WorldWideScience

Sample records for state-of-the-art-dehumidification cost-effective corrosion

  1. Practical use of solar heating-dehumidification dry kiln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yoshinori

    1988-06-01

    In order to decrease the energy cost for drying, a solar-dehumidification dry kiln which used the dehumidification dry process together with the solar thermal drier was developed and tested. In the daytime the drying temperature rose up to 60/sup 0/C in summer and 40/sup 0/C in winter, and it was kept higher by 15 to 20/sup 0/C than the outside temperature at night. Owing to the adoption of the combination of direct solar heating and exhausting highly humid air, it was not necessary to operate the dry kiln in the day time. Average electrical energy consumption which was consumed to 15% moisture content from the raw lumber was about 73kWh/m/sup 3/ in summer which was lowest, about 87kWh/m/sup 3/ in winter. Energy cost required for the solar dehumidification dry kiln is 1/2 to 2/3 of that of the conventional dehumidification dry kiln. The solar-dehumidification dry kiln has a merit of cheaper operating cost in the low energy cost and reduced drying time. (7 figs, 1 tab, 6 refs)

  2. Effect of hygroscopic materials on water vapor permeation and dehumidification performance of poly(vinyl alcohol) membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Bui, T. D.

    2017-01-16

    In this study, two hygroscopic materials, inorganic lithium chloride (LiCl) and organic triethylene glycol (TEG) were separately added to poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) to form blend membranes for air dehumidification. Water vapor permeation, dehumidification performance and long-term durability of the membranes were studied systematically. Membrane hydrophilicity and water vapor sorbability increased significantly with higher the hygroscopic material contents. Water vapor permeance of the membranes increased with both added hygroscopic material and absorbed water. Water permeation energy varied from positive to negative with higher hygroscopic content. This observation is attributed to a lower diffusion energy and a relatively constant sorption energy when hygroscopic content increases. Comparatively, PVA/TEG has less corrosive problems and is more environmentally friendly than PVA/LiCl. A membrane with PVA/TEG is observed to be highly durable and is suitable for dehumidification applications.

  3. Corrosion control for low-cost reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This conference was held September 19-24, 1993 in Houston, Texas to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on corrosion. Topics of interest focus on the following: atmospheric corrosion; chemical process industry corrosion; high temperature corrosion; and corrosion of plant materials. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  4. Energy Demand Comparison between Hollow Fiber Membrane Based Dehumidification and Evaporative Cooling Dehumidification Using TRNSYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeachul Jang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This communication presents the performance evaluation and comparative study between two different techniques: a membrane-based dehumidification system (MDS and evaporative cooling dehumidification (ECD for a typical climate of South Korea. Although there are different ways to dehumidify the air in living and work spaces, the membrane-based dehumidification system (MDS is the most effective way as it neither causes a change in the temperature nor harms the environment. Moreover, it consumes significantly less energy when compared to other methods. There are also limitations concerning products that are sensitive to temperature such as food and pharmaceutical products; the method of evaporative cooling dehumidification is not suitable for such applications. The present work demonstrated the excellent energy-saving performance of the membrane-based dehumidification system against evaporative cooling dehumidification by comparing the performance of these two systems during the rainy season using a transient system simulation. The results showed that the MDS helped to reduce the dehumidification load by more than 47.6% when compared to the ECD system, which is a significant achievement in this regard.

  5. Air dehumidification and drying processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, R.

    1988-07-01

    Details are given on the physical principles of air dehumidification and drying as well as on appropriate systems available on the market. Reference is made to dehumidification through condensation (intermittent compressor or electric auxiliary heater defrosting, reversible-circuit hot gas bypass defrosting), air drying through sorption (sorbents, regeneration through heat inputs), the operation of absorptive dryers (schematic sketches), and the change of state of air (Mollier h,x-diagramm). Practical examples refer to the dehumidification of storage rooms, archives, and waterworks as well as to air drying in the pharmaceutical industry, the pastry and candy industry, the food industry, and the drying (preservation) of turbines and generators during long standstill periods. A diagramm shows that while adsorption processes are efficient at temperatures below 80/sup 0/C, low-temperature dehumidification is efficient at temperatures above. (HWJ).

  6. Triple-bore hollow fiber membrane contactor for liquid desiccant based air dehumidification

    KAUST Repository

    Bettahalli Narasimha, Murthy Srivatsa

    2016-04-26

    Dehumidification is responsible for a large part of the energy consumption in cooling systems in high humidity environments worldwide. Improving efficiency is therefore essential. Liquid desiccants offer a promising solution for dehumidification, as desired levels of humidity removal could be easily regulated. The use of membrane contactors in combination with liquid desiccant is attractive for dehumidification because they prevent direct contact between the humid air and the desiccant, removing both the potential for desiccant carryover to the air and the potential for contamination of the liquid desiccant by dust and other airborne materials, as well as minimizing corrosion. However, the expected additional mass transport barrier of the membrane surface can lower the expected desiccation rate per unit of desiccant surface area. In this context, hollow fiber membranes present an attractive option for membrane liquid desiccant contactors because of their high surface area per unit volume. We demonstrate in this work the performance of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) based triple-bore hollow fiber membranes as liquid desiccant contactors, which are permeable to water vapor but impermeable to liquid water, for dehumidification of hot and humid air.

  7. Performance and cost assessment of solar driven humidification dehumidification desalination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubair, M. Ifras; Al-Sulaiman, Fahad A.; Antar, M.A.; Al-Dini, Salem A.; Ibrahim, Nasiru I.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimization of a new HDH system integrated solar evacuated tubes collectors was conducted. • The mathematical models developed for the collector and the HDH system were validated. • A multi-location analysis was then performed for six locations in Saudi Arabia. • Sharurah was found to have the highest annual output and Dhahran the lowest at 19,445 and 16,430 L. • The cost per liter of water produced varies from $0.032 to $0.038, depends on the location. - Abstract: A humidification-dehumidification (HDH) desalination system integrated with solar evacuated tubes was optimized. Then, the optimized system was assessed for the operation in different geographical locations, and the rate of freshwater production and cost per liter were determined in each location. The system design proposed in this paper uses a heat pipe design evacuated tube collector, which performs significantly better based on cost. An HDH desalination system with a closed-air/open-water loop, connected to the collector, was evaluated to determine the optimum operating parameters and the system performance during daytime (from 8 am to 3 pm), as well as the average day of each month for an entire year. The impact of the effectiveness of the humidifier and the dehumidifier, as well as, the number of collectors, were also studied. The analyses were performed for Dhahran, Jeddah, Riyadh, Sharurah, Qassim, and Tabuk to determine the effects of varying the geographical location. Sharurah has the highest calculated productivity of freshwater and Dhahran has the lowest at 19,445 and 16,430 L, respectively. To have a comprehensive study of the system proposed, a cost analysis was also performed to determine the feasibility of the system and the cost of water production. Results show that the price varied from $0.032 to $0.038 per liter for the locations evaluated.

  8. Investigation on a two-stage solar liquid-desiccant (LiBr) dehumidification system assisted by CaCl2 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Z.Q.; Dai, Y.J.; Wang, R.Z.

    2009-01-01

    A two-stage solar powered liquid-desiccant dehumidification system, for which two kinds of desiccant solution (lithium chloride and calcium bromide) are fed to the two dehumidification stages separately, has been studied. In the studied system air moisture (latent) load is separately removed by a pre-dehumidifier using cheap calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) and a main dehumidifier using stable lithium bromide (LiBr). Side-effect of mixing heat rejected during dehumidification process is considerably alleviated by an indirect evaporative cooling unit added between the two dehumidification stages. The feasibility of high-desiccant concentration difference achieved by reusing desiccant solution to dehumidify air and regenerating desiccant repeatedly is analyzed. By increasing desiccant concentration difference, desiccant storage capacity is effectively explored. It is found that the pre-dehumidification effect of CaCl 2 solution is significant in high ambient humidity condition. Also seen is that the desiccant investment can be decreased by 53%, though the cost of equipments is somewhat increased, and the Tcop and COP of the proposed system can reach 0.97 and 2.13, respectively

  9. Energy performance of an innovative liquid desiccant dehumidification system with a counter-flow heat and mass exchanger using potassium formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jradi, Muhyiddine; Riffat, Saffa

    2014-01-01

    An innovative micro-scale liquid desiccant dehumidification system is numerically investigated. The liquid desiccant dehumidification unit employs a counter-flow low-cost and efficient heat and mass exchange core, improving the thermal performance and eliminating desiccant carryover...... that the dehumidifier effectiveness is directly proportional to the intake air temperature, intake air relative humidity and liquid desiccant flow rate where the effectiveness is inversely proportional to the intake air velocity and the heat exchanger air channel height....

  10. EVALUATION OF CORROSION COST OF CRUDE OIL PROCESSING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADESANYA A.O.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Crude oil production industry as the hub of Nigeria Economy is not immune to the global financial meltdown being experienced world over which have resulted in a continual fall of oil price. This has necessitated the need to reduce cost of production. One of the major costs of production is corrosion cost, hence, its evaluation. This research work outlined the basic principles of corrosion prevention, monitoring and inspection and attempted to describe ways in which these measures may be adopted in the context of oil production. A wide range of facilities are used in crude oil production making it difficult to evaluate precisely the extent of corrosion and its cost implication. In this study, cost of corrosion per barrel was determined and the annualized value of corrosion cost was also determined using the principles of engineering economy and results analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results showed that among the corrosion prevention methods identified, the use of chemical treatment gave the highest cost contribution (81% of the total cost of prevention while coating added 19%. Cleaning pigging and cathodic protection gave no cost. The contribution of corrosion maintenance methods are 60% for repairs and 40% for replacement. Also among the corrosion monitoring and inspection identified, NDT gave the highest cost contribution of 41% of the total cost, followed by coating survey (34%. Cathodic protection survey and crude analysis gives the lowest cost contribution of 19% and 6% respectively. Corrosion control cost per barrel was found to be 77 cent/barrel. The significance of this cost was not much due to high price of crude oil in the international market. But the effect of corrosion in crude oil processing takes its toll on crude oil production (i.e. deferment.

  11. Air dehumidification by membrane with cold water for manned spacecraft environmental control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Yonghong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional condensation dehumidification method requires additional gas-liquid separation and water recovery process in the manned spacecraft humidity control system, which would increase weight and complexity of systems. A new membrane dehumidification with cold water is proposed, which uses water vapor partial pressure difference to promote water vapor transmembrane mass transfer for dehumidification. The permeability of the membrane was measured and the experimental results agree well with the theoretical calculations. Based on the simulation of dehumidification process of cold water-membrane, the influence of module structure and working condition on dehumidification performance was analyzed, which provided reference for the design of membrane module construct. It can be seen from the simulation and experiments that the cold water-membrane dehumidification can effectively reduce the thermal load of the manned spacecraft.

  12. Cost management of IT beyond cost of ownership models : a state of the art overview of the Dutch financial services industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maanen, H.; Berghout, E.W.

    Controlling costs is an essential part of a value driven information technology (IT) management. This paper gives a state of the art overview of IT cost management practice. Both theoretical and an empirical approach are taken. The theoretical approach is based on both general accounting literature

  13. Dry air preservation and corrosion prevention using desiccant dehumidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tykesson, M.; Ashworth, C.

    1991-01-01

    The preservation and longevity of power station plants is a significant problem, particularly in cold shut down situations for prolonged periods of time, and also in storage of parts prior to installation. Power station protection and equipment preservation using the desiccant method is not new. For many years dehumidification machinery has been employed as a barrier to moisture related degradation. The first rotary desiccant dehumidifiers were installed within the power plant industry in the mid 1960s. Many of these first installations remain in operation today. In order to understand the functioning of a desiccant unit as compared with other air handling systems, it is essential to understand the fundamentals of a psychrometric chart. This article will attempt to give the reader an understanding of the subject. (author)

  14. Modeling of Metal Structure Corrosion Damage: A State of the Art Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Portioli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The durability of metal structures is strongly influenced by damage due to atmospheric corrosion, whose control is a key aspect for design and maintenance of both new constructions and historical buildings. Nevertheless, only general provisions are given in European codes to prevent the effects of corrosion during the lifetime of metal structures. In particular, design guidelines such as Eurocode 3 do not provide models for the evaluation of corrosion depth that are able to predict the rate of thickness loss as a function of different influencing parameters. In this paper, the modeling approaches of atmospheric corrosion damage of metal structures, which are available in both ISO standards and the literature, are presented. A comparison among selected degradation models is shown in order to evaluate the possibility of developing a general approach to the evaluation of thickness loss due to corrosion.

  15. Solar Desalination by Humidification-Dehumidification of Air

    OpenAIRE

    Moumouh J.; Tahiri M.; Balli L.

    2018-01-01

    The importance of supplying potable water can hardly be overstressed. In many arid zones, coastal or inlands, seawater or brackish water desalination may be the only solution to the shortage of fresh water. The process based on humidification-dehumidification of air (HDH) principle mimic the natural water cycle. HDH technique has been subjected to many studies in recent years due to the low temperature, renewable energy use, simplicity, low cost installation and operation. An experimental tes...

  16. The effects of de-humidification and O{sub 2} direct injection in oxy-PC combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C.G.; Na, I.H.; Lee, J.W.; Chae, T.Y.; Yang, W. [Korea Insitute of Industrial Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Energy System R and D Dept.

    2013-07-01

    This study is aimed to derive effects of de-humidification and O{sub 2} direct injection in oxy-PC combustion system. Temperature distribution and flue gas composition were observed for various air and oxy-fuel conditions such as effect of various O{sub 2} concentration of total oxidant, O{sub 2} concentration of primary stream and O{sub 2} direct injection through 0-D heat and mass balance calculation and experiments in the oxy-PC combustion system of 0.3 MW scale in KITECH (Korea Institute of Industrial Technology). Flame attachment characteristic related to O{sub 2} direct injection was also observed experimentally. We found that FEGT (furnace exit gas temperature) of 100% de-humidification to oxidizer is lower than humidification condition; difference between two conditions is lower than 20 C in all cases. The efficiency changing of combustion was negligible in O{sub 2} direct injection. But O{sub 2} direct injection should be carefully designed to produce a stable flame.

  17. Dehumidification by dessiccant regenerated by natural gas at the Campeau ice rink in Gatineau; La deshumidification par dessiccant regenere par le gaz naturel a l'Arena Campeau de Gatineau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lajoie, S.

    2003-03-01

    As air quality gains in importance, dehumidification by dessiccant represents an interesting technological solution, especially in ice rinks where bad air quality (carbon monoxide) is not unknown. Contrary to conventional technologies, dehumidification by dessiccant allows to maintain adequate levels of air quality and optimum humidity levels. Three major advantages are: improved user comfort, the building structure is protected from corrosion, and superior air quality levels are achieved. The document first provided the reader with a brief overview of conventional mechanical dehumidification systems before discussing dehumidification by natural gas dessiccant. A quick historical review of the Campeau ice rink in Gatineau, Quebec was provided, including results obtained. The article concluded by indicating that the technology offers interesting potential for ice rinks. Energy savings are made possible through the utilization of this technology, and improves revenues by stretching operations for longer periods. 1 tab., 1 fig.

  18. Comparison of dehumidification and heat and vent drying of hem-fir softwood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackay, J F.G.; Nielson, R W

    1988-03-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the performance of dehumidifier kilns, compared to gas-fired, hot-air kilns in drying a commercial grade of softwood lumber. To accomplish this, drying tests were conducted with matched loads of lumber in a new test facility which was constructed to operate as a conventional heat and vent kiln or as a dehumidifier kiln. Comparisons were made of drying times, shrinkage and quality of dried product and total drying energy consumptions. Data from these tests were used in conjunction with capital, energy and other costs obtained from suppliers and operators of existing kilns to make economic comparisons between commercial-sized dehumidifier and heat and vent kilns. These comparisons were made on the basis of equivalent uniform annual costs. Dehumidification drying took about 20% longer and used about 50% of energy compared to heat and vent drying. Analysis of the test runs indicated that further improvements in the energy utilization efficiencies of dehumidifier kilns are feasible since one run indicated an energy consumption of only 36% of that in heat and vent drying. No differences in shrinkage or degrade were apparent. Economic comparisons for three sizes of kilns showed total drying costs by dehumidification to be less for a small-size kiln but more for medium- and large-size operations. Sensitivity analyses were performed to observe the effect of alternate energy prices, dehumidifier energy consumptions, dehumidifier drying times, building costs and degrade. 9 refs., 7 figs., 36 tabs.

  19. Corrosion Cost and Corrosion Map of Korea - Based on the Data from 2005 to 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Lim, H. K.; Kim, J. J.; Hwang, W. S.; Park, Y. S.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion of metallic materials occurs by the reaction with corrosive environment such as atmosphere, marine, soil, urban, high temperature etc. In general, reduction of thickness and cracking and degradation are resulted from corrosion. Corrosion in all industrial facilities and infrastructure causes large economic losses as well as a large number of accidents. Economic loss by corrosion has been reported to be nearly 1-6% of GNP or GDP. In order to reduce corrosion damage of industrial facilities, corrosion map as well as a systematic investigation of the loss of corrosion in each industrial sector is needed. The Corrosion Science Society of Korea in collaboration with 15 universities and institutes has started to survey on the cost of corrosion and corrosion map of Korea since 2005. This work presents the results of the survey on cost of corrosion by Uhlig, Hoar, and input-output methods, and the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion rate of carbon steel, weathering steel, galvanized steel, copper, and aluminum in Korea. The total corrosion cost was estimated in terms of the percentage of the GDP of industry sectors and the total GDP of Korea. According to the result of Input/output method, corrosion cost of Korea was calculated as 2.9% to GDP (2005). Time of wetness was shown to be categories 3 to 4 in all exposure areas. A definite seasonal difference was observed in Korea. In summer and fall, time of wetness was higher than in other seasons. Because of short exposure period (12 months), significant corrosion trends depending upon materials and exposure corrosion environments were not revealed even though increased mass loss and decreased corrosion rate by exposure time

  20. A hybrid desalination system using humidification-dehumidification and solar stills integrated with evacuated solar water heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharshir, S.W.; Peng, Guilong; Yang, Nuo; Eltawil, Mohamed A.; Ali, Mohamed Kamal Ahmed; Kabeel, A.E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Evacuated solar water heater integrated with humidification-dehumidification system. • Reuse of warm water drained from humidification-dehumidification to feed solar stills. • The thermal performance of hybrid system is increased by 50% and maximum yield is 63.3 kg/day. • The estimated price of the freshwater produced from the hybrid system is $0.034/L. - Abstract: This paper offers a hybrid solar desalination system comprising a humidification-dehumidification and four solar stills. The developed hybrid desalination system reuses the drain warm water from humidification-dehumidification to feed solar stills to stop the massive warm water loss during desalination. Reusing the drain warm water increases the gain output ratio of the system by 50% and also increased the efficiency of single solar still to about 90%. Furthermore, the production of a single solar still as a part of the hybrid system was more than that of the conventional one by approximately 200%. The daily water production of the conventional one, single solar still, four solar still, humidification- dehumidification and hybrid system were 3.2, 10.5, 42, 24.3 and 66.3 kg/day, respectively. Furthermore, the cost per unit liter of distillate from conventional one, humidification- dehumidification and hybrid system were around $0.049, $0.058 and $0.034, respectively.

  1. Exfoliation Corrosion and Pitting Corrosion and Their Role in Fatigue Predictive Modeling: State-of-the-Art Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Hoeppner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intergranular attack (IG and exfoliation corrosion (EC have a detrimental impact on the structural integrity of aircraft structures of all types. Understanding the mechanisms and methods for dealing with these processes and with corrosion in general has been and is critical to the safety of critical components of aircraft. Discussion of cases where IG attack and exfoliation caused issues in structural integrity in aircraft in operational fleets is presented herein along with a much more detailed presentation of the issues involved in dealing with corrosion of aircraft. Issues of corrosion and fatigue related to the structural integrity of aging aircraft are introduced herein. Mechanisms of pitting nucleation are discussed which include adsorption-induced, ion migration-penetration, and chemicomechanical film breakdown theories. In addition, pitting corrosion (PC fatigue models are presented as well as a critical assessment of their application to aircraft structures and materials. Finally environmental effects on short crack behavior of materials are discussed, and a compilation of definitions related to corrosion and fatigue are presented.

  2. Corrosion and protection in reinforced concrete : Pulse cathodic protection: an improved cost-effective alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion and protection in reinforced concrete. Pulse cathodic protection: an improved cost-effective alternative. The aim of the research project was to study the possibilities for establishing a new or improved electrochemical method for corrosion prevention/protection for reinforced concrete.

  3. Review of state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes. Task 1 of solar collector studies for solar heating and cooling applications. Final technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, J E; Diegle, R B

    1980-04-11

    The state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes is reviewed, and Task 1 of a current research program on use of aqueous heat transfer fluids for solar heating and cooling is summarized. The review of available published literature has indicated that lack of quantitative information exists relative to collector corrosion at the present time, particularly for the higher temperature applications of solar heating and cooling compared to domestic water heating. Solar collector systems are reviewed from the corrosion/service life viewpoint, with emphasis on various applications, collector design, heat transfer fluids, and freeze protection methods. Available information (mostly qualitative) on collector corrosion technology is reviewed to indicate potential corrosion problem areas and corrosion prevention practices. Sources of limited quantitative data that are reviewed are current solar applications, research programs on collector corrosion, and pertinent experience in related applications of automotive cooling and non-solar heating and cooling. A data bank was developed to catalog corrosion information. Appendix A of this report is a bibliography of the data bank, with abstracts reproduced from presently available literature accessions (about 220). This report is presented as a descriptive summary of information that is contained in the data bank.

  4. HIV Treatment as Prevention: Modelling the Cost of Antiretroviral Treatment—State of the Art and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Over, Mead

    2012-01-01

    Policy discussions about the feasibility of massively scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART) to reduce HIV transmission and incidence hinge on accurately projecting the cost of such scale-up in comparison to the benefits from reduced HIV incidence and mortality. We review the available literature on modelled estimates of the cost of providing ART to different populations around the world, and suggest alternative methods of characterising cost when modelling several decades into the future. In past economic analyses of ART provision, costs were often assumed to vary by disease stage and treatment regimen, but for treatment as prevention, in particular, most analyses assume a uniform cost per patient. This approach disregards variables that can affect unit cost, such as differences in factor prices (i.e., the prices of supplies and services) and the scale and scope of operations (i.e., the sizes and types of facilities providing ART). We discuss several of these variables, and then present a worked example of a flexible cost function used to determine the effect of scale on the cost of a proposed scale-up of treatment as prevention in South Africa. Adjusting previously estimated costs of universal testing and treatment in South Africa for diseconomies of small scale, i.e., more patients being treated in smaller facilities, adds 42% to the expected future cost of the intervention. PMID:22802731

  5. Effect of Secondary Phase Precipitation on the Corrosion Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai Wang; Tjong, Sie Chin

    2014-07-22

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) with austenitic and ferritic phases have been increasingly used for many industrial applications due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in acidic, caustic and marine environments. However, DSSs are susceptible to intergranular, pitting and stress corrosion in corrosive environments due to the formation of secondary phases. Such phases are induced in DSSs during the fabrication, improper heat treatment, welding process and prolonged exposure to high temperatures during their service lives. These include the precipitation of sigma and chi phases at 700-900 °C and spinodal decomposition of ferritic grains into Cr-rich and Cr-poor phases at 350-550 °C, respectively. This article gives the state-of the-art review on the microstructural evolution of secondary phase formation and their effects on the corrosion behavior of DSSs.

  6. State of the Art on Cactus Additions in Alkaline Media as Corrosion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Torres-Acosta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research in progress includes results on the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel in alkaline media when two different dehydrated cacti (Opuntia ficus-indica—Nopal—and Aloe Vera were used as additions in pH 12.5 and 13.3 solutions and in concrete. The dehydrated cactus addition was mixed at different concentrations by either solution or cement mass (0.10%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1.0%, and 2.0%. Half-cell potentials and LPR measurements were performed at different time periods to characterize the possible corrosion inhibiting effect of the cactus additions tested in such alkaline media. Results showed good corrosion inhibiting effect of dehydrated Nopal on reinforcing steel, in all tested solutions, when chloride ions are present. Aloe Vera did show also corrosion inhibiting improvements in some extent. The addition of such cactus led to an apparent formation of a denser and more packed oxide/hydroxide surface layer on the steel surface that decreased corrosion activity. This oxide/hydroxide layer growth was confirmed by microscopic evaluation of the metal surface layer performed at the end of the research program. The preliminary findings suggest that adding Nopal at concentrations between 1% and 2%, by mass, might be suitable for durability enhancing applications in alkaline media, especially in concrete structures.

  7. Feasibility and economic analysis of solid desiccant wheel used for dehumidification and preheating in blast furnace: A case study of steel plant, Nanjing, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Yipeng; Zhang, Yufeng; Sheng, Ying; Kong, Xiangrui; Du, Song

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of huge energy consumption from conventional dehumidification using lithium bromide adsorption refrigerating (LBARD) system, a novel desiccant wheel dehumidification and preheating (DWDP) system using two-stage desiccant wheel for blast furnace is brought forward. The DWDP system was designed for dehumidification and preheating in blast furnace of steel plant. It takes waste heat in the slag flushing water as desiccant regeneration and preheating energy. To validate the feasibility of the new DWDP system, experimental studies were conducted based on a steel plant in Nanjing, China. The experiment was designed to use DWDP system in humid outdoor climates e.g. summer seasons. The experimental results indicate that the moisture removal capacity of DWDP system can reach 8.7 g/kg which will lead to the improvement of steel production by 0.9% and the coal is saved of about 2100 tons per year. With the DWDP system, the energy consumed by cooling tower of slag flushing water can decrease 7.3%. All of these energy saved equates to 10.3 million CNY annually. A comparison of initial investment and operating cost between DWDP system and LBRAD system was then carried out. The results show that the initial investment and operating cost of DWDP system is 37% and 57% of present LBARD system, and the payback period is shortened 66%. - Highlights: • A novel two-stage desiccant wheel dehumidification system for blast furnace is proposed. • Average moisture removal of 8.7 g/kg is achieved and dehumidification efficiency is 47%. • Outlet humidity ratio is less than 10 g/kg that satisfies the requirement of blast air. • Waste heat in slag flushing water is utilized and 61.4 million kJ is saved annually. • The investment and operating cost is 37% and 57% of former dehumidification system

  8. Expanding ART for Treatment and Prevention of HIV in South Africa: Estimated Cost and Cost-Effectiveness 2011-2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granich, Reuben; Kahn, James G.; Bennett, Rod; Holmes, Charles B.; Garg, Navneet; Serenata, Celicia; Sabin, Miriam Lewis; Makhlouf-Obermeyer, Carla; De Filippo Mack, Christina; Williams, Phoebe; Jones, Louisa; Smyth, Caoimhe; Kutch, Kerry A.; Ying-Ru, Lo; Vitoria, Marco; Souteyrand, Yves; Crowley, Siobhan; Korenromp, Eline L.; Williams, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) significantly reduces HIV transmission. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of the impact of expanded ART in South Africa. Methods We model a best case scenario of 90% annual HIV testing coverage in adults 15–49 years old and four ART eligibility scenarios: CD4 count ART costs reflect South African data and international generic prices. ART reduces transmission by 92%. We conducted sensitivity analyses. Results Expanding ART to CD4 count ART and monitoring costs, all CD4 levels saves $0.6 billion versus current; other ART scenarios cost $9–194 per DALY averted. If ART reduces transmission by 99%, savings from all CD4 levels reach $17.5 billion. Sensitivity analyses suggest that poor retention and predominant acute phase transmission reduce DALYs averted by 26% and savings by 7%. Conclusion Increasing the provision of ART to ART uptake, retention, and adherence should be evaluated. PMID:22348000

  9. Review of Desiccant Dehumidification Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A. A.

    1994-10-01

    This paper overviews applications of desiccant technology for dehumidifying commercial and institutional buildings. Because of various market, policy, and regulatory factors, this technology is especially attractive for dehumidification applications in the I990s.

  10. Effect of Secondary Phase Precipitation on the Corrosion Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Duplex stainless steels (DSSs with austenitic and ferritic phases have been increasingly used for many industrial applications due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in acidic, caustic and marine environments. However, DSSs are susceptible to intergranular, pitting and stress corrosion in corrosive environments due to the formation of secondary phases. Such phases are induced in DSSs during the fabrication, improper heat treatment, welding process and prolonged exposure to high temperatures during their service lives. These include the precipitation of sigma and chi phases at 700–900 °C and spinodal decomposition of ferritic grains into Cr-rich and Cr-poor phases at 350–550 °C, respectively. This article gives the state-of the-art review on the microstructural evolution of secondary phase formation and their effects on the corrosion behavior of DSSs.

  11. Laser Beam Machining (LBM), State of the Art and New Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, J.

    2004-01-01

    An overview is given of the state of the art of laser beam machining in general with special emphasis on applications of short and ultrashort lasers. In laser welding the trend is to apply optical sensors for process control. Laser surface treatment is mostly used to apply corrosion and wear

  12. Procedures for Calculating Residential Dehumidification Loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Jon [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Booten, Chuck [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Residential building codes and voluntary labeling programs are continually increasing the energy efficiency requirements of residential buildings. Improving a building's thermal enclosure and installing energy-efficient appliances and lighting can result in significant reductions in sensible cooling loads leading to smaller air conditioners and shorter cooling seasons. However due to fresh air ventilation requirements and internal gains, latent cooling loads are not reduced by the same proportion. Thus, it's becoming more challenging for conventional cooling equipment to control indoor humidity at part-load cooling conditions and using conventional cooling equipment in a non-conventional building poses the potential risk of high indoor humidity. The objective of this project was to investigate the impact the chosen design condition has on the calculated part-load cooling moisture load, and compare calculated moisture loads and the required dehumidification capacity to whole-building simulations. Procedures for sizing whole-house supplemental dehumidification equipment have yet to be formalized; however minor modifications to current Air-Conditioner Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual J load calculation procedures are appropriate for calculating residential part-load cooling moisture loads. Though ASHRAE 1% DP design conditions are commonly used to determine the dehumidification requirements for commercial buildings, an appropriate DP design condition for residential buildings has not been investigated. Two methods for sizing supplemental dehumidification equipment were developed and tested. The first method closely followed Manual J cooling load calculations; whereas the second method made more conservative assumptions impacting both sensible and latent loads.

  13. The Cost Analysis of Corrosion Protection Solutions for Steel Components in Terms of the Object Life Cycle Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski Dariusz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Steel materials, due to their numerous advantages - high availability, easiness of processing and possibility of almost any shaping are commonly applied in construction for carrying out basic carrier systems and auxiliary structures. However, the major disadvantage of this material is its high corrosion susceptibility, which depends strictly on the local conditions of the facility and the applied type of corrosion protection system. The paper presents an analysis of life cycle costs of structures installed on bridges used in the road lane conditions. Three anti-corrosion protection systems were considered, analyzing their essential cost components. The possibility of reducing significantly the costs associated with anti-corrosion protection at the stage of steel barriers maintenance over a period of 30 years has been indicated. The possibility of using a new approach based on the life cycle cost estimation in the anti-corrosion protection of steel elements is presented. The relationship between the method of steel barrier protection, the scope of repair, renewal work and costs is shown. The article proposes an optimal solution which, while reducing the cost of maintenance of road infrastructure components in the area of corrosion protection, allows to maintain certain safety standards for steel barriers that are installed on the bridge.

  14. The Cost Analysis of Corrosion Protection Solutions for Steel Components in Terms of the Object Life Cycle Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Dariusz; Grzyl, Beata; Kristowski, Adam

    2017-09-01

    Steel materials, due to their numerous advantages - high availability, easiness of processing and possibility of almost any shaping are commonly applied in construction for carrying out basic carrier systems and auxiliary structures. However, the major disadvantage of this material is its high corrosion susceptibility, which depends strictly on the local conditions of the facility and the applied type of corrosion protection system. The paper presents an analysis of life cycle costs of structures installed on bridges used in the road lane conditions. Three anti-corrosion protection systems were considered, analyzing their essential cost components. The possibility of reducing significantly the costs associated with anti-corrosion protection at the stage of steel barriers maintenance over a period of 30 years has been indicated. The possibility of using a new approach based on the life cycle cost estimation in the anti-corrosion protection of steel elements is presented. The relationship between the method of steel barrier protection, the scope of repair, renewal work and costs is shown. The article proposes an optimal solution which, while reducing the cost of maintenance of road infrastructure components in the area of corrosion protection, allows to maintain certain safety standards for steel barriers that are installed on the bridge.

  15. A state of the art on primary side stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. P.; Kim, J. S.; Han, J. H.; Lee, D. H.; Lim, Y. S.; Suh, J. H.; Hwang, S. S.; Hur, D. H

    1999-09-01

    A state of art on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of alloy 600 used as steam generator tubing of nuclear power plant and remedial action on the PWSCC were reviewed and analyzed. One of the major metallurgical factors which have effect on PWSCC is Cr carbide distribution. A semicontinuous intergranular Cr carbide distribution enhance PWSCC of alloy 600. PWSCC rate is reported to be reported to be proportional to exp(-50 cal/RT) {sigma}{sup 4}. PWSCC rate also increase with increase in hydrogen partial pressure from 0 to 150 ppm and then decreased with further increase in hydrogen partial pressure to 757 ppm. Development of PWSCC prediction technology which takes into account tubing material, fabrication process and operating history of steam generator is needed to manage PWSCC of domestic nuclear power plant. PWSCC has mainly occurred at expansion irregularities within tubesheet, expansion transitions, dented tube support plate intersections and transition and apex of U bend. Remedial actions to PWSCC are sleeving, plugging, temperature reduction, Ni plating, Ni sleeving, shot peening and steam generator replacement in worst case. Option to remedial actions depend on plant specific such as plant age, leak rate from primary to secondary, density and progression of PWSCC. Ni sleeving developed in Framatome seems to be a powerful method because it never subject to PWSCC. Remedial action should be developed and evaluated for possible PWSCC of domestic nuclear power plant. (author)

  16. Research and development needs for desiccant cooling technology 1992--1997. (Supplement to the NREL report, Desiccant Cooling: State-of-the-Art Assessment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A A

    1992-12-01

    This report is a supplement to Desiccant Cooling: State-of-the-Art Assessment (NREL/TP-254-4147, DE93000013). In this supplement document we have described a detailed program assuming sufficient funding to implement the R&D activities needed. Desiccant dehumidification is a mature technology for industrial applications, and in recent years the technology has been used for air conditioning a number of institutional and commercial buildings. Our proposal is based on argumentative discussions at various national meetings with leaders of the technology. The goal is the penetration of the broad air conditioning market. This work is funded by the Buildings technology Office of the US Department of Energy.

  17. Hollow Fiber Membrane Dehumidification Device for Air Conditioning System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baiwang; Peng, Na; Liang, Canzeng; Yong, Wai Fen; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2015-11-16

    In order to provide a comfortable living and working environment indoors in tropical countries, the outdoor air often needs to be cooled and dehumidified before it enters the rooms. Membrane separation is an emerging technology for air dehumidification and it is based on the solution diffusion mechanism. Water molecules are preferentially permeating through the membranes due to its smaller kinetic diameter and higher condensability than the other gases. Compared to other dehumidification technologies such as direct cooling or desiccation, there is no phase transition involved in membrane dehumidification, neither the contact between the fresh air stream and the desiccants. Hence, membrane dehumidification would not only require less energy consumption but also avoid cross-contamination problems. A pilot scale air dehumidification system is built in this study which comprises nine pieces of one-inch PAN/PDMS hollow fiber membrane modules. A 150 h long-term test shows that the membrane modules has good water vapor transport properties by using a low vacuum force of only 0.78 bar absolute pressure at the lumen side. The water vapor concentration of the feed humid air decreases dramatically from a range of 18-22 g/m³ to a range of 13.5-18.3 g/m³. Most importantly, the total energy saving is up to 26.2% compared with the conventional air conditioning process.

  18. Hollow Fiber Membrane Dehumidification Device for Air Conditioning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiwang Zhao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide a comfortable living and working environment indoors in tropical countries, the outdoor air often needs to be cooled and dehumidified before it enters the rooms. Membrane separation is an emerging technology for air dehumidification and it is based on the solution diffusion mechanism. Water molecules are preferentially permeating through the membranes due to its smaller kinetic diameter and higher condensability than the other gases. Compared to other dehumidification technologies such as direct cooling or desiccation, there is no phase transition involved in membrane dehumidification, neither the contact between the fresh air stream and the desiccants. Hence, membrane dehumidification would not only require less energy consumption but also avoid cross-contamination problems. A pilot scale air dehumidification system is built in this study which comprises nine pieces of one-inch PAN/PDMS hollow fiber membrane modules. A 150 h long-term test shows that the membrane modules has good water vapor transport properties by using a low vacuum force of only 0.78 bar absolute pressure at the lumen side. The water vapor concentration of the feed humid air decreases dramatically from a range of 18–22 g/m3 to a range of 13.5–18.3 g/m3. Most importantly, the total energy saving is up to 26.2% compared with the conventional air conditioning process.

  19. New simulators from old - achieving state-of-the-art simulation without state-of-the-art costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmeier, H.J.; Rosser, R.M.; Fyffe, K.L.; Gaerttner, G.F.; Chulick, E.T.

    1990-01-01

    Achieving a state-of-the-art simulator for operator training requires neither the expensive remodeling of old simulators nor the acquisition of very expensive new machines. In this paper the authors present two distinct cases where older training simulators have been upgraded to meet training requirements with a minimum of inexpensive hardware additions, including plug-in/-out panels, and software changes

  20. Experimental study of a cascade solar still coupled with a humidification–dehumidification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farshchi Tabrizi, Farshad; Khosravi, Meisam; Shirzaei Sani, Iman

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In this study, coupling of a cascade solar still with a humidification–dehumidification system investigated experimentally. In addition, the effects of different operating conditions and configurations on thermal performance and productivity of the under investigation solar system were studied. - Highlights: • We investigate coupling of a cascade solar still with a humidification–dehumidification system. • The effects of different operating conditions on thermal performance were studied. • Temperature and flow rate of feed water as well as air process flow rate had undeniable effects on the productivity. • Coupling several CSS systems with just one HD system to maximize the productivity. • Enhancing daily productivity of coupling system from 28% to 141% for 40–150 ml/min flow rates, respectively. - Abstract: In this study, coupling of a cascade solar still with a humidification–dehumidification system was investigated experimentally under the climatological conditions of Zahedan (Latitude: 29.49, Longitude: 60.87), Iran. The inclined solar stills produce distillated and hot water simultaneously. In addition, the effects of different operating conditions and configurations on thermal performance and productivity of the solar system were studied. The effect of feed water and air flow rates on the daily productivity of HD system in different conditions such as feed water temperature has been investigated. The daily productivity of cascade solar still with and without HD system at different flow rates is investigated. Moreover, the end result of assembling the HD system with a cascade solar still was studied. The daily productivity of the system increases from 28% to 141% in the presence of humidification–dehumidification system. It also improves the thermal efficiency from 9% to 20% after using 40–150 ml/min of flow rate, respectively. The maximum productivity and efficiency were 5.4 kg/m"2 day and 39% for minimum flow rate.

  1. Composite tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers: A state-of-the-art review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Keiser, J.R.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Beginning in the mid-1960s, increasing energy costs in Finland and Sweden made energy recovery more critical to the cost-effective operation of a kraft pulp mill. Boiler designers responded to this need by raising the steam operating pressure, but almost immediately the wall tubes in these new boilers began to corrode rapidly. Test panels installed in the walls of the most severely corroding boiler identified austenitic stainless steel as sufficiently resistant to the new corrosive conditions, and discussions with Sandvik AB, a Swedish tube manufacturer, led to the suggestion that coextruded tubes be used for water wall service in kraft recovery boilers. Replacement of carbon steel by coextruded tubes has solved most of the corrosion problems experienced by carbon steel wall tubes, however, these tubes have not been problem-free. Beginning in early 1995, a multidisciplinary research program funded by the US Department of Energy was established to investigate the cause of cracking in coextruded tubes and to develop improved materials for use in water walls and floors of kraft recovery boilers. One portion of that program, a state-of-the-art review of public- and private-domain documents related to coextruded tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers is reported here. Sources of information that were consulted for this review include the following: tube manufacturers, boiler manufacturers, public-domain literature, companies operating kraft recovery boilers, consultants and failure analysis laboratories, and failure analyses conducted specifically for this project. Much of the information contained in this report involves cracking problems experienced in recovery boiler floors and those aspects of spout and air-port-opening cracking not readily attributable to thermal fatigue. 61 refs.

  2. The size effect in corrosion greatly influences the predicted life span of concrete infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Ueli M; Elsener, Bernhard

    2017-08-01

    Forecasting the life of concrete infrastructures in corrosive environments presents a long-standing and socially relevant challenge in science and engineering. Chloride-induced corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is the main cause for premature degradation of concrete infrastructures worldwide. Since the middle of the past century, this challenge has been tackled by using a conceptual approach relying on a threshold chloride concentration for corrosion initiation ( C crit ). All state-of-the-art models for forecasting chloride-induced steel corrosion in concrete are based on this concept. We present an experiment that shows that C crit depends strongly on the exposed steel surface area. The smaller the tested specimen is, the higher and the more variable C crit becomes. This size effect in the ability of reinforced concrete to withstand corrosion can be explained by the local conditions at the steel-concrete interface, which exhibit pronounced spatial variability. The size effect has major implications for the future use of the common concept of C crit . It questions the applicability of laboratory results to engineering structures and the reproducibility of typically small-scale laboratory testing. Finally, we show that the weakest link theory is suitable to transform C crit from small to large dimensions, which lays the basis for taking the size effect into account in the science and engineering of forecasting the durability of infrastructures.

  3. Zirconia powders production by precipitation: state-of-art review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Ana Paula Almeida de; Torem, Mauricio Leonardo

    1994-01-01

    The important role played by zirconia in advanced ceramics can be attributed to its excellent wear and corrosion resistance and refractory character. The polymorphic nature of zirconia made the controlled addition of stabilizing oxides or the constraining effect of a dense ceramics matrix necessary to maintain high parameters had a significant influence on powder properties and on compacted powder behaviour in sintering. Particle shape and size, purity and crystalline structure were specially influenced by precipitation parameters. Therefore, this work presented a review of the state of the art in zirconia powder production and in the recent research on precipitation of that powder. (author)

  4. Economical analysis of the spray drying process by pre-dehumidification of the inlet air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madeira, A.N.; Camargo, J.R. [University of Taubate (UNITAU), SP (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    2009-07-01

    Spray drying is a dehumidification process by atomization in a closed chamber that aims to remove moisture of a product by heat and mass transfer from the product's contained water to the air that, in this process is previously heated. This paper presents a case study for an industry that produces food ingredients. The current process applied in the product to heat the air can uses one of these two systems: a direct heating process that burns liquid petroleum gas in contact with the inlet air or indirect heating that uses a heat exchanger which heat the air. This heating system consumes 90% of the total process energy. However, this inlet air can reach the dehumidifier with high moisture from the atmosphere condition requesting, in this case, more energy consumption according to the year's seasons. This paper promotes a utilization study of the current process through the installation of a pre-dehumidification device of the inlet air and shows a study to three different dehumidification systems that means by refrigeration, adsorption and actual comparing their performance in an energetic and economical point of view. The goals of this study are to analyze the capacity of moisture removing of each removing device, the influence of moisture variation of the inlet air in the process as well as the economic impact of each device in the global system. It concludes that the utilization of dehumidification devices can eliminate the heating system reducing this way the energy consumption. Moreover it promotes the increasing of moisture gradient between the inlet air and the product optimizing the drying process and increasing the global energy efficiency in the global system. Choosing the most appropriate system for the pre-dehumidification device depends on the desired initial and final moisture content of the product, but applying pre-dehumidifiers at the inlet air promotes an energetic optimization in the spray drying process. (author)

  5. Corrosion-product transport, oxidation state and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brett, M.E.; Tapping, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    The issues associated with monitoring and controlling corrosion-product transport (CPT) in the balance-of-plant (BOP) and steam generators (SG) of CANDU stations are briefly reviewed. The efforts are focused on minimizing corrosion of carbon steel, which is used extensively in the CANDU primary and secondary systems. Emphasis is placed on the corrosion-product oxidation state as a monitor of water chemistry effectiveness, and as a monitor of system corrosion effects. The discussion is based mostly on the results and observations from Ontario Hydro plants, and their comparisons with PWRs. The effects of low oxygen and elevated hydrazine chemistry are reviewed, as well as the effects of lay-up and various start-up conditions. Progress in monitoring electrochemical potential (ECP) at Ontario Hydro plants and its relationship to the oxidation state of corrosion products is reviewed. Observations on corrosion-product transport on the primary side of steam generators are also discussed. (author)

  6. Corrosion-product transport, oxidation state and remedial measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, J.A.; Brett, M.E.; Tapping, R.L.

    1998-10-01

    The issues associated with monitoring and controlling corrosion-product transport (CPT) in the balance-of-plant (BOP) and steam generators (SG) of CANDU stations are briefly reviewed. Efforts are focused on minimizing corrosion of carbon steel, which is used extensively in the CANDU primary and secondary systems. Emphasis is placed on the corrosion-product oxidation state as a monitor of water chemistry effectiveness and as a monitor of system corrosion effects. The discussion is based mostly on the results of observations from Ontario Hydro plants, and their comparisons with pressurized-water reactors. The effects of low oxygen and elevated hydrazine chemistry are reviewed, as well as the effects of layup and various startup conditions. Progress in monitoring electrochemical potential (ECP) at Ontario Hydro plants and its relationship to the oxidation state of corrosion products is reviewed. Observations on CPT on the primary side of SGs are also discussed. (author)

  7. A comparative study of compression-expansion type dehumidification systems to achieve low dew point air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Choon; Bansal, Pradeep

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical feasibility study of three dehumidification systems to achieve air with dew points down to (-) 40 deg. C. The systems consist of compressors, heat exchangers, expanders and heaters. A thermodynamic model has been developed of the systems to study the effect of the compressor, expander, and heat recovery heat exchanger efficiency as a function of pressure ratio, net required work, quantity of condensed moisture, and system outlet dew point temperature. The analysis has revealed that the selection of a heat recovery heat exchanger is critical for an efficient dehumidification system, where compressor efficiency has the dominant effect on power consumption.

  8. Underground pipeline corrosion

    CERN Document Server

    Orazem, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Underground pipelines transporting liquid petroleum products and natural gas are critical components of civil infrastructure, making corrosion prevention an essential part of asset-protection strategy. Underground Pipeline Corrosion provides a basic understanding of the problems associated with corrosion detection and mitigation, and of the state of the art in corrosion prevention. The topics covered in part one include: basic principles for corrosion in underground pipelines, AC-induced corrosion of underground pipelines, significance of corrosion in onshore oil and gas pipelines, n

  9. Solid state dye-sensitized solar cells. Current state of the art. Challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenzmann, F.O.; Olson, C.L.; Goris, M.J.A.A.; Kroon, J.M. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15

    The first generation of dye-sensitized solar cell technology is based on a liquid electrolyte component. Today, this technology is on the verge of commercialization. The step towards the market and real applications is supported by the prospect of low manufacturing costs, good efficiency as well as the expectation that the current stability level of this technology is at least sufficient for applications in mobile electronics. These favorable developments may be reinforced and accelerated even further, if the corrosive liquid electrolyte could be replaced by a non-corrosive solid, since this would ease a number of stringent requirements in the production process. A successful exchange of the liquid electrolyte by a solid-state holeconductor requires to at least maintain, preferably improve, the most relevant technical parameters of the solar cell (efficiency, stability, cost). First pioneering work with solid-state hole conductors was carried out 10 years ago with an initial efficiency level below 1%. Until 2007, the record efficiency could be improved to 5%. This paper gives an overview of the solid-state concept as an early stage approach with good perspectives for the mid-term future (5-10 years)

  10. Material selection and corrosion control practices in petroleum production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuttle, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to review briefly the current state of the art and to discuss some of the anticipated future oil and gas drilling and production activities which may challenge the materials selection and corrosion technologies. The current state of art discussions in this paper have been augmented by providing a list of references so that interested engineers may delve into each subject in more detail as desired. The technological areas which appear to require additional input to meet future needs include high strength tubular goods for sour gas service, corrosion resistant high strength alloys, definition of the effects of pressure, temperature, and fluid composition on corrosion behavior, and fatigue properties of various steels in seawater

  11. Assessing Level and Effectiveness of Corrosion Education in the UAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwee Ling Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of corrosion can be minimized by an engineering workforce well trained in corrosion fundamentals and management. Since the United Arab Emirates incurs the second highest cost of corrosion after Saudi Arabia, this paper examined the quality of corrosion education in the UAE. Surveys with academia and industry respondents showed that dedicated corrosion courses and engineering courses that integrated corrosion into the curricula were available in UAE universities, but graduates had insufficient knowledge of corrosion engineering and superficial understanding of corrosion in real-life design contexts. The effectiveness of corrosion education is determined by both competence in corrosion knowledge/skills and availability of resources (faculty and research. Though most departments would not hire new corrosion-specialist faculty, department research efforts and industry partnerships in corrosion research were present. The paper concluded with recommendations for improving knowledge and skills of future engineers in corrosion and enhancing corrosion instruction to better meet industry needs.

  12. Study on bubble column humidification and dehumidification system for coal mine wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Penghui; Zhang, Meng; Du, Yuji; Cheng, Bo; Zhang, Donghai

    2018-04-01

    Water is important resource for human survival and development. Coal mine wastewater (CMW) is a byproduct of the process of coal mining, which is about 7.0 × 10 10 m 3 in China in 2016. Considering coal mine wastewater includes different ingredients, a new bubble column humidification and dehumidification system is proposed for CMW treatment. The system is mainly composed of a bubble column humidification and dehumidification unit, solar collector, fan and water tank, in which air is used as a circulating medium. The system can avoid water treatment component blocking for reverse osmosis (RO) and multi effect distillation (MED) dealing with CMW, and produce water greenly. By analysis of heat and mass transfer, the effects of solar radiation, air bubble velocity and mine water temperature on water treatment production characteristics are studied. Compared with other methods, thermal energy consumption (TEC) of bubble column humidification and dehumidification (BCHD) is moderate, which is about 700 kJ/kg (powered by solar energy). The results would provide a new method for CMW treatment and insights into the efficient coal wastewater treatment, besides, it helps to identify the parameters for the technology development in mine water treatment.

  13. State of the art in protection of erosion-corrosion on vertical axis tidal current turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musabikha, Siti; Utama, I. Ketut Aria Pria; Mukhtasor

    2018-05-01

    Vertical axis tidal current turbine is main part of ocean energy devices which converts the tidal current energy into electricity. Its development is arising too due to increased interest research topic concerning climate change mitigation. Due to its rotating movement, it will be induced mechanical forces, such as shear stress and/or particle impact. Because of its natural operations, vertical axis turbine is also being exposed to harsh and corroding marine environment itself. In order to secure the vertical tidal turbine devices from mechanical wear and corrosion effects which is lead to a material loss, an appropriate erosion-corrosion protection needs to be defined. Its protection actionscan be derived such as design factors, material selections, inhibitors usage, cathodic protections, and coatings. This paper aims to analyze protection method which is necessary to control erosion-corrosion phenomenon that appears to the vertical axis tidal current turbine.

  14. State-of-the-art review of OPG steam generator tubing degradation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennenstuhl, A.M.; Ramamurthy, S.; Good, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Steam generator (SG) degradation has been a major cause of pressurized water reactor (PWR) incapability world-wide and has limited the useful life of SGs at some utilities. The vast majority of the degradation has been the result of SCC of the thin walled nickel alloy SG tubes and has been most prevalent in mill annealed (MA) Alloy 600. Fortunately, Ontario Power Generation (OPG) SG tubes are manufactured from alloys that have much better resistance to this form of localized corrosion than Alloy 600MA and as a consequence have not encountered SCC to date. Other forms of degradation nevertheless have been experienced; some units at Pickering - B in particular have had many Alloy 400 SG tubes removed from service due to severe underdeposit corrosion (UDC) and costly modifications have been made to Darlington SGs to prevent leaks as a result of SG tube fretting-wear at tube supports. Degradation other than UDC and fretting-wear which could pose a threat to the future reliable operation of OPG's nuclear fleet has also been observed. Important activities in effectively managing SG degradation include determining the mode of degradation and arriving at an understanding of the contributing factors. This is done by a combination of non-destructive examination (NDE) of SG tubing in-situ, SG tube removals for metallurgical examination and research and development. SG tube metallurgical examinations provide information that can be used in the timely development of a strategy dealing with the degradation in the short to intermediate timeframe. Determining the main causative factors at a mechanistic level helps to improve the predictive capability and increases the probability of dealing with the problem in the most cost-effective way. OPG has used this approach together with in-situ NDE inspections during planned outages of its nuclear reactors to minimize the possibility of unscheduled outages and provide the best possible fitness-for-service assessments. Many metallurgical

  15. Cost assessment of natural hazards in Europe - state-of-the-art, knowledge gaps and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, V.; Becker, N.; Markantonis, V.; Schwarze, R.; van den Bergh, J. C. J. M.; Bouwer, L. M.; Bubeck, P.; Ciavola, P.; Thieken, A. H.; Genovese, E.; Green, C.; Hallegatte, S.; Kreibich, H.; Lequeux, Q.; Viavattenne, C.; Logar, I.; Papyrakis, E.; Pfurtscheller, C.; Poussin, J.; Przyluski, V.

    2012-04-01

    Effective and efficient reduction of natural hazard risks requires a thorough understanding of the costs of natural hazards in order to develop sustainable risk management strategies. The current methods that assess the costs of different natural hazards employ a diversity of terminologies and approaches for different hazards and impacted sectors. This makes it difficult to arrive at robust, comprehensive and comparable cost figures. The CONHAZ (Costs of Natural Hazards) project aimed to compile and synthesise current knowledge on cost assessment methods in order to strengthen the role of cost assessments in the development of integrated natural hazard management and adaptation planning. In order to achieve this, CONHAZ has adopted a comprehensive approach, considering natural hazards ranging from droughts, floods and coastal hazards to Alpine hazards, as well as different impacted sectors and cost types. Its specific objectives have been 1) to compile the state-of-the-art methods for cost assessment; 2) to analyse and assess these methods in terms of technical aspects, as well as terminology, data quality and availability, and research gaps; and 3) to synthesise resulting knowledge into recommendations and to identify further research needs. This presentation summarises the main results of CONHAZ. CONHAZ differentiates between direct tangible damages, losses due to business interruption, indirect damages, intangible effects, and costs of risk mitigation. It is shown that the main focus of cost assessment methods and their application in practice is on direct costs, while existing methods for assessing intangible and indirect effects are rather rarely applied and methods for assessing indirect effects often cannot be used on the scale of interest (e.g. the regional scale). Furthermore, methods often focus on single sectors and/or hazards, and only very few are able to reflect several sectors or multiple hazards. Process understanding and its use in cost assessment

  16. Theoretical modelling and optimization of bubble column dehumidifier for a solar driven humidification-dehumidification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjitha, P. Raj; Ratheesh, R.; Jayakumar, J. S.; Balakrishnan, Shankar

    2018-02-01

    Availability and utilization of energy and water are the top most global challenges being faced by the new millennium. At the present state water scarcity has become a global as well as a regional challenge. 40 % of world population faces water shortage. Challenge of water scarcity can be tackled only with increase in water supply beyond what is obtained from hydrological cycle. This can be achieved either by desalinating the sea water or by reusing the waste water. High energy requirement need to be overcome for either of the two processes. Of many desalination technologies, humidification dehumidification (HDH) technology powered by solar energy is widely accepted for small scale production. Detailed optimization studies on system have the potential to effectively utilize the solar energy for brackish water desalination. Dehumidification technology, specifically, require further study because the dehumidifier effectiveness control the energetic performance of the entire HDH system. The reason attributes to the high resistance involved to diffuse dilute vapor through air in a dehumidifier. The present work intends to optimize the design of a bubble column dehumidifier for a solar energy driven desalination process. Optimization is carried out using Matlab simulation. Design process will identify the unique needs of a bubble column dehumidifier in HDH system.

  17. Materials Characterization Center state-of-the-art report on corrosion data pertaining to metallic barriers for nuclear-waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, M.D.

    1982-10-01

    A compilation of published corrosion data on metals that have been suggested as canisters and overpack materials is presented. The data were categorized according to the solutions used in testing and divided into two parts: high-ionic strength solutions (such as seawater and brine) and low-ionic-strength waters (such as basalt and tuff waters). This distinction was made primarily because of the general difference in aggressiveness of these solutions with respect to general corrosion. A considerable amount of data indicated that titanium alloys have acceptably low uniform corrosion rates in anticipated repository sites; the other possible corrosion failure modes for titanium alloys, such as stress corrosion cracking and delayed failure due to hydrogen, have not been sufficiently studied to make any similar conclusions about lifetime with respect to these particular degradation processes. Other data suggested that iron-base alloys are sufficiently resistant to corrosion in basalt and tuff waters, although the effects of radiation and radiation combined with elevated temperature have not been reported in enough detail to conclusively qualify iron-base alloys for any particular barrier thickness in regard to uniform corrosion rate. The effect of overpack size on corrosion rate has been given little attention. A review of long-term underground data indicated that temperature and accessibility to oxygen were too different for deep geologic repositories to make the underground corrosion data directly applicable. However, the characteristics of corrosion attack, statistical treatment of data, and kinetics of corrosion showed that corrosion proceeds in a systematic and predictable way

  18. First results of a coated heat exchanger for the use in dehumidification and cooling processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, Gunther M.; Bongs, C.; Morgenstern, A.; Lehmann, S.; Kummer, H.; Henning, H.-M.; Henninger, Stefan K.

    2013-01-01

    In this work a novel solar driven dehumidification and cooling system is presented. The core components of this combined system are a sorptive dehumidification device based on high performance sorptive coatings and a novel evacuated tube solar air collector providing the driving heat. The essential part of the system is the coated heat exchanger. The chosen adsorbent is attached to the heat exchanger surface by a newly developed coating technique. Besides a brief description of the novel components and the experimental setup, the development of the aluminum heat exchanger, the coating procedure and scale up for geometries comparable to the heat exchanger in the dehumidification setup, as well as a first characterization of a small-sized coated heat exchanger regarding water uptake and dehumidification performance are presented. For estimating an overall system performance, a 2-dimensional thermodynamic model was applied, using the parameters in focus for the development of heat exchanger, coating and demonstration system. Highlights: • A novel developed technology is applied for sorptive coating of heat exchangers. • Upscaling to dimensions of 100 × 100 × 400 mm 3 was successful. • A small scale heat exchanger was coated and characterized showing good results. • Evaluation of adsorbents and simulation of system performance were carried out. • SAPO-34 gives best performance for driving temperatures of 100 °C and above

  19. Effects of air conditioning, dehumidification and natural ventilation on indoor concentrations of 222Rn and 220Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Thomas K.C.; Yu, K.N.

    2000-01-01

    A bedroom was selected for detailed measurements on 220 Rn and 222 Rn concentrations and environmental parameters including CO 2 concentration, temperature and relative humidity. To simulate different sealing conditions, five conditions were artificially created in the sampling period of 25 consecutive days. It was concluded that natural ventilation is the most efficient way to lower the 222 Rn levels, while air conditioning is the next. Dehumidification provides only a marginal reduction of 222 Rn levels. The 220 Rn concentrations are not affected by natural ventilation, air conditioner or dehumidification, and were all around 10 Bq m -3 . There are no significant correlations between the 220 Rn and 222 Rn concentrations and environmental conditions such as CO 2 concentrations, temperature, relative humidity and pressure

  20. State of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederman, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    There is a large body of experience in high luminosity data taking in fixed target research. We try to consider a wide variety of high rate experiments which were limited by the detector (not by available beam) to a preset number of collisions per second. We then attempt to translate these state-of-the-art experiments to effective collider experiments. To this end, we extend the chosen detector to a comparison 4π collider detector operating near 1 TeV. There are several issues: (1) effective solid angle must be translated to approx. = 4π, (2) environments may be quite different, e.g., beam dump near fixed target or beam halo muons vs. collider backgrounds, (3) the multiplicity varies over the experiments selected and (4) we have to treat open vs closed geometries. The large variety of experiments selected is designed to average over the causes for detector limitation. Finally we chose detectors which have produced physics in order to gauge the state of the art

  1. Life cycle impacts and costs of photovoltaic systems: Current state of the art and future outlooks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raugei, Marco; Frankl, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The photovoltaic energy sector is rapidly expanding and technological specification for PV has improved dramatically in the last two decades. This paper sketches the current state of the art and drafts three alternative scenarios for the future, in terms of costs, market penetration and environmental performance. According to these scenarios, if economic incentives are supported long enough into the next ten to twenty years, PV looks set for a rosy future, and is likely to play a significant role in the future energy mix, while at the same time contributing to reduce the environmental impact of electricity supply. (author)

  2. Life cycle impacts and costs of photovoltaic systems: Current state of the art and future outlooks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raugei, Marco [Environmental Management Research Group, Escola Superior de Commerc Internacional-Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Passeig Pujades 1, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Frankl, Paolo [Renewable Energy Unit, International Energy Agency, Rue de la Federation 9, 75739 Paris Cedex 15 (France)

    2009-03-15

    The photovoltaic energy sector is rapidly expanding and technological specification for PV has improved dramatically in the last two decades. This paper sketches the current state of the art and drafts three alternative scenarios for the future, in terms of costs, market penetration and environmental performance. According to these scenarios, if economic incentives are supported long enough into the next ten to twenty years, PV looks set for a rosy future, and is likely to play a significant role in the future energy mix, while at the same time contributing to reduce the environmental impact of electricity supply. (author)

  3. State of the art of solid state dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Susana O.; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; D'Errico, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Passive solid-state detectors still dominate the personal dosimetry field. This article provides state of the art in this field and summarizes the most recent works presented on TL, OSL and RPL during the 17th International Conference on Solid State Dosimetry held in Recife in September 2013. The Article contains in particular the techniques Thermoluminescence (TL), Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL), radio photoluminescence (RPL). Thermoluminescence has the biggest advantage of the wide availability of commercial materials for dosimetry, and the nature tissue-equivalent of several of these materials. The limitation of the TL dosimetry presents fading luminance signal and the need for high temperatures to obtain the signal. The Optically Stimulated Luminescence has the advantages of high sensitivity, the possibility of multiple reading, while its limit is the need to use response compensating filters in addition to the high cost of equipment and dosimeters still restricted very few options trading . The radio photoluminescence has a reading that is completely non-destructive, but their dosimeters present lack of tissue-equivalent and a high cost. Presents the details of the techniques and the advantages and limitations of each of these will be discussed

  4. Performance study of a heat pump driven and hollow fiber membrane-based two-stage liquid desiccant air dehumidification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ning; Yin, Shao-You; Zhang, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A heat pump driven, hollow fiber membrane-based two-stage liquid desiccant air dehumidification system. - Highlights: • A two-stage hollow fiber membrane based air dehumidification is proposed. • It is heat pump driven liquid desiccant system. • Performance is improved 20% upon single stage system. • The optimal first to second stage dehumidification area ratio is 1.4. - Abstract: A novel compression heat pump driven and hollow fiber membrane-based two-stage liquid desiccant air dehumidification system is presented. The liquid desiccant droplets are prevented from crossing over into the process air by the semi-permeable membranes. The isoenthalpic processes are changed to quasi-isothermal processes by the two-stage dehumidification processes. The system is set up and a model is proposed for simulation. Heat and mass capacities in the system, including the membrane modules, the condenser, the evaporator and the heat exchangers are modeled in detail. The model is also validated experimentally. Compared with a single-stage dehumidification system, the two-stage system has a lower solution concentration exiting from the dehumidifier and a lower condensing temperature. Thus, a better thermodynamic system performance is realized and the COP can be increased by about 20% under the typical hot and humid conditions in Southern China. The allocations of heat and mass transfer areas in the system are also investigated. It is found that the optimal regeneration to dehumidification area ratio is 1.33. The optimal first to second stage dehumidification area ratio is 1.4; and the optimal first to second stage regeneration area ratio is 1.286.

  5. State-of-the-art in Heterogeneous Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre R. Brodtkorb

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Node level heterogeneous architectures have become attractive during the last decade for several reasons: compared to traditional symmetric CPUs, they offer high peak performance and are energy and/or cost efficient. With the increase of fine-grained parallelism in high-performance computing, as well as the introduction of parallelism in workstations, there is an acute need for a good overview and understanding of these architectures. We give an overview of the state-of-the-art in heterogeneous computing, focusing on three commonly found architectures: the Cell Broadband Engine Architecture, graphics processing units (GPUs, and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs. We present a review of hardware, available software tools, and an overview of state-of-the-art techniques and algorithms. Furthermore, we present a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the architectures, and give our view on the future of heterogeneous computing.

  6. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) in the Oil and Gas Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovhus, Torben Lund; Eckert, Rickard

    2015-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a serious corrosion threat that impacts the operating integrity and reliability of assets in the oil and gas, maritime, power generation, and other industries. Yet MIC is also commonly misunderstood, leading to ineffective mitigation programs, wasted...... and implement improved mitigation strategies and thereby reduce operating risk. Our experts provide guidance in applying the latest state-of-the-art molecular microbiological methods (MMM) and industry standards to properly diagnose MIC in operating assets and on failed components. With this understanding, MIC...... can be effectively addressed as part of the overall Corrosion Management System (CMS)....

  7. Radiant floor cooling coupled with dehumidification systems in residential buildings: A simulation-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarrella, Angelo; De Carli, Michele; Peretti, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The floor radiant cooling in a typical apartment is analyzed. • Dehumidification devices, fan-coil and mechanical ventilation are compared. • The results are analyzed in terms of both thermal comfort and energy consumption. • The energy consumption of the dehumidifiers is higher than that of other systems. • The mechanical ventilation decreases the moisture level better than other systems. - Abstract: The development of radiant cooling has stimulated an interest in new systems based on coupling ventilation with radiant cooling. However, radiant cooling systems may cause condensation to form on an active surface under warm and humid conditions during the cooling season. This phenomenon occurs when surface temperature falls below dew point. To prevent condensation, air humidity needs to be reduced with a dehumidification device or a mechanical ventilation system. There are two main options to achieve this. The first is to use dehumidification devices that reduce humidity, but are not coupled with ventilation, i.e. devices that handle room air and leave air change to infiltrations. The second is to combine a mechanical ventilation system with dehumidifying finned coils. This study analyzes the floor radiant cooling of a typical residential apartment within a multi-storey building in three Italian climate zones by means of a detailed simulation tool. Five systems were compared in terms of both indoor thermal comfort and energy consumption: radiant cooling without dehumidification; radiant cooling with a soft dehumidification device; radiant cooling with a dehumidification device which also supplies sensible cooling; radiant cooling coupled with fan coils; and radiant cooling with a mechanical ventilation system which dehumidifies and cools

  8. Energy, exergy, economic and environmental (4E) analysis of a solar desalination system with humidification-dehumidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, Emrah; Çınar, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Possibility of suppling all energy consumption from solar energy was tested. • Air and water-heated humidification-dehumidification desalination system was proposed. • Energy, exergy, economic and environmental analysis were performed. • Productivity and performance of the desalination system was analyzed. • Various operational parameters were investigated. - Abstract: A novel humidification-dehumidification (HDH) solar desalination system is designed and tested with actual conditions and solar energy was used to provide both thermal and electrical energy. Energy-exergy analyses of the system are made and economic and enviro-economic properties are investigated using data obtained from experimental studies. In this way, economic and environmental impacts of the HDH solar desalination systems have also been determined. The maximum daily energy efficiency of the system was calculated as 31.54% and the maximum exergy efficiency was found as 1.87%. The maximum fresh water production rate is obtained as 1117.3 g/h. The estimated cost of fresh water produced through the designed HDH system is 0.0981 USD/L and enviro-economic parameter is 2.4041 USD/annum.

  9. A heat pump driven and hollow fiber membrane-based liquid desiccant air dehumidification system: Modeling and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li-Zhi; Zhang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    A compression heat pump driven and membrane-based liquid desiccant air dehumidification system is presented. The dehumidifier and the regenerator are made of two hollow fiber membrane bundles packed in two shells. Water vapor can permeate through these membranes effectively, while the liquid desiccant droplets are prevented from cross-over. Simultaneous heating and cooling of the salt solution are realized with a heat pump system to improve energy efficiency. In this research, the system is built up and a complete modeling is performed for the system. Heat and mass transfer processes in the membrane modules, as well as in the evaporator, the condenser, and other key components are modeled in detail. The whole model is validated by experiment. The performances of SDP (specific dehumidification power), dehumidification efficiency, EER (energy efficiency ratio) of heat pump, and the COP (coefficient of performance) of the system are investigated numerically and experimentally. The results show that the model can predict the system accurately. The dehumidification capabilities and the energy efficiencies of the system are high. Further, it performs well even under the harsh hot and humid South China weather conditions. - Highlights: • A membrane-based and heat pump driven air dehumidification system is proposed. • A real experimental set up is built and used to validate the model for the whole system. • Performance under design and varying operation conditions is investigated. • The system performs well even under harsh hot and humid conditions

  10. A Liquid Desiccant Cycle for Dehumidification and Fresh Water Supply in Controlled Environment Agriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Lefers, Ryan

    2017-12-01

    Controlled environment agriculture allows the production of fresh food indoors from global locations and contexts where it would not otherwise be possible. Growers in extreme climates and urban areas produce food locally indoors, saving thousands of food import miles and capitalizing upon the demand for fresh, tasty, and nutritious food. However, the growing of food, both indoors and outdoors, consumes huge quantities of water - as much as 70-80% of global fresh water supplies. The utilization of liquid desiccants in a closed indoor agriculture cycle provides the possibility of capturing plant-transpired water vapor. The regeneration/desalination of these liquid desiccants offers the potential to recover fresh water for irrigation and also to re-concentrate the desiccants for continued dehumidification. Through the utilization of solar thermal energy, the process can be completed with a very small to zero grid-energy footprint. The primary research in this dissertation focused on two areas: the dehumidification of indoor environments utilizing liquid desiccants inside membrane contactors and the regeneration of these desiccants using membrane distillation. Triple-bore PVDF hollow fiber membranes yielded dehumidification permeance rates around 0.25-0.31 g m-2 h-1 Pa-1 in lab-scale trials. A vacuum membrane distillation unit utilizing PVDF fibers yielded a flux of 2.8-7.0 kg m-2 hr-1. When the membrane contactor dehumidification system was applied in a bench scale controlled environment agriculture setup, the relative humidity levels responded dynamically to both plant transpiration and dehumidification rates, reaching dynamic equilibrium levels during day and night cycles. In addition, recovered fresh water from distillation was successfully applied for irrigation of crops and concentrated desiccants were successfully reused for dehumidification. If applied in practice, the liquid desiccant system for controlled environment agriculture offers the potential to reduce

  11. Review studies on the state of the art of separate effects and component behaviour of LWR cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefner, W.; Fischer, K.; Mewes, D.; Beckmann, H.

    1990-09-01

    In the frame of the Shared Cost Action (SCA) Reactor Safety 1985-87 programme Review Studies on the state of the art of separate effects and component behaviour (preparation for a possible future experimental programme) have been performed. The final reports of three of the selected topics closely related and of particular interest for the development of specific two-phase models are collected in this volume: - Contact condensation effects relevant to ECC-water injection into a cold leg main coolant pipe (Contract 3002-86-07 ELISPD, Battelle Frankfurt) - State of the art of two phase steam water flow in piping junctions (Contract 3006-86-07 ELISPF, CEA-CEN Grenoble) - Critical investigation and model development for countercurrent flow of gas and liquid in horizontal and vertical channels (Contract 3007-86-07 ELISPD, Universitat Hannover). Specific conclusions are drawn and recommendations are given in each of the three papers. A common conclusion is that for developing more general models applicable to a wider range of situations further experimental work needs to be done but with emphasis on larger pipe diameters of test sections up to 30 mm and increasing the system pressures. For better understanding the physical phenomena local parameters and their variations need to be measured more accurately by applying better and more advanced instrumentation

  12. State of the art review of degradation processes in LMFBR materials. Volume II. Corrosion behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, R.D.

    1975-01-01

    Degradation of materials exposed to Na in LMFBR service is reviewed. The degradation processes are discussed in sections on corrosion and mass transfer, erosion, wear and self welding, sodium--water reactions, and external corrosion. (JRD)

  13. Self-Healing Corrosion Protective Sol-Gel Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdolah Zadeh, M.

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the state of the art and the recent advances in the field of self-healing corrosion protective coatings, the thesis entitled “Self-healing corrosion protective sol-gel coatings” addresses novel routes to self-healing corrosion protective sol-gel coatings via extrinsic and intrinsic

  14. Biocorrosion and biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage. present state of the art at the beginning of the new millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videla, H. A.

    2003-01-01

    An overview on the present state of the art on Biocorrosion and Biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage is offered on the basis of the experience gathered in our laboratory over 25 years of research. The key concepts to understand the main effects of microorganisms on metal decay are briefly discussed. new trends in monitoring and control strategies to mitigate biocorrosion and biofouling deleterious effects are also described. Several relevant cases of biocorrosion studied by our research group are successively described: i) biocorrosion of aluminum and its alloys by fungal contaminants of jet fuels; ii) Sulfate-reducing bacteria SRB induced corrosion of steel; iii) biocorrosion and biofouling interactions in the marine environment: iv) monitoring strategies for assessing biocorrosion in industrial water systems; v) microbial inhibition of corrosion; vi) use and limitations of electrochemical techniques for evaluating biocorrosion effects. The future perspective of the field is made considering the potential of innovative techniques in microscopy (environmental scanning electron microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy, atomic force microscopy), new spectroscopy techniques used for the study of corrosion products and biofilms (energy dispersion X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis) and electrochemistry (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical noise analysis. (Author) 53 refs

  15. Biocorrosion and biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage. present state of the art at the beginning of the new millennium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, H. A.

    2003-07-01

    An overview on the present state of the art on Biocorrosion and Biofouling of metals and alloys of industrial usage is offered on the basis of the experience gathered in our laboratory over 25 years of research. The key concepts to understand the main effects of microorganisms on metal decay are briefly discussed. new trends in monitoring and control strategies to mitigate biocorrosion and biofouling deleterious effects are also described. Several relevant cases of biocorrosion studied by our research group are successively described: i) biocorrosion of aluminum and its alloys by fungal contaminants of jet fuels; ii) Sulfate-reducing bacteria SRB induced corrosion of steel; iii) biocorrosion and biofouling interactions in the marine environment: iv) monitoring strategies for assessing biocorrosion in industrial water systems; v) microbial inhibition of corrosion; vi) use and limitations of electrochemical techniques for evaluating biocorrosion effects. The future perspective of the field is made considering the potential of innovative techniques in microscopy (environmental scanning electron microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy, atomic force microscopy), new spectroscopy techniques used for the study of corrosion products and biofilms (energy dispersion X-ray analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis) and electrochemistry (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical noise analysis. (Author) 53 refs.

  16. State of the States, 2012: Arts Education State Policy Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts Education Partnership (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "State of the States 2012" summarizes state policies for arts education identified in statute or code for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information is based primarily on results from the AEP Arts Education State Policy Survey conducted in 2010-11, and updated in April 2012.

  17. Assessing Level and Effectiveness of Corrosion Education in the UAE

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Hwee Ling

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of corrosion can be minimized by an engineering workforce well trained in corrosion fundamentals and management. Since the United Arab Emirates incurs the second highest cost of corrosion after Saudi Arabia, this paper examined the quality of corrosion education in the UAE. Surveys with academia and industry respondents showed that dedicated corrosion courses and engineering courses that integrated corrosion into the curricula were available in UAE universities, but graduates...

  18. The effect of recasting on corrosion of DUCINOX prosthetic alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Klimek

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of recasting, up to two times, Ni-Cr (DUCINOX prosthetic alloy on its corrosion properties was carried out. The corrosion measurements were done in deoxygenated Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva solution at temperature of 37°C. In the study following electrochemical methods were used: measurement of free corrosion potential Ecor in open circuit, measurement of polarization resistance according to Stern-Geary's method and measurement of potentiodynamic characteristic in wide range of anodic polarization. In general, it can be stated that casting number weakly influence on corrosion properties of investigated alloy. At free corrosion potential there is no monotonic dependence of corrosion parameters versus casting number. However, at extreme anodic potentials monotonic changes of corrosion parameters with increasing casting number is observed. Obtained results and drawn conclusions are partially compatible with literature data.

  19. Selecting HVAC Systems to Achieve Comfortable and Cost-effective Residential Net-Zero Energy Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Skye, Harrison M; Domanski, Piotr A

    2018-02-15

    HVAC is responsible for the largest share of energy use in residential buildings and plays an important role in broader implementation of net-zero energy building (NZEB). This study investigated the energy, comfort and economic performance of commercially-available HVAC technologies for a residential NZEB. An experimentally-validated model was used to evaluate ventilation, dehumidification, and heat pump options for the NZEB in the mixed-humid climate zone. Ventilation options were compared to mechanical ventilation without recovery; a heat recovery ventilator (HRV) and energy recovery ventilator (ERV) respectively reduced the HVAC energy by 13.5 % and 17.4 % and reduced the building energy by 7.5 % and 9.7 %. There was no significant difference in thermal comfort between the ventilation options. Dehumidification options were compared to an air-source heat pump (ASHP) with a separate dehumidifier; the ASHP with dedicated dehumidification reduced the HVAC energy by 7.3 % and the building energy by 3.9 %. The ASHP-only option (without dedicated dehumidification) reduced the initial investment but provided the worst comfort due to high humidity levels. Finally, ground-source heat pump (GSHP) alternatives were compared to the ASHP; the GSHP with two and three boreholes reduced the HVAC energy by 26.0 % and 29.2 % and the building energy by 13.1 % and 14.7 %. The economics of each HVAC configuration was analyzed using installation cost data and two electricity price structures. The GSHPs with the ERV and dedicated dehumidification provided the highest energy savings and good comfort, but were the most expensive. The ASHP with dedicated dehumidification and the ERV (or HRV) provided reasonable payback periods.

  20. Effect of Flow Velocity on Corrosion Rate and Corrosion Protection Current of Marine Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Jong [Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Min Su; Jang, Seok Ki; Kim, Seong Jong [Mokpo National Maritime University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In spite of highly advanced paint coating techniques, corrosion damage of marine metal and alloys increase more and more due to inherent micro-cracks and porosities in coatings formed during the coating process. Furthermore, flowing seawater conditions promote the breakdown of the protective oxide of the materials introducing more oxygen into marine environments, leading to the acceleration of corrosion. Various corrosion protection methods are available to prevent steel from marine corrosion. Cathodic protection is one of the useful corrosion protection methods by which the potential of the corroded metal is intentionally lowered to an immune state having the advantage of providing additional protection barriers to steel exposed to aqueous corrosion or soil corrosion, in addition to the coating. In the present investigation, the effect of flow velocity was examined for the determination of the optimum corrosion protection current density in cathodic protection as well as the corrosion rate of the steel. It is demonstrated from the result that the material corrosion under dynamic flowing conditions seems more prone to corrosion than under static conditions.

  1. Zirconia powders production by precipitation: state-of-art review; Producao de pos de zirconia por precipitacao - revisao do estado da arte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Ana Paula Almeida de; Torem, Mauricio Leonardo [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais e Metalurgia

    1994-12-31

    The important role played by zirconia in advanced ceramics can be attributed to its excellent wear and corrosion resistance and refractory character. The polymorphic nature of zirconia made the controlled addition of stabilizing oxides or the constraining effect of a dense ceramics matrix necessary to maintain high parameters had a significant influence on powder properties and on compacted powder behaviour in sintering. Particle shape and size, purity and crystalline structure were specially influenced by precipitation parameters. Therefore, this work presented a review of the state of the art in zirconia powder production and in the recent research on precipitation of that powder. (author) 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Fraser; Lilja, Christina; Pedersen, Karsten; Pitkaenen, Petteri; Vaehaenen, Marjut

    2010-12-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid

  3. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada); Lilja, C. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Pedersen, K. [Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Molnlycke (Sweden); Pitkaenen, P.; Vaehaenen, M.

    2012-07-15

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  4. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Fraser (Integrity Corrosion Consulting Limited (Canada)); Lilja, Christina (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden)); Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden)); Pitkaenen, Petteri; Vaehaenen, Marjut (Posiva Oy (Finland))

    2010-12-15

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid

  5. An update of the state-of-the-art report on the corrosion of copper under expected conditions in a deep geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Lilja, C.; Pedersen, K.; Pitkaenen, P.; Vaehaenen, M.

    2012-07-01

    Copper has been the corrosion barrier of choice for the canister in the Swedish and Finnish, nuclear waste disposal programmes for over 30 years. During that time many studies have been carried out on the corrosion behaviour of copper under conditions likely to exist in an underground nuclear waste repository located in the Fenno-Scandian bedrock. This review is a summary of what has been learnt about the long-term behaviour of the corrosion barrier during this period and what the implications of this knowledge are for the predicted service life of the canisters. The review is based on the existing knowledge from various nuclear waste management programs around the world and from the open literature. Various areas are considered: the expected evolution of the geochemical and microbiological conditions in the groundwater and of the repository environment, the thermodynamics of copper corrosion, corrosion during the operational phase and in the bentonite prior to saturation of the buffer by groundwater, general and localised corrosion following saturation of the compacted bentonite buffer, stress corrosion cracking, radiation effects, the implications of corrosion on the service life of the canister, and areas for further study. This report is an updated version of that originally published in 2001/2002. The original material has been supplemented by information from studies carried out over the last decade. The conclusion drawn from this review is that the original prediction made in 1978 of canister lifetimes exceeding 100,000 years remains valid. (orig.)

  6. Behavior of cross flow heat exchangers during the cooling and dehumidification of air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ober, C [Karlsruhe Univ. (TH) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Mess- und Regelungstechnik mit Maschinenlaboratorium

    1980-09-01

    The task of cross flow heat exchangers in room air engineering consists on the one hand in heating up the air and, on the other hand, in the simultaneous cooling and dehumidification. The facilities used for this purpose generally are multi-row finned pipe heat exchangers which when used for cooling contain cold water or brine as the working fluid. The use of directly evaporating freezing mixtures may not be included in this consideration. The model establishment for the dynamic and the static behavior of multi-row cross flow heat exchangers during cooling and dehumidification of air has been derived in this contribution. The representation is performed for the dynamic case in the complex, display range of the Laplace transformation. A comparison with experimental results can be done very simply by means of measurements of the frequency-responce curves in the form of Bode diagrams. The description of the static behaviour may be applied as a basis for humidity controls with more favourable energy utilization.

  7. Astrakhan-Mangyshlak water main (pipeline): corrosion state of the inner surface, and methods for its corrosion protection. Part III. The effects of KW2353 inhibitor. Part IV. Microbiological corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reformatskaya, I.I.; Ashcheulova, I.I.; Barinova, M.A.; Kostin, D.V.; Prutchenko, S.G.; Ivleva, G.A.; Taubaldiev, T.S.; Murinov, K.S.; Tastanov, K.Kh.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the KW2353 corrosion inhibitor, applied on the Astrakhan-Mangyshlak water main (pipeline) since 1997, on the corrosion processes, occurring on the 17G1S steel surface, is considered. The properties of the surface sediments are also considered. The role of the microbiological processes in the corrosion behavior of the water main (pipeline) inner surface is studied. It is shown, that application of the polyphosphate-type inhibitors, including the KW2353 one, for the anticorrosive protection of the inner surface of the extended water main (pipelines) is inadmissible: at the temperature of ∼20 deg C this corrosion inhibitor facilitates the development of the local corrosion processes on the water main (pipeline) inner surface. At the temperature of ∼8 deg C the above inhibitor discontinues to effect the corrosive stability of the 17G1S steel. The optimal way of the anticorrosive protection of the steel equipment, contacting with the water media, is the increase in the oxygen content therein [ru

  8. State of the art of solid state dosimetry; Estado da arte em dosimetria do estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Susana O., E-mail: sosouza@ufs.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka University (Japan); D' Errico, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.derrico@yale.edu [Yale University, School of Medicine, CT (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Passive solid-state detectors still dominate the personal dosimetry field. This article provides state of the art in this field and summarizes the most recent works presented on TL, OSL and RPL during the 17th International Conference on Solid State Dosimetry held in Recife in September 2013. The Article contains in particular the techniques Thermoluminescence (TL), Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL), radio photoluminescence (RPL). Thermoluminescence has the biggest advantage of the wide availability of commercial materials for dosimetry, and the nature tissue-equivalent of several of these materials. The limitation of the TL dosimetry presents fading luminance signal and the need for high temperatures to obtain the signal. The Optically Stimulated Luminescence has the advantages of high sensitivity, the possibility of multiple reading, while its limit is the need to use response compensating filters in addition to the high cost of equipment and dosimeters still restricted very few options trading . The radio photoluminescence has a reading that is completely non-destructive, but their dosimeters present lack of tissue-equivalent and a high cost. Presents the details of the techniques and the advantages and limitations of each of these will be discussed.

  9. Preparation of Natural Zeolite for Air Dehumidification in Food Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Djaeni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Drying with air dehumidification with solid adsorbent improves the quality of food product as well as energy efficiency. The natural zeolite is one of adsorbent having potential to adsorb the water.  Normally, the material was activated to open the pore, remove the organic impurities, and increase Si/Al rate. Hence, it can enhance the adsorbing capacity. This research studied the activation of natural zeolite mined from Klaten, Indonesia as air dehumidification for food drying. Two different methods were used involving activation by heat and NaOH introduction.  As indicators, the porosity and water loaded were evaluated. Results showed both methods improved the adsorbing capacity significantly. With NaOH, the adsorbing capacity was higher. The simple test in onion and corn drying showed the presence of activated natural zeolite can speed up water evaporation positively. This performance was also comparable with Zeolite 3A

  10. Low temperature humidification dehumidification desalination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Enezi, Ghazi; Ettouney, Hisham; Fawzy, Nagla

    2006-01-01

    The humidification dehumidification desalination process is viewed as a promising technique for small capacity production plants. The process has several attractive features, which include operation at low temperature, ability to utilize sustainable energy sources, i.e. solar and geothermal, and requirements of low technology level. This paper evaluates the characteristics of the humidification dehumidification desalination process as a function of operating conditions. A small capacity experimental system is used to evaluate the process characteristics as a function of the flow rate of the water and air streams, the temperature of the water stream and the temperature of the cooling water stream. The experimental system includes a packed humidification column, a double pipe glass condenser, a constant temperature water circulation tank and a chiller for cooling water. The water production is found to depend strongly on the hot water temperature. Also, the water production is found to increase upon the increase of the air flow rate and the decrease of the cooling water temperature. The measured air and water temperatures, air relative humidity and the flow rates are used to calculate the air side mass transfer coefficient and the overall heat transfer coefficient. Measured data are found to be consistent with previous literature results

  11. Evaluation of the Performance of Houses With and Without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrigan, P. [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This report describes a research study that was conducted by the Building Science Corporation (BSC) Building America Research Team. BSC seeks to research and report on the field monitoring of the performance of in-situ supplemental dehumidification systems in low energy, high performance homes in a hot-humid climate. The purpose of this research project was to observe and compare the humidity control performance. Specifically, the study sought to compare the interior conditions and mechanical systems operation between two distinct groups of houses; homes with a supplemental dehumidifier installed in addition to HVAC system, and homes without any supplemental dehumidification. The subjects of the study were 10 single-family, new construction homes in New Orleans, LA.

  12. A state-of-the art report on the investigation of the various corrosion models for zirconium-based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. J.; Kim, K. H.; Baek, J. H.; Choi, B. K.; Jeong, Y. H.

    1999-02-01

    The desire to increase uranium utilization and to minimize spent fuel storage requirements provides an incentive to extend the average fuel rod discharge burnup to about 70,000MWd/MTU. For these higher burnups data are needed to determine if waterside corrosion of the cladding may be a life-limiting feature of fuel rod design. It is apparent that many factors can influence waterside corrosion, and these need to be better understood in order to minimize corrosion at these higher target burnups. The objective of this report is to review published data relevant to the corrosion of Zircaloy under PWR operating conditions. (author). 100 refs., 4 tabs., 21 figs

  13. Developing a Standard Method of Test for Packaged, Solid-Desiccant Based Dehumidification Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    A draft Method of Test (MOT) has been proposed for packaged, air-to-air, desiccant-based dehumidifier systems that incorporate a thermally-regenerated desiccant material for dehumidification. This MOT is intended to function as the ''system'' testing and rating compliment to the desiccant ''component'' (desiccant wheels and/or cassettes) MOT (ASHRAE 1998) and rating standard (ARI 1998) already adopted by industry. This draft standard applies to ''packaged systems'' that: Use desiccants for dehumidification of conditioned air for buildings; Use heated air for regeneration of the desiccant material; Include fans for moving process and regeneration air; May include other system components for filtering, pre-cooling, post-cooling, or heating conditioned air; and May include other components for humidification of conditioned air. The proposed draft applies to four different system operating modes depending on whether outdoor or indoor air is used for process air and regeneration air streams . Only the ''ventilation'' mode which uses outdoor air for both process and regeneration inlets is evaluated in this paper. Performance of the dehumidification system is presented in terms that would be most familiar and useful to designers of building HVAC systems to facilitate integration of desiccant equipment with more conventional hardware. Parametric performance results from a modified, commercial desiccant dehumidifier undergoing laboratory testing were used as data input to evaluate the draft standard. Performance results calculated from this experimental input, results from an error-checking/heat-balance verification test built into the standard, and estimated comparisons between desiccant and similarly performing conventional dehumidification equipment are calculated and presented. Some variations in test procedures are suggested to aid in analytical assessment of individual component performance

  14. A thermodynamic perspective to study energy performance of vacuum-based membrane dehumidification

    KAUST Repository

    Bui, Thuan Duc

    2017-05-13

    In humid environments, decoupling the latent and sensible cooling loads - dehumidifying - can significantly improve chiller efficiency. Here, a basic limit for dehumidification efficiency is established from fundamental thermodynamics. This is followed by the derivation of how this limit is modified when the pragmatic constraint of a finite flux must be accommodated. These limits allow one to identify promising system modifications, and to quantify their impact. The focus is on vacuum-based membrane dehumidification. New high-efficiency configurations are formulated, most notably, by coupling pumping with condensation. More than an order-of-magnitude improvement in efficiency is achievable. It is contingent on water vapor exiting at its saturation pressure rather than at ambient pressure. Sensitivity studies to recovery ratio, temperature, relative humidity and membrane selectivity are also presented.

  15. A thermodynamic perspective to study energy performance of vacuum-based membrane dehumidification

    KAUST Repository

    Bui, Thuan Duc; Kum Ja, M.; Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Ng, Kim Choon; Chua, Kian Jon

    2017-01-01

    In humid environments, decoupling the latent and sensible cooling loads - dehumidifying - can significantly improve chiller efficiency. Here, a basic limit for dehumidification efficiency is established from fundamental thermodynamics

  16. Fabrication and Properties of Micro-Nanoencapsulated Phase Change Materials for Internally-Cooled Liquid Desiccant Dehumidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Niu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Micro-nanoencapsulated phase change materials (M-NEPCMs are proposed to be useful in liquid desiccant dehumidification by restraining the temperature rise in the moisture-removal process and improving the dehumidification efficiency. In this paper, the n-octadecane M-NEPCMs with desirable thermal properties for internally-cooled dehumidification were fabricated by using compound emulsifiers through the in-situ polymerization method. Melamine-formaldehyde resin was used as the shell material. The effects of the mixing ratio, emulsification methods and amount of the compound emulsifiers on the morphology, size and thermal properties of the M-NEPCMs were investigated experimentally. The optimum weight mixing ratio of the compound emulsifiers is SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate:Tween80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate:Span80 (sorbitan monooleate = 0.1:0.6:0.3, which achieves the best stability of the n-octadecane emulsion. When the compound emulsifiers are 10 wt. % of the core material, the melting enthalpy of M-NEPCMs reaches its maximum of 145.26 J/g of capsules, with an encapsulation efficiency of 62.88% and a mean diameter of 636 nm. The sub-cooling of the prepared M-NEPCMs is lower than 3 °C, with an acceptable thermal reliability after the thermal cycling test. A pre-emulsification prior to the addition of deionized water in the emulsification is beneficial to the morphology of the capsules, as the phase change enthalpy can be increased by 123.7%.

  17. Fabrication and Properties of Micro-Nanoencapsulated Phase Change Materials for Internally-Cooled Liquid Desiccant Dehumidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Xu, Qing; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Yue; Yan, Yufeng; Liu, Tao

    2017-04-29

    Micro-nanoencapsulated phase change materials (M-NEPCMs) are proposed to be useful in liquid desiccant dehumidification by restraining the temperature rise in the moisture-removal process and improving the dehumidification efficiency. In this paper, the n -octadecane M-NEPCMs with desirable thermal properties for internally-cooled dehumidification were fabricated by using compound emulsifiers through the in-situ polymerization method. Melamine-formaldehyde resin was used as the shell material. The effects of the mixing ratio, emulsification methods and amount of the compound emulsifiers on the morphology, size and thermal properties of the M-NEPCMs were investigated experimentally. The optimum weight mixing ratio of the compound emulsifiers is SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate):Tween80 (polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate):Span80 (sorbitan monooleate) = 0.1:0.6:0.3, which achieves the best stability of the n -octadecane emulsion. When the compound emulsifiers are 10 wt. % of the core material, the melting enthalpy of M-NEPCMs reaches its maximum of 145.26 J/g of capsules, with an encapsulation efficiency of 62.88% and a mean diameter of 636 nm. The sub-cooling of the prepared M-NEPCMs is lower than 3 °C, with an acceptable thermal reliability after the thermal cycling test. A pre-emulsification prior to the addition of deionized water in the emulsification is beneficial to the morphology of the capsules, as the phase change enthalpy can be increased by 123.7%.

  18. Current state of knowledge in radiolysis effects on spent fuel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, H.; Sunder, S.

    1998-09-01

    Literature data on the effect of water radiolysis products on spent fuel oxidation and dissolution have been reviewed. Effects of γ-radiolysis, α-radiolysis and dissolved O 2 or H 2 O 2 in unirradiated solutions have been discussed separately. Also the effect of carbonate in γ-irradiated solutions and radiolysis effects on leaching of spent fuels have been reviewed. In addition a radiolysis model for calculation of corrosion rates of UO 2 , presented previously, has been discussed. The model has been shown to give a good agreement between calculated and measured corrosion rates in the case of γ-radiolysis and in unirradiated solutions of dissolved oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. The model has failed to predict the results of α-radiolysis. In a recent study it was shown that the model gave a good agreement with measured corrosion rates of spent fuel exposed in deionized water

  19. The state-of-the-art of ART sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencken, Jo E

    2014-03-01

    Sealing caries-prone pits and fissure systems is an effective caries-preventive measure. There are basically two types of sealant materials: glass-ionomer and resin-based materials. Low- and medium-viscosity glass-ionomers were initially used and showed a low level of retention. With the advent of the ART approach in the mid-nineties, high-viscosity glass-ionomers were introduced as sealant material and the retention rate of ART sealants increased substantially. As the effectiveness of a sealant is measured by its capacity to prevent (dentine) carious lesion development, sealant retention is considered a surrogate endpoint. The ART sealant protocol is described. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis covering low- medium- and high-viscosity glass-ionomer (ART) sealants have concluded that there is no evidence that either glass-ionomer or resin-based sealants prevent dentine carious lesions better. The annual dentine carious lesion development in teeth with high-viscosity glass-ionomer ART sealants over the first three years is 1%. These ART sealants have a high capacity of preventing carious lesion development. Because no electricity and running water is required, ART sealants can be placed both inside and outside the dental surgery. High-viscosity glass-ionomer ART sealants can be used alongside resin-based sealants.41:119-124

  20. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  1. State-of-the-art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecher, Arthur; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    This report presents a short overview on the state-of-the-art of wave tank testing of wave energy converters (WEC). Here for, it focuses mainly on the Phase 1 and 2 development phases of wave energy converters, as these are done in the wave tank (WEC), while the other development phases are perfo......This report presents a short overview on the state-of-the-art of wave tank testing of wave energy converters (WEC). Here for, it focuses mainly on the Phase 1 and 2 development phases of wave energy converters, as these are done in the wave tank (WEC), while the other development phases...

  2. Effect of heat treatment on the grooving corrosion resistance of ERW pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Kwon; Lee, Jae Young; Lim, Soo Hyun; Park, Ji Hwan; Seo, Bo Min; Kim, Seon Hwa

    2002-01-01

    The v-sharp grooving corrosion of ERW(electrical resistance welding) steel pipes limited their wide application in the industry in spite of their high productivity and efficiency. The grooving corrosion is caused mainly by the different microstructures between the matrix and weld that is formed during the rapid heating and cooling cycle in welding. By this localized corrosion reaction of pipes, it evolves economic problems such as the early damage of industrial facilities and pipe lines of apartment, and water pollution. Even though the diminishing of sulfur content is most effective to decrease the susceptibility of grooving corrosion, it requires costly process. In this study, improvement of grooving corrosion resistance was pursuited by post weld heat treatment in the temperature range between 650 .deg. C and 950 .deg. C. Also, the effect of heat input in the welding was investigated. By employing chromnoamperometry and potentiodynamic experiment, the corrosion rate and grooving corrosion index(α) were obtained. It was found that heat treatment could improve the grooving corrosion resistance. Among them, the heat treated at 900 .deg. C and 950 .deg. C had excellent grooving corrosion resistance. The index of heat treated specimen at 900 .deg. C and 950 .deg. C were 1.0, 1.2, respectively, which are almost immune to the grooving corrosion. Potential difference after the heat treatment, between base and weld metal was decreased considerably. While the as-received one measured 61∼71 mV, that of the 900 .deg. C heat treated steel pipe measured only 10mV. The results were explained and discussed

  3. Summary of State-of-the-Art Power Conversion Systems for Energy Storage Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atcitty, S.; Gray-Fenner, A.; Ranade, S.

    1998-09-01

    The power conversion system (PCS) is a vital part of many energy storage systems. It serves as the interface between the storage device, an energy source, and an AC load. This report summarizes the results of an extensive study of state-of-the-art power conversion systems used for energy storage applications. The purpose of the study was to investigate the potential for cost reduction and performance improvement in these power conversion systems and to provide recommendations for fiture research and development. This report provides an overview of PCS technology, a description of several state-of-the-art power conversion systems and how they are used in specific applications, a summary of four basic configurations for l:he power conversion systems used in energy storage applications, a discussion of PCS costs and potential cost reductions, a summary of the stancku-ds and codes relevant to the technology, and recommendations for future research and development.

  4. Using EnergyPlus to Perform Dehumidification Analysis on Building America Homes: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

    2011-03-01

    A parametric study was conducted using EnergyPlus version 6.0 to investigate humidity issues on a typical mid-1990s reference home, a 2006 International Energy Conservation Code home, and a high-performance home in a hot-humid climate. The impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls are analyzed on the high performance home. The study examined the combined effects of infiltration and mechanical ventilation with balanced and unbalanced mechanical ventilation systems. Indoor relative humidity excursions were examined; specifically, the number of excursions, average excursion length, and maximum excursion length. Space relative humidity, thermal comfort, and whole-house source energy consumption were analyzed for indoor relative humidity set points of 50%, 55%, and 60%. The study showed and explained why similar trends of high humidity were observed in all three homes regardless of energy efficiency, and why humidity problems are not necessarily unique in high-performance homes. Thermal comfort analysis indicated that occupants are unlikely to notice indoor humidity problems. The study confirmed that supplemental dehumidification should be provided to maintain space relative humidity below 60% in a hot-humid climate.

  5. Acoustic emission in wet or dry corrosion studies: an update on the art and usefulness of a data base; L'emission acoustique en corrosion humide et seche: etat de l'art et interet d'une base de donnees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caron, D.; Rigault, C. [Cetim-Centre Technique des Industries Mecaniques, 30 - Senlis (France); Rothea, C.; Mazille, H. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees, INSA, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Gaillet, L.; Moulin, G.; Beranger, G. [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, 60 (France)

    2001-07-01

    At the initiative of CETIM, a bibliographical work was accomplished at the LPCI (INSA Lyon) and UTC. The aim of this work was to establish the most current and complete state of the art on the potential of the acoustic emission (A.E.) for the detection of wet or dry corrosion met on many equipments used in the mechanical, chemical and petrochemical industries. Corrosion can affect all metallic equipments of industry under more or less aggressive operating conditions. In spite of the existing knowledge of the degradation mechanisms, the post-mortem analysis or laboratory simulation only gives either late or incomplete information. This usually results from difficulties to determine the actual local conditions. A.E. is a non-destructive control technique that can be applied as well in laboratory as on industrial site. According to literature data, the ability of A.E. to detect and monitor wet or dry corrosion was evidenced. Thus, it could be used for to a more reliable, secure and economic industrial management. However A.E. was and is still sometimes discussed. Indeed, the diversity of the equipments, processes and conditions of exploitation can generate some discrepancies. This study attempts to remove these ambiguities by detailing the principal parameters and key factors in order to objectively compare the referenced works. Our works confirms that A.E. is a very sensitive and powerful technique for studying wet or dry corrosion in laboratories or on industrial plants. (authors)

  6. Solar Desalination by Humidification-Dehumidification of Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moumouh J.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of supplying potable water can hardly be overstressed. In many arid zones, coastal or inlands, seawater or brackish water desalination may be the only solution to the shortage of fresh water. The process based on humidification-dehumidification of air (HDH principle mimic the natural water cycle. HDH technique has been subjected to many studies in recent years due to the low temperature, renewable energy use, simplicity, low cost installation and operation. An experimental test set-up has been fabricated and assembled. The prototype equipped with appropriate measuring and controlling devices. Detailed experiments have been carried out at various operating conditions. The heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained experimentally. The results of the investigation have shown that the system productivity increases with the increase in the mass flow rate of water through the unit. Water temperature at condenser exit increases linearly with water temperature at humidifier inlet and it decreases as water flow rate increases. HDH desalination systems realised on also work at atmospheric pressure; hence they do not need mechanical energy except for circulation pumps and fans. These kinds of systems are suitable for developing countries. The system is modular, it is possible to increase productivity with additional solar collectors and additional HDH cycles.

  7. Performance analysis of proposed hybrid air conditioning and humidification–dehumidification systems for energy saving and water production in hot and dry climatic regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nada, S.A.; Elattar, H.F.; Fouda, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Integrative air-conditioning (A/C) and humidification–dehumidification desalination systems are proposed. • Effects of operating parameters on the proposed systems are investigated. • System configurations that have the highest fresh water production rate, power saving and total cost saving are identified. - Abstract: Performance of integrative air-conditioning (A/C) and humidification–dehumidification desalination systems proposed for hot and dry climatic regions is theoretically investigated. The proposed systems aim to energy saving and systems utilization in fresh water production. Four systems with evaporative cooler and heat recovery units located at different locations are proposed, analyzed and evaluated at different operating parameters (fresh air ratio, supply air temperature and outside air wet bulb temperature). Other two basic systems are used as reference systems in proposed systems assessment. Fresh water production rate, A/C cooling capacity, A/C electrical power consumption, saving in power consumptions and total cost saving (TCS) parameters are used for systems evaluations and comparisons. The results show that (i) the fresh water production rates of the proposed systems increase with increasing fresh air ratio, supply air temperature and outdoor wet bulb temperature, (ii) powers saving of the proposed systems increase with increasing fresh air ratio and supply air temperature and decreasing of the outdoor air wet bulb temperature, (iii) locating the evaporative cooling after the fresh air mixing remarkably increases water production rate, and (vi) incorporating heat recovery in the air conditioning systems with evaporative cooling may adversely affect both of the water production rate and the total cost saving of the system. Comparison study has been presented to identify systems configurations that have the highest fresh water production rate, highest power saving and highest total cost saving. Numerical correlations for

  8. Physicochemical characteristics and sensory profile of honey samples from stingless bees (Apidae: Meliponinae submitted to a dehumidification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A.L. Carvalho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a dehumidification process on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of stingless-bee honey. Melipona scutellaris and M. quadrifasciata honey samples were submitted to a dehumidification process and to physicochemical (reducing sugars, apparent sucrose, moisture, diastatic activity, hydroxymethylfurfural, ash, pH, acidity, and electric conductivity and sensory evaluations (fluidity, color, aroma, crystallization,flavor,and acceptability. The results indicated that the dehumidification process does not interfere with honey quality and acceptability.Este estudo foi conduzido com o objetivo de avaliar o efeito do processo de desumidificação sobre as características físico-químicas e sensoriais do mel das abelhas sem ferrão. Amostras de méis de Melipona scutellaris e M. quadrifasciata foram submetidas ao processo de desumidificação, passando em seguida por avaliações físico-químicas (açúcares redutores, sacarose aparente, umidade, atividade diastásica, hidroximetilfurfural, cinzas, pH, acidez e condutividade elétrica e sensoriais (fluidez, cor, aroma, cristalização, sabor e aceitabilidade. Os resultados indicaram que o processo de desumidificação não interfere na qualidade e aceitabilidade do mel.

  9. Effect of compression deformation on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snir, Y.; Ben-Hamu, G.; Eliezer, D.; Abramov, E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Metallurgical features (mainly twinning, dislocation accumulation, and dynamic recrystallization). ► The thermo-mechanical state (amount of deformation and its temperature). ► The corrosion behavior of wrought Mg-alloys. This correlation was emphasized by the mechanical behavior measured through micro-hardness. ► Microstructural changes during deformation, and potentio-dynamic corrosion tests were correlated. - Abstract: The effect of deformation on the corrosion and mechanical behavior of wrought Mg-alloys AZ31, AM50, and ZK60 was investigated. The materials’ behavior was correlated to the changes in metallurgical features, during compression, into different amounts of deformation at three temperatures: 250° C, 280° C, and 350° C. The metallurgical features were monitored by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that there is a very strong correlation between three features: 1. metallurgical features (mainly twinning, dislocation accumulation, and dynamic recrystallization); 2. The thermo-mechanical state (amount of deformation and its temperature); and 3. The corrosion behavior of wrought Mg-alloys. This correlation was emphasized by the mechanical behavior measured through micro-hardness. Microstructural changes during deformation, and potentio-dynamic corrosion tests were correlated. These results show that studies on the effect of thermo-mechanical state (related to the microstructure) on the corrosion behavior of wrought Mg-alloys are essential in order to optimize their applicability to plastic forming processes.

  10. High Dehumidification Performance of Amorphous Cellulose Composite Membranes prepared from Trimethylsilyl Cellulose

    KAUST Repository

    Puspasari, Tiara

    2018-04-11

    Cellulose is widely regarded as an environmentally friendly, natural and low cost material which can significantly contribute the sustainable economic growth. In this study, cellulose composite membranes were prepared via regeneration of trimethylsilyl cellulose (TMSC), an easily synthesized cellulose derivative. The amorphous hydrophilic feature of the regenerated cellulose enabled fast permeation of water vapour. The pore-free cellulose layer thickness was adjustable by the initial TMSC concentration and acted as an efficient gas barrier. As a result, a 5,000 GPU water vapour transmission rate (WVTR) at the highest ideal selectivity of 1.1 x 106 was achieved by the membranes spin coated from a 7% (w/w) TMSC solution. The membranes maintained a 4,000 GPU WVTR with selectivity of 1.1 x 104 in the mixed-gas experiments, surpassing the performances of the previously reported composite membranes. This study provides a simple way to not only produce high performance membranes but also to advance cellulose as a low-cost and sustainable membrane material for dehumidification applications.

  11. The state-of-the-art of ART restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frencken, Jo E

    2014-04-01

    ART is less anxiety- and pain-provoking than traditional restorative treatments; administration of local anaesthesia is rarely required. Systematic reviews have provided evidence of the high level of effectiveness of high-viscosity glass-ionomer ART restoration in restoring single-surface cavities, both in primary and permanent posterior teeth, but its survival rates in restoring multiple-surface cavities in primary posterior teeth needs to be improved. Insufficient information is available regarding the survival rates of multiple-surface ART restorations in permanent teeth. Evidence from these reviews indicates no difference in the survival rates of single-surface high-viscosity glass-ionomer ART restorations and amalgam restorations in primary and permanent posterior teeth. Where indicated, high-viscosity glass-ionomer ART restorations can be used alongside traditional restorations. ART provides a much more acceptable introduction to dental restorative care than the traditional 'injection, drill and fill'.

  12. Critical corrosion issues and mitigation strategies impacting the operability of LWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent corrosion experience in US light water reactor nuclear power plants is reviewed with emphasis on mitigation strategies to control the cost of corrosion to LWR operators. Many components have suffered corrosion problems resulting in industry costs of billions of dollars. The most costly issues have been stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel coolant piping in boiling water reactors and corrosion damage to steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactors. Through industry wide R and D programs these problems are now understood and mitigation strategies have been developed to address the issues in a cost effective manner. Other significant corrosion problems for both reactor types are briefly reviewed. Tremendous progress has been made in controlling corrosion, however, minimizing its impact on plant operations will present a continuing challenge throughout the remaining service lives of these power plants

  13. The Impact of Company-Level ART Provision to a Mining Workforce in South Africa: A Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesine Meyer-Rath

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV impacts heavily on the operating costs of companies in sub-Saharan Africa, with many companies now providing antiretroviral therapy (ART programmes in the workplace. A full cost-benefit analysis of workplace ART provision has not been conducted using primary data. We developed a dynamic health-state transition model to estimate the economic impact of HIV and the cost-benefit of ART provision in a mining company in South Africa between 2003 and 2022.A dynamic health-state transition model, called the Workplace Impact Model (WIM, was parameterised with workplace data on workforce size, composition, turnover, HIV incidence, and CD4 cell count development. Bottom-up cost analyses from the employer perspective supplied data on inpatient and outpatient resource utilisation and the costs of absenteeism and replacement of sick workers. The model was fitted to workforce HIV prevalence and separation data while incorporating parameter uncertainty; univariate sensitivity analyses were used to assess the robustness of the model findings. As ART coverage increases from 10% to 97% of eligible employees, increases in survival and retention of HIV-positive employees and associated reductions in absenteeism and benefit payments lead to cost savings compared to a scenario of no treatment provision, with the annual cost of HIV to the company decreasing by 5% (90% credibility interval [CrI] 2%-8% and the mean cost per HIV-positive employee decreasing by 14% (90% CrI 7%-19% by 2022. This translates into an average saving of US$950,215 (90% CrI US$220,879-US$1.6 million per year; 80% of these cost savings are due to reductions in benefit payments and inpatient care costs. Although findings are sensitive to assumptions regarding incidence and absenteeism, ART is cost-saving under considerable parameter uncertainty and in all tested scenarios, including when prevalence is reduced to 1%-except when no benefits were paid out to employees leaving the workforce and

  14. The Impact of Company-Level ART Provision to a Mining Workforce in South Africa: A Cost-Benefit Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Pienaar, Jan; Brink, Brian; van Zyl, Andrew; Muirhead, Debbie; Grant, Alison; Churchyard, Gavin; Watts, Charlotte; Vickerman, Peter

    2015-09-01

    HIV impacts heavily on the operating costs of companies in sub-Saharan Africa, with many companies now providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in the workplace. A full cost-benefit analysis of workplace ART provision has not been conducted using primary data. We developed a dynamic health-state transition model to estimate the economic impact of HIV and the cost-benefit of ART provision in a mining company in South Africa between 2003 and 2022. A dynamic health-state transition model, called the Workplace Impact Model (WIM), was parameterised with workplace data on workforce size, composition, turnover, HIV incidence, and CD4 cell count development. Bottom-up cost analyses from the employer perspective supplied data on inpatient and outpatient resource utilisation and the costs of absenteeism and replacement of sick workers. The model was fitted to workforce HIV prevalence and separation data while incorporating parameter uncertainty; univariate sensitivity analyses were used to assess the robustness of the model findings. As ART coverage increases from 10% to 97% of eligible employees, increases in survival and retention of HIV-positive employees and associated reductions in absenteeism and benefit payments lead to cost savings compared to a scenario of no treatment provision, with the annual cost of HIV to the company decreasing by 5% (90% credibility interval [CrI] 2%-8%) and the mean cost per HIV-positive employee decreasing by 14% (90% CrI 7%-19%) by 2022. This translates into an average saving of US$950,215 (90% CrI US$220,879-US$1.6 million) per year; 80% of these cost savings are due to reductions in benefit payments and inpatient care costs. Although findings are sensitive to assumptions regarding incidence and absenteeism, ART is cost-saving under considerable parameter uncertainty and in all tested scenarios, including when prevalence is reduced to 1%-except when no benefits were paid out to employees leaving the workforce and when absenteeism

  15. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of California. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  16. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Arizona. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  17. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Georgia. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  18. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Florida. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  19. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Arkansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Arkansas. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  20. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Connecticut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Connecticut. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  1. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Hawaii. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  2. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Alaska. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  3. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Colorado. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  4. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Delaware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Delaware. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  5. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Alabama. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  6. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Washington. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  7. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Kentucky. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  8. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Vermont

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Vermont. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  9. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Wyoming. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  10. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Louisiana. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  11. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Maryland. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  12. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Nevada. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  13. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Ohio. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  14. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Nebraska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Nebraska. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  15. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Idaho. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  16. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Iowa. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  17. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Utah. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  18. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Oklahoma. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  19. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Tennessee. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  20. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Mississippi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Mississippi. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  1. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Montana. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  2. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Maine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Maine. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  3. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Michigan. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  4. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Indiana. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  5. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Pennsylvania. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  6. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Texas. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  7. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Kansas. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  8. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Massachusetts. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  9. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Minnesota. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  10. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Illinois. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  11. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Virginia. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  12. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Oregon. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  13. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Missouri. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  14. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Wisconsin. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  15. Materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud, F.; Desgranges, Clara; Martinelli, Laure; Rouillard, Fabien; Duhamel, Cecile; Marchetti, Loic; Perrin, Stephane; Molins, Regine; Chevalier, S.; Heintz, O.; David, N.; Fiorani, J.M.; Vilasi, M.; Wouters, Y.; Galerie, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Viguier, B.; Monceau, D.; Soustelle, M.; Pijolat, M.; Favergeon, J.; Brancherie, D.; Moulin, G.; Dawi, K.; Wolski, K.; Barnier, V.; Rebillat, F.; Lavigne, O.; Brossard, J.M.; Ropital, F.; Mougin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This book was made from the lectures given in 2010 at the thematic school on 'materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures'. It gathers the contributions from scientists and engineers coming from various communities and presents a state-of-the-art of the scientific and technological developments concerning the behaviour of materials at high temperature, in aggressive environments and in various domains (aerospace, nuclear, energy valorization, and chemical industries). It supplies pedagogical tools to grasp high temperature corrosion thanks to the understanding of oxidation mechanisms. It proposes some protection solutions for materials and structures. Content: 1 - corrosion costs; macro-economical and metallurgical approach; 2 - basic concepts of thermo-chemistry; 3 - introduction to the Calphad (calculation of phase diagrams) method; 4 - use of the thermodynamic tool: application to pack-cementation; 5 - elements of crystallography and of real solids description; 6 - diffusion in solids; 7 - notions of mechanics inside crystals; 8 - high temperature corrosion: phenomena, models, simulations; 9 - pseudo-stationary regime in heterogeneous kinetics; 10 - nucleation, growth and kinetic models; 11 - test experiments in heterogeneous kinetics; 12 - mechanical aspects of metal/oxide systems; 13 - coupling phenomena in high temperature oxidation; 14 - other corrosion types; 15 - methods of oxidized surfaces analysis at micro- and nano-scales; 16 - use of SIMS in the study of high temperature corrosion of metals and alloys; 17 - oxidation of ceramics and of ceramic matrix composite materials; 18 - protective coatings against corrosion and oxidation; 19 - high temperature corrosion in the 4. generation of nuclear reactor systems; 20 - heat exchangers corrosion in municipal waste energy valorization facilities; 21 - high temperature corrosion in oil refining and petrochemistry; 22 - high temperature corrosion in new energies industry. (J.S.)

  16. Electrochemical testing of passivity state and corrosion resistance of supermartensitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lasek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On low interstitial - supermartensitic stainless steels (X1CrNiMo 12-5-1, X2CrNiMo 13-6-2, X1CrNiMo 12-6-2 the electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out and the passive state stability and localized corrosion resistance were compared and evaluated. The effect of quenching and tempering as well as the changes in microstructure on polarisation curves and corrosion properties at room temperature were established. Small differences in chemical composition of steels were also registered on their corrosion parameters changes and resistance.

  17. Cultivating Demand for the Arts: Arts Learning, Arts Engagement, and State Arts Policy. Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaras, Laura; Lowell, Julia F.

    2008-01-01

    The findings summarized in this report are intended to shed light on what it means to cultivate demand for the arts, why it is necessary and important to cultivate this demand, and what state arts agencies (SAAs) and other arts and education policymakers can do to help. The research considered only the benchmark arts central to public policy:…

  18. Cost of a dedicated ART clinic | Harling | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background. The provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is being rolled out across South Africa. Little evidence exists on the cost of running clinics for ART provision. Objectives. To determine the cost per patient-month enrolled in an ART programme and per patient-visit for a dedicated, public-sector ART clinic in a ...

  19. The Effect of Low-Quantity Cr Addition on the Corrosion Behaviour of Dual-Phase High Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Handoko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial application of high carbon low alloy steel with the dual-phase structure of martensite and austenite has increased drastically in recent years. Due to its excellent compression strength and its high abrasion resistance, this grade of steel has used as a high performance cutting tool and in press machinery applications. By increasing the usage of more corrosive media in industrial practice and increasing the demand for reducing the production cost, it is crucial to understand the effect of the small addition of Cr on the corrosion behaviour of this grade of steel. In this study, this effect was investigated using Secondary Electron Microscopy (SEM and in-situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in the sodium chloride solution. Also, the corrosion rate was measured using the Tafel polarisation curve. It has been found that the small addition of Cr increased the stability of retained austenite, thus improving its corrosion resistance and reducing its corrosion rate. This effect has been acquired through in-situ high resolution topography images in which the samples were submerged in a corrosive solution. It has been demonstrated that the corrosion rate was reduced when the stability of austenite enhanced.

  20. Support for Arts Education. State Arts Agency Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Supporting lifelong learning in the arts is a top priority for state arts agencies. By supporting arts education in the schools, state arts agencies foster young imaginations, address core academic standards, and promote the critical thinking and creativity skills essential to a 21st century work force. State arts agencies also support…

  1. Evaluation of the Performance of Houses With and Without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrigan, P.; Norton, P.

    2014-10-01

    This report, Evaluation of the Performance of Houses with and without Supplemental Dehumidification in a Hot-Humid Climate, describes a research study that that was conducted by the Building Science Corporation (BSC) Building America Research Team. BSC seeks to research and report on the field monitoring of the performance of in-situ supplemental dehumidification systems in low energy, high performance, homes in a Hot-Humid climate. The purpose of this research project was to observe and compare the humidity control performance of new, single family, low energy, and high performance, homes. Specifically, the study sought to compare the interior conditions and mechanical systems operation between two distinct groups of houses, homes with a supplemental dehumidifier installed in addition to HVAC system, and homes without any supplemental dehumidification. The subjects of the study were ten single-family new construction homes in New Orleans, LA.Data logging equipment was installed at each home in 2012. Interior conditions and various end-use loads were monitored for one year. In terms of averages, the homes with dehumidifiers are limiting elevated levels of humidity in the living space. However, there was significant variation in humidity control between individual houses. An analysis of the equipment operation did not show a clear correlation between energy use and humidity levels. In general, no single explanatory variable appears to provide a consistent understanding of the humidity control in each house. Indoor humidity is likely due to all of the factors we have examined, and the specifics of how they are used by each occupant.

  2. State Arts Agency Fact Sheet: Support for Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online Submission, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This national overview of state arts agency grants and services for arts education includes summary statistics and geographic distribution. The fact sheet uses data from Final Descriptive Reports of state arts agency grant-making activities submitted annually to the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) and the National Endowment for…

  3. The dual role of microbes in corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion.

  4. The dual role of microbes in corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Nardy; van Veen, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion is the result of a series of chemical, physical and (micro) biological processes leading to the deterioration of materials such as steel and stone. It is a world-wide problem with great societal and economic consequences. Current corrosion control strategies based on chemically produced products are under increasing pressure of stringent environmental regulations. Furthermore, they are rather inefficient. Therefore, there is an urgent need for environmentally friendly and sustainable corrosion control strategies. The mechanisms of microbially influenced corrosion and microbially influenced corrosion inhibition are not completely understood, because they cannot be linked to a single biochemical reaction or specific microbial species or groups. Corrosion is influenced by the complex processes of different microorganisms performing different electrochemical reactions and secreting proteins and metabolites that can have secondary effects. Information on the identity and role of microbial communities that are related to corrosion and corrosion inhibition in different materials and in different environments is scarce. As some microorganisms are able to both cause and inhibit corrosion, we pay particular interest to their potential role as corrosion-controlling agents. We show interesting interfaces in which scientists from different disciplines such as microbiology, engineering and art conservation can collaborate to find solutions to the problems caused by corrosion. PMID:25259571

  5. The composition effect on the long-term corrosion of high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Waste glass can be optimized for long-term corrosion behavior if the key parameters that control the rate of corrosion are identified, measured, and modeled as functions of glass composition. Second-order polynomial models have been used to optimize glass with respect to a set of requirements on glass properties, such as viscosity and outcomes of standard corrosion tests. Extensive databases exist for the 7-day Product Consistency Test and the 28-day Materials Characterization Center tests, which have been used for nuclear waste glasses in the United States. Models based on these tests are reviewed and discussed to demonstrate the compositional effects on the extent of corrosion under specified conditions. However, modeling the rate of corrosion is potentially more useful for predicting long-term behavior than modeling the extent of corrosion measured by standard tests. Based on an experimental study of two glasses, it is shown that the rate of corrosion can be characterized by simple functions with physically meaningful coefficients. (author)

  6. Exergy Analysis of a Solar Humidification- Dehumidification Desalination Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed A. Elhaj; Jamal S. Yassin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the exergy analysis of a desalination unit using humidification-dehumidification process. Here, this unit is considered as a thermal system with three main components, which are the heating unit by using a solar collector, the evaporator or the humidifier, and the condenser or the dehumidifier. In these components the exergy is a measure of the quality or grade of energy and it can be destroyed in them. According to the second law of thermodynamics thi...

  7. State of the States 2016: Arts Education State Policy Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The "State of the States 2016" summarizes state policies for arts education identified in statute or administrative code for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information is based on a comprehensive search of state education statute and codes on each state's relevant websites. Complete results from this review are available in…

  8. Multi-objective Optimization of a Solar Humidification Dehumidification Desalination Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafigh, M.; Mirzaeian, M.; Najafi, B.; Rinaldi, F.; Marchesi, R.

    2017-11-01

    In the present paper, a humidification-dehumidification desalination unit integrated with solar system is considered. In the first step mathematical model of the whole plant is represented. Next, taking into account the logical constraints, the performance of the system is optimized. On one hand it is desired to have higher energetic efficiency, while on the other hand, higher efficiency results in an increment in the required area for each subsystem which consequently leads to an increase in the total cost of the plant. In the present work, the optimum solution is achieved when the specific energy of the solar heater and also the areas of humidifier and dehumidifier are minimized. Due to the fact that considered objective functions are in conflict, conventional optimization methods are not applicable. Hence, multi objective optimization using genetic algorithm which is an efficient tool for dealing with problems with conflicting objectives has been utilized and a set of optimal solutions called Pareto front each of which is a tradeoff between the mentioned objectives is generated.

  9. Hospital utilization, costs and mortality rates during the first 5 years of life: a population study of ART and non-ART singletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, G M; Lee, E; Hoang, V P; Hansen, M; Bower, C; Sullivan, E A

    2014-03-01

    Do singletons conceived following assisted reproduction technologies (ARTs) have significantly different hospital utilization, and therefore costs, compared with non-ART children during the first 5 years of life? ART singletons have longer hospital birth-admissions and a small increased risk of re-admission during the first 5 years of life resulting in higher costs of hospital care. ART singletons are at greater risk of adverse perinatal outcomes compared with non-ART singletons. Long-term physical and mental health outcomes of ART singletons are generally reassuring. There is a scarcity of information on health service utilization and the health economic impact of ART conceived children. A population cohort study using linked birth, hospital and death records. Perinatal outcomes, hospital utilization and costs, and mortality rates were compared for non-ART and ART singletons to 5 years. Adjustments were made for maternal age, parity, sex, birth year, socioeconomic status and funding source. Australian Diagnosis Related Groups cost-weights were used to derive costs. All costs are reported in 2009/2010 Australian dollars. All babies born in Western Australia between 1994 and 2003 were included; 224 425 non-ART singletons and 2199 ART conceived singletons. Hospital admission and death records in Western Australia linked to 2008 were used. Overall, ART singletons had a significantly longer length of stay during the birth-admission (mean difference 1.8 days, P birth-admission ($1473). The independent residual cost associated with ART conception was $342 during the birth-admission and an additional $548 up to 5 years of age, indicating that being conceived as an ART child predicts not only higher birth-admission costs but excess costs to at least 5 years of age. This study could not investigate the impact of different ART practices and techniques on perinatal outcomes or hospital utilization, nor could it adjust for parental characteristics such as cause of infertility

  10. Microencapsulation Technologies for Corrosion Protective Coating Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry; Jolley, Scott; Calle, Luz; Pearman, Benjamin; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Microencapsulation technologies for functional smart Coatings for autonomous corrosion control have been a research area of strong emphasis during the last decade. This work concerns the development of pH sensitive micro-containers (microparticles and microcapsules) for autonomous corrosion control. This paper presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in the field of microencapsulation for corrosion control applications, as well as the technical details of the pH sensitive microcontainer approach, such as selection criteria for corrosion indicators and corrosion inhibitors; the development and optimization of encapsulation methods; function evaluation before and after incorporation of the microcontainers into coatings; and further optimization to improve coating compatibility and performance.

  11. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviors of a PEO coating was investigated after the salt spray test. • Corrosion products have significant effects on corrosion behaviors of the coating. • An electrochemical corrosion model is proposed. - Abstract: The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  12. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Shen, Dejiu, E-mail: DejiuShen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Corrosion behaviors of a PEO coating was investigated after the salt spray test. • Corrosion products have significant effects on corrosion behaviors of the coating. • An electrochemical corrosion model is proposed. - Abstract: The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  13. Biotribocorrosion-an appraisal of the time dependence of wear and corrosion interactions: I. The role of corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y; Neville, A; Dowson, D

    2006-01-01

    With the increasing interest in metal-on-metal (MoM) joint implants, studies have been focused on their wear and corrosion behaviour. Integrated electrochemical tests have been conducted and are reported in this paper. The corrosion, wear and wear-corrosion behaviour for three materials (high carbon CoCrMo, low carbon CoCrMo and UNS S31603) have been discussed. Corrosion effects on the overall performance for the three materials are analysed. Two distinct regimes have been found for the three materials: (a) the running-in regime and (b) the steady state regime, in line with other research. Even in the steady state regime, 20%-30% of the material degradation can be attributed to corrosion-related damage. High carbon CoCrMo showed excellent corrosion, wear and corrosion-wear resistance and therefore it delivered the best overall performance in terms of a lower wear rate, a lower friction coefficient and a higher resistance to corrosion

  14. Cost-Effective and Environmentally Safe Corrosion Prevention for 2nd Marine Air Wing Support Equipment Using Desiccant Wheel Dehumidification (DEW)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCarthy, David

    1994-01-01

    ...: change the material, coat its surface or keep the item dry. In an effort to reduce the cost and environmental impact of maintaining contingency support equipment, the 2nd Marine Air Wing (2nd MAW...

  15. Current state of knowledge of water radiolysis effects on spent nuclear fuel corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, H.; Sunder, S.

    2000-07-01

    Literature data on the effect of water radiolysis products on spent-fuel oxidation and dissolution are reviewed. Effects of gamma radiolysis, alpha radiolysis, and dissolved O 2 or H 2 O 2 in unirradiated solutions are discussed separately. Also, the effect of carbonate in gamma-irradiated solutions and radiolysis effects on leaching of spent fuel are reviewed. In addition, a kinetic model for calculating the corrosion rates of UO 2 in solutions undergoing radiolysis is discussed. The model gives good agreement between calculated and measured corrosion rates in the case of gamma radiolysis and in unirradiated solutions containing dissolved oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. However, the model fails to predict the results of alpha radiolysis. In a recent study , it was shown that the model gave good agreement with measured corrosion rates of spent fuel exposed in deionized water. The applications of radiolysis studies for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel are discussed. (author)

  16. Orphan diseases: state of the drug discovery art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volmar, Claude-Henry; Wahlestedt, Claes; Brothers, Shaun P

    2017-06-01

    Since 1983 more than 300 drugs have been developed and approved for orphan diseases. However, considering the development of novel diagnosis tools, the number of rare diseases vastly outpaces therapeutic discovery. Academic centers and nonprofit institutes are now at the forefront of rare disease R&D, partnering with pharmaceutical companies when academic researchers discover novel drugs or targets for specific diseases, thus reducing the failure risk and cost for pharmaceutical companies. Considerable progress has occurred in the art of orphan drug discovery, and a symbiotic relationship now exists between pharmaceutical industry, academia, and philanthropists that provides a useful framework for orphan disease therapeutic discovery. Here, the current state-of-the-art of drug discovery for orphan diseases is reviewed. Current technological approaches and challenges for drug discovery are considered, some of which can present somewhat unique challenges and opportunities in orphan diseases, including the potential for personalized medicine, gene therapy, and phenotypic screening.

  17. Corrosion by concentrated sulfuric acid in carbon steel pipes and tanks: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panossian, Zehbour; Almeida, Neusvaldo Lira de; Sousa, Raquel Maria Ferreira de [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pimenta, Gutemberg de Souza [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento (CENPES); Marques, Leandro Bordalo Schmidt [PETROBRAS Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    PETROBRAS, allied to the policy of reduction of emission of pollutants, has been adjusting the processes of the new refineries to obtain products with lower sulfur content. Thus, the sulfur dioxide, extracted from the process gases of a new refinery to be built in the Northeast, will be used to produce sulfuric acid with concentration between (94-96) %. This acid will be stored in carbon steel tanks and transported through a buried 8-km carbon steel pipe from the refinery to a pier, where it will be loaded onto ships and sent to the consumer markets. Therefore, the corrosion resistance of carbon steel by concentrated acid will become a great concern for the mentioned storage and transportation. When the carbon steel comes into contact with concentrated sulfuric acid, there is an immediate acid attack with the formation of hydrogen gas and ferrous ions which, in turn, forms a protective layer of FeSO{sub 4} on the metallic surface. The durability of the tanks and pipes made of carbon steel will depend on the preservation of this protective layer. This work presents a review of the carbon steel corrosion in concentrated sulfuric acid and discusses the preventive methods against this corrosion, including anodic protection. (author)

  18. Is scorpion antivenom cost-effective as marketed in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Edward P; Bakall, Maja; Skrepnek, Grant H; Boyer, Leslie V

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the cost-effectiveness of scorpion antivenom compared to no antivenom, in the United States, using a decision analysis framework. A decision analytic model was created to assess patient course with and without antivenom. Costs were determined from the perspective of a health care payer. Cost data used in the model were extracted from Arizona Medicaid. The probability of clinical events occurring with and without antivenom was obtained from the published literature, medical claims obtained from Arizona Medicaid, and results of recent clinical trials. Patients that became so ill that mechanical ventilator support was necessary were considered treatment failures. A Monte Carlo simulation was run 1000 times and sampled simultaneously across all variable distributions in the model. The mean success rate was 99.87% (95% CI 99.64%-99.98%) with scorpion antivenom and 94.31% (95% CI 91.10%-96.61%) without scorpion antivenom. The mean cost using scorpion antivenom was $10,708 (95% CI $10,556 - $11,010) and the mean cost without scorpion antivenom was $3178 (95% CI $1627 - $5184). Since the 95% CIs do not overlap for either the success or cost, use of the scorpion antivenom was significantly more effective and significantly more expensive than no antivenom. Cost-effectiveness analysis found that the scorpion antivenom was not cost-effective at its current price as marketed in the United States. The scorpion antivenom marketed in the United States is extremely effective, but too costly to justify its use in most clinical situations. Formulary committees should restrict the use of this antivenom to only the most severe scorpion envenomations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of nanograin-boundary networks generation on corrosion of carburized martensitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonruang, Chatdanai; Thong-On, Atcharawadi; Kidkhunthod, Pinit

    2018-02-02

    Martensitic stainless steel parts used in carbonaceous atmosphere at high temperature are subject to corrosion which results in a large amount of lost energy and high repair and maintenance costs. This work therefore proposes a model for surface development and corrosion mechanism as a solution to reduce corrosion costs. The morphology, phase, and corrosion behavior of steel are investigated using GIXRD, XANES, and EIS. The results show formation of nanograin-boundary networks in the protective layer of martensitic stainless steel. This Cr 2 O 3 -Cr 7 C 3 nanograin mixture on the FeCr 2 O 4 layer causes ion transport which is the main reason for the corrosion reaction during carburizing of the steel. The results reveal the rate determining steps in the corrosion mechanism during carburizing of steel. These steps are the diffusion of uncharged active gases in the stagnant-gas layer over the steel surface followed by the conversion of C into C 4- and O into O 2- at the gas-oxide interface simultaneously with the migration of Cr 3+ from the metal-oxide interface to the gas-oxide interface. It is proposed that previous research on Al 2 O 3 coatings may be the solution to producing effective coatings that overcome the corrosion challenges discussed in this work.

  20. Cost of a dedicated ART clinic | Harling | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little evidence exists on the cost of running clinics for ART provision. Objectives. To determine the cost per patient-month enrolled in an ART programme and per patient-visit for a dedicated, public-sector ART clinic in a South African peri-urban setting in 2004/05 and 2005/06, as the clinic moved from a temporary to a ...

  1. Cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus vaccination in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Harrell W; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Saraiya, Mona; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2008-02-01

    We describe a simplified model, based on the current economic and health effects of human papillomavirus (HPV), to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls in the United States. Under base-case parameter values, the estimated cost per quality-adjusted life year gained by vaccination in the context of current cervical cancer screening practices in the United States ranged from $3,906 to $14,723 (2005 US dollars), depending on factors such as whether herd immunity effects were assumed; the types of HPV targeted by the vaccine; and whether the benefits of preventing anal, vaginal, vulvar, and oropharyngeal cancers were included. The results of our simplified model were consistent with published studies based on more complex models when key assumptions were similar. This consistency is reassuring because models of varying complexity will be essential tools for policy makers in the development of optimal HPV vaccination strategies.

  2. Ecological effects assessment: requirements vs state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, D.H.; Thomas, J.M.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1981-05-01

    Concerns for environmental quality, the ecologist's understanding of ecosystems, and the ability to quantitatively sample and evaluate hypotheses have contributed to current requirements and the state-of-the-art in ecological effects assessments in refard to nuclear power plants. The current cooling system approaches, data collection programs, and ecological effects assessments reflect these contributions. Over a decade of experience provides the basis for a timely review and evaluation of current proactice. The magnitude of economic and environmental resources being committed to cooling system alternatives mandates that the decision-making process result in as many optimal choices as possible. In addition, the resources being devoted to environmental data collection and integration provide considerable motivation for providing meaningful input to the decision-making process. It is maintained that the input should be as quantitative and as free from subjective content as is reasonably possible. An alternative viewpoint suggests that the past several decades of experience be considered but a first step, and the current task to be one of designing a second step

  3. The effects of corrosion conditions and cold work on the nodular corrosion of zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung

    1992-02-01

    The nodular corrosion of Zircaloy-4 was investigated on the effects of corrosion conditions and cold work. Variation of steam pressures, heat-up environments and prefilms were considered and cold work effects were also studied. The corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 was dependent on pressure between 1 and 100 atm and it followed the cubic law as W=16.85 x P 0.31 for plate specimens and W=12.69 x P 0.27 for tube specimens, where W is weight gain (mg/dm 2 ) and P is the steam pressure (atm). The environment variation in autoclave during heat-up period did not affect the early stage of nodular corrosion. The prefilm, which was formed at 500 .deg. C under 1 atm steam for 4 hours, restrained the formation of the initial small nodules. The oxide film formed under 1 atm steam showed no difference of electrical resistivity from the oxides formed under 100 atm steam pressure. Cold work specimens showed the higher resistivity against nodular corrosion than as-received specimens. The corrosion resistance arising from cold work seems to be due to the texture changes by the cold work. The results showed that cold work can affect the later stage of uniform corrosion and the early stage of nodular corrosion, namely, the nodule initiation stage

  4. Corrosion '98: 53. annual conference and exposition, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    This conference was divided into the following sections: Corrosion in Gas Treating; Problems and Solutions in Commercial Building Water Systems; Green Corrosion/Scale Inhibitors; Atmospheric Corrosion; AIRPOL Update/98; Rubber Lining--Answers to Many Problems; Interference Problems; Environmental Assisted Cracking: Fundamental Research and Industrial Applications; Corrosion in Nuclear Systems; New Developments in Scale and Deposit Control; Corrosion and Corrosion Protection in the Transportation Industries; What's All the Noise About--Electrochemical That Is; Refining Industry Corrosion; Corrosion Problems in Military Hardware: Case Histories, Fixes and Lessons Learned; Cathodic Protection Test Methods and Instrumentation for Underground and On-grade Pipelines and Tanks; Recent Developments in Volatile Corrosion Inhibitors; Corrosion in Supercritical Fluids; Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion; Advances in Understanding and Controlling CO 2 Corrosion; Managing Corrosion with Plastics; Material Developments for Use in Exploration and Production Environments; Corrosion in Cold Regions; The Effect of Downsizing and Outsourcing on Cooling System Monitoring and Control Practices; New Developments in Mechanical and Chemical Industrial Cleaning; Mineral Scale Deposit Control in Oilfield Related Operations; Biocides in Cooling Water; Corrosion and Corrosion Control of Reinforced Concrete Structures; Materials Performance for Fossil Energy Conversion Systems; Marine corrosion; Thermal Spray--Coating and Corrosion Control; Flow Effects on Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production; Corrosion Measurement Technologies; Internal Pipeline Monitoring--Corrosion Monitoring, Intelligent Pigging and Leak Detection; Cathodic Protection in Natural Waters; Corrosion in Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems; On-line Hydrogen Permeation Monitoring Equipment and Techniques, State of the Art; Water Reuse and Recovery; Performance of Materials in High Temperature Environments; Advances in Motor

  5. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of North Dakota. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  6. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of West Virginia. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  7. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of New Mexico. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  8. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of New York. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  9. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of Rhode Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of Rhode Island. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  10. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of New Hampshire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of New Hampshire. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  11. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of North Carolina. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  12. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of New Jersey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of New Jersey. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  13. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of South Carolina. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  14. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 for the State of South Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Philip R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Athalye, Rahul A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xie, YuLong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhuge, Jing Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Halverson, Mark A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richman, Eric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Moving to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2013 (ASHRAE 2013) edition from Standard 90.1-2010 (ASHRAE 2010) is cost-effective for the State of South Dakota. The table below shows the state-wide economic impact of upgrading to Standard 90.1-2013 in terms of the annual energy cost savings in dollars per square foot, additional construction cost per square foot required by the upgrade, and life-cycle cost (LCC) per square foot. These results are weighted averages for all building types in all climate zones in the state, based on weightings shown in Table 4. The methodology used for this analysis is consistent with the methodology used in the national cost-effectiveness analysis. Additional results and details on the methodology are presented in the following sections. The report provides analysis of two LCC scenarios: Scenario 1, representing publicly-owned buildings, considers initial costs, energy costs, maintenance costs, and replacement costs—without borrowing or taxes. Scenario 2, representing privately-owned buildings, adds borrowing costs and tax impacts.

  15. State-of-the-art of wind turbine design codes: main features overview for cost-effective generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenaar, D-P.; Dijkstra, S. [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands). Mechanical Engineering Systems and Control Group

    1999-07-01

    For successful large-scale application of wind energy, the price of electricity generated by wind turbines should decrease. Model-based control can be important since it has the potential to reduce fatigue loads, while simultaneously maintaining a desired amount of energy production. The controller synthesis, however, requires a mathematical model describing the most important dynamics of the complete wind turbine. In the wind energy community there is a wide variety in codes used to model a wind turbine's dynamic behaviour or to carry out design calculations. In this paper, the main features of the state-of-the-art wind turbine design codes have been investigated in order to judge the appropriateness of using one of these for the modeling, identification and control of flexible, variable speed wind turbines. It can be concluded that, although the sophistication of the design codes has increased enormously over the last two decades, they are, in general, not suitable for the design, and easy implementation of optimal operating strategies.

  16. A New Corrosion Sensor to Determine the Start and Development of Embedded Rebar Corrosion Process at Coastal Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiliang Jin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  17. A new corrosion sensor to determine the start and development of embedded rebar corrosion process at coastal concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Li, Zhiyuan; Jin, Weiliang

    2013-09-30

    The corrosion of reinforcements induced by chloride has resulted to be one of the most frequent causes of their premature damage. Most corrosion sensors were designed to monitor corrosion state in concrete, such as Anode-Ladder-System and Corrowatch System, which are widely used to monitor chloride ingress in marine concrete. However, the monitoring principle of these corrosion sensors is based on the macro-cell test method, so erroneous information may be obtained, especially from concrete under drying or saturated conditions due to concrete resistance taking control in macro-cell corrosion. In this paper, a fast weak polarization method to test corrosion state of reinforcements based on electrochemical polarization dynamics was proposed. Furthermore, a new corrosion sensor for monitoring the corrosion state of concrete cover was developed based on the proposed test method. The sensor was tested in cement mortar, with dry-wet cycle tests to accelerate the chloride ingress rate. The results show that the corrosion sensor can effectively monitor chloride penetration into concrete with little influence of the relative humidity in the concrete. With a reasonable corrosion sensor electrode arrangement, it seems the Ohm-drop effect measured by EIS can be ignored, which makes the tested electrochemical parameters more accurate.

  18. State of the art magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    In less than a decade Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has evolved from a laboratory demonstration to a safe and effective technique for clinical diagnosis. This evolutionary process continues. At this time 2-D and 3-D imaging of the head and body is firmly established in clinical use. Surface coil imaging, two-component chemical shift imaging, in-vivo spectroscopy and flow imaging are currently in various stages of development. The present state of the art of MRI is a function of an array of technologies: magnet, Rf coil, Rf pulse amplifier, gradient coil and driver, pulse programmer, A/D converter, computer system architecture, array processors and mass storage (both magnetic and optical). The overall product design is the result of a complex process which balances the advantages and disadvantages of each component for optimal system performance and flexibility. The author discusses the organization of a state-of-the-art MRI system. Several examples of the kinds of system interactions affecting design choices are given. (Auth.)

  19. Improving corrosion resistance of post-tensioned substructures emphasizing high performance grouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schokker, Andrea Jeanne

    The use of post-tensioning in bridges can provide durability and structural benefits to the system while expediting the construction process. When post-tensioning is combined with precast elements, traffic interference can be greatly reduced through rapid construction. Post-tensioned concrete substructure elements such as bridge piers, hammerhead bents, and straddle bents have become more prevalent in recent years. Chloride induced corrosion of steel in concrete is one of the most costly forms of corrosion each year. Coastal substructure elements are exposed to seawater by immersion or spray, and inland bridges may also be at risk due to the application of deicing salts. Corrosion protection of the post-tensioning system is vital to the integrity of the structure because loss of post-tensioning can result in catastrophic failure. Documentation for durability design of the grout, ducts, and anchorage systems is very limited. The objective of this research is to evaluate the effectiveness of corrosion protection measures for post-tensioned concrete substructures by designing and testing specimens representative of typical substructure elements using state-of-the-art practices in aggressive chloride exposure environments. This was accomplished through exposure testing of twenty-seven large-scale beam specimens and ten large-scale column specimens. High performance grout for post-tensioning tendon injection was also developed through a series of fresh property tests, accelerated exposure tests, and a large-scale pumping test to simulate field conditions. A high performance fly ash grout was developed for applications with small vertical rises, and a high performance anti-bleed grout was developed for applications involving large vertical rises such as tall bridge piers. Long-term exposure testing of the beam and column specimens is ongoing, but preliminary findings indicate increased corrosion protection with increasing levels of post-tensioning, although traditional

  20. Commercial high efficiency dehumidification systems using heat pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    An improved heat pipe design using separately connected two-section one-way flow heat pipes with internal microgrooves instead of wicks is described. This design is now commercially available for use to increase the dehumidification capacity of air conditioning systems. The design also includes a method of introducing fresh air into buildings while recovering heat and controlling the humidity of the incoming air. Included are applications and case studies, load calculations and technical data, and installation, operation, and maintenance information.

  1. A state of the art on electrochemical noise technique. Assessment of corrosion characteristics and development of remedial technology in nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Joung Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Lim, Yun Soo; Yi, Yong Sun; Chung, Man Kyo

    2003-02-01

    The studies for the application of electrochemical noise technique were reviewed in terms of principle, analysing method and application examples of this technique. Because 4% of the economic damage of industry is caused by metallic corrosion, it is important to find and protect corrosive materials and location. By corrosion monitoring of industrial facilities such as nuclear power plant using Electrochemical Noise Measurement(ENM), corrosion attack can be detected and furthermore it can be indicated whether the attacked materials is replaced by new one or not. According to development of control and electronic technology, it was easy to apply ENM to the industry and the interest in ENM also increased. As corrosion is produced on a metal under corrosive environment, local anode(oxidation) and cathode(reduction) are formed. Hence, there is potential difference and current flow between the anode and cathode. ENM is monitoring the potential difference and the current flow with time by high impedance load voltmeter and Zero Resistance Ammeter(ZRA), respectively. The potential difference and current flow generated spontaneously without any application of current and potential between electrodes are monitored by electrochemical noise technique, Thereby ENM can be regarded as the most ideal corrosion monitoring method for the industrial facility and nuclear power plant having corrosion damage and difficulty in access of human body. Moreover, it is possible to obtain the spontaneous and reliable results from the metals damaged by ununiform and localized corrosion such as pitting and SCC using ENM while it is difficult to obtain the reliable result using traditional linear polarization and ac-impedance measurement. In many countries, there are extensive works concerned with application of electrochemical noise technique to corrosion monitoring of nuclear power plant and other industrial facilities, whereas there is little work on this field in Korea. Systematic study for

  2. Design of State-of-the-art Flow Cells for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-31

    The worldwide energy demand is increasing every day and it necessitates rational and efficient usage of renewable energy. Undoubtedly, utilization of renewable energy can address various environmental challenges. However, all current renewable energy resources (wind, solar, and hydroelectric power) are intermittent and fluctuating in their nature that raises an important question of introducing effective energy storage solutions. Utilization of redox flow cells (RFCs) has recently been recognized as a viable technology for large-scale energy storage and, hence, is well suited for integrating renewable energy and balancing electricity grids. In brief, RFC is an electrochemical storage device where energy is stored in chemical bonds, similar to a battery, but with reactants external to the cell. The state-of-the-art in flow cell technology uses an aqueous acidic electrolyte and simple metal redox couples. Thus, there is an urgent call to develop efficient (high-energy density) and low-cost RFCs to meet the efflorescent energy storage demands. To address the first challenge of achieving high-energy density, we plan to design and further modify complexes composed of bifunctional multidentate ligands and specific metal centers, capable of storing as many electrons as possible. In order to address the second challenge of reducing cost of the RFCs, we plan to use iron (Fe) metal as it regularly occupies multiple oxidation states and is the second most abundant metal in the earth’s crust that makes it an ideal metal for improved energy densities, higher potentials, and numbers of electrons per molecule while maintaining potential cost competitiveness. Density functional theory calculations considering solvation effects will be performed to yield accurate predictions of redox potentials.

  3. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  4. The Art of the Renaissance Capitalist State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeka Vidrih

    2007-12-01

    This article also highlights the fact that the concept of art developed in Florence – a city-state that played an important role in the early-capitalist world of the Renaissance, but never assumed a leading role like Venice and Genoa. »Art« was thus created through Florence’s efforts to demonstrate its equality and importance and, although it failed to achieve this in the field of the (capitalist economy, it at least succeeded in the field of the (absolutist state that was subordinate to this economy.

  5. Effect of manufacturing process sequence on the corrosion resistance characteristics of coated metallic bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dur, Ender; Cora, Ömer Necati; Koç, Muammer

    2014-01-01

    Metallic bipolar plate (BPP) with high corrosion and low contact resistance, durability, strength, low cost, volume, and weight requirements is one of the critical parts of the PEMFC. This study is dedicated to understand the effect of the process sequence (manufacturing then coating vs. coating then manufacturing) on the corrosion resistance of coated metallic bipolar plates. To this goal, three different PVD coatings (titanium nitride (TiN), chromium nitride (CrN), zirconium nitride (ZrN)), with three thicknesses, (0.1, 0.5, 1 μm) were applied on BPPs made of 316L stainless steel alloy before and after two types of manufacturing (i.e., stamping or hydroforming). Corrosion test results indicated that ZrN coating exhibited the best corrosion protection while the performance of TiN coating was the lowest among the tested coatings and thicknesses. For most of the cases tested, in which coating was applied before manufacturing, occurrence of corrosion was found to be more profound than the case where coating was applied after manufacturing. Increasing the coating thickness was found to improve the corrosion resistance. It was also revealed that hydroformed BPPs performed slightly better than stamped BPPs in terms of the corrosion behavior.

  6. Performance analysis of a direct expansion air dehumidification system combined with membrane-based total heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Cai-Hang; Zhang, Li-Zhi; Pei, Li-Xia [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-09-15

    A direct expansion (DX) air dehumidification system is an efficient way to supply fresh and dry air to a built environment. It plays a key role in preventing the spread of respiratory disease like Swine flu (H1N1). To improve the efficiency of a conventional DX system in hot and humid regions, a new system of DX in combination with a membrane-based total heat exchanger is proposed. Air is supplied with dew points. A detailed mathematical modeling is performed. A cell-by-cell simulation technique is used to simulate its performances. A real prototype is built in our laboratory in South China University of Technology to validate the model. The effects of inlet air humidity and temperature, evaporator and condenser sizes on the system performance are investigated. The results indicate that the model can predict the system accurately. Compared to a conventional DX system, the air dehumidification rate (ADR) of the novel system is 0.5 times higher, and the coefficient of performance (COP) is 1 times higher. Furthermore, the system performs well even under harsh hot and humid weather conditions. (author)

  7. Shadow corrosion phenomenon. An out-of-pile study on electrochemical effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Nadine

    2017-04-28

    The focus of the present thesis was the study of the enhanced corrosion phenomenon named ''Shadow Corrosion''. Within the context of researching based on the corrosion mechanism as well as the influencing parameters and driving forces, which cause or even intensify the corrosion, a variety of electrochemical characterization and surface analysis techniques were used. The first part of this thesis gives a short introduction with the definition of the term Shadow Corrosion and of the specific type called ''Enhanced Spacer Shadow Corrosion'' (ESSC). This is followed by a description of the involved materials being Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Chapter 2 introduces the background knowledge including fundamentals about environ-mental conditions under which Shadow Corrosion occurs as well as the oxidation behavior of Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Furthermore, the state of the art about the Shadow Corrosion mechanism is presented and a description of the influencing effects on the enhanced corrosion phenomenon, like galvanic corrosion, water radiolysis, and photo-effect, is given. Further information and parameters on the part of AREVA GmbH concerning water impurities and a used coating layer on Inconel 718 are listed, which are of interest for the issue concerning the phenomenon Shadow Corrosion. The last part of this chapter contains the experimental conditions and parameters for the laboratory experiments with focus on water chemistry, specimen geometry, and UV-light exposure for photoexcitation and water radiolysis. Three different working hypotheses of this thesis are described in chapter 3. One hypothesis regarding the Shadow Corrosion Phenomenon is based on a galvanic corrosion mechanism between Zircaloy and Inconel 718. In addition, it is supposed that the galvanic corrosion could be influenced by the deposition of silver on Zircaloy and Inconel 718 in the form of an increased galvanic current. A further assumption is that the

  8. Shadow corrosion phenomenon. An out-of-pile study on electrochemical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    The focus of the present thesis was the study of the enhanced corrosion phenomenon named ''Shadow Corrosion''. Within the context of researching based on the corrosion mechanism as well as the influencing parameters and driving forces, which cause or even intensify the corrosion, a variety of electrochemical characterization and surface analysis techniques were used. The first part of this thesis gives a short introduction with the definition of the term Shadow Corrosion and of the specific type called ''Enhanced Spacer Shadow Corrosion'' (ESSC). This is followed by a description of the involved materials being Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Chapter 2 introduces the background knowledge including fundamentals about environ-mental conditions under which Shadow Corrosion occurs as well as the oxidation behavior of Zircaloy and Inconel 718. Furthermore, the state of the art about the Shadow Corrosion mechanism is presented and a description of the influencing effects on the enhanced corrosion phenomenon, like galvanic corrosion, water radiolysis, and photo-effect, is given. Further information and parameters on the part of AREVA GmbH concerning water impurities and a used coating layer on Inconel 718 are listed, which are of interest for the issue concerning the phenomenon Shadow Corrosion. The last part of this chapter contains the experimental conditions and parameters for the laboratory experiments with focus on water chemistry, specimen geometry, and UV-light exposure for photoexcitation and water radiolysis. Three different working hypotheses of this thesis are described in chapter 3. One hypothesis regarding the Shadow Corrosion Phenomenon is based on a galvanic corrosion mechanism between Zircaloy and Inconel 718. In addition, it is supposed that the galvanic corrosion could be influenced by the deposition of silver on Zircaloy and Inconel 718 in the form of an increased galvanic current. A further assumption is that the galvanic current could be decreased by a Cr

  9. Cryptococcal Meningitis Treatment Strategies Affected by the Explosive Cost of Flucytosine in the United States: A Cost-effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Matthew; Boulware, David R

    2016-06-15

    In the United States, cryptococcal meningitis causes approximately 3400 hospitalizations and approximately 330 deaths annually. The US guidelines recommend treatment with amphotericin B plus flucytosine for at least 2 weeks, followed by fluconazole for a minimum of 8 weeks. Due to generic drug manufacturer monopolization, flucytosine currently costs approximately $2000 per day in the United States, with a 2-week flucytosine treatment course costing approximately $28 000. The daily flucytosine treatment cost in the United Kingdom is approximately $22. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to determine the value of flucytosine relative to alternative regimens. We estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of 3 cryptococcal induction regimens: (1) amphotericin B deoxycholate for 4 weeks; (2) amphotericin and flucytosine (100 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks; and (3) amphotericin and fluconazole (800 mg/day) for 2 weeks. Costs of care were calculated using 2015 US prices and the medication costs. Survival estimates were derived from a randomized trial and scaled relative to published US survival data. Cost estimates were $83 227 for amphotericin monotherapy, $75 121 for amphotericin plus flucytosine, and $44 605 for amphotericin plus fluconazole. The ICER of amphotericin plus flucytosine was $23 842 per quality-adjusted life-year. Flucytosine is currently cost-effective in the United States despite a dramatic increase in price in recent years. Combination therapy with amphotericin and flucytosine is the most attractive treatment strategy for cryptococcal meningitis, though the rising price may be creating access issues that will exacerbate if the trend of profiteering continues. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Corrosion resistant alloy uses in the power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, J.L.; Hall, F.A.; Asphahani, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Nickel-base alloys have been used as cost-effective measures in a variety of severely corrosive situations in pollution control units for coal-fired power plants. Cost effectiveness and practical answers to corrosion problems are illustrated (specifically the wallpaper concept/metallic lining technique). Numerous cases of successful use of HASTELLOY alloys in Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) systems and hazardous waste treatment incineration scrubber systems are listed. In this paper developments in nickel-base alloys and their use in FGD and other segments of the power industry are discussed. In the Ni-Cr-Mo-W alloy family, the C-22 alloy has the best resistance to localized corrosion in halide environments (chloride/fluoride-containing solutions). This alloy is also used effectively as a universal filler metal to weld less-resistant alloys were weld corrosion may be a problem. Field performance of this alloy in the power industry is described

  11. The impact of corrosion on oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermani, M.B.; Harrop, D.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of corrosion on the oil industry has been viewed in terms of its effect on both capital and operational expenditures (CAPEX and OPEX) and health, safety and the environment (HSE). To fight against the high cost and the impact of corrosion within the oil industry, an overview of topical research and engineering activities is presented. This covers corrosion and metallurgy issues related to drilling, production, transportation and refinery activities

  12. The cost-effectiveness of male HPV vaccination in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesson, Harrell W; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Saraiya, Mona; Dunne, Eileen F; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2011-10-26

    The objective of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of adding human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of 12-year-old males to a female-only vaccination program for ages 12-26 years in the United States. We used a simplified model of HPV transmission to estimate the reduction in the health and economic burden of HPV-associated diseases in males and females as a result of HPV vaccination. Estimates of the incidence, cost-per-case, and quality-of-life impact of HPV-associated health outcomes were based on the literature. The HPV-associated outcomes included were: cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN); genital warts; juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP); and cervical, vaginal, vulvar, anal, oropharyngeal, and penile cancers. The cost-effectiveness of male vaccination depended on vaccine coverage of females. When including all HPV-associated outcomes in the analysis, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained by adding male vaccination to a female-only vaccination program was $23,600 in the lower female coverage scenario (20% coverage at age 12 years) and $184,300 in the higher female coverage scenario (75% coverage at age 12 years). The cost-effectiveness of male vaccination appeared less favorable when compared to a strategy of increased female vaccination coverage. For example, we found that increasing coverage of 12-year-old girls would be more cost-effective than adding male vaccination even if the increased female vaccination strategy incurred program costs of $350 per additional girl vaccinated. HPV vaccination of 12-year-old males might potentially be cost-effective, particularly if female HPV vaccination coverage is low and if all potential health benefits of HPV vaccination are included in the analysis. However, increasing female coverage could be a more efficient strategy than male vaccination for reducing the overall health burden of HPV in the population. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Effect of Precipitate State on Mechanical Properties, Corrosion Behavior, and Microstructures of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoyan; Li, Yao; Xu, Guofu; Huang, Jiwu; Yin, Zhimin

    2018-03-01

    The mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and microstructures of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy under various ageing treatments were investigated comparatively. The results show that the tensile strength and corrosion resistance are strongly affected by the precipitate state. Massive fine intragranular precipitates contribute to high strength. Discontinuous coarse grain boundary precipitates containing high Cu content, as well as the narrow precipitate free zone, result in low corrosion susceptibility. After the non-isothermal ageing (NIA) treatment, the tensile strength of 577 MPa is equivalent to that of 579 MPa for the T6 temper. Meanwhile, the stress corrosion susceptibility r tf and the maximum corrosion depth are 97.8% and 23.5 μm, which are comparable to those of 92.8% and 26.7 μm for the T73 temper. Moreover, the total ageing time of the NIA treatment is only 7.25 h, which is much less than that of 48.67 h for the retrogression and re-ageing condition.

  14. The effect of corrosion on stained glass windows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laissner, Johanna

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Stained glass windows belong to the most important cultural heritage of Europe. Within the last decades a disastrous deterioration took place. The wonderful stained glass windows and their glass paintings as pieces of art are acutely menaced by environmental corrosive influences. This corrosion process is a very complex reaction which is not only influenced by temperature and humidity changes but also by gaseous pollutants like sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides or ozone, by dust and air, microorganisms as well as synergetic interactions. Strongly affected by these environmental attacks are medieval stained glasses due to their chemical composition. They have a low content in silica and high contents of modifier ions (e.g. potassium and calcium. The corrosion phenomena can range from predominantly pitting on the surface to the formation of thick corrosion crusts which are turning the panel opaque and thus reducing strongly the transparency of the windows. In order to set up a conservation and restoration concept, it is necessary to know about the environmental conditions to which the stained glass windows are exposed. For this purpose very corrosion sensitive model glasses (so called glass sensors were developed which have a similar chemical composition as historic stained glasses. They exhibit the same corrosion reactions but react much faster, and are now widely used to estimate corrosive stresses on stained glass windows to give basic information about the corrosive impacts which work on the historic glasses. In this paper principle corrosion mechanisms of stained glass windows and their enhancing factors are discussed. For the evaluation of the environmental impact, the application of glass sensors is demonstrated.

    Las vidrieras coloreadas pertenecen al legado cultural más importante de Europa. En las últimas décadas se ha producido en ellas un desastroso deterioro. Las maravillosas vidrieras coloreadas y sus policromías est

  15. Investigation of parameters governing the corrosion protection efficacy of fusion bonded epoxy coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Ramniceanu, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    The primary cause of corrosion in transportation structures is due to chlorides which are applied to bridge decks as deicing salts. The direct cost of corrosion damage to the countryâ s infrastructure is approximately $8.3 billion per year. One of the most common corrosion abatement methods in the United States is the barrier protection implemented through the application of fusion bonded epoxy coatings. The purpose of this study was to investigate various coating and exposure param...

  16. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion. PMID:24558346

  17. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  18. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  19. Effect of surface stress states on the corrosion behavior of alloy 690

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Mo; Shim, Hee Sang; Seo, Myung Ji; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The test environment simulated the primary water chemistry in PWRs. Dissolved oxygen (DO), dissolved hydrogen (DH), pH and conductivity were monitored at room temperature using sensors manufactured by Orbisphere and Mettler Toledo. The temperature and pressure were maintained at 330 .deg. C and 150 bars during the corrosion test. The condition of the test solution was lithium (LiOH) 2 ppm and boron (H3BO4) 1,200 ppm, DH 35 cc/kg (STP) and less than 5 ppb DO. The flow rate of the loop system was 3.8 L/hour. Corrosion tests were conducted for 500 hours. The corrosion release rate was evaluated by a gravimetric analysis method using a two-step alkaline permanganate-ammonium citrate (AP/AC) descaling process. Compressive residual stress is induced by shot peening treatment but its value reveals some different trend between the shot peening intensity on the surface of Alloy 690 TT. A higher shot peening intensity causes a reduction in the corrosion rate and it is considered that the compressive residual stress beneath the surface layer suppresses the metal ion transfer in an alloy matrix.

  20. Water vapor permeation and dehumidification performance of poly(vinyl alcohol)/lithium chloride composite membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Bui, Duc Thuan

    2015-10-09

    Thin and robust composite membranes comprising stainless steel scaffold, fine and porous TiO2 and polyvinyl alcohol/lithium chloride were fabricated and studied for air dehumidification application. Higher hydrophilicity, sorption and permeation were observed for membranes with increased lithium chloride content up to 50%. The permeation and sorption properties of the membranes were investigated under different temperatures. The results provided a deeper insight into the membrane water vapor permeation process. It was specifically noted that lithium chloride significantly reduces water diffusion energy barrier, resulting in the change of permeation energy from positive to negative values. Higher water vapor permeance was observed for the membrane with higher LiCl content at lower temperature. The isothermal air dehumidification tests show that the membrane is suitable for dehumidifying air in high humid condition. Additionally, results also indicate a trade-off between the humidity ratio drop with the water vapor removal rate when varying air flowrate.

  1. Base technology development enhances state-of-the-art in meeting performance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, J.M.; Allen, G.C. Jr.; Luna, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has responsibility to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for baseline technology to support the design of radioactive material transportation packages. To fulfill this responsibility, SNL works with industry, government agencies, and national laboratories to identify and develop state-of-the-art technology required to design and test safe, cost-effective radioactive materials packages. Principal elements of the base technology program include: 1) analysis techniques, 2) testing, 3) subsystem and component development, 4) packaging systems development support, and 5) technical support for policy development. These program elements support a systems approach for meeting performance requirements and assure that there is a sound underlying technical basis for both transportation packaging design and associated policy decisions. Highlights from the base technology program included in this paper are testing, design and analysis methods, advanced materials, risk assessment and logistics models, and transportation package support

  2. Effect of separation and drainage of condensate on dehumidification in a refrigerated dryer; Reito joshitsuki ni okeru gyoshukusui bunri/haishutsu noryoku no joshitsu seino ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, H.; Ichinose, T. [SMC Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Tanzawa, Y.; Hashizume, T. [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Science and Engineering Research Lab.

    1995-11-15

    The representative refrigerated dryer as the compressed air dryers is one in which air was cooled at rather low temperature by working medium of refrigerators, and the dew point was decreased with increase of pressure, and air with low relative humility called as the dried air was obtained again by heating. In this paper, for clarifying effect of separation and drainage of condensate on dehumidification in a refrigerated dryer in relation to shape of a main cooler and a precool-reheater and air temperature of each part, calculation and experimental investigation were conducted. In a refrigerated dryer, condensate happened in the precool part of a precool-reheater and a main cooler, and this would give rise to reduce of separation and drainage of condensate and increase of thermal loads of each heat exchange, and would made dehumidification low. For a fact that decrease of separation and drainage of condensate in a main cooler would bring out heat conduction with phase change in the reheating part of a precool-reheater, it has a profitable side, but it is not desirable for ability of dryers. 6 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The effects of the glass surface area/solution volume ratio on glass corrosion: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.

    1995-03-01

    This report reviews and summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SA/V) ratio on the corrosion behavior of borosilicate waste glasses. The SA/V ratio affects the rate of glass corrosion through the extent of dilution of corrosion products released from the glass into the leachate solution: glass corrosion products are diluted more in tests conducted at low SA/V ratios than they are in tests conducted at high SA/V ratios. Differences in the solution chemistries generated in tests conducted at different SA/V ratios then affect the observed glass corrosion behavior. Therefore, any testing parameter that affects the solution chemistry will also affect the glass corrosion rate. The results of static leach tests conducted to assess the effects of the SA/V are discussed with regard to the effects of SA/V on the solution chemistry. Test results show several remaining issues with regard to the long-term glass corrosion behavior: can the SA/V ratio be used as an accelerating parameter to characterize the advanced stages of glass corrosion relevant to long disposal times; is the alteration of the glass surface the same in tests conducted at different SA/V, and in tests conducted with monolithic and crushed glass samples; what are the effects of the SA/V and the extent of glass corrosion on the disposition of released radionuclides? These issues will bear on the prediction of the long-term performance of waste glasses during storage. The results of an experimental program conducted at ANL to address these and other remaining issues regarding the effects of SA/V on glass corrosion are described. 288 refs., 59 figs., 16 tabs

  4. The effects of the glass surface area/solution volume ratio on glass corrosion: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1995-03-01

    This report reviews and summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SA/V) ratio on the corrosion behavior of borosilicate waste glasses. The SA/V ratio affects the rate of glass corrosion through the extent of dilution of corrosion products released from the glass into the leachate solution: glass corrosion products are diluted more in tests conducted at low SA/V ratios than they are in tests conducted at high SA/V ratios. Differences in the solution chemistries generated in tests conducted at different SA/V ratios then affect the observed glass corrosion behavior. Therefore, any testing parameter that affects the solution chemistry will also affect the glass corrosion rate. The results of static leach tests conducted to assess the effects of the SA/V are discussed with regard to the effects of SA/V on the solution chemistry. Test results show several remaining issues with regard to the long-term glass corrosion behavior: can the SA/V ratio be used as an accelerating parameter to characterize the advanced stages of glass corrosion relevant to long disposal times; is the alteration of the glass surface the same in tests conducted at different SA/V, and in tests conducted with monolithic and crushed glass samples; what are the effects of the SA/V and the extent of glass corrosion on the disposition of released radionuclides? These issues will bear on the prediction of the long-term performance of waste glasses during storage. The results of an experimental program conducted at ANL to address these and other remaining issues regarding the effects of SA/V on glass corrosion are described. 288 refs., 59 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in North America. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the highly corrosive hydrochloric acid (HCl) generated by the solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion. The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. NASA has over fifty years of experience dealing with unexpected failures caused by corrosion and has developed expertise in corrosion control in the launch and other environments. The Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC evolved, from what started as an atmospheric exposure test site near NASAs launch pads, into a capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA, external partners, and customers.This paper provides a chronological overview of NASAs role in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion in highly corrosive environments. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  6. Using EnergyPlus to Perform Dehumidification Analysis on Building America Homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xia [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Winkler, Jon [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Christensen, Dane [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2011-03-01

    This study used EnergyPlus to investigate humidity issues on a typical mid-1990s reference home, a 2006 International Energy Conservation Code home, and a high-performance home in a hot-humid climate; the study confirmed that supplemental dehumidification should be provided to maintain space relative humidity below 60% in a hot-humid climate.

  7. Influence of steam generator surface state on corrosion and oxide formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazenc, Arnaud; Leclercq, Stephanie; Seyeux, Antoine; Galtayries, Anouk; Marcus, Philippe

    2012-09-01

    The corrosion and release of nickel-based alloy Steam Generator tubes are partly due to their surface state. Among the most important parameters influencing the corrosion, the effect of grain size and the effect of grain crystallographic orientation have been chosen to be studied. The aim of this study is to determine how these parameters have an impact on the corrosion of Steam Generator tubes. Thermal treatments (700 deg. C and 1050 deg. C) have been performed on several samples in Alloy 690 to obtain homogeneous grain sizes, varying from 25 μm to 110 μm. Two samples have been oxidised for four days in a recirculating autoclave, reproducing primary conditions. The changes of oxide composition and thickness were examined by ToF-SIMS on samples exposed to primary water conditions. The intensity profiles versus thicknesses of characteristic oxide anions, such as CrO - , NiO - or FeO - enable us to evaluate the effect of grain size and crystallographic orientation on the formation of an enriched inner chromium layer. As regards to the grain size, there was no effect on the growth, but smaller grains led to a chromium-rich oxide layer. The effect of crystallographic orientation was observed on the oxidation kinetics and the composition of oxide scales. (authors)

  8. Characterizing Corrosion Effects of Weak Organic Acids Using a Modified Bono Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuqin; Turbini, Laura J.; Ramjattan, Deepchand; Christian, Bev; Pritzker, Mark

    2013-12-01

    To meet environmental requirements and achieve benefits of cost-effective manufacturing, no-clean fluxes (NCFs) or low-solids fluxes have become popular in present electronic manufacturing processes. Weak organic acids (WOAs) as the activation ingredients in NCFs play an important role, especially in the current lead-free and halogen-free soldering technology era. However, no standard or uniform method exists to characterize the corrosion effects of WOAs on actual metallic circuits of printed wiring boards (PWBs). Hence, the development of an effective quantitative test method for evaluating the corrosion effects of WOAs on the PWB's metallic circuits is imperative. In this paper, the modified Bono test, which was developed to quantitatively examine the corrosion properties of flux residues, is used to characterize the corrosion effects of five WOAs (i.e., abietic acid, succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and malic acid) on PWB metallic circuits. Experiments were performed under three temperature/humidity conditions (85°C/85% RH, 60°C/93% RH, and 40°C/93% RH) using two WOA solution concentrations. The different corrosion effects among the various WOAs were best reflected in the testing results at 40°C and 60°C. Optical microscopy was used to observe the morphology of the corroded copper tracks, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) characterization was performed to determine the dendrite composition.

  9. A review on pipeline corrosion, in-line inspection (ILI), and corrosion growth rate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanaei, H.R.; Eslami, A.; Egbewande, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pipelines are the very important energy transmission systems. Over time, pipelines can corrode. While corrosion could be detected by in-line inspection (ILI) tools, corrosion growth rate prediction in pipelines is usually done through corrosion rate models. For pipeline integrity management and planning selecting the proper corrosion ILI tool and also corrosion growth rate model is important and can lead to significant savings and safer pipe operation. In this paper common forms of pipeline corrosion, state of the art ILI tools, and also corrosion growth rate models are reviewed. The common forms of pipeline corrosion introduced in this paper are Uniform/General Corrosion, Pitting Corrosion, Cavitation and Erosion Corrosion, Stray Current Corrosion, Micro-Bacterial Influenced Corrosion (MIC). The ILI corrosion detection tools assessed in this study are Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL), Circumferential MFL, Tri-axial MFL, and Ultrasonic Wall Measurement (UT). The corrosion growth rate models considered in this study are single-value corrosion rate model, linear corrosion growth rate model, non-linear corrosion growth rate model, Monte-Carlo method, Markov model, TD-GEVD, TI-GEVD model, Gamma Process, and BMWD model. Strengths and limitations of ILI detection tools, and also corrosion predictive models with some practical examples are discussed. This paper could be useful for those whom are supporting pipeline integrity management and planning. - Highlights: • Different forms of pipeline corrosion are explained. • Common In-Line Inspection (ILI) tools and corrosion growth rate models are introduced. • Strength and limitations of corrosion growth rate models/ILI tools are discussed. • For pipeline integrity management programs using more than one corrosion growth rate model/ILI tool is suggested.

  10. The Effect of Homogenization on the Corrosion Behavior of Al-Mg Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yin; Hung, Yuanchun; Du, Zhiyong; Xiao, Zhengbing; Jia, Guangze

    2018-04-01

    The effect of homogenization on the corrosion behavior of 5083-O aluminum alloy is presented in this paper. The intergranular corrosion and exfoliation corrosion were used to characterize the discussed corrosion behavior of 5083-O aluminum alloy. The variations in the morphology, the kind and distribution of the precipitates, and the dislocation configurations in the samples after the homogenization were evaluated using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of the highly active grain boundary character distribution and the types of constituent particles on the corrosion are discussed on the basis of experimental observations. The results indicated that the corrosion behavior of 5083-O alloy was closely related to the microstructure obtained by the heat treatment. Homogenization carried out after casting had the optimal effect on the overall corrosion resistance of the material. Nevertheless, all samples could satisfy the requirements of corrosion resistance in marine applications.

  11. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B. S.; Yin, W. F.; Sang, D. H.; Jiang, Z. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 °C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr5S8 phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  12. Solar desalination system of combined solar still and humidification-dehumidification unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazy, Ahmed; Fath, Hassan E. S.

    2016-11-01

    Solar stills, as a simple technology, have many advantages such as simple design; unsophisticated fabrication; low capital and operation costs and easily maintained. However, their low daily production has put constraints on their usage. A radical improvement in the performance of solar stills can be achieved by the partial recovery of the energy losses from the glass cover of the still. This paper simulates a direct solar distillation system of combined solar still with an air heating humidification-dehumidification (HDH) sub-system. The main objective of the Still-HDH system is to improve the productivity and thermal efficiency of the conventional solar still by partially recovering the still energy losses to the ambient for additional water production. Various procedures have been employed to improve the thermal performance of the integrated system by recovering heat losses from one component in another component of the system. Simulations have been carried out for the performance of the Still-HDH system under different weather conditions. A comparison has been held between the Still-HDH system and a conventional solar still of the same size and under the same operating conditions.

  13. CMOS image sensors: State-of-the-art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theuwissen, Albert J. P.

    2008-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the state-of-the-art of CMOS image sensors. The main focus is put on the shrinkage of the pixels : what is the effect on the performance characteristics of the imagers and on the various physical parameters of the camera ? How is the CMOS pixel architecture optimized to cope with the negative performance effects of the ever-shrinking pixel size ? On the other hand, the smaller dimensions in CMOS technology allow further integration on column level and even on pixel level. This will make CMOS imagers even smarter that they are already.

  14. EUROCORR 2007 - The European corrosion congress - Progress by corrosion control. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This book of abstracts contains lectures, workshops and posters which were held on the European Corrosion Congress 2007 in Freiburg (Germany). The main topics of the sessions and posters are: 1. Corrosion and scale inhibition; 2. Corrosion by hot gases and combustion products; 3. Nuclear corrosion; 4. Environment sensitive fracture; 5. Surface Science; 6. Physico-chemical methods of corrosion testing; 7. Marine corrosion; 8. Microbial corrosion; 9. Corrosion of steel in concrete; 10. Corrosion in oil and gas production; 11. Coatings; 12. Corrosion in the refinery industry; 13. Cathodic protection; 14. Automotive Corrosion; 15. Corrosion of polymer materials. The main topics of the workshops are: 1. High temperature corrosion in the chemical, refinery and petrochemical industries; 2. Bio-Tribocorrosion; 3. Stress corrosion cracking in nuclear power plants; 4. Corrosion monitoring in nuclear systems; 5. Cathodic protection for marine and offshore environments; 6. Self-healing properties of new surface treatments; 7. Bio-Tribocorrosion - Cost 533/Eureka-ENIWEP-Meeting; 8. Drinking water systems; 9. Heat exchangers for seawater cooling

  15. State-of-the-art inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.; Van Gerven, K.A.J.; Akkerman, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present report provides a state-of-the-art inventory of relevant information and technical concepts for the ComCoast project, being the first phase of the research stages of Work Package 3 (WP3). This project was assigned to Royal Haskoning by CUR. The information scan was set-up in a systematic

  16. Multimodal Dialogue Management - State of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui Huu Trung, B.H.T.

    This report is about the state of the art in dialogue management. We first introduce an overview of a multimodal dialogue system and its components. Second, four main approaches to dialogue management are described (finite-state and frame-based, information-state based and probabilistic, plan-based,

  17. Leadership and Fairness: The state of the art.

    OpenAIRE

    van Knippenberg, D.; de Cremer, D.; van Knippenberg, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    textabstractResearch in leadership effectiveness has paid less to the role of leader fairness than probably it should have. More recently, this has started to change. To capture this development, we review the empirical literature in leadership and fairness to define the field of leadership and fairness, to assess the state of the art, and to identify a research agenda for future efforts in the field. The review shows that leader distributive, procedural, and especially interactional fairness...

  18. Greenhouse mechanization: State of the art and future perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henten, van E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art and future perspective of greenhouse mechanization. Driving forces for mechanization are identified. Dutch greenhouse crop production is used as an example. Analysis of a generic crop production process combined with a review of the state of the art in

  19. Fuel cells: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanari, S.; Casalegno, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the main features at present state-of-the-art fuel cell and hybrid cycle technologies, discussing their actual performance, possible applications, market entry perspectives and potential development [it

  20. State of the art of the welding method for sealing spent nuclear fuel canister made of copper. Part 2 - EBW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, T.

    2014-05-01

    This report consist the results of the development of the electron beam welding (EBW) method for sealing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) disposal canister. This report has been used as background material for selection of the sealing method for the SNF canister. Report contains the state of the art knowledge of the EBW method and research and development (R and D) results done by Posiva. Relevant R and D results of EB-welds done by SKB are also reviewed in this report. Requirements set for the welding and weld are present. These requirements are based on the long term safety and also some part of requirements are set by other processes like non-destructive testing (NDT) and manufacturing processes of components. Initial state of the weld is described in this report. Initial state has significant effect on the long term safety issues like corrosion resistance and creep ductility. Also short and long term mechanical properties as well as corrosion properties are described. Microstructure and residual stresses of the weld is represented in this report. Report consists also imperfections of the weld and statistical analysis of the evaluation of the probability of the largest defect size on the weld. Results of corrosion and creep tests of EB-welds are reviewed in this report. EBW process and machine are described. Preliminary designing of the EBW-machine has been done including component handling equipments. Preliminary welding procedure specification (pWPS) has drawn up and qualification of the personnel is described briefly. In-line process and quality control system including seam tracking system is implemented in modern EBW machine. Also NDT methods for inspection of the weld are described in this report. Concerning the results from the research and development work it can be concluded that EB welding method is suitable method for sealing SNF canister. Weld material fulfils requirements set by the long term safety. The welding system is robust and reliable and it is based

  1. The cost-effectiveness of Antiretroviral Treatment in Khayelitsha, South Africa – a primary data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulle Andrew M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the size of the HIV epidemic in South Africa and other developing countries, scaling up antiretroviral treatment (ART represents one of the key public health challenges of the next decade. Appropriate priority setting and budgeting can be assisted by economic data on the costs and cost-effectiveness of ART. The objectives of this research were therefore to estimate HIV healthcare utilisation, the unit costs of HIV services and the cost per life year (LY and quality adjusted life year (QALY gained of HIV treatment interventions from a provider's perspective. Methods Data on service utilisation, outcomes and costs were collected in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. Utilisation of a full range of HIV healthcare services was estimated from 1,729 patients in the Khayelitsha cohort (1,146 No-ART patient-years, 2,229 ART patient-years using a before and after study design. Full economic costs of HIV-related services were calculated and were complemented by appropriate secondary data. ART effects (deaths, therapy discontinuation and switching to second-line were from the same 1,729 patients followed for a maximum of 4 years on ART. No-ART outcomes were estimated from a local natural history cohort. Health-related quality of life was assessed on a sub-sample of 95 patients. Markov modelling was used to calculate lifetime costs, LYs and QALYs and uncertainty was assessed through probabilistic sensitivity analysis on all utilisation and outcome variables. An alternative scenario was constructed to enhance generalizability. Results Discounted lifetime costs for No-ART and ART were US$2,743 and US$9,435 over 2 and 8 QALYs respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio through the use of ART versus No-ART was US$1,102 (95% CI 1,043-1,210 per QALY and US$984 (95% CI 913-1,078 per life year gained. In an alternative scenario where adjustments were made across cost, outcome and utilisation parameters, costs and outcomes

  2. Heteronomy in the arts field: state funding and British arts organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Victoria D

    2018-03-01

    For Bourdieu, the field of cultural production is comprised of an autonomous and a heteronomous sector. A heteronomous sector is one that is interpenetrated by the commercial field. I discuss an arena that, until recently, was part of the relatively autonomous sector in the field of cultural production - the supported arts sector in the United Kingdom - and argue that it became more heteronomous, due to the penetration by the state. Heteronomy due to the commercial field is present but secondary to, and driven by, the actions of the state. Political parties' attempts to diffuse and legitimate a particular economic ideology have led to state demands that arts institutions adopt neoliberal business practices in exchange for funding. Government giving to the arts, previously at arm's length, proved to be a Faustian bargain that demanded significant repayment in the form of lost autonomy. Coercive pressures from the state, enacted over time, show how the domination of one field over another can occur, even when the domination is resisted. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  3. Meeting the challenge of extremely corrosive service: A primer on clad oilfield equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendley, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Extremely corrosive environments, such as those often encountered in deep, hot, sour oil and gas wells, are usually characterized by the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), chlorides, and other corrosive species coupled with high temperatures (> 400 F/204 C) and high pressures (up to 20,000 psi/138 MPa). Most low alloy and stainless steel materials are not suitable for such environments. Extremely corrosive service conditions dictate the use of a corrosion-resistant alloy (CRA) in areas which are exposed to the hostile environment. However, it is often cost-prohibitive to make an entire component out of CRA material. An alternative strategy is to use a low alloy steel for the bulk of the component and clad critical surfaces with a corrosion-resistant material. Clad equipment can provide excellent corrosion resistance in hostile environments at a fraction of the cost of 100% CRA components. This paper will detail the problems posed by extremely corrosive environments and discuss how clad equipment provides a cost-effective solution

  4. 蓄冰柜在密闭空间中的降温除湿性能分析%Cooling and dehumidification performance ofthe storage freezer in the emergency confined space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立瑶; 茅靳丰; 侯普民; 陈飞

    2017-01-01

    To ensure the confined space within the environment of temperature and humidity in the acceptable range, according to the mine chamber cooling and dehumidification technology, a new type of storage freezer cooling and dehumidification device was developed based on numerical simulation of fluent and theoretical calculation.The device adopts the modular design, and the number of ice storage module can be adjusted according to the change of the load, and removed for cooling dehumidification of the natural convection when power is interruption.Melted water can also be used for drinking.Through experiments, cooling and dehumidification performance and insulation properties of the storage freezer in a forced convection conditions were obtained.The results show that under the same ambient conditions of temperature and humidity, the larger the inlet airflow, the larger the total cooling and dehumidification amount, but with the air temperature increase, relative humidity reduces, and cooling and dehumidification effect of the unit mass air decreases.Under the same air flow rate, the higher the ambient temperature and humidity, the more obvious the unit mass air cooling and dehumidification effect.The total heat transfered is approximately in direct proportion to the air flow rate, and the higher the ambient temperature and humidity, the greater the proportion coefficient.Under the condition that the air flow rate is more than 420 m3/h, the storage freezer cooling and dehumidification capacity can meet the cooling load of 15 people in the emergency confined space.%为保证密闭空间内环境的温湿度在人员可接受的范围内,参照矿用救生舱降温除湿技术,基于fluent数值模拟与理论计算,研制了一种新型蓄冰柜降温除湿装置.该装置采用模块化设计,可以根据负

  5. Influence of vapor absorption cooling on humidification-dehumidification (HDH desalination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chiranjeevi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The desalination yield in humidification-dehumidification (HDH process is increased by proposing cooling plant integration with two stage operation. The current work is targeted on the investigation of vapor absorption refrigeration (VAR parameters on overall energy utilization factor (EUF. The dephlegmator heat is recovered internally in VAR instead of rejecting to environment. This work can be used to control the operational conditions of VAR to enhance the desalination and cooling together. The studied process parameters in VAR are strong solution concentration, separator or generator temperature, dephlegmator effectiveness, circulating water inlet temperature and evaporator temperature. Out of these five variables, lower limit of separator temperature, upper limit of dephlegmator effectiveness and lower limit of circulating water temperature are fixed in the specified range to attain the optimum strong solution concentration and optimum evaporator temperature. At the specified boundaries of three variables, the optimized strong solution concentration and evaporator temperature are 0.47 and 10 °C respectively. At this condition, the maximized cycle EUF is 0.358.

  6. State of the art undersøgelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nils

    1998-01-01

    Dette skrift omhandler nogle af de erfaringer der til dato er opnået i forbindelse med standby projektets udførelse. Hovedtemaet er en “State of the art undersøgelse” der omhandler standby-spændingsforsyninger, samt komponenter der kan anvendes til konstruktion af dem......Dette skrift omhandler nogle af de erfaringer der til dato er opnået i forbindelse med standby projektets udførelse. Hovedtemaet er en “State of the art undersøgelse” der omhandler standby-spændingsforsyninger, samt komponenter der kan anvendes til konstruktion af dem...

  7. The cost of providing combined prevention and treatment services, including ART, to female sex workers in Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Cianci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Female Sex workers (FSW are important in driving HIV transmission in West Africa. The Yerelon clinic in Burkina Faso has provided combined preventative and therapeutic services, including anti-retroviral therapy (ART, for FSWs since 1998, with evidence suggesting it has decreased HIV prevalence and incidence in this group. No data exists on the costs of such a combined prevention and treatment intervention for FSW. This study aims to determine the mean cost of service provision per patient year for FSWs attending the Yerelon clinic, and identifies differences in costs between patient groups. METHODS: Field-based retrospective cost analyses were undertaken using top-down and bottom-up costing approaches for 2010. Expenditure and service utilisation data was collated from primary sources. Patients were divided into groups according to full-time or occasional sex-work, HIV status and ART duration. Patient specific service use data was extracted. Costs were converted to 2012 US$. Sensitivity analyses considered removal of all research costs, different discount rates and use of different ART treatment regimens and follow-up schedules. RESULTS: Using the top-down costing approach, the mean annual cost of service provision for FSWs on or off ART was US$1098 and US$882, respectively. The cost for FSWs on ART reduced by 29%, to US$781, if all research-related costs were removed and national ART monitoring guidelines were followed. The bottom-up patient-level costing showed the cost of the service varied greatly across patient groups (US$505-US$1117, primarily due to large differences in the costs of different ART regimens. HIV-negative women had the lowest annual cost at US$505. CONCLUSION: Whilst FSWs may require specialised services to optimise their care and hence, the public health benefits, our study shows that the cost of ART provision within a combined prevention and treatment intervention setting is comparable to providing ART to

  8. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.S., E-mail: yinwenfeng2010@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Yin, W.F. [College of Mechatronic Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Sang, D.H. [Sheng Li Construction Group International Engineering Department, Shandong, Dongying, 257000 (China); Jiang, Z.Y. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion of a carbon-manganese steel and a stainless steel in sulfur and/or naphthenic acid media was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion rate of the carbon-manganese steel increased with the increase of the acid value and sulfur content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical values of the concentration of sulfur and acid for corrosion rate of the stainless steel were ascertained respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stainless steel is superior to the carbon-manganese steel in corrosion resistance because of the presence of stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases. - Abstract: The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 Degree-Sign C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  9. Drying hard maple (Acer saccharum L.) lumber in a small dehumidification kiln

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal. Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Portable sawmill owners quickly recognize the advantage to kiln drying lumber they produce. Having the ability to provide properly kiln-dried lumber opens new market opportunities and can increase profit margins. However, the construction and operation of a dry kiln must be economical and simple. A small dehumidification dry kiln constructed and tested in Princeton, WV...

  10. Where is your state of the art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos Gaona, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Beyond the purposes of publishing, questioning and/or hypothesizing, every research has the noble aim to quench the constant human need of pushing farther away the boundaries of knowledge, may such frontier exist. The state of the art is the generic expression coined to limit the whereabouts of any particular knowledge. We use it just like a compass, it tells us how far we are, what has been done and where we should go. Take for instance quantum field theory, the state of the art in particle physics will tell you that everything that exists in this universe is made of bosons, quarks and leptons. What!?. Hold on, I was taught (and luckily maybe you weren't) that the fundamental particles were electrons, neutrons and protons, right?. Indeed, that is the state of the art but from almost one century ago. So, if I may ask... where is your state of the art? This is not about quantum physics; it is not even about hydrology; it is about everything. Today, everybody doing or not a PhD fiercely believes that their research is important, extremely unique, life changing (and help us God if we are wrong); but how can you be so sure that what you do, isn't already done?. We live in a modern world, cool environmental scientists now have tagged this era as the Anthropocene; globalization is everywhere and of course knowledge has not escaped to it. Not only knowledge is now global but is totally diversified, any crazy idea you can think of (or actually you can't) it is very likely that somebody already has his/hers hands on it. Nevertheless, this is a good thing, isn't it?. Well, that is the whole point. Every time I should write my research's state of the art, I always get overwhelmed because it actually is pretty difficult to establish, and later when I think I get it, it seems that I am solving issues that somebody already bothered to solve 30 years ago. Therefore, does it really have some purpose to be swimming in a huge pool of knowledge, not knowing where exactly I am? or

  11. Effect of radiation on anaerobic corrosion of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Rance, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    To ensure the safe encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel elements for geological disposal, SKB of Sweden are considering using the Advanced Cold Process Canister, which consists of an outer copper canister and a cast iron insert. A programme of work has been carried out to investigate a range of corrosion issues associated with the canister, including measurements of gas generation due to the anaerobic corrosion of ferrous materials (carbon steel and cast iron) over a range of conditions. To date, all this work has been conducted in the absence of a radiation field. SKB asked Serco Assurance to carry out a set of experiments designed to investigate the effect of radiation on the corrosion of steel in repository environments. This report describes the experimental programme and presents the results that were obtained. The measurements were carried out in the type of gas cell used previously, in which the change in gas pressure was measured using a liquid-filled manometer. The test cells were placed in a radiation cell and positioned so that the received radiation dose was equivalent to that expected in the repository. Control cells were used to allow for any gas generation caused by radiolytic breakdown of the construction materials and the water. Tests were carried out at two temperatures (30 deg C and 50 deg C), two dose rates (11 Gray/hr and 300 Gray/hr), and in two different artificial groundwaters. A total of four tests were carried out, using carbon steel wires as the test material. The cells were exposed for a period of several months, after which they were dismantled and the corrosion product on one wire from each test cell was analysed using Raman spectroscopy. The report presents the results from the gas generation tests and compares the results obtained under irradiated conditions to results obtained previously in the absence of radiation. Radiation was found to enhance the corrosion rate at both dose rates but the greatest enhancement occurred at the

  12. State of the Art in the Cramer Classification Scheme and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slide presentation at the SOT FDA Colloquium on State of the Art in the Cramer Classification Scheme and Threshold of Toxicological Concern in College Park, MD. Slide presentation at the SOT FDA Colloquium on State of the Art in the Cramer Classification Scheme and Threshold of Toxicological Concern in College Park, MD.

  13. Theoretical investigation of solar humidification-dehumidification desalination system using parabolic trough concentrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.M.I.; El-Minshawy, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We evaluated the performance of sea water HDD system powered by solar PTC. → The proposed design to the expected desalination plant performance was introduced. → The collector thermal efficiency was a function of solar radiation value. → The highest fresh water productivity is found to be in the summer season. → The production time reaches 42% of the day time in the summer season. - Abstract: This paper deals with the status of solar energy as a clean and renewable energy applications in desalination. The object of this research is to theoretically investigate the principal operating parameters of a proposed desalination system based on air humidification-dehumidification principles. A parabolic trough solar collector is adapted to drive and optimize the considered desalination system. A test set-up of the desalination system was designed and a theoretical simulation model was constructed to evaluate the performance and productivity of the proposed solar humidification-dehumidification desalination system. The theoretical simulation model was developed in which the thermodynamic models of each component of the considered were set up respectively. The study showed that, parabolic trough solar collector is the suitable to drive the proposed desalination system. A comparison study had been presented to show the effect of the different parameters on the performance and the productivity of the system. The productivity of the proposed system showed also an increase with the increase of the day time till an optimum value and then decreased. The highest fresh water productivity is found to be in the summer season, when high direct solar radiation and long solar time are always expected. The production time reaches a maximum value in the summer season, which is 42% of the day.

  14. The effects of water radiolysis on the corrosion and stress corrosion behavior of type 316 stainless steel in pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyllie, W.E. II; Duquette, D.J.; Steiner, D.

    1994-11-01

    In the ITER Conceptual Design Activity, water will be used as coolant for the major reactor components, which will be made of solution-annealed 316 SS. A concern is that the radiolysis products may increase the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of 316 SS. The corrosion and stress corrosion of 316 SS was observed under irradiated and nonirradiated conditions. Gamma irradiation produced a 100 mV potential shift in the active direction, probably from the polarizing effect of reducing radiolysis products. The irradiation also resulted in nearly an order of magnitude increase in the passive current density of 316 SS, probably from increased surface reaction rates involving radiolysis products as well as increased corrosion rates; however the latter was considered insignificant. Computer simulations of pure water radiolysis at 50, 90, and 130 C and dose rates of 10 18 -10 24 were performed; effects of hydrogen, argon, and argon + 20% oxygen deaeration were also studied. Slow strain rate suggest that annealed and sensitized 316 SS was not suscepible to SCC in hydrogen- or argon-deaerated water at 50 C. Modeling of irradiated water chemistry was performed. Open circuit potential of senstizied and annealed 316 SS had a shift of 800 mV in the noble (positive) direction. Steady-state potentials of -0.180 V for sensitized 316 SS wire and -0.096 V vs Hg/HgSO 4 for annealed 316 SS wire were independent of oxygen presence. The -0.180 V shift is likely to promote SCC

  15. Cost-effectiveness of anti-retroviral therapy at a district hospital in southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robberstad Bjarne

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the resource implications of expanding anti-retroviral therapy (ART are likely to be large, there is a need to explore its cost-effectiveness. So far, there is no such information available from Ethiopia. Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of ART for routine clinical practice in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia. Methods We estimated the unit cost of HIV-related care from the 2004/5 fiscal year expenditure of Arba Minch Hospital in southern Ethiopia. We estimated outpatient and inpatient service use from HIV-infected patients who received care and treatment at the hospital between January 2003 and March 2006. We measured the health effect as life years gained (LYG for patients receiving ART compared with those not receiving such treatment. The study adopted a health care provider perspective and included both direct and overhead costs. We used Markov model to estimate the lifetime costs, health benefits and cost-effectiveness of ART. Findings ART yielded an undiscounted 9.4 years expected survival, and resulted in 7.1 extra LYG compared to patients not receiving ART. The lifetime incremental cost is US$2,215 and the undiscounted incremental cost per LYG is US$314. When discounted at 3%, the additional LYG decreases to 5.5 years and the incremental cost per LYG increases to US$325. Conclusion The undiscounted and discounted incremental costs per LYG from introducing ART were less than the per capita GDP threshold at the base year. Thus, ART could be regarded as cost-effective in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia.

  16. Evaluation of State-of-the-Art Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Systems for Hearing Aids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Jensen, Søren Holdt; Jensen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluates four state-of-the-art acoustic feedback cancellation systems in hearing aids in terms of the cancellation performance, sound quality degradation, and computational complexity. The authors compared a traditional full-band system to a system with a prediction error method...... in a full band, a subband system, a subband system with frequency shifting, and a recently proposed subband system with a novel probe noise deployment. All systems outperformed the traditional full-band system in cancellation performance, especially the subband system with probe noise is most effective...... for cancellation. However, in all cases there was a trade-off between performance and computational cost. With a 3-times increase in computation load, the probe noise based cancellation system can be realized that functions even in the most challenging feedback situation....

  17. Guide to state-of-the-art electron devices

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Concise, high quality and comparative overview of state-of-the-art electron device development, manufacturing technologies and applications Guide to State-of-the-Art Electron Devices marks the 60th anniversary of the IEEE Electron Devices Committee and the 35th anniversary of the IEEE Electron Devices Society, as such it defines the state-of-the-art of electron devices, as well as future directions across the entire field. Spans full range of electron device types such as photovoltaic devices, semiconductor manufacturing and VLSI technology and circuits, covered by IEEE Electron and Devices Society Contributed by internationally respected members of the electron devices community A timely desk reference with fully-integrated colour and a unique lay-out with sidebars to highlight the key terms Discusses the historical developments and speculates on future trends to give a more rounded picture of the topics covered A valuable resource R&D managers; engineers in the semiconductor industry; applied scientists...

  18. Corrosion in the oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brondel, D [Sedco Forex, Montrouge (France); Edwards, R [Schlumberger Well Services, Columbus, OH (United States); Hayman, A [Etudes et Productions Schlumberger, Clamart (France); Hill, D [Schlumberger Dowell, Tulsa, OK (United States); Mehta, S [Schlumberger Dowell, St. Austell (United Kingdom); Semerad, T [Mobil Oil Indonesia, Inc., Sumatra (Indonesia)

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion costs the oil industry billions of dollars a year, a fact that makes the role of the corrosion engineer an increasingly important one. Attention is paid to how corrosion affects every aspect of exploration and production, from offshore rigs to casing. Also the role of corrosion agents such as drilling and production fluids is reviewed. Methods of control and techniques to monitor corrosion are discussed, along with an explanation of the chemical causes of corrosion. 21 figs., 32 refs.

  19. Prediction of higher cost of antiretroviral therapy (ART) according to clinical complexity. A validated clinical index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Cesar; Pérez, Inaki; Podzamczer, Daniel; Llibre, Josep Maria; Domingo, Pere; González-García, Juan; Puig, Inma; Ayala, Pilar; Martín, Mayte; Trilla, Antoni; Lázaro, Pablo; Gatell, Josep Maria

    2016-03-01

    The financing of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is generally determined by the cost incurred in the previous year, the number of patients on treatment, and the evidence-based recommendations, but not the clinical characteristics of the population. To establish a score relating the cost of ART and patient clinical complexity in order to understand the costing differences between hospitals in the region that could be explained by the clinical complexity of their population. Retrospective analysis of patients receiving ART in a tertiary hospital between 2009 and 2011. Factors potentially associated with a higher cost of ART were assessed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. Two predictive models of "high-cost" were developed. The normalized estimated (adjusted for the complexity scores) costs were calculated and compared with the normalized real costs. In the Hospital Index, 631 (16.8%) of the 3758 patients receiving ART were responsible for a "high-cost" subgroup, defined as the highest 25% of spending on ART. Baseline variables that were significant predictors of high cost in the Clinic-B model in the multivariate analysis were: route of transmission of HIV, AIDS criteria, Spanish nationality, year of initiation of ART, CD4+ lymphocyte count nadir, and number of hospital admissions. The Clinic-B score ranged from 0 to 13, and the mean value (5.97) was lower than the overall mean value of the four hospitals (6.16). The clinical complexity of the HIV patient influences the cost of ART. The Clinic-B and Clinic-BF scores predicted patients with high cost of ART and could be used to compare and allocate costs corrected for the patient clinical complexity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. State of the art in video system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The closed circuit television (CCTV) system that is onboard the Space Shuttle has the following capabilities: camera, video signal switching and routing unit (VSU); and Space Shuttle video tape recorder. However, this system is inadequate for use with many experiments that require video imaging. In order to assess the state-of-the-art in video technology and data storage systems, a survey was conducted of the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology (HHVT) products. The performance of the state-of-the-art solid state cameras and image sensors, video recording systems, data transmission devices, and data storage systems versus users' requirements are shown graphically.

  1. Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of combination antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznik, Andreas; Lamorde, Mohammed; Hermans, Sabine; Castelnuovo, Barbara; Auerbach, Brandon; Semeere, Aggrey; Sempa, Joseph; Ssennono, Mark; Ssewankambo, Fred; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To model the cost-effectiveness in Uganda of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) to prevent mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods The cost-effectiveness of ART was evaluated on the assumption that ART reduces the risk of an HIV-positive pregnant

  2. TRU-ART: A cost-effective prototypical neutron imaging technique for transuranic waste certification systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.S.

    1989-01-01

    The certification of defense radioactive waste as either transuranic or low-level waste requires very sensitive and accurate assay instrumentation to determine the specific radioactivity within an individual waste package. An assay instrument that employs a new technique (TRU-ART), which can identify the location of the radioactive material within a waste package, was designed, fabricated, and tested to potentially enhance the certification of problem defense waste drums. In addition, the assay instrumentation has potential application in radioactive waste reprocessing and neutron tomography. The assay instrumentation uses optimized electronic signal responses from an array of boral- and cadmium-shielded polyethylene-moderated 3 H detector packages. Normally, thermal neutrons that are detected by 3 H detectors have very poor spatial dependency that may be used to determine the location of the radioactive material. However, these shielded-detector packages of the TRU-ART system maintain the spatial dependency of the radioactive material in that the point of fast neutron thermalization is immediately adjacent to the 3 H detector. The TRU-ART was used to determine the location of radioactive material within three mock-up drums (empty, peat moss, and concrete) and four actual waste drums. The TRU-ART technique is very analogous to emission tomography. The mock-up drum and actual waste drum data, which were collected by the TRU-ART, were directly input into a algebraic reconstruction code to produce three-dimensional isoplots. Finally, a comprehensive fabrication cost estimate of the fielded drum assay system and the TRU-ART system was determined, and, subsequently, these estimates were used in a cost-benefit analysis to compare the economic advantage of the respective systems

  3. Applications of heat pipes for HVAC dehumidification at Walt Disney World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.J.; Dinh, K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the theory and application of heat pipes for HVAC dehumidification purposes. In HVAC applications, a heat pipe is used as a heat exchanger that transfers heat from the return air directly to the supply air. The air is pre-cooled entering the cooling coil and reheated using the same heat removed from the return air. While consuming no energy, the heat pipe lets the evaporator coil operate at a lower temperature, increasing the moisture removal capabilities of the HVAC system by 50% to 100%. WALT DISNEY WORLD is currently testing several heat pipe applications ranging from 1 to 240 tons. The applications include (1) water attractions (2) museums/artifacts areas (3) resort guest rooms and (4) locker rooms. Actual energy usage and relative humidity reductions are shown to determine the effectiveness of the heat pipe as an energy efficient method of humidity control

  4. Solar hybrid cooling system for high-tech offices in subtropical climate - Radiant cooling by absorption refrigeration and desiccant dehumidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.F.; Chow, T.T.; Lee, C.K.; Lin, Z.; Chan, L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A solar hybrid cooling system is proposed for high-tech offices in subtropical climate. → An integration of radiant cooling, absorption refrigeration and desiccant dehumidification. → Year-round cooling and energy performances were evaluated through dynamic simulation. → Its annual primary energy consumption was lower than conventional system up to 36.5%. → The passive chilled beams were more energy-efficient than the active chilled beams. - Abstract: A solar hybrid cooling design is proposed for high cooling load demand in hot and humid climate. For the typical building cooling load, the system can handle the zone cooling load (mainly sensible) by radiant cooling with the chilled water from absorption refrigeration, while the ventilation load (largely latent) by desiccant dehumidification. This hybrid system utilizes solar energy for driving the absorption chiller and regenerating the desiccant wheel. Since a high chilled water temperature generated from the absorption chiller is not effective to handle the required latent load, desiccant dehumidification is therefore involved. It is an integration of radiant cooling, absorption refrigeration and desiccant dehumidification, which are powered up by solar energy. In this study, the application potential of the solar hybrid cooling system was evaluated for the high-tech offices in the subtropical climate through dynamic simulation. The high-tech offices are featured with relatively high internal sensible heat gains due to the intensive office electric equipment. The key performance indicators included the solar fraction and the primary energy consumption. Comparative study was also carried out for the solar hybrid cooling system using two common types of chilled ceilings, the passive chilled beams and active chilled beams. It was found that the solar hybrid cooling system was technically feasible for the applications of relatively higher cooling load demand. The annual primary energy

  5. Nanostructured materials for solid-state hydrogen storage: A review of the achievement of COST Action MP1103

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callini, Elsa; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo Francois; Ahuja, Rajeev; Ares, Jos Ramon; Bals, Sara; Biliskov, Nikola; Chakraborty, Sudip; Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Chaudhary, Anna Lisa; Cuevas, Fermin; Dam, Bernard; de Jongh, Petra; Dornheim, Martin; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Novakovic, Jasmina G.; Hirscher, Michael; Hirscher, M.; Jensen, Torben R.; Jensen, Peter Bjerre; Novakovic, Nikola; Lai, Qiwen; Leardini, Fabrice; Gattia, Daniele Mirabile; Pasquini, Luca; Steriotis, Theodore; Turner, Stuart; Vegge, Tejs; Zuttel, Andreas; Montone, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action MP1103 Nanostructured Materials for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage were synthesized, characterized and modeled. This Action dealt with the state of the art of energy storage and set up a competitive and coordinated

  6. Nanostructured materials for solid-state hydrogen storage: A review of the achievement of COST Action MP1103

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callini, Elsa; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action MP1103 Nanostructured Materials for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage were synthesized, characterized and modeled. This Action dealt with the state of the art of energy storage and set up a competitive and coordinated...

  7. Development of an Air-Source Heat Pump Integrated with a Water Heating / Dehumidification Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Uselton, Robert B. [Lennox Industries, Inc; Shen, Bo [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A residential-sized dual air-source integrated heat pump (AS-IHP) concept is under development in partnership between ORNL and a manufacturer. The concept design consists of a two-stage air-source heat pump (ASHP) coupled on the air distribution side with a separate novel water heating/dehumidification (WH/DH) module. The motivation for this unusual equipment combination is the forecast trend for home sensible loads to be reduced more than latent loads. Integration of water heating with a space dehumidification cycle addresses humidity control while performing double-duty. This approach can be applied to retrofit/upgrade applications as well as new construction. A WH/DH module capable of ~1.47 L/h water removal and ~2 kW water heating capacity was assembled by the manufacturer. A heat pump system model was used to guide the controls design; lab testing was conducted and used to calibrate the models. Performance maps were generated and used in a TRNSYS sub-hourly simulation to predict annual performance in a well-insulated house. Annual HVAC/WH energy savings of ~35% are predicted in cold and hot-humid U.S. climates compared to a minimum efficiency baseline.

  8. Detrimental effect of Air pollution, Corrosion on Building Materials and Historical Structures

    OpenAIRE

    N. Venkat Rao; M. Rajasekhar; Dr. G. Chinna Rao

    2016-01-01

    The economy of any country would be drastically changed if there were no corrosion. The annual cost of corrosion world wise is over 3 % of the worlds GDP. As pet the sources available, India losses $ 45 billion every year on account of corrosion of infrastructure, Industrial machinery and other historical heritage. Keeping this critical and alarming situation in view, this paper focuses on how all these forms of corrosion affect building materials and historical structures. It als...

  9. Electric automation history and state of the art; Historia da automacao eletrica e estado da arte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, M.F. [Itaipu Binacional, Foz do Iguacu, PR (Brazil). Div. de Engenharia Eletronica e Sistemas de Controle], E-mail: mendes@ieee.org; Jardini, J.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (PEA/EP/USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia de Energia e Automacao Eletricas], E-mail: jardini@pea.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    The article summarizes the history of electric systems automation, used in hydroelectric power plants, since the rise to the present day. Technologies are presented employed at various times, developments, the difference and the reasons for evolution. The emphasis is on today's modern systems technology, covering: communication, standardization, hardware, software, architecture, maintenance, operation and challenges. This work pretend to give subsidies for the design and implementation of automation systems electricity using state of the art. The scope are the new plants as well as those being modernized. Knowledge of history is important to investigate, to plan and evaluate the costs and benefits of automation systems for new electric plants and those that are undergoing processes technological upgrading.

  10. Corrosion and inhibition of stainless steel pitting corrosion in alkaline medium and the effect of Cl- and Br- anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refaey, S.A.M.; Taha, F.; El-Malak, A.M. Abd

    2005-01-01

    The effect of carbonate anion on the pitting corrosion and inhibition behavior of stainless steel samples (304L SS and 316L SS) has been studied using potentiodynamic and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The effect of concentration of CO 3 2- ions, pH, potential scanning rate and the composition of stainless steel are discussed. Additions of Cl - and Br - ions into the carbonate solution increase the anodic dissolution of stainless steel and decrease its pitting corrosion resistance. The effect of CO 3 2- anion on the inhibition of chloride and bromide pitting corrosion of the two stainless steel types has been studied also. Pitting corrosion decrease with the increasing of sodium carbonate concentration, i.e. increases the resistance of stainless steels towards the chloride and bromide pitting corrosion. This inhibition effect argued to formation of [Fe,Cr]CO 3 film caused by preferential adsorption of the CO 3 2- ion, leading to instantaneous repair of weak sites for pit nucleation

  11. The Effects of Martial Arts Training on Attentional Networks in Typical Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Ashleigh; Marí-Beffa, Paloma

    2018-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that training in Martial Arts is associated with improvements in cognitive function in children; but little has been studied in healthy adults. Here, we studied the impact of extensive training in Martial Arts on cognitive control in adults. To do so, we used the Attention Network Test (ANT) to test two different groups of participants: with at least 2 years of Martial Arts experience, and with no experience with the sport. Participants were screened from a wider sample of over 500 participants who volunteered to participate. 48 participants were selected: 21 in the Martial Arts group (mean age = 19.68) and 27 in the Non-Martial Arts group (mean age = 19.63). The two groups were matched on a number of demographic variables that included Age and BMI, following the results of a previous pilot study where these factors were found to significantly impact the ANT measures. An effect of Martial Arts experience was found on the Alert network, but not the Orienting or Executive ones. More specifically, Martial Artists showed improved performance when alert had to be sustained endogenously, performing more like the control group when an exogenous cue was provided. This result was further confirmed by a negative correlation between number of years of Martial Arts experience and the costs due to the lack of an exogenous cue suggesting that the longer a person takes part in the sport, the better their endogenous alert is. Results are interpreted in the context of the impact of training a particular attentional state in specific neurocognitive pathways.

  12. The Effects of Martial Arts Training on Attentional Networks in Typical Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh Johnstone

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence that training in Martial Arts is associated with improvements in cognitive function in children; but little has been studied in healthy adults. Here, we studied the impact of extensive training in Martial Arts on cognitive control in adults. To do so, we used the Attention Network Test (ANT to test two different groups of participants: with at least 2 years of Martial Arts experience, and with no experience with the sport. Participants were screened from a wider sample of over 500 participants who volunteered to participate. 48 participants were selected: 21 in the Martial Arts group (mean age = 19.68 and 27 in the Non-Martial Arts group (mean age = 19.63. The two groups were matched on a number of demographic variables that included Age and BMI, following the results of a previous pilot study where these factors were found to significantly impact the ANT measures. An effect of Martial Arts experience was found on the Alert network, but not the Orienting or Executive ones. More specifically, Martial Artists showed improved performance when alert had to be sustained endogenously, performing more like the control group when an exogenous cue was provided. This result was further confirmed by a negative correlation between number of years of Martial Arts experience and the costs due to the lack of an exogenous cue suggesting that the longer a person takes part in the sport, the better their endogenous alert is. Results are interpreted in the context of the impact of training a particular attentional state in specific neurocognitive pathways.

  13. One Step Closer to the Marketplace for State-of-the-Art Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivetrain | News | NREL One Step Closer to the Marketplace for State-of-the-Art Wind Turbine Drivetrain One Step Closer to the Marketplace for State-of-the-Art Wind Turbine Drivetrain April 1, 2016 modeling, and testing in state-of-the-art facilities designed to put the drivetrain through its paces

  14. Corrosion of X65 Pipeline Steel Under Deposit and Effect of Corrosion Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XU Yun-ze

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Effect of the deposit on the electrochemical parameters of X65 pipeline steel in oxygen contained sodium chloride solution was studied by EIS and PDS methods. The galvanic corrosion behavior under deposit and effect of different concentration of corrosion inhibitor PBTCA were studied by electrical resistance (ER method combined with ZRA. The results show that the corrosion potential of X65 steel shifts negatively as SiO2 covering its surface and the corrosion rate becomes lower. When the galvanic couple specimen with deposit is electrically connected with the specimen without deposit, anodic polarization occurs on X65 steel under deposit and the galvanic current density decreases from 120μA/cm2 to 50μA/cm2 and keeps stable. As 5×10-5, 8×10-5 and 3×10-4 PBTCA were introduced into the solution, the galvanic current density reaches the highest 1300μA/cm2 and then decreases to 610μA/cm2 keeping stable around 610μA/cm2, corrosion rate of X65 steel under deposit reaches 6.11mm/a. PBTCA accelerates the corrosion of X65 steel under deposit in oxygen contained solution. Through the investigation on the surface of the specimens, serious local corrosion occurs on the X65 steel surface under deposit.

  15. Effect of flow on corrosion in catenary risers and its corrosion inhibitor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Pedro Altoe; Magalhaes, Alvaro Augusto Oliveira; Silva, Jussara de Mello [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Kang, Cheolho; More, Parimal P. [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Oslo (Norway)

    2009-07-01

    In oil and gas production, multiphase flow is often encountered and a range of different flow patterns can be experienced in pipelines. The flow regime transition and flow characteristics can be changed with the change of pipeline topography, which affects the corrosion and the performance of corrosion inhibitor in these multiphase pipelines. This paper outlines on the effect of inclination on the flow characteristics and their subsequent effect on corrosion rates. Also, this paper presents on the performance of three candidate corrosion inhibitors under severe slugging conditions at low water cut. For the simulation of offshore flow lines and risers, the experiments were carried out in a 44 m long, 10 cm diameter, three different pipeline inclinations of 0, 3 and 45 degrees. Light condensate oil with a viscosity of 2.5 cP at room temperature was used and water cut was 20%. The results indicated that the baseline corrosion rate in 45 degrees showed higher than other inclinations. Each corrosion inhibitor showed a different inhibitor performance. (author)

  16. Galvanic corrosion -- Effect of environmental and experimental variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, A.K.; Fleming, D.L.; Lum, B.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Galvanic corrosion behavior of A 516 steel (UNS K01800) coupled to UNS N06022 and UNS R53400, respectively was evaluated in an acidic brine (pH ∼ 2.75) at 30 C, 60 C and 80 C using zero resistance ammeter method. A limited number of experiments were also performed in a neutral brine involving A 516 steel/UNS N06022 couple. The steady-state galvanic current and galvanic potential were measured as functions of anode-to-cathode (A/C) area ratio and electrode distance. Results indicate that the galvanic current was gradually reduced as the A/C area ratio was increased. No systematic trend on the effect of A/C area ratio on the galvanic potential was observed. Also, no significant effect of electrode distance on the galvanic current and galvanic potential was evident. In general, increased galvanic current was noticed with increasing temperature. The limited data obtained in the neutral brine indicate that the galvanic current was reduced in this environment compared to that in the acidic brine. Optical microscopic examination was performed on all tested specimens to evaluate the extent of surface damage resulting from galvanic interaction. A 516 steel suffered from general corrosion and crevice corrosion in all environments tested. Very light crevice corrosion mark was observed with UNS N06022 and R53400 in the acidic brine at 60 C and 80 C. However, this mark appears to be a surface discoloration and no actual crevice was detected

  17. The anaerobic digestion of urban sludges: evaluation, state of the art; La digestion anaerobie des boues urbaines: etat des lieux, etat de l'art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This presentation brings an evaluation and a state of the art of the sewage sludges channel, in terms of de-pollution efficiency as energy production. It gives also economical references which allow long dated arbitration. These data underline the necessity of taking into account the investments, the operating costs and also the induced profits: sludges volume reduction and the associated charges, complete or part energy autonomy... (A.L.B.)

  18. State of the art review of biofuels production from lignocellulose by thermophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yujia; Xin, Fengxue; Lu, Jiasheng; Dong, Weiliang; Zhang, Wenming; Zhang, Min; Wu, Hao; Ma, Jiangfeng; Jiang, Min

    2017-12-01

    Biofuels, including ethanol and butanol, are mainly produced by mesophilic solventogenic yeasts and Clostridium species. However, these microorganisms cannot directly utilize lignocellulosic materials, which are abundant, renewable and non-compete with human demand. More recently, thermophilic bacteria show great potential for biofuels production, which could efficiently degrade lignocellulose through the cost effective consolidated bioprocessing. Especially, it could avoid contamination in the whole process owing to its relatively high fermentation temperature. However, wild types thermophiles generally produce low levels of biofuels, hindering their large scale production. This review comprehensively summarizes the state of the art development of biofuels production by reported thermophilic microorganisms, and also concludes strategies to improve biofuels production including the metabolic pathways construction, co-culturing systems and biofuels tolerance. In addition, strategies to further improve butanol production are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The State of Comic Art Bibliography in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rhode

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the past two decades, several American bibliographies of comic art have been published to aid in research on comics and cartooning. Professor John Lent’s ten-volume Comic Art Bibliographies is one of the largest such projects and he began it with a self-published volume in 1986. Librarian Randy Scott published The Comic Art Collection Catalog: An Author, Artist, Title and Subject Catalog Of The Comic Art Collection, Special Collections Division, Michigan State University Libraries, whi...

  20. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  1. State of the art in microfabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2014-01-01

    In this review paper the state of the art in microfabrication is presented. The focus is on trends in integrated circuit fabrication by mainstream industrial players. The article starts with Moore’s Law, describing its inception as well as the evolution of Moore’s metric of the number of components

  2. Effect of Ti3+ ion on the Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Bong; Lim, Han Gwi; Kim, Bok Hee; Kim, Ki Ju

    1999-01-01

    Alloy 600 has been widely used as a steam generator tubing material in pressurized water reactors(PWRs) nuclear power plants. Corrosion of steam generator tubing mainly occurs on the secondary water side. The purpose of this work is primarily concerned with examining the effect of Ti 3+ ion concentrations on the corrosion behavior of the Alloy 600 steam generator tubing material. Corrosion behavior of the Alloy 600 steam generator tubing material was studied in aqueous solutions with varying Ti 3+ ion concentration at room temperature. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarization techniques were used to determine the corrosion and pitting potentials for the Alloy 600 test material. The addition of Ti 3+ ion to 1000ppm, showed inhibition effect on the corrosion of Alloy 600. But the corrosion of Alloy 600 was accelerated when the concentration of Ti 3+ ion exceeded 1000ppm, it is assumed that the effect of general corrosion of Alloy 600 is more sensitive than pitting corrosion. It is considered that the passive film which was formed on the Alloy 600 surface in the 100ppm Ti 3+ ion containing solution is mainly consisted of TiO 2

  3. Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air-Conditioning: Demonstrated Performance and Cost Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.; Lowenstein, A.

    2014-09-01

    Cooling loads must be dramatically reduced when designing net-zero energy buildings or other highly efficient facilities. Advances in this area have focused primarily on reducing a building's sensible cooling loads by improving the envelope, integrating properly sized daylighting systems, adding exterior solar shading devices, and reducing internal heat gains. As sensible loads decrease, however, latent loads remain relatively constant, and thus become a greater fraction of the overall cooling requirement in highly efficient building designs, particularly in humid climates. This shift toward latent cooling is a challenge for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Traditional systems typically dehumidify by first overcooling air below the dew-point temperature and then reheating it to an appropriate supply temperature, which requires an excessive amount of energy. Another dehumidification strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove water from air more efficiently; however, these systems are large and increase fan energy consumption due to the increased airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors. A third dehumidification strategy involves high flow liquid desiccant systems. These systems require a high maintenance separator to protect the air distribution system from corrosive desiccant droplet carryover and so are more commonly used in industrial applications and rarely in commercial buildings. Both solid desiccant systems and most high-flow liquid desiccant systems (if not internally cooled) add sensible energy which must later be removed to the air stream during dehumidification, through the release of sensible heat during the sorption process.

  4. Chemical effects in the Corrosion of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys. A Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    tances.II. Effect Of Pomegranate Juice And The Aqueous Extract Of Pomegranate Fruits And Tea leaves On The Corrosion Of Aluminum" The effect of the juices...T7651 tempers to exfoliation and stress- corrosion cracking . 1968-8 D.P. Doyle and H.P. Godard ,a) Tr. Mezhdunar. Kongr. Korroz. Metal, 4, 439-48, (1968...Tapper Brit. Corros. J., 3, 285-87, (1968) "Corrosion Of Aluminum" Summary of the literature of Al corrosion which includes stress- corrosion cracking

  5. Effect of aging on the corrosion of aluminum alloy 6061

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Bedawy, M.E.M.

    2010-01-01

    Not only alloying additions may affect the corrosion resistance of aluminum alloys, but also practices that result in a nonuniform microstructure may introduce susceptibility to some forms of corrosion, especially if the microstructural effect is localized. This work was intended to study the effect of aging time at 225, 185 and 140 degree C and the effect of constant aging time ( 24 hrs ) in the temperature range 100 - 450 degree C as well as the influence of the solution ph on the corrosion characteristics of 6061 aluminum alloy, (Al-Mg-Si alloy) containing 0.22 wt% Cu. The investigation was performed by standard immersion corrosion test according to the British Standard BS 11846 method B and by applying potentiodynamic polarization technique in neutral deaerated 0.5 % M NaCl solution as well as in alkaline NaOH solution (ph = 10). The susceptibility to corrosion and the dominant corrosion type was evaluated by examination of transverse cross sections of corroded samples after the immersion test and examination of the corroded surfaces after potentiodynamic polarization using optical microscope. Analysis of the polarization curves was used to determine the effect of different aging parameters on corrosion characteristics such as the corrosion current density I (corr), the corrosion potential E (corr), the cathodic current densities and the passivation behavior.Results of the immersion test showed susceptibility to intergranular corrosion in the under aged tempers while pitting was the dominant corrosion mode for the over aged tempers after aging at 225 and 185 degree C.Analysis of the potentiodynamic polarization curves showed similar dependence of I (corr) and cathodic current densities on the aging treatment in the neutral 0.5 %M NaCl solution and in the alkaline NaOH solution. It was observed that E(corr) values in the NaCl solution were shifted in the more noble direction for the specimens aged before peak aging while it decreased again with aging time for

  6. The effects of argon ion bombardment on the corrosion resistance of tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, A. H.; Sari, A. H.; Shokouhy, A.

    2017-02-01

    Application of ion beam has been widely used as a surface modification method to improve surface properties. This paper investigates the effect of argon ion implantation on surface structure as well as resistance against tantalum corrosion. In this experiment, argon ions with energy of 30 keV and in doses of 1 × 1017-10 × 1017 ions/cm2 were used. The surface bombardment with inert gases mainly produces modified topography and morphology of the surface. Atomic Force Microscopy was also used to patterned the roughness variations prior to and after the implantation phase. Additionally, the corrosion investigation apparatus wear was applied to compare resistance against tantalum corrosion both before and after ion implantation. The results show that argon ion implantation has a substantial impact on increasing resistance against tantalum corrosion. After the corrosion test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyzed the samples' surface morphologies. In addition, the elemental composition is characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The purpose of this paper was to obtain the perfect condition for the formation of tantalum corrosion resistance. In order to evaluate the effect of the ion implantation on the corrosion behavior, potentiodynamic tests were performed. The results show that the corrosion resistance of the samples strongly depends on the implantation doses.

  7. Corrosion of materials for heat exchangers and the countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1978-01-01

    When the materials for heat exchangers are selected, the heat transfer performance, mechanical strength, workability, cost, corrosion resistance and so on are taken in consideration. Most of the failure of heat exchangers is due to corrosion, and the corrosion failure on cooling water side occurs frequently, to which attention is not paid much usually. The rate of occurrence of corrosion failure is overwhelmingly high in heating tubes, and the failure owing to cooling water exceeds that owing to process fluid. The material of heating tubes is mostly aluminum brass, and local failure such as pitting corrosion or stress corrosion cracking holds a majority. The cause of corrosion failure due to cooling water is mostly the poor water quality. The mechanism of corrosion of metals can be explained by the electrochemical reaction between the metals and solutions. As for the factors affecting corrosion, dissolved oxygen, pH, Cl - ions, temperature, flow velocity, and foreign matters are enumerated. Copper alloys are sensitive to the effect of polluted sea water. Erosion corrosion is caused by eddies and bubbles owing to high flow velocity, and impingement attack is caused by scratching foreign matters. The quality of fresh water affects corrosion more than sea water in case of copper alloys. The preliminary examination of water quality is essential. (Kako, I.)

  8. State-of-the-art of home networking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koonen, A.M.J.; Popov, M.

    2012-01-01

    To introduce the Symposium on "Indoor Optical Networks: a Promising Way to a Converged Service Delivery", this presentation will give a brief overview of state-of-the-art home networking architectures, technologies and applications covering both technical and techno-economic aspects.

  9. Effect of sulfur on the SCC and corrosion fatigue performance of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, E.; Nolan, T.; Lucente, A.; Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Morris, R.; Mullen, J.; Newsome, G.

    2015-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted on model heats of 304/304L stainless steel with systematically controlled sulfur content to isolate the influence of sulfur on crack growth behavior. The results of the SCC experiments conducted in 338 C. degrees deaerated water on 20% cold worked model heats with 0.006 and 0.012 wt% sulfur showed an order of magnitude or more reduction in the crack growth rate relative to a model heat with <0.001 wt% sulfur. Corrosion fatigue crack growth rates revealed a reduction in the crack growth rates of the elevated sulfur heats relative to model predicted steady state crack growth rates with increasing rise time for nominal loading conditions of a stress ratio of 0.7 and a stress intensity factor range of 6.6 MPa√m. At the longest rise time of 5.330 sec, the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of the 0.006 wt% sulfur model heat was only 13% of model predictions and the crack growth of the 0.012 wt% sulfur heat completely stalled. Experiments conducted in anion faulted aerated water on stainless steel heats with moderate to high sulfur and variable carbon and boron contents showed that any detrimental effect of sulfur in this environment was secondary to the effect of sensitization in promoting SCC growth. (authors)

  10. The effect of the PWR secondary circuit water chemistry on erosion corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, J.

    1993-07-01

    The secondary circuit of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors is described. The causes of erosion corrosion are outlined, and the effects of the physical properties and chemical composition of water are discussed with emphasis on specific conductivity and concentrations of oxygen, ammonia, iron, sodium, silicon and organics. Described are corrective actions to eliminate the deviations from the normal state during reactor power reduction or reactor shutdown. (J.B.)

  11. 14 CFR 1203.403 - State-of-the-art and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State-of-the-art and intelligence. 1203.403... PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.403 State-of-the-art and intelligence. A logical... available from intelligence sources is known or is available to others. It is also important to consider...

  12. Corrosion behavior of Zircaloy 4 cladding material. Evaluation of the hydriding effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blat, M.

    1997-04-01

    In this work, particular attention has been paid to the hydriding effect in PIE and laboratory test to validate a detrimental hydrogen contribution on Zircaloy 4 corrosion behavior at high burnup. Laboratory corrosion tests results confirm that hydrides have a detrimental role on corrosion kinetics. This effect is particularly significant for cathodic charged samples with a massive hydride outer layer before corrosion test. PIE show that at high burnup a hydride layer is formed underneath the metal/oxide interface. The results of the metallurgical examinations are discussed with respect to the possible mechanisms involved in this detrimental effect of hydrogen. Therefore, according to the laboratory tests results and PIE, hydrogen could be a strong contributor to explain the increase in corrosion rate at high burnup. (author)

  13. Corrosion engineering in nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazak, M.; Tlamsa, J.; Jirousova, D.; Silber, K.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion problems in nuclear power industry are discussed from the point of view of anticorrosion measures, whose aim is not only increasing the lifetime of the equipment but, first of all, securing ecological safety. A brief description is given of causes of corrosion damage that occurred at Czechoslovak nuclear power plants and which could have been prevented. These involve the corrosion of large-volume radioactive waste tanks made of the CSN 17247 steel and of waste piping of an ion exchange station made of the same material, a crack in a steam generator collector, contamination of primary circuit water with iron, and corrosion of CrNi corrosion-resistant steel in a spent fuel store. It is concluded that if a sufficient insight into the corrosion relationships exists and a reasonable volume of data is available concerning the corrosion state during the nuclear facility performance, the required safety can be achieved without adopting extremely costly anticorrosion measures. (Z.M.)

  14. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed

  15. How the United States Funds the Arts. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Arts, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The infrastructure for arts and cultural support in the United States is complex and adaptive. Citizens who enjoy the arts can choose from a wide array of drama, visual and media arts, dance, music, and literature available in formal and informal settings--theaters, museums, and concert halls, but also libraries, schools, places of worship,…

  16. Platelet kinetics: the state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyns, A. duP

    1984-01-01

    In this paper an overview of the state of the art of platelet kinetics 1982 is presented. The subjects considered include a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of some of the many radionuclide platelet labels, viz 51 Cr, 111 In, focussing briefly on models for analysis of platelets survival. (Auth.)

  17. Statin cost effectiveness in primary prevention: A systematic review of the recent cost-effectiveness literature in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Aaron P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature on the cost-effectiveness of statin drugs in primary prevention of coronary heart disease is complex. The objective of this study is to compare the disparate results of recent cost-effectiveness analyses of statins. Findings We conducted a systematic review of the literature on statin cost-effectiveness. The four studies that met inclusion criteria reported varying conclusions about the cost-effectiveness of statin treatment, without a clear consensus as to whether statins are cost-effective for primary prevention. However, after accounting for each study’s assumptions about statin costs, we found substantial agreement among the studies. Studies that assumed statins to be more expensive found them to be less cost-effective, and vice-versa. Furthermore, treatment of low-risk groups became cost-effective as statins became less expensive. Conclusions Drug price is the primary determinant of statin cost-effectiveness within a given risk group. As more statin drugs become generic, patients at low risk for coronary disease may be treated cost-effectively. Though many factors must be weighed in any medical decision, from a cost-effectiveness perspective, statins may now be considered an appropriate therapy for many patients at low risk for heart disease.

  18. EFFECT OF THE HEAT AND SURFACE LASER TREATMENT ON THE CORROSION DEGRADATION OF THE Mg-Al ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek A. Dobrzański

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper there is presented the corrosion behavior of the cast magnesium alloys as cast state, after heat and laser treatment. Pitting corrosion resistance of the analyzed alloys was carried out using the potentiodynamic electrochemical method (direct current, based on a anodic polarization curve. On the basis of the achieved anodic polarization curves, using the Tefel extrapolation method near to the corrosion potential, the quantitative data were determined, which describe the electrochemical corrosion process of the investigated alloys: value of the corrosion potential Ecorr (mV, polarization resistance RP (kohm.cm2, corrosion current density icorr (10-6A/cm2, corrosion rate Vcorr (mm/year as well the mass loss Vc (g/m2<.

  19. Optimal inspection planning for onshore pipelines subject to external corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Wellison J.S.; Beck, André T.; Haukaas, Terje

    2013-01-01

    Continuous operation of pipeline systems involves significant expenditures in inspection and maintenance activities. The cost-effective safety management of such systems involves allocating the optimal amount of resources to inspection and maintenance activities, in order to control risks (expected costs of failure). In this context, this article addresses the optimal inspection planning for onshore pipelines subject to external corrosion. The investigation addresses a challenging problem of practical relevance, and strives for using the best available models to describe random corrosion growth and the relevant limit state functions. A single pipeline segment is considered in this paper. Expected numbers of failures and repairs are evaluated by Monte Carlo sampling, and a novel procedure is employed to evaluate sensitivities of the objective function with respect to design parameters. This procedure is shown to be accurate and more efficient than finite differences. The optimum inspection interval is found for an example problem, and the robustness of this optimum to the assumed inspection and failure costs is investigated. It is shown that optimum total expected costs found herein are not highly sensitive to the assumed costs of inspection and failure. -- Highlights: • Inspection, repair and failure costs of pipeline systems considered. • Optimum inspection schedule (OIS) obtained by minimizing total expected life-cycle costs. • Robustness of OIS evaluated w.r.t. estimated costs of inspection and failure. • Accurate non-conservative models of corrosion growth employed

  20. The Arts and State Governments: At Arm's Length or Arm in Arm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Julia F.; Ondaatje, Elizabeth Heneghan

    2006-01-01

    Even though a majority of Americans claim to support public funding of the arts, state government spending on the arts is minimal--and may be losing ground relative to other types of state expenditures. Moreover, most state arts agencies, or SAAs, have not succeeded in convincing state government leaders that the arts should be integral to their…

  1. Clinical Trials of Blood Pressure Lowering and Antihypertensive Medication: is Cognitive Measurement State-Of-The-Art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Merrill F; Torres, Rachael V; Davey, Adam

    2018-02-22

    Randomized controlled trials of blood pressure (BP) lowering and antihypertensive medication use on cognitive outcomes have often been disappointing, reporting mixed findings and small effect sizes. We evaluate the extent to which cognitive assessment protocols used in these trials approach state-of-the-art. Overall, we find that a primary focus on cognition and the systematic selection of cognitive outcomes across trials take a backseat to other trial goals. Twelve trials investigating change in cognitive functioning were examined and none met criteria for state-of-the-art assessment, including use of at least 4 tests indexing 2 cognitive domains. Four trials investigating incident dementia were also examined. Each trial used state-of-the-art diagnostic criteria to assess dementia, although follow-up periods were relatively short, with only 2 trials lasting for at least 3 years. Weaknesses in each trial may act to obscure or weaken the positive effects of BP lowering on cognitive functioning. Improving trial designs in terms of cognitive outcomes selected and length of follow-up periods employed could lead to more promising findings. We offer logical steps to achieve state-of-the-art assessment protocols, with examples, in hopes of improving future trials.

  2. Microencapsulation of Self Healing Agents for Corrosion Control Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, S. T.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion, the environmentally induced degradation of materials, is a very costly problem that has a major impact on the global economy. Results from a 2-year breakthrough study released in 2002 by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) showed that the total annual estimated direct cost associated with metallic corrosion in nearly every U.S. industry sector was a staggering $276 billion, approximately 3.1% of the nation's Gross Domestic Product (GOP). Corrosion protective coatings are widely used to protect metallic structures from the detrimental effects of corrosion but their effectiveness can be seriously compromised by mechanical damage, such as a scratch, that exposes the metallic substrate. The incorporation of a self healing mechanism into a corrosion control coating would have the potential to significantly increase its effectiveness and useful lifetime. This paper describes work performed to incorporate a number of microcapsule-based self healing systems into corrosion control coatings. The work includes the preparation and evaluation of self-healing systems based on curable epoxy, acrylate, and siloxane resins, as well as, microencapsulated systems based on passive, solvent born, healing agent delivery. The synthesis and optimization of microcapsule-based self healing systems for thin coating (less than 100 micron) will be presented.

  3. Hurricane Loss Estimation Models: Opportunities for Improving the State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles C., Jr.; Johnson, Mark E.

    2004-11-01

    The results of hurricane loss models are used regularly for multibillion dollar decisions in the insurance and financial services industries. These models are proprietary, and this “black box” nature hinders analysis. The proprietary models produce a wide range of results, often producing loss costs that differ by a ratio of three to one or more. In a study for the state of North Carolina, 324 combinations of loss models were analyzed, based on a combination of nine wind models, four surface friction models, and nine damage models drawn from the published literature in insurance, engineering, and meteorology. These combinations were tested against reported losses from Hurricanes Hugo and Andrew as reported by a major insurance company, as well as storm total losses for additional storms. Annual loss costs were then computed using these 324 combinations of models for both North Carolina and Florida, and compared with publicly available proprietary model results in Florida. The wide range of resulting loss costs for open, scientifically defensible models that perform well against observed losses mirrors the wide range of loss costs computed by the proprietary models currently in use. This outcome may be discouraging for governmental and corporate decision makers relying on this data for policy and investment guidance (due to the high variability across model results), but it also provides guidance for the efforts of future investigations to improve loss models. Although hurricane loss models are true multidisciplinary efforts, involving meteorology, engineering, statistics, and actuarial sciences, the field of meteorology offers the most promising opportunities for improvement of the state of the art.

  4. State of art in FE-based fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Fuel performance codes approximate this complex behavior using an axisymmetric, axially-stacked, one-dimensional radial representation to save computation cost. However, the need for improved modeling of PCMI and, particularly, the importance of multidimensional capability for accurate fuel performance simulation has been identified as safety margin decreases. Finite element (FE) method that is reliable and proven solution in mechanical field has been introduced into fuel performance codes for multidimensional analysis. The present state of the art in numerical simulation of FE-based fuel performance predominantly involves 2-D axisymmetric model and 3-D volumetric model. The FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN own 1.5-D and 2-D FE model to simulate PCMI and cladding ballooning. In 2-D simulation, the FALCON code, developed by EPRI, is a 2-D (R-Z and R-θ) fully thermal-mechanically coupled steady-state and transient FE-based fuel behavior code. The French codes TOUTATIS and ALCYONE which are 3-D, and typically used to investigate localized behavior. In 2008, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing multidimensional (2-D and 3-D) nuclear fuel performance code called BISON. In this paper, the current state of FE-based fuel performance code and their models are presented. Based on investigation into the codes, requirements and direction of development for new FE-based fuel performance code can be discussed. Based on comparison of models in FE-based fuel performance code, status of art in the codes can be discussed. A new FE-based fuel performance code should include typical pellet and cladding models which all codes own. In particular, specified pellet and cladding model such as gaseous swelling and high burnup structure (HBS) model should be developed to improve accuracy of code as well as consider AC condition. To reduce computation cost, the approximated gap and the optimized contact model should be also developed

  5. A parametric study on a humidification–dehumidification (HDH) desalination unit powered by solar air and water heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yıldırım, Cihan; Solmuş, İsmail

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A time dependent humidification–dehumidification desalination process is investigated. • Fourth-order Runge–Kutta method is used to simulate the problem. • Daily and annual performance are examined. • Various operational parameters are investigated. - Abstract: The performance of a solar powered humidification–dehumidification desalination system is theoretically investigated for various operating and design parameters of the system under climatological conditions of Antalya, Turkey. The primary components of the system are a flat plate solar water heater, a flat plate double pass solar air heater, a humidifier, a dehumidifier and a storage tank. The mathematical model of the system is developed and governing conservation equations are numerically solved by using the Fourth order Runge–Kutta method. Daily and annual yields are calculated for different configurations of the system such as only water heating, only air heating and water–air heating

  6. Cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions in Andhra Pradesh state of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar G Anil

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on cost-effectiveness of the range of HIV prevention interventions is a useful contributor to decisions on the best use of resources to prevent HIV. We conducted this assessment for the state of Andhra Pradesh that has the highest HIV burden in India. Methods Based on data from a representative sample of 128 public-funded HIV prevention programs of 14 types in Andhra Pradesh, we have recently reported the number of HIV infections averted by each type of HIV prevention intervention and their cost. Using estimates of the age of onset of HIV infection, we used standard methods to calculate the cost per Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY saved as a measure of cost-effectiveness of each type of HIV prevention intervention. Results The point estimates of the cost per DALY saved were less than US $50 for blood banks, men who have sex with men programmes, voluntary counselling and testing centres, prevention of parent to child transmission clinics, sexually transmitted infection clinics, and women sex worker programmes; between US $50 and 100 for truckers and migrant labourer programmes; more than US $100 and up to US $410 for composite, street children, condom promotion, prisoners and workplace programmes and mass media campaign for the general public. The uncertainty range around these estimates was very wide for several interventions, with the ratio of the high to the low estimates infinite for five interventions. Conclusions The point estimates for the cost per DALY saved from the averted HIV infections for all interventions was much lower than the per capita gross domestic product in this Indian state. While these indicative cost-effectiveness estimates can inform HIV control planning currently, the wide uncertainty range around estimates for several interventions suggest the need for more firm data for estimating cost-effectiveness of HIV prevention interventions in India.

  7. 77 FR 5281 - State-of-the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket ID: NRC-2012-0022] State-of-the-Art Reactor Consequence... release of Draft NUREG-1935, ``State-of-the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) Report,'' for public... offsite radiological health consequences for potential severe reactor accidents for the Peach Bottom...

  8. Effects of sulfur addition on pitting corrosion and machinability behavior of super duplex stainless steel containing rare earth metals: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Kim, Soon-Tae; Lee, In-Sung; Park, Yong-Soo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The mechanisms on the effects of rare earth metals (REM) and sulfur (S) additions on the initiation and propagation of pitting corrosion and machinabillity of a super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) were elucidated → It was found that, in consideration of the ratio of lifetime (the resistance to pitting corrosion) to cost (machining and raw material), a costly austenitic stainless steel with high Ni , medium Mo and low N can be replaced by the high S and REM added SDSS with 7 wt.% Ni-4 wt% Mo-0.3 wt.% N → The resistance to pitting corrosion of the tested super duplex stainless steel was affected by the type of inclusions, the preferential interface areas between inclusions and the substrate, and the PREN difference between the γ-phase and the α-phase for the initiation and propagation of the pitting corrosion. - Abstract: To elucidate the effects of sulfur addition on pitting corrosion and machinability behavior of alloys containing rare earth metals, a potentiostatic polarization test, a critical pitting temperature test, a SEM-EDS analysis of inclusions, and a tool life test were conducted. As sulfur content increased, the resistance to pitting corrosion decreased due to the formation of numerous manganese sulfides deteriorating the corrosion resistance and an increase in the preferential interface areas for the initiation of the pitting corrosion. With an increase in sulfur content, the tool life increased due to the lubricating films of manganese sulfides adhering to tool surface.

  9. An Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Corrosion on Dry Friction Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jongsu; Kang, Jaeyoung

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the friction noise characteristic in relation to the corrosion of metal by using the frictional reciprocating and pin-on-disk system. From the experiments, it is found that the corrosion of metal advances the onset time and increases the magnitude of friction noise. Further, it is observed that the effect of corrosion on friction noise stems from the alteration of tribo-surface during repetitive frictional motion. The alteration of the corrosive contact surface induces a negative friction-velocity slope, by which the corrosion of metal can generate dynamic instability faster than non-corrosion of metal

  10. Corrosion control for low-cost reliability: Preceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This book is Volume 6 of the preceedings from the 12th International Corrosion Congress. The electric power industry workshop dealt with water chemistry control; monitoring of chemical, electrochemical, and biological corrosion; corrosion product analyses; and nuclear and fossil-fuel power plants. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  11. The effect of conditioning agents on the corrosive properties of molten urea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, D E; Nguyen, D T; Norton, M M; Parker, B R; Daniels, L E

    1991-01-01

    From the process case histories of the failure of several heat exchanger tube bundles, it was revealed that molten urea containing lignosulfonate as a granulation conditioning-hardening agent (Urea LS[trademark]) is corrosive to Types 304 and 316 stainless steel. The results of field and laboratory immersion corrosion tests indicated that the corrosivity of molten urea is strongly dependent on the process temperature rather than the conditioner composition. At temperatures below 295F, molten Urea LS[trademark] is not aggressive to these stainless steels. However, at temperatures above 300F, the corrosion of these stainless steels is extremely severe. The corrosion rate of Types 304, 304L, 316, and 316L is as high as hundreds of mils per year. The corrosion mechanism tends to be more general than localized. The results of the laboratory corrosion test also revealed that among alloying elements, copper is detrimental to corrosion resistance of stainless steel exposed to molten Urea LS[trademark], chromium is the most beneficial, and nickel has only a minor effect. Thus, copper-free and chromium stainless steels have superior corrosion resistance to the molten Urea LS[trademark] at a wide range of temperatures up to 345F.

  12. The effect of corrosion on the structural reliability of steel offshore structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchers, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers essential theoretical concepts and data requirements for engineering structural reliability assessment suitable for the estimation of the safety and reliability of corroding ships, offshore structures and pipelines. Such infrastructure operates in a harsh environment. Allowance must be made for structural deterioration since protective measures such as paint coatings, galvanizing or cathodic protection may be ineffective. Reliability analysis requires accurate engineering models for the description and prediction of material corrosion loss and for the maximum depth of pitting. New probability-based models for both these forms of corrosion have been proposed recently and calibrated against a wide range of data. The effects of water velocity and of water pollution are reviewed and compared with recently reported field data for a corrosion at an offshore oil platform. The data interpreted according to the model show good correlation when allowance is made for the season of first immersion and the adverse effects of seawater velocity and of water pollution. An example is given to illustrate the application of reliability analysis to a pipeline subject to pitting corrosion. An important outcome is that good quality estimation of the longer-term probability of loss of structural integrity requires good modelling of the longer-term corrosion behaviour. This is usually associated with anaerobic corrosion. As a result, it cannot be extrapolated from data for short-term corrosion as this is associated with aerobic corrosion conditions

  13. The effect of corrosion on the structural reliability of steel offshore structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchers, Robert E. [Centre for Infrastructure Performance and Reliability, Department of Civil, Surveying and Environmental Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan NSW 2300 (Australia)]. E-mail: rob.melchers@newcastle.edu.au

    2005-10-01

    This paper considers essential theoretical concepts and data requirements for engineering structural reliability assessment suitable for the estimation of the safety and reliability of corroding ships, offshore structures and pipelines. Such infrastructure operates in a harsh environment. Allowance must be made for structural deterioration since protective measures such as paint coatings, galvanizing or cathodic protection may be ineffective. Reliability analysis requires accurate engineering models for the description and prediction of material corrosion loss and for the maximum depth of pitting. New probability-based models for both these forms of corrosion have been proposed recently and calibrated against a wide range of data. The effects of water velocity and of water pollution are reviewed and compared with recently reported field data for a corrosion at an offshore oil platform. The data interpreted according to the model show good correlation when allowance is made for the season of first immersion and the adverse effects of seawater velocity and of water pollution. An example is given to illustrate the application of reliability analysis to a pipeline subject to pitting corrosion. An important outcome is that good quality estimation of the longer-term probability of loss of structural integrity requires good modelling of the longer-term corrosion behaviour. This is usually associated with anaerobic corrosion. As a result, it cannot be extrapolated from data for short-term corrosion as this is associated with aerobic corrosion conditions.

  14. Using cost-effectiveness analyses to inform policy: the case of antiretroviral therapy in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walt Gill

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Much emphasis is put on providing evidence to assist policymakers in priority setting and investment decisions. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of interventions is one technique used by policymakers in their decisions around the allocation of scarce resources. However, even where such evidence is available, other considerations may also be taken into account, and even over-ride technical evidence. Antiretroviral therapy (ART is the most effective intervention to reduce HIV-related morbidity and prolong mortality. However, treatment provision in the developing world has been hindered by the high costs of services and drugs, casting doubts on its cost-effectiveness. This paper looks at Thailand's publicly-funded antiretroviral initiative which was first introduced in 1992, and explores the extent to which cost-effectiveness evidence influenced policy. Methods: This article reviews the development of the national ART programme in Thailand between 1992 and 2004. It examines the roles of cost-effectiveness information in treatment policy decisions. Qualitative approaches including document analysis and interview of key informants were employed. Results: Two significant policy shifts have been observed in government-organised ART provision. In 1996, service-based therapy for a few was replaced by a research network to support clinical assessments of antiretroviral medication in public hospitals. This decision was taken after a domestic study illustrated the unaffordable fiscal burden and inefficient use of resources in provision of ART. The numbers of treatment recipients was maintained at 2,000 per year throughout the 1990s. It was not until 2001 that a new government pledged to extend the numbers receiving the service, as part of its commitment to universal coverage. Several elements played a role in this decision: new groups of dominant actors, drug price reductions, a pro-active civil society movement, lessons from experience

  15. Understanding the Effects of Sampling on Healthcare Risk Modeling for the Prediction of Future High-Cost Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moturu, Sai T.; Liu, Huan; Johnson, William G.

    Rapidly rising healthcare costs represent one of the major issues plaguing the healthcare system. Data from the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System, Arizona's Medicaid program provide a unique opportunity to exploit state-of-the-art machine learning and data mining algorithms to analyze data and provide actionable findings that can aid cost containment. Our work addresses specific challenges in this real-life healthcare application with respect to data imbalance in the process of building predictive risk models for forecasting high-cost patients. We survey the literature and propose novel data mining approaches customized for this compelling application with specific focus on non-random sampling. Our empirical study indicates that the proposed approach is highly effective and can benefit further research on cost containment in the healthcare industry.

  16. Effect of Bi on the corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Meiyi; Zhou Bangxin; Li Qiang; Zhang Weipeng; Zhu Li; Zou Linghong; Zhang Jinlong; Peng Jianchao

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate systematically the effect of Bi addition on the corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys, different zirconium-based alloys, including Zr-4 (Zr-l.5Sn-0.2Fe-0.1Cr), S5 (Zr-0.8Sn-0.35Nb-0.4Fe-0.1Cr), T5 (Zr-0.7Sn-l.0Nb-0.3Fe-0.1Cr) and Zr-1Nb, were adopted to prepare the zirconium alloys containing Bi of 0∼0.5% in mass fraction. These alloys were denoted as Zr-4 + xBi, S5 + xBi, T5 + xBi and Zr-1Nb + xBi, respectively. The corrosion behavior of these specimens was investigated by autoclave testing in lithiated water with 0.01 M LiOH or deionized water at 360 ℃/18.6 MPa and in superheated steam at 400 ℃/10.3 MPa. The microstructure of the alloys was examined by TEM and the second phase particles (SPPs) were analyzed by EDS. Microstructure observation shows that the addition of Bi promotes the precipitation of Sn as second phase particles (SPPs) because Sn is in solid solution in α-Zr matrix in Zr-4, S5 and T5 alloys. The concentration of Bi dissolved in α-Zr matrix increase with the increase of Nb in the alloys, and the excess Bi precipitates as Bi-containing SPPs. The corrosion results show that the effect of Bi addition on the corrosion behavior of different zirconium-based alloys is very complicated, depending on their compositions and corrosion conditions. In the case of higher Bi concentration in α-Zr, the zirconium alloys exhibit better corrosion resistance. However, in the case of precipitation of Bi-containing SPPs, the corrosion resistance gets worse. This indicates that the solid solution of Bi in α-Zr matrix can improve the corrosion resistance, while the precipitation of the Bi-containing SPPs is harmful to the corrosion resistance. (authors)

  17. Effects of Alloyed Carbon on the General Corrosion and the Pitting Corrosion Behavior of FeCrMnN Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kim, Sung-Joon [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The effects of alloyed carbon on the pitting corrosion, the general corrosion, and the passivity behavior of Fe{sub 1}8Cr{sub 1}0Mn{sub 0}.4Nx{sub C} (x=0 ⁓ 0.38 wt%) alloys were investigated by various electrochemical methods and XPS analysis. The alloyed carbon increased the general corrosion resistance of the FeCrMnN matrix. Carbon enhanced the corrosion potential, reduced the metal dissolution rate, and accelerated the hydrogen evolution reaction rate in various acidic solutions. In addition, carbon promoted the pitting corrosion resistance of the matrix in a chloride solution. The alloyed carbon in the matrix increased the chromium content in the passive film, and thus the passive film became more protective.

  18. State Arts Policy: Trends and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, Julia F.

    2008-01-01

    State arts agencies (SAAs)--key players within the U.S. system of public support for the arts--face growing economic, political, and demographic challenges to the roles and missions they adopted when founded in the mid-1960s. This report, the fourth and final in a multiyear study, looks at state arts agencies' efforts to rethink their roles and…

  19. The effect of some metallurgical factors on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, A.A.; Morsy, S.M.; El-Raghy, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of cold work and subsequent heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in 3% NaCl aqueous solutions was studied. Cold work was found to increase the corrosion rate, and heat treatment at 1050 C followed by water-quenching was found reduce to the rate of attack. The increase in the corrosion rate accompanied with a shift in the less noble direction of the steady state potential, an increase in the exchange current density and a decrease in the value of the activation energy. The results indicated that the corrosion potentials are less noble than the critical potentials for pitting, and they are discussed in terms of a simple dissolution process. A correlation is made between the corrosion rate, as expresses in weight loss, and the electrode properties of the corroding material

  20. Fundamental Studies of the Role of Grain Boundaries on Uniform Corrosion of Advanced Nuclear Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Mitra [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Marquis, Emmanuelle [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-05-20

    The main objective of this proposal is to develop fundamental understanding of the role of grain boundaries in stable oxide growth. To understand the process of oxide layer destabilization, it is necessary to observe the early stages of corrosion. During conventional studies in which a sample is exposed and examined after removal from the autoclave, the destabilization process will normally have already taken place, and is only examined post facto. To capture the instants of oxide destabilization, it is necessary to observe it in situ; however, significant questions always arise as to the influence of the corrosion geometry and conditions on the corrosion process. Thus, a combination of post facto examinations and in situ studies is proposed, which also combines state-of-the-art characterization techniques to derive a complete understanding of the destabilization process and the role of grain boundaries.

  1. Fundamental Studies of the Role of Grain Boundaries on Uniform Corrosion of Advanced Nuclear Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, Mitra; Motta, Arthur; Marquis, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this proposal is to develop fundamental understanding of the role of grain boundaries in stable oxide growth. To understand the process of oxide layer destabilization, it is necessary to observe the early stages of corrosion. During conventional studies in which a sample is exposed and examined after removal from the autoclave, the destabilization process will normally have already taken place, and is only examined post facto. To capture the instants of oxide destabilization, it is necessary to observe it in situ; however, significant questions always arise as to the influence of the corrosion geometry and conditions on the corrosion process. Thus, a combination of post facto examinations and in situ studies is proposed, which also combines state-of-the-art characterization techniques to derive a complete understanding of the destabilization process and the role of grain boundaries.

  2. The effect of urea on the corrosion behavior of different dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geckili, Onur; Bilhan, Hakan; Bilgin, Tayfun; Anthony von Fraunhofer, J

    2012-01-01

    Intraoral corrosion of dental alloys has biological, functional, and esthetic consequences. Since it is well known that the salivary urea concentrations undergo changes with various diseases, the present study was undertaken to determine the effect of salivary urea concentrations on the corrosion behavior of commonly used dental casting alloys. Three casting alloys were subjected to polarization scans in synthetic saliva with three different urea concentrations. Cyclic polarization clearly showed that urea levels above 20 mg/100 ml decreased corrosion current densities, increased the corrosion potentials and, at much higher urea levels, the breakdown potentials. The data indicate that elevated urea levels reduced the corrosion susceptibility of all alloys, possibly through adsorption of organics onto the metal surface. This study indicates that corrosion testing performed in sterile saline or synthetic saliva without organic components could be misleading.

  3. Study of corrosion of aluminium alloys of nuclear purity in ordinary water, пart one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of corrosion of aluminum alloys of nuclear purity in ordinary water of the spent fuel storage pool of the RA research reactor at VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences has been examined in the frame work of the International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Project "Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum-Clad Spent Fuel in Water" since 2002. The study presented in this paper comprises activities on determination and monitoring of chemical parameters and radio activity of water and sludge in the RA spent fuel storage pool and results of the initial study of corrosion effects obtained by visual examinations of surfaces of various coupons made of aluminum alloys of nuclear purity of the test racks exposed to the pool water for a period from six months to six years.

  4. Influence of corrosion layers on quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denker, A.; Bohne, W.; Opitz-Coutureau, J.; Rauschenberg, J.; Roehrich, J.; Strub, E.

    2005-01-01

    Art historians and restorers in charge of ancient metal objects are often reluctant to remove the corrosion layer evolved over time, as this would change the appearance of the artefact dramatically. Therefore, when an elemental analysis of the objects is required, this has to be done by penetrating the corrosion layer. In this work the influence of corrosion was studied on Chinese and Roman coins, where removal of oxidized material was possible. Measurements on spots with and without corrosion are presented and the results discussed

  5. Experimental validation of a local dehumidification system based on cold water droplets and air-to-air heat exchanger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.G.O.N.; Hammink, H.A.J.; Hendriksen, L.J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive humidity is a problem in Dutch growing circumstances. A traditional solution is heating and natural ventilation. To save energy a number of energy efficient dehumidification methods are developed, like mechanical ventilation with dry outside air or a curtain of cold water droplets. In this

  6. Investigation on the thermographic detection of corrosion in RC structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantele, Elia A.; Votsis, Renos A.; Kyriakides, Nicholas; Georgiou, Panagiota G.; Ioannou, Fotia G.

    2017-09-01

    Corrosion of the steel reinforcement is the main problem of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Over the past decades, several methods have been developed aiming to detect the corrosion process early in order to minimise the structural damage and consequently the repairing costs. Emphasis was given in developing methods and techniques of non-destructive nature providing fast on-the-spot detection and covering large areas rather that concentrating on single locations. This study, investigates a non-destructive corrosion detection technique for reinforced concrete, which is based on infrared thermography and the difference in thermal characteristics of corroded and non-corroded steel rebars. The technique is based on the principle that corrosion products have poor heat conductivity, and they inhibit the diffusion of heat that is generated in the reinforcing bar due to heating. For the investigation RC specimens, have been constructed in the laboratory using embedded steel bars of different corrosion states. Afterward, one surface of the specimens was heated using an electric device while thermal images were captured at predefined time instants on the opposite surface with an IR camera. The test results showed a clear difference between the thermal characteristics of the corroded and the non-corroded samples, which demonstrates the potential of using thermography in corrosion detection in RC structures.

  7. Ascertaining the international state of the art of PSA methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, J. von

    1998-01-01

    Plant-specific PSAs, to be performed within the framework of the Periodic Safety Review of German Nuclear Power Plants require further development of the methodology. For that purpose foreign PSA-guidelines and PSA-reviewes as well as relevant literature are examined and appropriate insights are adopted within task A.2 of project SR 2096. The main goal of these activities is to achieve a comparison of the state of the art of PSA-methodologies applied abroad and in Germany. The German state of the art refers to the extent as is documented in the German PSA Guide (Leitfaden Probabilistische Sicherheitsanalyse /PSUe97/) which has to be used for the Periodic Safety Review of German Nuclear Power Plants. The structure for the evaluation is based on the working steps of a PSA. In total, according to the objectives of the Periodic Safety Review the German approach for plant-specific PSAs based on the German PSA Guide is conform to the state of the art abroad. Identified deviations in some details are evaluated reflecting the view of GRS. Particular aspects resulting from the evaluation should be considered for further development of the German PSA Guide. (orig.) [de

  8. Plastic heat exchangers: a state-of-the-art review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D; Holtz, R E; Koopman, R N; Marciniak, T J; MacFarlane, D R

    1979-07-01

    Significant increases in energy utilization efficiency can be achieved through the recovery of low-temperature rejected heat. This energy conserving possibility provides incentive for the development of heat exchangers which could be employed in applications where conventional units cannot be used. Some unique anticorrosion and nonstick characteristics of plastics make this material very attractive for heat recovery where condensation, especially sulfuric acid, and fouling occur. Some of the unique characteristics of plastics led to the commercial success of DuPont's heat exchangers utilizing polytetrafluoroethylene (trade name Teflon) tubes. Attributes which were exploited in this application were the extreme chemical inertness of the material and its flexibility, which enabled utilization in odd-shaped spaces. The wide variety of polymeric materials available ensures chemical inertness for almost any application. Lower cost, compoundability with fillers to improve thermal/mechanical properties, and versatile fabrication methods are incentives for many uses. Also, since many plastics resist corrosion, they can be employed in lower temperature applications (< 436 K), where condensation can occur and metal units have been unable to function. It is clear that if application and design can be merged to produce a cost-effective alternate to present methods of handling low-temperature rejected heat, then there is significant incentive for plastic heat exchangers, to replace traditional metallic heat exchangers or to be used in services where metals are totally unsuited.

  9. The effect of heat treatments on the corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bangxin; Zhao Wenjin; Miao Zhi; Pan Shufang; Li Cong; Jiang Yourong

    1996-06-01

    The effect of penultimate annealing temperature and cooling rate on the corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube has been investigated. Both nodular corrosion and uniform corrosion resistance can be improved obviously after changing the heat treatment from the original annealing at 650 degree C to quenching from 830 degree C (upper temperature of alpha phase region or lower temperature of beta phase region). Although the nodular corrosion resistance can be improved obviously after quenching from beta phase, there was a second transition in the variation between weight gain and exposure time, which shows a poor uniform corrosion resistance after a long exposure time during the autoclave tests. The main factor of affecting corrosion behavior is the solid solution contents of Fe and Cr in alpha zirconium rather than the size of second phase particles. About 200 μg/g Fe and Cr super saturated solid solution in alpha zirconium could get good uniform and nodular corrosion resistance, but much more solid solution contents of Fe and Cr in alpha zirconium could bring about a trend toward poor uniform corrosion resistance for long-term exposure time. (14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.)

  10. Development of a novel rotary desiccant cooling cycle with isothermal dehumidification and regenerative evaporative cooling using thermodynamic analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La, D.; Li, Y.; Dai, Y.J.; Ge, T.S.; Wang, R.Z.

    2012-01-01

    A novel rotary desiccant cooling cycle is proposed and studied using thermodynamic analysis method. The proposed cycle integrates the technologies of isothermal dehumidification and regenerative evaporative cooling, which are beneficial for irreversibility reduction. Thermodynamic investigation on the basic rotary desiccant cooling cycle shows that the exergy efficiency of the basic cycle is only 8.6%. The processes of desiccant dehumidification and evaporative cooling, which are essentially the basis for rotary desiccant cooling, affect the exergy performance of the cycle greatly and account for about one third of the total exergy destruction. The proposed cycle has potential to improve rotary desiccant cooling technology. It is advantageous in terms of both heat source utilization rate and space cooling capacity. The exergy efficiency of the new cycle is enhanced significantly to 29.1%, which is about three times that of the ventilation cycle, and 60% higher than that of the two-stage rotary desiccant cooling cycle. Furthermore, the regeneration temperature is reduced from 80 °C to about 60 °C. The corresponding specific exergy of the supply air is increased by nearly 30% when compared with the conventional cycles. -- Highlights: ► A novel rotary desiccant cooling cycle is developed using thermodynamic analysis method. ► Isothermal dehumidification and regenerative evaporative cooling have been integrated. ► The cycle is advantageous in terms of both heat source utilization rate and space cooling capacity. ► Cascaded energy utilization is beneficial for cycle performance improvement. ► Upper limits, which will be helpful to practical design and optimization, are obtained.

  11. The "State of Art" of Organisational Blogging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Gavin J.; Connolly, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the "state of art" of organisational blogging. It also aims to provide a critical review of the literature on organisational blogging and propose recommendations on how to advance the subject area in terms of academic research. Design/methodology/approach: A systematic literature review…

  12. EFFECT OF RATIO OF SURFACE AREA ON THE CORROSION RATE

    OpenAIRE

    Dody Prayitno; M. Irsyad

    2018-01-01

    Aluminum and steel are used to be a construction for a building outdoor panel. Aluminum and steel are connected by bolt and nut. An atmosphere due to a corrosion of the aluminum. The corrosion possibly to cause the hole diameter of bolt and nut to become larger. Thus the bolt and nut can not enough strong to hold the panel. The panel may collapse. The aim of the research is first to answer a question where does the corrosion starts. The second is to know the effect of ratio surface area of st...

  13. Contemporary Romanian Art in the United States1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altman Dana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the recent international interest in contemporary Romanian art and its growth in market share, with a focus on the United States. The theme is followed thorough in numerous museum exhibitions, increased collector following, art fair presence, gallery representation and auction activity initially in Europe and the United States. The phenomenon is discussed both in the context of the larger international movement conducive to the contemporary art price bubble, and in that of the local socio-economic changes. My chief interest lies in the factors leading up to the entry of post 1989 Romanian art in the global arena as a manifestation of market forces in the field. The analysis follows its grass roots local emergence through non-profit institutions, individual artists, small publications, low budget galleries, as well as the lack of contribution (with few notable exceptions of state institutions, while pointing out the national context of increasing deregulation of social support systems resulting in lack of focus on cultural manifestations. The conclusion is that the recent ascent of contemporary Romanian art (and coincidentally, the award winning contemporary Romanian cinematography is a fortuitous convergence of various factors, among which, increased international mobility and sharing. At the same time, it is also the result of the evolution of various individual artists that pursued a form of art rooted in Romanian artistic tradition but with a focus on the symbolic figurative. The result is a personal semiotics of raising the mundane to extraordinary levels that reconfigured the anxiety of entering a new system into an unmistakable and lasting visual language.

  14. Corrosion potential analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Karl F.

    1998-03-01

    Many cities in the northeastern U.S. transport electrical power from place to place via underground cables, which utilize voltages from 68 kv to 348 kv. These cables are placed in seamless steel pipe to protect the conductors. These buried pipe-type-cables (PTCs) are carefully designed and constantly pressurized with transformer oil to prevent any possible contamination. A protective coating placed on the outside diameter of the pipe during manufacture protects the steel pipe from the soil environment. Notwithstanding the protection mechanisms available, the pipes remain vulnerable to electrochemical corrosion processes. If undetected, corrosion can cause the pipes to leak transformer oil into the environment. These leaks can assume serious proportions due to the constant pressure on the inside of the pipe. A need exists for a detection system that can dynamically monitor the corrosive potential on the length of the pipe and dynamically adjust cathodic protection to counter local and global changes in the cathodic environment surrounding the pipes. The northeastern United States contains approximately 1000 miles of this pipe. This milage is critical to the transportation and distribution of power. So critical, that each of the pipe runs has a redundant double running parallel to it. Invocon, Inc. proposed and tested a technically unique and cost effective solution to detect critical corrosion potential and to communicate that information to a central data collection and analysis location. Invocon's solution utilizes the steel of the casing pipe as a communication medium. Each data gathering station on the pipe can act as a relay for information gathered elsewhere on the pipe. These stations must have 'smart' network configuration algorithms that constantly test various communication paths and determine the best and most power efficient route through which information should flow. Each network station also performs data acquisition and analysis tasks that ultimately

  15. Effect of niobium element on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yanping, E-mail: wuyanping-2@126.com; Wu, Quanwen; Zhu, Shengfa, E-mail: zhushf-306@163.com; Pu, Zhen; Zhang, Yanzhi; Wang, Qinguo; Lang, Dingmu; Zhang, Yuping

    2016-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) has many military and civilian uses. However, its high chemical reactivity limits its application. The effect of Nb content on corrosion behavior of DU is evaluated by scanning Kelvin probe and electrochemical corrosion measurements. The Volta potential value of DU and U-2.5 wt% Nb is about the same level, the Volta potential value of U-5.7 wt% Nb has a rise of 370mV{sub SHE} in comparison with DU. The polarization current of U-5.7 wt% Nb alloy is about an order of magnitude of that of DU. The Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} is the protective layer for the U-Nb alloys. The negative potential of Nb-depleted α phase is the main reason of the poor corrosion resistance of DU and U-2.5 wt% Nb alloy. - Highlights: • New method (scanning Kelvin probe) was used to study the corrosion property. • Three types of corrosion morphologies were found after potentiodynamic polarization. • The effect of impurity elements on corrosion property was mentioned. • The corrosion mechanism of DU and U-Nb alloys was discussed.

  16. Mission Accomplished: Working with State Arts Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Johanna Misey

    2005-01-01

    Most everyone involved professionally in the non-profit arts comes in contact with a state arts agency. A person may be on the Teaching Artist roster, works for a grantee organization, or has directly received a grant or fellowship. The work that one does in the school is probably funded by the state arts agency. Or, at a more basic level, the…

  17. Cost, affordability and cost-effectiveness of strategies to control tuberculosis in countries with high HIV prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Brian G

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV epidemic has caused a dramatic increase in tuberculosis (TB in East and southern Africa. Several strategies have the potential to reduce the burden of TB in high HIV prevalence settings, and cost and cost-effectiveness analyses can help to prioritize them when budget constraints exist. However, published cost and cost-effectiveness studies are limited. Methods Our objective was to compare the cost, affordability and cost-effectiveness of seven strategies for reducing the burden of TB in countries with high HIV prevalence. A compartmental difference equation model of TB and HIV and recent cost data were used to assess the costs (year 2003 US$ prices and effects (TB cases averted, deaths averted, DALYs gained of these strategies in Kenya during the period 2004–2023. Results The three lowest cost and most cost-effective strategies were improving TB cure rates, improving TB case detection rates, and improving both together. The incremental cost of combined improvements to case detection and cure was below US$15 million per year (7.5% of year 2000 government health expenditure; the mean cost per DALY gained of these three strategies ranged from US$18 to US$34. Antiretroviral therapy (ART had the highest incremental costs, which by 2007 could be as large as total government health expenditures in year 2000. ART could also gain more DALYs than the other strategies, at a cost per DALY gained of around US$260 to US$530. Both the costs and effects of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection (TLTI for HIV+ individuals were low; the cost per DALY gained ranged from about US$85 to US$370. Averting one HIV infection for less than US$250 would be as cost-effective as improving TB case detection and cure rates to WHO target levels. Conclusion To reduce the burden of TB in high HIV prevalence settings, the immediate goal should be to increase TB case detection rates and, to the extent possible, improve TB cure rates, preferably

  18. Corrosion in marine atmospheres. Effect of distance from the coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chico, B.; Otero, E.; Morcillos, M.; Mariaca, L.

    1998-01-01

    In marine atmospheres the deposition of saline particles on the surface of metals intensifies the metallic corrosion process. However, quantitative information about the effect of atmospheric salinity on metallic corrosion is very scarce. This paper reports the relationship between salinity and metallic corrosion, where a clear linear relation (r=0.97) has been found for a broad interval of salinities (4-500 mg Cl''-/m''2.d), as well as the relationship between salinity (or metallic corrosion) and distance from the coast. A hyperbolic function seems to be established both variables; there is an exponential drop in salinity (or corrosion) as shoreline distance increases tending towards and asymptotic value. The study has been based on information obtained from field research conducted at a marine atmosphere in Tarragona (Spain) and data compiled from the literature. (Author) 14 refs

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cardiovascular system: present state of the art and future potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    State-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) generates high-resolution images of the cardiovascular system. Conventional MRI techniques provide images in six to ten minutes per tomographic slice. New strategies have substantially improved the speed of imaging. The technology is relatively expensive, and its cost-effectiveness remains to be defined in relation to other effective, less expensive, and noninvasive technologies, such as echocardiography and nuclear medicine. The ultimate role of MRI will depend on several factors, including the development of specific applications such as (1) noninvasive angiography, especially of the coronary arteries;(2) noninvasive, high-resolution assessment of regional myocardial blood flow distribution (e.g., using paramagnetic contrast agents); (3) characterization of myocardial diseases using proton-relaxation property changes; and (4) evaluation of in vivo myocardial biochemistry. The three-dimensional imaging capability and the ability to image cardiovascular structures without contrast material give MRI a potential advantage over existing noninvasive diagnostic imaging techniques. This report analyzes current applications of MRI to the cardiovascular system and speculates on their future

  20. Study on corrosion of thermal power plant condenser tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Abdolreza Rashidi; Zhaam, Ali Akbar [Niroo Research Institute, end of Poonak Bakhtari blvd., Shahrak Ghods, Tehran (Iran)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study kinds of corrosion mechanisms in thermal power plant condenser tubes. Condenser is a shell and tube heat exchanger in which cooling water flows through its tubes. While the steam from low pressure turbine passes within condenser tubes, it is condensed by cooling water. The exhausted steam from low pressure turbine is condensed on external surface of condenser tubes and heat is transferred to cooling water which flow into tubes. Tubes composition is usually copper-based alloys, stainless steel or titanium. Annual damages due to corrosion cause much cost for replacement and repairing metallic equipment and installations in electric power industry. Because of existence of different contaminants in water and steam cycle, condenser tubes surfaces are exposed to corrosion. Contaminants like oxygen, carbon dioxide, chloride ion and ammonia in water and steam cycle originate several damages such as pitting and crevice corrosion, erosion, galvanic attack, SCC, condensed corrosion, de-alloying in thermal power plant condenser. The paper first states how corrosion damage takes place in condensers and then introduces types of usual alloys used in condensers and also their corrosion behavior. In continuation, a brief explanation is presented about kinds of condenser failures due to corrosion. Then, causes and locations of different mechanisms of corrosion events on condenser tubes and effects of different parameters such as composition, temperature, chloride and sulfide ion concentration, pH, water velocity and biological precipitation are examined and finally protection methods are indicated. Also some photos of tubes specimens related to power plants are studied and described in each case of mentioned mechanisms. (authors)

  1. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of community-based support for adolescents receiving antiretroviral treatment: an operational research study in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatti, Geoffrey; Jackson, Debra; Goga, Ameena E; Shaikh, Najma; Eley, Brian; Nachega, Jean B; Grimwood, Ashraf

    2018-02-01

    Adolescents and youth receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa have high attrition and inadequate ART outcomes, and evaluations of interventions improving ART outcomes amongst adolescents are very limited. Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target 3c is to substantially increase the health workforce in developing countries. We measured the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of community-based support (CBS) provided by lay health workers for adolescents and youth receiving ART in South Africa. A retrospective cohort study including adolescents and youth who initiated ART at 47 facilities. Previously unemployed CBS-workers provided home-based ART-related education, psychosocial support, symptom screening for opportunistic infections and support to access government grants. Outcomes were compared between participants who received CBS plus standard clinic-based care versus participants who received standard care only. Cumulative incidences of all-cause mortality and loss to follow-up (LTFU), adherence measured using medication possession ratios (MPRs), CD4 count slope, and virological suppression were analysed using multivariable Cox, competing-risks regression, generalized estimating equations and mixed-effects models over five years of ART. An expenditure approach was used to determine the incremental cost of CBS to usual care from a provider perspective. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated as annual cost per patient-loss (through death or LTFU) averted. Amongst 6706 participants included, 2100 (31.3%) received CBS. Participants who received CBS had reduced mortality, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 0.52 (95% CI: 0.37 to 0.73; p effectiveness of CBS in reducing attrition ranged from 42.2% after one year to 35.9% after five years. Virological suppression was similar after three years, but after five years 18.8% CBS participants versus 37.2% non-CBS participants failed to achieve viral suppression, adjusted odds ratio = 0

  2. Development of an active solar humidification-dehumidification (HDH) desalination system integrated with geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elminshawy, Nabil A.S.; Siddiqui, Farooq R.; Addas, Mohammad F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Productivity increases with increasing geothermal water flow rate up to 0.15 kg/s. • Geothermal energy increases productivity by 187–465% when used with solar energy. • Daytime experimental productivity (8AM-5PM) up to 104 L/m"2 was achieved. • Daily experimental productivity (24 h) up to 192 L/m"2 was achieved. • Fresh potable water can be produced at 0.003 USD/L using this desalination setup. - Abstract: This paper investigates the technical and economic feasibility of using a hybrid solar-geothermal energy source in a humidification-dehumidification (HDH) desalination system. The newly developed HDH system is a modified solar still with air blower and condenser used at its inlet and outlet respectively. A geothermal water tank in a temperature range 60–80 °C which imitates a low-grade geothermal energy source was used to supply heat to water inside the humidification chamber. The experiments were conducted in January 2015 under the climatological conditions of Madinah (latitude: 24°33′N, longitude: 39°36′0″E), Saudi Arabia to study the effect of geothermal water temperature and flow rate on the performance and productivity of proposed desalination system. Analytical model was also developed to compare the effect of solar energy and combined solar-geothermal energy on accumulated productivity. Daytime experimental accumulated productivity up to 104 L/m"2 and daily average gained output ratio (GOR) in the range 1.2–1.58 was achieved using the proposed desalination system. Cost of fresh water produced using the presented desalination system is 0.003 USD/L.

  3. Is Myomectomy Prior to Assisted Reproductive Technology Cost Effective in Women with Intramural Fibroids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo-Carons, Mary; Mumford, Sunni L; Armstrong, Alicia Y; DeCherney, Alan H; Devine, Kate

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the cost effectiveness of surgery to remove intramural (IM) fibroids prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART). The decision tree mathematical model along with sensitivity analysis was performed to analyze cost effectiveness of: (1) myomectomy followed by ART or (2) ART with IM myoma(s) in situ. At the median ongoing pregnancy (OP) rate (OPR) reported in the literature for a fresh, autologous ART cycle with IM fibroids in situ vs. post-IM myomectomy, average cost per OP was $72,355 vs. 66,075, indicating a cost savings with myomectomy. Sensitivity analysis over the range of reported OPRs demonstrated that pre-ART IM myomectomy was always cost effective when OPR among women with in situ myomas was ART IM myomectomy was only cost effective if it increased OPR by at least 9.6%. At the high end of OPRs reported for patients with IM myomas in situ (31.4%), a 19.5% improvement in OPR was needed to justify IM myomectomy from a cost perspective. Myomectomy should be used sparingly in cases where the goal of surgery is to achieve improvement in the outcomes of ART. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. For What Purpose the Arts? An Analysis of the Mission Statements of Urban Arts High Schools in Canada and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaztambide-Fernández, Rubén; Nicholls, Rachael; Arráiz-Matute, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    While general arts programs have declined in many schools across the United States and Canada, the number of specialized art programs in public secondary schools has swelled since the 1980s. While this increase is often celebrated by arts educators, questions about the justification of specialized arts programs are rarely raised, and their value…

  5. Investigation on the of effect of self assembling molecules on the corrosion resistance of the 1050 aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szurkalo, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    Surface treatments are widely used to increase the corrosion resistance of metallic materials. Specifically for aluminum and aluminum alloys, treatment with hexavalent chromium is one of the most used, due to its efficiency and ease of application. However, because of environmental restrictions and the high cost involved in the treatments of waste generated in this process, alternative methods for its replacement are necessary. In this context, this study investigated the effect of the surface treatment with self-assembling molecules (SAM) based on phosphonate compounds on the corrosion of the 1050 aluminum alloy. The conditions adopted for the SAM treatment were determined by conductivity and contact angle measurements, besides electrochemical experiments. Electrochemical techniques, specifically: measurement of the open circuit potential (OCP) variation with time, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curves were used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the 1050 aluminum alloy exposed to SAM treatment The experimental impedance diagrams were interpreted using equivalent electrical circuit models that simulate film that is formed on the alloy surface. The results of the samples treated with SAM were compared with those of samples either without any treatment or treated with chromatizing conversion coating with Cr(VI) and showed that the first treatment significantly increased the corrosion resistance of the aluminum alloy and approached that of chromatizing with Cr(VI) process. (author)

  6. Evaluation of the flow-accelerated corrosion downstream of an orifice. 2. Measurement of corrosion rate and evaluation on the effects of the flow field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaya, Yukinori; Utanohara, Yoichi; Nakamura, Akira; Murase, Michio

    2008-01-01

    In this study, in order to evaluate the effects of flow field on corrosion rate due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC), a corrosion rate downstream of an orifice was measured using the electric resistance method. The diameter of the pipe is 50 mm and that of the orifice is 24.3 mm, and flow velocity of the experimental loop was set at 5m/s, and the temperature of water was controlled within ±1 at 150deg-C. There were no significant circumferential difference in measured corrosion rate, and the maximum corrosion rate was observed at 1D or 2D downstream from the orifice. The ratios of the measured corrosion rate and the calculated wall shear stress at the 1D downstream from the orifice to the value at upstream under well developed flow agreed well. (author)

  7. The Effect of Corrosion on the Seismic Behavior of Buried Pipelines and a Remedy for Their Seismic Retrofit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Mahmood; Salek, Shamila; Moradi, Masoud

    2008-01-01

    The effect of corrosion phenomenon has been investigated by performing some sets of 3-Dimensional Nonlinear Time History Analysis (3-D NLTHA) in which soil structure interaction as well as wave propagation effects have been taken into consideration. The 3-D NLTHA has been performed by using a finite element computer program, and both states of overall and local corrosions have been considered for the study. The corrosion has been modeled in the computer program by introducing decreased values of either pipe wall thickness or modulus of elasticity and Poisson ratio. Three sets of 3-component accelerograms have been used in analyses, and some appropriate numbers of zeros have been added at the beginning of records to take into account the wave propagation in soil and its multi-support excitation effect. The soil has been modeled by nonlinear springs in longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. A relatively long segment of the pipeline has been considered for the study and the effect of end conditions has been investigated by assuming different kinds end supports for the segment. After studying the corroded pipeline, a remedy has been considered for the seismic retrofit of corroded pipe by using a kind of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) cover. The analyses have been repeated for the retrofitted pipeline to realize the adequacy of FRP cover. Numerical results show that if the length of the pipeline segment is large enough, comparing to the wave length of shear wave in the soil, the end conditions do not have any major effect on the maximum stress and strain values in the pipe. Results also show that corrosion can lead to the increase in plastic strain values in the pipe up to 4 times in the case of overall corrosion and up to 20 times in the case of local corrosion. The satisfactory effect of using FRP cover is also shown by the analyses results, which confirm the decrease of strain values to 1/3

  8. The Effect of Corrosion on the Seismic Behavior of Buried Pipelines and a Remedy for Their Seismic Retrofit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mahmood; Salek, Shamila; Moradi, Masoud

    2008-07-01

    The effect of corrosion phenomenon has been investigated by performing some sets of 3-Dimensional Nonlinear Time History Analysis (3-D NLTHA) in which soil structure interaction as well as wave propagation effects have been taken into consideration. The 3-D NLTHA has been performed by using a finite element computer program, and both states of overall and local corrosions have been considered for the study. The corrosion has been modeled in the computer program by introducing decreased values of either pipe wall thickness or modulus of elasticity and Poisson ratio. Three sets of 3-component accelerograms have been used in analyses, and some appropriate numbers of zeros have been added at the beginning of records to take into account the wave propagation in soil and its multi-support excitation effect. The soil has been modeled by nonlinear springs in longitudinal, lateral, and vertical directions. A relatively long segment of the pipeline has been considered for the study and the effect of end conditions has been investigated by assuming different kinds end supports for the segment. After studying the corroded pipeline, a remedy has been considered for the seismic retrofit of corroded pipe by using a kind of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) cover. The analyses have been repeated for the retrofitted pipeline to realize the adequacy of FRP cover. Numerical results show that if the length of the pipeline segment is large enough, comparing to the wave length of shear wave in the soil, the end conditions do not have any major effect on the maximum stress and strain values in the pipe. Results also show that corrosion can lead to the increase in plastic strain values in the pipe up to 4 times in the case of overall corrosion and up to 20 times in the case of local corrosion. The satisfactory effect of using FRP cover is also shown by the analyses results, which confirm the decrease of strain values to 1/3.

  9. A new corrosion monitoring technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Gerald K.

    2000-01-01

    Internal Corrosion Monitoring has relied upon 5 basic techniques. Little improvement in performance has been achieved in any of these. Many newer internal corrosion monitoring techniques have proved of little value in the field although some have instances of success in the laboratory. Industry has many high value hydrocarbon applications requiring corrosion rate monitoring for real-time problem solving and control. The high value of assets and the cost of asset replacement makes it necessary to practice cost effective process and corrosion control with sensitivity beyond the 5 basic techniques. This new metal loss technology offers this sensitivity. Traditional metal loss technology today provides either high sensitivity with short life, or conversely, long life but with substantially reduced sensitivity. The new metal loss technology offers an improved working life of sensors without significantly compromising performance. The paper discusses the limitations of existing on-line technologies and describes the performance of a new technology. This new metal loss technology was introduced at NACE Corrosion 99'. Since that time several field projects have been completed or are ongoing. This paper will discuss the new metal loss technology and report on some of the data that has been obtained.(author)

  10. Effects of electrodeposition potential on the corrosion properties of bis-1,2-[triethoxysilyl] ethane films on aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiming; Liu Liang; Zhang Jianqing; Cao Chunan

    2006-01-01

    Bis-1,2-[triethoxysilyl] ethane (BTSE) films were prepared on 2024-T3 alloys by using potentiostatic method for corrosion protection. This work mainly investigated the effects of electrodeposition potential on the corrosion properties of silane films. Films prepared at cathodic potentials display an improvement in corrosion inhibition properties, while those prepared at anodic potentials present the deterioration of protectiveness. In the case of cathodic deposition, when the potential shifts negatively from the open-circuit potential (OCP), corrosion protection of the obtained films initially increases and then decreases, with the optimal deposition potential at -0.8 V/SCE. As indicated in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, films deposited at the optimum potential present the most uniform and compact morphologies. In addition, steady-state polarization and current-time curves have been also recorded on Al alloys in BTSE solutions during the deposition, respectively

  11. State of the social responsibility art

    OpenAIRE

    Varela López, Leidy Viviana; Universidad de San Buenaventura Cali.

    2015-01-01

    From the eighties, it has been addressing the issue of corporate social responsibility, specifically toward the defense of human rights and climate change. However, although they have applied corporate social responsibility principles in some of the existing institutions, it is still very small the work being done around the specific activity of solid waste management. Some works have been compiled to build a state of the art for understanding in depth the concept of corporate social responsi...

  12. Effects of chemical composition on the corrosion of dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galo, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Rocha, Luís Augusto; de Mattos, Maria da Glória Chiarello

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the oral environment on the corrosion of dental alloys with different compositions, using electrochemical methods. The corrosion rates were obtained from the current-potential curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of artificial saliva on the corrosion of dental alloys was dependent on alloy composition. Dissolution of the ions occurred in all tested dental alloys and the results were strongly dependent on the general alloy composition. Regarding the alloys containing nickel, the Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Ti alloys released 0.62 mg/L of Ni on average, while the Co-Cr dental alloy released ions between 0.01 and 0.03 mg/L of Co and Cr, respectively.The open-circuit potential stabilized at a higher level with lower deviation (standard deviation: Ni-Cr-6Ti = 32 mV/SCE and Co-Cr = 54 mV/SCE). The potenciodynamic curves of the dental alloys showed that the Ni-based dental alloy with >70 wt% of Ni had a similar curve and the Co-Cr dental alloy showed a low current density and hence a high resistance to corrosion compared with the Ni-based dental alloys. Some changes in microstructure were observed and this fact influenced the corrosion behavior for the alloys. The lower corrosion resistance also led to greater release of nickel ions to the medium. The quantity of Co ions released from the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was relatively small in the solutions. In addition, the quantity of Cr ions released into the artificial saliva from the Co-Cr alloy was lower than Cr release from the Ni-based dental alloys.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of early initiation of first-line combination antiretroviral therapy in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sempa Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ugandan national guidelines recommend initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART at CD4+ T cell (CD4 count below 350 cell/μl, but the implementation of this is limited due to availability of medication. However, cART initiation at higher CD4 count increases survival, albeit at higher lifetime treatment cost. This analysis evaluates the cost-effectiveness of initiating cART at a CD4 count between 250–350 cell/μl (early versus Methods Life expectancy of cART-treated patients, conditional on baseline CD4 count, was modeled based on published literature. First-line cART costs $192 annually, with an additional $113 for patient monitoring. Delaying initiation of cART until the CD4 count falls below 250 cells/μl would incur the cost of the bi-annual CD4 count tests and routine maintenance care at $85 annually. We compared lifetime treatment costs and disability adjusted life-expectancy between early vs. delayed cART for ten baseline CD4 count ranges from 250-350 cell/μl. All costs and benefits were discounted at 3% annually. Results Treatment delay varied from 6–18 months. Early cART initiation increased life expectancy from 1.5-3.5 years and averted 1.33–3.10 disability adjusted life years (DALY’s per patient. Lifetime treatment costs were $4,300–$5,248 for early initiation and $3,940–$4,435 for delayed initiation. The cost/DALY averted of the early versus delayed start ranged from $260–$270. Conclusions In HIV-positive patients presenting with CD4 count between 250-350 cells/μl, immediate initiation of cART is a highly cost-effective strategy using the recommended one-time per capita GDP threshold of $490 reported for Uganda. This would constitute an efficient use of scarce health care funds.

  14. Corrosion fatigue of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaehn, H.; Wagner, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue phenomena can be classified into two main groups according to the electrochemical state of the metal surface in the presence of electrolytes: the active and the passive state with an important sub-group of corrosion fatigue in the unstable passive state. The allowable stress for structures exposed to the conjoint action of corrosion and fatigue is influenced by many factors: kind of media, number of cycles, frequency, mean stress, size, notches, loading mode, alloy composition and mechanical strength. A critical literature review shows contradictory results if a classification by the electrochemical surface state is not applied. Case histories and counter measures illustrate the practical importance of corrosion fatigue in many branches of industry as well as the urgent need for a better knowledge about the mutual influence of the phenomena to get rules by which the engineer can appraise the risk of corrosion fatigue. (orig.) [de

  15. State of the art report on design for X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papanikolaou, Apostolos; Andersen, Poul; Kristensen, Hans Otto Holmegaard

    2009-01-01

    The present State of the Art report aims at defining and reviewing the curent state of the ship design process in the frame of a holistic approach, accounting for various objectives and constraints. The report addresses mainly the design of transportation carriers, though some covered aspects...

  16. Effect of hydrogen on the corrosion behavior of the Mg–xZn alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingwei Song

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen evolution reaction is inevitable during the corrosion of Mg alloys. The effect of hydrogen on the corrosion behavior of the Mg–2Zn and Mg–5Zn alloys is investigated by charging hydrogen treatment. The surface morphologies of the samples after charging hydrogen were observed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM and the corrosion resistance was evaluated by polarization curves. It is found that there are oxide films formed on the surface of the charged hydrogen samples. The low hydrogen evolution rate is helpful to improve the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys, while the high hydrogen evolution rate can increases the defects in the films and further deteriorates their protection ability. Also, the charging hydrogen effect is greatly associated with the microstructure of Mg substrate.

  17. A State of the Art Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahangiri, Tohid; Bak, Claus Leth; Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da

    2015-01-01

    The first EHV composite cross-arms have been used since late 1990's in Switzerland. It was the first step to the compaction of towers sizes. Since then, significant advances have been made in composite cross-arms technology while the lattice construction technique has not been seriously challenged...... of EHV composite cross-arms and lightning protection methods are reviewed based on the state of the art review and subsequently some solutions are presented to overcome the two main challenges....

  18. State-of-the-Art Methods for Brain Tissue Segmentation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dora, Lingraj; Agrawal, Sanjay; Panda, Rutuparna; Abraham, Ajith

    2017-01-01

    Brain tissue segmentation is one of the most sought after research areas in medical image processing. It provides detailed quantitative brain analysis for accurate disease diagnosis, detection, and classification of abnormalities. It plays an essential role in discriminating healthy tissues from lesion tissues. Therefore, accurate disease diagnosis and treatment planning depend merely on the performance of the segmentation method used. In this review, we have studied the recent advances in brain tissue segmentation methods and their state-of-the-art in neuroscience research. The review also highlights the major challenges faced during tissue segmentation of the brain. An effective comparison is made among state-of-the-art brain tissue segmentation methods. Moreover, a study of some of the validation measures to evaluate different segmentation methods is also discussed. The brain tissue segmentation, content in terms of methodologies, and experiments presented in this review are encouraging enough to attract researchers working in this field.

  19. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentacosta, Natasha; Graham, William C; Gersoff, Wayne K

    2016-06-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation has evolved over the years to provide a state-of-the-art technique for the sports medicine surgeon to utilize in preserving contact mechanics and function of the knee in irreparable meniscal pathology. However, this procedure continues to spark considerable debate on proper tissue processing techniques, acceptable indications, methods of implantation, and potential long-term outcomes.

  20. Corrosion probe. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    Over 253 million liters of high-level waste (HLW) generated from plutonium production is stored in mild steel tanks at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Corrosion monitoring of double-shell storage tanks (DSTs) is currently performed at Hanford using a combination of process knowledge and tank waste sampling and analysis. Available technologies for corrosion monitoring have progressed to a point where it is feasible to monitor and control corrosion by on-line monitoring of the corrosion process and direct addition of corrosion inhibitors. The electrochemical noise (EN) technique deploys EN-based corrosion monitoring probes into storage tanks. This system is specifically designed to measure corrosion rates and detect changes in waste chemistry that trigger the onset of pitting and cracking. These on-line probes can determine whether additional corrosion inhibitor is required and, if so, provide information on an effective end point to the corrosion inhibitor addition procedure. This report describes the technology, its performance, its application, costs, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned

  1. Cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus vaccination for adolescent girls in Punjab state: Implications for India's universal immunization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Shankar; Bahuguna, Pankaj; Faujdar, Dharmjeet Singh; Jyani, Gaurav; Srinivasan, Radhika; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Suri, Vanita; Singh, Mini P; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-09-01

    Introduction of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for adolescent girls is being considered in the Punjab state of India. However, evidence regarding cost-effectiveness is sought by policy makers when making this decision. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained with introduction of the HPV vaccine compared with a no-vaccination scenario. A static progression model, using a combination of decision tree and Markov models, was populated using epidemiological, cost, coverage, and effectiveness data to determine the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination. Using a societal perspective, lifetime costs and consequences (in terms of QALYs) among a cohort of 11-year-old adolescent girls in Punjab state were modeled in 2 alternate scenarios with and without vaccination. All costs and consequences were discounted at a rate of 3%. Although immunizing 1 year's cohort of 11-year-old girls in Punjab state costs Indian National Rupees (INR) 135 million (US dollars [USD] 2.08 million and International dollars [Int$] 6.25 million) on an absolute basis, its net cost after accounting for treatment savings is INR 38 million (USD 0.58 million and Int$ 1.76 million). Incremental cost per QALY gained for HPV vaccination was found to be INR 73 (USD 1.12 and Int$ 3.38). Given all the data uncertainties, there is a 90% probability for the vaccination strategy to be cost-effective in Punjab state at a willingness-to-pay threshold of INR 10,000, which is less than one-tenth of the per capita gross domestic product. HPV vaccination appears to be a very cost-effective strategy for Punjab state, and is likely to be cost-effective for other Indian states. Cancer 2017;123:3253-60. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  2. State of the ART: clinical efficacy and improved quality of life in the public antiretroviral therapy program, Free State province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, E; Van Loon, F; Van Rensburg, D; Meulemans, H

    2009-11-01

    The South African public-sector antiretroviral treatment (ART) program has yielded promising early results. To extend and reinforce these preliminary findings, we undertook a detailed assessment of the clinical efficacy and outcomes over two years of ART. The primary objective was to assess the clinical outcomes and adverse effects of two years of ART, while identifying the possible effects of baseline health and patient characteristics. A secondary objective was to address the interplay between positive and negative outcomes (clinical benefits versus adverse effects) in terms of the patients' physical and emotional quality of life (QoL). Clinical outcome, baseline characteristics, health status, and physical and emotional QoL scores were determined from clinical files and interviews with 268 patients enrolled in the Free State ART program at three time points (6, 12, and 24 months of ART). Age, sex, education, and baseline health (CD4 cell count and viral load) were all independently associated with the ART outcome in the early stages of treatment, but their impact diminished as the treatment progressed. The number of patients classified as treatment successes increased over the first two years of ART, whereas the proportion of patients experiencing adverse effects diminished. Importantly, our findings show that ART had strong and stable positive effects on physical and emotional QoL. These favorable results demonstrate that a well-managed public-sector ART program can be very successful within a high-HIV-prevalence resource-limited setting. This finding emphasizes the need to adopt treatment scale-up as a key policy priority, while at the same time ensuring that the highest standards of healthcare provision are maintained. Healthcare services should also target vulnerable groups (males, less-educated patients, those with low baseline CD4 cell counts, and high baseline viral loads) who are most likely to experience treatment failure.

  3. Effect of Sn4+ Additives on the Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Anodic Coating Formed on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy in Alkaline Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, S. A.; Kuroda, K.; Saito, N.; Okido, M.

    Magnesium is the lightest structural metal with high specific strength and good mechanical properties. However, poor corrosion resistance limits its widespread use in many applications. Magnesium is usually treated with Chromate conversion coatings. However, due to changing environmental regulations and pollution prevention requirements, a significant push exists to find new, alternative for poisonous Cr6+. Therefore, we aim to improve corrosion resistance of anodic coatings on AZ31 alloys using low cost non-chromate electrolyte. Anodizing was carried out in alkaline solutions with tin additives. The effect of tin additives on the coating film was characterized by SEM and XRD. The corrosion resistance was evaluated using anodic and cathodic polarizations and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Corrosion resistance property was improved with tin additives and the best anti-corrosion property was obtained with addition of 0.03 M Na2SnO3.3H2O to anodizing solution.

  4. State of the art report on aging reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Yeong; Yang, Joon Eon; Han, Sang Hoon; Ha, Jae Joo

    2002-03-01

    The goal of this report is to describe the state of the art on aging analysis methods to calculate the effects of component aging quantitatively. In this report, we described some aging analysis methods which calculate the increase of Core Damage Frequency (CDF) due to aging by including the influence of aging into PSA. We also described several research topics required for aging analysis for components of domestic NPPs. We have described a statistical model and reliability physics model which calculate the effect of aging quantitatively by using PSA method. It is expected that the practical use of the reliability-physics model will be increased though the process with the reliability-physics model is more complicated than statistical model

  5. Structural Effects of Reinforced Concrete Beam Due to Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Idris, Nur'ain; Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Sarpin, Norliana; Zainal, Rozlin; Kasim, Narimah

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete is one of the main issues among construction stakeholders. The main consequences of steel corrosion include loss of cross section of steel area, generation of expansive pressure which caused cracking of concrete, spalling and delaminating of the concrete cover. Thus, it reduces the bond strength between the steel reinforcing bar and concrete, and deteriorating the strength of the structure. The objective of this study is to investigate the structural effects of corrosion damage on the performance of reinforced concrete beam. A series of corroded reinforced concrete beam with a corrosion rate of 0%, 20% and 40% of rebar corrosion is used in parametric study to assess the influence of different level of corrosion rate to the structural performance. As a result, the used of interface element in the finite element modelling predicted the worst case of corrosion analysis since cracks is induced and generate at this surface. On the other hand, a positive linear relationship was sketched between the increase of expansive pressure and the corrosion rate. Meanwhile, the gradient of the graph is decreased with the increase of steel bar diameter. Furthermore, the analysis shows that there is a significant effect on the load bearing capacity of the structure where the higher corrosion rate generates a higher stress concentration at the mid span of the beam. This study could predict the residual strength of reinforced concrete beam under the corrosion using the finite element analysis. The experimental validation is needed on the next stage to investigate the quantitative relation between the corrosion rate and its influence on the mechanical properties.

  6. Bridge maintenance to enhance corrosion resistance and performance of steel girder bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran Yanez, Luis M.

    The integrity and efficiency of any national highway system relies on the condition of the various components. Bridges are fundamental elements of a highway system, representing an important investment and a strategic link that facilitates the transport of persons and goods. The cost to rehabilitate or replace a highway bridge represents an important expenditure to the owner, who needs to evaluate the correct time to assume that cost. Among the several factors that affect the condition of steel highway bridges, corrosion is identified as the main problem. In the USA corrosion is the primary cause of structurally deficient steel bridges. The benefit of regular high-pressure superstructure washing and spot painting were evaluated as effective maintenance activities to reduce the corrosion process. The effectiveness of steel girder washing was assessed by developing models of corrosion deterioration of composite steel girders and analyzing steel coupons at the laboratory under atmospheric corrosion for two alternatives: when high-pressure washing was performed and when washing was not considered. The effectiveness of spot painting was assessed by analyzing the corrosion on steel coupons, with small damages, unprotected and protected by spot painting. A parametric analysis of corroded steel girder bridges was considered. The emphasis was focused on the parametric analyses of corroded steel girder bridges under two alternatives: (a) when steel bridge girder washing is performed according to a particular frequency, and (b) when no bridge washing is performed to the girders. The reduction of structural capacity was observed for both alternatives along the structure service life, estimated at 100 years. An economic analysis, using the Life-Cycle Cost Analysis method, demonstrated that it is more cost-effective to perform steel girder washing as a scheduled maintenance activity in contrast to the no washing alternative.

  7. Effect of Al and Ce oxide layers electrodeposited on OC4004 stainless steel on its corrosion characteristics in acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyanova, E.; Nikolova, D.; Stoychev, D.; Stefanov, P.; Marinova, T.

    2006-01-01

    The changes in the corrosion characteristics of stainless steel OC4004 in 0.1 M HNO 3 after electrodeposition of thin Al and Ce oxide films on it has been investigated. The Ce 2 O 3 -CeO 2 layers have been found to possess a pronounced stabilizing effect on the steel passive state and on its corrosion resistance, respectively, whereas the Al 2 O 3 layers do not improve considerably the corrosion behaviour of the SS/Al 2 O 3 system. A twice-lower corrosion current was observed with a ternary SS/Al 2 O 3 /Ce 2 O 3 -CeO 2 system in the passive region, while the zones of potentials, where the steel is in a stable passive state, are not changed. The obtained results permit the assumption that the cerium oxides layer acts as an effective cathode playing a determining role with respect to the improvement of the corrosion behavior of the steel. It has been concluded that when the SS/Al 2 O 3 /Ce 2 O 3 -CeO 2 system is used in media containing nitric acid, the corrosion will proceed at potentials where the passive state of steel would not be disturbed

  8. Multi-Country Analysis of Treatment Costs for HIV/AIDS (MATCH): Facility-Level ART Unit Cost Analysis in Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagar, Elya; Sundaram, Maaya; Condliffe, Kate; Matatiyo, Blackson; Chimbwandira, Frank; Chilima, Ben; Mwanamanga, Robert; Moyo, Crispin; Chitah, Bona Mukosha; Nyemazi, Jean Pierre; Assefa, Yibeltal; Pillay, Yogan; Mayer, Sam; Shear, Lauren; Dain, Mary; Hurley, Raphael; Kumar, Ritu; McCarthy, Thomas; Batra, Parul; Gwinnell, Dan; Diamond, Samantha; Over, Mead

    2014-01-01

    Background Today's uncertain HIV funding landscape threatens to slow progress towards treatment goals. Understanding the costs of antiretroviral therapy (ART) will be essential for governments to make informed policy decisions about the pace of scale-up under the 2013 WHO HIV Treatment Guidelines, which increase the number of people eligible for treatment from 17.6 million to 28.6 million. The study presented here is one of the largest of its kind and the first to describe the facility-level cost of ART in a random sample of facilities in Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia. Methods & Findings In 2010–2011, comprehensive data on one year of facility-level ART costs and patient outcomes were collected from 161 facilities, selected using stratified random sampling. Overall, facility-level ART costs were significantly lower than expected in four of the five countries, with a simple average of $208 per patient-year (ppy) across Ethiopia, Malawi, Rwanda and Zambia. Costs were higher in South Africa, at $682 ppy. This included medications, laboratory services, direct and indirect personnel, patient support, equipment and administrative services. Facilities demonstrated the ability to retain patients alive and on treatment at these costs, although outcomes for established patients (2–8% annual loss to follow-up or death) were better than outcomes for new patients in their first year of ART (77–95% alive and on treatment). Conclusions This study illustrated that the facility-level costs of ART are lower than previously understood in these five countries. While limitations must be considered, and costs will vary across countries, this suggests that expanded treatment coverage may be affordable. Further research is needed to understand investment costs of treatment scale-up, non-facility costs and opportunities for more efficient resource allocation. PMID:25389777

  9. [Analysis of costs and cost-effectiveness of preferred GESIDA/National AIDS Plan regimens for initial antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus infected adult patients in 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Antonio Javier; Llibre, Josep M; Arribas, José Ramón; Boix, Vicente; Clotet, Bonaventura; Domingo, Pere; González-García, Juan; Knobel, Hernando; López, Juan Carlos; Lozano, Fernando; Miró, José M; Podzamczer, Daniel; Santamaría, Juan Miguel; Tuset, Montserrat; Zamora, Laura; Lázaro, Pablo; Gatell, Josep M

    2013-11-01

    The GESIDA and National AIDS Plan panel of experts have proposed "preferred regimens" of antiretroviral treatment (ART) as initial therapy in HIV infected patients for 2013. The objective of this study is to evaluate the costs and effectiveness of initiating treatment with these "preferred regimens". An economic assessment of costs and effectiveness (cost/effectiveness) was performed using decision tree analysis models. Effectiveness was defined as the probability of having viral load <50copies/mL at week48, in an intention-to-treat analysis. Cost of initiating treatment with an ART regime was defined as the costs of ART and its consequences (adverse effects, changes of ART regime and drug resistance analyses) during the first 48weeks. The perspective of the analysis is that of the National Health System was applied, only taking into account differential direct costs: ART (official prices), management of adverse effects, resistance studies, and determination of HLA B*5701. The setting is Spain and the costs are those of 2013. A sensitivity deterministic analysis was performed, constructing three scenarios for each regimen: baseline, most favourable, and most unfavourable cases. In the baseline case scenario, the cost of initiating treatment ranges from 6,747euros for TDF/FTC+NVP to 12,059euros for TDF/FTC+RAL. The effectiveness ranges between 0.66 for ABC/3TC+LPV/r and ABC/3TC+ATV/r, and 0.87 for TDF/FTC+RAL and ABC/3TC+RAL. Effectiveness, in terms of cost/effectiveness, varies between 8,396euros and 13,930euros per responder at 48weeks, for TDF/FTC/RPV and TDF/FTC+RAL, respectively. Taking