from the interaction of N 2 and Ar with high-intensity infrared ultrashort laser pulses. Both N 2 and Ar reveal two classes of transitions, inner-valence ns ' l ' . From their pressure dependence, we associate each transition with either plasma or direct laser excitation. Furthermore, we qualitatively confirm such associations with the time dependence of the fluorescence signal. Remarkably, only N 2 presents evidence of direct laser excitation. This direct excitation produces ionic nitrogen fragments with inner-valence (2s) holes, two unidentified transitions, and one molecular transition, the N 2 + :X 2 Σ g + 2 Σ u + . We discuss these results in the light of a recently proposed model for multiphoton excitation

  3. Efficient channel-plasmon excitation by nano-mirrors

    Radko, Ilya; Holmgaard Stær, Tobias; Han, Zhanghua

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a configuration for efficient channel-plasmon mode excitation using tapered terminations of V-shaped groove waveguides. The plasmon excitation is achieved by directly illuminating tapers of gold V-grooves with a focused laser beam, incident normally onto the sample surface. For nea...

  4. Excited charmed mesons

    Butler, J.N.; Shukla, S.

    1995-05-01

    The experimental status of excited charmed mesons is reviewed and is compared to theoretical expectations. Six states have been observed and their properties are consistent with those predicted for excited charmed states with orbital angular momentum equal to one

  5. Portable vibration exciter

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  6. Multi-frequency excitation

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected

  7. Dissociation dynamics of anionic and excited neutral fragments of gaseous SiCl4 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations

    Chen, J M; Lu, K T; Lee, J M; Chou, T L; Chen, H C; Chen, S A; Haw, S C; Chen, T H

    2008-01-01

    The state-selective dissociation dynamics for anionic and excited neutral fragments of gaseous SiCl 4 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations were characterized by combining measurements of the photon-induced anionic dissociation, x-ray absorption and UV/visible dispersed fluorescence. The transitions of core electrons to high Rydberg states/doubly excited states in the vicinity of both Si 2p and Cl 2p ionization thresholds of gaseous SiCl 4 lead to a remarkably enhanced production of anionic, Si - and Cl - , fragments and excited neutral atomic, Si*, fragments. This enhancement via core-level excitation near the ionization threshold of gaseous SiCl 4 is explained in terms of the contributions from the Auger decay of doubly excited states, shake-modified resonant Auger decay, or/and post-collision interaction. These complementary results provide insight into the state-selective anionic and excited neutral fragmentation of gaseous molecules via core-level excitation.

  8. Elementary excitations in nuclei

    Lemmer, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The role of elementary quasi-particle and quasi-hole excitations is reviewed in connection with the analysis of data involving high-lying nuclear states. This article includes discussions on: (i) single quasi-hole excitations in pick-up reactions, (ii) the formation of single quasi-hole and quasi-particle excitations (in different nuclei) during transfer reactions, followed by (iii) quasi-particle quasi-hole excitations in the same nucleus that are produced by photon absorption. Finally, the question of photon absorption in the vicinity of the elementary Δ resonance is discussed, where nucleonic as well as nuclear degrees of freedom can be excited

  9. Multi-frequency excitation

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-03-10

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected for the device based on the natural frequency. Additionally, a second voltage amplitude of a second source of excitation can be selected for the device, and the first and second sources of excitation can be applied to the device. After applying the first and second sources of excitation, a frequency of the second source of excitation can be swept. Using the methods of multi- frequency excitation described herein, new operating frequencies, operating frequency ranges, resonance frequencies, resonance frequency ranges, and/or resonance responses can be achieved for devices and systems.

  10. a simple a simple excitation control excitation control excitation

    eobe

    field voltages determined follow a simple quadratic relationship that offer a very simple control scheme, dependent on only the stator current. Keywords: saturated reactances, no-load field voltage, excitation control, synchronous generators. 1. Introduction. Introduction. Introduction. The commonest generator in use today is ...

  11. Increased ionization rate in laser enrichment

    Janes, G.S.; Pike, G.T.

    1977-01-01

    A system employing multiple, upper excitation levels in a technique for isotopically selective ionization to improve the ionization efficiency is described. Laser radiation is employed to excite particles with isotopic selectivity. Excitation is produced to a plurality of excited states below the ionization level with the result of increasing the number of available excited particles for ionization and thereby increasing the ionization cross section for improved system efficiency

  12. Broad band exciplex dye lasers

    Dienes, A.; Shank, C.V.; Trozzolo, A.M.

    1975-01-01

    The disclosure is concerned with exciplex dye lasers, i.e., lasers in which the emitting species is a complex formed only from a constituent in an electronically excited state. Noting that an exciplex laser, favorable from the standpoint of broad tunability, results from a broad shift in the peak emission wavelength for the exciplex relative to the unreacted species, a desirable class resulting in such broad shift is described. Preferred classes of laser media utilizing specified resonant molecules are set forth. (auth)

  13. Laser induced energy transfer

    Falcone, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    Two related methods of rapidly transferring stored energy from one excited chemical species to another are described. The first of these, called a laser induced collision, involves a reaction in which the energy balance is met by photons from an intense laser beam. A collision cross section of ca 10 - 17 cm 2 was induced in an experiment which demonstrated the predicted dependence of the cross section on wavelength and power density of the applied laser. A second type of laser induced energy transfer involves the inelastic scattering of laser radiation from energetically excited atoms, and subsequent absorption of the scattered light by a second species. The technique of producing the light, ''anti-Stokes Raman'' scattering of visible and infrared wavelength laser photons, is shown to be an efficient source of narrow bandwidth, high brightness, tunable radiation at vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths by using it to excite a rare gas transition at 583.7 A. In addition, this light source was used to make the first measurement of the isotopic shift of the helium metastable level at 601 A. Applications in laser controlled chemistry and spectroscopy, and proposals for new types of lasers using these two energy transfer methods are discussed

  14. Spectra from foil-excited molybdenum ions

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Cecchi, J.L.; Kruse, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    The extreme-ultraviolet spectra (5 to 55 nm) for foil-excited molybdenum ions have been measured using 22 to 200 MeV beams from the Brookhaven National Laboratory MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator facility, 20 μg/cm 2 C stripping foils, and a grazing incidence spectrometer. The mean ion charge states (13 to 28) and the narrow distribution widths (about 2 charge states) were accurately predictable from experimental parameters. Where possible, comparisons are given with Mo radiation from tokamaks, vacuum sparks, and laser-excited plasmas

  15. Fractional Stark state selective electric field ionization of very high-n Rydberg states of molecules

    Dietrich, H.; Mueller-Dethlefs, K.; Baranov, L.Y.

    1996-01-01

    For the first time fractional Stark state selective electric field ionization of very high-n (n approx-gt 250) molecular Rydberg states is observed. An open-quote open-quote offset close-quote close-quote electric pulse selectively ionizes the more fragile open-quote open-quote red close-quote close-quote (down shifted in energy) Stark states. The more resilient open-quote open-quote bluer close-quote close-quote, or up-shifted, ones survive and are shifted down in energy upon application of a second (open-quote open-quote probe close-quote close-quote) pulse of opposite direction (diabatic Stark states close-quote inversion). Hence, even for smaller probe than offset fields ionization is observed. The offset/probe ratio allows one to control spectral peak shapes in zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectroscopy. copyright 1995 The American Physical Society

  16. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  17. The way toward theoretical description of state-selected reactions of O+ with methane

    Hrušák, Jan; Paidarová, Ivana

    354-355, SI (2013), s. 372-377 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0446 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : methane oxidation * excited state * ab initio MCSCF calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2013

  18. Step Towards Modeling the Atmosphere of Titan: State-Selected Reactions of O+ with Methane

    Hrušák, Jan; Paidarová, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2016), s. 419-424 ISSN 0169-6149 Grant - others:COST(XE) TD1308 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : methane oxidation * excited states * transition dipole moments Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2016

  19. Spike Bursts from an Excitable Optical System

    Rios Leite, Jose R.; Rosero, Edison J.; Barbosa, Wendson A. S.; Tredicce, Jorge R.

    Diode Lasers with double optical feedback are shown to present power drop spikes with statistical distribution controllable by the ratio of the two feedback times. The average time between spikes and the variance within long time series are studied. The system is shown to be excitable and present bursting of spikes created with specific feedback time ratios and strength. A rate equation model, extending the Lang-Kobayashi single feedback for semiconductor lasers proves to match the experimental observations. Potential applications to construct network to mimic neural systems having controlled bursting properties in each unit will be discussed. Brazilian Agency CNPQ.

  20. LASER FLUORESCENCE EEM PROBE FOR CONE PENETROMETER POLLUTION ANALYSIS

    A fiber optic LIF (Laser induced fluorescence) EEM (Excitation emission matrix) instrument for CPT deployment has been successfully developed and field tested. The system employs a Nd: YAG laser and Raman shifter as a rugged field portable excitation source. This excitation sou...

  1. X-ray lasers

    Elton, Raymond C

    2012-01-01

    The first in its field, this book is both an introduction to x-ray lasers and a how-to guide for specialists. It provides new entrants and others interested in the field with a comprehensive overview and describes useful examples of analysis and experiments as background and guidance for researchers undertaking new laser designs. In one succinct volume, X-Ray Lasers collects the knowledge and experience gained in two decades of x-ray laser development and conveys the exciting challenges and possibilities still to come._Add on for longer version of blurb_M>The reader is first introduced

  2. On isospin excitation energy

    Li Wenfei; Zhang Fengshou; Chen Liewen

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of Hartree-Fock theory using the extended Skyrme effective interaction, the isospin excitation energy as a function of relative neutron excess δ was investigated at different temperatures and densities. It was found that the isospin excitation energy decreased with the increment of temperature and/or the decrement of density. The authors pointed out that the decrement of isospin excitation energy was resulted from the weakening of quantum effect with increment of temperature and/or decrement of density. Meanwhile, the relationship between the isospin excitation energy and the symmetry energy was discussed and found that the symmetry energy was just a part of the isospin excitation energy. With increasing temperature and decreasing density, the contribution of the symmetry energy to the isospin excitation energy becomes more and more important. The isospin excitation energy as a function of relative neutron excess was also investigated using different potential parameters. The results shows that the isospin excitation energy is almost independent of the incompressibility and the effective mass, but strongly depends on the symmetry energy strength coefficient, which indicates that it is possible to extract the symmetry energy of the nuclear equation of state by investigating the isospin excitation energy in experiments

  3. Excited states 2

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that deals with molecules in the excited states. The book describes the geometries of molecules in the excited electronic states. One paper describes the geometries of a diatomic molecule and of polyatomic molecules; it also discusses the determination of the many excited state geometries of molecules with two, three, or four atoms by techniques similar to diatomic spectroscopy. Another paper introduces an ordered theory related to excitons in pure and mixed molecular crystals. This paper also presents some experimental data such as those invo

  4. Excited states v.6

    Lim, Edward C

    1982-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 6 is a collection of papers that discusses the excited states of molecules. The first paper discusses the linear polyene electronic structure and potential surfaces, considering both the theoretical and experimental approaches in such electronic states. This paper also reviews the theory of electronic structure and cites some experimental techniques on polyene excitations, polyene spectroscopic phenomenology, and those involving higher states of polyenes and their triplet states. Examples of these experimental studies of excited states involve the high-resolution one-pho

  5. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    George, V.E.; Haas, R.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Schlitt, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation

  6. New photoionization lasers pumped by laser-induced plasma radiation

    Hube, M.; Dieckmann, M.; Beigang, R.; Welling, H.; Wellegehausen, B.

    1988-01-01

    Innershell photoionization of atomic gases and vapors by soft x rays from a laser-produced plasma is a potential method for making lasers at short wavelengths. Normally, in such experiments only a single plasma spot or plasma line is created for the excitation. This gives high excitation rates but only a short excitation length. At high excitation rates detrimental influences, such as amplified spontaneous emission, optical saturation, or quenching processes, may decrease or even destroy a possible inversion. Therefore, it seems to be more favorable to use a number of separated plasma spots with smaller excitation rates and larger excitation lengths. As a test, a three-plasma spot device was constructed and used in the well-known Cd-photoionization laser at 442 nm. With a 600-mJ Nd:YAH laser (pulse length, 8 ns) for plasma production, output energies up to 300 μJ have been measured, which is more than a doubling of so far obtained data. On innershell excitation, levels may be populated that allow direct lasers as in the case of Cd or that are metastable and cannot be directly coupled to lower levels. In this case modifications in the excitation process are necessary. Such modifications may be an optical pump process in the atom prior to the innershell photoionization or an optical pump process (population transfer process) after the innershell ionization, leading to Raman or anti-Stokes Raman-type laser emissions. With these techniques and the developed multiplasma spot excitation device a variety of new laser emissions in K and Cs ions have been achieved which are indicated in the level schemes

  7. Investigation of in-vivo skin autofluorescence lifetimes under long-term cw optical excitation

    Lihachev, A; Ferulova, I; Vasiljeva, K; Spigulis, J

    2014-01-01

    The main results obtained during the last five years in the field of laser-excited in-vivo human skin photobleaching effects are presented. The main achievements and results obtained, as well as methods and experimental devices are briefly described. In addition, the impact of long-term 405-nm cw low-power laser excitation on the skin autofluorescence lifetime is experimentally investigated. (laser biophotonics)

  8. The argon excimer laser

    Wrobel, W.G.

    1981-02-01

    The electron-beam-pumped argon eximer laser is investigated and tuned for the first time. The electron beam is generated by means of an improved coaxial field emmision diode in which argon gas is excited with power densities of 0.3 GW/cm 3 for 18 ns. The processes in the excited gas of 20 to 65 bar are described in the context of a kinetic model as a sequence of stationary states. Investigations of the amplified spontaneous emission (superfluorescence) confirm the predictions of this model. Only the absorption due to the excited Ar atoms is anomalously high. Reproducible operation of the argon eximer laser was achieved in a wide pressure range with various resonator arrangements. The wavelength of this shortest wavelength of this shortest wavelength excimer laser is 126 nm, the laser line width approx. 1.7 nm, the pulse length 7 to 13 ns, and the laser power 250 kW. The laser emission is tuned from 123.2 nm to 128.4 nm by two different methods (diffraction grating and prism). This tunable laser is thus the one with the shortest wavelength at present. Its line width is 0.25 to 0.4 nm, and the power ue 1.7 kW. (orig.)

  9. Prompt and delayed excitation and photolysis of cesium dimers

    Davanloo, F.; Collins, C.B.; Inamdar, A.S.; Mehendale, N.Y.; Nagvi, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    In this work a time-delayed, double resonance technique was used for the study of the state selective photolysis of Cs 2 excited in the yellow range of visible wavelengths. Particular attention being placed on the production of the fine structure components of the 5 2 D and 6 2 P states of Cs and upon the lifetimes of the product populations in the cesium vapor. A quantitative model was constructed to fit the data and rate coefficients were extracted for processes tending to attenuate the product state selectivity. Reported here is what appears to be the first value for the fine-structure mixing cross section for Cs(5 2 D5/2 → 5 2 D 3 /sub 3/2/) of 17 A 2 +-50%, close to the geometric cross section

  10. Optically-Based Diagnostics for Gas-Phase Laser Development

    2010-08-01

    Laser (COIL), Electric Oxygen Iodine Laser (EOIL), Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL), and Exciplex Alkali Laser (XPAL). The papers at this Symposium... exciplex -assisted absorption and laser-induced fluorescence, and multi-photon excitation of infrared atomic alkali transitions.11,12 In this paper... EXCIPLEX LASER SYSTEMS Proper review and discussion of the DPAL and XPAL laser systems can be found elsewhere,11,12 and in the paper by Carroll and

  11. Modeling the hyperfine state selectivity of a short lamb-shift spin-filter polarimeter

    Mendez, A.J.; Roper, C.D.; Clegg, T.B.

    1995-01-01

    An rf cavity, previously used as a spin filter in a Lamb-shift polarized ion source, is being adapted for use as a polarimeter in an atomic beam polarized hydrogen and deuterium ion source. Paramount among the design criteria is maintaining the current source performance while providing on-line beam polarization monitoring. This requires minimizing both the polarimeter system length and the coupling with the magnetic fields of the other ion source systems. Detailed computer calculations have modeled the four-level interaction involving the 2S 1/2 -2P 1/2 states of the atomic beam. These indicate that a significantly shorter spin-filter cavity and uniform axial magnetic field than used in the Lamb-shift source do not compromise the spin-state selectivity. The calculations also predict the axial magnetic field uniformity needed as well as the gains achieved from proper shaping of the cavity rf and dc fields. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  12. Negative ion formation in the scattering of state-selected NO+ on GaAs(110)

    Martin, J.S.; Greeley, J.N.; Morris, J.R.; Ferenchok, B.T.; Jacobs, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    A hyperthermal beam of state-selected NO + X 1 Σ + (v,j) impinges on a clean, well characterized GaAs(110) surface. The resulting two-electron transfer products NO-and O- are independently interrogated with a novel ion imaging technique as a function of NO + translational and vibrational energies. The products are shown to have different appearance thresholds, product translational energy distributions, and NO + vibrational energy dependencies. Most notably, vibrational energy is an order of magnitude more effective that translational energy in activating O- formation at a collision energy of 45 eV. The O- angular distribution exhibits a correlation with translational energy which is asymmetric about the surface normal. These results suggest that the probability of O- formation is dependent on the molecules point of impact with the GaAs (110) surface. The dynamical features of the NO + /GaAs(110) reaction will be discussed in terms of the three independent coordinates addressed in this experiment: the diatom internuclear separation, the molecule-surface distance, and the surface impact parameter

  13. An equilibrium for frustrated quantum spin systems in the stochastic state selection method

    Munehisa, Tomo; Munehisa, Yasuko

    2007-01-01

    We develop a new method to calculate eigenvalues in frustrated quantum spin models. It is based on the stochastic state selection (SSS) method, which is an unconventional Monte Carlo technique that we have investigated in recent years. We observe that a kind of equilibrium is realized under some conditions when we repeatedly operate a Hamiltonian and a random choice operator, which is defined by stochastic variables in the SSS method, to a trial state. In this equilibrium, which we call the SSS equilibrium, we can evaluate the lowest eigenvalue of the Hamiltonian using the statistical average of the normalization factor of the generated state. The SSS equilibrium itself has already been observed in unfrustrated models. Our study in this paper shows that we can also see the equilibrium in frustrated models, with some restriction on values of a parameter introduced in the SSS method. As a concrete example, we employ the spin-1/2 frustrated J 1 -J 2 Heisenberg model on the square lattice. We present numerical results on the 20-, 32-, and 36-site systems, which demonstrate that statistical averages of the normalization factors reproduce the known exact eigenvalue to good precision. Finally, we apply the method to the 40-site system. Then we obtain the value of the lowest energy eigenvalue with an error of less than 0.2%

  14. Measurement of Moments and Radii of Light Nuclei by Collinear Fast-Beam Laser Spectroscopy and $\\beta$-NMR Spectroscopy

    Marinova, K P

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear Moments and radii of light unstable isotopes are investigated by applying different high-sensitivity and high-resolution techniques based on collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy. A study of nuclear structure in the sd shell is performed on neon isotopes in the extended chain of $^{17-28}$Ne, in particular on the proton-halo candidate $^{17}$Ne. Measurements of hyperfine structure and isotope shift have become possible by introducing an ultra-sensitive non-optical detection method which is based on optical pumping, state-selective collisional ionization and $\\beta$-activity counting. The small effect of nuclear radii on the optical isotope shifts of light elements requires very accurate measurements. The errors are dominated by uncertainties of the Doppler shifts which are conventionally determined from precisely measured acceleration voltages. These uncertainties are removed by measuring the beam energy with simultaneous excitation of two optical lines in parallel / antiparallel beam configuration. ...

  15. Advanced lasers for fusion

    Krupke, W.F.; George, E.V.; Haas, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Laser drive systems' performance requirements for fusion reactors are developed following a review of the principles of inertial confinement fusion and of the technical status of fusion research lasers (Nd:glass; CO 2 , iodine). These requirements are analyzed in the context of energy-storing laser media with respect to laser systems design issues: optical damage and breakdown, medium excitation, parasitics and superfluorescence depumping, energy extraction physics, medium optical quality, and gas flow. Three types of energy-storing laser media of potential utility are identified and singled out for detailed review: (1) Group VI atomic lasers, (2) rare earth solid state hybrid lasers, and (3) rare earth molecular vapor lasers. The use of highly-radiative laser media, particularly the rare-gas monohalide excimers, are discussed in the context of short pulse fusion applications. The concept of backward wave Raman pulse compression is considered as an attractive technique for this purpose. The basic physics and device parameters of these four laser systems are reviewed and conceptual designs for high energy laser systems are presented. Preliminary estimates for systems efficiencies are given. (Auth.)

  16. Subwavelength Localization of Atomic Excitation Using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    J. A. Miles

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We report an experiment in which an atomic excitation is localized to a spatial width that is a factor of 8 smaller than the wavelength of the incident light. The experiment utilizes the sensitivity of the dark state of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT to the intensity of the coupling laser beam. A standing-wave coupling laser with a sinusoidally varying intensity yields tightly confined Raman excitations during the EIT process. The excitations, located near the nodes of the intensity profile, have a width of 100 nm. The experiment is performed using ultracold ^{87}Rb atoms trapped in an optical dipole trap, and atomic localization is achieved with EIT pulses that are approximately 100 ns long. To probe subwavelength atom localization, we have developed a technique that can measure the width of the atomic excitations with nanometer spatial resolution.

  17. Photoionization dynamics of excited molecular states

    Dehmer, J.L.; O'Halloran, M.A.; Tomkins, F.S.; Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of opportunities for exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. Here we will first give a brief overview of the large variety of experimental approaches to excited state phenomena made possible by REMPI. Then we will examine in more detail, recent studies of the three photon resonant, four photon (3 + 1) ionization of H 2 via the C 'PI/sup u/ state. Strong non-Franck-Condon behavior in the photoelectron spectra of this nominally simple Rydberg state has led to the examination of a variety of dynamical mechanisms. Of these, the role of doubly excited autoionizing states now seems decisive. Progress on photoelectron studies of autoionizing states in H 2 , excited in a (2 + 1) REMPI process via the E, F 1 Σ/sub g/ + will also be briefly discussed. 26 refs., 7 figs

  18. Harmonic excitations in quasicrystals

    Luck, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    The harmonic excitations (phonons) of quasicrystals are studied in a simple one-dimensional model. The spectrum is a Cantor set, which exhibits selfsimilarity properties. The eigenstates are generically ''critical'', i.e. neither extended nor localized

  19. Chemical-state-selective mapping at nanometer scale using synchrotron radiation and photoelectron emission microscopy

    Hirao, Norie; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Honda, Mitsunori

    2010-01-01

    For surface analyses of semiconductor devices and various functional materials, it has become indispensable to analyze valence states at nanometer scale due to the rapid developments of nanotechnology. Since a method for microscopic mapping dependent on the chemical bond states has not been established so far, we have developed a photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) system combined with synchrotron soft X-ray excitation. The samples investigated were Si/SiO x micro-patterns prepared by O 2 + ion implantation in Si(001) wafer using a mask. PEEM images excited by various photon energies around the Si K-edge were observed. The lateral spatial resolution of the system was about 41 nm. The brightness of each spot in PEEM images changed depending on the photon energy, due to the X-ray absorption intensity of the respective chemical state. Since the surface of this sample was topographically flat, it has been demonstrated that the present method can be applied to observations of the microscopic pattern, depending not on the morphology, but only on the valence states of silicon. We have also in-situ measured the changes of the PEEM images upon annealing, and elucidated the mechanism of the lateral diffusion of oxygen and valence states of silicon at the nanometer scale. (author)

  20. Chemical-state-selective mapping at nanometer scale using synchrotron radiation and photoelectron emission microscopy

    Hirao, Norie; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Honda, Mitsunori

    2008-01-01

    For surface analyses of semiconductor devices and various functional materials, it has become indispensable to analyze the valence states at the nanometer scale due to the rapid developments of nanotechnology. Since a method for microscopic mapping dependent on the chemical bond states has not been established so far, we have developed a photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) system combined with synchrotron soft X-ray excitation. The samples investigated were Si/SiO x micro-patterns prepared by O 2 + ion implantation in a Si(001) wafer using a mask. PEEM images excited by various photon energies around the Si K-edge were observed. The lateral spatial resolution of the system was about 41 nm. The brightness of each spot in PEEM images changed depending on the photon energy, due to the X-ray absorption intensity of the respective chemical state. Since the surface of this sample is topographically flat, it has been demonstrated that the present method can be applied to observations of the microscopic pattern, depending not on the morphology, but only on the valence states of silicon. We have also in-situ measured the changes of PEEM images upon annealing, and elucidated the mechanism of the lateral diffusion of oxygen and valence states of silicon at the nanometer scale. (author)

  1. Radio frequency plasma excitation

    Burden, M.St.J.; Cross, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation into the use of rf sputtering for ion cleaning of insulating substrates before ion plating is reported. Initial experiments consisted of sputtering metals with rf power followed by the deposition of copper onto glass slides using rf plasma excitation and biasing supply. It was found that good quality films were obtained by rf ion plating onto plastics with excellent adhesion over a wide operating pressure range. A block schematic of the rf plasma excitation system is shown. (UK)

  2. High energy nuclear excitations

    Gogny, D.; Decharge, J.

    1983-09-01

    The main purpose of this talk is to see whether a simple description of the nuclear excitations permits one to characterize some of the high energy structures recently observed. The discussion is based on the linear response to different external fields calculated using the Random Phase Approximation. For those structure in heavy ion collisions at excitation energies above 50 MeV which cannot be explained with such a simple approach, we discuss a possible mechanism for this heavy ion scattering

  3. Response analysis of the dynamic excitation of hen eggs

    Libor Severa

    2007-01-01

    Commercially produced hen eggs have been tested by means of dynamic excitation of the egg-shells with following analysis of their response. The falling steel ball have been chosen as a exciting instrument and the laser vibrometer have been used as a measuring device for the egg response. The reproductibility of the experiments has been relatively high and the surface velocity has been found to be significantly dependent on the position around the meridian. Analysed frequency spectrum has show...

  4. Excitation of cavitation bubbles in low-temperature liquid nitrogen

    Sasaki, Koichi; Harada, Shingo

    2017-06-01

    We excited a cavitation bubble by irradiating a Nd:YAG laser pulse onto a titanium target that was installed in liquid nitrogen at a temperature below the boiling point. To our knowledge, this is the first experiment in which a cavitation bubble has been successfully excited in liquid nitrogen. We compared the cavitation bubble in liquid nitrogen with that in water on the basis of an equation reported by Florschuetz and Chao [J. Heat Transfer 87, 209 (1965)].

  5. Observation of correlated excitations in bimolecular collisions

    Gao, Zhi; Karman, Tijs; Vogels, Sjoerd N.; Besemer, Matthieu; van der Avoird, Ad; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.

    2018-02-01

    Although collisions between atoms and molecules are largely understood, collisions between two molecules have proven much harder to study. In both experiment and theory, our ability to determine quantum-state-resolved bimolecular cross-sections lags behind their atom-molecule counterparts by decades. For many bimolecular systems, even rules of thumb—much less intuitive understanding—of scattering cross sections are lacking. Here, we report the measurement of state-to-state differential cross sections on the collision of state-selected and velocity-controlled nitric oxide (NO) radicals and oxygen (O2) molecules. Using velocity map imaging of the scattered NO radicals, the full product-pair correlations of rotational excitation that occurs in both collision partners from individual encounters are revealed. The correlated cross sections show surprisingly good agreement with quantum scattering calculations using ab initio NO-O2 potential energy surfaces. The observations show that the well-known energy-gap law that governs atom-molecule collisions does not generally apply to bimolecular excitation processes, and reveal a propensity rule for the vector correlation of product angular momenta.

  6. Laser Control of Atoms and Molecules

    Letkhov, V S

    2007-01-01

    This text treats laser light as a universal tool to control matter at the atomic and molecular level, one of the most exciting applications of lasers. Lasers can heat matter, cool atoms to ultra-low temperatures where they show quantum collective behaviour, and can act selectively on specific atoms and molecules for their detection and separation.

  7. Lasers '89

    Harris, D.G.; Shay, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: XUV, X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Lasers, excimer lasers, chemical lasers, nuclear pumped lasers, high power gas lasers, solid state lasers, laser spectroscopy. The paper presented include: Development of KrF lasers for fusion and Nuclear driven solid-state lasers

  8. Doppler-free two-photon excitation of 238U

    Hodgkinson, D.P.; Wort, D.J.H.

    1981-04-01

    A theory of resonantly enhanced two-photon absorption is presented and tested in a number of experiments in which 238 U vapour is excited by two continuous wave dye lasers. Good quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is found. In particular the central prediction of the theory, that antiparallel laser beams of modest intensity can pump an appreciable fraction of the Maxwell velocity distribution, has been checked directly by measuring the spectral width of the fluorescence from the two-photon excited level. (author)

  9. Excitation of resonances of microspheres on an optical fiber

    Serpengüzel, A.; Arnold, S.; Griffel, G.

    1995-04-01

    Morphology-dependent resonances (MDR's) of solid microspheres are excited by using an optical fiber coupler. The narrowest measured MDR linewidths are limited by the excitation laser linewidth ( < 0.025 nm). Only MDR's, with an on-resonance to off-resonance intensity ratio of 104, contribute to scattering. The intensity of various resonance orders is understood by the localization principle and the recently developed generalized Lorentz-Mie theory. The microsphere fiber system has potential for becoming a building block in dispersive microphotonics. The basic physics underlying our approach may be considered a harbinger for the coupling of active photonic microstructures such as microdisk lasers.

  10. Laser photoelectron spectroscopy of MnH - and FeH - : Electronic structures of the metal hydrides, identification of a low-spin excited state of MnH, and evidence for a low-spin ground state of FeH

    Stevens, Amy E.; Feigerle, C. S.; Lineberger, W. C.

    1983-05-01

    The laser photoelectron spectra of MnH- and MnD-, and FeH- and FeD- are reported. A qualitative description of the electronic structure of the low-spin and high-spin states of the metal hydrides is developed, and used to interpret the spectra. A diagonal transition in the photodetachment to the known high-spin, 7Σ+, ground state of MnH is observed. An intense off-diagonal transition to a state of MnH, at 1725±50 cm-1 excitation energy, is attributed to loss of an antibonding electron from MnH-, to yield a low-spin quintet state of MnH. For FeH- the photodetachment to the ground state is an off-diagonal transition, attributed to loss of the antibonding electron from FeH-, to yield a low-spin quartet ground state of FeH. A diagonal transition results in an FeH state at 1945±55 cm-1; this state of FeH is assigned as the lowest-lying high-spin sextet state of FeH. An additional excited state of MnH and two other excited states of FeH are observed. Excitation energies for all the states are reported; vibrational frequencies and bond lengths for the ions and several states of the neutrals are also determined from the spectra. The electron affinity of MnH is found to be 0.869±0.010 eV; and the electron affinity of FeH is determined to be 0.934±0.011 eV. Spectroscopic constants for the various deuterides are also reported.

  11. Lasers in medicine and dentistry.

    Lehnert, M W

    1996-01-01

    Since their introduction, great enthusiasm has greeted the application of lasers to medicine and dentistry. The future is exciting. Research will someday take us to the days of the "Star Trek" laser-scan tooth or bone repair procedures. Lasers are very specific in their application. Choose this new technology carefully, making choices and purchases based on quality scientific research and ongoing analysis and review.

  12. Hybrid fiber-rod laser

    Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Messerly, Michael J.; Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2012-12-18

    Single, or near single transverse mode waveguide definition is produced using a single homogeneous medium to transport both the pump excitation light and generated laser light. By properly configuring the pump deposition and resulting thermal power generation in the waveguide device, a thermal focusing power is established that supports perturbation-stable guided wave propagation of an appropriately configured single or near single transverse mode laser beam and/or laser pulse.

  13. Experimental coherent control of lasers

    Gordon, R.; Ramsay, A.J.; Cleaver, J.R.A.; Heberle, A.P.

    2002-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate coherent control of a laser. A resonant 100-fs optical pulse is injected into a vertical cavity surface emitting laser to introduce a field component with well-defined phase and thereby excite beating oscillations between the transverse lasing modes. By changing the relative phase between two injected pulses, we can enhance or destroy the beating oscillations and select which lasing modes are excited. We discuss resonant pulse injection into lasers and show how mode competition improves controllability by suppressing the phase-sensitive effects of the carriers

  14. Laser development for laser fusion applications. Research progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    1981-04-01

    Research conducted during this period is reported on the following: (1) rare-gas-halogen lasers, (2) XeCl laser at excitation rates of 1.7 to 4.7 MW/cm 3 , (3) rare gas halogen laser modeling, (4) three-body ion recombination coefficients, (5) electron beam accelerators, (6) power conditioning studies for accelerators, (7) chemically pumped iodine lasers, (8) hydrogen fluoride lasers, and (9) supporting research

  15. Experiments on state selection and Penning ionisation with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    Kroon, J.P.C.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes experiments with metastable He/Ne atoms. The experiments are performed in a crossed beam machine. Two different sources are used for the production of metastable atoms: a source for the production of metastable atoms in the thermal energy range and a hollow cathode arc for the production of metastable atoms in the superthermal energy range (1-7 eV). The progress made in the use of the hollow cathode arc is described as well as the experimental set-up. The rare gas energy-level diagram is characterized by two metastable levels. By optical pumping it is possible to select a single metastable level, both for He and Ne. For the case of He this is done by a recently built He quenchlamp which selectively quenches the metastable 2 1 S level population. In the thermal energy range the quenching is complete; in the superthermal energy range the 2 1 S level population is only partly quenched. For the optical pumping of Ne* atoms a cw dye laser is used. New experiments have been started on the measurement, in a crossed beam machine, of the fluorescence caused by inelastic collisions where metastable atoms are involved. The He* + Ne system is used as a pilot study for these experiments. The He-Ne laser is based on this collision system. (Auth.)

  16. Collisional quenching at ultralow energies: controlling efficiency with internal state selection.

    Bovino, S; Bodo, E; Gianturco, F A

    2007-12-14

    Calculations have been carried out for the vibrational quenching of excited H(2) molecules which collide with Li(+) ions at ultralow energies. The dynamics has been treated exactly using the well-known quantum coupled-channel expansions over different initial vibrational levels. The overall interaction potential has been obtained from the calculations carried out earlier by our group using highly correlated ab initio methods. The results indicate that specific features of the scattering observables, e.g., the appearance of Ramsauer-Townsend minima in elastic channel cross sections and the marked increase of the cooling rates from specific initial states, can be linked to potential properties at vanishing energies (sign and size of scattering lengths) and to the presence of either virtual states or bound states. The suggestion is made such that by selecting the initial state preparation of the molecular partners, the ionic interactions would be amenable to controlling quenching efficiency at ultralow energies.

  17. Arduino Due based tool to facilitate in vivo two-photon excitation microscopy.

    Artoni, Pietro; Landi, Silvia; Sato, Sebastian Sulis; Luin, Stefano; Ratto, Gian Michele

    2016-04-01

    Two-photon excitation spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the characterization of the optical properties of genetically encoded and synthetic fluorescent molecules. Excitation spectroscopy requires tuning the wavelength of the Ti:sapphire laser while carefully monitoring the delivered power. To assist laser tuning and the control of delivered power, we developed an Arduino Due based tool for the automatic acquisition of high quality spectra. This tool is portable, fast, affordable and precise. It allowed studying the impact of scattering and of blood absorption on two-photon excitation light. In this way, we determined the wavelength-dependent deformation of excitation spectra occurring in deep tissues in vivo.

  18. Off-resonant vibrational excitation: Orientational dependence and spatial control of photofragments

    Machholm, Mette; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2000-01-01

    Off-resonant and resonant vibrational excitation with short intense infrared (IR) laser pulses creates localized oscillating wave packets, but differs by the efficiency of the excitation and surprisingly by the orientational dependence. Orientational selectivity of the vibrational excitation...... of randomly oriented heteronuclear diatomic molecules can be obtained under simultaneous irradiation by a resonant and an off-resonant intense IR laser pulse: Molecules with one initial orientation will be vibrationally excited, while those with the opposite orientation will be at rest. The orientation-dependent...... distribution. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  19. Reaction dynamics of electronically excited alkali atoms with simpler molecules

    Weiss, P.S.; Mestdagh, J.M.; Schmidt, H.; Vernon, M.F.; Covinsky, M.H.; Balko, B.A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1985-05-01

    The reactions of electronically excited sodium atoms with simple molecules have been studied in crossed molecular beams experiments. Electronically excited Na(3 2 P/sub 3/2/, 4 2 D/sub 5/2/, and 5 2 S/sub 1/2/) were produced by optical pumping using single frequency dye lasers. The effects of the symmetry, and the orientation and alignment of the excited orbital on the chemical reactivity, and detailed information on the reaction dynamics were derived from measurements of the product angular and velocity distributions. 12 refs., 9 figs

  20. Efficient channel-plasmon excitation by nano-mirrors

    Radko, Ilya P.; Stær, Tobias Holmgaard; Han, Zhanghua

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a configuration for efficient channel-plasmon mode excitation using tapered terminations of V-shaped groove waveguides. The plasmon excitation is achieved by directly illuminating tapers of gold V-grooves with a focused laser beam, incident normally onto the sample surface. For near......-infrared wavelengths, we find experimentally as well as numerically, by conducting three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations, that the efficiency of channel-plasmon mode excitation exceeds 10% in the optimum configuration, which is the highest experimentally observed efficiency of coupling from free-propagation...

  1. An intense polarized beam by a laser ionization injection

    Ohmori, Chihiro; Hiramatsu, Shigenori; Nakamura, Takeshi.

    1990-12-01

    Accumulation of protons and polarized protons by photo-ionization injection are described. This method consists of (1)producing the neutral hydrogen beam by Lorentz stripping, (2)excitation of the neutral hydrogen beam with a laser, and (3)ionization of the hydrogen beam in the 2P excited state with another laser. When the laser for the excitation is circularly polarized, we can get a polarized proton beam. An ionization efficiency of 98% and a polarization of 80% can be expected by an intense laser beam from a FEL(Free Electron Laser). (author)

  2. 双色激光激励对空气中太赫兹辐射增强的研究%THz emission enhancement in air by two-color laser excitation

    戴厚梅; 孙伟; 汪东亮

    2015-01-01

    Photocurrent model was used to study THz emission enhancement when air was irradiated by two‐color laser pulses with introducing another 400 nm laser pulse .The second order ionization of nitrogen and the collision between the electrons and the surrounding ions and molecules were taken in‐to account .The results show that the symmetry of laser field is broken by the introduction of the sec‐ond harmonic 400 nm laser ,w hich leads to the production of non‐zero DC electron current and greater intensity of T Hz emission in the far field .%利用光电流模型模拟研究在泵浦光中引入400 nm倍频光对空气中太赫兹辐射的增强情况,其中空气中氮气离化过程考虑到二阶离化,同时考虑电子在运动过程中与周围离子、分子的碰撞。结果表明,400 nm激光的引入打破了原激光电场的对称性,导致了光电流中漂移成分的产生,大大增强了最后的太赫兹波输出强度。

  3. Giant resonances on excited states

    Besold, W.; Reinhard, P.G.; Toepffer, C.

    1984-01-01

    We derive modified RPA equations for small vibrations about excited states. The temperature dependence of collective excitations is examined. The formalism is applied to the ground state and the first excited state of 90 Zr in order to confirm a hypothesis which states that not only the ground state but every excited state of a nucleus has a giant resonance built upon it. (orig.)

  4. Excitation of Nucleon Resonances

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2001-01-01

    I discuss developments in the area of nucleon resonance excitation, both necessary and feasible, that would put our understanding of nucleon structure in the regime of strong QCD on a qualitatively new level. They involve the collection of high quality data in various channels, a more rigorous approach in the search for ''missing'' resonances, an effort to compute some critical quantities in nucleon resonance excitations from first principles, i.e. QCD, and a proposal focused to obtain an understanding of a fundamental quantity in nucleon structure

  5. Multiplex electric discharge gas laser system

    Laudenslager, James B. (Inventor); Pacala, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A multiple pulse electric discharge gas laser system is described in which a plurality of pulsed electric discharge gas lasers are supported in a common housing. Each laser is supplied with excitation pulses from a separate power supply. A controller, which may be a microprocessor, is connected to each power supply for controlling the application of excitation pulses to each laser so that the lasers can be fired simultaneously or in any desired sequence. The output light beams from the individual lasers may be combined or utilized independently, depending on the desired application. The individual lasers may include multiple pairs of discharge electrodes with a separate power supply connected across each electrode pair so that multiple light output beams can be generated from a single laser tube and combined or utilized separately.

  6. Nonlinear excitation fluorescence microscopy: source considerations for biological applications

    Wokosin, David L.

    2008-02-01

    Ultra-short-pulse solid-state laser sources have improved contrast within fluorescence imaging and also opened new windows of investigation in biological imaging applications. Additionally, the pulsed illumination enables harmonic scattering microscopy which yields intrinsic structure, symmetry and contrast from viable embryos, cells and tissues. Numerous human diseases are being investigated by the combination of (more) intact dynamic tissue imaging of cellular function with gene-targeted specificity and electrophysiology context. The major limitation to more widespread use of multi-photon microscopy has been the complete system cost and added complexity above and beyond commercial camera and confocal systems. The current status of all-solid-state ultrafast lasers as excitation sources will be reviewed since these lasers offer tremendous potential for affordable, reliable, "turnkey" multiphoton imaging systems. This effort highlights the single box laser systems currently commercially available, with defined suggestions for the ranges for individual laser parameters as derived from a biological and fluorophore limited perspective. The standard two-photon dose is defined by 800nm, 10mW, 200fs, and 80Mhz - at the sample plane for tissue culture cells, i.e. after the full scanning microscope system. Selected application-derived excitation wavelengths are well represented by 700nm, 780nm, ~830nm, ~960nm, 1050nm, and 1250nm. Many of the one-box lasers have fixed or very limited excitation wavelengths available, so the lasers will be lumped near 780nm, 800nm, 900nm, 1050nm, and 1250nm. The following laser parameter ranges are discussed: average power from 200mW to 2W, pulse duration from 70fs to 700fs, pulse repetition rate from 20MHz to 200MHz, with the laser output linearly polarized with an extinction ratio at least 100:1.

  7. Effects of noise in excitable systems

    Lindner, B.; Garcia-Ojalvo, J.; Neiman, A.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2004-01-01

    We review the behavior of theoretical models of excitable systems driven by Gaussian white noise. We focus mainly on those general properties of such systems that are due to noise, and present several applications of our findings in biophysics and lasers. As prototypes of excitable stochastic dynamics we consider the FitzHugh-Nagumo and the leaky integrate-and-fire model, as well as cellular automata and phase models. In these systems, taken as individual units or as networks of globally or locally coupled elements, we study various phenomena due to noise, such as noise-induced oscillations, stochastic resonance, stochastic synchronization, noise-induced phase transitions and noise-induced pulse and spiral dynamics. Our approach is based on stochastic differential equations and their corresponding Fokker-Planck equations, treated by both analytical calculations and/or numerical simulations. We calculate and/or measure the rate and diffusion coefficient of the excitation process, as well as spectral quantities like power spectra and degree of coherence. Combined with a multiparametric bifurcation analysis of the corresponding cumulant equations, these approaches provide a comprehensive picture of the multifaceted dynamical behaviour of noisy excitable systems

  8. State-selective electron capture into He-like U90+ ions in collisions with gaseous targets

    Ma, X.; Stoehlker, T.; Brinzanescu, O.; Fritzsche, S.; Ludziejewski, T.; Stachura, Z.; Warczak, A.

    2000-11-01

    For He-like uranium, a state-selective electron capture study was carried out for relativistic collisions with gaseous targets. In the experiment, the projectile X-ray emission produced by electron capture in collisions of 223 MeV/u U 90+ ions on N 2 , Ar, Kr, and Xe targets was measured in coincidence with down-charged U 89+ projectiles. Due to the large fine structure splitting in heavy ions, the well resolved Balmer transitions observed were used to deduce subshell sensitive cross-sections for electron capture. For this purpose a theoretical spectrum analysis and simulation was performed by taking into account electron cascades from states up to n = 40. The state-selective data are compared with theoretical calculations as a function of target atomic number. An overall agreement is found between the experimental data and the theoretical approaches applied except for the j-sensitive part. (orig.)

  9. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  10. Excitable particles in an optical torque wrench

    Pedaci, Francesco; Huang, Zhuangxiong; van Oene, Maarten; Barland, Stephane; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2011-03-01

    The optical torque wrench is a laser trapping technique capable of applying and directly measuring torque on microscopic birefringent particles using spin momentum transfer, and has found application in the measurement of static torsional properties of biological molecules such as single DNAs. Motivated by the potential of the optical torque wrench to access the fast rotational dynamics of biological systems, a result of its all-optical manipulation and detection, we focus on the angular dynamics of the trapped birefringent particle, demonstrating its excitability in the vicinity of a critical point. This links the optical torque wrench to nonlinear dynamical systems such as neuronal and cardiovascular tissues, nonlinear optics and chemical reactions, all of which display an excitable binary (`all-or-none') response to input perturbations. On the basis of this dynamical feature, we devise and implement a conceptually new sensing technique capable of detecting single perturbation events with high signal-to-noise ratio and continuously adjustable sensitivity.

  11. Can Measured Synergy Excitations Accurately Construct Unmeasured Muscle Excitations?

    Bianco, Nicholas A; Patten, Carolynn; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2018-01-01

    Accurate prediction of muscle and joint contact forces during human movement could improve treatment planning for disorders such as osteoarthritis, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy. Recent studies suggest that muscle synergies, a low-dimensional representation of a large set of muscle electromyographic (EMG) signals (henceforth called "muscle excitations"), may reduce the redundancy of muscle excitation solutions predicted by optimization methods. This study explores the feasibility of using muscle synergy information extracted from eight muscle EMG signals (henceforth called "included" muscle excitations) to accurately construct muscle excitations from up to 16 additional EMG signals (henceforth called "excluded" muscle excitations). Using treadmill walking data collected at multiple speeds from two subjects (one healthy, one poststroke), we performed muscle synergy analysis on all possible subsets of eight included muscle excitations and evaluated how well the calculated time-varying synergy excitations could construct the remaining excluded muscle excitations (henceforth called "synergy extrapolation"). We found that some, but not all, eight-muscle subsets yielded synergy excitations that achieved >90% extrapolation variance accounted for (VAF). Using the top 10% of subsets, we developed muscle selection heuristics to identify included muscle combinations whose synergy excitations achieved high extrapolation accuracy. For 3, 4, and 5 synergies, these heuristics yielded extrapolation VAF values approximately 5% lower than corresponding reconstruction VAF values for each associated eight-muscle subset. These results suggest that synergy excitations obtained from experimentally measured muscle excitations can accurately construct unmeasured muscle excitations, which could help limit muscle excitations predicted by muscle force optimizations.

  12. Excitation of Stellar Pulsations

    Houdek, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this review I present an overview of our current understanding of the physical mechanisms that are responsible for the excitation of pulsations in stars with surface convection zones. These are typically cooler stars such as the δ Scuti stars, and stars supporting solar-like oscillations....

  13. Relativistic Coulomb excitation

    Winther, A.; Alder, K.

    1979-01-01

    Coulomb excitation of both target and projectile in relativistic heavy ion collisions is evaluated including the lowest order correction for the deviation from a straight line trajectory. Explicit results for differential and total cross sections are given in the form of tables and figures. (Auth.)

  14. Excited lepton search

    Behrend, H.J.; Buerger, J.; Criegee, L.; Fenner, H.; Field, J.H.; Franke, G.; Fuster, J.; Holler, Y.; Meyer, J.; Schroeder, V.; Sindt, H.; Timm, U.; Winter, G.G.; Zimmermann, W.; Bussey, P.J.; Campbell, A.J.; Dainton, J.B.; Hendry, D.; McCurrach, G.; Scarr, J.M.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Smith, K.M.; Blobel, V.; Poppe, M.; Spitzer, H.; Boer, W. de; Buschhorn, G.; Christiansen, W.; Grindhammer, G.; Gunderson, B.; Kiesling, C.; Kotthaus, R.; Kroha, H.; Lueers, D.; Oberlack, H.; Sack, B.; Schacht, P.; Shooshtari, G.; Wiedenmann, W.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Fournier, D.; Gaillard, M.; Grivaz, J.F.; Haissinski, J.; Janot, P.; Journe, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Ros, E.; Spadafora, A.; Veillet, J.J.; Aleksan, R.; Cozzika, G.; Ducros, Y.; Jarry, P.; Lavagne, Y.; Ould Saada, F.; Pamela, J.; Pierre, F.; Zacek, J.; Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Gnat, Y.; Grunhaus, J.

    1986-02-01

    Using the CELLO detector at PETRA we have searched for excited leptons by studying e + e - interactions which yield p + p - γγ, l + l - γ and γγ final states, where l = 3, μ or τ. We observe good agreement with QED and set new limits on e*, μ*, and τ* production. (orig.)

  15. Hardness and excitation energy

    It is shown that the first excitation energy can be given by the Kohn-Sham hardness (i.e. the energy difference of the ground-state lowest unoccupied and highest occupied levels) plus an extra term coming from the partial derivative of the ensemble exchange-correlation energy with respect to the weighting factor in the ...

  16. Nonlinear excitations in biomolecules

    Peyrard, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the workshop entitled ''Nonlinear Excitations in Biomolecules'' is to attempt to bridge the gap between the physicists and biologists communities which is mainly due to language and cultural barriers. The progress of nonlinear science in the last few decades which have shown that the combination of nonlinearity, which characterize most biological phenomena, and cooperative effects in a system having a large number of degrees of freedom, can give rise to coherent excitations with remarkable properties. New concepts, such as solitons nd nonlinear energy localisation have become familiar to physicists and applied mathematicians. It is thus tempting to make an analogy between these coherent excitations and the exceptional stability of some biological processes, such as for instance DNA transcription, which require the coordination of many events in the ever changing environment of a cell. Physicists are now invoking nonlinear excitations to describe and explain many bio-molecular processes while biologists often doubt that the seemingly infinite variety of phenomena that they are attempting to classify can be reduced to such simple concepts. A large part of the meeting is devoted to tutorial lectures rather than to latest research results. The book provides a pedagogical introduction to the two topics forming the backbone of the meeting: the theory of nonlinear excitations and solitons, and their application in biology; and the structure and function of biomolecules, as well as energy and charge transport in biophysics. In order to emphasize the link between physics and biology, the volume is not divided along these two topics but according to biological subjects. Each chapter starts with a short introduction attempting to help the reader to find his way among the contributions and point out the connection between them. 23 lectures over the 32 presented have been selected and refers to quantum properties of macro-molecules. (J.S.)

  17. Quantum control of vibrational excitations in a heteronuclear ...

    WINTEC

    Optimal control theory is applied to obtain infrared laser pulses for selective vibrational exci- tation in a ... introduced in the field prior to evaluation of the cost functional for better field shape. Conjugate ... focused greater attention on optimal control of quan- tum states ... from the ground state to the first excited state in a.

  18. Influence of laser parameters on laser ultrasonic efficiency

    Forbes, A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available , TEA CO2 lasers, laser chemistry, short pulses 1. INTRODUCTION Polymer-matrix composites are increasingly used in the aerospace industry, particularly in the manufacture of modern fighter planes1-3. The number and complexity of such composites... efficiency can be improved by utilising short pulses in the 3–4 µm and 10 µm spectral regions1. Short pulse 10 µm radiation can be produced by transversely excited, atmospheric CO2 (TEA CO2) lasers. Due to the technological maturity of these lasers...

  19. Fermionic Collective Excitations in a Lattice Gas of Rydberg Atoms

    Olmos, B.; Gonzalez-Ferez, R.; Lesanovsky, I.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the many-body quantum states of a laser-driven gas of Rydberg atoms confined to a large spacing ring lattice. If the laser driving is much stronger than the van der Waals interaction among the Rydberg atoms, these many-body states are collective fermionic excitations. The first excited state is a spin wave that extends over the entire lattice. We demonstrate that our system permits us to study fermions in the presence of disorder although no external atomic motion takes place. We analyze how this disorder influences the excitation properties of the fermionic states. Our work shows a route towards the creation of complex many-particle states with atoms in lattices.

  20. Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum

    Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

    1984-07-17

    A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.