WorldWideScience

Sample records for state resolved photodissociation

  1. State-resolved Photodissociation and Radiative Association Data for the Molecular Hydrogen Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammit, Mark C.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Colgan, James; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Kilcrease, David P.; Bray, Igor; Fontes, Christopher J.; Hakel, Peter; Timmermans, Eddy

    2017-12-01

    We present state-resolved (electronic, vibrational, and rotational) cross sections and rate coefficients for the photodissociation (PD) of {{{H}}}2+ and radiative association (RA) of H–H+. We developed a fully quantum mechanical approach within the nonrelativistic Born–Oppenheimer approximation to describe {{{H}}}2+ and calculate the data for transitions between the ground electronic state 1s{σ }g and the 2p{σ }u, 2p{π }u, 3p{σ }u, 3p{π }u, 4p{σ }u, 4f{σ }u, 4f{π }u, and 4p{π }u electronic states (i.e., up to {{{H}}}2+ n = 4). Tables of the dipole-matrix elements and energies needed to calculate state-resolved cross sections and rate coefficients will be made publicly available. These data could be important in astrophysical models when dealing with photon wavelengths (or radiation temperature distributions that are weighted toward such wavelengths) around 100 nm. For example, at these wavelengths and a material temperature of 8400 K, the LTE-averaged PD cross section via the (second electronically excited) 2p{π }u state is over three times larger than the PD cross section via the (first electronically excited) 2p{σ }u state.

  2. Ultrafast Photodissociation Dynamics of the F State of Sulfur Dioxide by Femtosecond Time-Resolved Pump-Probe Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dong-Dong; Ni Qiang; Luo Si-Zuo; Zhang Jing; Liu Hang; Xu Hai-Feng; Jin Ming-Xing; Ding Da-Jun

    2011-01-01

    A femtosecond pump-probe method is employed to study the dissociation dynamics of sulfur dioxide. SO 2 molecules are excited to the F state by absorbing two photons of 267 nm femtosecond laser pulses, and ionized by 400 nm laser pulses at different delay times between the two lasers. Transients of both parent ions (SO + 2 ) and the fragment ions (SO + , S + and O + ) are observed. The SO + 2 transient can be well fitted to a biexponential decay comprising a fast and a slow component of 280 fs and 2.97 ps lifetimes, respectively. The SO + transient consists of two growth components of 270 fs and 2.50 ps. The results clearly show that the F state of SO 2 dissociates along an S-O bond. The transients of S + and O + , however, have different behavior, which consist of a fast growth and a long decay component. A possible mechanism of the fragment formation is discussed to understand the dissociation dynamics of the F state of SO 2 . (atomic and molecular physics)

  3. ROVIBRATIONALLY RESOLVED DIRECT PHOTODISSOCIATION THROUGH THE LYMAN AND WERNER TRANSITIONS OF H2 FOR FUV/X-RAY-IRRADIATED ENVIRONMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, C. D.; Porter, R. L.; Stancil, P. C.; Abel, N. P.; Ferland, G. J.; Shaw, G.; Van Hoof, P. A. M.; Williams, R. J. R.

    2012-01-01

    Using ab initio potential curves and dipole transition moments, cross-section calculations were performed for the direct continuum photodissociation of H 2 through the B 1 Σ + u 1 Σ + g (Lyman) and C 1 Π u 1 Σ + g (Werner) transitions. Partial cross-sections were obtained for wavelengths from 100 Å to the dissociation threshold between the upper electronic state and each of the 301 bound rovibrational levels v''J'' within the ground electronic state. The resulting cross-sections are incorporated into three representative classes of interstellar gas models: diffuse clouds, photon-dominated regions, and X-ray-dominated regions (XDRs). The models, which used the CLOUDY plasma/molecular spectra simulation code, demonstrate that direct photodissociation is comparable to fluorescent dissociation (or spontaneous radiative dissociation, the Solomon process) as an H 2 destruction mechanism in intense far-ultraviolet or X-ray-irradiated gas. In particular, changes in H 2 rotational column densities are found to be as large as 20% in the XDR model with the inclusion of direct photodissociation. The photodestruction rate from some high-lying rovibrational levels can be enhanced by pumping from H Lyβ due to a wavelength coincidence with cross-section resonances resulting from quasi-bound levels of the upper electronic states. Given the relatively large size of the photodissociation data set, a strategy is described to create truncated, but reliable, cross-section data consistent with the wavelength resolving power of typical observations.

  4. Time-resolved photodissociation of oxygen at 162 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trushin, Sergei A; Schmid, Wolfram E; Fuss, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen was excited by 10 fs pulses in the Schumann-Runge continuum at 162 nm, which is by 0.57 eV above the dissociation limit. It was probed by high-intensity ionization at 810 nm with 10 14 W cm -2 , measuring the ion yields. The O 2 + signal decays in 4.3 fs, which is much shorter than the expected time for dissociation. It is ascribed to a rapid decay of the ionization probability. In a similar time, the ion in the second excited state (with excess energy taken over from the neutral) reaches the dissociation limit, whereas this time would be much longer from the two lower ion states. In fact, the O + signal rises to a (first) maximum at 6 fs. The preference for the higher ion state is rationalized by an intermediate resonance in the neutral molecule for which the polarization dependence also provides evidence. But the shape of the O + signal is very odd: it exhibits three maxima (at 6, 29 and 53 fs) of increasing intensity, before decaying rapidly (≤3.5 fs) to a pedestal. In contrast to the first maximum, the others appear at times when there is practically no interatomic force left in the excited state. We postulate a highly repulsive doubly excited state as a resonance for interpreting the second maximum, and for the third an ion-pair state lying further outside. Comparison is made with enhanced ionization, which has often been found at large interatomic distances on multiple ionization in strong laser fields. Consistent with this mechanism is the absence of similar observations at negative delay times, where five fundamental photons act as a pump and the fifth harmonic as a probe.

  5. Photodissociation of ultracold diatomic strontium molecules with quantum state control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M; McGuyer, B H; Apfelbeck, F; Lee, C-H; Majewska, I; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2016-07-07

    Chemical reactions at ultracold temperatures are expected to be dominated by quantum mechanical effects. Although progress towards ultracold chemistry has been made through atomic photoassociation, Feshbach resonances and bimolecular collisions, these approaches have been limited by imperfect quantum state selectivity. In particular, attaining complete control of the ground or excited continuum quantum states has remained a challenge. Here we achieve this control using photodissociation, an approach that encodes a wealth of information in the angular distribution of outgoing fragments. By photodissociating ultracold (88)Sr2 molecules with full control of the low-energy continuum, we access the quantum regime of ultracold chemistry, observing resonant and nonresonant barrier tunnelling, matter-wave interference of reaction products and forbidden reaction pathways. Our results illustrate the failure of the traditional quasiclassical model of photodissociation and instead are accurately described by a quantum mechanical model. The experimental ability to produce well-defined quantum continuum states at low energies will enable high-precision studies of long-range molecular potentials for which accurate quantum chemistry models are unavailable, and may serve as a source of entangled states and coherent matter waves for a wide range of experiments in quantum optics.

  6. Photodissociation of quantum state-selected diatomic molecules yields new insight into ultracold chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Mickey; McGuyer, Bart H.; Lee, Chih-Hsi; Apfelbeck, Florian; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2016-05-01

    When a molecule is subjected to a sufficiently energetic photon it can break apart into fragments through a process called ``photodissociation''. For over 70 years this simple chemical reaction has served as a vital experimental tool for acquiring information about molecular structure, since the character of the photodissociative transition can be inferred by measuring the 3D photofragment angular distribution (PAD). While theoretical understanding of this process has gradually evolved from classical considerations to a fully quantum approach, experiments to date have not yet revealed the full quantum nature of this process. In my talk I will describe recent experiments involving the photodissociation of ultracold, optical lattice-trapped, and fully quantum state-resolved 88Sr2 molecules. Optical absorption images of the PADs produced in these experiments reveal features which are inherently quantum mechanical in nature, such as matter-wave interference between output channels, and are sensitive to the quantum statistics of the molecular wavefunctions. The results of these experiments cannot be predicted using quasiclassical methods. Instead, we describe our results with a fully quantum mechanical model yielding new intuition about ultracold chemistry.

  7. Product fine-structure resolved photodissociation dynamics: The A band of H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Linsen [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xie, Daiqian, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Sun, Zhigang [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Guo, Hua, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    The photodissociation dynamics of H{sub 2}O in its first absorption band is investigated on an accurate potential energy surface based on a large number of high-level ab initio points. Several ro-vibrational states of the parent molecule are considered. Different from most previous theoretical studies, the spin-orbit and Λ-doublet populations of the open-shell OH fragment are reported from full-dimensional wave packet calculations. The populations of the two spin-orbit manifolds are in most cases close to the statistical limit, but the Λ-doublet is dominated by the A{sup ″} component, thanks largely to the fast in-plane dissociation of H{sub 2}O(A{sup ~1}A{sup ′′}). Comparisons with experimental data and a Franck-Condon model are generally very good, although some discrepancies exist.

  8. Product fine-structure resolved photodissociation dynamics: The A band of H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Linsen; Xie, Daiqian; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua

    2014-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of H 2 O in its first absorption band is investigated on an accurate potential energy surface based on a large number of high-level ab initio points. Several ro-vibrational states of the parent molecule are considered. Different from most previous theoretical studies, the spin-orbit and Λ-doublet populations of the open-shell OH fragment are reported from full-dimensional wave packet calculations. The populations of the two spin-orbit manifolds are in most cases close to the statistical limit, but the Λ-doublet is dominated by the A ″ component, thanks largely to the fast in-plane dissociation of H 2 O(A ~1 A ′′ ). Comparisons with experimental data and a Franck-Condon model are generally very good, although some discrepancies exist

  9. Femtosecond time-resolved photodissociation dynamics of methyl halide molecules on ultrathin gold films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai E. Vaida

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The photodissociation of small organic molecules, namely methyl iodide, methyl bromide, and methyl chloride, adsorbed on a metal surface was investigated in real time by means of femtosecond-laser pump–probe mass spectrometry. A weakly interacting gold surface was employed as substrate because the intact adsorption of the methyl halide molecules was desired prior to photoexcitation. The gold surface was prepared as an ultrathin film on Mo(100. The molecular adsorption behavior was characterized by coverage dependent temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy. Submonolayer preparations were irradiated with UV light of 266 nm wavelength and the subsequently emerging methyl fragments were probed by photoionization and mass spectrometric detection. A strong dependence of the excitation mechanism and the light-induced dynamics on the type of molecule was observed. Possible photoexcitation mechanisms included direct photoexcitation to the dissociative A-band of the methyl halide molecules as well as the attachment of surface-emitted electrons with transient negative ion formation and subsequent molecular fragmentation. Both reaction pathways were energetically possible in the case of methyl iodide, yet, no methyl fragments were observed. As a likely explanation, the rapid quenching of the excited states prior to fragmentation is proposed. This quenching mechanism could be prevented by modification of the gold surface through pre-adsorption of iodine atoms. In contrast, the A-band of methyl bromide was not energetically directly accessible through 266 nm excitation. Nevertheless, the one-photon-induced dissociation was observed in the case of methyl bromide. This was interpreted as being due to a considerable energetic down-shift of the electronic A-band states of methyl bromide by about 1.5 eV through interaction with the gold substrate. Finally, for methyl chloride no photofragmentation could be detected at all.

  10. Photodissociation from a manifold of rovibrational states and free-free absorption by a diatomic molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V S; Presnyakov, L P

    2002-01-01

    An analytical approach for the description of photoabsorption by a gas or plasma medium containing atomic and molecular components in thermodynamic equilibrium is developed. Continuous absorption of radiation is due to the photodissociation of a diatomic molecule from a manifold of excited rovibrational states and free-free transitions between the two electronic terms of a quasimolecule temporarily formed during a collision of atomic particles. The formulae are obtained for individual photodissociation cross sections from a given rovibrational state and for the Boltzmann-averaged cross section. Particular attention is paid to the derivation of a general analytical expression for the total absorption coefficient including the integral contribution of bound-free and free-free radiative transitions. The consideration is based on the theory of nonadiabatic transitions combined with the approximation of a quasicontinuum for rovibrational states. The theory is applied to the investigation of photoabsorption by the H 2 + ion in the IR, visible and UV spectral regions. It is shown that our results are in good agreement with available ab initio quantal calculations of photodissociation cross sections and with semiclassical calculations of absorption coefficients. Special attention is paid to the investigation of the relative contributions of the H 2 + and H - ions to the total absorption in a wide range of wavelengths and temperatures

  11. State-to-state photodissociation dynamics of triatomic molecules: H2O in the B band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Bin; Xie Daiqian; Guo Hua

    2012-01-01

    State-to-state photodissociation dynamics of H 2 O in its B band has been investigated quantum mechanically on a new set of non-adiabatically coupled potential energy surfaces for the lowest two 1 A' states of H 2 O, which are developed at the internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction level with the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. Quantum dynamical calculations carried out using the Chebyshev propagator yield absorption spectra, product state distributions, branching ratios, and differential cross sections, which are in reasonably good agreement with the latest experimental results. Particular focus is placed here on the dependence of various dynamical observables on the photon energy. Detailed analyses of the dynamics have assigned the diffuse structure in absorption spectrum to short-time recurring dynamics near the HOH conical intersection. The non-adiabatic dissociation to the ground state OH product via the HOH conical intersection is facile, direct, fast, and produces rotationally hot OH(X-tilde) products. On the other hand, the adiabatic channel on the excited state leading to the OH(A-tilde) product is dominated by long-lived resonances, which depend sensitively on the potential energy surfaces.

  12. High precision optical spectroscopy and quantum state selected photodissociation of ultracold 88Sr2 molecules in an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Mickey

    2017-04-01

    Over the past several decades, rapid progress has been made toward the accurate characterization and control of atoms, epitomized by the ever-increasing accuracy and precision of optical atomic lattice clocks. Extending this progress to molecules will have exciting implications for chemistry, condensed matter physics, and precision tests of physics beyond the Standard Model. My thesis describes work performed over the past six years to establish the state of the art in manipulation and quantum control of ultracold molecules. We describe a thorough set of measurements characterizing the rovibrational structure of weakly bound 88Sr2 molecules from several different perspectives, including determinations of binding energies; linear, quadratic, and higher order Zeeman shifts; transition strengths between bound states; and lifetimes of narrow subradiant states. Finally, we discuss measurements of photofragment angular distributions produced by photodissociation of molecules in single quantum states, leading to an exploration of quantum-state-resolved ultracold chemistry. The images of exploding photofragments produced in these studies exhibit dramatic interference effects and strongly violate semiclassical predictions, instead requiring a fully quantum mechanical description.

  13. Vector properties in molecular photodissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, J.

    1999-12-01

    The technique of resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) of atomic and molecular species produced from a photofragmentation event combined with time-of flight (TOF) detection is used to examine scalar and vector properties following photodissociation. This technique is applied to the study of methyl bromide dissociation in a product state specific manner. We report measurements of the angular distributions and kinetic energy releases of the resulting bromine atoms in the ground and first spin-orbit excited state. Additionally we report measurements of the angular distributions and kinetic energy releases of the methyl fragment in the ground vibrational state, and also the excited state with one quanta in the ν 2 vibrational modes. These studies were carried out in the red wing of the absorption band at several wavelengths. For these measurements we were able to resolve the spin orbit state of the partner bromine fragment. From our observations we find new evidence for enhanced nonadiabatic curve crossing active in methyl bromide dissociation in comparison with earlier studies of methyl iodide. The atomic polarization produced following photodissociation of a diatomic molecule was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. We develop theoretical expressions relating the lab frame and molecular frame atomic polarization to the photoexcitation and subsequent dissociation of a diatomic molecule. This treatment includes both incoherent, coherent and non-adiabatic processes which may be active in the photodissociation process. We treat the general case of a polarized diatomic molecule yielding two fragments with non zero angular momentum. Experimentally, an investigation of the polarization of atomic Cl( 2 P 3/2 ) photofragments from the ∼330 nm photolysis of molecular chlorine using the REMPI-TOF technique is reported. We present a theoretical framework in which to treat such experiments allowing the extraction of parameters with direct physical

  14. New ab initio potential surfaces and three-dimensional quantum dynamics for transition state spectroscopy in ozone photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Koichi; Morokuma, Keiji; Le Quéré, Frederic; Leforestier, Claude

    1992-04-01

    New ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the ground and B ( 1B 2) states of ozone have been calculated with the CASSCF-SECI/DZP method to describe the three-dimensional photodissociation process. The dissociation energy of the ground state and the vertical barrier height of the B PES are obtained to be 0.88 and 1.34 eV, respectively, in better agreement with the experimental values than the previous calculation. The photodissociation autocorrelation function, calculated on the new B PES, based on exact three-dimensional quantum dynamics, reproduces well the main recurrence feature extracted from the experimental spectra.

  15. Photodissociation processes in molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, L.R.

    1979-05-01

    A description is presented of a study of the photodissociation dynamics of molecules in a molecular beam. Photo-fragmentation translational spectroscopy has been utilized to observe the photodissociation dynamics of ozone. Using a supersonic molecular beam and a 10 nanosecond pulsed laser at lambda = 266 nm, the velocities of the fragment products are measured by the method of time of flight. The resolution of the time of flight spectrum of ozone is sufficiently high that the electronic and vibrational states are clearly resolved and identified. Above the threshold (lambda 1 D) has been estimated in the past to be unity for the process O 3 ( 1 A 1 ) + hν)lambda 3 ( 1 B 2 ) → O 2 ( 1 Δ/sub g/) + O( 1 D). However a small production of O 2 ( 3 Σ/sub g/ - ) + O( 3 P) has been observed in this study. The O 2 ( 1 Δ/sub g/) product yields four vibrational states (v = 0, 1, 2, 3) which yields a vibrational temperature of 2700 0 K along with narrow energy distributions of rotational levels. These energy distributions are compared with photodissociation models along with the polarization dependence of the dissociative process which was also measured. 143 references

  16. Photodissociation processes in molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, L.R.

    1979-05-01

    A description is presented of a study of the photodissociation dynamics of molecules in a molecular beam. Photo-fragmentation translational spectroscopy has been utilized to observe the photodissociation dynamics of ozone. Using a supersonic molecular beam and a 10 nanosecond pulsed laser at lambda = 266 nm, the velocities of the fragment products are measured by the method of time of flight. The resolution of the time of flight spectrum of ozone is sufficiently high that the electronic and vibrational states are clearly resolved and identified. Above the threshold (lambda < 310 nm), the quantum yield for the production of O(/sup 1/D) has been estimated in the past to be unity for the process O/sub 3/ (/sup 1/A/sub 1/) + h..nu..)lambda < 300 nm) ..-->.. O/sub 3/(/sup 1/B/sub 2/) ..-->.. O/sub 2/(/sup 1/..delta../sub g/) + O(/sup 1/D). However a small production of O/sub 2/ (/sup 3/..sigma../sub g//sup -/) + O(/sup 3/P) has been observed in this study. The O/sub 2/(/sup 1/..delta../sub g/) product yields four vibrational states (v = 0, 1, 2, 3) which yields a vibrational temperature of 2700/sup 0/K along with narrow energy distributions of rotational levels. These energy distributions are compared with photodissociation models along with the polarization dependence of the dissociative process which was also measured. 143 references.

  17. Communication: Photodissociation of CH3CHO at 308 nm: Observation of H-roaming, CH3-roaming, and transition state pathways together along the ground state surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hou-Kuan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Hung, Kai-Chan; Kasai, Toshio; Lin, King-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Following photodissociation of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) at 308 nm, the CO(v = 1-4) fragment is acquired using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The CO(v = 1) rotational distribution shows a bimodal feature; the low- and high-J components result from H-roaming around CH3CO core and CH3-roaming around CHO radical, respectively, in consistency with a recent assignment by Kable and co-workers (Lee et al., Chem. Sci. 5, 4633 (2014)). The H-roaming pathway disappears at the CO(v ≥ 2) states, because of insufficient available energy following bond-breaking of H + CH3CO. By analyzing the CH4 emission spectrum, we obtained a bimodal vibrational distribution; the low-energy component is ascribed to the transition state (TS) pathway, consistent with prediction by quasiclassical trajectory calculations, while the high-energy component results from H- and CH3-roamings. A branching fraction of H-roaming/CH3-roaming/TS contribution is evaluated to be (8% ± 3%)/(68% ± 10%)/(25% ± 5%), in which the TS pathway was observed for the first time. The three pathways proceed concomitantly along the electronic ground state surface.

  18. Photodissociation of CS from Excited Rovibrational Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattillo, R. J.; Cieszewski, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Forrey, R. C.; Babb, J. F.; McCann, J. F.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2018-05-01

    Accurate photodissociation cross sections have been computed for transitions from the X 1Σ+ ground electronic state of CS to six low-lying excited electronic states. New ab initio potential curves and transition dipole moment functions have been obtained for these computations using the multi-reference configuration interaction approach with the Davidson correction (MRCI+Q) and aug-cc-pV6Z basis sets. State-resolved cross sections have been computed for transitions from nearly the full range of rovibrational levels of the X 1Σ+ state and for photon wavelengths ranging from 500 Å to threshold. Destruction of CS via predissociation in highly excited electronic states originating from the rovibrational ground state is found to be unimportant. Photodissociation cross sections are presented for temperatures in the range between 1000 and 10,000 K, where a Boltzmann distribution of initial rovibrational levels is assumed. Applications of the current computations to various astrophysical environments are briefly discussed focusing on photodissociation rates due to the standard interstellar and blackbody radiation fields.

  19. Iodine photodissociation laser SOFIA with MOPO-HF as a solid-state oscillator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Jan; Turčičová, Hana; Králiková, Božena; Král, Lukáš; Huynh, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 3 (2009), 687-694 ISSN 0946-2171 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0814; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LN00A100 Grant - others:EC - 6FP LASERLAB-EUROPE(XE) RII3-CT-2003-506350 Program:FP6 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : Iodine photodissociation laser * optical parametric amplification * chirped pulse * optical synchronization * stabilization of wavelength and pointing Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.992, year: 2009

  20. Spin-State-Controlled Photodissociation of Iron(III) Azide to an Iron(V) Nitride Complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andris, E.; Navrátil, R.; Jašík, J.; Sabenya, G.; Costas, M.; Srnec, Martin; Roithová, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 45 (2017), s. 14057-14060 ISSN 1521-3773 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ion spectroscopy * Iron(V) nitride * Photodissociation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry

  1. Transition state region in the A-Band photodissociation of allyl iodide—A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacherjee, Aditi, E-mail: abhattacherjee@berkeley.edu, E-mail: andrewattar@berkeley.edu; Attar, Andrew R., E-mail: abhattacherjee@berkeley.edu, E-mail: andrewattar@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Leone, Stephen R., E-mail: srl@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy based on a high-harmonic generation source is used to study the 266 nm induced A-band photodissociation dynamics of allyl iodide (CH{sub 2} =CHCH{sub 2}I). The photolysis of the C—I bond at this wavelength produces iodine atoms both in the ground ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}, I) and spin-orbit excited ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}, I*) states, with the latter as the predominant channel. Using XUV absorption at the iodine N{sub 4/5} edge (45–60 eV), the experiments constitute a direct probe of not only the long-lived atomic iodine reaction products but also the fleeting transition state region of the repulsive n{sub I}σ{sup ∗}{sub C—I} excited states. Specifically, three distinct features are identified in the XUV transient absorption spectrum at 45.3 eV, 47.4 eV, and 48.4 eV (denoted transients A, B, and C, respectively), which arise from the repulsive valence-excited nσ{sup ∗} states and project onto the high-lying core-excited states of the dissociating molecule via excitation of 4d(I) core electrons. Transients A and B originate from 4d(I) → n(I) core-to-valence transitions, whereas transient C is best assigned to a 4d(I) →σ{sup ∗}(C—I) transition. The measured differential absorbance of these new features along with the I/I* branching ratios known from the literature is used to suggest a more definitive assignment, albeit provisional, of the transients to specific dissociative states within the A-band manifold. The transients are found to peak around 55 fs–65 fs and decay completely by 145 fs–185 fs, demonstrating the ability of XUV spectroscopy to map the evolution of reactants into products in real time. The similarity in the energies of transients A and B with analogous features observed in methyl iodide [Attar et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 5072, (2015)] together with the new observation of transient C in the present work provides a more complete picture of the valence electronic

  2. ESIPT and photodissociation of 3-hydroxychromone in solution: photoinduced processes studied by static and time-resolved UV/Vis, fluorescence, and IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Katharina; Grün, Anneken; Stamm, Anke; Schmitt, Yvonne; Gerhards, Markus; Diller, Rolf

    2013-11-07

    The spectral properties of fluorescence sensors such as 3-hydroxychromone (3-HC) and its derivatives are sensitive to interaction with the surrounding medium as well as to substitution. 3-HC is a prototype system for other derivatives because it is the basic unit of all flavonoides undergoing ESIPT and is not perturbed by a substituent. In this study, the elementary processes and intermediate states in the photocycle of 3-HC as well as its anion were identified and characterized by the use of static and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy in different solvents (methylcyclohexane, acetonitrile, ethanol, and water at different pH). Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra and lifetimes of the intermediate states were obtained for the normal, tautomer and anionic excited state, while mid-IR vibrational spectra yielded structural information on ground and excited states of 3-HC. A high sensitivity on hydrogen-bonding perturbations was observed, leading to photoinduced anion formation in water, while in organic solvents, different processes are suggested, including slow picosecond ESIPT and contribution of the trans-structure excited state or a different stable solvation state with different direction of OH. The formation of the latter could be favored by the lack of a substituent increasing contact points for specific solute-solvent interactions at the hydroxyl group compared to substituted derivatives. The effect of substituents has to be considered for the design of future fluorescence sensors based on 3-HC.

  3. Half collisions by photodissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, M.S. de.

    1980-01-01

    The photodissociation of ICl, IBr and TlBr is studied. In the case of ICl and IBr, experiments are reported at various wavelengths between 480 and 530 nm. For TlBr, photodissociation for a range of wavelengths between 264 and 268 nm is reported. (Auth.)

  4. Photodissociation of gaseous CH3COSH at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Observation of three dissociation channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, En-Lan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Upon one-photon excitation at 248 nm, gaseous CH 3 C(O)SH is dissociated following three pathways with the products of (1) OCS + CH 4 , (2) CH 3 SH + CO, and (3) CH 2 CO + H 2 S that are detected using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy. The excited state 1 (n O , π * CO ) has a radiative lifetime of 249 ± 11 ns long enough to allow for Ar collisions that induce internal conversion and enhance the fragment yields. The rate constant of collision-induced internal conversion is estimated to be 1.1 × 10 −10 cm 3 molecule −1 s −1 . Among the primary dissociation products, a fraction of the CH 2 CO moiety may undergo further decomposition to CH 2 + CO, of which CH 2 is confirmed by reaction with O 2 producing CO 2 , CO, OH, and H 2 CO. Such a secondary decomposition was not observed previously in the Ar matrix-isolated experiments. The high-resolution spectra of CO are analyzed to determine the ro-vibrational energy deposition of 8.7 ± 0.7 kcal/mol, while the remaining primary products with smaller rotational constants are recognized but cannot be spectrally resolved. The CO fragment detected is mainly ascribed to the primary production. A prior distribution method is applied to predict the vibrational distribution of CO that is consistent with the experimental findings.

  5. Photodissociation of CH3CHO at 248 nm by time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy: Verification of roaming and triple fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kai-Chan; Tsai, Po-Yu; Li, Hou-Kuan; Lin, King-Chuen

    2014-02-01

    By using time-resolved Fourier-transform infrared emission spectroscopy, the HCO fragment dissociated from acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) at 248 nm is found to partially decompose to H and CO. The fragment yields are enhanced by the Ar addition that facilitates the collision-induced internal conversion. The channels to CH2CO + H2 and CH3CO + H are not detected significantly. The rotational population distribution of CO, after removing the Ar collision effect, shows a bimodal feature comprising both low- and high-rotational (J) components, sharing a fraction of 19% and 81%, respectively, for the vibrational state v = 1. The low-J component is ascribed to both roaming pathway and triple fragmentation. They are determined to have a branching ratio of 0.06, respectively, relative to the whole v = 1 population. The CO roaming is accompanied by a highly vibrational population of CH4 that yields a vibrational bimodality.

  6. Active vs. spectator modes in nonadiabatic photodissociation dynamics of the hydroxymethyl radical via the 22A(3s) Rydberg state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changjian; Guo, Hua

    2018-01-01

    The choice of the active degrees of freedom (DOFs) is a pivotal issue in a reduced-dimensional model of quantum dynamics when a full-dimensional one is not feasible. Here, several five-dimensional (5D) models are used to investigate the nonadiabatic photodissociation dynamics of the hydroxymethyl (CH2OH) radical, which possesses nine internal DOFs, in its lowest absorption band. A normal-mode based scheme is used to identify the active and spectator modes, and its predictions are confirmed by 5D quantum dynamical calculations. Our results underscore the important role of the CO stretching mode in the photodissociation dynamics of CH2OH, originating from the photo-induced promotion of an electron from the half-occupied π*CO antibonding orbital to a carbon Rydberg orbital.

  7. Iron monoxide photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestakov, D. A.; Parker, D. H.; Baklanov, A. V.

    2005-02-01

    The photodissociation of Fe56O was studied by means of the velocity map imaging technique. A molecular beam of iron atoms and iron monoxide molecules was created using an electrical discharge with an iron electrode in a supersonic expansion of molecular oxygen. The ground state iron atom Fe(D45) and FeO concentrations in the molecular beam have been estimated. The dissociation energy of the FeO XΔ5 ground electronic state was found to be D00(FeO )=4.18±0.01eV. The effective absorption cross section of FeO at 252.39nm (vac), leading to the Fe(D45)+O(P3) dissociation channel, is ˜1.2×10-18cm2. A (1+1) resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectrum of Fe56O in the region 39550-39580 cm-1 with rotational structure has been observed, but not assigned. Angular distributions of Fe(D45) and Fe(D35) products for the channel FeO →Fe(D4,35)+O(P3) have been measured at several points in the 210-260nm laser light wavelength region. The anisotropy parameter varies strongly with wavelength for both channels.

  8. Photoisomerization and photodissociation dynamics of reactive free radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bise, Ryan T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-08-01

    The photofragmentation pathways of chemically reactive free radicals have been examined using the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Measurements of the photodissociation cross-sections, product branching ratios, product state energy distributions, and angular distributions provide insight into the excited state potential energy surfaces and nonadiabatic processes involved in the dissociation mechanisms. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of the predissociative $\\tilde{A}$2A1 and $\\tilde{B}$2A2 states of CH3S have been investigated. At all photon energies, CH3 + S(3Pj), was the main reaction channel. The translational energy distributions reveal resolved structure corresponding to vibrational excitation of the CH3 umbrella mode and the S(3Pj) fine-structure distribution from which the nature of the coupled repulsive surfaces is inferred. Dissociation rates are deduced from the photofragment angular distributions, which depend intimately on the degree of vibrational excitation in the C-S stretch. Nitrogen combustion radicals, NCN, CNN and HNCN have also been studied. For all three radicals, the elimination of molecular nitrogen is the primary reaction channel. Excitation to linear excited triplet and singlet electronic states of the NCN radical generates resolved vibrational structure of the N2 photofragment. The relatively low fragment rotational excitation suggests dissociation via a symmetric C2V transition state. Resolved vibrational structure of the N2 photofragment is also observed in the photodissociation of the HNCN radical. The fragment vibrational and rotational distributions broaden with increased excitation energy. Simple dissociation models suggest that the HNCN radical isomerizes to a cyclic intermediate (c-HCNN) which then dissociates via a tight cyclic

  9. Studies of combustion reactions at the state-resolved differential cross section level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, P.L.; Suits, A.G.; Bontuyan, L.S.; Whitaker, B.J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved differential reaction cross sections provide perhaps the most detailed information about the mechanism of a chemical reaction, but heretofore they have been extremely difficult to measure. This program explores a new technique for obtaining differential cross sections with product state resolution. The three-dimensional velocity distribution of state-selected reaction products is determined by ionizing the appropriate product, waiting for a delay while it recoils along the trajectory imparted by the reaction, and finally projecting the spatial distribution of ions onto a two dimensional screen using a pulsed electric field. Knowledge of the arrival time allows the ion position to be converted to a velocity, and the density of velocity projections can be inverted mathematically to provide the three-dimensional velocity distribution for the selected product. The main apparatus has been constructed and tested using photodissociations. The authors report here the first test results using crossed beams to investigate collisions between Ar and NO. Future research will both develop further the new technique and employ it to investigate methyl radical, formyl radical, and hydrogen atom reactions which are important in combustion processes. The authors intend specifically to characterize the reactions of CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}CO; of HCO with O{sub 2}; and of H with CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}.

  10. Photodissociation spectroscopy of the dysprosium monochloride molecular ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.dunning@gmail.com; Schowalter, Steven J.; Puri, Prateek; Hudson, Eric R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Petrov, Alexander; Kotochigova, Svetlana [Department of Physics, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    We have performed a combined experimental and theoretical study of the photodissociation cross section of the molecular ion DyCl{sup +}. The photodissociation cross section for the photon energy range 35 500 cm{sup −1} to 47 500 cm{sup −1} is measured using an integrated ion trap and time-of-flight mass spectrometer; we observe a broad, asymmetric profile that is peaked near 43 000 cm{sup −1}. The theoretical cross section is determined from electronic potentials and transition dipole moments calculated using the relativistic configuration-interaction valence-bond and coupled-cluster methods. The electronic structure of DyCl{sup +} is extremely complex due to the presence of multiple open electronic shells, including the 4f{sup 10} configuration. The molecule has nine attractive potentials with ionically bonded electrons and 99 repulsive potentials dissociating to a ground state Dy{sup +} ion and Cl atom. We explain the lack of symmetry in the cross section as due to multiple contributions from one-electron-dominated transitions between the vibrational ground state and several resolved repulsive excited states.

  11. Photodissociation and photoisomerization dynamics of CH2=CHCHO in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Weiqiang; Yang Chunfan; Zhao Hongmei; Liu Kunhui; Su Hongmei

    2010-01-01

    By means of time-resolved Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, we have investigated the 193 nm photodissociation and photoisomerization dynamics of the prototype molecule of α,β-enones, acrolein (CH 2 =CHCHO) in CH 3 CN solution. The primary photolysis channels and absolute branching ratios are determined. The most probable reaction mechanisms are clarified by control experiments monitoring the product yields varied with the triplet quencher addition. The predominant channel is the 1,3-H migration yielding the rearrangement product CH 3 CH=C=O with a branching ratio of 0.78 and the less important channel is the α cleavage of C-H bond yielding radical fragments CH 2 =CHCO+H with a branching ratio of only 0.12. The 1,3-H migration is strongly suggested to correlate with the triplet 3 (ππ * ) state rather than the ground S 0 state and the α cleavage of C-H bond is more likely to proceed in the singlet S 1 1 (nπ * ) state. From the solution experiments we have not only acquired clues clarifying the previous controversial mechanisms, but also explored different photochemistry in solution. Compared to the gas phase photolysis which is dominated by photodissociation channels, the most important channel in solution is the photoisomerization of 1,3-H migration. The reason leading to the different photochemistry in solution is further ascribed to the solvent cage effect.

  12. Photodissociation and photoisomerization dynamics of CH2=CHCHO in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiqiang; Yang, Chunfan; Zhao, Hongmei; Liu, Kunhui; Su, Hongmei

    2010-03-01

    By means of time-resolved Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, we have investigated the 193 nm photodissociation and photoisomerization dynamics of the prototype molecule of α,β-enones, acrolein (CH2CHCHO) in CH3CN solution. The primary photolysis channels and absolute branching ratios are determined. The most probable reaction mechanisms are clarified by control experiments monitoring the product yields varied with the triplet quencher addition. The predominant channel is the 1,3-H migration yielding the rearrangement product CH3CHCO with a branching ratio of 0.78 and the less important channel is the α cleavage of CH bond yielding radical fragments CH2CHCO+H with a branching ratio of only 0.12. The 1,3-H migration is strongly suggested to correlate with the triplet (ππ ∗)3 state rather than the ground S0 state and the α cleavage of CH bond is more likely to proceed in the singlet S1 (nπ∗)1 state. From the solution experiments we have not only acquired clues clarifying the previous controversial mechanisms, but also explored different photochemistry in solution. Compared to the gas phase photolysis which is dominated by photodissociation channels, the most important channel in solution is the photoisomerization of 1,3-H migration. The reason leading to the different photochemistry in solution is further ascribed to the solvent cage effect.

  13. Photodissociation and photoionization of organosulfur radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Chia-Wei.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamics of S( 3 P 2,1,0 , 1 D 2 ) production from the 193 nm photodissociation of CH 3 SCH 3 , H 2 S and CH 3 SH have been studied using 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) techniques. The 193 nm photodissociation cross sections for the formation of S from CH 3 S and HS initially prepared in the photodissociation of CH 3 SCH 3 and H 2 S are estimated to be 1 x 10 -18 and 1.1 x 10 -18 cm 2 , respectively. The dominant product from CH 3 S is S( 1 D), while that from SH is S( 3 P). Possible potential energy surfaces involved in the 193 nm photodissociation of CH 3 S(X) and SH(X) have been also examined. Threshold photoelectron (PE) spectra for SH and CH 3 S formed in the ultraviolet photodissociation of H 2 S and CH 3 SH, respectively, have been measured using the nonresonant two-photon pulsed field ionization (N2P-PFI) technique. The rotationally resolved N2P-PFI-PE spectrum obtained for SH indicates that photoionization dynamics favors the rotational angular momentum change ΔN 2 product 3,2 ) and CH 3 S(X 2 E 3/2 ) are determined to be 84,057.5 ± 3 cm -1 and 74,726 ± 8 cm -1 respectively. The spin-orbit splittings for SH(X 2 product 3/2,1/2 ) and CH 3 S(X 2 E 3/2,1/2 ) are found to be 377 ± 2 and 257 ± 5 cm -1 , respectively, in agreement with previous measurements. The C-S stretching frequency for CH 3 S + (X 3 A 2 ) is 733 ± 5 cm -1 . This study illustrates that the PFI-PE detection method can be a sensitive probe for the nascent internal energy distribution of photoproducts

  14. Photodissociation of the OD radical at 226 and 243 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radenovic, Dragana C.; Roij, Andre J.A. van; Chestakov, Dmitri A.; Eppink, Andre T.J.B.; Meulen, J.J. ter; Parker, David H.; Loo, Mark P.J. van der; Groenenboom, Gerrit C.; Greenslade, Margaret E.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2003-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of state selected OD radicals has been examined at 243 and 226 nm using velocity map imaging to probe the angle-speed distributions of the D( 2 S) and O( 3 P 2 ) products. Both experiment and complementary first principle calculations demonstrate that photodissociation occurs by promotion of OD from high vibrational levels of the ground X 2 Π state to the repulsive 1 2 Σ - state

  15. Discrete variable theory of triatomic photodissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heather, R.W.; Light, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    The coupled equations describing the photodissociation process are expressed in the discrete variable representation (DVR) in which the coupled equations are labeled by quadrature points rather than by internal basis functions. A large reduction in the dimensionality of the coupled equations can be realized since the spatially localized bound state nuclear wave function vanishes at most of the quadrature points, making only certain orientations of the fragments important in the region of strong interaction (small separation). The discrete variable theory of photodissociation is applied to the model dissociation of bent HCN in which the CN fragment is treated as a rigid rotor. The truncated DVR rotational distributions are compared with the exact close coupled rotational distributions, and excellent agreement with greatly reduced dimensionality of the equations is found

  16. Photodissociation of acetone from 266 to 312 nm: Dynamics of CH3 + CH3CO channels on the S0 and T1 states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kin Long Kelvin; Nauta, Klaas; Kable, Scott H.

    2017-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of acetone (CH3)2CO, cooled in a molecular beam, have been explored over the wavelength range 266-312 nm. Nascent CH3 fragments were detected by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization, followed by mass-selected ion imaging. For photolysis at λ = 306 nm, the image shows a sharp ring, which, when converted to a translational energy distribution, reveals a narrow Gaussian peak with a maximum at 90% of the available energy. As the photolysis energy is increased, the distribution slowly broadens and shifts to higher recoil translational energy. The fraction of available energy in translation energy decreases in favour of internal energy of the CH3CO fragment. These observations are consistent with a dynamical model in which the energy of the exit channel barrier on the T1 surface evolves mostly into relative translational energy. Energy in excess of the barrier is partitioned statistically into all degrees of freedom. No evidence was found for any other dynamical pathway producing CH3 fragments, including reaction on S0 or S1, for dissociation between 306 and 266 nm. For λ > 306 nm, a diffuse, slow recoil component to the image appears. The translational energy distribution for this component is fit well by a statistical prior distribution of energy. We attribute this component to dissociation on the S0, ground state surface; to our knowledge, this is the first direct observation of this channel. The appearance of S0 dynamics and the disappearance of the T1 component are consistent with previously inferred barrier height on T1 for the production of CH3CO + CH3. The possible atmospheric implications of our findings are discussed.

  17. A Theoretical Study of the Photodissociation Mechanism of Cyanoacetylene in Its Lowest Singlet and Triplet Excited States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng; Du, Wei-Na; Duan, Xue-Mei; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2008-11-01

    Cyanoacetylene (H5-C4 ≡ C3-C2 ≡ N1) is a minor constituent of the atmosphere of Titan, and its photochemistry plays an important role in the formation of the haze surrounding the satellite. In this paper, the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and multiconfigurational second-order perturbation (CASPT2) approaches are employed to investigate the photochemical processes for cyanoacetylene in its first singlet and triplet excited states with the cc-pVTZ basis set. Fissions of the C4-H5 and C2-C3 bonds in S1 yield H(2S) + CCCN(A2Π) and HCC(A2Π) + CN(X2Σ+), respectively. In T1, the corresponding dissociation products are H(2S) + CCCN(X2Σ+) and HCC(X2Σ) + CN(X2Σ+). At the CASPT2(14,13)//CASSCF(14,13) + ZPE level, the barriers for the adiabatic dissociation of the C4-H5 and C2-C3 bonds are 6.11 and 6.94 eV in S1 and 5.71 and 6.39 eV in T1, respectively, taking the energy of S0 minimum as reference. Based on the calculated potential energy surfaces, the existence of a metastable excited molecule is anticipated upon 260-230 nm photoexcitation, which provides a probable approach for cyanoacetylene to polymerize. The internal conversion (IC) process through vibronic interaction followed by C4-H5 fission in the ground state is found to account for the observed diffuse character in the UV absorption spectrum below 240 nm.

  18. State resolved vibrational relaxation modeling for strongly nonequilibrium flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Josyula, Eswar

    2011-05-01

    Vibrational relaxation is an important physical process in hypersonic flows. Activation of the vibrational mode affects the fundamental thermodynamic properties and finite rate relaxation can reduce the degree of dissociation of a gas. Low fidelity models of vibrational activation employ a relaxation time to capture the process at a macroscopic level. High fidelity, state-resolved models have been developed for use in continuum gas dynamics simulations based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). By comparison, such models are not as common for use with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. In this study, a high fidelity, state-resolved vibrational relaxation model is developed for the DSMC technique. The model is based on the forced harmonic oscillator approach in which multi-quantum transitions may become dominant at high temperature. Results obtained for integrated rate coefficients from the DSMC model are consistent with the corresponding CFD model. Comparison of relaxation results obtained with the high-fidelity DSMC model shows significantly less excitation of upper vibrational levels in comparison to the standard, lower fidelity DSMC vibrational relaxation model. Application of the new DSMC model to a Mach 7 normal shock wave in carbon monoxide provides better agreement with experimental measurements than the standard DSMC relaxation model.

  19. Photodissociation dynamics and spectroscopy of free radical combustion intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, David Lewis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals is studied by the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Photodetachment of internally cold, mass-selected negative ions produces a clean source of radicals, which are subsequently dissociated and detected. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states of the radical. In addition, the photodissociation dynamics, product branching ratios, and bond energies are probed at fixed photon energies by measuring the translational energy, P(ET), and angular distribution of the recoiling fragments using a time- and position-sensitive detector. Ab initio calculations are combined with dynamical and statistical models to interpret the observed data. The photodissociation of three prototypical hydrocarbon combustion intermediates forms the core of this work.

  20. The elementary steps of the photodissociation and recombination reactions of iodine molecules enclosed in cages and channels of zeolite crystals: A femtosecond time-resolved study of the geometry effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flachenecker, G.; Materny, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments on iodine molecules enclosed into well-defined cages and channels of different crystalline SiO 2 modifications of zeolites. The new experimental results obtained from iodine in TON (Silica-ZSM-22), FER (Silica-Ferrierit), and MFI (Silicalit-1) porosils are compared with data published earlier on the iodine/DDR (Decadodecasil 3R) porosil system [Flachenecker et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 5, 865 (2003)]. A summary of all findings is given. The processes analyzed by means of the ultrafast spectroscopy are the vibrational relaxation as well as the dissociation and recombination reactions, which are caused by the interaction of the photo-excited iodine molecules with the cavity walls of the porosils. A clear dependence of the observed dynamics on the geometry of the surrounding lattice structure can be seen. These measurements are supported by temperature-dependent experiments. Making use of a theoretical model which is based on the classical Langevin equation, an analysis of the geometry-reaction relation is performed. The Brownian dynamics simulations show that in contrast to the vibrational relaxation the predissociation dynamics are independent of the frequency of collisions with the surroundings. From the results obtained in the different surroundings, we conclude that mainly local fields are responsible for the crossing from the bound B state to the repulsive a/a ' states of the iodine molecules

  1. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumark, D.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The authors have developed a novel technique for studying the photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals. In these experiments, radicals are generated by laser photodetachment of a fast (6-8 keV) mass-selected negative ion beam. The resulting radicals are photodissociated with a second laser, and the photofragments are collected and detected with high efficiency using a microchannel plate detector. The overall process is: ABC{sup -} {yields} ABC + e{sup -} {yields} A + BC, AB + C. Two types of fragment detection schemes are used. To map out the photodissociation cross-section of the radical, the photodissociation laser is scanned and the total photofragment yield is measured as a function of wavelength. In other experiments, the photodissociation frequency is fixed and the photofragment masses, kinetic energy release, and scattering angle is determined for each photodissociation event.

  2. Signatures of non-adiabatic dynamics in the fine-structure state distributions of the OH(X{sup ~}/A{sup ~}) products in the B-band photodissociation of H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Linsen [Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xie, Daiqian, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Guo, Hua, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-03-28

    A detailed quantum mechanical characterization of the photodissociation dynamics of H{sub 2}O at 121.6 nm is presented. The calculations were performed using a full-dimensional wave packet method on coupled potential energy surfaces of all relevant electronic states. Our state-to-state model permits a detailed analysis of the OH(X{sup ~}/A{sup ~}) product fine-structure populations as a probe of the non-adiabatic dissociation dynamics. The calculated rotational state distributions of the two Λ-doublet levels of OH(X{sup ~}, v = 0) exhibit very different characteristics. The A′ states, produced mostly via the B{sup ~}→X{sup ~} conical intersection pathway, have significantly higher populations than the A″ counterparts, which are primarily from the B{sup ~}→A{sup ~} Renner-Teller pathway. The former features a highly inverted and oscillatory rotational state distribution, while the latter has a smooth distribution with much less rotational excitation. In good agreement with experiment, the calculated total OH(X{sup ~}) rotational state distribution and anisotropy parameters show clear even-odd oscillations, which can be attributed to a quantum mechanical interference between waves emanating from the HOH and HHO conical intersections in the B{sup ~}→X{sup ~} non-adiabatic pathway. On the other hand, the experiment-theory agreement for the OH(A{sup ~}) fragment is also satisfactory, although some small quantitative differences suggest remaining imperfections of the ab initio based potential energy surfaces.

  3. Signatures of non-adiabatic dynamics in the fine-structure state distributions of the OH(X~/A~) products in the B-band photodissociation of H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Linsen; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua

    2015-01-01

    A detailed quantum mechanical characterization of the photodissociation dynamics of H 2 O at 121.6 nm is presented. The calculations were performed using a full-dimensional wave packet method on coupled potential energy surfaces of all relevant electronic states. Our state-to-state model permits a detailed analysis of the OH(X ~ /A ~ ) product fine-structure populations as a probe of the non-adiabatic dissociation dynamics. The calculated rotational state distributions of the two Λ-doublet levels of OH(X ~ , v = 0) exhibit very different characteristics. The A′ states, produced mostly via the B ~ →X ~ conical intersection pathway, have significantly higher populations than the A″ counterparts, which are primarily from the B ~ →A ~ Renner-Teller pathway. The former features a highly inverted and oscillatory rotational state distribution, while the latter has a smooth distribution with much less rotational excitation. In good agreement with experiment, the calculated total OH(X ~ ) rotational state distribution and anisotropy parameters show clear even-odd oscillations, which can be attributed to a quantum mechanical interference between waves emanating from the HOH and HHO conical intersections in the B ~ →X ~ non-adiabatic pathway. On the other hand, the experiment-theory agreement for the OH(A ~ ) fragment is also satisfactory, although some small quantitative differences suggest remaining imperfections of the ab initio based potential energy surfaces

  4. Signatures of non-adiabatic dynamics in the fine-structure state distributions of the OH( X ˜ / A ˜ ) products in the B-band photodissociation of H2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Linsen; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua

    2015-03-01

    A detailed quantum mechanical characterization of the photodissociation dynamics of H2O at 121.6 nm is presented. The calculations were performed using a full-dimensional wave packet method on coupled potential energy surfaces of all relevant electronic states. Our state-to-state model permits a detailed analysis of the OH( X ˜ / A ˜ ) product fine-structure populations as a probe of the non-adiabatic dissociation dynamics. The calculated rotational state distributions of the two Λ-doublet levels of OH( X ˜ , v = 0) exhibit very different characteristics. The A' states, produced mostly via the B ˜ → X ˜ conical intersection pathway, have significantly higher populations than the A″ counterparts, which are primarily from the B ˜ → A ˜ Renner-Teller pathway. The former features a highly inverted and oscillatory rotational state distribution, while the latter has a smooth distribution with much less rotational excitation. In good agreement with experiment, the calculated total OH( X ˜ ) rotational state distribution and anisotropy parameters show clear even-odd oscillations, which can be attributed to a quantum mechanical interference between waves emanating from the HOH and HHO conical intersections in the B ˜ → X ˜ non-adiabatic pathway. On the other hand, the experiment-theory agreement for the OH( A ˜ ) fragment is also satisfactory, although some small quantitative differences suggest remaining imperfections of the ab initio based potential energy surfaces.

  5. Signatures of non-adiabatic dynamics in the fine-structure state distributions of the OH(X̃/Ã) products in the B-band photodissociation of H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Linsen; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua

    2015-03-28

    A detailed quantum mechanical characterization of the photodissociation dynamics of H2O at 121.6 nm is presented. The calculations were performed using a full-dimensional wave packet method on coupled potential energy surfaces of all relevant electronic states. Our state-to-state model permits a detailed analysis of the OH(X̃/Ã) product fine-structure populations as a probe of the non-adiabatic dissociation dynamics. The calculated rotational state distributions of the two Λ-doublet levels of OH(X̃, v = 0) exhibit very different characteristics. The A' states, produced mostly via the B̃→X̃ conical intersection pathway, have significantly higher populations than the A″ counterparts, which are primarily from the B̃→Ã Renner-Teller pathway. The former features a highly inverted and oscillatory rotational state distribution, while the latter has a smooth distribution with much less rotational excitation. In good agreement with experiment, the calculated total OH(X̃) rotational state distribution and anisotropy parameters show clear even-odd oscillations, which can be attributed to a quantum mechanical interference between waves emanating from the HOH and HHO conical intersections in the B̃→X̃ non-adiabatic pathway. On the other hand, the experiment-theory agreement for the OH(Ã) fragment is also satisfactory, although some small quantitative differences suggest remaining imperfections of the ab initio based potential energy surfaces.

  6. Ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the benzyl radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Zheng, Xianfeng; Lucas, Michael; Zhang, Jingsong

    2011-05-14

    Ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation dynamics of jet-cooled benzyl radical via the 4(2)B(2) electronically excited state is studied in the photolysis wavelength region of 228 to 270 nm using high-n Rydberg atom time-of-flight (HRTOF) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) techniques. In this wavelength region, H-atom photofragment yield (PFY) spectra are obtained using ethylbenzene and benzyl chloride as the precursors of benzyl radical, and they have a broad peak centered around 254 nm and are in a good agreement with the previous UV absorption spectra of benzyl. The H + C(7)H(6) product translational energy distributions, P(E(T))s, are derived from the H-atom TOF spectra. The P(E(T)) distributions peak near 5.5 kcal mol(-1), and the fraction of average translational energy in the total excess energy, , is ∼0.3. The P(E(T))s indicate the production of fulvenallene + H, which was suggested by recent theoretical studies. The H-atom product angular distribution is isotropic, with the anisotropy parameter β ≈ 0. The H/D product ratios from isotope labeling studies using C(6)H(5)CD(2) and C(6)D(5)CH(2) are reasonably close to the statistical H/D ratios, suggesting that the H/D atoms are scrambled in the photodissociation of benzyl. The dissociation mechanism is consistent with internal conversion of the electronically excited benzyl followed by unimolecular decomposition of the hot benzyl radical on the ground state.

  7. Photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals, clusters, and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeon [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals and ions is studied to characterize the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a special method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states. Branching ratios to various product channels, the translational energy distributions of the fragments, and bond dissociation energies are then determined at selected photon energies. The detailed picture of photodissociation dynamics is provided with the aid of ab initio calculations and a statistical model to interpret the observed data. Important reaction intermediates in combustion reactions have been studied: CCO, C2H5O, and linear Cn (n = 4--6).

  8. Photodissociation of aligned CH3I and C6H3F2I molecules probed with time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging by site-selective extreme ultraviolet ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Kasra; Savelyev, Evgeny; Brauße, Felix; Berrah, Nora; Bomme, Cédric; Brouard, Mark; Burt, Michael; Christensen, Lauge; Düsterer, Stefan; Erk, Benjamin; Höppner, Hauke; Kierspel, Thomas; Krecinic, Faruk; Lauer, Alexandra; Lee, Jason W L; Müller, Maria; Müller, Erland; Mullins, Terence; Redlin, Harald; Schirmel, Nora; Thøgersen, Jan; Techert, Simone; Toleikis, Sven; Treusch, Rolf; Trippel, Sebastian; Ulmer, Anatoli; Vallance, Claire; Wiese, Joss; Johnsson, Per; Küpper, Jochen; Rudenko, Artem; Rouzée, Arnaud; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Boll, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    We explore time-resolved Coulomb explosion induced by intense, extreme ultraviolet (XUV) femtosecond pulses from a free-electron laser as a method to image photo-induced molecular dynamics in two molecules, iodomethane and 2,6-difluoroiodobenzene. At an excitation wavelength of 267 nm, the dominant reaction pathway in both molecules is neutral dissociation via cleavage of the carbon-iodine bond. This allows investigating the influence of the molecular environment on the absorption of an intense, femtosecond XUV pulse and the subsequent Coulomb explosion process. We find that the XUV probe pulse induces local inner-shell ionization of atomic iodine in dissociating iodomethane, in contrast to non-selective ionization of all photofragments in difluoroiodobenzene. The results reveal evidence of electron transfer from methyl and phenyl moieties to a multiply charged iodine ion. In addition, indications for ultrafast charge rearrangement on the phenyl radical are found, suggesting that time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging is sensitive to the localization of charge in extended molecules.

  9. State-resolved Thermal/Hyperthermal Dynamics of Atmospheric Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    M. Zolot, W. W. Harper , B. G. Perkins, P. J. Dagdigian, and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 125 (2) (2006). 4 B. G. Perkins and D. J. Nesbitt, Proc...Quantum Dots to Biomolecules,” Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, March 18, 2011. DISTRIBUTION A

  10. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyr, Douglas Robert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The photodissociation of free radicals is studied in order to characterize the spectroscopy and dissociation dynamics of the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a novel method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with a highly complementary form of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The optical spectroscopy of transitions to dissociative states is determined by monitoring the total photofragment yield as a function of dissociation photon energy. Branching ratios to various product channels, internal energy distributions of the fragments, bond dissociation energies, and the translational energy-dependent photofragment recoil angular distributions are then determined at selected excitation energies. A detailed picture of the dissociation dynamics can then be formulated, allowing insight concerning the interactions of potential energy surfaces involved in the dissociation. After an introduction to the concepts and techniques mentioned above, the experimental apparatus used in these experiments is described in detail. The basis and methods used in the treatment of data, especially in the dissociation dynamics experiments, are then put forward.

  11. Fast beam studies of free radical photodissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyr, D.R.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1993-11-01

    The photodissociation of free radicals is studied in order to characterize the spectroscopy and dissociation dynamics of the dissociative electronic states in these species. To accomplish this, a novel method of radical production, based on the photodetachment of the corresponding negative ion, has been combined with a highly complementary form of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The optical spectroscopy of transitions to dissociative states is determined by monitoring the total photofragment yield as a function of dissociation photon energy. Branching ratios to various product channels, internal energy distributions of the fragments, bond dissociation energies, and the translational energy-dependent photofragment recoil angular distributions are then determined at selected excitation energies. A detailed picture of the dissociation dynamics can then be formulated, allowing insight concerning the interactions of potential energy surfaces involved in the dissociation. After an introduction to the concepts and techniques mentioned above, the experimental apparatus used in these experiments is described in detail. The basis and methods used in the treatment of data, especially in the dissociation dynamics experiments, are then put forward

  12. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and photodissociation of polyatomic molecules and radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.Y. [Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States)

    1993-12-01

    In the past decade, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the photodissociation (PD) dynamics of triatomic molecules. However, the PD study of radicals, especially polyatomic radicals, has remained essentially an unexplored research area. Detailed state-to-state PD cross sections for radicals in the UV and VUV provide challenges not only for dynamical calculations, but also for ab initio quantum chemical studies. The authors have developed a laser based pump-probe apparatus for the measurement of absolute PD cross sections for CH{sub 3}S and HS is summarized.

  13. Discrimination of binary coherent states using a homodyne detector and a photon number resolving detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittmann, Christoffer; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Takeoka, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    We investigate quantum measurement strategies capable of discriminating two coherent states probabilistically with significantly smaller error probabilities than can be obtained using nonprobabilistic state discrimination. We apply a postselection strategy to the measurement data of a homodyne...... detector as well as a photon number resolving detector in order to lower the error probability. We compare the two different receivers with an optimal intermediate measurement scheme where the error rate is minimized for a fixed rate of inconclusive results. The photon number resolving (PNR) receiver...

  14. High power atomic iodine photodissociation lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.E.; Padrick, T.D.; Jones, E.D.

    1976-01-01

    The atomic iodine photodissociation laser has developed into a system capable of producing nanosecond or shorter pulses of near infrared radiation with energies well in excess of a hundred J. Discussed are the operating characteristics, advantages, and potential problem areas associated with this laser

  15. Isotope separation by selective photodissociation of glyoxal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marling, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    Dissociation products, mainly formaldehyde and carbon monoxide, enriched in a desired isotope of carbon, oxygen, or hydrogen are obtained by the selective photodissociation of glyoxal wherein glyoxal is subjected to electromagnetic radiation in a predetermined wavelength such that photon absorption excites and induces dissociation of only those molecules of glyoxal containing the desired isotope

  16. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and vibrationally mediated photodissociation of V+(OCO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citir, Murat; Altinay, Gokhan; Metz, Ricardo B

    2006-04-20

    Electronic spectra of gas-phase V+(OCO) are measured in the near-infrared from 6050 to 7420 cm(-1) and in the visible from 15,500 to 16,560 cm(-1), using photofragment spectroscopy. The near-IR band is complex, with a 107 cm(-1) progression in the metal-ligand stretch. The visible band shows clearly resolved vibrational progressions in the metal-ligand stretch and rock, and in the OCO bend, as observed by Brucat and co-workers. A vibrational hot band gives the metal-ligand stretch frequency in the ground electronic state nu3'' = 210 cm(-1). The OCO antisymmetric stretch frequency in the ground electronic state (nu1'') is measured by using vibrationally mediated photodissociation. An IR laser vibrationally excites ions to nu1'' = 1. Vibrationally excited ions selectively dissociate following absorption of a second, visible photon at the nu1' = 1 CO2, due to interaction with the metal. Larger blue shifts observed for complexes with fewer ligands agree with trends seen for larger V+(OCO)n clusters.

  17. Quantum treatment of the Ar-HI photodissociation dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Lopez, Sergio; Prosmiti, Rita; Garcia-Vela, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    A wave packet simulation of the ultraviolet photolysis dynamics of Ar-HI(v=0) is reported. Cluster photodissociation is started from two different initial states, namely, the ground van der Waals (vdW) and the first excited vdW bending state, associated with the Ar-I-H and Ar-H-I isomeric forms of the system, respectively. Formation of Ar-I radical products is investigated over the energy range of the cluster absorption spectrum. It is found that the yield of bound Ar-I radical complexes is typically 90%-100% and 70%-80% for the initial states associated with the Ar-I-H and Ar-H-I isomers, respectively. This result is in agreement with the experimentally observed time-of-flight spectrum of the hydrogen fragment produced after Ar-HI photodissociation. The high Ar-I yield is explained mainly by the small amount of energy available for the radical that is converted into internal energy in the photofragmentation process, which enhances the Ar-I survival probability. Quantum interference effects manifest themselves in structures in the angular distribution of the hydrogen fragment, and in pronounced rainbow patterns in the rotational distributions of the Ar-I radical

  18. The Photodissociation of HCN and HNC: Effects on the HNC/HCN Abundance Ratio in the Interstellar Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Alfredo [Departamento de Química Física Aplicada (UAM), Unidad Asociada a IFF-CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias Módulo 14, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049, Madrid (Spain); Roncero, Octavio; Zanchet, Alexandre [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Agúndez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, José, E-mail: octavio.roncero@csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/ Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco E-28049 (Spain)

    2017-03-20

    The impact of the photodissociation of HCN and HNC isomers is analyzed in different astrophysical environments. For this purpose, the individual photodissociation cross sections of HCN and HNC isomers have been calculated in the 7–13.6 eV photon energy range for a temperature of 10 K. These calculations are based on the ab initio calculation of three-dimensional adiabatic potential energy surfaces of the 21 lower electronic states. The cross sections are then obtained using a quantum wave packet calculation of the rotational transitions needed to simulate a rotational temperature of 10 K. The cross section calculated for HCN shows significant differences with respect to the experimental one, and this is attributed to the need to consider non-adiabatic transitions. Ratios between the photodissociation rates of HCN and HNC under different ultraviolet radiation fields have been computed by renormalizing the rates to the experimental value. It is found that HNC is photodissociated faster than HCN by a factor of 2.2 for the local interstellar radiation field and 9.2 for the solar radiation field, at 1 au. We conclude that to properly describe the HNC/HCN abundance ratio in astronomical environments illuminated by an intense ultraviolet radiation field, it is necessary to use different photodissociation rates for each of the two isomers, which are obtained by integrating the product of the photodissociation cross sections and ultraviolet radiation field over the relevant wavelength range.

  19. Discrimination of optical coherent states using a photon number resolving detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittmann, C.; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Leuchs, G.

    2010-01-01

    The discrimination of non-orthogonal quantum states with reduced or without errors is a fundamental task in quantum measurement theory. In this work, we investigate a quantum measurement strategy capable of discriminating two coherent states probabilistically with significantly smaller error...... probabilities than can be obtained using non-probabilistic state discrimination. We find that appropriate postselection of the measurement data of a photon number resolving detector can be used to discriminate two coherent states with small error probability. We compare our new receiver to an optimal...

  20. Intracluster superelastic scattering via sequential photodissociation in small HI clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chastaing, D.; Underwood, J.; Wittig, C.

    2003-01-01

    The photodissociation of expansion-cooled HI monomer by using 266 nm radiation yields H atoms having 12 830 and 5287 cm-1 of translational energy in the HI center-of-mass system for the I( 2 P 3/2 ) and I( 2 P 1/2 ) (i.e., I and I * , respectively) co-fragments. Irradiating HI clusters [i.e., (HI) n , with n=2 being the dominant cluster] with 266 nm radiation produces, among other things, some H atoms whose translational energies are peaked at 20 285 cm-1, which is 7455 cm-1 higher in energy than the more energetic of the monomer peaks. These very fast H atoms arise from sequential photodissociation within the clusters. Namely, a weakly bound I*·(HI) n-1 complex is first created by the photodissociation of an HI moiety within (HI) n , and then the photodissociation of a second HI moiety [within I*·(HI) n-1 ] produces a fast H atom that scatters from the nearby I*, in some cases deactivating it in the process. Thus, the latter superelastically scattered H atom acquires, as translational energy, nearly all of the I* energy (7603 cm-1). For example, for the dimer, the first dissociation event, (HI) 2 +hv→H+I(I*)·HI, is followed by I*·HI+hv→H superelastic +I-I. High quality potentials for the relevant HI excited states have been calculated recently, and coupling between 3 Π 0 + (which correlates with I * ) and 1 Π (which correlates with I) has been shown to be due to spin-rotation interaction. There is a high degree of separability between the photodissociation of the second HI moiety and the subsequent H+I * scattering (within a given cluster). This is due mainly to the shape of the 3 Π 0 + potential; specifically, it has a shallow well that persists to small r. The shape of the 3 Π 0 + potential is influenced by relativity; i.e., strong spin-orbit coupling maintains the I* spherical electron density to relatively small r. The 3 Π 0 + → 1 Π transition probabilities are calculated for H+I * collisions having different values of the collisional orbital

  1. Spin-resolved photoemission of surface states of W(110)-(1x1)H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochstrasser, M.; Tobin, J.G.; Rotenberg, Eli; Kevan, S.D.

    2002-01-01

    The surface electronic states of W(110)-(1x1)H have been measured using spin- and angle-resolved photoemission. We directly demonstrate that the surface bands are both split and spin-polarized by the spin-orbit interaction in association with the loss of inversion symmetry near a surface. We observe 100 percent spin polarization of the surface states, with the spins aligned in the plane of the surface and oriented in a circular fashion relative to the S-bar symmetry point. In contrast, no measurable polarization of nearby bulk states is observed

  2. Correlation functions for fully or partially state-resolved reactive scattering calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manthe, Uwe; Welsch, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Flux correlation functions and the quantum transition state concept are important tools for the accurate description of polyatomic reaction processes. Combined with the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach, they facilitate rigorous full-dimensional calculations of cumulative and initial-state selected reaction probabilities for six atom reactions. In recent work [R. Welsch, F. Huarte-Larrañaga, and U. Manthe, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064117 (2012)], an approach which allows one to calculate also state-to-state reaction probabilities within the quantum transition state concept has been introduced. This article presents further developments. Alternative generalized flux correlation functions are introduced and discussed. Equations for the calculation of fully state-resolved differential cross section using arbitrary definitions of the body fixed frame are derived. An approach for the efficient calculation of partially state-resolved observables as a function of the collision energy is introduced. Finally, numerical test studying the D + H 2 reaction illustrate important aspects of the formalism

  3. Photodissociation spectroscopy of the Mg+-acetic acid complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Yohannes; Kleiber, P. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have studied the structure and photodissociation of Mg+-acetic acid clusters. Ab initio calculations suggest four relatively strongly bound ground state isomers for the [MgC2H4O2]+ complex. These isomers include the cis and trans forms of the Mg+-acetic acid association complex with Mg+ bonded to the carbonyl O atom of acetic acid, the Mg+-acetic acid association complex with Mg+ bonded to the hydroxyl O atom of acetic acid, or to a Mg+-ethenediol association complex. Photodissociation through the Mg+-based 3p←3s absorption bands in the near UV leads to direct (nonreactive) and reactive dissociation products: Mg+, MgOH+, Mg(H2O )+, CH3CO+, and MgCH3+. At low energies the dominant reactive quenching pathway is through dehydration to Mg(H2O)+, but additional reaction channels involving C-H and C-C bond activation are also open at higher energies.

  4. Particle-Resolved Modeling of Aerosol Mixing State in an Evolving Ship Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, N. S.; Tian, J.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Schlager, H.; Petzold, A.

    2011-12-01

    The aerosol mixing state is important since it impacts the particles' optical and CCN properties and thereby their climate impact. It evolves continuously during the particles' residence time in the atmosphere as a result of coagulation with other particles and condensation of secondary aerosol species. This evolution is challenging to represent in traditional aerosol models since they require the representation of a multi-dimensional particle distribution. While modal or sectional aerosol representations cannot practically resolve the aerosol mixing state for more than a few species, particle-resolved models store the composition of many individual aerosol particles directly. They thus sample the high-dimensional composition state space very efficiently and so can deal with tens of species, fully resolving the mixing state. Here we use the capabilities of the particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC to simulate the evolution of particulate matter emitted from marine diesel engines and compare the results to aircraft measurements made in the English Channel in 2007 as part of the European campaign QUANTIFY. The model was initialized with values of gas concentrations and particle size distributions and compositions representing fresh ship emissions. These values were obtained from a test rig study in the European project HERCULES in 2006 using a serial four-stroke marine diesel engine operating on high-sulfur heavy fuel oil. The freshly emitted particles consisted of sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon and ash. We then tracked the particle population for several hours as it evolved undergoing coagulation, dilution with the background air, and chemical transformations in the aerosol and gas phase. This simulation was used to compute the evolution of CCN properties and optical properties of the plume on a per-particle basis. We compared our results to size-resolved data of aged ship plumes from the QUANTIFY Study in 2007 and showed that the model was able to reproduce

  5. Quantum state engineering, purification, and number-resolved photon detection with high-finesse optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne E. B.; Muschik, Christine A.; Giedke, Geza

    2010-01-01

    We propose and analyze a multifunctional setup consisting of high-finesse optical cavities, beam splitters, and phase shifters. The basic scheme projects arbitrary photonic two-mode input states onto the subspace spanned by the product of Fock states |n>|n> with n=0,1,2,.... This protocol does no...... is especially attractive as a generalization to many modes allows for distribution and purification of entanglement in networks. In an alternative working mode, the setup allows for quantum nondemolition number resolved photodetection in the optical domain....

  6. PHASE-RESOLVED TIMING ANALYSIS OF GRS 1915+105 IN ITS ρ STATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Shu-Ping; Wang, Na; Ding, Guo-Qiang; Qu, Jin-Lu

    2013-01-01

    We made a phase-resolved timing analysis of GRS 1915+105 in its ρ state and obtained detailed ρ cycle evolutions of the frequency, amplitude, and coherence of the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO). We combined our timing results with the spectral study by Neilsen et al. to perform an elaborate comparison analysis. Our analyses show that the LFQPO frequency does not scale with the inner disk radius, but it is related to the spectral index, indicating a possible correlation between the LFQPO and the corona. The LFQPO amplitude spectrum and other results are naturally explained by tying the LFQPO to the corona. The similarities of the spectra of variability parameters between the LFQPOs from ρ state and those from more steady states indicate that the LFQPOs of GRS 1915+105 in very different states seem to share the same origin.

  7. PHASE-RESOLVED TIMING ANALYSIS OF GRS 1915+105 IN ITS {rho} STATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Shu-Ping; Wang, Na; Ding, Guo-Qiang [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 150 Science 1-Street, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830011 (China); Qu, Jin-Lu, E-mail: yanshup@xao.ac.cn, E-mail: na.wang@xao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2013-04-10

    We made a phase-resolved timing analysis of GRS 1915+105 in its {rho} state and obtained detailed {rho} cycle evolutions of the frequency, amplitude, and coherence of the low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (LFQPO). We combined our timing results with the spectral study by Neilsen et al. to perform an elaborate comparison analysis. Our analyses show that the LFQPO frequency does not scale with the inner disk radius, but it is related to the spectral index, indicating a possible correlation between the LFQPO and the corona. The LFQPO amplitude spectrum and other results are naturally explained by tying the LFQPO to the corona. The similarities of the spectra of variability parameters between the LFQPOs from {rho} state and those from more steady states indicate that the LFQPOs of GRS 1915+105 in very different states seem to share the same origin.

  8. Multiphonon generation during photodissociation of slow Landau-Pekar polarons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myasnikov, E. N.; Myasnikova, A. E.; Mastropas, Z. P.

    2006-01-01

    The spectra of the low-temperature photodissociation (photoionization) of Landau-Pekar polarons are calculated using the theory of quantum-coherent states and a new method of variation with respect to the parameters of phonon vacuum deformation. It is shown that the final polaron states upon photodissociation may have different numbers of phonons produced in a single dissociation event and different momenta of charge carriers. The spectrum of optical absorption related to the photodissociation of polarons exhibits a superposition of bands corresponding to various numbers of phonons formed as a result of dissociation of a single polaron. Due to a large width of the energy region corresponding to the final states of charge carriers, the halfwidth of each band is on the order of the energy of polaron coupling and is much greater than the phonon energy. For this reason, the individual phonon bands exhibit strong overlap. The very broad and, probably, structureless band formed as a result of the superposition of all these components begins at an energy equal to the sum of the polaron coupling energy (E p ) and the phonon energy. This band has a maximum at a frequency of about 5.6E p /ℎ and a halfwidth on the order of 5.6E p /ℎ at a unit effective mass (m* = m e ) of band electrons. For an effective charge carrier mass within m* = (1-3)m e , the energy of the polaron band maximum can be estimated as 5E p with an error of about 10%, and the halfwidth falls within 3.4E p 1/2 p . The multiphonon character of this band is related to a decay of the phonon condensate after the escape of charge carrier from a polaron. Such polarons are likely to be observed in the spectra of complex metal oxides, including high-temperature superconductors. Examples of such polaron bands in the reported absorption and photoconductivity spectra of nonstoichiometric cuprates, manganites, nickelates, and titanates are presented. A theory of the formation of Landau-Pekar polarons with the

  9. Photodissociation dynamics in the first absorption band of pyrrole. I. Molecular Hamiltonian and the Herzberg-Teller absorption spectrum for the A12(π σ* ) ←X˜ 1 A1(π π ) transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2018-03-01

    This paper opens a series in which the photochemistry of the two lowest πσ* states of pyrrole and their interaction with each other and with the ground electronic state X ˜ are studied using ab initio quantum mechanics. New 24-dimensional potential energy surfaces for the photodissociation of the N-H bond and the formation of the pyrrolyl radical are calculated using the multiconfigurational perturbation theory (CASPT2) for the electronic states X ˜ (π π ) , 11A2(πσ*), and 11B1(πσ*) and locally diabatized. In this paper, the ab initio calculations are described and the photodissociation in the state 11A2(πσ*) is analyzed. The excitation 11 A2←X ˜ is mediated by the coordinate dependent transition dipole moment functions constructed using the Herzberg-Teller expansion. Nuclear dynamics, including 6, 11, and 15 active degrees of freedom, are studied using the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method. The focus is on the frequency resolved absorption spectrum as well as on the dissociation time scales and the resonance lifetimes. Calculations are compared with available experimental data. An approximate convolution method is developed and validated, with which absorption spectra can be calculated and assigned in terms of vibrational quantum numbers. The method represents the total absorption spectrum as a convolution of the diffuse spectrum of the detaching H-atom and the Franck-Condon spectrum of the heteroaromatic ring. Convolution calculation requires a minimal quantum chemical input and is a promising tool for studying the πσ* photodissociation in model biochromophores.

  10. Quantum state-resolved gas/surface reaction dynamics probed by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Li [Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, Goettingen (Germany); Ueta, Hirokazu; Beck, Rainer D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Moleculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland); Bisson, Regis [Aix-Marseille Universite, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France)

    2013-05-15

    We report the design and characterization of a new molecular-beam/surface-science apparatus for quantum state-resolved studies of gas/surface reaction dynamics combining optical state-specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage with detection of surface-bound reaction products by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). RAIRS is a non-invasive infrared spectroscopic detection technique that enables online monitoring of the buildup of reaction products on the target surface during reactant deposition by a molecular beam. The product uptake rate obtained by calibrated RAIRS detection yields the coverage dependent state-resolved reaction probability S({theta}). Furthermore, the infrared absorption spectra of the adsorbed products obtained by the RAIRS technique provide structural information, which help to identify nascent reaction products, investigate reaction pathways, and determine branching ratios for different pathways of a chemisorption reaction. Measurements of the dissociative chemisorption of methane on Pt(111) with this new apparatus are presented to illustrate the utility of RAIRS detection for highly detailed studies of chemical reactions at the gas/surface interface.

  11. Determination of electronic states in crystalline semiconductors and metals by angle-resolved photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, K.A.

    1979-08-01

    An important part of the theoretical description of the solid state is band structure, which relies on the existence of dispersion relations connecting the electronic energy and wavevector in materials with translational symmetry. These relations determine the electronic behavior of such materials. The elaboration of accurate band structures, therefore, is of considerable fundamental and practical importance. Angle-resolved photoemission (ARP) spectroscopy provides the only presently available method for the detailed experimental investigation of band structures. This work is concerned with its application to both semiconducting and metallic single crystals

  12. Photodissociation and charge transfer dynamics of negative ions studied with femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanni, Martin Thomas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    This dissertation presents studies aimed at understanding the potential energy surfaces and dynamics of isolated negative ions, and the effects of solvent on each. Although negative ions play important roles in atmospheric and solution phase chemistry, to a large extent the ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of gas phase negative ions are poorly characterized, and solvent effects even less well understood. In an effort to fill this gap, the author's coworkers and the author have developed a new technique, anion femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy, and applied it to gas phase photodissociation and charge transfer processes. Studies are presented that (1) characterize the ground and excited states of isolated and clustered anions, (2) monitor the photodissociation dynamics of isolated and clustered anions, and (3) explore the charge-transfer-to-solvent states of atomic iodide clustered with polar and non-polar solvents.

  13. Photodissociation and charge transfer dynamics of negative ions studied with femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanni, Martin T.

    1999-01-01

    This dissertation presents studies aimed at understanding the potential energy surfaces and dynamics of isolated negative ions, and the effects of solvent on each. Although negative ions play important roles in atmospheric and solution phase chemistry, to a large extent the ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of gas phase negative ions are poorly characterized, and solvent effects even less well understood. In an effort to fill this gap, the author's coworkers and the author have developed a new technique, anion femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy, and applied it to gas phase photodissociation and charge transfer processes. Studies are presented that (1) characterize the ground and excited states of isolated and clustered anions, (2) monitor the photodissociation dynamics of isolated and clustered anions, and (3) explore the charge-transfer-to-solvent states of atomic iodide clustered with polar and non-polar solvents

  14. Photodissociation of OCS: deviations between theory and experiment, and the importance of higher order correlation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J A; Olsen, J M H

    2014-11-14

    The photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) was investigated theoretically in a series of studies by Schmidt and co-workers. Initial studies [J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 131101 (2012); J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 054313 (2012)] found photodissociation in the first UV-band to occur mainly by excitation of the 2(1)A' (A) excited state. However, in a later study [G. C. McBane, J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 094314 (2013)] it was found that a significant fraction of photodissociation must occur by excitation of 1(1)A″ (B) excited state to explain the product angular distribution. The branching between excitation of the A and B excited states is determined by the magnitude of the transition dipole moment vectors in the Franck-Condon region. This study examines the sensitivity of these quantities to changes in the employed electronic structure methodology. This study benchmarks the methodology employed in previous studies against highly correlated electronic structure methods (CC3 and MRAQCC) and provide evidence in support of the picture of the OCS photodissociation process presented in [G. C. McBane, J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 094314 (2013)] showing that excitation of A and B electronic states both contribute significantly to the first UV absorption band of OCS. In addition, this study presents evidence in support of the assertion that the A state potential energy surface employed in previous studies underestimates the energy at highly bent geometries (γ ∼ 70°) leading to overestimated rotational energy in the product CO.

  15. Photodissociation of OCS: Deviations between theory and experiment, and the importance of higher order correlation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J. A.; Olsen, J. M. H.

    2014-01-01

    The photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) was investigated theoretically in a series of studies by Schmidt and co-workers. Initial studies [J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 131101 (2012); J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 054313 (2012)] found photodissociation in the first UV-band to occur mainly by excitation of the 2 1 A ′ (A) excited state. However, in a later study [G. C. McBane, J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 094314 (2013)] it was found that a significant fraction of photodissociation must occur by excitation of 1 1 A ″ (B) excited state to explain the product angular distribution. The branching between excitation of the A and B excited states is determined by the magnitude of the transition dipole moment vectors in the Franck-Condon region. This study examines the sensitivity of these quantities to changes in the employed electronic structure methodology. This study benchmarks the methodology employed in previous studies against highly correlated electronic structure methods (CC3 and MRAQCC) and provide evidence in support of the picture of the OCS photodissociation process presented in [G. C. McBane, J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 094314 (2013)] showing that excitation of A and B electronic states both contribute significantly to the first UV absorption band of OCS. In addition, this study presents evidence in support of the assertion that the A state potential energy surface employed in previous studies underestimates the energy at highly bent geometries (γ ∼ 70°) leading to overestimated rotational energy in the product CO

  16. The steady-state and time-resolved photophysical properties of a dimeric indium phthalocyanine complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Araki, Yasuyuki; Dini, Danilo; Liu Ying; Ito, Osamu; Fujitsuka, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    The steady-state and time-resolved photophysical properties and some molecular orbital calculation results of a dimeric indium phthalocyanine complex with an indium-indium bond, i.e., [tBu 4 PcIn] 2 .2tmed, have been described. The results regarding triplet excited state lifetimes can be ascribed to strong intramolecular interactions existing only in the excited state of this dimer because no significant difference in the absorption spectra of the tBu 4 PcInCl monomer and the [tBu 4 PcIn] 2 .2tmed dimer is observed, suggesting that no ground-state interaction can be assessed. The deactivation processes of the excited singlet state of [tBu 4 PcIn] 2 .2tmed are apparently faster than that of μ-oxo-bridged PcIn dimer [tBu 4 PcIn] 2 O. Molecular orbital calculation on the PcIn dimer shows no node between two indium atoms was found in the HOMO - 2 of the PcIn-InPc dimer, suggesting that bonding electrons distribute between two indium atoms

  17. THE PHOTODISSOCIATION OF FORMALDEHYDE IN COMETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, Paul D., E-mail: pfeldman@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Observations of comets in the 905–1180 Å spectral band made with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer in 2001 and 2004 show unusual features in the fluorescent emissions of CO and H{sub 2}. These include emission from a non-thermal high-J rotational population of CO and solar Lyα induced fluorescence from excited vibrational levels of H{sub 2}, both of which are attributed to the photodissociation of formaldehyde. In this paper we model the large number of observed H{sub 2} lines and demonstrate the dependence of the pumping on the heliocentric velocity of the comet and the solar line profiles. We also derive the rotational and vibrational populations of H{sub 2} and show that they are consistent with the results of laboratory studies of the photodissociation of H{sub 2}CO. In addition to the principal series of H i and O i, the residual spectrum is found to consist mainly of the Rydberg series of C i multiplets from which we derive the mean carbon column abundance in the coma. Fluorescent emissions from N i and N{sub 2} are also searched for.

  18. Photodissociation dynamics of 2-chloro-6-nitrotoluene and nitrocyclopentane in gas phase: Laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawade, Monali N.; Saha, Ankur; Upadhyaya, Hari P.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D., E-mail: pdnaik@barc.gov.in

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Photodissociation studies on chloronitrotoluene (ClNT) and nitrocyclopentane (NCP). • Nascent OH product detected state selectively using laser induced fluorescence. • OH formation takes place from the ground electronic state with an exit barrier. • UV photodissociation dynamics of ClNT and NCP is different. - Abstract: Photodissociation of 2-chloro-6-nitrotoluene (ClNT) at 193, 248 and 266 nm and nitrocyclopentane (NCP) at 193 nm leads to the formation of OH, as detected by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The nascent OH produced from the photolysis of ClNT at all the wavelengths is vibrationally cold, with the Boltzmann type rotational state distributions. However, the nascent OH product from NCP is in the ground and vibrationally excited states with the measured average relative population in ν{sup ″}=1 to that in ν{sup ″}=0 of 0.12 ± 0.03, and these levels are characterized by rotational temperatures of 650 ± 180 K and 1570 ± 90 K, respectively. The translational energy partitioned in the OH fragment has been measured for photodissociation of both ClNT and NCP. On the basis of both the experimental results and the ground state molecular orbital (MO) calculations, a plausible mechanism for the OH formation has been proposed.

  19. Photo-dissociation of hydrogen passivated dopants in gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, L.; Larsson, J.A.; Nolan, M.; Murtagh, M.; Greer, J.C.; Barbe, M.; Bailly, F.; Chevallier, J.; Silvestre, F.S.; Loridant-Bernard, D.; Constant, E.; Constant, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of the photo-dissociation mechanisms of hydrogen passivated n- and p-type dopants in gallium arsenide is presented. The photo-induced dissociation of the Si Ga -H complex has been observed for relatively low photon energies (3.48 eV), whereas the photo-dissociation of C As -H is not observed for photon energies up to 5.58 eV. This fundamental difference in the photo-dissociation behavior between the two dopants is explained in terms of the localized excitation energies about the Si-H and C-H bonds

  20. Quantum State-Resolved Collision Dynamics of Nitric Oxide at Ionic Liquid and Molten Metal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zutz, Amelia Marie

    Detailed molecular scale interactions at the gas-liquid interface are explored with quantum state-to-state resolved scattering of a jet-cooled beam of NO(2pi1/2; N = 0) from ionic liquid and molten metal surfaces. The scattered distributions are probed via laser-induced fluorescence methods, which yield rotational and spin-orbit state populations that elucidate the dynamics of energy transfer at the gas-liquid interface. These collision dynamics are explored as a function of incident collision energy, surface temperature, scattering angle, and liquid identity, all of which are found to substantially affect the degree of rotational, electronic and vibrational excitation of NO via collisions at the liquid surface. Rotational distributions observed reveal two distinct scattering pathways, (i) molecules that trap, thermalize and eventually desorb from the surface (trapping-desorption, TD), and (ii) those that undergo prompt recoil (impulsive scattering, IS) prior to complete equilibration with the liquid surface. Thermally desorbing NO molecules are found to have rotational temperatures close to, but slightly cooler than the surface temperature, indicative of rotational dependent sticking probabilities on liquid surfaces. Nitric oxide is a radical with multiple low-lying electronic states that serves as an ideal candidate for exploring nonadiabatic state-changing collision dynamics at the gas-liquid interface, which induce significant excitation from ground (2pi1/2) to excited (2pi 3/2) spin-orbit states. Molecular beam scattering of supersonically cooled NO from hot molten metals (Ga and Au, Ts = 300 - 1400 K) is also explored, which provide preliminary evidence for vibrational excitation of NO mediated by thermally populated electron-hole pairs in the hot, conducting liquid metals. The results highlight the presence of electronically nonadiabatic effects and build toward a more complete characterization of energy transfer dynamics at gas-liquid interfaces.

  1. Theoretical study of ultraviolet induced photodissociation dynamics of sulfuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Tatsuhiro; Ohta, Ayumi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Ikeda, Kumiko [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-Cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Danielache, Sebastian O. [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-Cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI), Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Department of Environmental Science and Techonology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yoohama 226-8502 (Japan); Nanbu, Shinkoh, E-mail: shinkoh.nanbu@sophia.ac.jp [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-Cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Photodissociation dynamics of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at low-lying electronically excited states were investigated. • Photochemical processes were simulated by on-the-fly ab initio MD. • Sulfuric acid after the excitation to the S{sub 1} state dissociated to HSO{sub 4}(1{sup 2}A″) + H({sup 2}S). • Sulfuric acid after the excitation to the S{sub 2} state dissociated to HSO{sub 4}(2{sup 2}A″) + H({sup 2}S). • The energy region of the UV spectra where NMD fractionation may occur is predicted. - Abstract: Photodissociation dynamics of sulfuric acid after excitation to the first and second excited states (S{sub 1} and S{sub 2}) were studied by an on-the-fly ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on the Zhu–Nakamura version of the trajectory surface hopping (ZN-TSH). Forces acting on the nuclear motion were computed on-the-fly by CASSCF method with Dunning’s augmented cc-pVDZ basis set. It was newly found that the parent molecule dissociated into two reaction-channels (i) HSO{sub 4}(1{sup 2}A″) + H({sup 2}S) by S{sub 1}-excitation, and (ii) HSO{sub 4}(2{sup 2}A″) + H({sup 2}S) by S{sub 2}-excitation. The direct dissociation dynamics yield products different from the SO{sub 2} + 2OH fragments often presented in the literature. Both channels result in the same product and differs only in the electronic state of the HSO{sub 4} fragment{sub .} The trajectories running on S{sub 2} do not hop with S{sub 0} and a nonadiabatic transition happens at the S{sub 2}–S{sub 1} conical intersection located at a longer OH bond-length than the S{sub 1}–S{sub 0} intersection producing an electronic excited state (2{sup 2}A″) of HSO{sub 4} product.

  2. Theoretical treatment of photodissociation of water by time-dependent quantum mechanical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weide, K.

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm for wavepacket propagation, based on Kosloff's method of expansion of the time evolution operator in terms of Chebychev polynomials, and some details of its implementation are described. With the programs developed, quantum-mechanical calculations for up to three independent molecular coordinates are possible and feasible and therefore photodissociation of non-rotating triatomic molecules can be treated exactly. The angular degree of freedom here is handled by expansion in terms of free diatomic rotor states. The time-dependent wave packet picture is compared with the more traditional view of stationary wave functions, and both are used to interpret computational results where appropriate. Two-dimensional calculations have been performed to explain several experimental observations about water photodissociation. All calculations are based on ab initio potential energy surfaces, and it is explained in each case why it is reasonable to neglect the third degree of freedom. Many experimental results are reproduced quantitatively. (orig.) [de

  3. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure: Multiple layers of emitters and multiple initial states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Chen, Y.; Wu, H.; Shirley, D.A.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) has been applied to experimental systems involving multiple layers of emitters and non-s core-level photoemission in an effort to broaden the utility of the technique. Most of the previous systems have been comprised of atomic or molecular overlayers adsorbed onto a single-crystal, metal surface and the photoemission data were taken from an s atomic core-level in the overlayer. For such a system, the acquired ARPEFS data is dominated by the p o final state wave backscattering from the substrate atoms and is well understood. In this study, we investigate ARPEFS as a surface-region structure determination technique when applied to experimental systems comprised of multiple layers of photoemitters and arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission. Understanding the data acquired from multiple layers of photoemitters is useful for studying multilayer interfaces, ''buried'' surfaces, and clean crystals in ultra- high vacuum. The ability to apply ARPEFS to arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission obviously opens up many systems to analysis. Efforts have been ongoing to understand such data in depth. We present clean Cu(111) 3s, 3p, and 3d core-level, normal photoemission data taken on a high resolution soft x-ray beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, California and clean Ni(111) 3p normal photoemission data taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Upton, New York, USA

  4. Highly-resolved modeling of personal transportation energy consumption in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratori, Matteo; Moran, Michael J.; Serra, Emmanuele; Rizzoni, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    This paper centers on the estimation of the total primary energy consumption for personal transportation in the United States, to include gasoline and/or electricity consumption, depending on vehicle type. The bottom-up sector-based estimation method introduced here contributes to a computational tool under development at The Ohio State University for assisting decision making in energy policy, pricing, and investment. In order to simulate highly-resolved consumption profiles three main modeling steps are needed: modeling the behavior of drivers, generating realistic driving profiles, and simulating energy consumption of different kinds of vehicles. The modeling proposed allows for evaluating the impact of plug-in electric vehicles on the electric grid – especially at the distribution level. It can serve as a tool to compare different vehicle types and assist policy-makers in estimating their impact on primary energy consumption and the role transportation can play to reduce oil dependency. - Highlights: • Modeling primary energy consumption for personal transportation in the United States. • Behavior of drivers has been simulated in order to establish when driving events occur and the length of each event. • Realistic driving profiles for each driving event are generated using a stochastic model. • The model allows for comparing the initial cost of different vehicles and their expected energy-use operating cost. • Evaluation of the impact of PEVs on the electric grid – especially at the distribution level – can be performed

  5. Space resolved x-ray diffraction measurements of the supercooled state of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Shinya; Nishida, Akira; Mina, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    In order to measure an ordering process of polymers, the supercooled state near the crystallizing surface was observed by a space resolved X-ray diffraction method at Photon Factory (PF). Using temperature slope crystallization, low density polyethylene and even-number paraffins were examined during crystallization from the melt state. The results indicate that polyethylene shows a sharp b-axis orientation where the lamellar normal and crystalline c-axis are perpendicular to the temperature slope. The crystalline lamellae are well-developed with lamellar thickness of 180 A. The supercooled melt state just above the crystallizing plane shows some diffraction in the small angle region without any crystalline reflection in the wide angle. This fact suggests that a long-range ordering (lamellar structure) appears prior to the short-range one (crystalline structure). The in-situ crystallizing surface was observed by an optical microscope connected to a TV system. The crystallizing surface of even-number paraffins moves to upwards in the temperature slope. In-situ X-ray measurements at PF revealed that the crystalline c-axis and lamellar normal of the even number paraffins are parallel to the temperature slope. From these results, the crystalline ordering and the surface movement of even number paraffins are explained using special nucleation mechanism including a screw dislocation. (author)

  6. Photodissociation dynamics of 1-propanol and 2-propanol at 193.3 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weidong; Yuan Yan; Zhang Jingsong

    2003-01-01

    193.3-nm photodissociation dynamics of jet-cooled 1-propanol and 2-propanol and their partially deuterated variants are examined by using the high-n Rydberg-atom time-of-flight technique. Isotope labeling studies show that O-H bond fission is the primary H-atom production channel in the ultraviolet photodissociation of both 1-propanol and 2-propanol. Center-of-mass (c.m.) product translational energy release of the RO-H dissociation channel is large, with T >=0.78 for H+1-propoxy (n-propoxy) and 0.79 for H+2-propoxy (isoproxy). Maximum c.m. translational energy release yields an upper limit of the O-H bond dissociation energy: 433±2 kJ/mol in 1-propanol and 435±2 kJ/mol in 2-propanol. H-atom product angular distribution is anisotropic (with β≅-0.79 for 1-propanol and -0.77 for 2-propanol), suggesting an electronic transition moment perpendicular to the H-O-C plane and a short excited-state dissociation lifetime (less than a rotational period). Information about photodissociation dynamics and bond energies of the partially deuterated propanols are also obtained. The 193.3-nm photodissociation dynamics of 1-propanol and 2-propanol are nearly identical to each other and are similar to those of methanol and ethanol. This indicates a common RO-H dissociation mechanism: after the n O →σ * (O-H)/3s excitation localized on the H-O-C moiety, the H atom is ejected promptly in the H-O-C plane in a time scale shorter than a rotational period of the parent molecule, and it dissociates along the O-H coordinate on the repulsive excited-state potential-energy surface with a large translational energy release

  7. Testing the effects of message framing, kernel state, and exercise guideline adherence on exercise intentions and resolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Out, Kim; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2014-11-01

    To study the effects of framed messages on exercise intention and resolve. Two (type of frame: gain or loss) × 2 (type of kernel state: desirable or undesirable outcome) post-test study. Participants were recruited online and questioned about their previous exercise behaviour and their exercise risk perception. After this, they were randomly allocated to one of four messages that were different in terms of positive or negative outcomes (type of frame) and in terms of attained or avoided outcomes (type of kernel state). After reading the message, participants indicated their intention and resolve to engage in sufficient exercise. No effects were found for intention. For resolve, there was a significant interaction between type of frame, type of kernel state, and exercise adherence. Those who did not adhere to the exercise guideline and read the loss-framed message with attained outcomes reported significantly higher resolve than all other participants. This study indicates the relevance of including attained outcomes in message framing exercise interventions as well as a focus on exercise resolve. What is already known on this subject? Message framing is commonly used to increase exercise intentions and behaviour. Meta-analyses do not provide consistent support for this theory. Very little attention has been paid to resolve and message factors on framing effects. What does this study add? Framed messages have an effect on exercise resolve, but not on intention. Loss-framed messages with attained outcomes are most persuasive for those who do not adhere to exercise guidelines. Exercise framing studies should include behavioural resolve next to intention. . © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Photodissociation and excitation of interstellar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dishoeck, E.F. van.

    1984-01-01

    Apart from a rather long introduction containing some elementary astrophysics, quantum chemistry and spectroscopy and an incomplete, historical review of molecular observations, this thesis is divided into three sections. In part A, a rigorous quantum chemical and dynamical study is made of the photodissociation processes in the OH and HCl molecules. In part B, the cross sections obtained in part A are used in various astrophysical problems such as the study of the abundances of the OH and HCl molecules in interstellar clouds, the use of the OH abundance as a measure of the cosmic ray ionization rate, the lifetime of the OH radical in comets and the abundance of OH in the solar photosphere. Part C discusses the excitation of the C 2 molecule under interstellar conditions, its use as a diagnostic probe of the temperature, density and strength of the radiation field in interstellar clouds. Quadrupole moments and oscillator strengths are analyzed. (Auth.)

  9. Photodissociation of spatially aligned acetaldehyde cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Kyoung; Silva, Ruchira; Kim, Myung Hwa; Shen, Lei; Suits, Arthur G

    2007-07-26

    Photofragment translational energy and angular distributions are reported for the photodissociation of acetaldehyde cations in the wavelength range 354-363 nm obtained using the DC slice ion imaging technique. Vibrationally selected parent ions were produced by 2+1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) via the 3sCH3CO+, and CH4+. The angular distributions reveal that all product channels have a predominantly parallel recoil anisotropy although the lower beta2 parameter of CH3CO+ indicates the concomitant presence of a perpendicular component. Furthermore, the distinct angular distribution of the CH3CO+ fragments shows a large value of the higher order Legendre polynomial term, providing evidence that acetaldehyde cations are spatially aligned during the ionization process.

  10. Photodissociation spectroscopy of NbnArm complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, W.J.C.; Knickelbein, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of niobium clusters containing 7 to 20 atoms have been measured from 336 to 634 nm by way of photodissociation action spectroscopy of the corresponding van der Waals complexes with argon atoms: Nb n Ar m → hν Nb n + m Ar. The clusters in this size range do not display discrete absorption bands characteristic of molecular behavior, but rather absorption cross sections which increase monotonically with decreasing wavelength. This behavior is in qualitative accord with the absorption behavior predicted by the spherical Mie model for small niobium spheres, however, the measured cross sections are 2--5 times larger than predicted over this wavelength range, with the smallest clusters displaying the largest deviations. Interpreted within the classical electrodynamic framework, these observations suggest that the absorption spectra derive oscillator strength from an incipient surface plasmon, redshifted from its predicted resonance frequency in the vacuum ultraviolet

  11. Mechanisms of Diurnal Precipitation over the United States Great Plains: A Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.-I.; Choi, I.; Tao, W.-K.; Schubert, S. D.; Kang, I.-K.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of summertime diurnal precipitation in the US Great Plains were examined with the two-dimensional (2D) Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud-resolving model (CRM). The model was constrained by the observed large-scale background state and surface flux derived from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program s Intensive Observing Period (IOP) data at the Southern Great Plains (SGP). The model, when continuously-forced by realistic surface flux and large-scale advection, simulates reasonably well the temporal evolution of the observed rainfall episodes, particularly for the strongly forced precipitation events. However, the model exhibits a deficiency for the weakly forced events driven by diurnal convection. Additional tests were run with the GCE model in order to discriminate between the mechanisms that determine daytime and nighttime convection. In these tests, the model was constrained with the same repeating diurnal variation in the large-scale advection and/or surface flux. The results indicate that it is primarily the surface heat and moisture flux that is responsible for the development of deep convection in the afternoon, whereas the large-scale upward motion and associated moisture advection play an important role in preconditioning nocturnal convection. In the nighttime, high clouds are continuously built up through their interaction and feedback with long-wave radiation, eventually initiating deep convection from the boundary layer. Without these upper-level destabilization processes, the model tends to produce only daytime convection in response to boundary layer heating. This study suggests that the correct simulation of the diurnal variation in precipitation requires that the free-atmospheric destabilization mechanisms resolved in the CRM simulation must be adequately parameterized in current general circulation models (GCMs) many of which are overly sensitive to the parameterized boundary layer heating.

  12. Resolving discrete pulsar spin-down states with current and future instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, B.; Stappers, B. W.; Weltevrede, P.

    2018-04-01

    An understanding of pulsar timing noise offers the potential to improve the timing precision of a large number of pulsars as well as facilitating our understanding of pulsar magnetospheres. For some sources, timing noise is attributable to a pulsar switching between two different spin-down rates (\\dot{ν }). Such transitions may be common but difficult to resolve using current techniques. In this work, we use simulations of \\dot{ν }-variable pulsars to investigate the likelihood of resolving individual \\dot{ν } transitions. We inject step changes in the value of \\dot{ν } with a wide range of amplitudes and switching time-scales. We then attempt to redetect these transitions using standard pulsar timing techniques. The pulse arrival-time precision and the observing cadence are varied. Limits on \\dot{ν } detectability based on the effects such transitions have on the timing residuals are derived. With the typical cadences and timing precision of current timing programmes, we find that we are insensitive to a large region of Δ \\dot{ν } parameter space that encompasses small, short time-scale switches. We find, where the rotation and emission states are correlated, that using changes to the pulse shape to estimate \\dot{ν } transition epochs can improve detectability in certain scenarios. The effects of cadence on Δ \\dot{ν } detectability are discussed, and we make comparisons with a known population of intermittent and mode-switching pulsars. We conclude that for short time-scale, small switches, cadence should not be compromised when new generations of ultra-sensitive radio telescopes are online.

  13. Surface State Dynamics of Topological Insulators Investigated by Femtosecond Time- and Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamoon Hedayat

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Topological insulators (TI are known for striking quantum phenomena associated with their spin-polarized topological surface state (TSS. The latter in particular forms a Dirac cone that bridges the energy gap between valence and conduction bands, providing a unique opportunity for prospective device applications. In TI of the BixSb2−xTeySe3−y (BSTS family, stoichiometry determines the morphology and position of the Dirac cone with respect to the Fermi level. In order to engineer specific transport properties, a careful tuning of the TSS is highly desired. Therefore, we have systematically explored BSTS samples with different stoichiometries by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TARPES. This technique provides snapshots of the electronic structure and discloses the carrier dynamics in surface and bulk states, providing crucial information for the design of electro-spin current devices. Our results reveal the central role of doping level on the Dirac cone structure and its femtosecond dynamics. In particular, an extraordinarily long TSS lifetime is observed when the the vertex of the Dirac cone lies at the Fermi level.

  14. Optimal laser control of ultrafast photodissociation of I2- in water: Mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Yoshikazu; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Ohtsuki, Yukiyoshi; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2004-01-01

    A linearized optimal control method in combination with mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulation is used for numerically investigating the possibility of controlling photodissociation wave packets of I 2 - in water. Optimal pulses are designed using an ensemble of photodissociation samples, aiming at the creation of localized dissociation wave packets. Numerical results clearly show the effectiveness of the control although the control achievement is reduced with an increase in the internuclear distance associated with a target region. We introduce effective optimal pulses that are designed using a statistically averaged effective dissociation potential, and show that they semiquantitatively reproduce the control achievements calculated by using optimal pulses. The control mechanisms are interpreted from the time- and frequency-resolved spectra of the effective optimal pulses

  15. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, R. M.; Sciare, J.; Poulain, L.; Kamili, K.; Merkel, M.; Müller, T.; Wiedensohler, A.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; McGillicuddy, E.; O'Connor, I. P.; Sodeau, J. R.; Wenger, J. C.

    2012-02-01

    compared with 85% and 15% respectively for BC estimated from the aethalometer model. On average, the mass size distribution for EC particles is bimodal; the smaller mode is attributed to locally emitted, mostly externally mixed EC particles, while the larger mode is dominated by aged, internally mixed ECOCNOx particles associated with continental transport events. Periods of continental influence were identified using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) "FLEXPART". A consistent minimum between the two EC mass size modes was observed at approximately 400 nm for the measurement period. EC particles below this size are attributed to local emissions using chemical mixing state information and contribute 79% of the scaled ATOFMS EC particle mass, while particles above this size are attributed to continental transport events and contribute 21% of the EC particle mass. These results clearly demonstrate the potential benefit of monitoring size-resolved mass concentrations for the separation of local and continental EC emissions. Knowledge of the relative input of these emissions is essential for assessing the effectiveness of local abatement strategies.

  16. Sources and mixing state of size-resolved elemental carbon particles in a European megacity: Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Healy

    2012-02-01

    mass was apportioned to fossil fuel and biomass burning respectively using the ATOFMS data compared with 85% and 15% respectively for BC estimated from the aethalometer model. On average, the mass size distribution for EC particles is bimodal; the smaller mode is attributed to locally emitted, mostly externally mixed EC particles, while the larger mode is dominated by aged, internally mixed ECOCNOx particles associated with continental transport events. Periods of continental influence were identified using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM "FLEXPART". A consistent minimum between the two EC mass size modes was observed at approximately 400 nm for the measurement period. EC particles below this size are attributed to local emissions using chemical mixing state information and contribute 79% of the scaled ATOFMS EC particle mass, while particles above this size are attributed to continental transport events and contribute 21% of the EC particle mass. These results clearly demonstrate the potential benefit of monitoring size-resolved mass concentrations for the separation of local and continental EC emissions. Knowledge of the relative input of these emissions is essential for assessing the effectiveness of local abatement strategies.

  17. Time-resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy with sub-nanosecond beam blanking for direct evaluation of the local density of states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, R.J.; Weppelman, I.G.C.; Garming, M.W.H.; Kruit, P.; Hoogenboom, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    We show cathodoluminescence-based time-resolved electron beam spectroscopy in order to directly probe the spontaneous emission decay rate that is modified by the local density of states in a nanoscale environment. In contrast to dedicated laser-triggered electron-microscopy setups, we use commercial

  18. Testing the effects of message framing, kernel state, and exercise guideline adherence on exercise intentions and resolve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, G.J.; Out, K.; Rhodes, R.E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To study the effects of framed messages on exercise intention and resolve. Design Two (type of frame: gain or loss) × 2 (type of kernel state: desirable or undesirable outcome) post-test study. Methods Participants were recruited online and questioned about their previous exercise

  19. Study of photodissociation parameters of carboxyhemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'min, V V; Salmin, V V; Provorov, A S; Salmina, A B

    2008-01-01

    The general properties of photodissociation of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in buffer solutions of whole human blood are studied by the flash photolysis method on a setup with intersecting beams. It is shown that the efficiency of photoinduced dissociation of the HbCO complex virtually linearly depends on the photolytic irradiation intensity for the average power density not exceeding 45 mW cm -2 . The general dissociation of the HbCO complex in native conditions occurs in a narrower range of values of the saturation degree than in model experiments with the hemoglobin solution. The dependence of the pulse photolysis efficiency of HbCO on the photolytic radiation wavelength in the range from 550 to 585 nm has a broad bell shape. The efficiency maximum corresponds to the electronic Q transition (porphyrin π-π* absorption) in HbCO at a wavelength of 570 nm. No dissociation of the complex was observed under given experimental conditions upon irradiation of solutions by photolytic radiation at wavelengths above 585 nm. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. DC slice ion imaging study of atomic orbital orientation and alignment in photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Kyoung

    A complete study of atomic photofragment polarization has been achieved by using DC slice imaging, a recently developed approach directly providing the central slice of the full 3D product distribution without any mathematical transformation. In this dissertation, the quantum mechanical treatment adapted for the sliced images has been derived to extract the angular momentum polarization anisotropy parameters for any recoil speeds. The important photodissociation dynamics of small polyatomic molecules has been presented based on the thorough interpretation of the observed orientation and alignment. The first demonstration of DC slice imaging of orbital polarization was a study of the 193 nm photodissociation of ethylene sulfide, followed by detailed investigation in ozone and OCS. In ozone, the speed-dependent orientation was measured for O(1D2) atom produced from photodissociation in the 248--285 nm region. The results show negligible orbital orientation following dissociation by circularly polarized light but strong recoil speed-dependent orientation following photolysis by linearly polarized light at all wavelengths studied. The origin of this polarization is ascribed to nonadiabatic transitions at avoided crossings and at long range. The atomic orbital alignment and orientation, including the higher order moments (K = 3, 4), has been carried out for the photodissociation of OCS at 193 nm. The observed speed-dependent beta and polarization parameters of S(1D2) atom support the interpretation that there are two main dissociation processes: a simultaneous two-surface excitation and the initial single-surface excitation followed by the nonadiabatic crossing to the ground state. The angle- and speed-dependent density matrix can be constructed containing the higher order contributions for circularly-polarized dissociation light. It was shown in one case that the higher order contributions should not be overlooked for an accurate picture of the dissociation dynamics in

  1. Rotationally resolved state-to-state photoionization and the photoelectron study of vanadium monocarbide and its cations (VC/VC(+)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yih Chung; Luo, Zhihong; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Zheng; Song, Ying-Nan; Kuang, Sophie Yajin; Yin, Qing Zhu; Lau, Kai-Chung; Ng, C Y

    2015-04-21

    By employing two-color visible (VIS)-ultraviolet (UV) laser photoionization and pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (PFI-PE) techniques, we have obtained highly rotationally resolved photoelectron spectra for vanadium monocarbide cations (VC(+)). The state-to-state VIS-UV-PFI-PE spectra thus obtained allow unambiguous assignments for the photoionization rotational transitions, resulting in a highly precise value for the adiabatic ionization energy (IE) of vanadium monocarbide (VC), IE(VC) = 57512.0 ± 0.8 cm(-1) (7.13058 ± 0.00010 eV), which is defined as the energy of the VC(+)(X(3)Δ1; v(+) = 0; J(+) = 1) ← VC(X(2)Δ3/2; v'' = 0; J'' = 3/2) photoionization transition. The spectroscopic constants for VC(+)(X(3)Δ1) determined in the present study include the harmonic vibrational frequency ωe(+) = 896.4 ± 0.8 cm(-1), the anharmonicity constant ωe(+)xe(+) = 5.7 ± 0.8 cm(-1), the rotational constants Be(+) = 0.6338 ± 0.0025 cm(-1) and αe(+) = 0.0033 ± 0.0007 cm(-1), the equilibrium bond length re(+) = 1.6549 ± 0.0003 Å, and the spin-orbit coupling constant A = 75.2 ± 0.8 cm(-1) for VC(+)(X(3)Δ1,2,3). These highly precise energetic and spectroscopic data are used to benchmark state-of-the-art CCSDTQ/CBS calculations. In general, good agreement is found between the theoretical predictions and experimental results. The theoretical calculations yield the values, IE(VC) = 7.126 eV; the 0 K bond dissociation energies: D0(V-C) = 4.023 eV and D0(V(+)-C) = 3.663 eV; and heats of formation: ΔH°(f0)(VC) = 835.2, ΔH°(f298)(VC) = 840.4, ΔH°(f0)(VC(+)) = 1522.8, and ΔH°(f298)(VC(+)) = 1528.0 kJ mol(-1).

  2. Photodissociation of dibromoethanes at 248 nm: an ignored channel of Br2 elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Lung; Lee, Ping-Chen; Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, King-Chuen; Kuo, H H; Chen, P H; Chang, A H H

    2009-05-14

    Br(2) molecular elimination is probed in the photodissociation of 1,1- and 1,2-C(2)H(4)Br(2) isomeric forms at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. Their photodissociation processes differ markedly from each other. The quantum yield of the Br(2) fragment in 1,2-dibromoethane is 0.36+/-0.18, in contrast to a value of 0.05+/-0.03 in 1,1-dibromoethane. The vibrational population ratios of Br(2)(v=1)/Br(2)(v=0) are 0.8+/-0.1 and 0.5+/-0.2 for 1,2- and 1,1-dibromoethanes, respectively. The Br(2) yield densities are found to increase by a factor of 35% and 190% for 1,2- and 1,1-dibromoethanes within the same temperature increment. In the ab initio potential energy calculations, the transition state (TS) along the adiabatic ground state surface may correlate to the Br(2) products. The TS energy for 1,2-dibromoethane is well below the excitation energy at 483 kJ/mol, whereas that for 1,1-dibromoethane is slightly above. Such a small TS energy barrier impedes the photodissociation of the ground state 1,1-dibromoethane such that the production yield of Br(2) may become relatively low, but rise rapidly with the temperature. The TS structure shows a larger bond distance of Br-Br in 1,2-dibromoethane than that in 1,1-dibromoethane. That explains why the former isomer may result in hotter vibrational population of the Br(2) fragments.

  3. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  4. Isotope effects in photodissociation: Chemical reaction dynamics and implications for atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Solvejg; Grage, Mette Marie-Louise; Nyman, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    obtaining the absorption and/or photodissociation cross section is a threefold challenge: computing the electronic potential energy surfaces, interpolating the potentials, and finding the cross section either by time-dependent or time-independent methods. We review electronic structure methods used...... for computing accurate potential energy surfaces for the electronic ground and accessible excited state as well as coupling between them (electronic transition dipole moments and diabatic coupling). Methods used for interpolation are discussed. The time-independent methods are based on the reflection principle...

  5. Formation and femtosecond photodissociation of Agn+andAun+ complexes with benzene and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2009-02-01

    The reactions of free, size selected gold and silver cluster cations Agn+andAun+ ( n = 3, 5) with C 6H 6 as well as with a mixture of C 6H 6 and CO were investigated in a radio frequency ion trap under multiple collision condition. While benzene was found to react with all investigated metal clusters exhibiting size dependent adsorbate coverages, the coadsorption of C 6H 6 and CO was only observed on the gold clusters. Photodissociation experiments at 353 and 393 nm, respectively, provided indications for charge transfer induced fragmentation in the case of the silver cluster-benzene complexes. In particular, for Ag(CH)2+ the femtosecond time resolved fragmentation dynamics could be measured.

  6. Vibrational frequencies and dephasing times in excited electronic states by femtosecond time-resolved four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Taiha; Albrecht, A. C.

    1993-06-01

    Time-resolved degenerate four-wave mixing (TRDFWM) for an electronically resonant system in a phase-matching configuration that measures population decay is reported. Because the spectral width of input light exceeds the vibrational Bohr frequency of a strong Raman active mode, the vibrational coherence produces strong oscillations in the TRDFWM signal together with the usual population decay from the excited electronic state. The data are analyzed in terms of a four-level system: ground and excited electronic states each split by a vibrational quantum of a Raman active mode. Absolute frequencies and their dephasing times of the vibrational modes at ≈590 cm -1 are obtained for the excited as well as the ground electronic state. The vibrational dephasing rate in the excited electronic state is about an order of magnitude faster than that in the ground state, the origin of which is speculated upon.

  7. Combining UV photodissociation with electron transfer for peptide structure analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shaffer, C. J.; Marek, Aleš; Pepin, R.; Slováková, K.; Tureček, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2015), s. 470-475 ISSN 1076-5174 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : electron transfer dissociation * laser photodissociation * peptide ions * cation radical * chromophores * isomer distinction Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.541, year: 2015

  8. Controlling the branching ratio of photodissociation using aligned molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.J.; Wendt-Larsen, I.; Stapelfeldt, H.

    1999-01-01

    Using a sample of iodine molecules, aligned by a strong, linearly polarized laser pulse, we control the branching ratio of the I+I and I+I* photodissociation channels by a factor of 26. The control relies on selective photoexcitation of two potential curves that each correlate adiabatically...

  9. An atomic perspective of the photodissociation and geminate recombination of triiodide in condensed phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xian, Rui

    2016-11-15

    The thesis presents progress made towards a thorough understanding of the photodissociation and geminate recombination of triiodide anion (I{sub 3}{sup -}) in solution and solid state using novel time-resolved spectroscopic and structural methods that have matured in the past decade. An isolated I{sub 3}{sup -} has only three degrees of freedom, but in the condensed phase, the case of an open quantum system, its chemistry is transformed because other degrees of freedom from the surroundings (the bath) need to be fully taken into account. This system is a textbook example for understanding dissociation and recombination processes in condensed phases, but unresolved issues about the reaction pathways remain. To probe the issues, firstly, mid-UV pulse shaper-based closed-loop adaptive control as well as open-loop power and chirp control schemes were used in conjunction with single-color pump-probe detection of the yield of the photoproduct diiodide (I{sub 2}{sup -.}) to study the above reaction in ethanol solution. The experiments revealed a strong pump-chirp dependence of the I{sub 2}{sup -.}-yield (as much as 40% change). Subsequently, two possible mechanisms involving additional reaction channels were postulated in order to explain such effect. Secondly, pump-supercontinuum-probe spectroscopy and ultrafast electron diffraction were performed separately on solid state triiodide compound n-(C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}NI{sub 3} (TBAT). This system was chosen to provide a well-defined lattice for the bath and to avail atomic resolution of the condensed phase reaction dynamics. In the optical experiment, coherent oscillations were observed within a probe delay of 1 ps that bear strong resemblance to the stretching modes of ground-state I{sub 3}{sup -} and I{sub 2}{sup -.} fragment, which makes it the first to reliably distinguish the two species in a single measurement. In addition, the spectroscopic signature of a novel intermediate, the tetraiodide anion (I{sub 4}{sup

  10. An atomic perspective of the photodissociation and geminate recombination of triiodide in condensed phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian, Rui

    2016-11-01

    The thesis presents progress made towards a thorough understanding of the photodissociation and geminate recombination of triiodide anion (I_3"-) in solution and solid state using novel time-resolved spectroscopic and structural methods that have matured in the past decade. An isolated I_3"- has only three degrees of freedom, but in the condensed phase, the case of an open quantum system, its chemistry is transformed because other degrees of freedom from the surroundings (the bath) need to be fully taken into account. This system is a textbook example for understanding dissociation and recombination processes in condensed phases, but unresolved issues about the reaction pathways remain. To probe the issues, firstly, mid-UV pulse shaper-based closed-loop adaptive control as well as open-loop power and chirp control schemes were used in conjunction with single-color pump-probe detection of the yield of the photoproduct diiodide (I_2"-".) to study the above reaction in ethanol solution. The experiments revealed a strong pump-chirp dependence of the I_2"-".-yield (as much as 40% change). Subsequently, two possible mechanisms involving additional reaction channels were postulated in order to explain such effect. Secondly, pump-supercontinuum-probe spectroscopy and ultrafast electron diffraction were performed separately on solid state triiodide compound n-(C_4H_9)_4NI_3 (TBAT). This system was chosen to provide a well-defined lattice for the bath and to avail atomic resolution of the condensed phase reaction dynamics. In the optical experiment, coherent oscillations were observed within a probe delay of 1 ps that bear strong resemblance to the stretching modes of ground-state I_3"- and I_2"-". fragment, which makes it the first to reliably distinguish the two species in a single measurement. In addition, the spectroscopic signature of a novel intermediate, the tetraiodide anion (I_4"-".), was identified and its origin is attributed to intermolecular interaction of the

  11. Direct observation of spin-resolved full and empty electron states in ferromagnetic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, G., E-mail: giulia.berti@polimi.it; Calloni, A.; Brambilla, A.; Bussetti, G.; Duò, L.; Ciccacci, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133, Milano (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    We present a versatile apparatus for the study of ferromagnetic surfaces, which combines spin-polarized photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopies. Samples can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy and analyzed in situ. Spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy analysis is done with a hemispherical electron analyzer coupled to a 25 kV-Mott detector. Inverse photoemission spectroscopy experiments are performed with GaAs crystals as spin-polarized electron sources and a UV bandpass photon detector. As an example, measurements on the oxygen passivated Fe(100)-p(1×1)O surface are presented.

  12. Thermochemical nonequilibrium analysis of O2+Ar based on state-resolved kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Gang; Boyd, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermochemical nonequilibrium studies for three lowest lying electronic states of O 2 . • The complete sets of the rovibrational state-to-state transition rates of O 2 +Ar. • Rovibrational relaxations and coupled chemical reactions of O 2 . • Nonequilibrium reaction rates of O 2 derived from the quasi-steady state assumption. - Abstract: The thermochemical nonequilibrium of the three lowest lying electronic states of molecular oxygen, O 2 (X 3 Σ g - ,a 1 Δ g ,b 1 Σ g + ), through interactions with argon is studied in the present work. The multi-body potential energy surfaces of O 2 +Ar are evaluated from the semi-classical RKR potential of O 2 in each electronic state. The rovibrational states and energies of each electronic state are calculated by the quantum mechanical method based on the present inter-nuclear potential of O 2 . Then, the complete sets of the rovibrational state-to-state transition rate coefficients of O 2 +Ar are calculated by the quasi-classical trajectory method including the quasi-bound states. The system of master equations constructed by the present state-to-state transition rate coefficients are solved to analyze the thermochemical nonequilibrium of O 2 +Ar in various heat bath conditions. From these studies, it is concluded that the vibrational relaxation and coupled chemical reactions of each electronic state needs to be treated as a separate nonequilibrium process, and rotational nonequilibrium needs to be considered at translational temperatures above 10,000 K

  13. Getting the job done: Resolving state-federal conflicts in Superfund

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.; Silver, D.

    1998-12-31

    The American system of federalism creates frequent opportunities for clashes between state and federal environmental regulators.State and federal environmental laws overlap but are not easily reconciled. Most federal environmental law provides no clear answer as to how to reconcile differing mandates of state and federal environmental regulators. In this article, they will examine these state-federal conflicts as they played out in 1994 in the cleanup of contaminated sites in the state of Washington. This article describes the way a regional office of the Environmental Protection Agency and the state`s Department of Ecology developed a novel approach to managing the essential tension between overlapping state and federal cleanup laws.

  14. Near ultraviolet photodissociation spectroscopy of Mn{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) and Mn{sup +}(D{sub 2}O)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Wright L.; Copeland, Christopher; Kocak, Abdulkadir; Sallese, Zachary; Metz, Ricardo B., E-mail: rbmetz@chem.umass.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

    2014-11-28

    The electronic spectra of Mn{sup +}(H{sub 2}O) and Mn{sup +}(D{sub 2}O) have been measured from 30 000 to 35 000 cm{sup −1} using photodissociation spectroscopy. Transitions are observed from the {sup 7}A{sub 1} ground state in which the Mn{sup +} is in a 3d{sup 5}4s{sup 1} electronic configuration, to the {sup 7}B{sub 2} (3d{sup 5}4p{sub y}) and {sup 7}B{sub 1} (3d{sup 5}4p{sub x}) excited states with T{sub 0} = 30 210 and 32 274 cm{sup −1}, respectively. Each electronic transition has partially resolved rotational and extensive vibrational structure with an extended progression in the metal−ligand stretch at a frequency of ∼450 cm{sup −1}. There are also progressions in the in-plane bend in the {sup 7}B{sub 2} state, due to vibronic coupling, and the out-of-plane bend in the {sup 7}B{sub 1} state, where the calculation illustrates that this state is slightly non-planar. Electronic structure computations at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ and TD-DFT B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level are also used to characterize the ground and excited states, respectively. These calculations predict a ground state Mn-O bond length of 2.18 Å. Analysis of the experimentally observed vibrational intensities reveals that this bond length decreases by 0.15 ± 0.015 Å and 0.14 ± 0.01 Å in the excited states. The behavior is accounted for by the less repulsive p{sub x} and p{sub y} orbitals causing the Mn{sup +} to interact more strongly with water in the excited states than the ground state. The result is a decrease in the Mn-O bond length, along with an increase in the H-O-H angle. The spectra have well resolved K rotational structure. Fitting this structure gives spin-rotation constants ε{sub aa}″ = −3 ± 1 cm{sup −1} for the ground state and ε{sub aa}′ = 0.5 ± 0.5 cm{sup −1} and ε{sub aa}′ = −4.2 ± 0.7 cm{sup −1} for the first and second excited states, respectively, and A′ = 12.8 ± 0.7 cm{sup −1} for the first excited state. Vibrationally mediated

  15. Energy- and time-resolved microscopy using PEEM: recent developments and state-of-the-art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, N B; Escher, M; Merkel, M [FOCUS GmbH, Neukirchner Strasse 2, 65510 Huenstetten (Germany); Oelsner, A [Surface Concept GmbH, Staudingerweg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Schoenhense, G [Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, 55099 Mainz (Germany)], E-mail: n.weber@focus-gmbh.com

    2008-03-15

    Two novel methods of spectroscopic surface imaging are discussed, both based on photoemission electron microscopy PEEM. They are characterised by a simple electron-optical set up retaining a linear column. An imaging high-pass energy filter has been developed on the basis of lithographically-fabricated microgrids. Owing to a mesh size of only 7{mu}m, no image distortions occur. The present energy resolution is 70 meV. The second approach employs time-of-flight energy dispersion and time-resolved detection using a Delayline Detector. In this case, the drift energy and the time resolution of the detector determine the energy resolution. The present time resolution is 180 ps, giving rise to an energy resolution in the 100 meV range.

  16. Photodissociation of ethylbenzene and n-propylbenzene in a molecular beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Liang; Jiang, Jyh-Chiang; Lee, Yuan T.; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2002-10-01

    The photodissociation of jet-cooled ethylbenzene and n-propylbenzene at both 193 and 248 nm was studied using vacuum ultraviolet photoionization/multimass ion imaging techniques. The photofragment translational energy distributions from both the molecules obtained at 193 nm show that the probability of portioning energy to product translational energy decreases monotonically with increasing translational energy. They indicate that the dissociation occurs from the ground electronic state. However, the photofragment translational energy distributions from both molecules obtained at 248 nm contain a fast and a slow component. 75% of ethylbenzene and 80% of n-propylbenzene following the 248 nm photoexcitation dissociate from electronic excited state, resulting in the fast component. The remaining 25% of ethylbenzene and 20% of n-propylbenzene dissociate through the ground electronic state, giving rise to the slow component. A comparison with an ab initio calculation suggests that the dissociation from the first triplet state corresponds to the fast component in translational energy distribution.

  17. Investigations on the interactions of aurintricarboxylic acid with bovine serum albumin: Steady state/time resolved spectroscopic and docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Munmun; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Ganguly, Tapan

    2011-01-10

    In this paper, the nature of the interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) has been investigated by measuring steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), FT-IR and fluorescence anisotropy in protein environment under physiological conditions. From the analysis of the steady state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching of BSA in aqueous solution in presence of ATA it has been inferred that the nature of the quenching originates from the combined effect of static and dynamic modes. From the determination of the thermodynamic parameters obtained from temperature-dependent changes in K(b) (binding constant) it was apparent that the combined effect of hydrophobic association and electrostatic attraction is responsible for the interaction of ATA with BSA. The effect of ATA on the conformation of BSA has been examined by analyzing CD spectrum. Though the observed results demonstrate some conformational changes in BSA in presence of ATA but the secondary structure of BSA, predominantly of α-helix, is found to retain its identity. Molecular docking of ATA with BSA also indicates that ATA docks through hydrophobic interaction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Resolving the Spatial Structures of Bound Hole States in Black Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhizhan; Fang, Hanyan; Carvalho, Alexandra; Rodin, A S; Liu, Yanpeng; Tan, Sherman J R; Telychko, Mykola; Lv, Pin; Su, Jie; Wang, Yewu; Castro Neto, A H; Lu, Jiong

    2017-11-08

    Understanding the local electronic properties of individual defects and dopants in black phosphorus (BP) is of great importance for both fundamental research and technological applications. Here, we employ low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscope (LT-STM) to probe the local electronic structures of single acceptors in BP. We demonstrate that the charge state of individual acceptors can be reversibly switched by controlling the tip-induced band bending. In addition, acceptor-related resonance features in the tunnelling spectra can be attributed to the formation of Rydberg-like bound hole states. The spatial mapping of the quantum bound states shows two distinct shapes evolving from an extended ellipse shape for the 1s ground state to a dumbbell shape for the 2p x excited state. The wave functions of bound hole states can be well-described using the hydrogen-like model with anisotropic effective mass, corroborated by our theoretical calculations. Our findings not only provide new insight into the many-body interactions around single dopants in this anisotropic two-dimensional material but also pave the way to the design of novel quantum devices.

  19. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Guorong; Neville, Simon P.; Schalk, Oliver; Sekikawa, Taro; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Worth, Graham A.; Stolow, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B 1 (π3p y ) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A 2 (πσ ∗ ) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH 3 dissociation coordinate

  20. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of N-methylpyrrole: A time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guorong [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information & Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Neville, Simon P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Schalk, Oliver [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Sekikawa, Taro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Kita-13 Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ashfold, Michael N. R. [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Worth, Graham A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Stolow, Albert, E-mail: astolow@uottawa.ca [National Research Council Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, 10 Marie Curie, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-01-07

    The dynamics of N-methylpyrrole following excitation at wavelengths in the range 241.5-217.0 nm were studied using a combination of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES), ab initio quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree method, as well as high-level photoionization cross section calculations. Excitation at 241.5 and 236.2 nm results in population of the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, in agreement with previous studies. Excitation at 217.0 nm prepares the previously neglected B{sub 1}(π3p{sub y}) Rydberg state, followed by prompt internal conversion to the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state. In contrast with the photoinduced dynamics of pyrrole, the lifetime of the wavepacket in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state was found to vary with excitation wavelength, decreasing by one order of magnitude upon tuning from 241.5 nm to 236.2 nm and by more than three orders of magnitude when excited at 217.0 nm. The order of magnitude difference in lifetimes measured at the longer excitation wavelengths is attributed to vibrational excitation in the A{sub 2}(πσ{sup ∗}) state, facilitating wavepacket motion around the potential barrier in the N–CH{sub 3} dissociation coordinate.

  1. Quantum state-resolved, bulk gas energetics: Comparison of theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaffery, Anthony J., E-mail: A.J.McCaffery@sussex.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Sussex, Brighton, Sussex BN1 6SJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-21

    Until very recently, the computational model of state-to-state energy transfer in large gas mixtures, introduced by the author and co-workers, has had little experimental data with which to assess the accuracy of its predictions. In a novel experiment, Alghazi et al. [Chem. Phys. 448, 76 (2015)] followed the equilibration of highly vibrationally excited CsH(D) in baths of H{sub 2}(D{sub 2}) with simultaneous time- and quantum state-resolution. Modal temperatures of vibration, rotation, and translation for CsH(D) were obtained and presented as a function of pump-probe delay time. Here the data from this study are used as a test of the accuracy of the computational method, and in addition, the consequent changes in bath gas modal temperatures, not obtainable in the experiment, are predicted. Despite large discrepancies between initial CsH(D) vibrational states in the experiment and those available using the computational model, the quality of agreement is sufficient to conclude that the model’s predictions constitute at least a very good representation of the overall equilibration that, for some measurements, is very accurate.

  2. Photodissociation of Small Molecules and Photoionization of Free Radicals Using the VUV Velocity-Map Imaging Photoion and Photoelectron Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong

    The tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser generated through the two-photon resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing scheme is combined with the newly developed time-slice velocity map imaging photoion method to study the photodissociation of small molecules in the VUV region, and with the velocity map imaging photoelectron method to study the photoionization of free radicals. The photodissociation dynamics of NO in the energy region around 13.5 eV has been investigated. Branching ratios of the three lowest dissociation channels of 12C 16O that produce C(3P) + O(3P), C( 1D) + O(3P) and C(3P) + O(1D) are measured for the first time in the VUV region from 102,500 cm-1 to 110,500 cm-1, valuable information of the dissociation dynamics for this prototype system has been deduced. We demonstrated an experiment that has two independently tunable VUV lasers and a time-slice velocity map imaging setup, this provides us a global way to perform systematic state-selected photodissociation of small molecules via state-selected detection of the atomic products in the VUV region. The velocity map imaging photoelectron method was successfully used to obtain the photoelectron spectrum of the propargyl radical (C3H3) via a single VUV photoionization process. The propargyl radical is generated by the 193 nm laser photodissociation of the precursor C3H3Cl. This is the first time that the velocity map imaging photoelectron method is used to get the photoelectron spectra of free radicals, indicating that it is a powerful technique for studying the photoionization of free radicals which are always hard to be produced with high enough number densities for spectroscopic studies. This dissertation is mainly based on the following peer-reviewed journal articles: 1. Hong Gao, Yang Pan, Lei Yang, Jingang Zhou, C. Y. Ng and William M. Jackson. "Time-slice velocity-map ion imaging studies of the Photodissociation of NO in the vacuum ultraviolet region", the Journal of Chemical Physics, 136, 134302

  3. TD-DFT Insight into Photodissociation of Co-C Bond in Coenzyme B12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Michal Kozlowski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme B12 (AdoCbl is one of the most biologically active forms of vitamin B12, and continues to be a topic of active research interest. The mechanism of Co-C bond cleavage in AdoCbl, and the corresponding enzymatic reactions are however, not well understood at the molecular level. In this work, time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT has been applied to investigate the photodissociation of coenzyme B12. To reduce computational cost, while retaining the major spectroscopic features of AdoCbl, a truncated model based on ribosylcobalamin (RibCbl was used to simulate Co-C photodissociation. Equilibrium geometries of RibCbl were obtained by optimization at the DFT/BP86/TZVP level of theory, and low-lying excited states were calculated by TD-DFT using the same functional and basis set. The calculated singlet states, and absorption spectra were simulated in both the gas phase, and water, using the polarizable continuum model (PCM. Both spectra were in reasonable agreement with experimental data, and potential energy curves based on vertical excitations were plotted to explore the nature of Co-C bond dissociation. It was found that a repulsive 3(σCo-C → σ*Co-C triplet state became dissociative at large Co-C bond distance, similar to a previous observation for methylcobalamin (MeCbl. Furthermore, potential energy surfaces (PESs obtained as a function of both Co-CRib and Co-NIm distances, identify the S1 state as a key intermediate generated during photoexcitation of RibCbl, attributed to a mixture of a MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer and a σ bonding-ligand charge transfer (SBLCT states.

  4. Time-resolved imaging of domain pattern destruction and recovery via nonequilibrium magnetization states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Philipp; Ewald, Johannes; Wieland, Marek; Nisius, Thomas; Vogel, Andreas; Viefhaus, Jens; Meier, Guido; Wilhein, Thomas; Drescher, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The destruction and formation of equilibrium multidomain patterns in permalloy (Ni80Fe20 ) microsquares has been captured using pump-probe x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectromicroscopy at a new full-field magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy endstation with subnanosecond time resolution. The movie sequences show the dynamic magnetization response to intense Oersted field pulses of approximately 200-ps root mean square (rms) duration and the magnetization reorganization to the ground-state domain configuration. The measurements display how a vortex flux-closure magnetization distribution emerges out of a nonequilibrium uniform single-domain state. During the destruction of the initial vortex pattern, we have traced the motion of the central vortex core that is ejected out of the microsquare at high velocities exceeding 1 km/s. A reproducible recovery into a defined final vortex state with stable chirality and polarity could be achieved. Using an additional external bias field, the transient reversal of the square magnetization direction could be monitored and consistently reproduced by micromagnetic simulations.

  5. Potential energy surface from spectroscopic data in the photodissociation of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwa Joong; Kim, Young Sik

    2001-01-01

    The time-dependent tracking inversion method is studied to extract the potential energy surface of the electronic excited state in the photodissociation of triatomic molecules. Based on the relay of the regularized inversion procedure and time-dependent wave packet propagation, the algorithm extracts the underlying potential energy surface piece by tracking the time-dependent data, which can be synthesized from Raman excitation profiles. We have demonstrated the algorithm to extract the potential energy surface of electronic excited state for NO 2 molecule where the wave packet split on a saddle-shaped surface. Finally, we describe the merits of the time-dependent tracking inversion method compared with the time-dependent inversion method and discussed several extensions of the algorithm

  6. Photodissociation spectroscopy of the Mg + -CO2 complex and its isotopic analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, C. S.; Willey, K. F.; Robbins, D. L.; Pilgrim, J. S.; Duncan, M. A.

    1993-02-01

    Mg+-CO2 ion-molecule cluster complexes are produced by laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle cluster source. The vibronic spectroscopy in these complexes is studied with mass-selected photodissociation spectroscopy in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Two excited electronic states are observed (2) 2Σ+ and 2Π. The 2Π state has a vibrational progression in the metal-CO2 stretching mode (ωe'=381.8 cm-1). The complexes are linear (Mg+-OCO) and are bound by the charge-quadrupole interaction. The dissociation energy (D0`) is 14.7 kcal/mol. Corresponding spectra are measured for each of the 24, 25, and 26 isotopes of magnesium. These results are compared to theoretical predictions made by Bauschlicher and co-workers.

  7. Visualizing chemical states and defects induced magnetism of graphene oxide by spatially-resolved-X-ray microscopy and spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y F; Singh, Shashi B; Limaye, Mukta V; Shao, Y C; Hsieh, S H; Chen, L Y; Hsueh, H C; Wang, H T; Chiou, J W; Yeh, Y C; Chen, C W; Chen, C H; Ray, Sekhar C; Wang, J; Pong, W F; Takagi, Y; Ohigashi, T; Yokoyama, T; Kosugi, N

    2015-10-20

    This investigation studies the various magnetic behaviors of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and elucidates the relationship between the chemical states that involve defects therein and their magnetic behaviors in GO sheets. Magnetic hysteresis loop reveals that the GO is ferromagnetic whereas photo-thermal moderately reduced graphene oxide (M-rGO) and heavily reduced graphene oxide (H-rGO) gradually become paramagnetic behavior at room temperature. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and corresponding X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were utilized to investigate thoroughly the variation of the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups, as well as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states in flat and wrinkle regions to clarify the relationship between the spatially-resolved chemical states and the magnetism of GO, M-rGO and H-rGO. The results of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism further support the finding that C 2p(σ*)-derived states are the main origin of the magnetism of GO. Based on experimental results and first-principles calculations, the variation in magnetic behavior from GO to M-rGO and to H-rGO is interpreted, and the origin of ferromagnetism is identified as the C 2p(σ*)-derived states that involve defects/vacancies rather than the C 2p(π*) states that are bound with oxygen-containing and hydroxyl groups on GO sheets.

  8. Circularly polarized near-field optical mapping of spin-resolved quantum Hall chiral edge states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamyouda, Syuhei; Ito, Hironori; Shibata, Yusuke; Kashiwaya, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masumi; Akazaki, Tatsushi; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Ootuka, Youiti; Nomura, Shintaro

    2015-04-08

    We have successfully developed a circularly polarized near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) that enables us to irradiate circularly polarized light with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. As a demonstration, we perform real-space mapping of the quantum Hall chiral edge states near the edge of a Hall-bar structure by injecting spin polarized electrons optically at low temperature. The obtained real-space mappings show that spin-polarized electrons are injected optically to the two-dimensional electron layer. Our general method to locally inject spins using a circularly polarized NSOM should be broadly applicable to characterize a variety of nanomaterials and nanostructures.

  9. Two-photon spectral amplitude of entangled states resolved in separable Schmidt modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avella, A; Brida, G; Gramegna, M; Shurupov, A; Genovese, M; Chekhova, M

    2015-01-01

    The ability to access high dimensionality in Hilbert spaces represents a demanding key-stone for state-of-the-art quantum information. The manipulation of entangled states in continuous variables, wavevector as well frequency, represents a powerful resource in this sense. The number of dimensions of the Hilbert space that can be used in practical information protocols can be determined by the number of Schmidt modes that it is possible to address one by one. In the case of wavevector variables, the Schmidt modes can be losslessly selected using single-mode fibre and a spatial light modulator, but no similar procedure exists for the frequency space. The aim of this work is to present a technique to engineer the spectral properties of biphoton light, emitted via ultrafast spontaneous parametric down conversion, in such a way that the two-photon spectral amplitude (TPSA) contains several non-overlapping Schmidt modes, each of which can be filtered losslessly in frequency variables. Such TPSA manipulation is operated by a fine balancing of parameters like the pump frequency, the shaping of pump pulse spectrum, the dispersion dependence of spontaneous parametric down-conversion crystals as well as their length. Measurements have been performed exploiting the group velocity dispersion induced by the passage of optical fields through dispersive media, operating a frequency-to-time two-dimensional Fourier transform of the TPSA. Exploiting this kind of measurement we experimentally demonstrate the ability to control the Schmidt modes structure in TPSA through the pump spectrum manipulation. (paper)

  10. Control of HOD photodissociation dynamics via bond-selective infrared multiphoton excitation and a femtosecond ultraviolet laser pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, Bjarne; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1992-01-01

    moment, excites the molecule to a dissociative electronic state. We consider the HOD molecule which is ideal due to the local mode structure of the vibrational states. It is shown that selective and localized bond stretching can be created in simple laser fields. When such a nonstationary vibrating HOD...... molecule is photodissociated with a short laser pulse (~5 fs) complete selectivity between the channels H+OD and D+OH is observed over the entire absorption band covering these channels. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  11. State-Resolved Metal Nanoparticle Dynamics Viewed through the Combined Lenses of Ultrafast and Magneto-optical Spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tian; Herbert, Patrick J; Zheng, Hongjun; Knappenberger, Kenneth L

    2018-05-08

    Electronic carrier dynamics play pivotal roles in the functional properties of nanomaterials. For colloidal metals, the mechanisms and influences of these dynamics are structure dependent. The coherent carrier dynamics of collective plasmon modes for nanoparticles (approximately 2 nm and larger) determine optical amplification factors that are important to applied spectroscopy techniques. In the nanocluster domain (sub-2 nm), carrier coupling to vibrational modes affects photoluminescence yields. The performance of photocatalytic materials featuring both nanoparticles and nanoclusters also depends on the relaxation dynamics of nonequilibrium charge carriers. The challenges for developing comprehensive descriptions of carrier dynamics spanning both domains are multifold. Plasmon coherences are short-lived, persisting for only tens of femtoseconds. Nanoclusters exhibit discrete carrier dynamics that can persist for microseconds in some cases. On this time scale, many state-dependent processes, including vibrational relaxation, charge transfer, and spin conversion, affect carrier dynamics in ways that are nonscalable but, rather, structure specific. Hence, state-resolved spectroscopy methods are needed for understanding carrier dynamics in the nanocluster domain. Based on these considerations, a detailed understanding of structure-dependent carrier dynamics across length scales requires an appropriate combination of spectroscopic methods. Plasmon mode-specific dynamics can be obtained through ultrafast correlated light and electron microscopy (UCLEM), which pairs interferometric nonlinear optical (INLO) with electron imaging methods. INLO yields nanostructure spectral resonance responses, which capture the system's homogeneous line width and coherence dynamics. State-resolved nanocluster dynamics can be obtained by pairing ultrafast with magnetic-optical spectroscopy methods. In particular, variable-temperature variable-field (VTVH) spectroscopies allow quantification

  12. Theoretical Concepts in Molecular Photodissociation Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1995-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Quantum Dynamics of Molecular Photofragmentation The Total Reaction Probability Final Product Distributions Time-Independent Approach, Stationary Scattering States Gaussian Wave Packet Dynamics Wigner Phase Space Representation The Diatomic...

  13. Photodissociation dynamics of CH3C(O)SH in argon matrix: A QM/MM nonadiabatic dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shu-Hua; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Fang, Qiu; Cui, Ganglong

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we have first employed the combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to study the photodissociation mechanism of thioacetic acid CH3C(O)SH in the S1, T1, and S0 states in argon matrix. CH3C(O)SH is treated quantum mechanically using the complete active space self-consistent field and complete active space second-order perturbation theory methods; argon matrix is described classically using Lennard-Jones potentials. We find that the C-S bond fission is predominant due to its small barriers of ca. 3.0 and 1.0 kcal/mol in the S1 and T1 states. It completely suppresses the nearby C—C bond fission. After the bond fission, the S1 radical pair of CH3CO and SH can decay to the S0 and T1 states via internal conversion and intersystem crossing, respectively. In the S0 state, the radical pair can either recombine to form CH3C(O)SH or proceed to form molecular products of CH2CO and H2S. We have further employed our recently developed QM/MM generalized trajectory-based surface-hopping method to simulate the photodissociation dynamics of CH3C(O)SH. In 1 ps dynamics simulation, 56% trajectories stay at the Franck-Condon region; the S1 C—S bond fission takes place in the remaining 44% trajectories. Among all nonadiabatic transitions, the S1 → S0 internal conversion is major (55%) but the S1 → T1 intersystem crossing is still comparable and cannot be ignored, which accounts for 28%. Finally, we have found a radical channel generating the molecular products of CH2CO and H2S, which is complementary to the concerted molecular channel. The present work sets the stage for simulating photodissociation dynamics of similar thio-carbonyl systems in matrix.

  14. Single photon excimer laser photodissociation of highly vibrationally excited polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiee, J.J.; Wampler, F.B.; Rice, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    The ir + uv photodissociation of SF 6 has been performed using CO 2 and ArF lasers. The two-color photolysis significantly enhances the photodissociation process over ArF irradiation alone and is found to preserve the initial isotopic specificity of the ir excitation process

  15. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of quinine sulfate dication bound to sodium dodecylsulfate micelles: Fluorescent complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D., E-mail: ddpant@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-15

    Interaction of quinine sulfate dication (QSD) with anionic, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been studied at different premicellar, micellar and postmicellar concentrations in aqueous phase using steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy techniques. At premicellar concentrations of SDS, the decrease in absorbance, appearance of an extra fluorescence band at lower wavelengths and tri-exponential decay behavior of fluorescence, are attributed to complex formation between QSD molecules and surfactant monomers. At postmicellar concentrations the red shift in fluorescence spectrum, increase in quantum yield and increase in fluorescence lifetimes are attributed to incorporation of solute molecules to micelles. At lower concentrations of SDS, a large shift in fluorescence is observed on excitation at the red edge of absorption spectrum and this is explained in terms of distribution of ion pairs of different energies in the ground state and the observed fluorescence lifetime behavior corroborates with this model. The temporal fluorescence anisotropy decay of QSD in SDS micelles allowed determination of restriction on the motion of the fluorophore. All the different techniques used in this study reveal that the photophysics of QSD is very sensitive to the microenvironments of SDS micelles and QSD molecules reside at the water-micelle interface. -- Highlights: • Probe molecule is very sensitive to microenvironment of micelles. • Highly fluorescent ion-pair formation has been observed. • Modulated photophysics of probe molecule in micellar solutions has been observed. • Probe molecules strongly bind with micelles and reside at probe–micelle interface.

  16. A single-column particle-resolved model for simulating the vertical distribution of aerosol mixing state: WRF-PartMC-MOSAIC-SCM v1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey H.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    The PartMC-MOSAIC particle-resolved aerosol model was previously developed to predict the aerosol mixing state as it evolves in the atmosphere. However, the modeling framework was limited to a zero-dimensional box model approach without resolving spatial gradients in aerosol concentrations. This paper presents the development of stochastic particle methods to simulate turbulent diffusion and dry deposition of aerosol particles in a vertical column within the planetary boundary layer. The new model, WRF-PartMC-MOSAIC-SCM, resolves the vertical distribution of aerosol mixing state. We verified the new algorithms with analytical solutions for idealized test cases and illustrate the capabilities with results from a 2-day urban scenario that shows the evolution of black carbon mixing state in a vertical column.

  17. Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Polfer, Nicolas C

    2014-01-01

    This lecture notes book presents how enhanced structural information of biomolecular ions can be obtained from interaction with photons of specific frequency - laser light. The methods described in the book ""Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions"" make use of the fact that the discrete energy and fast time scale of photoexcitation can provide more control in ion activation. This activation is the crucial process producing structure-informative product ions that cannot be generated with more conventional heating methods, such as collisional activation. Th

  18. Photodissociation and photoionisation of atoms and molecules of astrophysical interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heays, A. N.; Bosman, A. D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2017-06-01

    A new collection of photodissociation and photoionisation cross sections for 102 atoms and molecules of astrochemical interest has been assembled, along with a brief review of the basic physical processes involved. These have been used to calculate dissociation and ionisation rates, with uncertainties, in a standard ultraviolet interstellar radiation field (ISRF) and for other wavelength-dependent radiation fields, including cool stellar and solar radiation, Lyman-α dominated radiation, and a cosmic-ray induced ultraviolet flux. The new ISRF rates generally agree within 30% with our previous compilations, with a few notable exceptions. Comparison with other databases such as PHIDRATES is made. The reduction of rates in shielded regions was calculated as a function of dust, molecular and atomic hydrogen, atomic C, and self-shielding column densities. The relative importance of these shielding types depends on the atom or molecule in question and the assumed dust optical properties. All of the new data are publicly available from the Leiden photodissociation and ionisation database. Sensitivity of the calculated rates to variation of temperature and isotope, and uncertainties in measured or calculated cross sections, are tested and discussed. Tests were conducted on the new rates with an interstellar-cloud chemical model, and find general agreement (within a factor of two) in abundances obtained with the previous iteration of the Leiden database assuming an ISRF, and order-of-magnitude variations assuming various kinds of stellar radiation. The newly parameterised dust-shielding factors makes a factor-of-two difference to many atomic and molecular abundances relative to parameters currently in the UDfA and KIDA astrochemical reaction databases. The newly-calculated cosmic-ray induced photodissociation and ionisation rates differ from current standard values up to a factor of 5. Under high temperature and cosmic-ray-flux conditions the new rates alter the equilibrium

  19. Steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic investigations on the photoreactions involved within the electronically excited electron acceptor 9-cyanoanthracene in presence of benzotriazole and benzimidazole donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Bardhan, Munmun; Ganguly, Tapan

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical, 'steady-state' and 'time-resolved' spectroscopic investigations were made on the well-known electron acceptor 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA) when interacted with the electron donors benzotriazole (BZT) and benzimidazole (BMI) molecules. Though electrochemical measurements indicate the thermodynamical possibility of occurrences of photoinduced electron transfer reactions within these reacting systems in the lowest excited singlet state (S 1 ) of the acceptor CNA but the steady-state and time-resolved measurements clearly demonstrate only the triplet-initiated charge separation reactions. It was reported earlier that in the cases of disubstituted indole molecules the occurrences of photoinduced electron transfer reactions were apparent both in the excited singlet and triplet states of the acceptor 9-cyanoanthracene, but the similarly structured present donor molecules benzotriazole (and benzimidazole) behave differently from indoles. The weak ground state complex formations within the presently studied reacting systems appear to be responsible for the observed static quenching phenomena as evidenced from the time-resolved fluorescence studies. Time-resolved spectroscopic investigations demonstrate the formation of the ground state of the reacting components (donor and acceptor) through recombination of triplet ion-pairs via formations of contact neutral radical produced by H-abstraction mechanism.

  20. Time-resolved and steady-state studies of biologically and chemically relevant systems using laser, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Charles Ashley [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    In Chapter 2 several experimental and data analysis methods used in this thesis are described. In Chapter 3 steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the concentration of the efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a, in the feces of animals and it was found that their levels far exceed those reported to be inhibitory to efflux pumps. In Chapter 4 the solvation dynamics of 6-Propionyl-2-(N,Ndimethyl) aminonaphthalene (PRODAN) was studied in reverse micelles. The two fluorescent states of PRODAN solvate on different time scales and as such care must be exercised in solvation dynamic studies involving it and its analogs. In Chapter 5 we studied the experimental and theoretical solvation dynamics of coumarin 153 (C153) in wild-type (WT) and modified myoglobins. Based on the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence studies, we have concluded that it is important to thoroughly characterize the structure of a protein and probe system before comparing the theoretical and experimental results. In Chapter 6 the photophysical and spectral properties of a derivative of the medically relevant compound curcumin called cyclocurcumin was studied. Based on NMR, fluorescence, and absorption studies, the ground- and excited-states of cyclocurcumin are complicated by the existence of multiple structural isomers. In Chapter 7 the hydrolysis of cellulose by a pure form of cellulase in an ionic liquid, HEMA, and its aqueous mixtures at various temperatures were studied with the goal of increasing the cellulose to glucose conversion for biofuel production. It was found that HEMA imparts an additional stability to cellulase and can allow for faster conversion of cellulose to glucose using a pre-treatment step in comparison to only buffer.

  1. Photodissociation of hydrogen iodide on the surface of large argon clusters: The orientation of the librational wave function and the scattering from the cluster cage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavicek, Petr; Jungwirth, Pavel; Lewerenz, Marius; Nahler, N. Hendrik; Farnik, Michal; Buck, Udo

    2004-01-01

    A set of photodissociation experiments and simulations of hydrogen iodide (HI) on Ar n clusters, with an average size =139, has been carried out for different laser polarizations. The doped clusters are prepared by a pick-up process. The HI molecule is then photodissociated by a UV laser pulse and the outgoing H fragment is ionized by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in a (2+1) excitation scheme within the same laser pulse at the wavelength of 243 nm. The measured time-of-flight spectra are transformed into hydrogen kinetic energy distributions. They exhibit a strong fraction of caged H atoms at zero-kinetic energy and peaks at the unperturbed cage exit for both spin-orbit channels nearly independent of the polarization. At this dissociation wavelength, the bare HI molecule exhibits a strict state separation, with a parallel transition to the spin-orbit excited state and perpendicular transitions to the ground state. The experimental results have been reproduced using molecular simulation techniques. Classical molecular dynamics was used to estimate the HI dopant distribution after the pick-up procedure. Subsequently, quasi-classical molecular dynamics (Wigner trajectories approach) has been applied for the photodissociation dynamics. The following main results have been obtained: (i) The HI dopant lands on the surface of the argon cluster during the pick-up process, (ii) zero-point energy plays a dominant role for the hydrogen orientation in the ground state of HI-Ar n surface clusters, qualitatively changing the result of the photodissociation experiment upon increasing the number of argon atoms, and, finally, (iii) the scattering of hydrogen atoms from the cage which originate from different dissociation states seriously affects the experimentally measured kinetic energy distributions

  2. Photodissociation of HCN and HNC isomers in the 7-10 eV energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenel, Aurelie; Roncero, Octavio, E-mail: octavio.roncero@csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Aguado, Alfredo [Departamento de Química Física Aplicada (UAM), Unidad Asociada a IFF-CSIC, Facultad de Ciencias Módulo 14, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Agúndez, Marcelino; Cernicharo, José [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/ Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, 28049 Cantoblanco (Spain)

    2016-04-14

    The ultraviolet photoabsorption spectra of the HCN and HNC isomers have been simulated in the 7-10 eV photon energy range. For this purpose, the three-dimensional adiabatic potential energy surfaces of the 7 lowest electronic states, and the corresponding transition dipole moments, have been calculated, at multireference configuration interaction level. The spectra are calculated with a quantum wave packet method on these adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The spectra for the 3 lower excited states, the dissociative electronic states, correspond essentially to predissociation peaks, most of them through tunneling on the same adiabatic state. The 3 higher electronic states are bound, hereafter electronic bound states, and their spectra consist of delta lines, in the adiabatic approximation. The radiative lifetime towards the ground electronic states of these bound states has been calculated, being longer than 10 ns in all cases, much longer that the characteristic predissociation lifetimes. The spectra of HCN is compared with the available experimental and previous theoretical simulations, while in the case of HNC there are no previous studies to our knowledge. The spectrum for HNC is considerably more intense than that of HCN in the 7-10 eV photon energy range, which points to a higher photodissociation rate for HNC, compared to HCN, in astrophysical environments illuminated by ultraviolet radiation.

  3. Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging Using Solid-State Detectors: Characteristics, Present Status, and Research Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayed, Mrwan; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-09-14

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and diffuse optical imaging (DOI) are emerging non-invasive imaging modalities that have wide spread potential applications in many fields, particularly for structural and functional imaging in medicine. In this article, we review time-resolved diffuse optical imaging (TR-DOI) systems using solid-state detectors with a special focus on Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) and Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). These TR-DOI systems can be categorized into two types based on the operation mode of the detector (free-running or time-gated). For the TR-DOI prototypes, the physical concepts, main components, figures-of-merit of detectors, and evaluation parameters are described. The performance of TR-DOI prototypes is evaluated according to the parameters used in common protocols to test DOI systems particularly basic instrumental performance (BIP). In addition, the potential features of SPADs and SiPMs to improve TR-DOI systems and expand their applications in the foreseeable future are discussed. Lastly, research challenges and future developments for TR-DOI are discussed for each component in the prototype separately and also for the entire system.

  4. Laser wakefield generated X-ray probe for femtosecond time-resolved measurements of ionization states of warm dense aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, M. Z.; Chen, Z.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Fedosejevs, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada); Fourmaux, S.; Saraf, A.; Otani, K.; Kieffer, J. C. [INRS-EMT, Université du Québec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Ng, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    We have developed a laser wakefield generated X-ray probe to directly measure the temporal evolution of the ionization states in warm dense aluminum by means of absorption spectroscopy. As a promising alternative to the free electron excited X-ray sources, Betatron X-ray radiation, with femtosecond pulse duration, provides a new technique to diagnose femtosecond to picosecond transitions in the atomic structure. The X-ray probe system consists of an adjustable Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscope for focusing the Betatron emission to a small probe spot on the sample being measured, and a flat Potassium Acid Phthalate Bragg crystal spectrometer to measure the transmitted X-ray spectrum in the region of the aluminum K-edge absorption lines. An X-ray focal spot size of around 50 μm was achieved after reflection from the platinum-coated 10-cm-long KB microscope mirrors. Shot to shot positioning stability of the Betatron radiation was measured resulting in an rms shot to shot variation in spatial pointing on the sample of 16 μm. The entire probe setup had a spectral resolution of ∼1.5 eV, a detection bandwidth of ∼24 eV, and an overall photon throughput efficiency of the order of 10{sup −5}. Approximately 10 photons were detected by the X-ray CCD per laser shot within the spectrally resolved detection band. Thus, it is expected that hundreds of shots will be required per absorption spectrum to clearly observe the K-shell absorption features expected from the ionization states of the warm dense aluminum.

  5. Photodissociation dynamics of 2-chloro-6-nitrotoluene and nitrocyclopentane in gas phase: Laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawade, Monali N.; Saha, Ankur; Upadhyaya, Hari P.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D.

    2014-10-01

    Photodissociation of 2-chloro-6-nitrotoluene (ClNT) at 193, 248 and 266 nm and nitrocyclopentane (NCP) at 193 nm leads to the formation of OH, as detected by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The nascent OH produced from the photolysis of ClNT at all the wavelengths is vibrationally cold, with the Boltzmann type rotational state distributions. However, the nascent OH product from NCP is in the ground and vibrationally excited states with the measured average relative population in ν″ = 1 to that in ν″ = 0 of 0.12 ± 0.03, and these levels are characterized by rotational temperatures of 650 ± 180 K and 1570 ± 90 K, respectively. The translational energy partitioned in the OH fragment has been measured for photodissociation of both ClNT and NCP. On the basis of both the experimental results and the ground state molecular orbital (MO) calculations, a plausible mechanism for the OH formation has been proposed.

  6. Photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical at 248 and 193 nm using fast-beam photofragment translational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Aaron W.; Ryazanov, Mikhail; Sullivan, Erin N.; Neumark, Daniel M., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-07-14

    The photodissociation dynamics of the methyl perthiyl radical (CH{sub 3}SS) have been investigated using fast-beam coincidence translational spectroscopy. Methyl perthiyl radicals were produced by photodetachment of the CH{sub 3}SS{sup −} anion followed by photodissociation at 248 nm (5.0 eV) and 193 nm (6.4 eV). Photofragment mass distributions and translational energy distributions were measured at each dissociation wavelength. Experimental results show S atom loss as the dominant (96%) dissociation channel at 248 nm with a near parallel, anisotropic angular distribution and translational energy peaking near the maximal energy available to ground state CH{sub 3}S and S fragments, indicating that the dissociation occurs along a repulsive excited state. At 193 nm, S atom loss remains the major fragmentation channel, although S{sub 2} loss becomes more competitive and constitutes 32% of the fragmentation. The translational energy distributions for both channels are very broad at this wavelength, suggesting the formation of the S{sub 2} and S atom products in several excited electronic states.

  7. Nonadiabatic effects in C-Br bond scission in the photodissociation of bromoacetyl chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valero, Rosendo; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2006-01-01

    Bromoacetyl chloride photodissociation has been interpreted as a paradigmatic example of a process in which nonadiabatic effects play a major role. In molecular beam experiments by Butler and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 95, 3848 (1991); J. Chem. Phys. 97, 355 (1992)], BrCH 2 C(O)Cl was prepared in its ground electronic state (S 0 ) and excited with a laser at 248 nm to its first excited singlet state (S 1 ). The two main ensuing photoreactions are the ruptures of the C-Cl bond and of the C-Br bond. A nonadiabatic model was proposed in which the C-Br scission is strongly suppressed due to nonadiabatic recrossing at the barrier formed by the avoided crossing between the S 1 and S 2 states. Recent reduced-dimensional dynamical studies lend support to this model. However, another interpretation that has been given for the experimental results is that the reduced probability of C-Br scission is a consequence of incomplete intramolecular energy redistribution. To provide further insight into this problem, we have studied the energetically lowest six singlet electronic states of bromoacetyl chloride by using an ab initio multiconfigurational perturbative electronic structure method. Stationary points (minima and saddle points) and minimum energy paths have been characterized on the S 0 and S 1 potential energy surfaces. The fourfold way diabatization method has been applied to transform five adiabatic excited electronic states to a diabatic representation. The diabatic potential energy matrix of the first five excited singlet states has been constructed along several cuts of the potential energy hypersurfaces. The thermochemistry of the photodissociation reactions and a comparison with experimental translational energy distributions strongly suggest that nonadiabatic effects dominate the C-Br scission, but that the reaction proceeds along the energetically allowed diabatic pathway to excited-state products instead of being nonadiabatically suppressed. This conclusion is

  8. Investigations on the photoreactions of phenothiazine and phenoxazine in presence of 9-cyanoanthracene by using steady state and time resolved spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Munmun; Mandal, Paulami; Tzeng, Wen-Bih; Ganguly, Tapan

    2010-09-01

    By using electrochemical, steady state and time resolved (fluorescence lifetime and transient absorption) spectroscopic techniques, detailed investigations were made to reveal the mechanisms of charge separation or forward electron transfer reactions within the electron donor phenothiazine (PTZH) or phenoxazine (PXZH) and well known electron acceptor 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA). The transient absorption spectra suggest that the charge separated species formed in the excited singlet state resulted from intermolecular photoinduced electron transfer reactions within the donor PTZH (or PXZH) and CNA acceptor relaxes to the corresponding triplet state. Though alternative mechanisms of via formations of contact neutral radical by H-transfer reaction have been proposed but the observed results obtained from the time resolved measurements indicate that the regeneration of ground state reactants is primarily responsible due to direct recombination of triplet contact ion-pair (CIP) or solvent-separated ion-pair (SSIP).

  9. An alternative laser driven photodissociation mechanism of pyrrole via πσ*1∕S0 conical intersection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandipati, K R; Lan, Z; Singh, H; Mahapatra, S

    2017-06-07

    A first principles quantum dynamics study of N-H photodissociation of pyrrole on the S 0 - 1 πσ * (A21) coupled electronic states is carried out with the aid of an optimally designed UV-laser pulse. A new photodissociation path, as compared to the conventional barrier crossing on the πσ*1 state, opens up upon electronic transitions under the influence of pump-dump laser pulses, which efficiently populate both the dissociation channels. The interplay of electronic transitions due both to vibronic coupling and the laser pulse is observed in the control mechanism and discussed in detail. The proposed control mechanism seems to be robust, and not discussed in the literature so far, and is expected to trigger future experiments on the πσ*1 photochemistry of molecules of chemical and biological importance. The design of the optimal pulses and their application to enhance the overall dissociation probability is carried out within the framework of optimal control theory. The quantum dynamics of the system in the presence of pulse is treated by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in the semi-classical dipole approximation.

  10. An alternative laser driven photodissociation mechanism of pyrrole via π*1σ/S0 conical intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandipati, K. R.; Lan, Z.; Singh, H.; Mahapatra, S.

    2017-06-01

    A first principles quantum dynamics study of N-H photodissociation of pyrrole on the S0-1π σ*(A12) coupled electronic states is carried out with the aid of an optimally designed UV-laser pulse. A new photodissociation path, as compared to the conventional barrier crossing on the π*1σ state, opens up upon electronic transitions under the influence of pump-dump laser pulses, which efficiently populate both the dissociation channels. The interplay of electronic transitions due both to vibronic coupling and the laser pulse is observed in the control mechanism and discussed in detail. The proposed control mechanism seems to be robust, and not discussed in the literature so far, and is expected to trigger future experiments on the π*1σ photochemistry of molecules of chemical and biological importance. The design of the optimal pulses and their application to enhance the overall dissociation probability is carried out within the framework of optimal control theory. The quantum dynamics of the system in the presence of pulse is treated by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in the semi-classical dipole approximation.

  11. Size-resolved measurement of the mixing state of soot in the megacity Beijing, China: diurnal cycle, aging and parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. F. Cheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles are the most efficient light absorbing aerosol species in the atmosphere, playing an important role as a driver of global warming. Their climate effects strongly depend on their mixing state, which significantly changes their light absorbing capability and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity. Therefore, knowledge about the mixing state of soot and its aging mechanism becomes an important topic in the atmospheric sciences.

    The size-resolved (30–320 nm diameter mixing state of soot particles in polluted megacity air was measured at a suburban site (Yufa during the CAREBeijing 2006 campaign in Beijing, using a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA. Particles in this size range with non-volatile residuals at 300 °C were considered to be soot particles. On average, the number fraction of internally mixed soot in total soot particles (Fin, decreased from 0.80 to 0.57 when initial Dp increased from 30 to 320 nm. Further analysis reveals that: (1 Fin was well correlated with the aerosol hygroscopic mixing state measured by a CCN counter. More externally mixed soot particles were observed when particles showed more heterogeneous features with regard to hygroscopicity. (2 Fin had pronounced diurnal cycles. For particles in the accumulation mode (Dp at 100–320 nm, largest Fin were observed at noon time, with "apparent" turnover rates (kex → in up to 7.8% h−1. (3 Fin was subject to competing effects of both aging and emissions. While aging increases Fin by converting externally mixed soot particles into internally mixed ones, emissions tend to reduce Fin by emitting more fresh and externally mixed soot particles. Similar competing effects were also found with air mass age indicators. (4 Under the estimated emission

  12. The photodissociation of 8B and the solar neutrino problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The extraction of the photodissociation cross sections of 8 B from Coulomb dissociation experiments is investigated. A careful study is done on the contributions of the E1, E2 and M1 multipolarities to the breakup. A comparison with the data of a recent experiment is performed. It is shown that the extraction of the radiative capture cross sections 7 Be(p, γ) 8 B which are relevant for the solar neutrino problem is not affected appreciably by Coulomb reacceleration. A non-perturbative model is used for the purpose. Emphasis is put on the perspectives for future experiments which are planned at the University of Notre Dame, RIKEN (Japan), and GSI (Germany). An analysis of the total yields of ''photon-point'' processes in inelastic electron scattering is also done. (orig.)

  13. UV photodissociation spectroscopy of oxidized undecylenic acid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Anthony L; Park, Jiho; Walser, Maggie L; Lin, Ao; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2006-03-16

    Oxidation of thin multilayered films of undecylenic (10-undecenoic) acid by gaseous ozone was investigated using a combination of spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques. The UV absorption spectrum of the oxidized undecylenic acid film is significantly red-shifted compared to that of the initial film. Photolysis of the oxidized film in the tropospheric actinic region (lambda > 295 nm) readily produces formaldehyde and formic acid as gas-phase products. Photodissociation action spectra of the oxidized film suggest that organic peroxides are responsible for the observed photochemical activity. The presence of peroxides is confirmed by mass-spectrometric analysis of the oxidized sample and an iodometric test. Significant polymerization resulting from secondary reactions of Criegee radicals during ozonolysis of the film is observed. The data strongly imply the importance of photochemistry in aging of atmospheric organic aerosol particles.

  14. Photodissociation of the acetone cation at 355 nm using the velocity imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, William M.; Xu, Dadong

    2000-09-01

    Photodissociation of acetone cations, CH3COCH3+, at 355 nm has been studied by means of the ion velocity imaging technique. Acetone cations are produced via direct photoionization of a supersonic beam of acetone at 118 nm generated by frequency tripling the 355 nm laser. Only the acetyl cation, CH3CO+, could be detected as a dissociation product in the time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The acetyl ion signal depends upon the fifth power of the 355 nm laser energy, while the acetone ion signal depends upon the third power. This suggests that the fragment ion is produced via two-photon absorption of 355 nm photons by the acetone cation. The total translational energy distribution and angular distribution of acetyl cation were derived from the 2D images of CH3CO+ for the reaction CH3COCH3++2hν355nm→CH3CO++CH3*. The translational energy distribution suggests that methyl radicals are produced in two electronically excited states, the Rydberg 3s 1 2A1' and the valence 1 2A″ states. The anisotropy parameter β shows that the Rydberg state is formed via a perpendicular excitation and the valence state via a parallel transition.

  15. Photodissociation of HBr/LiF(001) - A quantum mechanical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seideman, Tamar

    1993-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of HBr adsorbed on an LiF(001) surface is studied using time-independent quantum mechanics. The photodissociation line shape and the Br(2P(1/2))/Br(2P(3/2)) yield ratio are computed and compared with the corresponding quantities for gas phase photodissociation. The angular distribution of the hydrogen photofragments following excitation of adsorbed HBr is computed and found to agree qualitatively with experimental data. The effect of polarization of the photon is illustrated and discussed. We find the field polarization to affect significantly the magnitude of the photodissociation signal but not the angular dependence of the photofragment distribution, in agreement with experiment and in accord with expectations for a strongly aligned adsorbed phase.

  16. Photodissociation of HBr/LiF(001): A quantum mechanical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seideman, Tamar

    1993-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of HBr adsorbed on a LiF(001) surface is studied using time-independent quantum mechanics. The photodissociation lineshape and the Br(P(sub 1/2)-2)/Br(P(sub 3/2)-2) yield ratio are computed and compared with the corresponding quantities for gas phase photodissociation. The angular distribution of the hydrogen photofragments following excitation of adsorbed HBr is computed and found to agree qualitatively with experimental data. The effect of polarization of the photon is illustrated and discussed. The field polarization is found to affect significantly the magnitude of the photodissociation signal but not the angular dependence of the photofragment distribution, in agreement with experiment and in accord with expectations for a strongly aligned adsorbed phase.

  17. Imaging the Dynamics of CH2BrI Photodissociation in the Near Ultraviolet Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Changen; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Joseph D; Kidwell, Nathanael M

    2018-04-19

    The photodissociation dynamics of jet-cooled CH 2 BrI were investigated in the near-ultraviolet (UV) region from 280-310 nm using velocity map imaging. We report the translational and internal energy distributions of the CH 2 Br radical and ground state I ( 2 P 3/2 ) or spin-orbit excited I ( 2 P 1/2 ) fragments determined by velocity map imaging of the ionized iodine fragments following 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of the nascent neutral iodine products. The velocity distributions indicate that most of the available energy is partitioned into the internal energy of the CH 2 Br radical with only modest translational excitation imparted to the cofragments, which is consistent with a simple impulsive model. Furthermore, from extrapolation of the velocity distribution results, the first determination of the C-I bond dissociation energy of CH 2 BrI is presented in this work to be D 0 = 16 790 ± 590 cm -1 . The ion images appear anisotropic, indicative of a prompt dissociation, and the derived anisotropy parameters are consistently positive. Additionally, the angular distributions report on the electronic excited state dynamics, which validate recent works characterizing the electronic states responsible for the first absorption band of CH 2 BrI. In the current work, photolysis of CH 2 BrI on the red edge of the absorption spectrum reveals an additional channel producing I ( 2 P 3/2 ) fragments.

  18. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A.J.; Stoffels, W.W.; Haverlag, M.; Mullen, van der J.J.A.M.; Pupat, N.B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved

  19. Photodissociation of the carbon monoxide dication in the {sup 3}Σ{sup −} manifold: Quantum control simulation towards the C{sup 2+} + O channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranckx, S. [Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), CP 160/09, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratoire de Chimie Physique (UMR 8000), Université Paris-Sud, Orsay 91405 (France); Loreau, J.; Vaeck, N. [Service de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), CP 160/09, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Meier, C. [Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, UMR 5589, IRSAMC, Université Toulouse III Paul Sabatier, Bât. 3R1b4, Toulouse (France); Desouter-Lecomte, M., E-mail: michele.desouter-lecomte@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique (UMR 8000), Univ. Paris Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay 91405 (France); Département de Chimie, B6c Université de Liège, Sart Tilman, 4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-10-28

    The photodissociation and laser assisted dissociation of the carbon monoxide dication X{sup 3}Π CO{sup 2+} into the {sup 3}Σ{sup −} states are investigated. Ab initio electronic structure calculations of the adiabatic potential energy curves, radial nonadiabatic couplings, and dipole moments for the X {sup 3}Π state are performed for 13 excited {sup 3}Σ{sup −} states of CO{sup 2+}. The photodissociation cross section, calculated by time-dependent methods, shows that the C{sup +} + O{sup +} channels dominate the process in the studied energy range. The carbon monoxide dication CO{sup 2+} is an interesting candidate for control because it can be produced in a single, long lived, v = 0 vibrational state due to the instability of all the other excited vibrational states of the ground {sup 3}Π electronic state. In a spectral range of about 25 eV, perpendicular transition dipoles couple this {sup 3}Π state to a manifold of {sup 3}Σ{sup −} excited states leading to numerous C{sup +} + O{sup +} channels and a single C{sup 2+} + O channel. This unique channel is used as target for control calculations using local control theory. We illustrate the efficiency of this method in order to find a tailored electric field driving the photodissociation in a manifold of strongly interacting electronic states. The selected local pulses are then concatenated in a sequence inspired by the “laser distillation” strategy. Finally, the local pulse is compared with optimal control theory.

  20. Equilibrium constants in aqueous lanthanide and actinide chemistry from time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy: The role of ground and excited state reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billard, I.; Luetzenkirchen, K.

    2003-01-01

    Equilibrium constants for aqueous reactions between lanthanide or actinide ions and (in-) organic ligands contain important information for various radiochemical problems, such as nuclear reprocessing or the migration of radioelements in the geosphere. We study the conditions required to determine equilibrium constants by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Based on a simulation study it is shown that the possibility to determine equilibrium constants depends upon the reaction rates in the photoexcited states of the lanthanide or actinide ions. (orig.)

  1. Properties of Highly Rotationally Excited H2 in Photodissociation Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Sally Jane; Wan, Yier; Stancil, Phillip C.; Yang, Benhui H.; Zhang, Ziwei

    2018-06-01

    H2 is the dominant molecular species in the vast majority of interstellar environments and it plays a crucial role as a radiative coolant. In photodissociation regions, it is one of the primary emitters in the near to mid-infrared which are due to lines originating from highly excited rotational levels. However, collisional data for rotational levels j>10 are sparse, particularly for H2-H2 collisions. Utilizing new calculations for para-H2 and ortho-H2 collisional rate coefficients with H2 for j as high as 30, we investigate the effects of the new results in standard PDR models with the spectral simulation package Cloudy. We also perform Cloudy models of the Orion Bar and use Radex to explore rotational line ratio diagnostics. The resulting dataset of H2 collisional data should find wide application to other molecular environments. This work was support by Hubble Space Telescope grant HST-AR-13899.001-A and NASA grants NNX15AI61G and NNX16AF09G.

  2. Model of comet comae. II. Effects of solar photodissociative ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, W.F.; Giguere, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    Improvements to our computer model of coma plotochemistry are described. These include an expansion of the chemical reactions network and new rate constants that have been measured only recently. Photolytic reactions of additional molecules are incorporated, and photolytic branching ratios are treated in far greater detail than in our previous work. A total of 25 photodissociative ionization (PDI) reactions are now considered (as compared to only 3 PDI reactions previously). Solar PDI of the mother molecule CO 2 is shown to compete effectively with photoionization of CO in the production of observed CO + . The CO + density peak predicted by our improved model, for COP 2 or CO mother molecules, is deep in the inner coma, in better agreement with observation than our old CO 2 model. However, neither CO 2 nor CO mother molecule calculations reproduce the CO + /H 2 O + ratio observed in comet Kohoutek. PDI products of CO 2 , CO, CH 4 , and NH 3 mother molecules fuel a complex chemistry scheme, producing inner coma abundances of CN, C 2 , and C 3 much greater than previously calculated

  3. Transient photoelectron spectroscopy of the dissociative Br2(1Piu) state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Daniel; Goulay, Fabien; Leone, Stephen R

    2007-11-14

    Photodissociation of bromine on the Br2(1Piu) state is probed with ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (53.7 nm) single-photon ionization. Time-resolved photoelectron spectra show simultaneously the depletion of ground state bromine molecules as well as the rise of Br(2P3/2) products due to 402.5 nm photolysis. A partial photoionization cross-section ratio of atomic versus molecular bromine is obtained. Transient photoelectron spectra of a dissociative wave packet on the excited state are presented in the limit of low-power-density, single-photon excitation to the dissociative state. Transient binding energy shifts of "atomic-like" photoelectron peaks are observed and interpreted as photoionization of nearly separated Br atom pairs on the Br2(1Piu) state to repulsive dissociative ionization states.

  4. Rotationally resolved state-to-state photoionization and photoelectron study of titanium carbide and its cation (TiC/TiC⁺).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhihong; Huang, Huang; Chang, Yih-Chung; Zhang, Zheng; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Ng, C Y

    2014-10-14

    Titanium carbide and its cation (TiC/TiC(+)) have been investigated by the two-color visible (VIS)-ultraviolet (UV) resonance-enhanced photoionization and pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (PFI-PE) methods. Two visible excitation bands for neutral TiC are observed at 16,446 and 16,930 cm(-1). Based on rotational analyses, these bands are assigned as the respective TiC((3)Π1) ← TiC(X(3)Σ(+)) and TiC((3)Σ(+)) ← TiC(X(3)Σ(+)) transition bands. This assignment supports that the electronic configuration and term symmetry for the neutral TiC ground state are …7σ(2)8σ(1)9σ(1)3π(4) (X(3)Σ(+)). The rotational constant and the corresponding bond distance of TiC(X(3)Σ(+); v″ = 0) are determined to be B0″ = 0.6112(10) cm(-1) and r0″ = 1.695(2) Å, respectively. The rotational analyses of the VIS-UV-PFI-PE spectra for the TiC(+)(X; v(+) = 0 and 1) vibrational bands show that the electronic configuration and term symmetry for the ionic TiC(+) ground state are …7σ(2)8σ(1)3π(4) (X(2)Σ(+)) with the v(+) = 0 → 1 vibrational spacing of 870.0(8) cm(-1) and the rotational constants of B(e)(+) = 0.6322(28) cm(-1), and α(e)(+) = 0.0085(28) cm(-1). The latter rotational constants yield the equilibrium bond distance of r(e)(+) = 1.667(4) Å for TiC(+)(X(2)Σ(+)). The cleanly rotationally resolved VIS-UV-PFI-PE spectra have also provided a highly precise value of 53 200.2(8) cm(-1) [6.5960(1) eV] for the adiabatic ionization energy (IE) of TiC. This IE(TiC) value along with the known IE(Ti) has made possible the determination of the difference between the 0 K bond dissociation energy (D0) of TiC(+)(X(2)Σ(+)) and that of TiC(X(3)Σ(+)) to be D0(Ti(+)-C) - D0(Ti-C) = 0.2322(2) eV. Similar to previous experimental observations, the present state-to-state PFI-PE study of the photoionization transitions, TiC(+)(X(2)Σ(+); v(+) = 0 and 1, N(+)) ← TiC((3)Π1; v', J'), reveals a strong decreasing trend for the photoionization cross section as |ΔN(+)| = |N

  5. Rotationally resolved state-to-state photoionization and photoelectron study of titanium carbide and its cation (TiC/TiC+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Zhihong; Huang, Huang; Chang, Yih-Chung; Zhang, Zheng; Ng, C. Y.; Yin, Qing-Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Titanium carbide and its cation (TiC/TiC + ) have been investigated by the two-color visible (VIS)-ultraviolet (UV) resonance-enhanced photoionization and pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (PFI-PE) methods. Two visible excitation bands for neutral TiC are observed at 16 446 and 16 930 cm −1 . Based on rotational analyses, these bands are assigned as the respective TiC( 3 Π 1 ) ← TiC(X 3 Σ + ) and TiC( 3 Σ + ) ← TiC(X 3 Σ + ) transition bands. This assignment supports that the electronic configuration and term symmetry for the neutral TiC ground state are …7σ 2 8σ 1 9σ 1 3π 4 (X 3 Σ + ). The rotational constant and the corresponding bond distance of TiC(X 3 Σ + ; v″ = 0) are determined to be B 0 ″ = 0.6112(10) cm −1 and r 0 ″ = 1.695(2) Å, respectively. The rotational analyses of the VIS-UV-PFI-PE spectra for the TiC + (X; v + = 0 and 1) vibrational bands show that the electronic configuration and term symmetry for the ionic TiC + ground state are …7σ 2 8σ 1 3π 4 (X 2 Σ + ) with the v + = 0 → 1 vibrational spacing of 870.0(8) cm −1 and the rotational constants of B e + = 0.6322(28) cm −1 , and α e + = 0.0085(28) cm −1 . The latter rotational constants yield the equilibrium bond distance of r e + = 1.667(4) Å for TiC + (X 2 Σ + ). The cleanly rotationally resolved VIS-UV-PFI-PE spectra have also provided a highly precise value of 53 200.2(8) cm −1 [6.5960(1) eV] for the adiabatic ionization energy (IE) of TiC. This IE(TiC) value along with the known IE(Ti) has made possible the determination of the difference between the 0 K bond dissociation energy (D 0 ) of TiC + (X 2 Σ + ) and that of TiC(X 3 Σ + ) to be D 0 (Ti + −C) − D 0 (Ti−C) = 0.2322(2) eV. Similar to previous experimental observations, the present state-to-state PFI-PE study of the photoionization transitions, TiC + (X 2 Σ + ; v + = 0 and 1, N + ) ← TiC( 3 Π 1 ; v′, J′), reveals a strong decreasing trend for the photoionization cross

  6. Photodissociation of anisole and absolute photoionization cross-section of the phenoxy radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Pratt, S T

    2013-11-21

    We have studied the photodissociation dynamics of anisole (C6H5OCH3) at 193 nm and determined the absolute photoionization cross-section of the phenoxy radical at 118.2 nm (10.486 eV) relative to the known cross-section of the methyl radical. Even at this energy, there is extensive fragmentation of the phenoxy radical upon photoionization, which is attributed to ionizing transitions that populate low-lying excited electronic states of the cation. For phenoxy radicals with less than ∼1 eV of internal energy, we find a cross-section for the production of the phenoxy cation of 14.8 ± 3.8 Mb. For radicals with higher internal energy, dissociative ionization is the dominant process, and for internal energies of ∼2.7-3.7 eV, we find a total cross-section (photoionization plus dissociative ionization) of 22.3 ± 4.1 Mb. The results are discussed relative to the recently reported photoionization cross-section of phenol.

  7. Photodissociation and stability of carbon clusters; Photodissociation et stabilite d`agregats de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouyer, R.

    1995-04-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the dissociation of ionised carbon clusters (containing 16 to 36 atoms) after photoexcitation by a UV-visible laser pulse. It contributes to experimental studies on formation mechanisms of carbon clusters, and particularly fullerenes. Its first aim is the knowledge of the internal energy of the clusters before dissociation. In the first part, a general overview summarizes the theoretical and experimental studies devoted to energetics (structure, stability, dissociation) of carbon clusters containing less than 60 atoms. In the second part, two techniques for producing mass-selected carbon clusters are described. The particular characteristics for such a production in a direct vaporization source are compared to those in a collisional-cooled source. The question of stability of intermediate-size clusters is asked. We study the photoabsorption spectroscopy of carbon clusters in the third part. A model for sequential absorption of several photons is developed, and used to analyze cluster dissociation versus the photoexcitation laser fluence. The absolute photoabsorption cross sections, and the number of absorbed photons are deduced. For some cluster sizes, laser wavelength scanning leads to evidence for existence of several clusters structures (or so-called isomers). The last part deals with photo dissociation mechanisms. Dissociation is found to occur after single-photon absorption, or after vibrational heating of the clusters. In that latter case, a statistical model including restricted intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution is used to calculate dissociation energies from measured fragmentation times of well-defined internal energy states. These energies, which are characteristic of cyclic structures, are then used to a better understanding of carbon cluster formation in a direct vaporization source. (Author). 76 refs., 63 figs., 23 tabs.

  8. Accurate Quantum Wave Packet Study of the Deep Well D+ + HD Reaction: Product Ro-vibrational State-Resolved Integral and Differential Cross Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Haixiang; Zhu, Weimin; Su, Wenli; Dong, Lihui; Li, Bin

    2018-03-08

    The H + + H 2 reaction and its isotopic variants as the simplest triatomic ion-molecule reactive system have been attracting much interests, however there are few studies on the titled reaction at state-to-state level until recent years. In this work, accurate state-to-state quantum dynamics studies of the titled reaction have been carried out by a reactant Jacobi coordinate-based time-dependent wave packet approach on diabatic potential energy surfaces constructed by Kamisaka et al. Product ro-vibrational state-resolved information has been calculated for collision energies up to 0.2 eV with maximal total angular momentum J = 40. The necessity of including all K-component for accounting the Coriolis coupling for the reaction has been illuminated. Competitions between the two product channels, (D + + HD' → D' + + HD and D + + HD' → H + + DD') were investigated. Total integral cross sections suggest that resonances enhance the reactivity of channel D + + HD'→ H + + DD', however, resonances depress the reactivity of the another channel D + + HD' → D' + + HD. The structures of the differential cross sections are complicated and depend strongly on collision energies of the two channels and also on the product rotational states. All of the product ro-vibrational state-resolved differential cross sections for this reaction do not exhibit rigorous backward-forward symmetry which may indicate that the lifetimes of the intermediate resonance complexes should not be that long. The dynamical observables of this deuterated isotopic reaction are quite different from the reaction of H + + H 2 → H 2 + H + reported previously.

  9. Photodissociation of acrylonitrile at 193 nm: A photofragment translational spectroscopy study using synchrotron radiation for product photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, D.A.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T.; North, S.W.; Hall, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the photodissociation of acrylonitrile (H 2 CCHCN) at 193 nm using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The experiments were performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline at the Advanced Light Source and used tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation for product photoionization. We have identified four primary dissociation channels including atomic and molecular hydrogen elimination, HCN elimination, and CN elimination. There is significant evidence that all of the dissociation channels occur on the ground electronic surface following internal conversion from the initially optically prepared state. The product translational energy distributions reflect near statistical simple bond rupture for the radical dissociation channels, while substantial recombination barriers mediate the translational energy release for the two molecular elimination channels. Photoionization onsets have provided additional insight into the chemical identities of the products and their internal energy content. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  10. Examining diseased states in a scaled-up vocal fold model using simultaneous temporally resolved DPIV and pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Dylan; Wei, Nathaniel; Ringenber, Hunter; Krane, Michael; Wei, Timothy

    2017-11-01

    This study builds on the parallel presentation of Ringenberg, et al. (APS-DFD 2017) involving simultaneous, temporally and spatially resolved flow and pressure measurements in a scaled-up vocal fold model. In this talk, data from experiments replicating characteristics of diseased vocal folds are presented. This begins with vocal folds that do not fully close and continues with asymmetric oscillations. Data are compared to symmetric, i.e. `healthy', oscillatory motions presented in the companion talk. Having pressure and flow data for individual as well as phase averaged oscillations for these diseased cases highlights the potential for aeroacoustic analysis in this complex system. Supported by NIH Grant No. 2R01 DC005642-11.

  11. Atomic and Molecular Data for State-Resolved Modelling of Hydrogen and Helium and Their Isotopes in Fusion Plasma. Summary Report of the First Research Coordination Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The First Research Coordination Meeting of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Atomic and Molecular Data for State-Resolved Modelling of Hydrogen and Helium and Their Isotopes in Fusion Plasma' was held 10-12 August 2011 at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna. Participants reviewed the status of the database on molecular processes of H and He, identified data needs and made plans for development of new data in connection with the CRP. The proceedings of the meeting are summarized here. Participants' summaries and work plans are also provided. (author)

  12. Far-infrared and submillimeter spectroscopy of photodissociation regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qaiyum, A.

    1993-12-01

    The physical properties of the galactic and extragalactic photodissociation regions, warm gas components molecular clouds are, generally, derived through the far-infrared (FIR) fine structure and submillimeter line emissions arising out of these regions. In the theoretical studies of these lines the model of Tielens and Hollenbach (herein after referred as TH) are usually employed in which all the opacity is assumed local in escape probability formalism and inward directed photons do not escape. These assumptions are contrary to the observational facts, where most of the lines are found optically thin except OI (63 μm) and low rotational transitions of CO and some other molecules. The optically thin medium will allow the radiation to escape through any face of the region. These observational evidences let us to assume finite parallel plane slab, instead of semi-infinite parallel slab, in which the photons are allowed to escape from both surfaces (back and front). In the present study an attempt has been made to incorporate the two sided escape of photons from the PDRs and to study its effect on the FIR and submillimeter line emission from the PDRs/molecular clouds. Further the present formalism is also employed to study the clumpy PDRs/molecular clouds. The preliminary results show that now serious consequences are found on the thermal and chemical structure of the regions but individual line emissions are modified by differing factors. Particularly at low density and low kinetic temperature the change is substantial but at density greater than the critical density of the line and temperature close to the excitation temperature its effect is almost negligible. An attempt has also been made to study the physical conditions of the M17 region employing the present formalism. (author). 49 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  13. Nuclear spin state-resolved cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostics of a low-temperature H3+ -dominated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejduk, Michal; Dohnal, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    We have applied a continuous-wave near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy method to study the parameters of a H 3 + -dominated plasma at temperatures in the range 77–200 K. We monitor populations of three rotational states of the ground vibrational state corresponding to para and ortho nuclear spin states in the discharge and the afterglow plasma in time and conclude that abundances of para and ortho states and rotational temperatures are well defined and stable. The non-trivial dependence of a relative population of para- H 3 + on a relative population of para-H 2 in a source H 2 gas is described. The results described in this paper are valuable for studies of state-selective dissociative recombination of H 3 + ions with electrons in the afterglow plasma and for the design of sources of H 3 + ions in a specific nuclear spin state. (paper)

  14. Nuclear spin state-resolved cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostics of a low-temperature H_3^+ -dominated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Michal; Dohnal, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-04-01

    We have applied a continuous-wave near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy method to study the parameters of a H_3^+ -dominated plasma at temperatures in the range 77-200 K. We monitor populations of three rotational states of the ground vibrational state corresponding to para and ortho nuclear spin states in the discharge and the afterglow plasma in time and conclude that abundances of para and ortho states and rotational temperatures are well defined and stable. The non-trivial dependence of a relative population of para- H_3^+ on a relative population of para-H2 in a source H2 gas is described. The results described in this paper are valuable for studies of state-selective dissociative recombination of H_3^+ ions with electrons in the afterglow plasma and for the design of sources of H_3^+ ions in a specific nuclear spin state.

  15. Atomic carbon emission from photodissociation of CO2. [planetary atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Phillips, E.; Lee, L. C.; Judge, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Atomic carbon fluorescence, C I 1561, 1657, and 1931 A, has been observed from photodissociation of CO2, and the production cross sections have been measured. A line emission source provided the primary photons at wavelengths from threshold to 420 A. The present results suggest that the excited carbon atoms are produced by total dissociation of CO2 into three atoms. The cross sections for producing the O I 1304-A fluorescence through photodissociation of CO2 are found to be less than 0.01 Mb in the wavelength region from 420 to 835 A. The present data have implications with respect to photochemical processes in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus.

  16. State resolved rotational excitation in HD+D2 collisions. II. Angular dependence of 0→2 transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, U.; Huisken, F.; Maneke, G.; Schaefer, J.

    1983-01-01

    Time-of-flight spectra for the scattering of HD molecules from D 2 molecules have been measured at a collision energy of E = 70.3 meV over a range of center-of-mass scattering angles from 45 0 to 158 0 . The spectra reveal clearly resolved transitions at the energy loss ΔE = 33 meV which corresponds to 0→2 transitions of HD and the double transition 0→1 of HD and 0→2 of D 2 . The differential cross sections derived from these spectra increase with increasing scattering angle from 1.7% to 34.7% of the elastic cross section. The pure 0→2 transition of D 2 which only needs 22 meV to be induced could not be detected within our experimental sensitivity of 0.02 A 2 /sr. Closed coupled calculations based on the ab initio potential surface of Meyer and Schaefer show that this result can be explained by the different coupling terms which are responsible for these transitions. In contrast to the 0→1 transition the 0→2 transition of HD proved to be sensitive to the anisotropic part of the interaction potential for the homonuclear system. The comparison of experimental and calculated cross sections for the ab initio potential of Meyer and Schaefer reveals discrepancies for the 0→1 transition of HD, but shows agreement for the 0→2 transition of HD at intermediate angles

  17. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of the smallest polyene, trans 1,3-butadiene. I. Time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.; Schalk, Oliver; Gador, Niklas; Glover, William J.; Mori, Toshifumi; Schultz, Thomas; Schuurman, Michael S.; Martínez, Todd J.; Stolow, Albert

    2018-04-01

    The ultrafast excited state dynamics of the smallest polyene, trans-1,3-butadiene, were studied by femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence (TRPEPICO) spectroscopy. The evolution of the excited state wavepacket, created by pumping the bright 1Bu (ππ*) electronic state at its origin of 216 nm, is projected via one- and two-photon ionization at 267 nm onto several ionization continua. The results are interpreted in terms of Koopmans' correlations and Franck-Condon factors for the excited and cationic states involved. The known predissociative character of the cation excited states is utilized to assign photoelectron bands to specific continua using TRPEPICO spectroscopy. This permits us to report the direct observation of the famously elusive S1(21Ag) dark electronic state during the internal conversion of trans 1,3-butadiene. Our phenomenological analysis permits the spectroscopic determination of several important time constants. We report the overall decay lifetimes of the 11Bu and 21Ag states and observe the re-appearance of the hot ground state molecule. We argue that the apparent dephasing time of the S2(11Bu) state, which leads to the extreme breadth of the absorption spectrum, is principally due to large amplitude torsional motion on the 1Bu surface in conjunction with strong non-adiabatic couplings via conical intersections, whereupon nuclear wavepacket revivals to the initial Franck-Condon region become effectively impossible. In Paper II [W. J. Glover et al., J. Chem. Phys. 148, 164303 (2018)], ab initio multiple spawning is used for on-the-fly computations of the excited state non-adiabatic wavepacket dynamics and their associated TRPEPICO observables, allowing for direct comparisons of experiment with theory.

  18. Geometric phase effects in the coherent control of the branching ratio of photodissociation products of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Mayumi; Ohtsuki, Yukiyoshi; Fujimura, Yuichi; Lan, Zhenggang; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Optimal control simulation is used to examine the control mechanisms in the photodissociation of phenol within a two-dimensional, three-electronic-state model with two conical intersections. This model has two channels for H-atom elimination, which correspond to the 2 π and 2 σ states of the phenoxyl radical. The optimal pulse that enhances 2 σ dissociation initially generates a wave packet on the S 1 potential-energy surface of phenol. This wave packet is bifurcated at the S 2 -S 1 conical intersection into two components with opposite phases because of the geometric phase effect. The destructive interference caused by the geometric phase effect reduces the population around the S 1 -S 0 conical intersection, which in turn suppresses nonadiabatic transitions and thus enhances dissociation to the 2 σ limit. The optimal pulse that enhances S 0 dissociation, on the other hand, creates a wave packet on the S 2 potential-energy surface of phenol via an intensity borrowing mechanism, thus avoiding geometric phase effects at the S 2 -S 1 conical intersection. This wave packet hits the S 1 -S 0 conical intersection directly, resulting in preferred dissociation to the 2 π limit. The optimal pulse that initially prepares the wave packet on the S 1 potential-energy surface (PES) has a higher carrier frequency than the pulse that prepares the wave packet on the S 2 PES. This counterintuitive effect is explained by the energy-level structure and the S 2 -S 1 vibronic coupling mechanism

  19. Photodissociation comprehensive study of OH- on alkali halides and their interaction with colour centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, L.

    1985-01-01

    This work shows that the OH - defect induces changes in the electronics processes of the alkali halides such as in radiation damage and optical cycles of colour centers. Two cases were considered: with the presence of an OH - ion in the (1) excited state and (2) in the ground state; 1) the comprehensive study of resonant OH - photodissociation in several hosts showed that deep traps (for electrons) can be produced from the OH - dissociation. These traps can be effective for the capture of electrons produced in the radiation damage of the lattice as well as for trapping electrons from ionized color centers. It was observed a second channel (new) for the de-excitation of the (OH - )* molecule in KI and RbI. This effect can be effective only when the lattice around the molecule holds a large enough interstitial space. This new mechanism is responsible for the strong production at LNT of F centers and OH 0 molecules at the expenses of OH - defects. Considering the complete investigation of the full cycle it was proposed a phenomenological model that would explain the observed behaviour when one covers a wide variation of lattice parameters (KCl -> RbI); 2) It was verified that the OH - ion present in the lattice induces strong changes in the de-excitation processes of electronic defects with a spread out wave function (like F centers). A change in the reorientation behaviour of excited F 2 and F + 2 centers was also verified. Two main effects should be mentioned: A) The induced de-excitation is very fast and non-radiative on F centers. B) Another type of system investigated (F 2 and F + 2 ) has shown an intense increase of the speed of reorientation of the F 2 and F + 2 excited centers. (autor) [pt

  20. Product state resolved excitation spectroscopy of He-, Ne-, and Ar-Br2 linear isomers: experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, Jordan M; van der Veer, Wytze E; Bieler, Craig R; Janda, Kenneth C

    2008-04-07

    Valence excitation spectra for the linear isomers of He-, Ne-, and Ar-Br2 are reported and compared to a two-dimensional simulation using the currently available potential energy surfaces. Excitation spectra from the ground electronic state to the region of the inner turning point of the Rg-Br2 (B,nu') stretching coordinate are recorded while probing the asymptotic Br2 (B,nu') state. Each spectrum is a broad continuum extending over hundreds of wavenumbers, becoming broader and more blueshifted as the rare gas atom is changed from He to Ne to Ar. In the case of Ne-Br2, the threshold for producing the asymptotic product state reveals the X-state linear isomer bond energy to be 71+/-3 cm(-1). The qualitative agreement between experiment and theory shows that the spectra can be correctly regarded as revealing the one-atom solvent shifts and also provides new insight into the one-atom cage effect on the halogen vibrational relaxation. The measured spectra provide data to test future ab initio potential energy surfaces in the interaction of rare gas atoms with the halogen valence excited state.

  1. Photodissociation dynamics of H2O at 111.5 nm by a vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heilong; Yu, Yong; Chang, Yao; Su, Shu; Yu, Shengrui; Li, Qinming; Tao, Kai; Ding, Hongli; Yang, Jaiyue; Wang, Guanglei; Che, Li; He, Zhigang; Chen, Zhichao; Wang, Xingan; Zhang, Weiqing; Dai, Dongxu; Wu, Guorong; Yuan, Kaijun; Yang, Xueming

    2018-03-01

    Photodissociation dynamics of H2O via the F ˜ state at 111.5 nm were investigated using the high resolution H-atom Rydberg "tagging" time-of-flight (TOF) technique, in combination with the tunable vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser at the Dalian Coherent Light Source. The product translational energy distributions and angular distributions in both parallel and perpendicular directions were derived from the recorded TOF spectra. Based on these distributions, the quantum state distributions and angular anisotropy parameters of OH (X) and OH (A) products have been determined. For the OH (A) + H channel, highly rotationally excited OH (A) products have been observed. These products are ascribed to a fast direct dissociation on the B ˜ 1A1 state surface after multi-step internal conversions from the initial excited F ˜ state to the B ˜ state. While for the OH (X) + H channel, very highly rotationally excited OH (X) products with moderate vibrational excitation are revealed and attributed to the dissociation via a nonadiabatic pathway through the well-known two conical intersections between the B ˜ -state and the X ˜ -state surfaces.

  2. Kinetics of photodissociated oxygen recombination to human oxyhemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokut', S.B.; Syakhovich, V.E.; Parul', D.A.; Lepeshkevich, S.V.; Dzhagarov, B.M.

    2001-01-01

    Oxygen binding to the tetrameric hemoglobin (Hb) is a basic reaction for study of a cooperativity and allosteric homotropic and heterotropic interactions in proteins. In tetrameric hemoglobin the certain sites in the α 1 β 2 -interface have the precise geometry and chemical reactivity to bind 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, protons, chloride and hence shift the equilibrium away from the oxyconformation, thereby favoring O 2 release. Post-translational modifications of the major hemoglobin fraction Hb A 1 with sugar moiety in the Hb central cavity leads to differences in geometry of the effectors binding region providing a useful experimental tool to study the long range relationship in the tetramer molecule. Here we present the results of the nongeminate biomolecular association of Hb and O 2 obtained by nanosecond laser flash-photolysis. All measurements were carried out in 50 mM potassium-phosphate buffer pH 7.4 with the following samples Hb A 1 , HbA 1c , HbA 1b , and HbA 1 in the presence of the tenfold excess of inositol hexaphosphate (IHP). Our results show that oxygen recombination kinetics are characterized by two processes with different decay times and Hb-form-dependent contributions. This process can be described by the following expression: A(t)=A 1 exp(-t/τ 1 )+A 2 exp(-t/τ 2 ), where A(t) is a normalized number of the deoxy-Hb molecules. The short-live component has a lifetime τ 1 , which is Hb-type dependent and changes in the intervals 30-60 μs, the second component has a lifetime τ 2 around 100 μs, and also is sample-dependent value. A(t=0) is proportional to apparent quantum yields of the photodissociation and determines by geminate stages of oxygen binding to Fe from the protein matrix areas. These results show that post-translational modifications of the major hemoglobin component HbA 1 have influence on hemoglobin transport function via the long range relationship in the tetramer molecule

  3. Time-resolved resonance raman spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene in the lowest excited singlet state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, Niels-Henrik; Langkilde, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrwn of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene in its lowest excited S1 state excited in resonance with the S1 → Sn absorption band at 650 nm in non-polar solvents is reported. Three vibrational bands at 1572, 1481 and 1165 cm−1 are observed. A possible assignment of the the 1481 cm−...

  4. Generation of sub-Poissonian non-Gaussian states from multimode twin beams by photon-number-resolving detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lamperti, M.; Allevi, A.; Bondani, M.; Machulka, R.; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, O.; Peřina Jr., J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2014), "1461017-1"-"1461017-7" ISSN 0219-7499 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/12/0382 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : quantum state engineering and measurements * parametric down-conversion * photodetectors * sub-Poissonian statistics * non-Gaussianity Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.877, year: 2014

  5. Measured resolved shear stresses and Bishop-Hill stress states in individual grains of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Ytterdal; Oddershede, Jette; Beaudoin, Armand

    2017-01-01

    somewhat from the theoretical expectation. These deviations are found to originate from a larger tensile stress component than in the theoretical Bishop-Hill stress states and to be associated also with deviations from axisymmetric plastic strain. This conclusion was supported by finite-element crystal...

  6. Photodissociation of H2+ by a ruby laser with ion energy analysis of ejected H+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozenne, J.B.; Pham, D.; Tadjeddine, M.; Durup, J.

    1974-01-01

    The kinetic energy released in the photodissociation of H 2 + by a ruby laser beam has been measured. The spectrum of the dissociation kinetic energy of H + +H shows several vibrational levels, and after deconvolution due to the energetic and angular resolution of the apparatus, gives a population of those vibrational levels, close to theoretical population [fr

  7. Detection of Indistinct Fe-N Stretching Bands in Iron(V) Nitrides by Photodissociation Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andris, E.; Navrátil, R.; Jašík, J.; Sabenya, G.; Costas, M.; Srnec, Martin; Roithová, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 20 (2018), s. 5078-5081 ISSN 1521-3765 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : photodissociation spectrochemistry * infrared spectra * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry

  8. The effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on the chemistry of photodissociation regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakes, ELO; Tielens, AGGM

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of including polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the abundance of neutral atoms and molecules for two typical photodissociation regions (PDRs): a high-density case (the Orion complex) and a low-density case. PAHs provide a large surface area for chemistry

  9. Photodissociation of OCS: Deviations between theory and experiment, and the importance of higher order correlation effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2014-01-01

    The photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) was investigated theoretically in a series of studies by Schmidt and co-workers. Initial studies [J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys.136, 131101 (2012);J. A. Schmidt, M. S. Johnson, G. C. McBane, and R. Schinke...

  10. UV Photodissociation Action Spectroscopy of Haloanilinium Ions in a Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Christopher S.; Kirk, Benjamin B.; Blanksby, Stephen J.; O'Hair, Richard. A. J.; Trevitt, Adam J.

    2013-06-01

    UV-vis photodissociation action spectroscopy is becoming increasingly prevalent because of advances in, and commercial availability of, ion trapping technologies and tunable laser sources. This study outlines in detail an instrumental arrangement, combining a commercial ion-trap mass spectrometer and tunable nanosecond pulsed laser source, for performing fully automated photodissociation action spectroscopy on gas-phase ions. The components of the instrumentation are outlined, including the optical and electronic interfacing, in addition to the control software for automating the experiment and performing online analysis of the spectra. To demonstrate the utility of this ensemble, the photodissociation action spectra of 4-chloroanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-iodoanilinium cations are presented and discussed. Multiple photoproducts are detected in each case and the photoproduct yields are followed as a function of laser wavelength. It is shown that the wavelength-dependent partitioning of the halide loss, H loss, and NH3 loss channels can be broadly rationalized in terms of the relative carbon-halide bond dissociation energies and processes of energy redistribution. The photodissociation action spectrum of (phenyl)Ag2 + is compared with a literature spectrum as a further benchmark.

  11. Moving from local to State water governance to resolve a local conflict between irrigated agriculture and commercial forestry in South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Virginie; McKay, Jennifer; Keremane, Ganesh

    2014-11-01

    In the Lower Limestone Coast, South Australia, a unique water allocation plan has been under consideration for several years. This plan is the first in Australia to consider forestry as a water affecting activity. Indeed, forestry plantations have a twofold impact on water-rainfall or aquifer recharge interception and direct extraction of groundwater in shallow water table areas-and alter the available water for irrigation as a result of the previous water budget. This paper examines how water is allocated across the competing requirements for water but also across the competing legal, economic and administrative scales embodied by the competing water users; and thus it also details the pre-judicial mechanism used to resolve the conflict over these competing scales. Qualitative and quantitative content analysis in Nvivo was applied to: (i) 180 local newspaper articles on the planning process, (ii) 65 submission forms filled in by the community during a public consultation on the draft water plan and (iii) 20 face-to-face interviews of keys stakeholders involved in the planning process. The social sustainability perspective taken in this study establishes the legal, economic and administrative competitive scales at stake in the conflict regarding water between forestry and irrigation. It also evidences the special feature of this paper, which is that to overcome these competitions and resolve the local conflict before judicial process, the water governance moved up in the administrative scale, from local/regional to State level. Initiated and initially prepared at regional level through the local Natural Resources Management Board, the water planning process was taken up to State level through the formation of an Interdepartmental Committee and the establishment of a Taskforce in charge of developing a policy. These were supported by an amendment of a State legislation on Natural Resources Management to manage the water impacts of forestry plantations.

  12. Probing the ignored elimination channel of Br2 in the 248 nm photodissociation of 1,1-dibromoethylene by cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping-Chen; Tsai, Po-Yu; Hsiao, Ming-Kai; Lin, King-Chuen; Huang, C H; Chang, A H H

    2009-03-09

    In the photodissociation of 1,1-C(2)H(2)Br(2) at 248 nm, the Br(2) elimination channel is probed by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS). In terms of spectral simulation, the vibrational population ratio of Br(2)(v = 1)/Br(2)(v = 0) is found to be 0.55+/-0.05, which indicates that the Br(2) fragment is vibrationally hot. The rotational population is thermally equilibrated with a Boltzmann temperature of 349+/-38 K. According to ab initio potential energy calculations, the obtained fragments are anticipated to result primarily from photodissociation of the ground electronic state that undergoes 1) H migration followed by three-center elimination, and 2) isomerization forming either trans- or cis-1,2-C(2)H(2)Br(2) from which Br(2) is eliminated. RRKM calculations predict that the Br(2) dissociation rates through the ground singlet state prevail over those through the triplet state. Measurements of temperature and Ar pressure dependence are examined to support the proposed pathway via internal conversion. The quantum yield for the Br(2) elimination reaction is determined to be 0.07+/-0.04. This result is smaller than that obtained in 1,2-C(2)H(2)Br(2), probably because the dissociation rates are slowed in the isomerization stage.

  13. Communication: On the competition between adiabatic and nonadiabatic dynamics in vibrationally mediated ammonia photodissociation in its A band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Changjian [Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhu, Xiaolei; Yarkony, David R., E-mail: jianyi.m@gmail.com, E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Ma, Jianyi, E-mail: jianyi.m@gmail.com, E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610065 (China); Xie, Daiqian, E-mail: jianyi.m@gmail.com, E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Guo, Hua, E-mail: jianyi.m@gmail.com, E-mail: yarkony@jhu.edu, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Non-adiabatic processes play an important role in photochemistry, but the mechanism for conversion of electronic energy to chemical energy is still poorly understood. To explore the possibility of vibrational control of non-adiabatic dynamics in a prototypical photoreaction, namely, the A-band photodissociation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}), full-dimensional state-to-state quantum dynamics of symmetric or antisymmetric stretch excited NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}) is investigated on recently developed coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces. The experimentally observed H atom kinetic energy distributions are reproduced. However, contrary to previous inferences, the NH{sub 2}(A{sup ~2}A{sub 1})/NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) branching ratio is found to be small regardless of the initial preparation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}), while the internal state distribution of the preeminent fragment, NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}), is found to depend strongly on the initial vibrational excitation of NH{sub 3}(X{sup ~1}A{sub 1}). The slow H atoms in photodissociation mediated by the antisymmetric stretch fundamental state are due to energy sequestered in the internally excited NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) fragment, rather than in NH{sub 2}(A{sup ~2}A{sub 1}) as previously proposed. The high internal excitation of the NH{sub 2}(X{sup ~2}B{sub 1}) fragment is attributed to the torques exerted on the molecule as it passes through the conical intersection seam to the ground electronic state of NH{sub 3}. Thus in this system, contrary to previous assertions, the control of electronic state branching by selective excitation of ground state vibrational modes is concluded to be ineffective. The juxtaposition of precise quantum mechanical results with complementary results based on quasi-classical surface hopping trajectories provides significant insights into the non-adiabatic process.

  14. Photodissociation dynamics of CO2 at 157.6 nm by photofragment-translational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolow, A.; Lee, Y.T.

    1993-01-01

    The photodissociation of CO 2 at 157 nm was studied by the photofragment-translational spectroscopy technique. Product time-of-flight spectra were recorded and center-of-mass translational energy distributions were determined. Two electronic channels were observed---one forming O( 1 D) and the other O( 3 P). With previously determined anisotropy parameters of β=2 for the O( 3 P) channel and β=0 for the O( 1 D) channel, an electronic branching ratio of 6%±2%O( 3 P) was obtained, consistent with previous results. The translational energy distribution for the CO(v)+O( 3 P) channel was very broad (over 30 kcal/mol) and appeared to peak near CO(v=0). The value of β=2 for the O( 3 P) channel was confirmed by comparing Doppler profiles, derived from our measured translational energy distribution, with previously measured Doppler profiles. This suggests that the O( 3 P) channel arises from a direct transition to an excited triplet state. The O( 1 D) channel had a structured time-of-flight which related to rovibrational distributions of the CO product. The influence of the excitation of the CO 2 (ν 2 ) bending mode was investigated and shown to have a small but not negligible contribution. Based upon a comparison of our data with a previous vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) laser induced fluorescence study, we obtain as our best estimate of the vibrational branching ratio, CO(v=0)/CO(v=1)=1.9, for the CO(v)+O( 1 D) channel

  15. Simulation of angle-resolved photoemission spectra by approximating the final state by a plane wave: From graphene to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puschnig, Peter, E-mail: peter.puschnig@uni-graz.at; Lüftner, Daniel

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Computational study on angular dependent photoemission spectroscopy. • Graphene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. • Plane wave final state approximation accounts for experimental findings. - Abstract: We present a computational study on the angular-resolved photoemission spectra (ARPES) from a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and graphene. Our theoretical approach is based on ab-initio density functional theory and the one-step model where we greatly simplify the evaluation of the matrix element by assuming a plane wave for the final state. Before comparing our ARPES simulations with available experimental data, we discuss how typical approximations for the exchange-correlation energy affect orbital energies. In particular, we show that by employing a hybrid functional, considerable improvement can be obtained over semi-local functionals in terms of band widths and relative energies of π and σ states. Our ARPES simulations for graphene show that the plane wave final state approximation provides indeed an excellent description when compared to experimental band maps and constant binding energy maps. Furthermore, our ARPES simulations for a number of polycyclic aromatic molecules from the oligo-acene, oligo-phenylene, phen-anthrene families as well as for disc-shaped molecules nicely illustrate the evolution of the electronic structure from molecules with increasing size towards graphene.

  16. Spectral watermarking in femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy: resolving the nature of the carotenoid S-star state

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kloz, Miroslav; Weissenborn, J.; Polívka, T.; Frank, H.A.; Kennis, J.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 21 (2016), s. 14619-14628 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_008/0000162; GA MŠk LQ1606 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_008/0000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : beta-carotene * excited-state * ultrafast dynamics * resonance Raman * excitation * conversion * pathway * laser * S-1 Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  17. Steady State and Time-Resolved Fluorescence Dynamics of Triphenylamine Based Oligomers with Phenylene/Thiophene/Furan in Solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Zeng; Ying-Liang, Liu; Kang, Meng; Xiang-Jie, Zhao; Shu-Feng, Wang; Qi-Huang, Gong

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the photo-physical properties of a series of triphenylamine-based oligomers by steady-state and picosecond transient fluorescence measurements in solvents. The oligomers are composed alternatively with triphenylamine and phenylene/thiophene/furan group, bridged by vinyl group (PNB/PNT/PNF). Their fluorescence spectra show bathochromic phenomenon with solvent polarity and viscosity increasing. The fluorescence decays are bi-exponential for PNB and PNT, and tri-exponential for PNF in THF and aniline. The strong viscosity dependence suggests conformational relaxation along the PNF chain after photo excitation. (condensed matter: electronicstructure, electrical, magnetic, and opticalproperties)

  18. The principles and values of the social state of law as a legal and political framework for resolving conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia Hernandez, Javier Gonzaga

    2008-01-01

    The social state of law is the legal politic framework proposed in the 1991 Constitution, in which Colombians expect to construct a new relationship with nature, based in principles and values such as life, prevalence of general interest over the individual, solidarity, protection of cultural and natural wealth, human dignity and civic participation. The environmental conflicts currently pose a new challenge for the jurists, given that for its comprehension, development and solution proposal it becomes necessary to have a general legal framework and rules of environmental law, as well as principles and values consecrated in the constitution and in other international instruments ratified by Colombia. The participation of an informed, trained and deliberative citizenship, in the resolution of environmental conflicts and in the decisions taken over the environment, will create a dynamic public opinion that will question governors, will manage jointly their own projects and will promote different values from those created from the consumer societies and the individual ownership in the actual states

  19. Spectrum of Slip Processes on the Subduction Interface in a Continuum Framework Resolved by Rate-and State Dependent Friction and Adaptive Time Stepping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrendoerfer, R.; van Dinther, Y.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    To explore the relationships between subduction dynamics and the megathrust earthquake potential, we have recently developed a numerical model that bridges the gap between processes on geodynamic and earthquake cycle time scales. In a self-consistent, continuum-based framework including a visco-elasto-plastic constitutive relationship, cycles of megathrust earthquake-like ruptures were simulated through a purely slip rate-dependent friction, albeit with very low slip rates (van Dinther et al., JGR, 2013). In addition to much faster earthquakes, a range of aseismic slip processes operate at different time scales in nature. These aseismic processes likely accommodate a considerable amount of the plate convergence and are thus relevant in order to estimate the long-term seismic coupling and related hazard in subduction zones. To simulate and resolve this wide spectrum of slip processes, we innovatively implemented rate-and state dependent friction (RSF) and an adaptive time-stepping into our continuum framework. The RSF formulation, in contrast to our previous friction formulation, takes the dependency of frictional strength on a state variable into account. It thereby allows for continuous plastic yielding inside rate-weakening regions, which leads to aseismic slip. In contrast to the conventional RSF formulation, we relate slip velocities to strain rates and use an invariant formulation. Thus we do not require the a priori definition of infinitely thin, planar faults in a homogeneous elastic medium. With this new implementation of RSF, we succeed to produce consistent cycles of frictional instabilities. By changing the frictional parameter a, b, and the characteristic slip distance, we observe a transition from stable sliding to stick-slip behaviour. This transition is in general agreement with predictions from theoretical estimates of the nucleation size, thereby to first order validating our implementation. By incorporating adaptive time-stepping based on a

  20. Methane dissociation on the steps and terraces of Pt(211) resolved by quantum state and impact site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Helen; Guo, Han; Gutiérrez-González, Ana; Menzel, Jan Paul; Jackson, Bret; Beck, Rainer D.

    2018-01-01

    Methane dissociation on the step and terrace sites of a Pt(211) single crystal was studied by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) at a surface temperature of 120 K. The C—H stretch RAIRS signal of the chemisorbed methyl product species was used to distinguish between adsorption on step and terrace sites allowing methyl uptake to be monitored as a function of incident kinetic energy for both sites. Our results indicate a direct dissociation mechanism on both sites with higher reactivity on steps than on terraces consistent with a difference in an activation barrier height of at least 30 kJ/mol. State-specific preparation of incident CH4 with one quantum of antisymmetric (ν3) stretch vibration further increases the CH4 reactivity enabling comparison between translational and vibrational activation on both steps and terraces. The reaction is modeled with first principles quantum theory that accurately describes dissociative chemisorption at different sites on the surface.

  1. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic investigations on intramolecular electron transfer processes within a synthesized methoxynaphthalene dyad by using a nematic liquid crystal medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardhan, Munmun; Mandal, Paulami; De, Asish; Kumar De, Avijit; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Ganguly, Tapan

    2010-01-01

    UV-vis, steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic investigations were made on photoinduced charge separation and thermal charge recombination processes involved within a novel synthesized dyad, 1-(4-chloro-phenyl)-3-(4-methoxy-naphthalen-1-yl)-propenone (MNCA) where the donor 1-methoxynaphthalene (MNT) and the acceptor p-choloroacetophenone (PCA) moieties are connected by a short unsaturated olefinic bond. The measurements were made within the pseudo-ordered domain (just above nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition temperature, >308 K) of a nematic liquid crystal, 4-(n-pentyl)-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). Results observed are compared with those obtained from the similar measurements in isotropic media. The charge separation and recombination rates remain more-or-less unchanged within the experimental error irrespective of the polarity of the environment, whether in pseudo-ordered domain (ε S ∼10.5) of a nematic liquid crystal 5CB or in highly polar isotropic medium ACN (ε S ∼37.5). The structural rigidity of the dyad MNCA having stable elongated form both in the ground as well as in the photoexcited states seems to be the reason for this unique behavior of solvent insensitivity. The theoretical predictions done by ab initio method density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP/6-311 G (d, p) basis function correlate well with experimental observations of formations of only one stable elongated (E-type) conformer both in the ground and electronic excited state.

  2. Excited-State Dynamics of a DNA Duplex in a Deep Eutectic Solvent Probed by Femtosecond Time-Resolved IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Harpe, Kimberly; Kohl, Forrest R; Zhang, Yuyuan; Kohler, Bern

    2018-03-08

    To better understand how the solvent influences excited-state deactivation in DNA strands, femtosecond time-resolved IR (fs-TRIR) pump-probe measurements were performed on a d(AT) 9 ·d(AT) 9 duplex dissolved in a deep eutectic solvent (DES) made from choline chloride and ethylene glycol in a 1:2 mol ratio. This solvent, known as ethaline, is a member of a class of ionic liquids capable of solubilizing DNA with minimal disruption to its secondary structure. UV melting analysis reveals that the duplex studied here melts at 18 °C in ethaline compared to 50 °C in aqueous solution. Ethaline has an excellent transparency window that facilitates TRIR measurements in the double-bond stretching region. Transient spectra recorded in deuterated ethaline at room temperature indicate that photoinduced intrastrand charge transfer occurs from A to T, yielding the same exciplex state previously detected in aqueous solution. This state decays via charge recombination with a lifetime of 380 ± 10 ps compared to the 300 ± 10 ps lifetime measured earlier in D 2 O solution. The TRIR data strongly suggest that the long-lived exciplex forms exclusively in the solvated duplex, and not in the denatured single strands, which appear to have little, if any, base stacking. The longer lifetime of the exciplex state in the DES compared to aqueous solution is suggested to arise from reduced stabilization of the charge transfer state, resulting in slower charge recombination on account of Marcus inverted behavior.

  3. Photo-electron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation of molecular radicals and fragments produced by laser photo-dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahon, Laurent

    1991-01-01

    This research thesis reports the combined use of a laser and of a synchrotron radiation in order to respectively photo-dissociate a molecule and to photo-ionize fragments which are analysed by photo-electron spectroscopy. This association allows, on the one hand, radical photo-ionization to be studied, and, on the other hand, polyatomic molecule photo-dissociation to be studied. The author studied the photo-excitation and/or photo-ionization in layer 4d (resp. 3d) of atomic iodine (resp. bromine) produced almost complete laser photo-dissociation of I_2 (resp. Br_2). He discuses the processes of relaxation of transitions from valence 4d to 5p (resp. 3d to 4p) which occur either by direct self-ionization or by resonant Auger effect, and reports the study of photo-dissociation of s-tetrazine (C_2N_4H_2) [fr

  4. Constructing a Spatially Resolved Methane Emission Inventory of Natural Gas Production and Distribution over Contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Omara, M.; Adams, P. J.; Presto, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas after Carbon Dioxide. The natural gas production and distribution accounts for 23% of the total anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States. The boost of natural gas production in U.S. in recent years poses a potential concern of increased methane emissions from natural gas production and distribution. The Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (Edgar) v4.2 and the EPA Greenhouse Gas Inventory (GHGI) are currently the most commonly used methane emission inventories. However, recent studies suggested that both Edgar v4.2 and the EPA GHGI largely underestimated the methane emission from natural gas production and distribution in U.S. constrained by both ground and satellite measurements. In this work, we built a gridded (0.1° Latitude ×0.1° Longitude) methane emission inventory of natural gas production and distribution over the contiguous U.S. using emission factors measured by our mobile lab in the Marcellus Shale, the Denver-Julesburg Basin, and the Uintah Basin, and emission factors reported from other recent field studies for other natural gas production regions. The activity data (well location and count) are mostly obtained from the Drillinginfo, the EPA Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP) and the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Results show that the methane emission from natural gas production and distribution estimated by our inventory is about 20% higher than the EPA GHGI, and in some major natural gas production regions, methane emissions estimated by the EPA GHGI are significantly lower than our inventory. For example, in the Marcellus Shale, our estimated annual methane emission in 2015 is 600 Gg higher than the EPA GHGI. We also ran the GEOS-Chem methane simulation to estimate the methane concentration in the atmosphere with our built inventory, the EPA GHGI and the Edgar v4.2 over the nested North American Domain. These simulation results showed differences in

  5. Photo-Induced Spin-State Conversion in Solvated Transition Metal Complexes Probed via Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huse, Nils; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2010-04-30

    Solution-phase photoinduced low-spin to high-spin conversion in the FeII polypyridyl complex [Fe(tren(py)3)]2+ (where tren(py)3 is tris(2-pyridylmethyliminoethyl)amine) has been studied via picosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy. Following 1A1 --> 1MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) excitation at 560 nm, changes in the iron L2- and L3-edges were observed concomitant with formation of the transient high-spin 5T2 state. Charge-transfer multiplet calculations coupled with data acquired on low-spin and high-spin model complexes revealed a reduction in ligand field splitting of 1 eV in the high-spin state relative to the singlet ground state. A significant reduction in orbital overlap between the central Fe-3d and the ligand N-2p orbitals was directly observed, consistent with the expected ca. 0.2 Angstrom increase in Fe-N bond length upon formation of the high-spin state. The overall occupancy of the Fe-3d orbitals remains constant upon spin crossover, suggesting that the reduction in sigma-donation is compensated by significant attenuation of pi-back-bonding in the metal-ligand interactions. These results demonstrate the feasibility and unique potential of time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study ultrafast reactions in the liquid phase by directly probing the valence orbitals of first-row metals as well as lighter elements during the course of photochemical transformations.

  6. Electronic structure of charge-density-wave state in quasi-2D KMo6O17 purple bronze characterized by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, M. A.; Avila, J.; Drouard, S.; Guyot, H.; Asensio, M. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report on an angle-resolved-photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) investigation of layered quasi-two dimensional (2D) Molybdenum purple bronze KMo6O17 in order to study and characterizes the transition to a charge-density-wave (CDW) state. We have performed photoemission temperature dependent measurements cooling down from room temperature (RT) to 32 K, well below the Peierls transition for this material, with CDW transition temperature Tc =110 K. The spectra have been taken at a selected kF point of the Fermi surface (FS) that satisfies the nesting condition of the FS, looking for the characteristic pseudo-gap opening in this kind of materials. The pseudogap has been estimated and it result to be in agreement with our previous works. The shift to lower binding energy of crossing Fermi level ARPES feature have been also confirmed and studied as a function of temperature, showing a rough like BCS behaviour. Finally we have also focused on ARPES measurements along ΓM¯ high symmetry direction for both room and low temperature states finding some insight for ‘shadow’ or back folded bands indicating the new periodicity of real lattice after the CDW lattice distortion.

  7. Vibrational spectroscopy of the electronically excited state. 4. Nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of carotenoid excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallinger, R.F.; Farquharson, S.; Woodruff, W.H.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra are reported for the S 0 and T 1 states of the carotenoids β-carotene, zeaxanthin, echinenone, canthaxanthin, dihydroxylycopene, astaxanthin, decapreno(C 50 )-β-carotene, β-apo-8'-carotenal, and ethyl β-apo-8'-carotenoate. The results reveal qualitatively similar ground-state spectra and similar frequency shifts in all observed resonance Raman modes between S 0 and T 1 , regardless of carotenoid structure. Examinations of the relationship of the putative C--C and C==C frequencies in S 0 and T 1 reveals anomalous shifts to lower frequency in the ''single-bond'' mode upon electronic excitation. These shifts may be due to molecular distortions in the excited state which force changes in molecular motions comprising the observed modes. However, another possibility requiring no distortion is that the interaction (off-diagonal) force constants connecting the C--C and C==C modes change sign upon electronic excitation. This latter phenomenon may provide a unitary explanation for the ''anomalous'' frequency shifts in the C--C and C==C modes, both in the T 1 states of carotenoids and in the S 1 states of simpler polyenes, without postulating large, unpredicted structural changes upon excitation or general errors in existing vibrational or theoretical analyses. Resonance Raman and absorbance studies with 35-ps time resolution suggest that S 1 lifetime (of the 1 B/sub u/ and/or the 1 A/sub g/* states) of β-carotene in benzene is less than 1 ps

  8. Synergistic effects for the TiO2/RuO2/Pt photodissociation of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondel, G; Harriman, A; Williams, D

    1983-07-01

    Compressed discs of naked TiO2 or TiO2 coated with a thin film of a noble metal (e.g. Pt) do not photodissociate water upon illumination with UV light, but small amounts of H2 are generated if the TiO2 has been reduced in a stream of H2 at 600 C. Discs prepared from mixtures of TiO2/RuO2 facilitate the UV photodissociation of water into H2 and O2 although the yields are very low. When a thin (about 9 nm) film of Pt is applied to the TiO2/RuO2 discs, the yields of H2 and O2 observed upon irradiation with UV light are improved drastically. 25 references.

  9. Photodissociation thresholds of OH produced from CH sub 3 OH in solid neon and argon

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, B M; Lo, W J; Lee, Y P

    2001-01-01

    Photodissociation thresholds of OH from CH sub 3 OH in solid Ne and Ar were determined via photolysis of CH sub 3 OH/Ne and CH sub 3 OH/Ar (1/200) samples in situ at 4 K. The samples were irradiated with VUV synchrotron radiation after dispersion by a Seya-Namioka monochromator. The OH photo-product was detected by means of laser-induced fluorescence technique. The increase of fluorescent intensity of OH was monitored and recorded after the matrix sample was irradiated at different wavelengths for 3-5 min. Photodissociation threshold energies of 7.13+-0.02 eV (174.0+-0.5 nm) and 7.08+-0.04 eV (175.0+-1.0 nm) were measured for OH production of CH sub 3 OH in solid Ne and Ar, respectively.

  10. Effect of linear chirp on strong field photodissociation of H+2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhudesai, Vaibhav; Natan, Adi; Bruner, Barry; Silberberg, Yaron; Lev, Uri; Heber, Oded; Strasser, Daniel; Schwalm, Dirk; Zajfman, Daniel; Ben-Itzhak, Itzik

    2011-01-01

    We report the experimental findings of a systematic study of the effect of linear chirp on strong field photodissociation of H + 2 . For vibrational levels around or above the one photon crossing, the effect manifests itself in terms of a shift in the kinetic energy release (KER) peaks. The peaks shift up for negative chirp whereas they shift down for positive chirp. The measurements are carried out by varying two of the three laser pulse characteristics, energy, pulse peak intensity and linear chirp, while keeping the third constant. The shifts in the KER peaks are found to be intensity dependent for a given value of chirp. However, in the last two cases (i.e., fixed pulsed energy and fixed pulse peak intensity), they are found to be independent of the chirp magnitude. The results are understood on the basis of saturation of photodissociation probabilities for these levels.

  11. Effect of linear chirp on strong field photodissociation of H{sup +}{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhudesai, Vaibhav; Natan, Adi; Bruner, Barry; Silberberg, Yaron; Lev, Uri; Heber, Oded; Strasser, Daniel; Schwalm, Dirk; Zajfman, Daniel [Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 (Israel); Ben-Itzhak, Itzik [Kansas State University, Kansas (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We report the experimental findings of a systematic study of the effect of linear chirp on strong field photodissociation of H{sup +}{sub 2}. For vibrational levels around or above the one photon crossing, the effect manifests itself in terms of a shift in the kinetic energy release (KER) peaks. The peaks shift up for negative chirp whereas they shift down for positive chirp. The measurements are carried out by varying two of the three laser pulse characteristics, energy, pulse peak intensity and linear chirp, while keeping the third constant. The shifts in the KER peaks are found to be intensity dependent for a given value of chirp. However, in the last two cases (i.e., fixed pulsed energy and fixed pulse peak intensity), they are found to be independent of the chirp magnitude. The results are understood on the basis of saturation of photodissociation probabilities for these levels.

  12. Characteristic analysis of laser isotope separation process by two-step photodissociation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Atsuyuki; Kiyose, Ryohei

    1981-01-01

    A large number of laser isotope separation experiments have been performed actively in many countries. In this paper, the selective two-step photodissociation method is chosen and simultaneous nonlinear differential equations that express the separation process are solved directly by using computer. Predicted separation factors are investigated in relation to the incident pulse energy and the concentration of desired molecules. Furthermore, the concept of separative work is used to evaluate the results of separation for this method. It is shown from an example of numerical calculation that a very large separation factor can be obtained if the concentration of desired molecules is lowered and two laser pulses to be closely synchronized are not always required in operation for the photodissociation of molecules. (author)

  13. Internal energy of HCl upon photolysis of 2-chloropropene at 193 nm investigated with time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy and quasiclassical trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-M.; Huang, Y.-H.; Liu, S.-Y.; Lee, Y.-P.; Pombar-Perez, Marta; Martinez-Nunez, Emilio; Vazquez, Saulo A.

    2008-01-01

    Following photodissociation of 2-chloropropene (H 2 CCClCH 3 ) at 193 nm, vibration-rotationally resolved emission spectra of HCl (υ≤6) in the spectral region of 1900-2900 cm -1 were recorded with a step-scan time-resolved Fourier-transform spectrometer. All vibrational levels show a small low-J component corresponding to ∼400 K and a major high-J component corresponding to 7100-18 700 K with average rotational energy of 39± 3 11 kJ mol -1 . The vibrational population of HCl is inverted at υ=2, and the average vibrational energy is 86±5 kJ mol -1 . Two possible channels of molecular elimination producing HCl+propyne or HCl+allene cannot be distinguished positively based on the observed internal energy distribution of HCl. The observed rotational distributions fit qualitatively with the distributions of both channels obtained with quasiclassical trajectories (QCTs), but the QCT calculations predict negligible populations for states at small J. The observed vibrational distribution agrees satisfactorily with the total QCT distribution obtained as a weighted sum of contributions from both four-center elimination channels. Internal energy distributions of HCl from 2-chloropropene and vinyl chloride are compared.

  14. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic investigations on intramolecular electron transfer processes within a synthesized methoxynaphthalene dyad by using a nematic liquid crystal medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, Munmun; Mandal, Paulami; De, Asish; Kumar De, Avijit [Department of Spectroscopy, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032, West Bengal (India); Chowdhury, Joydeep [Sammilani Mahavidyalaya Baghajatin Station, West Bengal (India); Ganguly, Tapan, E-mail: sptg@mahendra.iacs.res.i [Department of Spectroscopy, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032, West Bengal (India)

    2010-06-15

    UV-vis, steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic investigations were made on photoinduced charge separation and thermal charge recombination processes involved within a novel synthesized dyad, 1-(4-chloro-phenyl)-3-(4-methoxy-naphthalen-1-yl)-propenone (MNCA) where the donor 1-methoxynaphthalene (MNT) and the acceptor p-choloroacetophenone (PCA) moieties are connected by a short unsaturated olefinic bond. The measurements were made within the pseudo-ordered domain (just above nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition temperature, >308 K) of a nematic liquid crystal, 4-(n-pentyl)-4'-cyanobiphenyl (5CB). Results observed are compared with those obtained from the similar measurements in isotropic media. The charge separation and recombination rates remain more-or-less unchanged within the experimental error irrespective of the polarity of the environment, whether in pseudo-ordered domain (epsilon{sub S}approx10.5) of a nematic liquid crystal 5CB or in highly polar isotropic medium ACN (epsilon{sub S}approx37.5). The structural rigidity of the dyad MNCA having stable elongated form both in the ground as well as in the photoexcited states seems to be the reason for this unique behavior of solvent insensitivity. The theoretical predictions done by ab initio method density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP/6-311 G (d, p) basis function correlate well with experimental observations of formations of only one stable elongated (E-type) conformer both in the ground and electronic excited state.

  15. Imaging of rotational wave-function in photodissociation of rovibrationally excited HCl molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grygoryeva, Kateřina; Rakovský, Jozef; Votava, Ondřej; Fárník, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 147, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 013901. ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-08937S; GA ČR GA13-11635S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Angular distribution * Chemical reactions * Photodissociation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.965, year: 2016

  16. Classical photodissociation dynamics with Bohr quantization: Application to the fragmentation of a van der Waals cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbelo-González, W.; Bonnet, L.; Larrégaray, P.; Rayez, J.-C.; Rubayo-Soneira, J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A recent classical description of photodissociation dynamics in a quantum spirit is applied for the first time to a realistic process, the fragmentation of NeBr 2 . Highlights: ► The photo-dissociation of NeBr 2 is studied by means of two approaches. ► The first is the standard classical one with Gaussian binning. ► The second is a new method applied for the first time to a realistic system. ► The new method leads to exactly the same results as the standard one. ► However, it requires about 10 times less trajectories in the present case. - Abstract: The recent classical dynamical approach of photodissociations with Bohr quantization [L. Bonnet, J. Chem. Phys. 133 (2010) 174108] is applied for the first time to a realistic process, the photofragmentation of the van der Waals cluster NeBr 2 . We illustrate the fact that this approach, formally equivalent to the standard one, may be numerically much more efficient.

  17. Quantum chemical molecular dynamical investigation of alkyl nitrite photo-dissociated on copper surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaojing; Wang Wei; Han Peilin; Kubo, Momoji; Miyamoto, Akira

    2008-01-01

    An accelerated quantum chemical molecular dynamical code 'Colors-Excite' was used to investigate the photolysis of alkyl nitrites series, RONO (R=CH 3 and C(CH 3 ) 3 ) on copper surfaces. Our calculations showed that the photo-dissociated processes are associated with the alkyl substituents of RONO when adsorbed on copper surfaces. For R=CH 3 , a two-step photolysis reaction occurred, yielding diverse intermediate products including RO radical, NO, and HNO, consistent with those reported in gas phase. While for R=C(CH 3 ) 3 , only one-step photolysis reaction occurred and gave intermediate products of RO radical and NO. Consequently, pure RO species were achieved to adsorb on metal surfaces by removing the NO species in photolysis reaction. The detailed photo-dissociated behaviors of RONO on copper surfaces with different alkyl substituents which are uncovered by the present simulation can be extended to explain the diverse dissociative mechanism experimentally observed. The quantum chemical molecular dynamical code 'Colors-Excite' is proved to be highly applicable to the photo-dissociations on metal surfaces

  18. Picosecond dynamics of reactions in the liquid phase: studies of iodine photodissociation and development of new laser techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, M.A.

    1985-09-01

    Iodine photodissociation and recombination was studied as a model for processes common to chemical reaction in the liquid phase. Picosecond transient absorption measurements from 1000 to 295 nm were used to monitor the dynamics in a variety of solvents. Most of the atoms which undergo geminate recombination were found to do so in less than or equal to 15 ps, in agreement with the results of existing molecular dynamics simulations. Vibrational relaxation times vary from approx.15 ps near the middle of the ground state well to approx.150 ps for complete relaxation to v = 0. The prediction of strong resonant vibrational energy transfer to chlorinated methane solvents was not supported, but some evidence for this mechanism was found for alkane solvents. Current theory is unable to explain the large variation (65 to 2700 ps) of the excited A'-state lifetime in various solvents. The 10-Hz amplified, synchronously-pumped dye laser which was used in these studies is described and characterized. SERS (Stimulated Electronic Raman Scattering) and difference frequency mixing were used in the generation of the infrared and far-infrared, respectively. 54 refs., 38 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Photodissociation dynamics of CH{sub 3}C(O)SH in argon matrix: A QM/MM nonadiabatic dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Shu-Hua; Liu, Xiang-Yang; Fang, Qiu; Cui, Ganglong, E-mail: ganglong.cui@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Photochemistry, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2015-11-21

    In this work, we have first employed the combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to study the photodissociation mechanism of thioacetic acid CH{sub 3}C(O)SH in the S{sub 1}, T{sub 1}, and S{sub 0} states in argon matrix. CH{sub 3}C(O)SH is treated quantum mechanically using the complete active space self-consistent field and complete active space second-order perturbation theory methods; argon matrix is described classically using Lennard-Jones potentials. We find that the C-S bond fission is predominant due to its small barriers of ca. 3.0 and 1.0 kcal/mol in the S{sub 1} and T{sub 1} states. It completely suppresses the nearby C—C bond fission. After the bond fission, the S{sub 1} radical pair of CH{sub 3}CO and SH can decay to the S{sub 0} and T{sub 1} states via internal conversion and intersystem crossing, respectively. In the S{sub 0} state, the radical pair can either recombine to form CH{sub 3}C(O)SH or proceed to form molecular products of CH{sub 2}CO and H{sub 2}S. We have further employed our recently developed QM/MM generalized trajectory-based surface-hopping method to simulate the photodissociation dynamics of CH{sub 3}C(O)SH. In 1 ps dynamics simulation, 56% trajectories stay at the Franck-Condon region; the S{sub 1} C—S bond fission takes place in the remaining 44% trajectories. Among all nonadiabatic transitions, the S{sub 1} → S{sub 0} internal conversion is major (55%) but the S{sub 1} → T{sub 1} intersystem crossing is still comparable and cannot be ignored, which accounts for 28%. Finally, we have found a radical channel generating the molecular products of CH{sub 2}CO and H{sub 2}S, which is complementary to the concerted molecular channel. The present work sets the stage for simulating photodissociation dynamics of similar thio-carbonyl systems in matrix.

  20. Measurement of fluorophore concentrations and fluorescence quantum yield in tissue-simulating phantoms using three diffusion models of steady-state spatially resolved fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, Kevin R; Farrell, Thomas J; Patterson, Michael S [Department of Medical Physics, Juravinski Cancer Centre and McMaster University, 699 Concession Street, Hamilton, Ontario L8V 5C2 (Canada)

    2003-12-21

    Steady-state diffusion theory models of fluorescence in tissue have been investigated for recovering fluorophore concentrations and fluorescence quantum yield. Spatially resolved fluorescence, excitation and emission reflectance were calculated by diffusion theory and Monte Carlo simulations, and measured using a multi-fibre probe on tissue-simulating phantoms containing either aluminium phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS{sub 4}), Photofrin or meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphine dihydrochloride (TPPS{sub 4}). The accuracy of the fluorophore concentration and fluorescence quantum yield recovered by three different models of spatially resolved fluorescence were compared. The models were based on: (a) weighted difference of the excitation and emission reflectance, (b) fluorescence due to a point excitation source or (c) fluorescence due to a pencil beam excitation source. When literature values for the fluorescence quantum yield were used for each of the fluorophores, the fluorophore absorption coefficient (and hence concentration) at the excitation wavelengthwas recovered with a root-mean-square accuracy of 11.4% using the point source model of fluorescence and 8.0% using the more complicated pencil beam excitation model. The accuracy was calculated over a broad range of optical properties and fluorophore concentrations. The weighted difference of reflectance model performed poorly, with a root-mean-square error in concentration of about 50%. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that there are some situations where the weighted difference of reflectance is as accurate as the other two models, although this was not confirmed experimentally. Estimates of the fluorescence quantum yield in multiple scattering media were also made by determining independently from the fitted absorption spectrum and applying the various diffusion theory models. The fluorescence quantum yields for AlPcS{sub 4} and TPPS{sub 4} were calculated to be 0.59 {+-} 0.03 and 0.121 {+-} 0

  1. Measurement of fluorophore concentrations and fluorescence quantum yield in tissue-simulating phantoms using three diffusion models of steady-state spatially resolved fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, Kevin R; Farrell, Thomas J; Patterson, Michael S

    2003-01-01

    Steady-state diffusion theory models of fluorescence in tissue have been investigated for recovering fluorophore concentrations and fluorescence quantum yield. Spatially resolved fluorescence, excitation and emission reflectance were calculated by diffusion theory and Monte Carlo simulations, and measured using a multi-fibre probe on tissue-simulating phantoms containing either aluminium phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS 4 ), Photofrin or meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphine dihydrochloride (TPPS 4 ). The accuracy of the fluorophore concentration and fluorescence quantum yield recovered by three different models of spatially resolved fluorescence were compared. The models were based on: (a) weighted difference of the excitation and emission reflectance, (b) fluorescence due to a point excitation source or (c) fluorescence due to a pencil beam excitation source. When literature values for the fluorescence quantum yield were used for each of the fluorophores, the fluorophore absorption coefficient (and hence concentration) at the excitation wavelengthwas recovered with a root-mean-square accuracy of 11.4% using the point source model of fluorescence and 8.0% using the more complicated pencil beam excitation model. The accuracy was calculated over a broad range of optical properties and fluorophore concentrations. The weighted difference of reflectance model performed poorly, with a root-mean-square error in concentration of about 50%. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that there are some situations where the weighted difference of reflectance is as accurate as the other two models, although this was not confirmed experimentally. Estimates of the fluorescence quantum yield in multiple scattering media were also made by determining independently from the fitted absorption spectrum and applying the various diffusion theory models. The fluorescence quantum yields for AlPcS 4 and TPPS 4 were calculated to be 0.59 ± 0.03 and 0.121 ± 0.001 respectively using the point

  2. Study on the interaction of phthalate esters to human serum albumin by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoyun [National Key Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Zhaowei [College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhou, Ximin; Wang, Xiaoru [National Key Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Chen, Xingguo, E-mail: chenxg@lzu.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Department of Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {center_dot} Molecular docking revealed PAEs to be located in the hydrophobic pocket of HSA. {center_dot} HSA-DMP had one class of binding sites while HSA-BBP and HSA-DEHP had two types. {center_dot} Hydrophobic and hydrogen interactions dominated in the association of HSA-PAEs. {center_dot} The lifetime of Trp residue of HSA decreased after the addition of PAEs. {center_dot} The presences of PAEs could alter the second structure of HSA. - Abstract: Phthalate esters (PAEs) are globally pervasive contaminants that are considered to be endocrine disruptor chemicals and toxic environmental priority pollutants. In this paper, the interactions between PAEs and human serum albumin (HSA) were examined by molecular modelling, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) and circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD). The association constants between PAEs and HSA were determined using the Stern-Volmer and Scatchard equations. The binding of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) to HSA has a single class of binding site and its binding constants (K) are 4.08 x 10{sup 3}, 3.97 x 10{sup 3}, 3.45 x 10{sup 3}, and 3.20 x 10{sup 3} L mol{sup -1} at 289, 296, 303, and 310 K, respectively. The Stern-Volmer and Scatchard plots both had two regression curves for HSA-butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP) and HSA-di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), which indicated that these bindings were via two types of binding sites: the numbers of binding site for the first type were lower than for the second type. The binding constants of the first type binding site were higher than those of the second type binding site at corresponding temperatures, the results suggesting that the first type of binding site had high affinity and the second binding site involved other sites with lower binding affinity and selectivity. The thermodynamic parameters of the binding reactions ({Delta}G{sup o}, {Delta}H{sup o} and {Delta}S{sup o}) were measured, and they indicated the presences

  3. Time-resolved generation of membrane potential by ba3 cytochrome c oxidase from Thermus thermophilus coupled to single electron injection into the O and OH states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siletsky, Sergey A; Belevich, Ilya; Belevich, Nikolai P; Soulimane, Tewfik; Wikström, Mårten

    2017-11-01

    Two electrogenic phases with characteristic times of ~14μs and ~290μs are resolved in the kinetics of membrane potential generation coupled to single-electron reduction of the oxidized "relaxed" O state of ba 3 oxidase from T. thermophilus (O→E transition). The rapid phase reflects electron redistribution between Cu A and heme b. The slow phase includes electron redistribution from both Cu A and heme b to heme a 3 , and electrogenic proton transfer coupled to reduction of heme a 3 . The distance of proton translocation corresponds to uptake of a proton from the inner water phase into the binuclear center where heme a 3 is reduced, but there is no proton pumping and no reduction of Cu B . Single-electron reduction of the oxidized "unrelaxed" state (O H →E H transition) is accompanied by electrogenic reduction of the heme b/heme a 3 pair by Cu A in a "fast" phase (~22μs) and transfer of protons in "middle" and "slow" electrogenic phases (~0.185ms and ~0.78ms) coupled to electron redistribution from the heme b/heme a 3 pair to the Cu B site. The "middle" and "slow" electrogenic phases seem to be associated with transfer of protons to the proton-loading site (PLS) of the proton pump, but when all injected electrons reach Cu B the electronic charge appears to be compensated by back-leakage of the protons from the PLS into the binuclear site. Thus proton pumping occurs only to the extent of ~0.1 H + /e - , probably due to the formed membrane potential in the experiment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Bond Shortening (1.4 Å) in the Singlet and Triplet Excited States of [Ir2(dimen)4]2+ in Solution Determined by Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haldrup, Martin Kristoffer; Harlang, Tobias; Christensen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Ground- and excited-state structures of the bimetallic, ligand-bridged compound Ir2(dimen)42+ are investigated in acetonitrile by means of time-resolved X-ray scattering. Following excitation by 2 ps laser pulses at 390 nm, analysis of difference scattering patterns obtained at eight different ti...

  5. The dependence of the ultrafast relaxation kinetics of the S2 and S1 states in β-carotene homologs and lycopene on conjugation length studied by femtosecond time-resolved absorption and Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Masazumi; Fujii, Ritsuko; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hashimoto, Hideki; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2009-06-01

    The ultrafast relaxation kinetics of all-trans-β-carotene homologs with varying numbers of conjugated double bonds n(n =7-15) and lycopene (n =11) has been investigated using femtosecond time-resolved absorption and Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopies, both carried out under identical excitation conditions. The nonradiative relaxation rates of the optically allowed S2(1Bu+1) state were precisely determined by the time-resolved fluorescence. The kinetics of the optically forbidden S1(2Ag-1) state were observed by the time-resolved absorption measurements. The dependence of the S1 relaxation rates upon the conjugation length is adequately described by application of the energy gap law. In contrast to this, the nonradiative relaxation rates of S2 have a minimum at n =9 and show a reverse energy gap law dependence for values of n above 11. This anomalous behavior of the S2 relaxation rates can be explained by the presence of an intermediate state (here called the Sx state) located between the S2 and S1 states at large values of n (such as n =11). The presence of such an intermediate state would then result in the following sequential relaxation pathway S2→Sx→S1→S0. A model based on conical intersections between the potential energy curves of these excited singlet states can readily explain the measured relationships between the decay rates and the energy gaps.

  6. Spontaneous Isomerization of Peptide Cation Radicals Following Electron Transfer Dissociation Revealed by UV-Vis Photodissociation Action Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Naruaki; Houferak, Camille; Murphy, Megan P; Nguyen, Huong T H; Dang, Andy; Tureček, František

    2018-01-16

    Peptide cation radicals of the z-type were produced by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of peptide dications and studied by UV-Vis photodissociation (UVPD) action spectroscopy. Cation radicals containing the Asp (D), Asn (N), Glu (E), and Gln (Q) residues were found to spontaneously isomerize by hydrogen atom migrations upon ETD. Canonical N-terminal [z 4 + H] +● fragment ion-radicals of the R-C ● H-CONH- type, initially formed by N-C α bond cleavage, were found to be minor components of the stable ion fraction. Vibronically broadened UV-Vis absorption spectra were calculated by time-dependent density functional theory for several [ ● DAAR + H] + isomers and used to assign structures to the action spectra. The potential energy surface of [ ● DAAR + H] + isomers was mapped by ab initio and density functional theory calculations that revealed multiple isomerization pathways by hydrogen atom migrations. The transition-state energies for the isomerizations were found to be lower than the dissociation thresholds, accounting for the isomerization in non-dissociating ions. The facile isomerization in [ ● XAAR + H] + ions (X = D, N, E, and Q) was attributed to low-energy intermediates having the radical defect in the side chain that can promote hydrogen migration along backbone C α positions. A similar side-chain mediated mechanism is suggested for the facile intermolecular hydrogen migration between the c- and [z + H] ● -ETD fragments containing Asp, Asn, Glu, and Gln residues. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universität Leipzig, Linnéstrasse 2, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Asmis, Knut R., E-mail: knut.asmis@uni-leipzig.de, E-mail: js@chemie.hu-berlin.de [Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universität Leipzig, Linnéstrasse 2, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Bischoff, Florian A.; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim, E-mail: knut.asmis@uni-leipzig.de, E-mail: js@chemie.hu-berlin.de [Institut für Chemie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, D-10099 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-28

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D{sub 2}-tagged AlO{sub 1-4}{sup −} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3-6}{sup −} are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm{sup −1}. Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3-6}{sup −} anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO{sub 3}{sup −}. Terminal Al–O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm{sup −1}. Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm{sup −1}) and lower energies (850-570 cm{sup −1}), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm{sup −1} represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al–(O){sub 2}–Al ring.

  8. Spontaneous Isomerization of Peptide Cation Radicals Following Electron Transfer Dissociation Revealed by UV-Vis Photodissociation Action Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Naruaki; Houferak, Camille; Murphy, Megan P.; Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Dang, Andy; Tureček, František

    2018-01-01

    Peptide cation radicals of the z-type were produced by electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of peptide dications and studied by UV-Vis photodissociation (UVPD) action spectroscopy. Cation radicals containing the Asp (D), Asn (N), Glu (E), and Gln (Q) residues were found to spontaneously isomerize by hydrogen atom migrations upon ETD. Canonical N-terminal [z4 + H]+● fragment ion-radicals of the R-C●H-CONH- type, initially formed by N-Cα bond cleavage, were found to be minor components of the stable ion fraction. Vibronically broadened UV-Vis absorption spectra were calculated by time-dependent density functional theory for several [●DAAR + H]+ isomers and used to assign structures to the action spectra. The potential energy surface of [●DAAR + H]+ isomers was mapped by ab initio and density functional theory calculations that revealed multiple isomerization pathways by hydrogen atom migrations. The transition-state energies for the isomerizations were found to be lower than the dissociation thresholds, accounting for the isomerization in non-dissociating ions. The facile isomerization in [●XAAR + H]+ ions (X = D, N, E, and Q) was attributed to low-energy intermediates having the radical defect in the side chain that can promote hydrogen migration along backbone Cα positions. A similar side-chain mediated mechanism is suggested for the facile intermolecular hydrogen migration between the c- and [z + H]●-ETD fragments containing Asp, Asn, Glu, and Gln residues. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Influence of light-induced conical intersection on the photodissociation dynamics of D2(+) starting from individual vibrational levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halász, Gábor J; Csehi, András; Vibók, Ágnes; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2014-12-26

    Previous works have shown that dressing of diatomic molecules by standing or by running laser waves gives rise to the appearance of so-called light-induced conical intersections (LICIs). Because of the strong nonadiabatic couplings, the existence of such LICIs may significantly change the dynamical properties of a molecular system. In our former paper (J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 8528), the photodissociation dynamics of the D(2)(+) molecule were studied in the LICI framework starting the initial vibrational nuclear wave packet from the superposition of all the vibrational states initially produced by ionizing D(2). The present work complements our previous investigation by letting the initial nuclear wave packets start from different individual vibrational levels of D(2)(+), in particular, above the energy of the LICI. The kinetic energy release spectra, the total dissociation probabilities, and the angular distributions of the photofragments are calculated and discussed. An interesting phenomenon has been found in the spectra of the photofragments. Applying the light-induced adiabatic picture supported by LICI, explanations are given for the unexpected structure of the spectra.

  10. Electronic structure, Dirac points and Fermi arc surface states in three-dimensional Dirac semimetal Na3Bi from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Aiji; Chen Chaoyu; Wang Zhijun; Shi Youguo; Feng Ya; Yi Hemian; Xie Zhuojin; He Shaolong; He Junfeng; Peng Yingying; Liu Yan; Liu Defa; Hu Cheng; Zhao Lin; Liu Guodong; Dong Xiaoli; Zhang Jun; Nakatake, M; Iwasawa, H; Shimada, K

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) Dirac semimetals have linearly dispersive 3D Dirac nodes where the conduction band and valence band are connected. They have isolated 3D Dirac nodes in the whole Brillouin zone and can be viewed as a 3D counterpart of graphene. Recent theoretical calculations and experimental results indicate that the 3D Dirac semimetal state can be realized in a simple stoichiometric compound A 3 Bi ( A = Na, K, Rb). Here we report comprehensive high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) measurements on the two cleaved surfaces, (001) and (100), of Na 3 Bi. On the (001) surface, by comparison with theoretical calculations, we provide a proper assignment of the observed bands, and in particular, pinpoint the band that is responsible for the formation of the three-dimensional Dirac cones. We observe clear evidence of 3D Dirac cones in the three-dimensional momentum space by directly measuring on the k x – k y plane and by varying the photon energy to get access to different out-of-plane k z s. In addition, we reveal new features around the Brillouin zone corners that may be related with surface reconstruction. On the (100) surface, our ARPES measurements over a large momentum space raise an issue on the selection of the basic Brillouin zone in the (100) plane. We directly observe two isolated 3D Dirac nodes on the (100) surface. We observe the signature of the Fermi-arc surface states connecting the two 3D Dirac nodes that extend to a binding energy of ∼150 meV before merging into the bulk band. Our observations constitute strong evidence on the existence of the Dirac semimetal state in Na 3 Bi that are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental work. In addition, our results provide new information to clarify on the nature of the band that forms the 3D Dirac cones, on the possible formation of surface reconstruction of the (001) surface, and on the issue of basic Brillouin zone selection for the (100) surface. (rapid communication)

  11. Selective control of photodissociation in deutereted water molecule HOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.; Deshpande, Sarin; Sarma, Manabendra; Kurkal, Vandana; Mishra, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Bond dissociation in the deutereted water molecule HOD has been investigated to explore the possibility of selective control of dissociation of O-H and O-D bonds using simple field profiles and initial states that do not require high overtone excitations. Preliminary results indicate that considerable selectivity in dissociation of O-H and O-D bonds can be achieved using fundamental and first overtone excitations only and use of field optimized initial state (FOIST) based scheme with appropriate choice of field parameters and initial states may enhance both selectivity and yield

  12. Silver as an electron source for photodissociation of hydronium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papas, B. N.; Whitten, J. L. [Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2011-11-28

    The photochemistry of a solvated hydronium ion near a silver surface is investigated using ab initio self-consistent field and configuration interaction theory. Photoinduced electron attachment can occur at energies in the range of 1.1-1.2 eV depending upon the initial orientation of the hydronium relative to the silver surface. Rearrangement of solvating waters considerably reduces transition state barriers to dissociation on the excited-state potential energy surface, such that fast dissociation of the neutralized hydronium would occur with no barrier. Both the H and H{sub 2} product channels are exothermic pathways on the excited state surface and in several instances exothermic compared to the energy of the initial structure.

  13. Isotope effects in gas-phase chemical reactions and photodissociation processes: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The origins of isotope effects in equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical processes are reviewed. In non-equilibrium processes, attention is given to isotope effects in simple bimolecular reactions, symmetry-related reactions, and photodissociation processes. Recent examples of isotope effects in these areas are reviewed. Some indication of other scientific areas for which measurements and/or calculations of isotope effects are used is also given. Examples presented focus on neutral molecule chemistry and in many cases complement examples considered in greater detail in the other chapters of this volume

  14. Diabatic potential-optimized discrete variable representation: application to photodissociation process of the CO molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitencourt, Ana Carla P; Prudente, Frederico V; Vianna, Jose David M

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new numerically optimized discrete variable representation using eigenstates of diabatic Hamiltonians. This procedure provides an efficient method to solve non-adiabatic coupling problems since the generated basis sets take into account information on the diabatic potentials. The method is applied to the B 1 Σ + - D' 1 Σ + Rydberg-valence predissociation interaction in the CO molecule. Here we give an account of the discrete variable representation and present the procedure for the calculation of its optimized version, which we apply to obtain the total photodissociation cross sections of the CO molecule

  15. Photodissociation dynamics of the simplest alkyl peroxy radicals, CH3OO and C2H5OO, at 248 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Erin N.; Nichols, Bethan; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2018-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of the simplest alkyl peroxy radicals, methyl peroxy (CH3OO) and ethyl peroxy (C2H5OO), are investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. A fast beam of CH3OO- or C2H5OO- anions is photodetached to generate neutral radicals that are subsequently dissociated using 248 nm photons. The coincident detection of the photofragment positions and arrival times allows for the determination of mass, translational energy, and angular distributions for both two-body and three-body dissociation events. CH3OO exhibits repulsive O loss resulting in the formation of O(1D) + CH3O with high translational energy release. Minor two-body channels leading to OH + CH2O and CH3O + O(3P) formation are also detected. In addition, small amounts of H + O(3P) + CH2O are observed and attributed to O loss followed by CH3O dissociation. C2H5OO exhibits more complex dissociation dynamics, in which O loss and OH loss occur in roughly equivalent amounts with O(1D) formed as the dominant O atom electronic state via dissociation on a repulsive surface. Minor two-body channels leading to the formation of O2 + C2H5 and HO2 + C2H4 are also observed and attributed to a ground state dissociation pathway following internal conversion. Additionally, C2H5OO dissociation yields a three-body product channel, CH3 + O(3P) + CH2O, for which the proposed mechanism is repulsive O loss followed by the dissociation of C2H5O over a barrier. These results are compared to a recent study of tert-butyl peroxy (t-BuOO) in which 248 nm excitation results in three-body dissociation and ground state two-body dissociation but no O(1D) production.

  16. Using Molecular Genetic Markers to Resolve a Subspecies Boundary: The Northern Boundary of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher in the Four-Corner States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Eben H.; Sogge, Mark K.; Theimer, Tad C.; Girard, Jessica; Keim, Paul

    2008-01-01

    *Executive Summary* The northern boundary of the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is currently approximated as running through southern Colorado and Utah, but the exact placement is uncertain because this subspecies shares a border with the more northern and non-endangered E. t. adastus. To help resolve this issue, we evaluated the geographic distribution of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by sampling breeding sites across the four-corner states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). We found that breeding sites clustered into two major groups generally consistent with the currently designated boundary, with the exception of three sites situated along the current boundary. However, delineating a precise boundary that would separate the two subspecies is made difficult because (1) we found evidence for a region of intergradation along the boundary area, suggesting the boundary is not discreet, and (2) the boundary region is sparsely populated, with too few extant breeding populations to precisely locate a boundary. The boundary region encompasses an area where elevation changes markedly over relatively short distances, with low elevation deserts to the south and more mesic, higher elevation habitats to the north. We hypothesized that latitudinal and elevational differences and their concomitant ecological effects could form an ecological barrier that inhibited gene flow between the subspecies, forming the basis for the subspecies boundary. We modeled changes in geographic patterns of genetic markers as a function of latitude and elevation finding significant support for this relationship. The model was brought into a GIS environment to create multiple subspecies boundaries, with the strength of each predicted boundary evaluated on the basis of how much genetic variation it explained. The candidate boundary that accounted for the most genetic variation was situated generally near the currently recognized subspecies boundary

  17. Pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe ultrafast spectroscopy resolves cross section of an early ground state intermediate and stimulated emission in the photoreactions of the Pr ground state of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Ann E; Lincoln, Craig N; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; van Thor, Jasper J

    2012-01-26

    contrast, using a 680 nm dump pulse, ground state formation is observed for all models examined. The ΔΔOD signals were dominated by stimulated emission, at both 1 and 14 ps delays for the longer wavelength excitation. The GSI, which is revealed by the PRP measurements and not resolved from pump-probe measurements, is found to be directly formed from the excited state of Pr, and its formation is considered using heterogeneous, homogeneous, and target models to globally fit the data.

  18. Case-resolving capacity of dental care of the Unified Health System: the perception of users in a city in the state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arinilson Moreira Chaves Lima

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to learn about the users' perceptions concerning the case-resolving capacity of dental care in the Unified Health System and to analyze the associations between solving capacity and both sociodemographic characteristics and access to the service. This was a cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach, in which 461 users responded to individual interviews. The outcome variable was the case-resolving capacity of dental care, obtained through the question: “In your opinion, is the dentist of this health center managing to solve all your oral health problems (Yes/No”. Independent variables were grouped into the following: sociodemographic and related to the access to the service. Most participants reported that their oral health problems were being solved. By using the Poisson regression, the lack of case-resolving capacity was found to be associated to the patients' not considering the dental surgeon's working hours convenient; to the long time they had to wait to get an appointment in the health center; and to the long time they had to wait in the waiting room. The results showed the positive view that users have about the case-resolving capacity of public dental care, and the relationship between access to the service and the said solving capacity.

  19. Photodissociation of 1,2-dibromoethylene at 248 nm: Br2 molecular elimination probed by cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Ping-Chen; Lin, King-Chuen; Huang, C H; Sun, B J; Chang, A H H

    2008-06-02

    The Br2 elimination channel is probed for 1,2-C2H2Br2 in the B(3)Pi(+)ou-X(1)Sigma(+)g transition upon irradiation at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS). The nascent vibrational population ratio of Br2(v=1)/Br2(v=0) is obtained to be 0.7+/-0.2, thus indicating that the Br2 fragment is produced in hot vibrational states. The obtained Br2 products are anticipated to result primarily from photodissociation of the ground-state cis isomer via four-center elimination or from cis/trans isomers via three-center elimination, each mechanism involving a transition state that has a Br-Br distance much larger than that of ground state Br2. According to ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathways that lead to Br2 elimination may proceed either through the electronic ground state by internal conversion or through the triplet state by intersystem crossing. Temperature-dependence measurements are examined, thereby supporting the pathway that involves internal conversion--which was excluded previously by using product translational spectroscopy (PTS). The quantum yield for the Br2 elimination reaction is determined to be 0.120.1, being substantially contributed by the ground-state Br2 product. The discrepancy of this value from that (of 0.2) obtained by PTS may rise from the lack of measurements in probing the triplet-state Br2 product.

  20. CO product energy distribution in the photodissociation of methylketene and acrolein at 193 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, G. T.; Umstead, M. E.; Lin, M. C.

    1985-04-01

    CO product vibrational energy distributions in the photodissociation of the two C3H4O isomers, methylketene (CH3CHCO) and acrolein (CH2CHCHO), at 193 nm have been measured by CO laser resonance absorption. The CO from methylketene was found to be vibrationally excited up to v=7, and from acrolein v=6, with average vibrational energies of 3.4±0.3 and 2.7±0.7 kcal/mol, respectively. The similarities observed in the appearance times and in the vibrational energy content of the CO formed in the two systems support our previous conclusion that in the case of acrolein isomerization to methylketene takes place prior to the dissociation process: CH2CHCHO+hν→CH3CHCO*†→CH3CH+CO†. The CO vibrational energy distributions observed in both systems agree closely with the statistical distribution predicted assuming that ethylidene rather than ethylene is formed in the photodissociation reaction.

  1. Design of a formaldehyde photodissociation process for carbon and oxygen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, R.C.; Scheibner, K.F.

    1993-01-01

    The current shortage of 18 O has revived interest in using one step UV photodissociation of formaldehyde to enrich 13 C, 17 O and 18 O. The frequency doubled output of the copper laser pumped dye laser system currently in operation at LLNL can be used to drive this dissociation. The authors use a simple kinetics model and their experience with Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) process design to examine the relative merits of different designs for a formaldehyde photodissociation process. Given values for the molecular photoabsorption cross section, partition function, spectroscopic selectivity, collisional exchange and quenching cross sections (all as parameters), they perform a partial optimization in the space of illuminated area, formaldehyde pressure in each stage, and formaldehyde residence time in each stage. They examine the effect of cascade design (heads and tails staging) on molecule and photon utilization for each of the three isotope separation missions, and look in one case at the system's response to different ratios of laser to formaldehyde costs. Finally, they examine the relative cost of enrichment as a function of isotope and product assay. Emphasis is as much on the process design methodology, which is general, as on the specific application to formaldehyde

  2. Photodissociation dynamics of formyl fluoride (HFCO) at 193 nm: Branching ratios and distributions of kinetic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.; Wu, C.-Y.; Yang, S.K.; Lee, Y.-P.

    2005-01-01

    Following photodissociation of formyl fluoride (HFCO) at 193 nm, we detected products with fragmentation translational spectroscopy utilizing a tunable vacuum ultraviolet beam from a synchrotron for ionization. Among three primary dissociation channels observed in this work, the F-elimination channel HFCO→HCO+F dominates, with a branching ratio ∼0.66 and an average release of kinetic energy ∼55 kJ mol -1 ; about 17% of HCO further decomposes to H+CO. The H-elimination channel HFCO→FCO+H has a branching ratio ∼0.28 and an average release of kinetic energy ∼99 kJ mol -1 ; about 21% of FCO further decomposes to F+CO. The F-elimination channel likely proceeds via the S 1 surface whereas the H-elimination channel proceeds via the T 1 surface; both channels exhibit moderate barriers for dissociation. The molecular HF-elimination channel HFCO→HF+CO, correlating with the ground electronic surface, has a branching ratio of only ∼0.06; the average translational release of 93 kJ mol -1 , ∼15% of available energy, implies that the fragments are highly internally excited. Detailed mechanisms of photodissociation are discussed

  3. Infrared photodissociation of van der Waals molecules containing ethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casassa, M.P.; Bomse, D.S.; Janda, K.C.

    1981-01-01

    Vibrational predissociation line shapes in the n 7 region of the ethylene spectrum are measured for van der Waals molecules of ethylene bound to Ne, Ar, Kr, C 2 H 4 , C 2 F 4 , and larger ethylene clusters. The predissociative rate is very fast for this group of molecules. The vibrationally excited state lifetimes are 0.44, 0.59 and 0.89 x 10 -12 sec for (C 2 H 4 ) 2 , ArxC 2 H 4 , and C 2 H 4 xC 2 F 4 respectively. That the observed line shapes are homogeneous is demonstrated by the fact that a low-power, narrow frequency bandwidth laser can dissociate a large fraction of the initial ensemble of ethylene clusters. The observed transition probability is proportional to the number of ethylene subunits for clusters containing three or fewer ethylene subunits. These observations are interpreted in terms of intramolecular energy flow directly from ethylene n 7 to the weak van der Waals modes of motion

  4. Photoleucine Survives Backbone Cleavage by Electron Transfer Dissociation. A Near-UV Photodissociation and Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Action Spectroscopy Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shaffer, C. J.; Martens, J.; Marek, Aleš; Oomens, J.; Tureček, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 7 (2016), s. 1176-1185 ISSN 1044-0305 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : peptide ions * electron transfer dissociation * photoleucine label * near-UV photodissociation * infrared multiphoton dissociation action spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.786, year: 2016

  5. Excitation of Molecular Hydrogen in the Orion Bar Photodissociation Region from a Deep Near-infrared IGRINS Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kyle F.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Oh, Heeyoung; Mace, Gregory N.; Kim, Hwihyun; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Pavel, Michael D.; Lee, Sungho; Pak, Soojong; Park, Chan; Sok Oh, Jae; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2017-04-01

    We present a deep near-infrared spectrum of the Orion Bar Photodissociation Region (PDR) taken with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) on the 2.7 m telescope at the McDonald Observatory. IGRINS has high spectral resolution (R˜ {{45,000}}) and instantaneous broad wavelength coverage (1.45-2.45 μm), enabling us to detect 87 emission lines from rovibrationally excited molecular hydrogen (H2) that arise from transitions out of 69 upper rovibration levels of the electronic ground state. These levels cover a large range of rotational and vibrational quantum numbers and excitation energies, making them excellent probes of the excitation mechanisms of H2 and physical conditions within the PDR. The Orion Bar PDR is thought to consist of cooler high density clumps or filaments (T=50{--}250 K, {n}H={10}5{--}{10}7 cm-3) embedded in a warmer lower density medium (T=250{--}1000 K, {n}H={10}4{--}{10}5 cm-3). We fit a grid of constant temperature and density Cloudy models, which recreate the observed H2 level populations well, to constrain the temperature to a range of 600-650 K and the density to {n}H=2.5× {10}3{--}{10}4 cm-3. The best-fit model gives T = 625 K and {n}H=5× {10}3 cm-3. This well-constrained warm temperature is consistent with kinetic temperatures found by other studies for the Orion Bar’s lower density medium. However, the range of densities well fit by the model grid is marginally lower than those reported by other studies. We could be observing lower density gas than the surrounding medium, or perhaps a density-sensitive parameter in our models is not properly estimated.

  6. Time-resolved studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    When new or more powerful probes become available that offer both shorter data-collection times and the opportunity to apply innovative approaches to established techniques, it is natural that investigators consider the feasibility of exploring the kinetics of time-evolving systems. This stimulating area of research not only can lead to insights into the metastable or excited states that a system may populate on its way to a ground state, but can also lead to a better understanding of that final state. Synchrotron radiation, with its unique properties, offers just such a tool to extend X-ray measurements from the static to the time-resolved regime. The most straight-forward application of synchrotron radiation to the study of transient phenomena is directly through the possibility of decreased data-collection times via the enormous increase in flux over that of a laboratory X-ray system. Even further increases in intensity can be obtained through the use of novel X-ray optical devices. Widebandpass monochromators, e.g., that utilize the continuous spectral distribution of synchrotron radiation, can increase flux on the sample several orders of magnitude over conventional X-ray optical systems thereby allowing a further shortening of the data-collection time. Another approach that uses the continuous spectral nature of synchrotron radiation to decrease data-collection times is the open-quote parallel data collectionclose quotes method. Using this technique, intensities as a function of X-ray energy are recorded simultaneously for all energies rather than sequentially recording data at each energy, allowing for a dramatic decrease in the data-collection time

  7. Photodissociation of water. II. Wave packet calculations for the photofragmentation of H2O and D2O in the B˜ band

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harrevelt, Rob; van Hemert, Marc C.

    2000-04-01

    A complete three-dimensional quantum mechanical description of the photodissociation of water in the B˜ band, starting from its rotational ground state, is presented. In order to include B˜-X˜ vibronic coupling and the B˜-Ã Renner-Teller coupling, diabatic electronic states have been constructed from adiabatic electronic states and matrix elements of the electronic angular momentum operators, following the procedure developed by A. J. Dobbyn and P. J. Knowles [Mol. Phys. 91, 1107 (1997)], using the ab initio results discussed in the preceding paper. The dynamics is studied using wave packet methods, and the evolution of the time-dependent wave function is discussed in detail. Results for the H2O and D2O absorption spectra, OH(A)/OH(X) and OD(A)/OD(X) branching ratios, and rovibrational distributions of the OH and OD fragments are presented and compared with available experimental data. The present theoretical results agree at least qualitatively with the experiments. The calculations show that the absorption spectrum and the product state distributions are strongly influenced by long-lived resonances on the adiabatic B˜ state. It is also shown that molecular rotation plays an important role in the photofragmentation process, due to both the Renner-Teller B˜-X˜ mixing, and the strong effect of out-of-plane molecular rotations (K>0) on the dynamics at near linear HOH and HHO geometries.

  8. Time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of excited argon and ground-state titanium atoms in pulsed magnetron discharges

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sushkov, V.; Do, H.T.; Čada, Martin; Hubička, Zdeněk; Hippler, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2013), 1-10 ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/0386; GA ČR GAP108/12/2104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : absorption spectroscopy * diode laser * magnetron * argon metastable * HiPIMS * titanium * time-resolved Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.056, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0963-0252/22/1/015002/

  9. Identification of the high pt jet events produced by a resolved photon at HERA and reconstruction of the initial state parton kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostini, G.; Monaldi, D.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the possibility offered by the HERA detectors to identify the events where a proton interacts with a parton of the (quasi) real photon. We find that the presence of hadronic fragments of the photon outside of the beam pipe allows the identification of the two jet events produced by a resolved photon, with good efficiency and low background from the direct photon events. We show that it is also possible to reconstruct the fractional momenta of the two incoming partons. (orig.)

  10. Bulk electronic state of high-Tc cuprate La2-xSrxCuO4 observed by high-energy angle integrated and resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, S.; Sekiyama, A.; Tsunekawa, M.; Ernst, P.T.; Shigemoto, A.; Yamasaki, A.; Irizawa, A.; Imada, S.; Sing, M.; Muro, T.; Sasagawa, T.; Takagi, H.; Suga, S.

    2005-01-01

    The high-energy core-level photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements have been performed for La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 (LSCO). Polar-angle dependence of the Cu 2p core-level PES has revealed a discrepancy between bulk and surface. We have observed by the high-energy ARPES that the Fermi surface of LSCO with x=0.16 is electron-like, in contrast to previous low-energy ARPES results

  11. Three-dimensional photodissociation in strong laser fields: Memory-kernel effective-mode expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xuan; Thanopulos, Ioannis; Shapiro, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a method for the efficient computation of non-Markovian quantum dynamics for strong (and time-dependent) system-bath interactions. The past history of the system dynamics is incorporated by expanding the memory kernel in exponential functions thereby transforming in an exact fashion the non-Markovian integrodifferential equations into a (larger) set of ''effective modes'' differential equations (EMDE). We have devised a method which easily diagonalizes the EMDE, thereby allowing for the efficient construction of an adiabatic basis and the fast propagation of the EMDE in time. We have applied this method to three-dimensional photodissociation of the H 2 + molecule by strong laser fields. Our calculations properly include resonance-Raman scattering via the continuum, resulting in extensive rotational and vibrational excitations. The calculated final kinetic and angular distribution of the photofragments are in overall excellent agreement with experiments, both when transform-limited pulses and when chirped pulses are used.

  12. Schrödinger–Langevin equation with quantum trajectories for photodissociation dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chia-Chun, E-mail: ccchou@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2017-02-15

    The Schrödinger–Langevin equation is integrated to study the wave packet dynamics of quantum systems subject to frictional effects by propagating an ensemble of quantum trajectories. The equations of motion for the complex action and quantum trajectories are derived from the Schrödinger–Langevin equation. The moving least squares approach is used to evaluate the spatial derivatives of the complex action required for the integration of the equations of motion. Computational results are presented and analyzed for the evolution of a free Gaussian wave packet, a two-dimensional barrier model, and the photodissociation dynamics of NOCl. The absorption spectrum of NOCl obtained from the Schrödinger–Langevin equation displays a redshift when frictional effects increase. This computational result agrees qualitatively with the experimental results in the solution-phase photochemistry of NOCl.

  13. Photodissociation dynamics of the iodide-uracil (I{sup −}U) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei-Li; Kunin, Alice [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Matthews, Edward; Yoshikawa, Naruo; Dessent, Caroline E. H., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu, E-mail: caroline.dessent@york.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Neumark, Daniel M., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu, E-mail: caroline.dessent@york.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Photofragment action spectroscopy and femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron imaging are utilized to probe the dissociation channels in iodide-uracil (I{sup −} ⋅ U) binary clusters upon photoexcitation. The photofragment action spectra show strong I{sup −} and weak [U—H]{sup −} ion signal upon photoexcitation. The action spectra show two bands for I{sup −} and [U—H]{sup −} production peaking around 4.0 and 4.8 eV. Time-resolved experiments measured the rate of I{sup −} production resulting from excitation of the two bands. At 4.03 eV and 4.72 eV, the photoelectron signal from I{sup −} exhibits rise times of 86 ± 7 ps and 36 ± 3 ps, respectively. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the lower energy band, which encompasses the vertical detachment energy (4.11 eV) of I{sup −}U, corresponds to excitation of a dipole-bound state of the complex, while the higher energy band is primarily a π–π{sup ∗} excitation on the uracil moiety. Although the nature of the two excited states is very different, the long lifetimes for I{sup −} production suggest that this channel results from internal conversion to the I{sup −} ⋅ U ground state followed by evaporation of I{sup −}. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the dissociation rates to Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations.

  14. Integrating Faith-Based Organizations into State-Funded Pre-K Programs: Resolving Constitutional Conflict. Pre-K Policy Brief Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dan; Boylan, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This policy brief addresses federal and state constitutional issues that arise when faith-based organizations participate in state prekindergarten (pre-k) programs and recommends safeguards to ensure that public funding of those programs complies with constitutional principles respecting the separation of church and state and freedom of religion.…

  15. Apparatus for extraction and separation of a preferentially photo-dissociated molecular isotope into positive and negative ions by means of an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus for the separation and extraction of molecular isotopes is claimed. Molecules of one and the same isotope are preferentially photo-dissociated by a laser and an ultraviolet source, or by multi-photon absorption of laser radiation. The resultant ions are confined with a magnetic field, moved in opposite directions by an electric field, extracted from the photo-dissociation region by means of screening and accelerating grids, and collected in ducts

  16. Zwitterionic states in gas-phase polypeptide ions revealed by 157-nm ultra-violet photodissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Silivra, Oleg A; Zubarev, Roman A

    2006-01-01

    carboxylic groups relative to competing COOH losses (45 Da) from neutral carboxylic groups. Loss of CO2 is a strong indication of the presence of a zwitterionic [(+)...(-)...(+)] salt bridge in the gas-phase polypeptide cation. This method provides a tool for studying, for example, the nature of binding...... of the fragment formation should be taken into account. Cations of Trp-cage proteins exist preferentially as zwitterions, with the deprotonation position divided between the Asp9 residue and the C terminus in the ratio 3:2. The majority of dications of the same molecule are not zwitterions. Furthermore, 157-nm...

  17. The electronically excited states of LH2 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila strain 10050 studied by time-resolved spectroscopy and dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. II. Homo-arrays of LH2 complexes reconstituted into phospholipid model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflock, Tobias J; Oellerich, Silke; Krapf, Lisa; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Ullmann, G Matthias; Köhler, Jürgen

    2011-07-21

    We performed time-resolved spectroscopy on homoarrays of LH2 complexes from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. Variations of the fluorescence transients were monitored as a function of the excitation fluence and the repetition rate of the excitation. These parameters are directly related to the excitation density within the array and to the number of LH2 complexes that still carry a triplet state prior to the next excitation. Comparison of the experimental observations with results from dynamic Monte Carlo simulations for a model cluster of LH2 complexes yields qualitative agreement without the need for any free parameter and reveals the mutual relationship between energy transfer and annihilation processes.

  18. Photoelectron and photodissociation studies of free atoms and molecules, using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medhurst, L.J.

    1991-11-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation and Zero-Kinetic-Energy Photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study two-electron transitions in atomic systems at their ionization thresholds. Using this same technique the core-ionized mainline and satellite states of N{sub 2} and CO were studied with vibrational resolution. Vibrationally resolved synchrotron radiation was used to study the dissociation of N{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and CH{sub 3}Cl near the N 1s and C 1s thresholds. The photoelectron satellites of the argon 3s, krypton 4s and xenon 4d subshells were studied with zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy at their ionization thresholds. In all of these cases, satellites with lower binding energies are enhanced at their thresholds while those closer to the double ionization threshold are suppressed relative to their intensities at high incident light energies.

  19. Photoelectron and photodissociation studies of free atoms and molecules, using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medhurst, Laura Jane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation and Zero-Kinetic-Energy Photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study two-electron transitions in atomic systems at their ionization thresholds. Using this same technique the core-ionized mainline and satellite states of N2 and CO were studied with vibrational resolution. Vibrationally resolved synchrotron radiation was used to study the dissociation of N2, C2H4, and CH3Cl near the N 1s and C 1s thresholds. The photoelectron satellites of the argon 3s, krypton 4s and xenon 4d subshells were studied with zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy at their ionization thresholds. In all of these cases, satellites with lower binding energies are enhanced at their thresholds while those closer to the double ionization threshold are suppressed relative to their intensities at high incident light energies.

  20. Photoelectron and photodissociation studies of free atoms and molecules, using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medhurst, L.J.

    1991-11-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation and Zero-Kinetic-Energy Photoelectron spectroscopy were used to study two-electron transitions in atomic systems at their ionization thresholds. Using this same technique the core-ionized mainline and satellite states of N 2 and CO were studied with vibrational resolution. Vibrationally resolved synchrotron radiation was used to study the dissociation of N 2 , C 2 H 4 , and CH 3 Cl near the N 1s and C 1s thresholds. The photoelectron satellites of the argon 3s, krypton 4s and xenon 4d subshells were studied with zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy at their ionization thresholds. In all of these cases, satellites with lower binding energies are enhanced at their thresholds while those closer to the double ionization threshold are suppressed relative to their intensities at high incident light energies

  1. UV-POSIT: Web-Based Tools for Rapid and Facile Structural Interpretation of Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD) Mass Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jake; Parker, W. Ryan; Cammarata, Michael B.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2018-04-01

    UV-POSIT (Ultraviolet Photodissociation Online Structure Interrogation Tools) is a suite of web-based tools designed to facilitate the rapid interpretation of data from native mass spectrometry experiments making use of 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD). The suite includes four separate utilities which assist in the calculation of fragment ion abundances as a function of backbone cleavage sites and sequence position; the localization of charge sites in intact proteins; the calculation of hydrogen elimination propensity for a-type fragment ions; and mass-offset searching of UVPD spectra to identify unknown modifications and assess false positive fragment identifications. UV-POSIT is implemented as a Python/Flask web application hosted at http://uv-posit.cm.utexas.edu. UV-POSIT is available under the MIT license, and the source code is available at https://github.com/jarosenb/UV_POSIT. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. UV-POSIT: Web-Based Tools for Rapid and Facile Structural Interpretation of Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD) Mass Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jake; Parker, W Ryan; Cammarata, Michael B; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2018-04-06

    UV-POSIT (Ultraviolet Photodissociation Online Structure Interrogation Tools) is a suite of web-based tools designed to facilitate the rapid interpretation of data from native mass spectrometry experiments making use of 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD). The suite includes four separate utilities which assist in the calculation of fragment ion abundances as a function of backbone cleavage sites and sequence position; the localization of charge sites in intact proteins; the calculation of hydrogen elimination propensity for a-type fragment ions; and mass-offset searching of UVPD spectra to identify unknown modifications and assess false positive fragment identifications. UV-POSIT is implemented as a Python/Flask web application hosted at http://uv-posit.cm.utexas.edu . UV-POSIT is available under the MIT license, and the source code is available at https://github.com/jarosenb/UV_POSIT . Graphical Abstract.

  3. High-Resolution Photoionization, Photoelectron and Photodissociation Studies. Determination of Accurate Energetic and Spectroscopic Database for Combustion Radicals and Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Cheuk-Yiu [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-04-25

    The main goal of this research program was to obtain accurate thermochemical and spectroscopic data, such as ionization energies (IEs), 0 K bond dissociation energies, 0 K heats of formation, and spectroscopic constants for radicals and molecules and their ions of relevance to combustion chemistry. Two unique, generally applicable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser photoion-photoelectron apparatuses have been developed in our group, which have used for high-resolution photoionization, photoelectron, and photodissociation studies for many small molecules of combustion relevance.

  4. Photodissociation of H2+ by intense chirped pulses - beyond the effect of pulse duration and peak power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev, U; Prabhudesai, V; Natan, A; Bruner, B; Diner, A; Heber, O; Strasser, D; Schwalm, D; Silberberg, Y; Zajfman, D; Ben-Itzhak, I; Hua, J J; Esry, B D

    2009-01-01

    H 2 + photodissociation, induced by intense short laser pulses, was measured by a full 3D imaging system. We have conducted a series of experiments, in which we systematically changed the linear chirp, using a pulse shaper, and observed the kinetic energy release spectra(KER). Distinct differences in the KER spectra are observed both in peak positions and angular distribution for laser pulses with similar duration and intensity but opposite chirp sign.

  5. Photodissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} by intense chirped pulses - beyond the effect of pulse duration and peak power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lev, U; Prabhudesai, V; Natan, A; Bruner, B; Diner, A; Heber, O; Strasser, D; Schwalm, D; Silberberg, Y; Zajfman, D [Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Ben-Itzhak, I; Hua, J J; Esry, B D, E-mail: uri.lev@Weizmann.ac.i [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    H{sub 2}{sup +} photodissociation, induced by intense short laser pulses, was measured by a full 3D imaging system. We have conducted a series of experiments, in which we systematically changed the linear chirp, using a pulse shaper, and observed the kinetic energy release spectra(KER). Distinct differences in the KER spectra are observed both in peak positions and angular distribution for laser pulses with similar duration and intensity but opposite chirp sign.

  6. Anhydrate to hydrate solid-state transformations of carbamazepine and nitrofurantoin in biorelevant media studied in situ using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Johan Peter; Rantanen, Jukka; Arnfast, Lærke

    2016-01-01

    with different biorelevant media, simulated fasted and fed state intestinal fluids containing bile salt and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) micelles, DOPC/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mixture, bile salt solution and water. Two anhydrate compounds (carbamazepine, CBZ and nitrofurantoin, NF) with different...

  7. A study of relaxation mechanisms in the A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} state of nitric oxide by time resolved double resonant polarization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampanoni-Panariello, A; Bombach, R; Hemmerling, B; Hubschmid, W [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Double resonant polarization labeling spectroscopy is applied to detect nitric oxide in flames and to characterize rotational energy transfer and orientation changing collisions in its first excited electronic state. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  8. Study of the photodissociation of a CdSe nanocrystal beam by means of photoluminescence and Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Orii, T; Onari, S; Kaito, S I; Arai, T

    1997-01-01

    We developed an apparatus that enables us to perform optical measurements of nanocrystals suspended in vacuum. CdSe nanocrystals were produced by a gas evaporation method, and nanocrystal beams were then formed using an inert-gas flow with differential pumping. We measured photoluminescence spectra of the nanocrystal beams with excitations of various photon energies and powers. For a low excitation power, edge emission of the CdSe nanocrystal beam was observed. With increase of the laser power, Raman lines of Se dimers emitted due to the photodissociation of CdSe nanocrystals were observed. It was found that the thresholds of the excitation laser fluence for the photodissociation of CdSe nanocrystals were much smaller than the thresholds of laser fluence for the laser-induced emission of Se atoms from bulk CdSe. The electronic process is dominant in the photodissociation of CdSe nanocrystals whose surfaces are completely free. We suggest that the effective supply of carriers confined in nanocrystals to the su...

  9. Mid-infrared picosecond pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe experiments to resolve a ground-state intermediate in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Clark, Ian P; Towrie, Michael; van Thor, Jasper J

    2009-12-24

    Multipulse picosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy has been used to study photochemical reactions of the cyanobacterial phytochrome photoreceptor Cph1. Different photophysical schemes have been discussed in the literature to describe the pathways after photoexcitation, particularly, to identify reaction phases that are linked to photoisomerisation and electronic decay in the 1566-1772 cm(-1) region that probes C=C and C=O stretching modes of the tetrapyrrole chromophore. Here, multipulse spectroscopy is employed, where, compared to conventional visible pump-mid-infrared probe spectroscopy, an additional visible pulse is incorporated that interacts with populations that are evolving on the excited- and ground-state potential energy surfaces. The time delays between the pump and the dump pulse are chosen such that the dump pulse interacts with different phases in the reaction process. The pump and dump pulses are at the same wavelength, 640 nm, and are resonant with the Pr ground state as well as with the excited state and intermediates. Because the dump pulse additionally pumps the remaining, partially recovered, and partially oriented ground-state population, theory is developed for estimating the fraction of excited-state molecules. The calculations take into account the model-dependent ground-state recovery fraction, the angular dependence of the population transfer resulting from the finite bleach that occurs with linearly polarized intense femtosecond optical excitation, and the partially oriented population for the dump field. Distinct differences between the results from the experiments that use a 1 or a 14 ps dump time favor a branching evolution from S1 to an excited state or reconfigured chromophore and to a newly identified ground-state intermediate (GSI). Optical dumping at 1 ps shows the instantaneous induced absorption of a delocalized C=C stretching mode at 1608 cm(-1), where the increased cross section is associated with the electronic ground-state

  10. Resolving surface chemical states in XPS analysis of first row transition metals, oxides and hydroxides: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biesinger, Mark C., E-mail: biesingr@uwo.ca [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, University of Western Ontario Research Park, Room LL31, 999 Collip Circle, London, Ontario, N6G 0J3 (Canada); ACeSSS (Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Payne, Brad P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Grosvenor, Andrew P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5C9 (Canada); Lau, Leo W.M. [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, University of Western Ontario Research Park, Room LL31, 999 Collip Circle, London, Ontario, N6G 0J3 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Gerson, Andrea R.; Smart, Roger St.C. [ACeSSS (Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2011-01-15

    Chemical state X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of first row transition metals and their oxides and hydroxides is challenging due to the complexity of their 2p spectra resulting from peak asymmetries, complex multiplet splitting, shake-up and plasmon loss structure, and uncertain, overlapping binding energies. Our previous paper [M.C. Biesinger et al., Appl. Surf. Sci. 257 (2010) 887-898.] in which we examined Sc, Ti, V, Cu and Zn species, has shown that all the values of the spectral fitting parameters for each specific species, i.e. binding energy (eV), full wide at half maximum (FWHM) value (eV) for each pass energy, spin-orbit splitting values and asymmetric peak shape fitting parameters, are not all normally provided in the literature and data bases, and are necessary for reproducible, quantitative chemical state analysis. A more consistent, practical and effective approach to curve fitting was developed based on a combination of (1) standard spectra from quality reference samples, (2) a survey of appropriate literature databases and/or a compilation of literature references and (3) specific literature references where fitting procedures are available. This paper extends this approach to the chemical states of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni metals, and various oxides and hydroxides where intense, complex multiplet splitting in many of the chemical states of these elements poses unique difficulties for chemical state analysis. The curve fitting procedures proposed use the same criteria as proposed previously but with the additional complexity of fitting of multiplet split spectra which has been done based on spectra of numerous reference materials and theoretical XPS modeling of these transition metal species. Binding energies, FWHM values, asymmetric peak shape fitting parameters, multiplet peak separation and peak area percentages are presented. The procedures developed can be utilized to remove uncertainties in the analysis of surface states in nano

  11. Time resolved amplified FRET identifies protein kinase B activation state as a marker for poor prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Miles

    2017-12-01

    General significance: The quantitative imaging technology based on Amplified-FRET can rapidly analyse protein activation states and molecular interactions. It could be used for prognosis and assess drug function during the early cycles of chemotherapy. It enables evaluation of clinical efficiency of personalised cancer treatment.

  12. Operation: Inherent Resolve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer-Larsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet giver læseren indsigt i den internationale koalitions engagement mod IS igennem Operaton Inherent Resolve; herunder koalitionens strategi i forhold til IS strategi, ligesom det belyser kampagnens legalitet og folkeretlige grundlag, ligesom det giver et bud på overvejelser om kampagnens...

  13. Temperature dependence of the photodissociation of CO2 from high vibrational levels: 205-230 nm imaging studies of CO(X1Σ+) and O(3P, 1D) products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, S.; Samanta, B. R.; Samanta, A. K.; Reisler, H.

    2017-07-01

    The 205-230 nm photodissociation of vibrationally excited CO2 at temperatures up to 1800 K was studied using Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) and time-sliced Velocity Map Imaging (VMI). CO2 molecules seeded in He were heated in an SiC tube attached to a pulsed valve and supersonically expanded to create a molecular beam of rotationally cooled but vibrationally hot CO2. Photodissociation was observed from vibrationally excited CO2 with internal energies up to about 20 000 cm-1, and CO(X1Σ+), O(3P), and O(1D) products were detected by REMPI. The large enhancement in the absorption cross section with increasing CO2 vibrational excitation made this investigation feasible. The internal energies of heated CO2 molecules that absorbed 230 nm radiation were estimated from the kinetic energy release (KER) distributions of CO(X1Σ+) products in v″ = 0. At 230 nm, CO2 needs to have at least 4000 cm-1 of rovibrational energy to absorb the UV radiation and produce CO(X1Σ+) + O(3P). CO2 internal energies in excess of 16 000 cm-1 were confirmed by observing O(1D) products. It is likely that initial absorption from levels with high bending excitation accesses both the A1B2 and B1A2 states, explaining the nearly isotropic angular distributions of the products. CO(X1Σ+) product internal energies were estimated from REMPI spectroscopy, and the KER distributions of the CO(X1Σ+), O(3P), and O(1D) products were obtained by VMI. The CO product internal energy distributions change with increasing CO2 temperature, suggesting that more than one dynamical pathway is involved when the internal energy of CO2 (and the corresponding available energy) increases. The KER distributions of O(1D) and O(3P) show broad internal energy distributions in the CO(X1Σ+) cofragment, extending up to the maximum allowed by energy but peaking at low KER values. Although not all the observations can be explained at this time, with the aid of available theoretical studies of CO2 VUV

  14. One- and two-photon single ionization of 1D helium: resolving the role of individual decay channels and resonance states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neimanns, Vera; Zimmermann, Klaus; Joerder, Felix; Buchleitner, Andreas [Albert-Ludwigs-Univ., Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Quantum Optics and Statistics; Lugan, Pierre [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics of Nanosystems, Institute of Theoretical Physics, EPF Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    We combine the method of complex rotation and Floquet theory to analyze the multiphoton ionization of helium atoms in strong laser fields. We focus on 1D Z{sup 2+}e{sup -}e{sup -} helium to highlight the methods that allow us to extract the partial decay rates associated with various decay channels. In the regime of one-photon single ionization, we study the dependence of the partial rates associated with the singly ionized He{sup +}(N) states on the field frequency. We show that the electron-electron interaction provides couplings to higher single-ionization continua. Finally, we examine two-photon single-ionization processes, and analyze the role of the internal electronic structure of the atom, specifically the signature of resonant coupling to intermediate bound states on the decay rates.

  15. Improved production of Br atoms near zero speed by photodissociating laser aligned Br2 molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, L Z; Yin, J P

    2014-10-28

    We theoretically investigated the improvement on the production rate of the decelerated bromine (Br) atoms near zero speed by photodissociating laser aligned Br2 precursors. Adiabatic alignment of Br2 precursors exposed to long laser pulses with duration on the order of nanoseconds was investigated by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The dynamical fragmentation of adiabatically aligned Br2 precursors was simulated and velocity distribution of the Br atoms produced was analyzed. Our study shows that the larger the degree of the precursor alignment, ⟨cos(2) θ⟩, the higher the production rate of the decelerated Br atoms near zero speed. For Br2 molecules with an initial rotational temperature of ~1 K, a ⟨cos(2) θ⟩ value of ~0.88 can result in an improvement factor of over ~20 on the production rate of the decelerated Br atoms near zero speed, requiring a laser intensity of only ~1 × 10(12) W/cm(2) for alignment.

  16. Characterization of hydrogen bonding motifs in proteins: hydrogen elimination monitoring by ultraviolet photodissociation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Lindsay J; Chai, Wenrui; Rosenberg, Jake A; Henkelman, Graeme; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2017-08-02

    Determination of structure and folding of certain classes of proteins remains intractable by conventional structural characterization strategies and has spurred the development of alternative methodologies. Mass spectrometry-based approaches have a unique capacity to differentiate protein heterogeneity due to the ability to discriminate populations, whether minor or major, featuring modifications or complexation with non-covalent ligands on the basis of m/z. Cleavage of the peptide backbone can be further utilized to obtain residue-specific structural information. Here, hydrogen elimination monitoring (HEM) upon ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) of proteins transferred to the gas phase via nativespray ionization is introduced as an innovative approach to deduce backbone hydrogen bonding patterns. Using well-characterized peptides and a series of proteins, prediction of the engagement of the amide carbonyl oxygen of the protein backbone in hydrogen bonding using UVPD-HEM is demonstrated to show significant agreement with the hydrogen-bonding motifs derived from molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystal structures.

  17. Photodissociation of C3H5Br and C4H7Br at 234 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Kook; Paul, Dababrata; Hong, Ki Ryong; Cho, Ha Na; Kim, Tae Kyu; Lee, Kyoung Seok

    2012-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of cyclopropyl bromide (C-3H 5 Br) and cyclobutyl bromide (C 4 H 7 Br) at 234 nm was investigated. A two-dimensional photofragment ion-imaging technique coupled with a [2+1] resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization scheme was utilized to obtain speed and angular distributions of the nascent Br( 2 P 3/2 ) and Br*( 2 P 1/2 ) atoms. The recoil anisotropies for the Br and Br* channels were measured to be βBr = 0.92 ± 0.03 and βBr* = 1.52 ± 0.04 for C 3 H 5 Br and βBr = 1.10 ± 0.03 and βBr* = 1.49 ± 0.05 for C 4 H 7 Br. The relative quantum yield for Br was found to be ΦBr = 0.13 ± 0.03 and for C 3 H 5 Br and C 4 H 7 Br, respectively. The soft radical limit of the impulsive model adequately modeled the related energy partitioning. The nonadiabatic transition probability from the 3A' and 4A' potential energy surfaces was estimated and discussed

  18. Differential Fragmentation of Mobility-Selected Glycans via Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kelsey A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2017-06-01

    The alternative dissociation pathways initiated by ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) compared with collision-induced dissociation (CID) may provide useful diagnostic fragments for biomolecule identification, including glycans. However, underivatized glycans do not commonly demonstrate strong UV absorbance, resulting in low fragmentation yields for UVPD spectra. In contrast to UVPD experiments that leverage covalent modification of glycans, we detail the capacity of metal adduction to yield comparatively rich UVPD fragmentation patterns and enhance separation factors for an isomeric glycan set in a drift tube ion mobility system. Ion mobility and UVPD-MS spectra for two N-acetyl glycan isomers were examined, each adducted with sodium or cobalt cations, with the latter providing fragment yield gains of an order of magnitude versus sodium adducts. Furthermore, our glycan analysis incorporated front-end ion mobility separation such that the structural glycan isomers could still be identified even as a mixture and not simply composite spectra of isomeric standards. Cobalt adduction proved influential in the glycan separation by yielding an isomer resolution of 0.78 when analyzed simultaneously versus no discernable separation obtained with the sodium adducts. It is the combined enhancement of both isomeric drift time separation and isomer distinction with improved UVPD fragment ion yields that further bolster multivalent metal adduction for advancing glycan IM-MS experiments. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Top-Down Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Analysis of Protein Structures Using Ultraviolet Photodissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Nicholas I; Huguet, Romain; Zhang, Terry; Viner, Rosa; Zabrouskov, Vlad; Pan, Jingxi; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V; Borchers, Christoph H

    2018-03-06

    Top-down hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) analysis using electron capture or transfer dissociation Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) is a powerful method for the analysis of secondary structure of proteins in solution. The resolution of the method is a function of the degree of fragmentation of backbone bonds in the proteins. While fragmentation is usually extensive near the N- and C-termini, electron capture (ECD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD) fragmentation methods sometimes lack good coverage of certain regions of the protein, most often in the middle of the sequence. Ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) is a recently developed fast-fragmentation technique, which provides extensive backbone fragmentation that can be complementary in sequence coverage to the aforementioned electron-based fragmentation techniques. Here, we explore the application of electrospray ionization (ESI)-UVPD FTMS on an Orbitrap Fusion Lumos Tribrid mass spectrometer to top-down HDX analysis of proteins. We have incorporated UVPD-specific fragment-ion types and fragment-ion mixtures into our isotopic envelope fitting software (HDX Match) for the top-down HDX analysis. We have shown that UVPD data is complementary to ETD, thus improving the overall resolution when used as a combined approach.

  20. Isotope separation of 17O by photodissociation of ozone with near-infrared laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Shigeru; Kambe, Takashi; Sato, Tetsuya; Igarashi, Takehiro; Kuze, Hiroaki

    2012-04-01

    Oxygen-17 is a stable oxygen isotope useful for various diagnostics in both engineering and medical applications. Enrichment of 17O, however, has been very costly due to the lack of appropriate methods that enable efficient production of 17O on an industrial level. In this paper, we report the first 17O-selective photodissociation of ozone at a relatively high pressure, which has been achieved by irradiating a gas mixture of 10 vol% O3-90 vol% CF4 with narrowband laser. The experiment was conducted on a pilot-plant scale. A total laser power of 1.6 W was generated by external-cavity diode lasers with all the laser wavelengths fixed at the peak of an absorption line of 16O16O17O around 1 μm. The beams were introduced into a 25 -m long photoreaction cell under the sealed-off condition with a total pressure of 20 kPa. Lower cell temperature reduced the background decomposition of ozone, and at the temperature of 158 K, an 17O enrichment factor of 2.2 was attained.

  1. Photodissociation dynamics of propene at 157.6 nm: Kinetic energy distributions and branching ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.-H.; Lee, Y.-Y.; Lee, Yuan T.; Yang Xueming

    2003-01-01

    Photodissociation dynamics of propene at 157.6 nm has been investigated in a molecular beam apparatus using the photofragment translational spectroscopic technique combined with the vacuum ultraviolet ionization method. Eleven photofragments have been successfully detected and ascribed to eight (five binary and three triple) dissociation channels: namely, C 3 H 5 +H, C 3 H 4 +H+H, C 3 H 4 +H 2 , C 3 H 3 +H 2 +H, C 2 H 4 +CH 2 , C 2 H 3 +CH 3 , C 2 H 2 +CH 4 , and C 2 H 2 +CH 3 +H. Their branching ratios have been determined to be 1%, 7%, 2 H 2 +CH 3 +H channel. In addition, the averaged kinetic energy releases and the fractions in translational energy have also been determined from the measured kinetic energy distributions. For the binary dissociation channels, the fractions in translational energy are less than 18% except the C 3 H 5 +H channel, whereas they are more than 42% for the triple dissociation channels. An intriguing finding indicates that the C 2 H 4 +CH 2 channel has a nearly identical kinetic energy distribution and a similar branching ratio to the C 2 H 3 +CH 3 channel, although the former undergoes a three-center elimination process different from the C-C bond rupture occurring in the latter

  2. Resolving surface chemical states in XPS analysis of first row transition metals, oxides and hydroxides: Sc, Ti, V, Cu and Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biesinger, Mark C.; Lau, Leo W.M.; Gerson, Andrea R.; Smart, Roger St.C.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical state X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of first row transition metals and their oxides and hydroxides is challenging due to the complexity of the 2p spectra resulting from peak asymmetries, complex multiplet splitting, shake-up and plasmon loss structure, and uncertain, overlapping binding energies. A review of current literature shows that all values necessary for reproducible, quantitative chemical state analysis are usually not provided. This paper reports a more consistent, practical and effective approach to curve-fitting the various chemical states in a variety of Sc, Ti, V, Cu and Zn metals, oxides and hydroxides. The curve-fitting procedures proposed are based on a combination of (1) standard spectra from quality reference samples, (2) a survey of appropriate literature databases and/or a compilation of the literature references, and (3) specific literature references where fitting procedures are available. Binding energies, full-width at half maximum (FWHM) values, spin-orbit splitting values, asymmetric peak-shape fitting parameters, and, for Cu and Zn, Auger parameters values are presented. The quantification procedure for Cu species details the use of the shake-up satellites for Cu(II)-containing compounds and the exact binding energies of the Cu(0) and Cu(I) peaks. The use of the modified Auger parameter for Cu and Zn species allows for corroborating evidence when there is uncertainty in the binding energy assignment. These procedures can remove uncertainties in analysis of surface states in nano-particles, corrosion, catalysis and surface-engineered materials.

  3. Resolving surface chemical states in XPS analysis of first row transition metals, oxides and hydroxides: Sc, Ti, V, Cu and Zn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biesinger, Mark C., E-mail: biesingr@uwo.ca [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, University of Western Ontario Research Park, Room LL31, 999 Collip Circle, London, Ontario, N6G 0J3 (Canada); ACeSSS (Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Lau, Leo W.M. [Surface Science Western, University of Western Ontario, University of Western Ontario Research Park, Room LL31, 999 Collip Circle, London, Ontario, N6G 0J3 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Gerson, Andrea R.; Smart, Roger St.C. [ACeSSS (Applied Centre for Structural and Synchrotron Studies), University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2010-11-15

    Chemical state X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of first row transition metals and their oxides and hydroxides is challenging due to the complexity of the 2p spectra resulting from peak asymmetries, complex multiplet splitting, shake-up and plasmon loss structure, and uncertain, overlapping binding energies. A review of current literature shows that all values necessary for reproducible, quantitative chemical state analysis are usually not provided. This paper reports a more consistent, practical and effective approach to curve-fitting the various chemical states in a variety of Sc, Ti, V, Cu and Zn metals, oxides and hydroxides. The curve-fitting procedures proposed are based on a combination of (1) standard spectra from quality reference samples, (2) a survey of appropriate literature databases and/or a compilation of the literature references, and (3) specific literature references where fitting procedures are available. Binding energies, full-width at half maximum (FWHM) values, spin-orbit splitting values, asymmetric peak-shape fitting parameters, and, for Cu and Zn, Auger parameters values are presented. The quantification procedure for Cu species details the use of the shake-up satellites for Cu(II)-containing compounds and the exact binding energies of the Cu(0) and Cu(I) peaks. The use of the modified Auger parameter for Cu and Zn species allows for corroborating evidence when there is uncertainty in the binding energy assignment. These procedures can remove uncertainties in analysis of surface states in nano-particles, corrosion, catalysis and surface-engineered materials.

  4. Time-resolved measurement of the quantum states of photons using two-photon interference with short-time reference pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Changliang; Hofmann, Holger F.

    2011-01-01

    To fully utilize the energy-time degree of freedom of photons for optical quantum-information processes, it is necessary to control and characterize the temporal quantum states of the photons at extremely short time scales. For measurements of the temporal coherence of the quantum states beyond the time resolution of available detectors, two-photon interference with a photon in a short-time reference pulse may be a viable alternative. In this paper, we derive the temporal measurement operators for the bunching statistics of a single-photon input state with a photon from a weak coherent reference pulse. It is shown that the effects of the pulse shape of the reference pulse can be expressed in terms of a spectral filter selecting the bandwidth within which the measurement can be treated as an ideal projection on eigenstates of time. For full quantum tomography, temporal coherence can be determined by using superpositions of reference pulses at two different times. Moreover, energy-time entanglement can be evaluated based on the two-by-two entanglement observed in the coherences between pairs of detection times.

  5. Sensitivity of the photodissociation of NO2, NO3, HNO3 and H2O2 to the solar radiation diffused by the ground and by atmospheric particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugnai, A.; Petroncelli, P.; Fiocco, G.

    1979-01-01

    The diffusion of solar radiation by atmospheric molecules and aerosols and by ground albedo affects the photodissociation rates of atmospheric species relevant to the ozone chemistry. In this paper, a previous investigation on the photodissociation of O 3 is extended to NO 2 , NO 3 , HNO 3 , H 2 O 2 . Because of the different character of the absorption spectra of these species, the behaviour of photodissociation profiles with height and their sensitivity to such factors as ground albedo, aerosol loads, solar zenith angle are somewhat different. The results show that the presence of the aerosols usually enhances the photodissociation in the upper troposphere and in the stratosphere, because of scattering, but tends to reduce it at low heights because of the increased extinction. Enhancements in the photodissociation coefficients are as high as 20 to 40% for low values of the albedo and large aerosol loads such as those obtained after a volcanic eruption. On the other hand, at large values of the albedo, the effect of aerosols is mainly in attenuating the radiation going into and coming from the ground and their presence can lead to reduced photolysis even in the stratosphere. (author)

  6. The electronically excited states of LH2 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila strain 10050 studied by time-resolved spectroscopy and dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. I. Isolated, non-interacting LH2 complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflock, Tobias J; Oellerich, Silke; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Ullmann, G Matthias; Köhler, Jürgen

    2011-07-21

    We have employed time-resolved spectroscopy on the picosecond time scale in combination with dynamic Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the photophysical properties of light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. The variations of the fluorescence transients were studied as a function of the excitation fluence, the repetition rate of the excitation and the sample preparation conditions. Here we present the results obtained on detergent solubilized LH2 complexes, i.e., avoiding intercomplex interactions, and show that a simple four-state model is sufficient to grasp the experimental observations quantitatively without the need for any free parameters. This approach allows us to obtain a quantitative measure for the singlet-triplet annihilation rate in isolated, noninteracting LH2 complexes.

  7. Comprehensive mechanism and structure-sensitivity of ethanol oxidation on platinum: new transition-state searching method for resolving the complex reaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Fang; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2008-08-20

    Ethanol oxidation on Pt is a typical multistep and multiselectivity heterogeneous catalytic process. A comprehensive understanding of this fundamental reaction would greatly benefit design of catalysts for use in direct ethanol fuel cells and the degradation of biomass-derived oxygenates. In this work, the reaction network of ethanol oxidation on different Pt surfaces, including close-packed Pt{111}, stepped Pt{211}, and open Pt{100}, is explored thoroughly with an efficient reaction path searching method, which integrates our new transition-state searching technique with periodic density functional theory calculations. Our new technique enables the location of the transition state and saddle points for most surface reactions simply and efficiently by optimization of local minima. We show that the selectivity of ethanol oxidation on Pt depends markedly on the surface structure, which can be attributed to the structure-sensitivity of two key reaction steps: (i) the initial dehydrogenation of ethanol and (ii) the oxidation of acetyl (CH3CO). On open surface sites, ethanol prefers C-C bond cleavage via strongly adsorbed intermediates (CH2CO or CHCO), which leads to complete oxidation to CO2. However, only partial oxidizations to CH3CHO and CH3COOH occur on Pt{111}. Our mechanism points out that the open surface Pt{100} is the best facet to fully oxidize ethanol at low coverages, which sheds light on the origin of the remarkable catalytic performance of Pt tetrahexahedra nanocrystals found recently. The physical origin of the structure-selectivity is rationalized in terms of both thermodynamics and kinetics. Two fundamental quantities that dictate the selectivity of ethanol oxidation are identified: (i) the ability of surface metal atoms to bond with unsaturated C-containing fragments and (ii) the relative stability of hydroxyl at surface atop sites with respect to other sites.

  8. Diode pumped solid state kilohertz disk laser system for time-resolved combustion diagnostics under microgravity at the drop tower Bremen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Volker; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang [Institute of Photonic Technology, Laser Diagnostics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Eigenbrod, Christian; Klinkov, Konstantin [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity, University Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Larionov, Mikhail; Giesen, Adolf; Stolzenburg, Christian [Institut für Strahlwerkzeuge (IFSW), Pfaffenwaldring 43, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    We describe a specially designed diode pumped solid state laser system based on the disk laser architecture for combustion diagnostics under microgravity (μg) conditions at the drop tower in Bremen. The two-stage oscillator-amplifier-system provides an excellent beam profile (TEM{sub 00}) at narrowband operation (Δλ < 1 pm) and is tunable from 1018 nm to 1052 nm. The laser repetition rate of up to 4 kHz at pulse durations of 10 ns enables the tracking of processes on a millisecond time scale. Depending on the specific issue it is possible to convert the output radiation up to the fourth harmonic around 257 nm. The very compact laser system is integrated in a slightly modified drop capsule and withstands decelerations of up to 50 g (>11 ms). At first the concept of the two-stage disk laser is briefly explained, followed by a detailed description of the disk laser adaption to the drop tower requirements with special focus on the intended use under μg conditions. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the capsule laser as a tool for μg combustion diagnostics, we finally present an investigation of the precursor-reactions before the droplet ignition using 2D imaging of the Laser Induced Fluorescence of formaldehyde.

  9. Theoretical study of the mechanism of formation of a chemical bond between two ions: A+ and B+. Application to CO++. Interpretation of N2O++ photo-dissociation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levasseur, Nathalie

    1989-01-01

    This research thesis reports the theoretical study of the mechanism of formation of a chemical bond between two positively charged species, within the frame of the valence-bond theory and in the CO model case. The analysis in terms of orthogonal and non orthogonal orbitals leads to two very different interpretations, and allows potential curves of doubly charged diatomic ions to be simply explained, the generally evoked model to be put into question again, and a predictive model to be developed. The theoretical determination of N 2 O potential energy surfaces and of the first states of N 2 O ++ ( 3 Σ - , 1 Δ, 1 Σ + et 3 Π) allowed experimental results of N 2 O ++ photo-dissociation to be at least qualitatively understood and interpreted. Moreover, the study of electronic configurations involved in dissociation, showed that the model elaborated for a diatomic molecule is also valid for a triatomic system [fr

  10. Time-resolved spectroscopy in synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, V.; Stanford Univ., CA

    1980-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) from large-diameter storage rings has intrinsic time structure which facilitates time-resolved measurements form milliseconds to picoseconds and possibly below. The scientific importance of time-resolved measurements is steadily increasing as more and better techniques are discovered and applied to a wider variety of scientific problems. This paper presents a discussion of the importance of various parameters of the SR facility in providing for time-resolved spectroscopy experiments, including the role of beam-line optical design parameters. Special emphasis is placed on the requirements of extremely fast time-resolved experiments with which the effects of atomic vibrational or relaxation motion may be studied. Before discussing the state-of-the-art timing experiments, we review several types of time-resolved measurements which have now become routine: nanosecond-range fluorescence decay times, time-resolved emission and excitation spectroscopies, and various time-of-flight applications. These techniques all depend on a short SR pulse length and a long interpulse period, such as is provided by a large-diameter ring operating in a single-bunch mode. In most cases, the pulse shape and even the stability of the pulse shape is relatively unimportant as long as the pulse length is smaller than the risetime of the detection apparatus, typically 1 to 2 ns. For time resolution smaller than 1 ns, the requirements on the pulse shape become more stringent. (orig./FKS)

  11. Chloroacetone photodissociation at 193 nm and the subsequent dynamics of the CH3C(O)CH2 radical—an intermediate formed in the OH + allene reaction en route to CH3 + ketene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alligood, Bridget W.; FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Szpunar, David E.; Butler, Laurie J.

    2011-02-01

    We use a combination of crossed laser-molecular beam experiments and velocity map imaging experiments to investigate the primary photofission channels of chloroacetone at 193 nm; we also probe the dissociation dynamics of the nascent CH3C(O)CH2 radicals formed from C-Cl bond fission. In addition to the C-Cl bond fission primary photodissociation channel, the data evidence another photodissociation channel of the precursor, C-C bond fission to produce CH3CO and CH2Cl. The CH3C(O)CH2 radical formed from C-Cl bond fission is one of the intermediates in the OH + allene reaction en route to CH3 + ketene. The 193 nm photodissociation laser allows us to produce these CH3C(O)CH2 radicals with enough internal energy to span the dissociation barrier leading to the CH3 + ketene asymptote. Therefore, some of the vibrationally excited CH3C(O)CH2 radicals undergo subsequent dissociation to CH3 + ketene products; we are able to measure the velocities of these products using both the imaging and scattering apparatuses. The results rule out the presence of a significant contribution from a C-C bond photofission channel that produces CH3 and COCH2Cl fragments. The CH3C(O)CH2 radicals are formed with a considerable amount of energy partitioned into rotation; we use an impulsive model to explicitly characterize the internal energy distribution. The data are better fit by using the C-Cl bond fission transition state on the S1 surface of chloroacetone as the geometry at which the impulsive force acts, not the Franck-Condon geometry. Our data suggest that, even under atmospheric conditions, the reaction of OH with allene could produce a small branching to CH3 + ketene products, rather than solely producing inelastically stabilized adducts. This additional channel offers a different pathway for the OH-initiated oxidation of such unsaturated volatile organic compounds, those containing a C=C=C moiety, than is currently included in atmospheric models.

  12. Three-body dissociations: The photodissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide at 193 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, D.A.; North, S.W.; Stranges, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule with two equivalent chemical bonds is excited above the threshold for dissociation of both bonds, how the rupture of the two bonds is temporally coupled becomes a salient question. Following absorption at 193 nm dimethyl sulfoxide (CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3}) contains enough energy to rupture both C-S bonds. This can happen in a stepwise (reaction 1) or concerted (reaction 2) fashion where the authors use rotation of the SOCH{sub 3} intermediate prior to dissociation to define a stepwise dissociation: (1) CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} 2CH{sub 3} + SO; (2a) CH{sub 3}SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} CH{sub 3} + SOCH{sub 3}; and (2b) SOCH{sub 3} {r_arrow} SO + CH{sub 3}. Recently, the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide following absorption at 193 nm was suggested to involve simultaneous cleavage of both C-S bonds on an excited electronic surface. This conclusion was inferred from laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and resonant multiphoton ionization (2+1 REMPI) measurements of the internal energy content in the CH{sub 3} and SO photoproducts and a near unity quantum yield measured for SO. Since this type of concerted three body dissociation is very interesting and a rather rare event in photodissociation dynamics, the authors chose to investigate this system using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1. The soft photoionization provided by the VUV undulator radiation allowed the authors to probe the SOCH{sub 3} intermediate which had not been previously observed and provided good evidence that the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide primarily proceeds via a two step dissociation, reaction 2.

  13. Three-body dissociations: The photodissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide at 193 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, D.A.; North, S.W.; Stranges, D.

    1997-01-01

    When a molecule with two equivalent chemical bonds is excited above the threshold for dissociation of both bonds, how the rupture of the two bonds is temporally coupled becomes a salient question. Following absorption at 193 nm dimethyl sulfoxide (CH 3 SOCH 3 ) contains enough energy to rupture both C-S bonds. This can happen in a stepwise (reaction 1) or concerted (reaction 2) fashion where the authors use rotation of the SOCH 3 intermediate prior to dissociation to define a stepwise dissociation: (1) CH 3 SOCH 3 → 2CH 3 + SO; (2a) CH 3 SOCH 3 → CH 3 + SOCH 3 ; and (2b) SOCH 3 → SO + CH 3 . Recently, the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide following absorption at 193 nm was suggested to involve simultaneous cleavage of both C-S bonds on an excited electronic surface. This conclusion was inferred from laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and resonant multiphoton ionization (2+1 REMPI) measurements of the internal energy content in the CH 3 and SO photoproducts and a near unity quantum yield measured for SO. Since this type of concerted three body dissociation is very interesting and a rather rare event in photodissociation dynamics, the authors chose to investigate this system using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy at beamline 9.0.2.1. The soft photoionization provided by the VUV undulator radiation allowed the authors to probe the SOCH 3 intermediate which had not been previously observed and provided good evidence that the dissociation of dimethyl sulfoxide primarily proceeds via a two step dissociation, reaction 2

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  15. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3(A-tilde) and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonhommeau, David; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2008-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of ammonia upon excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode (mode ν 2 with n 2 =0,...,6 quanta of vibration) in the A-tilde electronic state is investigated by means of several mixed quantum/classical methods, and the calculated final-state properties are compared to experiments. Five mixed quantum/classical methods are tested: one mean-field approach (the coherent switching with decay of mixing method), two surface-hopping methods [the fewest switches with time uncertainty (FSTU) and FSTU with stochastic decay (FSTU/SD) methods], and two surface-hopping methods with zero-point energy (ZPE) maintenance [the FSTU/SD+trajectory projection onto ZPE orbit (TRAPZ) and FSTU/SD+minimal TRAPZ (mTRAPZ) methods]. We found a qualitative difference between final NH 2 internal energy distributions obtained for n 2 =0 and n 2 >1, as observed in experiments. Distributions obtained for n 2 =1 present an intermediate behavior between distributions obtained for smaller and larger n 2 values. The dynamics is found to be highly electronically nonadiabatic with all these methods. NH 2 internal energy distributions may have a negative energy tail when the ZPE is not maintained throughout the dynamics. The original TRAPZ method was designed to maintain ZPE in classical trajectories, but we find that it leads to unphysically high internal vibrational energies. The mTRAPZ method, which is new in this work and provides a general method for maintaining ZPE in either single-surface or multisurface trajectories, does not lead to unphysical results and is much less time consuming. The effect of maintaining ZPE in mixed quantum/classical dynamics is discussed in terms of agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics for n 2 =0 and n 2 =6 are also analyzed to reveal details not available from experiment, in particular, the time required for quenching of electronic excitation and the adiabatic energy gap and geometry at the time of quenching

  16. Highly resolving computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, B.; Petersen, D.; Walter, E.

    1984-01-01

    With the development of highly-resolving devices for computerized tomography, CT diagnosis of the lumbar vertebral column has gained increasing importance. As an ambulatory, non-invasive method it has proved in comparative studies to be at least equivalent to myelography in the detection of dislocations of inter-vertebral disks (4,6,7,15). Because with modern devices not alone the bones, but especially the spinal soft part structures are clearly and precisely presented with a resolution of distinctly below 1 mm, a further improvement of the results is expected as experience will increase. The authors report on the diagnosis of the lumbar vertebral column with the aid of a modern device for computerized tomography and wish to draw particular attention to the possibility of doing this investigation as a routine, and to the diagnostic value of secondary reconstructions. (BWU) [de

  17. Highly resolving computerized tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, B.; Petersen, D.; Walter, E.

    1984-01-01

    With the development of highly-resolving devices for computerized tomography, CT diagnosis of the lumbar vertebral column has gained increasing importance. As an ambulatory, non-invasive method it has proved in comparative studies to be at least equivalent to myelography in the detection of dislocations of inter-vertebral disks (4,6,7,15). Because with modern devices not alone the bones, but especially the spinal soft part structures are clearly and precisely presented with a resolution of distinctly below 1 mm, a further improvement of the results is expected as experience will increase. The authors report on the diagnosis of the lumbar vertebral column with the aid of a modern device for computerized tomography and wish to draw particular attention to the possibility of doing this investigation as a routine, and to the diagnostic value of secondary reconstructions.

  18. Probing the UV-Induced Photodissociation of CH3I and C6H3F2I with Femtosecond Time-Resolved Coulomb Explosion Imaging at FLASH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savelyev, Evgeny; Amini, Kasra; Brauße, Felix

    2017-01-01

    , the dominant reaction pathway in both molecules is neutral cleavage of the carbon--iodine bond, which allows studying the influence of the molecular environment on the XUV absorption and the subsequent Coulomb explosion process. The XUV probe pulse induces local inner-shell ionization of atomic iodine...

  19. Relative quantum yield of I-asterisk(2P1/2) in the tunable laser UV photodissociation of i-C3F7I and n-C3F7I - Effect of temperature and exciplex emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, J. E.; Leone, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Wavelength-specific relative quantum yields of metastable I from pulsed laser photodissociation of i-C3F7I and n-C3F7I in the range 265-336 nm are determined by measuring the time-resolved infrared emission from the atomic I(P-2(1/2) P-2(3/2) transition. It is shown that although this yield appears to be unity from 265 to 298 nm, it decreases dramatically at longer wavelengths. Values are also reported for the enhancement of emission from metastable I due to exciplex formation at several temperatures. The exciplex formation emission increases linearly with parent gas pressure, but decreases with increasing temperature. Absorption spectra of i- and n-C3F7I between 303 and 497 K are presented, and the effect of temperature on the quantum yields at selected wavelengths greater than 300 nm, where increasing the temperature enhances the absorption considerably, are given. The results are discussed in regard to the development of solar-pumped iodine lasers.

  20. Relevance of the law of international organisations in resolving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    structures to resolve disputes between states. Uncertainty remains, however, on the availability of effective structures within the system to resolve disputes between international organisations. It is important to note that international organisations were, prior to 1945, not considered subjects of international law so as to be ...

  1. Photon number projection using non-number-resolving detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, Peter P; Webb, James G; Huntington, Elanor H; Ralph, Timothy C

    2007-01-01

    Number-resolving photo-detection is necessary for many quantum optics experiments, especially in the application of entangled state preparation. Several schemes have been proposed for approximating number-resolving photo-detection using non-number-resolving detectors. Such techniques include multi-port detection and time-division multiplexing. We provide a detailed analysis and comparison of different number-resolving detection schemes, with a view to creating a useful reference for experimentalists. We show that the ideal architecture for projective measurements is a function of the detector's dark count and efficiency parameters. We also describe a process for selecting an appropriate topology given actual experimental component parameters

  2. Picosecond real time study of the bimolecular reaction O(3P)+C2H4 and the unimolecular photodissociation of CH3CHO and H2CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.; McDonald, J. Douglas

    1998-07-01

    The bimolecular reaction of O(3P) with ethylene and the unimolecular photodissociation of acetaldehyde and formaldehyde have been studied using a picosecond pump/probe technique. The bimolecular reaction was initiated in a van der Waals dimer precursor, C2H4ṡNO2, and the evolution of the vinoxy radical product monitored by laser-induced fluorescence. The NO2 constituent of the complex was photodissociated at 266 nm. The triplet oxygen atom then attacks a carbon atom of C2H4 to form a triplet diradical (CH2CH2O) which subsequently dissociates to vinoxy (CH2CHO) and H. The rise time of vinoxy radical production was measured to be 217 (+75-25) ps. RRKM theory was applied and a late high exit barrier was invoked in order to fit the measured rise time. The structure and binding energy of the van der Waals complex have been modeled using Lennard-Jones type potentials and the results were compared with other systems. The unimolecular side of the potential energy surfaces of this reaction has been investigated by photodissociating acetaldehyde at the same pump energy of 266 nm. The resulting photoproducts, acetyl radical (CH3CO) and formyl radical (HCO), have been monitored by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) combined with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The similarity in the measured evolution times of both radicals indicates the same photodissociation pathway of the parent molecule. The photodissociation rate of acetaldehyde is estimated from RRKM theory to be very fast (3×1012s-1). The T1←S1 intersystem crossing (ISC) rate is found to be the rate determining step to photodissociation and increases with energy. The REMPI mechanism for the production of CH3CO+ is proposed to be the same as that of HCO+(2+1). The HCO product from the photodissociation of formaldehyde at 266 nm reveals a faster T1←S1 ISC rate than in acetaldehyde.

  3. Resolving inventory differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.H.; Clark, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Determining the cause of an inventory difference (ID) that exceeds warning or alarm limits should not only involve investigation into measurement methods and reexamination of the model assumptions used in the calculation of the limits, but also result in corrective actions that improve the quality of the accountability measurements. An example illustrating methods used by Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel to resolve an ID is presented that may be useful to other facilities faced with a similar problem. After first determining that no theft or diversion of material occurred and correcting any accountability calculation errors, investigation into the IDs focused on volume and analytical measurements, limit of error of inventory difference (LEID) modeling assumptions, and changes in the measurement procedures and methods prior to the alarm. There had been a gradual gain trend in IDs prior to the alarm which was reversed by the alarm inventory. The majority of the NM in the facility was stored in four large tanks which helped identify causes for the alarm. The investigation, while indicating no diversion or theft, resulted in changes in the analytical method and in improvements in the measurement and accountability that produced a 67% improvement in the LEID

  4. The role of water-vapour photodissociation on the formation of a deep minimum in mesopause ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Vardavas

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional atmospheric photochemical model with an altitude grid of about 1.5 km was used to examine the structure of the global mean vertical ozone profile and its night-time-to-daytime variation in the upper atmosphere. Two distinct ozone layers are predicted, separated by a sharp drop in the ozone concentration near the mesopause. This naturally occurring mesopause ozone deep minimum is primarily produced by the rapid increase in the destruction of water vapour, and hence increase in HOx, at altitudes between 80 and 85 km, a region where water-vapour photodissociation by ultraviolet radiation of the solar Lyman-alpha line is significant, and where the supply of water vapour is maintained by methane oxidation even for very dry conditions at the tropospheric-stratospheric exchange region. The model indicates that the depth of the mesopause ozone minimum is limited by the efficiency with which inactive molecular hydrogen is produced, either by the conversion of atomic hydrogen to molecular hydrogen via one of the reaction channels of H with HO2, or by Lyman-alpha photodissociation of water vapour via the channel that leads to the production of molecular hydrogen. The ozone concentration rapidly recovers above 85 km due to the rapid increase in O produced by the photodissociation of O2 by absorption of ultraviolet solar radiation in the Schumann-Runge bands and continuum. Above 90 km, there is a decrease in ozone due to photolysis as the production of ozone through the three-body recombination of O2 and O becomes slower with decreasing pressure. The model also predicts two peaks in the night-time/daytime ozone ratio, one near 75 km and the other near 110 km, plus a strong peak in the night-time/daytime ratio of OH near 110 km. Recent observational evidence supports the predictions of the model.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure · Middle atmosphere · Thermosphere · Transmission and scattering of radiation

  5. Pressure and temperature-dependent quantum yields for the photodissociation of acetone between 279 and 327.5 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, M. A.; Heard, D. E.; Pilling, M. J.; Arnold, S. R.; Chipperfield, M. P.

    2004-03-01

    The photodissociation of acetone has been studied over the wavelength (λ) range 279-327.5 nm as a function of temperature (T) and pressure (p) using a spectroscopic method to monitor the acetyl (CH3CO) radical fragment. Above 310 nm the quantum yield (QY) is substantially smaller than previous measurements, and decreases with T. The QYs for production of CH3CO + CH3 and CH3 + CH3 + CO have been parameterised as a function of λ, p and T and used to calculate the altitude dependence of the photolysis frequency. In the upper troposphere (UT) the acetone photolysis lifetime is a factor of 2.5-10 longer, dependent upon latitude and season, than if the previously recommended QYs are used.

  6. Radical Rearrangement Chemistry in Ultraviolet Photodissociation of Iodotyrosine Systems: Insights from Metastable Dissociation, Infrared Ion Spectroscopy, and Reaction Pathway Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranka, Karnamohit; Zhao, Ning; Yu, Long; Stanton, John F; Polfer, Nicolas C

    2018-05-29

    We report on the ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) chemistry of protonated tyrosine, iodotyrosine, and diiodotyrosine. Distonic loss of the iodine creates a high-energy radical at the aromatic ring that engages in hydrogen/proton rearrangement chemistry. Based on UVPD kinetics measurements, the appearance of this radical is coincident with the UV irradiation pulse (8 ns). Conversely, sequential UVPD product ions exhibit metastable decay on ca. 100 ns timescales. Infrared ion spectroscopy is capable of confirming putative structures of the rearrangement products as proton transfers from the imine and β-carbon hydrogens. Potential energy surfaces for the various reaction pathways indicate that the rearrangement chemistry is highly complex, compatible with a cascade of rearrangements, and that there is no preferred rearrangement pathway even in small molecular systems like these. Graphical Abstract.

  7. Photodissociative Cross-Linking of Non-covalent Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong T. H.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Shaffer, Christopher J.; Tureček, František

    2018-05-01

    We report a gas-phase UV photodissociation study investigating non-covalent interactions between neutral hydrophobic pentapeptides and peptide ions incorporating a diazirine-tagged photoleucine residue. Phenylalanine (Phe) and proline (Pro) were chosen as the conformation-affecting residues that were incorporated into a small library of neutral pentapeptides. Gas-phase ion-molecule complexes of these peptides with photo-labeled pentapeptides were subjected to photodissociation. Selective photocleavage of the diazirine ring at 355 nm formed short-lived carbene intermediates that underwent cross-linking by insertion into H-X bonds of the target peptide. The cross-link positions were established from collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectra (CID-MS3) providing sequence information on the covalent adducts. Effects of the amino acid residue (Pro or Phe) and its position in the target peptide sequence were evaluated. For proline-containing peptides, interactions resulting in covalent cross-links in these complexes became more prominent as proline was moved towards the C-terminus of the target peptide sequence. The photocross-linking yields of phenylalanine-containing peptides depended on the position of both phenylalanine and photoleucine. Density functional theory calculations were used to assign structures of low-energy conformers of the (GLPMG + GLL*LK + H)+ complex. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectory calculations were used to capture the thermal motion in the complexes within 100 ps and determine close contacts between the incipient carbene and the H-X bonds in the target peptide. This provided atomic-level resolution of potential cross-links that aided spectra interpretation and was in agreement with experimental data. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Resolving deconvolution ambiguity in gene alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbell Earl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many gene structures it is impossible to resolve intensity data uniquely to establish abundances of splice variants. This was empirically noted by Wang et al. in which it was called a "degeneracy problem". The ambiguity results from an ill-posed problem where additional information is needed in order to obtain an unique answer in splice variant deconvolution. Results In this paper, we analyze the situations under which the problem occurs and perform a rigorous mathematical study which gives necessary and sufficient conditions on how many and what type of constraints are needed to resolve all ambiguity. This analysis is generally applicable to matrix models of splice variants. We explore the proposal that probe sequence information may provide sufficient additional constraints to resolve real-world instances. However, probe behavior cannot be predicted with sufficient accuracy by any existing probe sequence model, and so we present a Bayesian framework for estimating variant abundances by incorporating the prediction uncertainty from the micro-model of probe responsiveness into the macro-model of probe intensities. Conclusion The matrix analysis of constraints provides a tool for detecting real-world instances in which additional constraints may be necessary to resolve splice variants. While purely mathematical constraints can be stated without error, real-world constraints may themselves be poorly resolved. Our Bayesian framework provides a generic solution to the problem of uniquely estimating transcript abundances given additional constraints that themselves may be uncertain, such as regression fit to probe sequence models. We demonstrate the efficacy of it by extensive simulations as well as various biological data.

  9. Photodissociation of van der Waals clusters of isoprene with oxygen, C{sub 5}H{sub 8}-O{sub 2}, in the wavelength range 213-277 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidma, Konstantin V.; Frederix, Pim W. J. M.; Parker, David H. [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Baklanov, Alexey V. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Institutskaja Street 3, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation) and Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova street 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-07

    The speed and angular distribution of O atoms arising from the photofragmentation of C{sub 5}H{sub 8}-O{sub 2}, the isoprene-oxygen van der Waals complex, in the wavelength region of 213-277 nm has been studied with the use of a two-color dissociation-probe method and the velocity map imaging technique. Dramatic enhancement in the O atoms photo-generation cross section in comparison with the photodissociation of individual O{sub 2} molecules has been observed. Velocity map images of these 'enhanced' O atoms consisted of five channels, different in their kinetic energy, angular distribution, and wavelength dependence. Three channels are deduced to be due to the one-quantum excitation of the C{sub 5}H{sub 8}-O{sub 2} complex into the perturbed Herzberg III state ({sup 3}{Delta}{sub u}) of O{sub 2}. This excitation results in the prompt dissociation of the complex giving rise to products C{sub 5}H{sub 8}+O+O when the energy of exciting quantum is higher than the complex photodissociation threshold, which is found to be 41740 {+-} 200 cm{sup -1} (239.6{+-}1.2 nm). This last threshold corresponds to the photodissociation giving rise to an unexcited isoprene molecule. The second channel, with threshold shifted to the blue by 1480 {+-} 280 cm{sup -1}, corresponds to dissociation with formation of rovibrationally excited isoprene. A third channel was observed at wavelengths up to 243 nm with excitation below the upper photodissociation threshold. This channel is attributed to dissociation with the formation of a bound O atom C{sub 5}H{sub 8}-O{sub 2}+hv{yields} C{sub 5}H{sub 8}-O{sub 2}({sup 3}{Delta}{sub u}) {yields} C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O + O and/or to dissociation of O{sub 2} with borrowing of the lacking energy from incompletely cooled complex internal degrees of freedom C{sub 5}H{sub 8}{sup *}-O{sub 2}+hv{yields} C{sub 5}H{sub 8}{sup *}-O{sub 2}({sup 3}{Delta}{sub u}) {yields} C{sub 5}H{sub 8}+ O + O. The kinetic energy of the O atoms arising in two other

  10. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3(A) and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhommeau, David; Truhlar, Donald G

    2008-07-07

    The photodissociation dynamics of ammonia upon excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode (mode nu(2) with n(2)=0,[ellipsis (horizontal)],6 quanta of vibration) in the A electronic state is investigated by means of several mixed quantum/classical methods, and the calculated final-state properties are compared to experiments. Five mixed quantum/classical methods are tested: one mean-field approach (the coherent switching with decay of mixing method), two surface-hopping methods [the fewest switches with time uncertainty (FSTU) and FSTU with stochastic decay (FSTU/SD) methods], and two surface-hopping methods with zero-point energy (ZPE) maintenance [the FSTUSD+trajectory projection onto ZPE orbit (TRAPZ) and FSTUSD+minimal TRAPZ (mTRAPZ) methods]. We found a qualitative difference between final NH(2) internal energy distributions obtained for n(2)=0 and n(2)>1, as observed in experiments. Distributions obtained for n(2)=1 present an intermediate behavior between distributions obtained for smaller and larger n(2) values. The dynamics is found to be highly electronically nonadiabatic with all these methods. NH(2) internal energy distributions may have a negative energy tail when the ZPE is not maintained throughout the dynamics. The original TRAPZ method was designed to maintain ZPE in classical trajectories, but we find that it leads to unphysically high internal vibrational energies. The mTRAPZ method, which is new in this work and provides a general method for maintaining ZPE in either single-surface or multisurface trajectories, does not lead to unphysical results and is much less time consuming. The effect of maintaining ZPE in mixed quantum/classical dynamics is discussed in terms of agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics for n(2)=0 and n(2)=6 are also analyzed to reveal details not available from experiment, in particular, the time required for quenching of electronic excitation and the adiabatic energy gap and geometry at the time of quenching.

  11. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3(Ã) and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhommeau, David; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2008-07-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of ammonia upon excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode (mode ν2 with n2=0,…,6 quanta of vibration) in the à electronic state is investigated by means of several mixed quantum/classical methods, and the calculated final-state properties are compared to experiments. Five mixed quantum/classical methods are tested: one mean-field approach (the coherent switching with decay of mixing method), two surface-hopping methods [the fewest switches with time uncertainty (FSTU) and FSTU with stochastic decay (FSTU/SD) methods], and two surface-hopping methods with zero-point energy (ZPE) maintenance [the FSTU /SD+trajectory projection onto ZPE orbit (TRAPZ) and FSTU /SD+minimal TRAPZ (mTRAPZ) methods]. We found a qualitative difference between final NH2 internal energy distributions obtained for n2=0 and n2>1, as observed in experiments. Distributions obtained for n2=1 present an intermediate behavior between distributions obtained for smaller and larger n2 values. The dynamics is found to be highly electronically nonadiabatic with all these methods. NH2 internal energy distributions may have a negative energy tail when the ZPE is not maintained throughout the dynamics. The original TRAPZ method was designed to maintain ZPE in classical trajectories, but we find that it leads to unphysically high internal vibrational energies. The mTRAPZ method, which is new in this work and provides a general method for maintaining ZPE in either single-surface or multisurface trajectories, does not lead to unphysical results and is much less time consuming. The effect of maintaining ZPE in mixed quantum/classical dynamics is discussed in terms of agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics for n2=0 and n2=6 are also analyzed to reveal details not available from experiment, in particular, the time required for quenching of electronic excitation and the adiabatic energy gap and geometry at the time of quenching.

  12. The effects of nitric oxide cooling and the photodissociation of molecular oxygen on the thermosphere/ionosphere system over the Argentine Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Wells

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past the global, fully coupled, time-dependent mathematical model of the Earth's thermosphere/ionosphere/plasmasphere (CTIP has been unable to reproduce accurately observed values of the maximum plasma frequency, foF2, at extreme geophysical locations such as the Argentine Islands during the summer solstice where the ionosphere remains in sunlight throughout the day. This is probably because the seasonal dependence of thermospheric cooling by 5.3 µm nitric oxide has been neglected and the photodissociation of O2 and heating rate calculations have been over-simplified. Now we have included an up-to-date calculation of the solar EUV and UV thermospheric heating rate, coupled with a new calculation of a diurnally varying O2 photodissociation rate, in the model. Seasonally dependent 5.3 µm nitric oxide cooling is also included. With these important improvements, it is found that model values of foF2 are in substantially better agreement with observation. The height of the F2-peak is reduced throughout the day, but remains within acceptable limits of values derived from observation, except at around 0600 h LT. We also carry out two studies of the sensitivity of the upper atmosphere to changes in the magnitude of nitric oxide cooling and photodissociation rates. We find that hmF2 increases with increased heating, whilst foF2 falls. The converse is true for an increase in the cooling rate. Similarly increasing the photodissociation rate increases both hmF2 and foF2. These changes are explained in terms of changes in the neutral temperature, composition and neutral wind.

  13. A molecular beam study of the one, two, and three photon photodissociation mechanism of the group VIB (Cr,Mo,W) hexacarbonyls at 248 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataraman, B.; Hou, H.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, S.; Bandukwalla, G.; Vernon, M.

    1990-01-01

    Photodissociation of the group VIB (Cr,Mo,W) hexacarbonyls has been studied at 248 nm using molecular beam photofragment spectroscopy. One, two and three photon processes have been observed. Analysis of the product velocity distributions shows that the photodissociation mechanism consists of sequential CO eliminations with the nth photon channel best described as the single photon photodissociation of the stable products of the n-1st photon channel. The product translational energy distribution for the first CO elimination step is quantitatively similar for all three hexacarbonyls and characteristic of a repulsive translational energy release. The product translational energy distributions of all subsequent CO elimination steps are accurately described by a simple, microcanonical model. Qualitative molecular orbital considerations suggest that the large product translational energy observed in the first CO elimination step results from a repulsive σ interaction between the closed shell CO ligand and an excited molecular orbital which has a significant admixture of metal (n+1)p z , (n+1)s and nd z 2 orbitals. This repulsive interaction is absent in the remaining CO elimination steps because there are vacancies in the coordination shell along the z axis

  14. Time resolved techniques: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.; Tischler, J.Z.

    1990-06-01

    Synchrotron sources provide exceptional opportunities for carrying out time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigations. The high intensity, high angular resolution, and continuously tunable energy spectrum of synchrotron x-ray beams lend themselves directly to carrying out sophisticated time-resolved x-ray scattering measurements on a wide range of materials and phenomena. When these attributes are coupled with the pulsed time-structure of synchrotron sources, entirely new time-resolved scattering possibilities are opened. Synchrotron beams typically consist of sub-nanosecond pulses of x-rays separated in time by a few tens of nanoseconds to a few hundred nanoseconds so that these beams appear as continuous x-ray sources for investigations of phenomena on time scales ranging from hours down to microseconds. Studies requiring time-resolution ranging from microseconds to fractions of a nanosecond can be carried out in a triggering mode by stimulating the phenomena under investigation in coincidence with the x-ray pulses. Time resolution on the picosecond scale can, in principle, be achieved through the use of streak camera techniques in which the time structure of the individual x-ray pulses are viewed as quasi-continuous sources with ∼100--200 picoseconds duration. Techniques for carrying out time-resolved scattering measurements on time scales varying from picoseconds to kiloseconds at present and proposed synchrotron sources are discussed and examples of time-resolved studies are cited. 17 refs., 8 figs

  15. On the resolvents methods in quantum perturbation calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burzynski, A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper gives a systematic review of resolvent methods in quantum perturbation calculations. The case of discrete spectrum of hamiltonian is considered specially (in the literature this is the fewest considered case). The topics of calculations of quantum transitions by using of the resolvent formalism, quantum transitions between states from particular subspaces, the shifts of energy levels, are shown. The main ideas of stationary perturbation theory developed by Lippmann and Schwinger are considered too. (author)

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Time-resolved ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckert, D.

    1986-06-01

    The time-resolved ESR spectroscopy is one of the modern methods in radiospectroscopy and plays an important role in solving various problems in chemistry and biology. Proceeding from the basic ideas of time-resolved ESR spectroscopy the experimental equipment is described generally including the equipment developed at the Central Institute of Isotope and Radiation Research. The experimental methods applied to the investigation of effects of chemically induced magnetic polarization of electrons and to kinetic studies of free radicals in polymer systems are presented. The theory of radical pair mechanism is discussed and theoretical expressions are summarized in a computer code to compute the theoretical polarization for each pair of the radicals

  18. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  19. Photodissociation of NaH using time-dependent Fourier grid method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have solved the time dependent Schrödinger equation by using the Chebyshev polynomial scheme and Fourier grid Hamiltonian method to calculate the dissociation cross section of NaH molecule by 1-photon absorption from the 1+ state to the 1 state. We have found that the results differ significantly from an ...

  20. Time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verano-Braga, Thiago; Schwämmle, Veit; Sylvester, Marc

    2012-01-01

    proteins involved in the Ang-(1-7) signaling, we performed a mass spectrometry-based time-resolved quantitative phosphoproteome study of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) treated with Ang-(1-7). We identified 1288 unique phosphosites on 699 different proteins with 99% certainty of correct peptide...

  1. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  2. Resolving Ethical Issues at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninga, Jacques S.

    2013-01-01

    Although ethical dilemmas are a constant in teachers' lives, the profession has offered little in the way of training to help teachers address such issues. This paper presents a framework, based on developmental theory, for resolving professional ethical dilemmas. The Four-Component Model of Moral Maturity, when used in conjunction with a…

  3. Multireference theoretical investigation on selectivity of the bond fissions in photodissociation of acetyl cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong-Yan; Liu, Ya-Jun; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2007-12-01

    The selectivity of the C -CH3 and C-CN bond fissions upon excitation of acetyl cyanide at 193nm has been investigated at the theoretical level of multistate complete active space self-consistent field second order perturbation. The calculated results indicated that the initially excited S3 state relaxes to S2 via ultrafast internal conversion. The S2 state could dissociate via two pathways. One, adiabatically dissociates to CH3CO(X˜)+CN(Ã). The other one internally converts to S1 before S1 intersystem crossing to T1. The T1 state subsequently dissociates to two groups of products: CH3(X˜)+OCCN(X˜) and CH3CO(X˜)+CN(X˜). The experimentally observed preference branching of CN elimination over CH3 one and bond selectivity are the results of the competition between the adiabatic and nonadiabatic dynamics of the S2 state.

  4. Minimum resolvable power contrast model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuai; Wang, Xia; Zhou, Jingjing

    2018-01-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio and MTF are important indexs to evaluate the performance of optical systems. However,whether they are used alone or joint assessment cannot intuitively describe the overall performance of the system. Therefore, an index is proposed to reflect the comprehensive system performance-Minimum Resolvable Radiation Performance Contrast (MRP) model. MRP is an evaluation model without human eyes. It starts from the radiance of the target and the background, transforms the target and background into the equivalent strips,and considers attenuation of the atmosphere, the optical imaging system, and the detector. Combining with the signal-to-noise ratio and the MTF, the Minimum Resolvable Radiation Performance Contrast is obtained. Finally the detection probability model of MRP is given.

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  6. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July - September 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  7. Isomer-specific detection in the UV photodissociation of the propargyl radical by chirped-pulse mm-wave spectroscopy in a pulsed quasi-uniform flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Bernadette M; Suas-David, Nicolas; Dias, Nureshan; Suits, Arthur G

    2018-02-21

    Isomer-specific detection and product branching fractions in the UV photodissociation of the propargyl radical is achieved through the use of chirped-pulse Fourier-transform mm-wave spectroscopy in a pulsed quasi-uniform flow (CPUF). Propargyl radicals are produced in the 193 nm photodissociation of 1,2-butadiene. Absorption of a second photon leads to H atom elimination giving three possible C 3 H 2 isomers: singlets cyclopropenylidene (c-C 3 H 2 ) and propadienylidene (l-C 3 H 2 ), and triplet propargylene ( 3 HCCCH). The singlet products and their appearance kinetics in the flow are directly determined by rotational spectroscopy, but due to the negligible dipole moment of propargylene, it is not directly monitored. However, we exploit the time-dependent kinetics of H-atom catalyzed isomerization to infer the branching to propargylene as well. We obtain the overall branching among H loss channels to be 2.9% (+1.1/-0.5) l-C 3 H 2 + H, 16.8% (+3.2/-1.3) c-C 3 H 2 + H, and 80.2 (+1.8/-4.2) 3 HCCCH + H. Our findings are qualitatively consistent with earlier RRKM calculations in that the major channel in the photodissociation of the propargyl radical at 193 nm is to 3 HCCCH + H; however, a greater contribution to the energetically most favorable isomer, c-C 3 H 2 + H is observed in this work. We do not detect the predicted HCCC + H 2 channel, but place an upper bound on its yield of 1%.

  8. Dissociation dynamics of CH3I in electric spark induced breakdown revealed by time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Wei-long; Song, Yun-fei; Duo, Li-ping; Liu, Yu-qiang; Yang, Yan-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Emission of electric spark dissociation of CH 3 I is similar to its fs LIBS. • We use fs laser induced breakdown as a simulation for electric spark dissociation. • The I 2 molecule formation is directly observed in the time-resolved LIBS. • Bimolecular collision of I ∗ and CH 3 I is responsible for the formation of I 2 . - Abstract: The electric discharge spark dissociation of gas CH 3 I is found to be similar to its femtosecond laser photodissociation. The almost identical spectra of the two processes show that their initial ionization conditions are very similar. The initial ionization followed by molecular fragmentation is proposed as the dissociation mechanism, in which the characteristic emissions of I + , CH 3 , CH 2 , CH, H, and I 2 are identified as the dissociation products. The emission band of 505 nm I 2 is clearly observed in the time-resolved laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The dynamic curve indicates that I 2 ∗ molecules are formed after the delay time of ∼4.7 ns. The formation of I 2 ∗ molecule results from the bimolecular collision of the highly excited iodine atom I ∗ ( 4 P) and CH 3 I molecule. This dynamical information can help understand the process of electric discharge spark dissociation of CH 3 I

  9. Cation-Size-Dependent Conformational Locking of Glutamic Acid by Alkali Ions: Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy of Cryogenic Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyne, Johanna; Bouchet, Aude; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Fujii, Masaaki; Dopfer, Otto

    2018-03-01

    Consolidated knowledge of conformation and stability of amino acids and their clusters is required to understand their biochemical recognition. Often, alkali ions interact with amino acids and proteins. Herein, infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of cryogenic metalated glutamic acid ions (GluM + , M = Li-Cs) are systematically analyzed in the isomer-specific fingerprint and XH stretch ranges (1100-1900, 2600-3600 cm -1 ) to provide a direct measure for cation-size-dependent conformational locking. GluM + ions are generated by electrospray ionization and cooled down to 15 K in a cryogenic quadrupole ion trap. The assignment of the IRPD spectra is supported by density functional theory calculations at the dispersion-corrected B3LYP-D3/aug-cc-pVTZ level. In the global minimum of GluM + , the flexibility of Glu is strongly reduced by the formation of rigid ionic CO···M + ···OC metal bridges, corresponding to charge solvation. The M + binding energy decreases monotonically with increasing cation size from D 0 = 314 to 119 kJ/mol for Li-Cs. Whereas for Li and Na only the global minimum of GluM + is observed, for K-Cs at least three isomers exist at cryogenic temperature. The IRPD spectra of cold GluM + ions are compared to IR multiple-photon dissociation spectra measured at room temperature. Furthermore, we elucidate the differences of the impact of protonation and metalation on the structure and conformational locking of Glu.

  10. Determination of the barrier height for acetyl radical dissociation from acetyl chloride photodissociation at 235 nm using velocity map imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaonan; Ratliff, Britni J; FitzPatrick, Benjamin L; Butler, Laurie J

    2008-12-18

    This work uses velocity map imaging to determine the barrier height for acetyl radical, CH3CO, dissociation to CH3 + CO. Photodissociation of acetyl chloride at 235 nm generates acetyl radicals with an internal energy distribution spanning this barrier. We determine the velocity and internal energy distribution of all nascent acetyl radicals, stable and unstable, by measuring the velocities of the Cl(2P3/2) and Cl(2P1/2) cofragments. These Cl cofragments are detected with 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in a spin-orbit branching ratio Cl(2P3/2):Cl(2P1/2) of 3.3 +/- 0.2. Using 157 nm photoionization, we then detect the recoil velocities of the energetically stable acetyl radicals. The radicals and momentum matched Cl atoms evidence parallel angular distributions. Comparison of the total recoil translational energy distribution P(E(T)) for all radicals to that obtained from the detection of stable radicals yields an onset for dissociation at a translational energy of 25.0 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol. From this onset we can calculate the barrier height for CH3CO --> CH3 + CO, but this relies on prior determinations of the C-Cl bond energy of acetyl chloride. Using an experimental bond dissociation energy of 83.4 +/- 0.2 kcal/mol yields a dissociation barrier of 14.2 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol. Our data evidence that a portion of the acetyl radicals formed with total internal energy above the barrier are stable due to the partitioning of energy into rotation during the C-Cl bond fission of the precursor. Thus, the internal energy onset for dissociation is not as sharp as was assumed in prior determinations of the barrier. The experimentally determined onset is compared with that predicted from electronic structure calculations at the G3//B3LYP and CCSD(T) levels of theory.

  11. Photodissociation of NaK: Ab initio spin-orbit interaction of the Na (32S) and K (42Pj) manifold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaa, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    The relevant interstate b 3 II, A 1 Σ + , c 3 Σ + , and B 1 II spin-orbit induced matrix elements, arising from the Ma (3 2 S) K (4 2 P j ) manifold are treated within the full microscopic Breit-Pauli approximation based on ab initio configuration interaction (CI) wave functions. The determination of these couplings as a function of the internuclear distance of NaK should permit a full treatment of the fine-structure branching ratio K*(4 2 P 1/2 (D 1 ))/Kasterisk(4 2 P 3/2 (D 2 )) in manifold-meditated photodissociation and in the treatment of interstate perturbations

  12. Attosecond Coherent Control of the Photo-Dissociation of Oxygen Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Felix; Ray, Dipanwita; Wright, Travis; Shivaram, Niranjan; Bocharova, Irina; Slaughter, Daniel; Ranitovic, Predrag; Belkacem, Ali; Weber, Thorsten

    2016-05-01

    Attosecond Coherent Control has emerged in recent years as a technique to manipulate the absorption and ionization in atoms as well as the dissociation of molecules on an attosecond time scale. Single attosecond pulses and attosecond pulse trains (APTs) can coherently excite multiple electronic states. The electronic and nuclear wave packets can then be coupled with a second pulse forming multiple interfering quantum pathways. We have built a high flux extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light source delivering APTs based on HHG that allows to selectively excite neutral and ion states in molecules. Our beamline provides spectral selectivity and attosecond interferometric control of the pulses. In the study presented here, we use APTs, generated by High Harmonic Generation in a high flux extreme ultraviolet light source, to ionize highly excited states of oxygen molecules. We identify the ionization/dissociation pathways revealing vibrational structure with ultra-high resolution ion 3D-momentum imaging spectroscopy. Furthermore, we introduce a delay between IR pulses and XUV/IR pulses to constructively or destructively interfere the ionization and dissociation pathways, thus, enabling the manipulation of both the O2+and the O+ ion yields with attosecond precision. Supported by DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  13. Healthcare Teams Neurodynamically Reorganize When Resolving Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Stevens

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Research on the microscale neural dynamics of social interactions has yet to be translated into improvements in the assembly, training and evaluation of teams. This is partially due to the scale of neural involvements in team activities, spanning the millisecond oscillations in individual brains to the minutes/hours performance behaviors of the team. We have used intermediate neurodynamic representations to show that healthcare teams enter persistent (50–100 s neurodynamic states when they encounter and resolve uncertainty while managing simulated patients. Each of the second symbols was developed situating the electroencephalogram (EEG power of each team member in the contexts of those of other team members and the task. These representations were acquired from EEG headsets with 19 recording electrodes for each of the 1–40 Hz frequencies. Estimates of the information in each symbol stream were calculated from a 60 s moving window of Shannon entropy that was updated each second, providing a quantitative neurodynamic history of the team’s performance. Neurodynamic organizations fluctuated with the task demands with increased organization (i.e., lower entropy occurring when the team needed to resolve uncertainty. These results show that intermediate neurodynamic representations can provide a quantitative bridge between the micro and macro scales of teamwork.

  14. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  15. Mediation for resolving family disputes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamenecka-Usova M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the understanding of the institute of marriage and its importance in the society has changed. Marriage is no longer assumed to be a commitment for a lifetime. As the principle of equality has replaced hierarchy as the guiding principle of family law it gave more grounds for family disputes and it became socially acceptable to leave marriages that are intolerable or merely unfulfilling. The aim of this article is to suggest an alternative dispute resolution method-mediation as a worthy option for resolving family conflicts.

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  18. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  19. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  20. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  1. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  4. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  5. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  6. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April-June 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  7. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  8. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  9. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  10. Time-of-flight spectroscopy of metastable photodissociation fragments in vacuum-UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, C.H.; Welge, K.H.

    1974-01-01

    Photofragment time-of-flight experiments carried out at photon energies > approximately 11.8eV (1050A) is reported. Processes of the kind AB+hν→A*+B have been investigated where A* is an electronically excited species in a metastable state that can be detected by Auger electron emission from metal surfaces. The present work has been concerned with the identification of dissociation processes from N 2 O, CO 2 , and OCS, measurement of recoil energies and, for the first time, also angular dependent experiments. One objective of the work was to further explore the potential of such studies in the vacuum uv. Their feasibility was demonstrated previously in preliminary experiments

  11. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roessler, Johanna

    2009-02-20

    Cleared edge overgrowth (CEO) nanostructures are identified and studied by 1D und 2D {mu}PL mapping scans and by time-resolved and power-dependent measurements. Distinct excitonic ground states of 2fold CEO QDs with large localization energies are achieved. The deeper localization reached as compared to the only other report on 2fold CEO QDs in literature is attributed to a new strain-free fabrication process and changed QW thickness in [001] growth. In order to achieve controlled manipulation of 2fold CEO QDs the concept of a CEO structure with three top gates and one back gate is presented. Due to the complexity of this device, a simpler test structure is realized. Measurements on this test structure confirm the necessity to either grow significantly thicker overgrowth layers or to provide separate top gates in all three spatial direction to controllably manipulate 2fold CEO QDs with an external electric field. (orig.)

  12. The role of mediation in resolving workplace relationship conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Donna Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Stress triggered by workplace-based interpersonal conflict can result in damaged relationships, loss of productivity, diminished job satisfaction and increasingly, workers' compensation claims for psychological injury. This paper examined the literature on the role and effectiveness of mediation, as the most common method of Alternative Dispute Resolution, in resolving workplace relationship conflict. Available evidence suggests that mediation is most effective when supported by organisational commitment to ADR strategies, policies and processes, and conducted by independent, experienced and qualified mediators. The United States Postal Service program REDRESS™ is described as an illustration of the successful use of mediation to resolve conflict in the workplace. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Intramolecular charge transfer of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile probed by time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption: No evidence for two ICT states and a πσ* reaction intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariasse, Klaas A.; Druzhinin, Sergey I.; Senyushkina, Tamara; Kovalenko, Sergey A.

    2009-01-01

    For the double exponential fluorescence decays of the locally excited (LE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) in acetonitrile (MeCN) the same times τ 1 and τ 2 are observed. This means that the reversible LE ICT reaction, starting from the initially excited LE state, can be adequately described by a two state mechanism. The most important factor responsible for the sometimes experimentally observed differences in the nanosecond decay time, with τ 1 (LE) 1 (ICT), is photoproduct formation. By employing a global analysis of the LE and ICT fluorescence response functions with a time resolution of 0.5 ps/channel in 1200 channels reliable kinetic and thermodynamic data can be obtained. The arguments presented in the literature in favor of a πσ* state with a bent CN group as an intermediate in the ICT reaction of DMABN are discussed. From the appearance of an excited state absorption (ESA) band in the spectral region between 700 and 800 nm in MeCN for N,N-dimethylanilines with CN, Br, F, CF 3 , and C(=O)OC 2 H 2 p-substituents, it is concluded that this ESA band cannot be attributed to a πσ * state, as only the C-C≡N group can undergo the required 120 deg. bending.

  14. A classical trajectory study of the photodissociation of T1 acetaldehyde: The transition from impulsive to statistical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Keiran C.; Crittenden, Deborah L.; Kable, Scott H.; Jordan, Meredith J.T.

    2006-01-01

    Previous experimental and theoretical studies of the radical dissociation channel of T 1 acetaldehyde show conflicting behavior in the HCO and CH 3 product distributions. To resolve these conflicts, a full-dimensional potential-energy surface for the dissociation of CH 3 CHO into HCO and CH 3 fragments over the barrier on the T 1 surface is developed based on RO-CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ(DZ) ab initio calculations. 20 000 classical trajectories are calculated on this surface at each of five initial excess energies, spanning the excitation energies used in previous experimental studies, and translational, vibrational, and rotational distributions of the radical products are determined. For excess energies near the dissociation threshold, both the HCO and CH 3 products are vibrationally cold; there is a small amount of HCO rotational excitation and little CH 3 rotational excitation, and the reaction energy is partitioned dominantly (>90% at threshold) into relative translational motion. Close to threshold the HCO and CH 3 rotational distributions are symmetrically shaped, resembling a Gaussian function, in agreement with observed experimental HCO rotational distributions. As the excess energy increases the calculated HCO and CH 3 rotational distributions are observed to change from a Gaussian shape at threshold to one more resembling a Boltzmann distribution, a behavior also seen by various experimental groups. Thus the distribution of energy in these rotational degrees of freedom is observed to change from nonstatistical to apparently statistical, as excess energy increases. As the energy above threshold increases all the internal and external degrees of freedom are observed to gain population at a similar rate, broadly consistent with equipartitioning of the available energy at the transition state. These observations generally support the practice of separating the reaction dynamics into two reservoirs: an impulsive reservoir, fed by the exit channel dynamics, and a

  15. Resolving the radical cation formation from the lowest-excited singlet (S-1) state of terthiophene in a TiO2-SiO2 hybrid polymer matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbig, M.; Ruseckas, A.; Grage, M.M.-L.

    1999-01-01

    and simultaneous rise of 3T(-)(+.) radical cation absorption. The observed kinetics of electron transfer are independent of excess vibrational energy in the S-1 state, and can be described by a biexponential function with time constants of similar to 1 ps (for similar to 62% of the excited 3T molecules...

  16. The analysis of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence: I. Theoretical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithambo, M L

    2007-01-01

    This is the first of two linked papers on the analysis of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence. This paper focusses on a theoretical basis of analytical methods and on methods for interpretation of time-resolved luminescence spectra and calculation of luminescence throughput. Using a comparative analysis of the principal features of time-resolved luminescence and relevant analogues from steady state optical stimulation, formulae for configuring a measurement system for optimum performance are presented. We also examine the possible use of stretched-exponential functions for analysis of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence spectra

  17. Valence ionized states of iron pentacarbonyl and eta5-cyclopentadienyl cobalt dicarbonyl studied by symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculation and collision-energy resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Ohno, Koichi

    2010-02-28

    Valence ionized states of iron pentacarbonyl Fe(CO)(5) and eta(5)-cyclopentadienyl cobalt dicarbonyl Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2) have been studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, two-dimensional Penning ionization electron spectroscopy (2D-PIES), and symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations. Theory provided reliable assignments for the complex ionization spectra of these molecules, which have metal-carbonyl bonds. Theoretical ionization energies agreed well with experimental observations and the calculated wave functions could explain the relative intensities of PIES spectra. The collision-energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) was obtained by 2D-PIES. To interpret these CEDPICS, the interaction potentials between the molecules and a Li atom were examined in several coordinates by calculations. The relation between the slope of the CEDPICS and the electronic structure of the ionized states, such as molecular symmetry and the spatial distribution of ionizing orbitals, was analyzed. In Fe(CO)(5), an attractive interaction was obtained for the equatorial CO, while the interaction for the axial CO direction was repulsive. For Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2), the interaction potential in the direction of both Co-C-O and Co-Cp ring was attractive. These anisotropic interactions and ionizing orbital distributions consistently explain the relative slopes of the CEDPICS.

  18. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of M(N2)n(+) (M = Y, La, Ce; n = 7-8) in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua; Shi, Lei; Xing, Xiaopeng; Tang, Zichao

    2016-02-14

    M(N2)n(+) (M = Y, La, Ce; n = 7-8) complexes have been studied by infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The experimental results indicate that the N-N stretching vibrational frequencies are red-shifted from the gas-phase N2 value. The π back-donation is found to be a main contributor in these systems. IRPD spectra and DFT calculations reveal the coexistence of two isomers in the seven-coordinate M(N2)7(+) and eight-coordinate M(N2)8(+) complexes, respectively. The present studies on these metal-nitrogen complexes shed light on the interactions and coordinations toward N2 with transition and lanthanide metals.

  19. Resolvability of regional density structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plonka, A.; Fichtner, A.

    2016-12-01

    Lateral density variations are the source of mass transport in the Earth at all scales, acting as drivers of convectivemotion. However, the density structure of the Earth remains largely unknown since classic seismic observables and gravityprovide only weak constraints with strong trade-offs. Current density models are therefore often based on velocity scaling,making strong assumptions on the origin of structural heterogeneities, which may not necessarily be correct. Our goal is to assessif 3D density structure may be resolvable with emerging full-waveform inversion techniques. We have previously quantified the impact of regional-scale crustal density structure on seismic waveforms with the conclusion that reasonably sized density variations within thecrust can leave a strong imprint on both travel times and amplitudes, and, while this can produce significant biases in velocity and Q estimates, the seismic waveform inversion for density may become feasible. In this study we performprincipal component analyses of sensitivity kernels for P velocity, S velocity, and density. This is intended to establish theextent to which these kernels are linearly independent, i.e. the extent to which the different parameters may be constrainedindependently. Since the density imprint we observe is not exclusively linked to travel times and amplitudes of specific phases,we consider waveform differences between complete seismograms. We test the method using a known smooth model of the crust and seismograms with clear Love and Rayleigh waves, showing that - as expected - the first principal kernel maximizes sensitivity to SH and SV velocity structure, respectively, and that the leakage between S velocity, P velocity and density parameter spaces is minimal in the chosen setup. Next, we apply the method to data from 81 events around the Iberian Penninsula, registered in total by 492 stations. The objective is to find a principal kernel which would maximize the sensitivity to density

  20. Photoabsorption and photodissociation studies of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) in the 35,000-80,000 cm-1 region using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Anuvab; Singh, Param Jeet; Shastri, Aparna; Sunanda, K.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2015-05-01

    Photoabsorption and photodissociation studies of dimethyl sulphoxide and its deuterated isotopologue (DMSO-h6 and DMSO-d6) are performed using synchrotron radiation in the 35,000-80,000 cm-1 region. In the photoabsorption spectrum, Rydberg series converging to the first three ionization potentials of DMSO at 9.1, 10.1 and 12.3 eV corresponding to removal of an electron from the highest three occupied molecular orbitals (14a‧, 7a″ and 13a‧) are observed. Based on a quantum defect analysis, Rydberg series assignments are extended to higher members as compared to earlier works and a few ambiguities in earlier assignments are clarified. Analysis is aided by quantum chemical calculations using the DFT and TDDFT methodologies. Vibronic structures observed in the spectrum of DMSO-h6 in the regions 7.7-8.1 eV and 8.1-8.8 eV are attributed to the transitions 7a″→4p at 7.862 eV and 14a‧→6s/4d at 8.182 eV, respectively. Photoabsorption spectra of DMSO-h6 and -d6 recorded using a broad band incident radiation show prominent peaks, which are identified and assigned to electronic and vibronic transitions of the SO radical. This provides a direct confirmation of the fact that DMSO preferentially dissociates into CH3 and SO upon UV-VUV excitation, as proposed in earlier photodissociation studies. An extended vibronic band system associated with the e1Π-X3Σ- transition of the SO radical is identified and assigned. The complete VUV photoabsorption spectrum of DMSO-d6 is also reported here for the first time.

  1. Dynamic Time-Resolved Chirped-Pulse Rotational Spectroscopy of Vinyl Cyanide Photoproducts in a Room Temperature Flow Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Daniel P.; Prozument, Kirill

    2017-06-01

    Chirped-pulsed (CP) Fourier transform rotational spectroscopy invented by Brooks Pate and coworkers a decade ago is an attractive tool for gas phase chemical dynamics and kinetics studies. A good reactor for such a purpose would have well-defined (and variable) temperature and pressure conditions to be amenable to accurate kinetic modeling. Furthermore, in low pressure samples with large enough number of molecular emitters, reaction dynamics can be observable directly, rather than mediated by supersonic expansion. In the present work, we are evaluating feasibility of in situ time-resolved CP spectroscopy in a room temperature flow tube reactor. Vinyl cyanide (CH_2CHCN), neat or mixed with inert gasses, flows through the reactor at pressures 1-50 μbar (0.76-38 mTorr) where it is photodissociated by a 193 nm laser. Millimeter-wave beam of the CP spectrometer co-propagates with the laser beam along the reactor tube and interacts with nascent photoproducts. Rotational transitions of HCN, HNC, and HCCCN are detected, with ≥10 μs time-steps for 500 ms following photolysis of CH_2CHCN. The post-photolysis evolution of the photoproducts' rotational line intensities is investigated for the effects of rotational and vibrational thermalization of energized photoproducts. Possible contributions from bimolecular and wall-mediated chemistry are evaluated as well.

  2. Generation of carotenoid radical cation in the vicinity of a chlorophyll derivative bound to titanium oxide, upon excitation of the chlorophyll derivative to the Q y state, as identified by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Xiang, Junfeng; Koyama, Yasushi; Rondonuwu, Ferdy S.; Nagae, Hiroyoshi; Sasaki, Shin-ichi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2005-12-01

    Electron injection from a chlorophyll derivative (methyl 3-carboxy-3-devinylpyropheophorobide a, abbreviated as PPB a) to TiO 2 nanoparticle took place in ≈30 fs following the decay of an excimer that was generated immediately after excitation to the Q y state (681 nm). Then, electron transfer from carotenoids (Cars) to PPB arad + took place in ≈200-240 ps. The latter observation supports the electron-transfer mechanism proposed in a previous investigation, in which Cars were added as redox spacers to the PPB a-sensitized TiO 2 solar cells to enhance their performance (X.-F. Wang, J. Xiang, P. Wang, Y. Koyama, S. Yanagida, Y. Wada, K. Hamada, S. Sasaki, H. Tamiaki, Chem. Phys. Lett. 408 (2005) 409).

  3. Imposing resolved turbulence in CFD simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilling, L.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    In large‐eddy simulations, the inflow velocity field should contain resolved turbulence. This paper describes and analyzes two methods for imposing resolved turbulence in the interior of the domain in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations. The intended application of the methods is to impose...

  4. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of nitrobenzene and its aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Oliver; Townsend, Dave; Wolf, Thomas J. A.; Holland, David M. P.; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.; Szöri, Milan; Stolow, Albert

    2018-01-01

    We report the first femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy study of 2-, 3- and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (NBA) and nitrobenzene (NBE) in the gas phase upon excitation at 200 nm. In 3- and 4-NBA, the dynamics follow fast intersystem crossing within 1-2 picoseconds. In 2-NBA and NBE, the dynamics are faster (∼ 0.5 ps). 2-NBA undergoes hydrogen transfer similar to solution phase dynamics. NBE either releases NO2 in the excited state or converts internally back to the ground state. We discuss why these channels are suppressed in the other nitrobenzaldehydes.

  5. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of lead halide perovskite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idowu, Mopelola A.; Yau, Sung H.; Varnavski, Oleg; Goodson, Theodore

    2015-09-01

    Recently, lead halide perovskites which are organic-inorganic hybrid structures, have been discovered to be highly efficient as light absorbers. Herein, we show the investigation of the excited state dynamics and emission properties of non-stoichiometric precursor formed lead halide perovskites grown by interdiffusion method using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. The influence of the different ratios of the non-stoichiometric precursor solution was examined. The observed photoluminescence properties were correlated with the femtosecond transient absorption measurements.

  6. Time-resolved spectroscopy defines perturbation in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.

    1998-01-01

    Time-resolved LIF spectroscopy is employed in order to investigate perturbations in different excited electronic state of alkali molecules. Dunham Coefficients are used to search the selected excited ro-vibrational level, which is overlap with the other nearby excited states. Lifetime measurement has been performed of more than 50 ro-vibrational levels. Out of these 25 levels were observed drastically different lifetimes from the other unperturbed levels. In this report, influence of different perturbations on this anomalous behavior is investigated and discussed. (author)

  7. Numerical simulations of time-resolved quantum electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaury, Benoit; Weston, Joseph; Santin, Matthieu; Houzet, Manuel; Groth, Christoph; Waintal, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulation has become a major tool in quantum electronics both for fundamental and applied purposes. While for a long time those simulations focused on stationary properties (e.g. DC currents), the recent experimental trend toward GHz frequencies and beyond has triggered a new interest for handling time-dependent perturbations. As the experimental frequencies get higher, it becomes possible to conceive experiments which are both time-resolved and fast enough to probe the internal quantum dynamics of the system. This paper discusses the technical aspects–mathematical and numerical–associated with the numerical simulations of such a setup in the time domain (i.e. beyond the single-frequency AC limit). After a short review of the state of the art, we develop a theoretical framework for the calculation of time-resolved observables in a general multiterminal system subject to an arbitrary time-dependent perturbation (oscillating electrostatic gates, voltage pulses, time-varying magnetic fields, etc.) The approach is mathematically equivalent to (i) the time-dependent scattering formalism, (ii) the time-resolved non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism and (iii) the partition-free approach. The central object of our theory is a wave function that obeys a simple Schrödinger equation with an additional source term that accounts for the electrons injected from the electrodes. The time-resolved observables (current, density, etc.) and the (inelastic) scattering matrix are simply expressed in terms of this wave function. We use our approach to develop a numerical technique for simulating time-resolved quantum transport. We find that the use of this wave function is advantageous for numerical simulations resulting in a speed up of many orders of magnitude with respect to the direct integration of NEGF equations. Our technique allows one to simulate realistic situations beyond simple models, a subject that was until now beyond the simulation

  8. Time-resolved absorption measurements on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; DaSilva, L.; Delettrez, J.; Gregory, G.G.; Richardson, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Time-resolved measurements of the incident laser light that is scattered and/or refracted from targets irradiated by the 24 uv-beam OMEGA laser at LLE, have provided some interesting features related to time-resolved absorption. The decrease in laser absorption characteristic of irradiating a target that implodes during the laser pulse has been observed. The increase in absorption expected as the critical density surface moves from a low to a high Z material in the target has also been noted. The detailed interpretation of these results is made through comparisons with simulation using the code LILAC, as well as with streak data from time-resolved x-ray imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, time and space-resolved imaging of the scattered light yields information on laser irradiation uniformity conditions on the target. The report consists of viewgraphs

  9. Knowledge Extraction from Atomically Resolved Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcek, Lukas; Maksov, Artem; Pan, Minghu; Vasudevan, Rama K; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2017-10-24

    Tremendous strides in experimental capabilities of scanning transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) over the past 30 years made atomically resolved imaging routine. However, consistent integration and use of atomically resolved data with generative models is unavailable, so information on local thermodynamics and other microscopic driving forces encoded in the observed atomic configurations remains hidden. Here, we present a framework based on statistical distance minimization to consistently utilize the information available from atomic configurations obtained from an atomically resolved image and extract meaningful physical interaction parameters. We illustrate the applicability of the framework on an STM image of a FeSe x Te 1-x superconductor, with the segregation of the chalcogen atoms investigated using a nonideal interacting solid solution model. This universal method makes full use of the microscopic degrees of freedom sampled in an atomically resolved image and can be extended via Bayesian inference toward unbiased model selection with uncertainty quantification.

  10. Femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy of xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Sullivan, James O; Polívka, Tomás; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2006-11-16

    Xanthophylls are a major class of photosynthetic pigments that participate in an adaptation mechanism by which higher plants protect themselves from high light stress. In the present work, an ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopic investigation of all the major xanthophyll pigments from spinach has been performed. The molecules are zeaxanthin, lutein, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin. beta-Carotene was also studied. The experimental data reveal the inherent spectral properties and ultrafast dynamics including the S(1) state lifetimes of each of the pigments. In conjunction with quantum mechanical computations the results address the molecular features of xanthophylls that control the formation and decay of the S* state in solution. The findings provide compelling evidence that S* is an excited state with a conformational geometry twisted relative to the ground state. The data indicate that S* is formed via a branched pathway from higher excited singlet states and that its yield depends critically on the presence of beta-ionylidene rings in the polyene system of pi-electron conjugated double bonds. The data are expected to be beneficial to researchers employing ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopic methods to investigate the mechanisms of both energy transfer and nonphotochemical quenching in higher plant preparations.

  11. Transient analysis for resolving safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, J.; Layman, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) has a Generic Safety Analysis Program to help resolve high priority generic safety issues. This paper describes several high priority safety issues considered at NSAC and how they were resolved by transient analysis using thermal hydraulics and neutronics codes. These issues are pressurized thermal shock (PTS), anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), steam generator tube rupture (SGTR), and reactivity transients in light of the Chernobyl accident

  12. Resolving the excited state equilibrium of peridinin in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papagiannakis, E.; Larsen, D.S.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Vengris, M.; Hiller, R.G.; van Grondelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    The carotenoid peridinin is abundant in the biosphere, as it is the main pigment bound by the light-harvesting complexes of dinoflagellates, where it collects blue and green sunlight and transfers energy to chlorophyll a with high efficiency. Its molecular structure is particularly complex, giving

  13. Mechanistic photodecarboxylation of pyruvic acid: Excited-state proton transfer and three-state intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xue-Ping; Fang, Qiu; Cui, Ganglong

    2014-10-01

    Photodissociation dynamics of pyruvic acid experimentally differs from that of commonly known ketones. We have employed the complete active space self-consistent field and its multi-state second-order perturbation methods to study its photodissociation mechanism in the S0, T1, and S1 states. We have uncovered four nonadiabatic photodecarboxylation paths. (i) The S1 system relaxes via an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) to a hydrogen-transferred tautomer, near which an S1/S0 conical intersection funnels the S1 to S0 state. Then, some trajectories continue completing the decarboxylation reaction in the S0 state; the remaining trajectories via a reverse hydrogen transfer return to the S0 minimum, from which a thermal decarboxylation reaction occurs. (ii) Due to a small S1 -T1 energy gap and a large S1/T1 spin-orbit coupling, an efficient S1 → T1 intersystem crossing process happens again near this S1/S0 conical intersection. When decaying to T1 state, a direct photodecarboxylation proceeds. (iii) Prior to ESIPT, the S1 system first decays to the T1 state via an S1 → T1 intersystem crossing; then, the T1 system evolves to a hydrogen-transferred tautomer. Therefrom, an adiabatic T1 decarboxylation takes place due to a small barrier of 7.7 kcal/mol. (iv) Besides the aforementioned T1 ESIPT process, there also exists a comparable Norrish type I reaction in the T1 state, which forms the ground-state products of CH3CO and COOH. Finally, we have found that ESIPT plays an important role. It closes the S1-T1 and S1-S0 energy gaps, effecting an S1/T1/S0 three-state intersection region, and mediating nonadiabatic photodecarboxylation reactions of pyruvic acid.

  14. In-pile Thermal Conductivity Characterization with Time Resolved Raman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hurley, David H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2018-03-19

    The project is designed to achieve three objectives: (1) Develop a novel time resolved Raman technology for direct measurement of fuel and cladding thermal conductivity. (2) Validate and improve the technology development by measuring ceramic materials germane to the nuclear industry. (3) Conduct instrumentation development to integrate optical fiber into our sensing system for eventual in-pile measurement. We have developed three new techniques: time-domain differential Raman (TD-Raman), frequency-resolved Raman (FR-Raman), and energy transport state-resolved Raman (ET-Raman). The TD-Raman varies the laser heating time and does simultaneous Raman thermal probing, the FR-Raman probes the material’s thermal response under periodical laser heating of different frequencies, and the ET-Raman probes the thermal response under steady and pulsed laser heating. The measurement capacity of these techniques have been fully assessed and verified by measuring micro/nanoscale materials. All these techniques do not need the data of laser absorption and absolute material temperature rise, yet still be able to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity with unprecedented accuracy. It is expected they will have broad applications for in-pile thermal characterization of nuclear materials based on pure optical heating and sensing.

  15. Angle-resolved effective potentials for disk-shaped molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.heinemann@tu-berlin.de; Klapp, Sabine H. L., E-mail: klapp@physik.tu-berlin.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Palczynski, Karol, E-mail: karol.palczynski@helmholtz-berlin.de; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Institut für Physik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstraße 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB), Institute of Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Hahn-Meitner Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-07

    We present an approach for calculating coarse-grained angle-resolved effective pair potentials for uniaxial molecules. For integrating out the intramolecular degrees of freedom we apply umbrella sampling and steered dynamics techniques in atomistically-resolved molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Throughout this study we focus on disk-like molecules such as coronene. To develop the methods we focus on integrating out the van der Waals and intramolecular interactions, while electrostatic charge contributions are neglected. The resulting coarse-grained pair potential reveals a strong temperature and angle dependence. In the next step we fit the numerical data with various Gay-Berne-like potentials to be used in more efficient simulations on larger scales. The quality of the resulting coarse-grained results is evaluated by comparing their pair and many-body structure as well as some thermodynamic quantities self-consistently to the outcome of atomistic MD simulations of many-particle systems. We find that angle-resolved potentials are essential not only to accurately describe crystal structures but also for fluid systems where simple isotropic potentials start to fail already for low to moderate packing fractions. Further, in describing these states it is crucial to take into account the pronounced temperature dependence arising in selected pair configurations due to bending fluctuations.

  16. High-throughput bioconjugation for enhanced 193 nm photodissociation via droplet phase initiated ion/ion chemistry using a front-end dual spray reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotham, Victoria C; Shaw, Jared B; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2015-09-15

    Fast online chemical derivatization of peptides with an aromatic label for enhanced 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) is demonstrated using a dual electrospray reactor implemented on the front-end of a linear ion trap (LIT) mass spectrometer. The reactor facilitates the intersection of protonated peptides with a second population of chromogenic 4-formyl-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (FBDSA) anions to promote real-time formation of ion/ion complexes at atmospheric pressure. Subsequent collisional activation of the ion/ion intermediate results in Schiff base formation generated via reaction between a primary amine in the peptide cation and the aldehyde moiety of the FBDSA anion. Utilizing 193 nm UVPD as the subsequent activation step in the MS(3) workflow results in acquisition of greater primary sequence information relative to conventional collision induced dissociation (CID). Furthermore, Schiff-base-modified peptides exhibit on average a 20% increase in UVPD efficiency compared to their unmodified counterparts. Due to the efficiency of covalent labeling achieved with the dual spray reactor, we demonstrate that this strategy can be integrated into a high-throughput LC-MS(n) workflow for rapid derivatization of peptide mixtures.

  17. Photodissociation of C{sub 3}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 4}H{sub 7}Br at 234 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Kook; Paul, Dababrata; Hong, Ki Ryong; Cho, Ha Na; Kim, Tae Kyu [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Seok [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The photodissociation dynamics of cyclopropyl bromide (C-3H{sub 5}Br) and cyclobutyl bromide (C{sub 4}H{sub 7}Br) at 234 nm was investigated. A two-dimensional photofragment ion-imaging technique coupled with a [2+1] resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization scheme was utilized to obtain speed and angular distributions of the nascent Br({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}) and Br*({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}) atoms. The recoil anisotropies for the Br and Br* channels were measured to be βBr = 0.92 ± 0.03 and βBr* = 1.52 ± 0.04 for C{sub 3}H{sub 5}Br and βBr = 1.10 ± 0.03 and βBr* = 1.49 ± 0.05 for C{sub 4}H{sub 7}Br. The relative quantum yield for Br was found to be ΦBr = 0.13 ± 0.03 and for C{sub 3}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 4}H{sub 7}Br, respectively. The soft radical limit of the impulsive model adequately modeled the related energy partitioning. The nonadiabatic transition probability from the 3A' and 4A' potential energy surfaces was estimated and discussed.

  18. The conforming brain and deontological resolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Melanie; LaViers, Lisa; Prietula, Michael J; Berns, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during the passive processing of sacred values predicted individual differences in conformity. Individuals with stronger deontological resolve, as measured by greater VLPFC activity, displayed lower levels of conformity. We also tested whether responsiveness to social reward, as measured by ventral striatal activity during social feedback, predicted variability in conformist behavior across individuals but found no significant relationship. From these results we conclude that unwillingness to conform to others' values is associated with a strong neurobiological representation of social rules.

  19. The conforming brain and deontological resolve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Pincus

    Full Text Available Our personal values are subject to forces of social influence. Deontological resolve captures how strongly one relies on absolute rules of right and wrong in the representation of one's personal values and may predict willingness to modify one's values in the presence of social influence. Using fMRI, we found that a neurobiological metric for deontological resolve based on relative activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC during the passive processing of sacred values predicted individual differences in conformity. Individuals with stronger deontological resolve, as measured by greater VLPFC activity, displayed lower levels of conformity. We also tested whether responsiveness to social reward, as measured by ventral striatal activity during social feedback, predicted variability in conformist behavior across individuals but found no significant relationship. From these results we conclude that unwillingness to conform to others' values is associated with a strong neurobiological representation of social rules.

  20. Femtosecond Time-Resolved Resonance-Enhanced CARS of Gaseous Iodine at Room Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ping; Fan Rong-Wei; Xia Yuan-Qin; Yu Xin; Chen De-Ying; Yao Yong

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved resonance-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is applied to investigate molecular dynamics in gaseous iodine. 40 fs laser pulses are applied to create and monitor the high vibrational states of iodine at room temperature (corresponding to a vapor pressure as low as about 35 Pa) by femtosecond time-resolved CARS. Depending on the time delay between the probe pulse and the pump/Stokes pulse pairs, the high vibrational states both on the electronically ground states and the excited states can be detected as oscillations in the CARS transient signal. It is proved that the femtosecond time-resolved CARS technique is a promising candidate for investigating the molecular dynamics of a low concentration system and can be applied to environmental and atmospheric monitoring measurements. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  1. Resolving Ethical Dilemmas in Financial Audit

    OpenAIRE

    Professor PhD Turlea Eugeniu; PhD Student Mocanu Mihaela

    2010-01-01

    Resolving ethical dilemmas is a difficult endeavor in any field and financial auditing makes no exception. Ethical dilemmas are complex situations which derive from a conflict and in which a decision among several alternatives is needed. Ethical dilemmas are common in the work of the financial auditor, whose mission is to serve the interests of the public at large, not those of the auditee’s managers who mandate him/her. The objective of the present paper is to offer support in resolving ethi...

  2. Time- and Site-Resolved Dynamics in a Topological Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ningyuan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From studies of exotic quantum many-body phenomena to applications in spintronics and quantum information processing, topological materials are poised to revolutionize the condensed-matter frontier and the landscape of modern materials science. Accordingly, there is a broad effort to realize topologically nontrivial electronic and photonic materials for fundamental science as well as practical applications. In this work, we demonstrate the first simultaneous site- and time-resolved measurements of a time-reversal-invariant topological band structure, which we realize in a radio-frequency photonic circuit. We control band-structure topology via local permutation of a traveling-wave capacitor-inductor network, increasing robustness by going beyond the tight-binding limit. We observe a gapped density of states consistent with a modified Hofstadter spectrum at a flux per plaquette of ϕ=π/2. In situ probes of the band gaps reveal spatially localized bulk states and delocalized edge states. Time-resolved measurements reveal dynamical separation of localized edge excitations into spin-polarized currents. The radio-frequency circuit paradigm is naturally compatible with nonlocal coupling schemes, allowing us to implement a Möbius strip topology inaccessible in conventional systems. This room-temperature experiment illuminates the origins of topology in band structure, and when combined with circuit quantum electrodynamics techniques, it provides a direct path to topologically ordered quantum matter.

  3. Relationship between time-resolved and non-time-resolved Beer-Lambert law in turbid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Y; Hazeki, O; Tamura, M

    1997-06-01

    The time-resolved Beer-Lambert law proposed for oxygen monitoring using pulsed light was extended to the non-time-resolved case in a scattered medium such as living tissues with continuous illumination. The time-resolved Beer-Lambert law was valid for the phantom model and living tissues in the visible and near-infrared regions. The absolute concentration and oxygen saturation of haemoglobin in rat brain and thigh muscle could be determined. The temporal profile of rat brain was reproduced by Monte Carlo simulation. When the temporal profiles of rat brain under different oxygenation states were integrated with time, the absorbance difference was linearly related to changes in the absorption coefficient. When the simulated profiles were integrated, there was a linear relationship within the absorption coefficient which was predicted for fractional inspiratory oxygen concentration from 10 to 100% and, in the case beyond the range of the absorption coefficient, the deviation from linearity was slight. We concluded that an optical pathlength which is independent of changes in the absorption coefficient is a good approximation for near-infrared oxygen monitoring.

  4. Direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since 1997 we systematically perform direct angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on in-situ grown thin (< 30 nm) cuprate films. Specifically, we probe low-energy electronic structure and properties of high-c superconductors (HTSC) under different degrees of epitaxial (compressive vs. tensile) strain.

  5. Resolved resonance parameters for 236Np

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morogovskij, G.B.; Bakhanovich, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Multilevel Breit-Wigner parameters were obtained for fission cross-section representation in the 0.01-33 eV energy region from evaluation of a 236 Np experimental fission cross-section in the resolved resonance region. (author)

  6. Decomposition of time-resolved tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmid, P.J.; Violato, D.; Scarano, F.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on a transitional water jet at a Reynolds number of Re = 5,000. Flow fields have been obtained by means of time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry capturing all relevant spatial and temporal scales. The measured threedimensional flow fields have

  7. Alignment of time-resolved data from high throughput experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Nada; Franke, Raimo; Findeisen, Peter; Klawonn, Frank

    2016-12-01

    To better understand the dynamics of the underlying processes in cells, it is necessary to take measurements over a time course. Modern high-throughput technologies are often used for this purpose to measure the behavior of cell products like metabolites, peptides, proteins, [Formula: see text]RNA or mRNA at different points in time. Compared to classical time series, the number of time points is usually very limited and the measurements are taken at irregular time intervals. The main reasons for this are the costs of the experiments and the fact that the dynamic behavior usually shows a strong reaction and fast changes shortly after a stimulus and then slowly converges to a certain stable state. Another reason might simply be missing values. It is common to repeat the experiments and to have replicates in order to carry out a more reliable analysis. The ideal assumptions that the initial stimulus really started exactly at the same time for all replicates and that the replicates are perfectly synchronized are seldom satisfied. Therefore, there is a need to first adjust or align the time-resolved data before further analysis is carried out. Dynamic time warping (DTW) is considered as one of the common alignment techniques for time series data with equidistant time points. In this paper, we modified the DTW algorithm so that it can align sequences with measurements at different, non-equidistant time points with large gaps in between. This type of data is usually known as time-resolved data characterized by irregular time intervals between measurements as well as non-identical time points for different replicates. This new algorithm can be easily used to align time-resolved data from high-throughput experiments and to come across existing problems such as time scarcity and existing noise in the measurements. We propose a modified method of DTW to adapt requirements imposed by time-resolved data by use of monotone cubic interpolation splines. Our presented approach

  8. Time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of radiation-chemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, G.N.R.

    1983-01-01

    A tunable pulsed laser Raman spectrometer for time resolved Raman studies of radiation-chemical processes is described. This apparatus utilizes the state of art optical multichannel detection and analysis techniques for data acquisition and electron pulse radiolysis for initiating the reactions. By using this technique the resonance Raman spectra of intermediates with absorption spectra in the 248-900 nm region, and mean lifetimes > 30 ns can be examined. This apparatus can be used to time resolve the vibrational spectral overlap between transients absorbing in the same region, and to follow their decay kinetics by monitoring the well resolved Raman peaks. For kinetic measurements at millisecond time scale, the Raman technique is preferable over optical absorption method where low frequency noise is quite bothersome. A time resolved Raman study of the pulse radiolytic oxidation of aqueous tetrafluorohydroquinone and p-methoxyphenol is briefly discussed. 15 references, 5 figures

  9. Chasing the Evasive Fe=O Stretch and the Spin State of the Iron(IV)-Oxo Complexes by Photodissociation Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andris, E.; Navrátil, R.; Jašík, J.; Terencio, T.; Srnec, Martin; Costas, M.; Roithová, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 7 (2017), s. 2757-2765 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Coordination reactions * Inorganic compounds * Ligands Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  10. Primary photodissociation pathways of epichlorohydrin and analysis of the C-C bond fission channels from an O(3P)+allyl radical intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Alligood, Bridget W.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2010-01-01

    This study initially characterizes the primary photodissociation processes of epichlorohydrin, c-(H 2 COCH)CH 2 Cl. The three dominant photoproduct channels analyzed are c-(H 2 COCH)CH 2 +Cl, c-(H 2 COCH)+CH 2 Cl, and C 3 H 4 O+HCl. In the second channel, the c-(H 2 COCH) photofission product is a higher energy intermediate on C 2 H 3 O global potential energy surface and has a small isomerization barrier to vinoxy. The resulting highly vibrationally excited vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass corresponding to ketene, H 2 CCO. The final primary photodissociation pathway HCl+C 3 H 4 O evidences a recoil kinetic energy distribution similar to that of four-center HCl elimination in chlorinated alkenes, so is assigned to production of c-(H 2 COC)=CH 2 ; the epoxide product is formed with enough vibrational energy to isomerize to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C 3 H 5 O radical produced from C-Cl bond photofission. When the epoxide radical photoproduct undergoes facile ring opening, it is the radical intermediate formed in the O( 3 P)+allyl bimolecular reaction when the O atom adds to an end C atom. We focus on the HCO+C 2 H 4 and H 2 CO+C 2 H 3 product channels from this radical intermediate in this report. Analysis of the velocity distribution of the momentum-matched signals from the HCO+C 2 H 4 products at m/e=29 and 28 shows that the dissociation of the radical intermediate imparts a high relative kinetic energy, peaking near 20 kcal/mol, between the products. Similarly, the energy imparted to relative kinetic energy in the H 2 CO+C 2 H 3 product channel of the O( 3 P)+allyl radical intermediate also peaks at high-recoil kinetic energies, near 18 kcal/mol. The strongly forward-backward peaked angular distributions and the high kinetic energy release result from tangential recoil during the dissociation of highly rotationally excited nascent radicals formed photolytically in this experiment

  11. Primary photodissociation pathways of epichlorohydrin and analysis of the C-C bond fission channels from an O(3P)+allyl radical intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Alligood, Bridget W.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    This study initially characterizes the primary photodissociation processes of epichlorohydrin, c-(H2COCH)CH2Cl. The three dominant photoproduct channels analyzed are c-(H2COCH)CH2+Cl, c-(H2COCH)+CH2Cl, and C3H4O+HCl. In the second channel, the c-(H2COCH) photofission product is a higher energy intermediate on C2H3O global potential energy surface and has a small isomerization barrier to vinoxy. The resulting highly vibrationally excited vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass corresponding to ketene, H2CCO. The final primary photodissociation pathway HCl+C3H4O evidences a recoil kinetic energy distribution similar to that of four-center HCl elimination in chlorinated alkenes, so is assigned to production of c-(H2COC)=CH2; the epoxide product is formed with enough vibrational energy to isomerize to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C3H5O radical produced from C-Cl bond photofission. When the epoxide radical photoproduct undergoes facile ring opening, it is the radical intermediate formed in the O(P3)+allyl bimolecular reaction when the O atom adds to an end C atom. We focus on the HCO+C2H4 and H2CO+C2H3 product channels from this radical intermediate in this report. Analysis of the velocity distribution of the momentum-matched signals from the HCO+C2H4 products at m/e=29 and 28 shows that the dissociation of the radical intermediate imparts a high relative kinetic energy, peaking near 20 kcal/mol, between the products. Similarly, the energy imparted to relative kinetic energy in the H2CO+C2H3 product channel of the O(P3)+allyl radical intermediate also peaks at high-recoil kinetic energies, near 18 kcal/mol. The strongly forward-backward peaked angular distributions and the high kinetic energy release result from tangential recoil during the dissociation of highly rotationally excited nascent radicals formed photolytically in this experiment. The data also reveal substantial branching to an HCCH+H3

  12. Elimination mechanisms of Br2+ and Br+ in photodissociation of 1,1- and 1,2-dibromoethylenes using velocity imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Linqiang; Zhang Bing; Lee, Wei-Bin; Chao, Meng-Hsuan; Lin, King-Chuen

    2011-01-01

    Elimination pathways of the Br 2 + and Br + ionic fragments in photodissociation of 1,2- and 1,1-dibromoethylenes (C 2 H 2 Br 2 ) at 233 nm are investigated using time-of-flight mass spectrometer equipped with velocity ion imaging. The Br 2 + fragments are verified not to stem from ionization of neutral Br 2 , that is a dissociation channel of dibromoethylenes reported previously. Instead, they are produced from dissociative ionization of dibromoethylene isomers. That is, C 2 H 2 Br 2 is first ionized by absorbing two photons, followed by the dissociation scheme, C 2 H 2 Br 2 + + hv→Br 2 + + C 2 H 2 . 1,2-C 2 H 2 Br 2 gives rise to a bright Br 2 + image with anisotropy parameter of -0.5 ± 0.1; the fragment may recoil at an angle of ∼66 deg. with respect to the C = C bond axis. However, this channel is relatively slow in 1,1-C 2 H 2 Br 2 such that a weak Br 2 + image is acquired with anisotropy parameter equal to zero, indicative of an isotropic recoil fragment distribution. It is more complicated to understand the formation mechanisms of Br + . Three routes are proposed for dissociation of 1,2-C 2 H 2 Br 2 , including (a) ionization of Br that is eliminated from C 2 H 2 Br 2 by absorbing one photon, (b) dissociation from C 2 H 2 Br 2 + by absorbing two more photons, and (c) dissociation of Br 2 + . Each pathway requires four photons to release one Br + , in contrast to the Br 2 + formation that involves a three-photon process. As for 1,1-C 2 H 2 Br 2 , the first two pathways are the same, but the third one is too weak to be detected.

  13. Time-resolved brightness measurements by streaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Joshua S.; Speirs, Rory W.; McCulloch, Andrew J.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2018-03-01

    Brightness is a key figure of merit for charged particle beams, and time-resolved brightness measurements can elucidate the processes involved in beam creation and manipulation. Here we report on a simple, robust, and widely applicable method for the measurement of beam brightness with temporal resolution by streaking one-dimensional pepperpots, and demonstrate the technique to characterize electron bunches produced from a cold-atom electron source. We demonstrate brightness measurements with 145 ps temporal resolution and a minimum resolvable emittance of 40 nm rad. This technique provides an efficient method of exploring source parameters and will prove useful for examining the efficacy of techniques to counter space-charge expansion, a critical hurdle to achieving single-shot imaging of atomic scale targets.

  14. Deflection evaluation using time-resolved radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, D.A.; Lucero, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved radiography is the creation of an x-ray image for which both the start-exposure and stop-exposure times are known with respect to the event under study. The combination of image and timing are used to derive information about the event. The authors have applied time-resolved radiography to evaluate motions of explosive-driven events. In the particular application discussed in this paper, the author's intent is to measure maximum deflections of the components involved. Exposures are made during the time just before to just after the event of interest occurs. A smear or blur of motion out to its furthest extent is recorded on the image. Comparison of the dynamic images with static images allows deflection measurements to be made

  15. Reverse Universal Resolving Algorithm and inverse driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Inverse interpretation is a semantics based, non-standard interpretation of programs. Given a program and a value, an inverse interpreter finds all or one of the inputs, that would yield the given value as output with normal forward evaluation. The Reverse Universal Resolving Algorithm is a new...... variant of the Universal Resolving Algorithm for inverse interpretation. The new variant outperforms the original algorithm in several cases, e.g., when unpacking a list using inverse interpretation of a pack program. It uses inverse driving as its main technique, which has not been described in detail...... before. Inverse driving may find application with, e.g., supercompilation, thus suggesting a new kind of program inverter....

  16. 238U + n resolved resonance energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.K.; de Saussure, G.; Perez, R.B.; Difilippo, F.C.; Ingle, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Neutron transmission measurements from 100 eV to 170 keV at 150 m through four 238 U samples are reported. The energy calibration is described, and the resultant 233 U resolved resonance energies are found to be intermediate between those from other workers. In addition, some energies for sharp resonances in 23 Na, 27 Al, 32 S, and 206 Pb are given

  17. Generalized Darcy–Oseen resolvent problem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Medková, Dagmar; Ptashnyk, M.; Varnhorn, W.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 6 (2016), s. 1621-1630 ISSN 0170-4214 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Darcy-Oseen resolvent problem * semipermeable membrane * Brinkman-Darcy equations * fluid flow between free-fluid domains and porous media Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.017, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mma.3872/abstract

  18. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of xanthophylls at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Hong; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Frank, Harry A

    2008-03-20

    Many of the spectroscopic features and photophysical properties of xanthophylls and their role in energy transfer to chlorophyll can be accounted for on the basis of a three-state model. The characteristically strong visible absorption of xanthophylls is associated with a transition from the ground state S0 (1(1)Ag-) to the S2 (1(1)Bu+) excited state. The lowest lying singlet state denoted S1 (2(1)Ag-), is a state into which absorption from the ground state is symmetry forbidden. Ultrafast optical spectroscopic studies and quantum computations have suggested the presence of additional excited singlet states in the vicinity of S1 (2(1)Ag-) and S2 (1(1)Bu+). One of these is denoted S* and has been suggested in previous work to be associated with a twisted molecular conformation of the molecule in the S1 (2(1)Ag-) state. In this work, we present the results of a spectroscopic investigation of three major xanthophylls from higher plants: violaxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. These molecules have systematically increasing extents of pi-electron conjugation from nine to eleven conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. All-trans isomers of the molecules were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and studied by steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy at 77 K. Analysis of the data using global fitting techniques has revealed the inherent spectral properties and ultrafast dynamics of the excited singlet states of each of the molecules. Five different global fitting models were tested, and it was found that the data are best explained using a kinetic model whereby photoexcitation results in the promotion of the molecule into the S2 (1(1)Bu+) state that subsequently undergoes decay to a vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state and with the exception of violaxanthin also to the S* state. The vibrationally hot S1 (1(1)Ag-) state then cools to a vibrationally relaxed S1 (2(1)Ag-) state in less than a picosecond. It was also found that a portion

  19. A Comparative Study of H2 Excitation and Physical Conditions in Interstellar and Circumstellar Photo-dissociation Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kyle; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2017-06-01

    “Photo-dissociation” or “Photon-dominated” Regions (PDRs) exist in the ISM at the interfaces between photo-ionized and molecular gas, where UV radiation sets the ionization state, chemistry, and excitation at the edge of the molecular zone. In these regions, excited rotational-vibrational (“rovibrational”) states of the ground electronic state of H2 are fluorescently populated when the absorption of far-UV photons conveys the molecules into excited electronic states from which they rapidly decay. Downward transitions from the excited rovibrational states produce a rich spectrum of near-infrared emission lines. Since these quadrupole lines are generally optically thin, their fluxes scale with the populations of the upper levels of the respective transitions, providing excellent probes of the excitation and physical conditions in the emitting regions. We present and compare high resolution (R~45,000) near-infrared (1.45-2.45 μm) spectra, obtained on the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) (Park et al. 2014, SPIE, 9147, 1), for a variety of Galactic PDRs including regions of high mass star formation, reflection nebulae, and planetary nebulae. Typically a large number of transitions, up to about 100 individual lines, are seen in each source. We fit grids of Cloudy models (Ferland et al. 2013, RMxAA, 49, 137) to the observed H2 emission to constrain physical parameters such as the temperature, density, and UV field of each PDR and explore the similarities and differences between the various environments where PDRs arise.This work used the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrometer (IGRINS), developed under a collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) with the financial support of the US National Science Foundation (NSF grant AST-1229522) to the University of Texas at Austin, and the Korean GMT Project of KASI. We

  20. On marginally resolved objects in optical interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaume, R.

    2003-03-01

    With the present and soon-to-be breakthrough of optical interferometry, countless objects shall be within reach of interferometers; yet, most of them are expected to remain only marginally resolved with hectometric baselines. In this paper, we tackle the problem of deriving the properties of a marginally resolved object from its optical visibilities. We show that they depend on the moments of flux distribution of the object: centre, mean angular size, asymmetry, and curtosis. We also point out that the visibility amplitude is a second-order phenomenon, whereas the phase is a combination of a first-order term, giving the location of the photocentre, and a third-order term, more difficult to detect than the visibility amplitude, giving an asymmetry coefficient of the object. We then demonstrate that optical visibilities are not a good model constraint while the object stays marginally resolved, unless observations are carried out at different wavelengths. Finally, we show an application of this formalism to circumstellar discs.

  1. WFIRST: Resolving the Milky Way Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalirai, Jason; Conroy, Charlie; Dressler, Alan; Geha, Marla; Levesque, Emily; Lu, Jessica; Tumlinson, Jason

    2018-01-01

    WFIRST will yield a transformative impact in measuring and characterizing resolved stellar populations in the Milky Way. The proximity and level of detail that such populations need to be studied at directly map to all three pillars of WFIRST capabilities - sensitivity from a 2.4 meter space based telescope, resolution from 0.1" pixels, and large 0.3 degree field of view from multiple detectors. In this poster, we describe the activities of the WFIRST Science Investigation Team (SIT), "Resolving the Milky Way with WFIRST". Notional programs guiding our analysis include targeting sightlines to establish the first well-resolved large scale maps of the Galactic bulge aand central region, pockets of star formation in the disk, benchmark star clusters, and halo substructure and ultra faint dwarf satellites. As an output of this study, our team is building optimized strategies and tools to maximize stellar population science with WFIRST. This will include: new grids of IR-optimized stellar evolution and synthetic spectroscopic models; pipelines and algorithms for optimal data reduction at the WFIRST sensitivity and pixel scale; wide field simulations of Milky Way environments including new astrometric studies; and strategies and automated algorithms to find substructure and dwarf galaxies in the Milky Way through the WFIRST High Latitude Survey.

  2. IR photodissociation spectroscopy of (OCS){sub n}{sup +} and (OCS){sub n}{sup −} cluster ions: Similarity and dissimilarity in the structure of CO{sub 2}, OCS, and CS{sub 2} cluster ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inokuchi, Yoshiya, E-mail: y-inokuchi@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Ebata, Takayuki [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2015-06-07

    Infrared photodissociation (IRPD) spectra of (OCS){sub n}{sup +} and (OCS){sub n}{sup −} (n = 2–6) cluster ions are measured in the 1000–2300 cm{sup −1} region; these clusters show strong CO stretching vibrations in this region. For (OCS){sub 2}{sup +} and (OCS){sub 2}{sup −}, we utilize the messenger technique by attaching an Ar atom to measure their IR spectra. The IRPD spectrum of (OCS){sub 2}{sup +}Ar shows two bands at 2095 and 2120 cm{sup −1}. On the basis of quantum chemical calculations, these bands are assigned to a C{sub 2} isomer of (OCS){sub 2}{sup +}, in which an intermolecular semi-covalent bond is formed between the sulfur ends of the two OCS components by the charge resonance interaction, and the positive charge is delocalized over the dimer. The (OCS){sub n}{sup +} (n = 3–6) cluster ions show a few bands assignable to “solvent” OCS molecules in the 2000–2080 cm{sup −1} region, in addition to the bands due to the (OCS){sub 2}{sup +} ion core at ∼2090 and ∼2120 cm{sup −1}, suggesting that the dimer ion core is kept in (OCS){sub 3–6}{sup +}. For the (OCS){sub n}{sup −} cluster anions, the IRPD spectra indicate the coexistence of a few isomers with an OCS{sup −} or (OCS){sub 2}{sup −} anion core over the cluster range of n = 2–6. The (OCS){sub 2}{sup −}Ar anion displays two strong bands at 1674 and 1994 cm{sup −1}. These bands can be assigned to a C{sub s} isomer with an OCS{sup −} anion core. For the n = 2–4 anions, this OCS{sup −} anion core form is dominant. In addition to the bands of the OCS{sup −} core isomer, we found another band at ∼1740 cm{sup −1}, which can be assigned to isomers having an (OCS){sub 2}{sup −} ion core; this dimer core has C{sub 2} symmetry and {sup 2}A electronic state. The IRPD spectra of the n = 3–6 anions show two IR bands at ∼1660 and ∼2020 cm{sup −1}. The intensity of the latter component relative to that of the former one becomes stronger and stronger with

  3. Picosecond rotationally resolved stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanjaroon, Chakree; Reeve, Scott W.; Ford, Alan; Murry, W. Dean; Lyon, Kevin; Yount, Bret; Britton, Dan; Burns, William A.; Allen, Susan D.; Bruce Johnson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) experiments were performed on the nitric oxide molecule in a flow cell environment using lasers with pulse widths of 17-25 ps. A lambda excitation scheme, or ''pump-dump" arrangement, was employed with the pump laser tuned to the T 00 vibronic band origin ( λ=226.35(1)nm) of the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') ← X2Π1/2( v″ = 0, J″) and the dump laser scanned from 246-248 nm within the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') → X2Π1/2( v″ = 2, J″) transition. The rotationally resolved SEP spectra were measured by observing the total fluorescence within the A2Σ+( v' = 0, J') → X2Π1/2( v″ = 1, J″) transition between 235 nm and 237.2 nm while scanning the dump laser wavelengths. Multiple rotational states were excited due to the broad laser bandwidth. Measurements showed that the resolved rotational structure depended on the energy and bandwidth of the applied pump and dump laser pulses. Analysis of the observed fluorescence depletion signals yielded an average percent fluorescence depletion of about 19% when λ=226.35(1)nm and λ=247.91(1)nm. This value reflects the percent transfer of the NO population from the A2Σ+( V' = 0, J') excited electronic state to the X2Π1/2( v″ = 2, J″) ground electronic state. The maximum expected depletion is 50% in the limit of dump saturation. Selective excitation of NO at the bandhead provides good spectral discrimination from the background emission and noise and unambiguously confirms the identity of the emitter.

  4. Fully resolved simulations of expansion waves propagating into particle beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Goran; Hackl, Jason; Annamalai, Subramanian; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    There is a tremendous amount of research that has been done on compression waves and shock waves moving over particles but very little concerning expansion waves. Using 3-D direct numerical simulations, this study will explore expansion waves propagating into fully resolved particle beds of varying volume fractions and geometric arrangements. The objectives of these simulations are as follows: 1) To fully resolve all (1-way coupled) forces on the particles in a time varying flow and 2) to verify state-of-the-art drag models for such complex flows. We will explore a range of volume fractions, from very low ones that are similar to single particle flows, to higher ones where nozzling effects are observed between neighboring particles. Further, we will explore two geometric arrangements: body centered cubic and face centered cubic. We will quantify the effects that volume fraction and geometric arrangement plays on the drag forces and flow fields experienced by the particles. These results will then be compared to theoretical predictions from a model based on the generalized Faxen's theorem. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  5. Spectral cumulus parameterization based on cloud-resolving model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yuya

    2018-02-01

    We have developed a spectral cumulus parameterization using a cloud-resolving model. This includes a new parameterization of the entrainment rate which was derived from analysis of the cloud properties obtained from the cloud-resolving model simulation and was valid for both shallow and deep convection. The new scheme was examined in a single-column model experiment and compared with the existing parameterization of Gregory (2001, Q J R Meteorol Soc 127:53-72) (GR scheme). The results showed that the GR scheme simulated more shallow and diluted convection than the new scheme. To further validate the physical performance of the parameterizations, Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) experiments were performed, and the results were compared with reanalysis data. The new scheme performed better than the GR scheme in terms of mean state and variability of atmospheric circulation, i.e., the new scheme improved positive bias of precipitation in western Pacific region, and improved positive bias of outgoing shortwave radiation over the ocean. The new scheme also simulated better features of convectively coupled equatorial waves and Madden-Julian oscillation. These improvements were found to be derived from the modification of parameterization for the entrainment rate, i.e., the proposed parameterization suppressed excessive increase of entrainment, thus suppressing excessive increase of low-level clouds.

  6. Time-resolved studies. Ch. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Dennis M.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1991-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation, with its unique properties, offers a tool to extend X-ray measurements from the static to the time-resolved regime. The most straight-forward application of synchrotron radiation to the study of transient phenomena is directly through the possibility of decreased data-collection times via the enormous increase in flux over that of a laboratory X-ray system. Even further increases in intensity can be obtained through the use of novel X-ray optical devices. Wide-bandpass monochromators, e.g., that utilize the continuous spectral distribution of synchrotron radiation, can increase flux on the sample several orders of magnitude over conventional X-ray optical systems thereby allowing a further shortening of the data-collection time. Another approach that uses the continuous spectral nature of synchrotron radiation to decrease data-collection times is the 'parallel data collection' method. Using this technique, intensities as a function of X-ray energy are recorded simultaneously for all energies rather than sequentially recording data at each energy, allowing for a dramatic decrease in data-collection time. Perhaps the most exciting advances in time-resolved X-ray studies will be made by those methods that exploit the pulsed nature of the radiation emitted from storage rings. Pulsed techniques have had an enormous impact in the study of the temporal evolution of transient phenomena. The extension from continuous to modulated sources for use in time-resolved work has been carried over in a host of fields that use both pulsed particle and pulsed electro-magnetic beams. In this chapter the new experimental techniques are reviewed and illustrated with some experiments. (author). 98 refs.; 20 figs.; 5 tabs

  7. Time-resolved x-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques for time-resolved x-ray diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on systems utilizing x-ray diodes or scintillators. System design concerns for high-bandwidth (> 1 GHz) diagnostics will be emphasized. The limitations of a coaxial cable system and a technique for equalizing to improve bandwidth of such a system will be reviewed. Characteristics of new multi-GHz amplifiers will be presented. An example of a complete operational system on the Los Alamos Helios laser will be presented which has a bandwidth near 3 GHz over 38 m of coax. The system includes the cable, an amplifier, an oscilloscope, and a digital camera readout

  8. Achieving patient satisfaction: resolving patient complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxler, K F

    1997-07-01

    Patients demand to be active participants on and partners with the health care team to design their care regimen. Patients bring unique perceptions and expectations and use these to evaluate service quality and satisfaction. If customer satisfaction is not achieved and a patient complaint results, staff must have the skills to respond and launch a service recovery program. Service recovery, when done with style and panache, can retain loyal customers. Achieving patient satisfaction and resolving patient complaints require commitment from top leadership and commitment from providers to dedicate the time to understand their patients' needs.

  9. Spatially Resolved Analysis of Bragg Selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Sabel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper targets an inherent control of optical shrinkage in photosensitive polymers, contributing by means of spatially resolved analysis of volume holographic phase gratings. Point by point scanning of the local material response to the Gaussian intensity distribution of the recording beams is accomplished. Derived information on the local grating period and grating slant is evaluated by mapping of optical shrinkage in the lateral plane as well as through the depth of the layer. The influence of recording intensity, exposure duration and the material viscosity on the Bragg selectivity is investigated.

  10. Spatially Resolved Circumnuclear Dust in Centaurus A

    OpenAIRE

    Karovska, Margarita; Marengo, Massimo; Elvis, Martin; Fazio, Giovanni; Hora, Joseph; Hinz, Philip; Hoffmann, William; Meyer, Michael; Mamajek, Eric

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present results from our exploratory mid-IR study of Centaurus A circumnuclear environment using high-angular resolution imaging at the Magellan 6.5m telescope with the MIRAC/BLINC camera. We detected emission from a compact region surrounding the nuclear source, and obtained photometry at 8.8 microns and in the N band. Our analysis suggests that the nuclear region is resolved with a size of approximately 3 pc. The mid-IR emission from this region is likely associated with co...

  11. Periodicity in Age-Resolved Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esipov, Sergei

    We discuss the interplay between the non-linear diffusion and age-resolved population dynamics. Depending on the age properties of collective migration the system may exhibit continuous joint expansion of all ages or continuous expansion with age segregation. Between these two obvious limiting regimes there is an interesting window of periodic expansion, which has been previously used by us in modeling bacterial colonies of Proteus mirabilis. In order to test whether the age-dependent collective migration leads to periodicity in other systems we performed a Fourier analysis of historical data on ethnic expansions and found multiple co-existing periods of activity.

  12. Asymmetric valley-resolved beam splitting and incident modes in slanted graphene junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, S. H.; Chu, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    Electron injection into a graphene sheet through a slanted armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) is investigated. An incident mode, or subband, in the AGNR is valley-unpolarized. Our attention is on the valley-resolved nature of the injected electron beams and its connection to the incident mode. It is known for a normal injection that an incident mode will split symmetrically into two valley-resolved beams of equal intensity. We show, in contrast, that slanted injections result in asymmetric valley-resolved beam splitting. The most asymmetric beam splitting cases, when one of the valley-resolved beams has basically disappeared, are found and the condition derived. This is shown not due to trigonal warping because it holds even in the low incident energy regime, as long as collimation allows. These most asymmetric beam splitting cases occur at energies within an energy interval near and include the subband edge of an incident mode. The physical picture is best illustrated by a projection of the slanted AGNR subband states onto that of the 2D graphene sheet. It follows that the disappearing of a valley-resolved beam coincides with the situation that the group velocities of the projected states in the corresponding valley are in backward directions

  13. Determining grain resolved stresses in polycrystalline materials using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for characterization of the grain resolved (type II) stress states in a polycrystalline sample based on monochromatic X-ray diffraction data. The algorithm is a robust 12-parameter-per-grain fit of the centre-of-mass grain positions, orientations and stress tensors...

  14. Photosensitized production of singlet oxygen: spatially-resolved optical studies in single cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbach, Thomas; Kuimova, Marina; Gbur, Peter

    2009-01-01

    be monitored using viability assays. Time- and spatially-resolved optical measurements of both singlet oxygen and its precursor, the excited state sensitizer, reflect the complex and dynamic morphology of the cell. These experiments help elucidate photoinduced, oxygen-dependent events that compromise cell...

  15. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on iron-chalcogenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maletz, Janek; Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr; Evtushinsky, Daniil; Thirupathaiah, Setti; Wolter-Giraud, Anja; Harnagea, Luminita; Kordyuk, Alexander; Borisenko, Sergey [IFW Dresden (Germany); Yaresko, Alexander [MPI-FKF, Stuttgart (Germany); Vasiliev, Alexander [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Chareev, Dimitri [RAS, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Rienks, Emile [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden (Germany); Shermadini, Zurab; Luetkens, Hubertus; Sedlak, Kamil; Khasanov, Rustem; Amato, Alex; Krzton-Maziopa, Anna; Conder, Kazimierz; Pomjakushina, Ekaterina [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Klauss, Hans-Henning [TU Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The electronic structure of the iron chalcogenide superconductors FeSe{sub 1-x} and Rb{sub 0.77}Fe{sub 1.61}Se{sub 2} was investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The results were compared to DFT calculations and μSR measurements. Both compounds share ''cigar-shaped'' Fermi surface sheets in their electronic structure, that can be found in almost all iron-pnictide superconductors. These features originate from a strong interplay of two hole- and electron-like bands in the Brillouin zone center, leading to a pronounced singularity in the density of states just below the Fermi level. This facilitates the coupling to a bosonic mode responsible for superconductivity.

  16. Super-resolved terahertz microscopy by knife-edge scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giliberti, V.; Flammini, M.; Ciano, C.; Pontecorvo, E.; Del Re, E.; Ortolani, M.

    2017-08-01

    We present a compact, all solid-state THz confocal microscope operating at 0.30 THz that achieves super-resolution by using the knife-edge scan approach. In the final reconstructed image, a lateral resolution of 60 μm ≍ λ/17 is demonstrated when the knife-edge is deep in the near-field of the sample surface. When the knife-edge is lifted up to λ/4 from the sample surface, a certain degree of super-resolution is maintained with a resolution of 0.4 mm, i.e. more than a factor 2 if compared to the diffraction-limited scheme. The present results open an interesting path towards super-resolved imaging with in-depth information that would be peculiar to THz microscopy systems.

  17. Time-resolved fluorometry of the aromatic amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laws, W.R.; Ross, J.B.A.; Katsoyannis, P.G.; Wyssbrod, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    The aromatic amino acids tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine are the chromophores that produce the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins. It has been a long-desired goal to be able to use the fluorescence of these amino acids to help understand protein dynamics, structure, and function. Considerable information about proteins in solution has come from steady-state, or time-averaged, fluorescence measurements, especially from the fluorescence of tryptophan. For a protein to be characterized more extensively, however, the time dependence of the intrinsic fluorescence must also be explained. Unfortunately, complex fluorescence decay kinetics have been observed not only for proteins having just a single aromatic amino acid, but also for simple analogues of these amino acids; the cause of these complex decays is not fully understood. Considerable effort must still be made to resolve the mechanisms causing the complex decays

  18. Rapid Spontaneously Resolving Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qi; Zhao, Hexiang; Zhang, Hanmei; You, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study reports a rare patient of a rapid spontaneously resolving acute subdural hematoma. In addition, an analysis of potential clues for the phenomenon is presented with a review of the literature. Patient Presentation: A 1-year-and-2-month-old boy fell from a height of approximately 2 m. The patient was in a superficial coma with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 when he was transferred to the authors’ hospital. Computed tomography revealed the presence of an acute subdural hematoma with a midline shift beyond 1 cm. His guardians refused invasive interventions and chose conservative treatment. Repeat imaging after 15 hours showed the evident resolution of the hematoma and midline reversion. Progressive magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the complete resolution of the hematoma, without redistribution to a remote site. Conclusions: Even though this phenomenon has a low incidence, the probability of a rapid spontaneously resolving acute subdural hematoma should be considered when patients present with the following characteristics: children or elderly individuals suffering from mild to moderate head trauma; stable or rapidly recovered consciousness; and simple acute subdural hematoma with a moderate thickness and a particularly low-density band in computed tomography scans. PMID:28468224

  19. High resolving power spectrometer for beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshammer, H.W.; Spencer, J.E.

    1992-03-01

    We describe a system designed to analyze the high energy, closely spaced bunches from individual RF pulses. Neither a large solid angle nor momentum range is required so this allows characteristics that appear useful for other applications such as ion beam lithography. The spectrometer is a compact, double-focusing QBQ design whose symmetry allows the Quads to range between F or D with a correspondingly large range of magnifications, dispersion and resolving power. This flexibility insures the possibility of spatially separating all of the bunches along the focal plane with minimal transverse kicks and bending angle for differing input conditions. The symmetry of the system allows a simple geometric interpretationof the resolving power in terms of thin lenses and ray optics. We discuss the optics and the hardware that is proposed to measure emittance, energy, energy spread and bunch length for each bunch in an RF pulse train for small bunch separations. We also discuss how to use such measurements for feedback and feedforward control of these bunch characteristics as well as maintain their stability. 2 refs

  20. Femtosecond Time-resolved Optical Polarigraphy (FTOP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoshima, S.; Fujimoto, M.; Hosoda, M.; Tsuchiya, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A novel time-resolved imaging technique named FTOP (Femtosecond Time-resolved Optical Polarigraphy) for visualizing the ultrafast propagation dynamics of intense light pulses in a medium has been proposed and demonstrated. Femtosecond snapshot images can be created with a high spatial resolution by imaging only the polarization components of the probe pulse; these polarization components change due to the instantaneous birefringence induced by the pump pulse in the medium. Ultrafast temporal changes in the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the optical pulse intensity were clearly visualized in consecutive images by changing the delay between the pump and probe. We observe that several filaments appear and then come together before the vacuum focus due to nonlinear effects in air. We also prove that filamentation dynamics such as the formation position and the propagation behavior are complex and are strongly affected by the pump energy. The results collected clearly show that this method FTOP succeeds for the first time in directly visualizing the ultrafast dynamics of the self-modulated nonlinear propagation of light. (author)

  1. Time Resolved Deposition Measurements in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Kugel, H.; Roquemore, A.L.; Hogan, J.; Wampler, W.R.

    2004-01-01

    Time-resolved measurements of deposition in current tokamaks are crucial to gain a predictive understanding of deposition with a view to mitigating tritium retention and deposition on diagnostic mirrors expected in next-step devices. Two quartz crystal microbalances have been installed on NSTX at a location 0.77m outside the last closed flux surface. This configuration mimics a typical diagnostic window or mirror. The deposits were analyzed ex-situ and found to be dominantly carbon, oxygen, and deuterium. A rear facing quartz crystal recorded deposition of lower sticking probability molecules at 10% of the rate of the front facing one. Time resolved measurements over a 4-week period with 497 discharges, recorded 29.2 (micro)g/cm 2 of deposition, however surprisingly, 15.9 (micro)g/cm 2 of material loss occurred at 7 discharges. The net deposited mass of 13.3 (micro)g/cm 2 matched the mass of 13.5 (micro)g/cm 2 measured independently by ion beam analysis. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that transient processes are likely to dominate the deposition

  2. Regressing Atherosclerosis by Resolving Plaque Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    regression requires the alteration of macrophages in the plaques to a tissue repair “alternatively” activated state. This switch in activation state... tissue repair “alternatively” activated state. This switch in activation state requires the action of TH2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 or IL-13. To...regulation of tissue macrophage and dendritic cell population dynamics by CSF-1. J Exp Med. 2011;208(9):1901–1916. 35. Xu H, Exner BG, Chilton PM

  3. Time-resolved suprathermal x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.H.Y.; Rosen, M.D.

    1978-01-01

    Temporally resolved x-ray spectra in the range of 1 to 20 keV have been obtained from gold disk targets irradiated by 1.06 μm laser pulses from the Argus facility. The x-ray streak camera used for the measurement has been calibrated for streak speed and dynamic range by using an air-gap Fabry-Perot etalon, and the instrument response has been calibrated using a multi-range monoenergetic x-ray source. The experimental results indicate that we are able to observe the ''hot'' x-ray temperature evolve in time and that the experimentally observed values can be qualitatively predicted by LASNEX code computations when the inhibited transport model is used

  4. Time-resolved measurements of luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, Bradley B. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); McShane, Michael J., E-mail: mcshane@tamu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Luminescence sensing and imaging has become more widespread in recent years in a variety of industries including the biomedical and environmental fields. Measurements of luminescence lifetime hold inherent advantages over intensity-based response measurements, and advances in both technology and methods have enabled their use in a broader spectrum of applications including real-time medical diagnostics. This review will focus on recent advances in analytical methods, particularly calculation techniques, including time- and frequency-domain lifetime approaches as well as other time-resolved measurements of luminescence. -- Highlights: • Developments in technology have led to widespread use of luminescence lifetime. • Growing interest for sensing and imaging applications. • Recent advances in approaches to lifetime calculations are reviewed. • Advantages and disadvantages of various methods are weighed. • Other methods for measurement of luminescence lifetime also described.

  5. Time-resolved measurements of luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Bradley B.; McShane, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence sensing and imaging has become more widespread in recent years in a variety of industries including the biomedical and environmental fields. Measurements of luminescence lifetime hold inherent advantages over intensity-based response measurements, and advances in both technology and methods have enabled their use in a broader spectrum of applications including real-time medical diagnostics. This review will focus on recent advances in analytical methods, particularly calculation techniques, including time- and frequency-domain lifetime approaches as well as other time-resolved measurements of luminescence. -- Highlights: • Developments in technology have led to widespread use of luminescence lifetime. • Growing interest for sensing and imaging applications. • Recent advances in approaches to lifetime calculations are reviewed. • Advantages and disadvantages of various methods are weighed. • Other methods for measurement of luminescence lifetime also described

  6. Radiofrequency encoded angular-resolved light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckley, Brandon W.; Akbari, Najva; Diebold, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    The sensitive, specific, and label-free classification of microscopic cells and organisms is one of the outstanding problems in biology. Today, instruments such as the flow cytometer use a combination of light scatter measurements at two distinct angles to infer the size and internal complexity...... of cells at rates of more than 10,000 per second. However, by examining the entire angular light scattering spectrum it is possible to classify cells with higher resolution and specificity. Current approaches to performing these angular spectrum measurements all have significant throughput limitations...... Encoded Angular-resolved Light Scattering (REALS), this technique multiplexes angular light scattering in the radiofrequency domain, such that a single photodetector captures the entire scattering spectrum from a particle over approximately 100 discrete incident angles on a single shot basis. As a proof...

  7. Time - resolved thermography at Tokamak T-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunow, C.; Guenther, K.; Lingertat, J.; Chicherov, V.M.; Evstigneev, S.A.; Zvonkov, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    Thermographic experiments were performed at T-10 tokamak to investigate the thermic coupling of plasma and the limiter. The limiter is an internal equipment of the vacuum vessel of tokamak-type fusion devices and the interaction of plasma with limiter results a high thermal load of limiter for short time. In according to improve the limiter design the temperature distribution on the limiter surface was measured by a time-resolved thermographic method. Typical isotherms and temperature increment curves are presented. This measurement can be used as a systematic plasma diagnostic method because the limiter is installed in the tokamak whereas special additional probes often disturb the plasma discharge. (D.Gy.) 3 refs.; 7 figs

  8. Resolvent-Techniques for Multiple Exercise Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Sören; Lempa, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    We study optimal multiple stopping of strong Markov processes with random refraction periods. The refraction periods are assumed to be exponentially distributed with a common rate and independent of the underlying dynamics. Our main tool is using the resolvent operator. In the first part, we reduce infinite stopping problems to ordinary ones in a general strong Markov setting. This leads to explicit solutions for wide classes of such problems. Starting from this result, we analyze problems with finitely many exercise rights and explain solution methods for some classes of problems with underlying Lévy and diffusion processes, where the optimal characteristics of the problems can be identified more explicitly. We illustrate the main results with explicit examples

  9. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Resolvent-Techniques for Multiple Exercise Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Sören, E-mail: christensen@math.uni-kiel.de [Christian–Albrechts-University in Kiel, Mathematical Institute (Germany); Lempa, Jukka, E-mail: jukka.lempa@hioa.no [Oslo and Akershus University College, School of business, Faculty of Social Sciences (Norway)

    2015-02-15

    We study optimal multiple stopping of strong Markov processes with random refraction periods. The refraction periods are assumed to be exponentially distributed with a common rate and independent of the underlying dynamics. Our main tool is using the resolvent operator. In the first part, we reduce infinite stopping problems to ordinary ones in a general strong Markov setting. This leads to explicit solutions for wide classes of such problems. Starting from this result, we analyze problems with finitely many exercise rights and explain solution methods for some classes of problems with underlying Lévy and diffusion processes, where the optimal characteristics of the problems can be identified more explicitly. We illustrate the main results with explicit examples.

  11. Picosecond rotationally resolved stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanjaroon, Chakree; Reeve, Scott W.; Ford, Alan; Murry, W. Dean; Lyon, Kevin; Yount, Bret; Britton, Dan; Burns, William A.; Allen, Susan D.; Bruce Johnson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Stimulated emission pumping for nitric oxide was studied using picosecond lasers. ► Weak and tightly focused pulses provide sufficient energy for population transfer. ► Selective excitation at the bandhead yields strong fluorescence depletion signals. ► We observe 19% population transfer to v″ = 2 of the X 2 Π 1/2 ground electronic state. - Abstract: Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) experiments were performed on the nitric oxide molecule in a flow cell environment using lasers with pulse widths of 17–25 ps. A lambda excitation scheme, or ‘‘pump–dump” arrangement, was employed with the pump laser tuned to the T 00 vibronic band origin (λ pump =226.35(1)nm) of the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) ← X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 0, J″) and the dump laser scanned from 246–248 nm within the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) → X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 2, J″) transition. The rotationally resolved SEP spectra were measured by observing the total fluorescence within the A 2 Σ + (v′ = 0, J′) → X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 1, J″) transition between 235 nm and 237.2 nm while scanning the dump laser wavelengths. Multiple rotational states were excited due to the broad laser bandwidth. Measurements showed that the resolved rotational structure depended on the energy and bandwidth of the applied pump and dump laser pulses. Analysis of the observed fluorescence depletion signals yielded an average percent fluorescence depletion of about 19% when λ pump =226.35(1)nm and λ dump =247.91(1)nm. This value reflects the percent transfer of the NO population from the A 2 Σ + (V′ = 0, J′) excited electronic state to the X 2 Π 1/2 (v″ = 2, J″) ground electronic state. The maximum expected depletion is 50% in the limit of dump saturation. Selective excitation of NO at the bandhead provides good spectral discrimination from the background emission and noise and unambiguously confirms the identity of the emitter.

  12. Resolvent-based modeling of passive scalar dynamics in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Scott; Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley

    2017-11-01

    The resolvent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations expresses the system state as the output of a linear (resolvent) operator acting upon a nonlinear forcing. Previous studies have demonstrated that a low-rank approximation of this linear operator predicts many known features of incompressible wall-bounded turbulence. In this work, this resolvent model for wall-bounded turbulence is extended to include a passive scalar field. This formulation allows for a number of additional simplifications that reduce model complexity. Firstly, it is shown that the effect of changing scalar diffusivity can be approximated through a transformation of spatial wavenumbers and temporal frequencies. Secondly, passive scalar dynamics may be studied through the low-rank approximation of a passive scalar resolvent operator, which is decoupled from velocity response modes. Thirdly, this passive scalar resolvent operator is amenable to approximation by semi-analytic methods. We investigate the extent to which this resulting hierarchy of models can describe and predict passive scalar dynamics and statistics in wall-bounded turbulence. The support of AFOSR under Grant Numbers FA9550-16-1-0232 and FA9550-16-1-0361 is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Dissociation of metastable CH3CO radicals studied by time-resolved photofragment imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toshinori; Shibata, Takeshi; Li, Haiyang

    1998-05-01

    A novel experimental technique to measure the energy- dependent unimolecular dissociation rate k(E) of radical species is presented. Internally excited CH3CO radicals were formed by ultraviolet photodissociation of CH3COCl, and the subsequent decay of these radicals was detected by subpicosecond time-clocked photofragment imaging. The CH3CO radicals with different internal energies were dispersed in space by their recoil velocities, and their decay rates were measured for each internal energy.

  14. Photodissociation constant of NO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nootebos, M.A.; Bange, P.

    1992-01-01

    The velocity of the dissociation of NO 2 into ozone and NO mainly depends on the ultraviolet sunlight quantity, and with that the cloudiness. A correct value for this reaction constant is important for the accurate modelling of O 3 - and NO 2 -concentrations in plumes of electric power plants, in particular in the case of determination of the amount of photochemical summer smog. An advanced signal processing method (deconvolution, correlation) was applied on the measurements. The measurements were carried out from aeroplanes

  15. Photodissociation dynamics of polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hequan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1998-02-23

    This report consists of five studies as follows: A laser photofragmentation time-of-flight mass spectrometric study of acetophenone at 193 and 248 nm; A 193 nm laser photofragmentation time-of-flight mass spectrometric study of dimethylsulfoxide; 193 nm laser photofragmentation time-of-flight mass spectrometric study of HSCH2CH2SH; Thiophene biradical decay of the primary laser photofragmentation product at 193 nm; and Scattering cross sections for O(3P)[SO(X,3Σ-)] + He[Ne, Ar, Kr]. Chapters are included for the introduction and general conclusions.

  16. Very large array and green bank telescope observations of Orion B (NGC 2024, W12): photodissociation region properties and magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshi, D. Anish [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville and Green Bank, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Jeyakumar, S., E-mail: aroshi@nrao.edu, E-mail: mgoss@nrao.edu, E-mail: sjk@astro.ugto.mx [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, AP 144, Guanajuato CP 36000 (Mexico)

    2014-10-01

    We present images of C110α and H110α radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 4.8 GHz and images of H166α, C166α, and X166α RRL emission at 1.4 GHz, observed toward the star-forming region NGC 2024. The 1.4 GHz image with angular resolution ∼70'' is obtained using Very Large Array (VLA) data. The 4.8 GHz image with angular resolution ∼17'' is obtained by combining VLA and Green Bank Telescope data in order to add the short and zero spacing data in the uv plane. These images reveal that the spatial distributions of C110α line emission is confined to the southern rim of the H II region close to the ionization front whereas the C166α line emission is extended in the north-south direction across the H II region. The LSR velocity of the C110α line is 10.3 km s{sup –1} similar to that of lines observed from molecular material located at the far side of the H II region. This similarity suggests that the photodissociation region (PDR) responsible for C110α line emission is at the far side of the H II region. The LSR velocity of C166α is 8.8 km s{sup –1}. This velocity is comparable with the velocity of molecular absorption lines observed from the foreground gas, suggesting that the PDR is at the near side of the H II region. Non-LTE models for carbon line-forming regions are presented. Typical properties of the foreground PDR are T {sub PDR} ∼ 100 K, n{sub e}{sup PDR}∼5 cm{sup –3}, n {sub H} ∼ 1.7 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, and path length l ∼ 0.06 pc, and those of the far side PDR are T {sub PDR} ∼ 200 K, n{sub e}{sup PDR}∼ 50 cm{sup –3}, n {sub H} ∼ 1.7 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}, and l ∼ 0.03 pc. Our modeling indicates that the far side PDR is located within the H II region. We estimate the magnetic field strength in the foreground PDR to be 60 μG and that in the far side PDR to be 220 μG. Our field estimates compare well with the values obtained from OH Zeeman observations toward NGC 2024. The H166α spectrum

  17. Very large array and green bank telescope observations of Orion B (NGC 2024, W12): photodissociation region properties and magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshi, D. Anish; Goss, W. M.; Jeyakumar, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present images of C110α and H110α radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 4.8 GHz and images of H166α, C166α, and X166α RRL emission at 1.4 GHz, observed toward the star-forming region NGC 2024. The 1.4 GHz image with angular resolution ∼70'' is obtained using Very Large Array (VLA) data. The 4.8 GHz image with angular resolution ∼17'' is obtained by combining VLA and Green Bank Telescope data in order to add the short and zero spacing data in the uv plane. These images reveal that the spatial distributions of C110α line emission is confined to the southern rim of the H II region close to the ionization front whereas the C166α line emission is extended in the north-south direction across the H II region. The LSR velocity of the C110α line is 10.3 km s –1 similar to that of lines observed from molecular material located at the far side of the H II region. This similarity suggests that the photodissociation region (PDR) responsible for C110α line emission is at the far side of the H II region. The LSR velocity of C166α is 8.8 km s –1 . This velocity is comparable with the velocity of molecular absorption lines observed from the foreground gas, suggesting that the PDR is at the near side of the H II region. Non-LTE models for carbon line-forming regions are presented. Typical properties of the foreground PDR are T PDR ∼ 100 K, n e PDR ∼5 cm –3 , n H ∼ 1.7 × 10 4 cm –3 , and path length l ∼ 0.06 pc, and those of the far side PDR are T PDR ∼ 200 K, n e PDR ∼ 50 cm –3 , n H ∼ 1.7 × 10 5 cm –3 , and l ∼ 0.03 pc. Our modeling indicates that the far side PDR is located within the H II region. We estimate the magnetic field strength in the foreground PDR to be 60 μG and that in the far side PDR to be 220 μG. Our field estimates compare well with the values obtained from OH Zeeman observations toward NGC 2024. The H166α spectrum shows narrow (1.7 km s –1 ) and broad (33 km s –1 ) line features. The

  18. Time-resolved photoluminescence of SiOx encapsulated Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalem, Seref; Hannas, Amal; Österman, Tomas; Sundström, Villy

    Silicon and its oxide SiOx offer a number of exciting electrical and optical properties originating from defects and size reduction enabling engineering new electronic devices including resistive switching memories. Here we present the results of photoluminescence dynamics relevant to defects and quantum confinement effects. Time-resolved luminescence at room temperature exhibits an ultrafast decay component of less than 10 ps at around 480 nm and a slower component of around 60 ps as measured by streak camera. Red shift at the initial stages of the blue luminescence decay confirms the presence of a charge transfer to long lived states. Time-correlated single photon counting measurements revealed a life-time of about 5 ns for these states. The same quantum structures emit in near infrared close to optical communication wavelengths. Nature of the emission is described and modeling is provided for the luminescence dynamics. The electrical characteristics of metal-oxide-semiconductor devices were correlated with the optical and vibrational measurement results in order to have better insight into the switching mechanisms in such resistive devices as possible next generation RAM memory elements. ``This work was supported by ENIAC Joint Undertaking and Laser-Lab Europe''.

  19. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence of fluorescein derivative for time-resolved and confocal fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoqing; Song, Fengling; Wang, Jingyun; Zhang, Yukang; Xue, Yingying; Sun, Liangliang; Jiang, Na; Gao, Pan; Tian, Lu; Peng, Xiaojun

    2014-07-09

    Compared with fluorescence imaging utilizing fluorophores whose lifetimes are in the order of nanoseconds, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy has more advantages in monitoring target fluorescence. In this work, compound DCF-MPYM, which is based on a fluorescein derivative, showed long-lived luminescence (22.11 μs in deaerated ethanol) and was used in time-resolved fluorescence imaging in living cells. Both nanosecond time-resolved transient difference absorption spectra and time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) were employed to explain the long lifetime of the compound, which is rare in pure organic fluorophores without rare earth metals and heavy atoms. A mechanism of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) that considers the long wavelength fluorescence, large Stokes shift, and long-lived triplet state of DCF-MPYM was proposed. The energy gap (ΔEST) of DCF-MPYM between the singlet and triplet state was determined to be 28.36 meV by the decay rate of DF as a function of temperature. The ΔE(ST) was small enough to allow efficient intersystem crossing (ISC) and reverse ISC, leading to efficient TADF at room temperature. The straightforward synthesis of DCF-MPYM and wide availability of its starting materials contribute to the excellent potential of the compound to replace luminescent lanthanide complexes in future time-resolved imaging technologies.

  20. Resolving Environmental Effects of Wind Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Karin C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); DeGeorge, Elise M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Copping, Andrea E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; May, Roel [Norwegian Institute for Nature Research; Bennet, Finlay [Marine Scotland Science; Warnas, Marijke [Rijkswaterstaat; Perron, Muriel [nateco AG; Elmqvist, Asa [Swedish Environmental Protection Agency

    2018-04-25

    Concerns for potential wildlife impacts resulting from land-based and offshore wind energy have created challenges for wind project development. Research is not always adequately supported, results are neither always readily accessible nor are they satisfactorily disseminated, and so decisions are often made based on the best available information, which may be missing key findings. The potential for high impacts to avian and bat species and marine mammals have been used by wind project opponents to stop, downsize, or severely delay project development. The global nature of the wind industry - combined with the understanding that many affected species cross-national boundaries, and in many cases migrate between continents - also points to the need to collaborate on an international level. The International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Technology Collaborative Programs facilitates coordination on key research issues. IEA Wind Task 34 - WREN: Working Together to Resolve Environmental Effects of Wind Energy-is a collaborative forum to share lessons gained from field research and modeling, including management methods, wildlife monitoring methods, best practices, study results, and successful approaches to mitigating impacts and addressing the cumulative effects of wind energy on wildlife.

  1. Fully Resolved Simulations of 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Xia, Huanxiong; Lu, Jiacai

    2017-11-01

    Numerical simulations of Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) (or Fused Filament Fabrication) where a filament of hot, viscous polymer is deposited to ``print'' a three-dimensional object, layer by layer, are presented. A finite volume/front tracking method is used to follow the injection, cooling, solidification and shrinking of the filament. The injection of the hot melt is modeled using a volume source, combined with a nozzle, modeled as an immersed boundary, that follows a prescribed trajectory. The viscosity of the melt depends on the temperature and the shear rate and the polymer becomes immobile as its viscosity increases. As the polymer solidifies, the stress is found by assuming a hyperelastic constitutive equation. The method is described and its accuracy and convergence properties are tested by grid refinement studies for a simple setup involving two short filaments, one on top of the other. The effect of the various injection parameters, such as nozzle velocity and injection velocity are briefly examined and the applicability of the approach to simulate the construction of simple multilayer objects is shown. The role of fully resolved simulations for additive manufacturing and their use for novel processes and as the ``ground truth'' for reduced order models is discussed.

  2. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton W, Frederick; Walsh S, David; Doyle L, Barney; Dodd E, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a -.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients

  3. The Resolved Stellar Population of Leo A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoy, Eline

    1996-05-01

    New observations of the resolved stellar population of the extremely metal-poor Magellanic dwarf irregular galaxy Leo A in Thuan-Gunn r, g, i, and narrowband Hα filters are presented. Using the recent Cepheid variable star distance determination to Leo A by Hoessel et al., we are able to create an accurate color-magnitude diagram (CMD). We have used the Bavesian inference method described by Tolstoy & Saha to calculate the likelihood of a Monte Carlo simulation of the stellar population of Leo A being a good match to the data within the well understood errors in the data. The magnitude limits on our data are sensitive enough to look back at ~1 Gyr of star formation history at the distance of Leo A. To explain the observed ratio of red to blue stars in the observed CMD, it is necessary to invoke either a steadily decreasing star formation rate toward the present time or gaps in the star formation history. We also compare the properties of the observed stellar population with the known spatial distribution of the H I gas and H II regions to support the conclusions from CMD modeling. We consider the possibility that currently there is a period of diminished star formation in Leo A, as evidenced by the lack of very young stars in the CMD and the faint H II regions. How the chaotic H I distribution, with no observable rotation, fits into our picture of the evolution of Leo A is as yet unclear.

  4. Enzyme reactions and their time resolved measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajdu, Janos

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses experimental strategies in data collection with the Laue method and summarises recent results using synchrotron radiation. Then, an assessment is made of the progress towards time resolved studies with protein crystals and the problems that remain. The paper consists of three parts which respectively describe some aspects of Laue diffraction, recent examples of structural results from Laue diffraction, and kinetic Laue crystallography. In the first part, characteristics of Laue diffraction is discussed first, focusing on the harmonics problems, spatials problem, wavelength normalization, low resolution hole, data completeness, and uneven coverage of reciprocal space. Then, capture of the symmetry unique reflection set is discussed focusing on the effect of wavelength range on the number of reciprocal lattice points occupying diffracting positions, effect of crystal to film distance and the film area and shape on the number of reflections captured, and effect of crystal symmetry on the number of unique reflections within the number of reflections captured. The second part addresses the determination of the structure of turkey egg white lysozyme, and calcium binding in tomato bushy stunt virus. The third part describes the initiation of reactions in enzyme crystals, picosecond Laue diffraction at high energy storage rings, and detectors. (N.K.)

  5. Component-resolved diagnostics in vernal conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentia, Alicia; Sanchís, Eugenia; Montero, Javier A

    2016-10-01

    Conventional diagnostic tests in allergy are insufficient to clarify the cause of vernal conjunctivitis. Component-resolved diagnostic (CRD) by microarray allergen assay may be useful in detecting allergens that might be involved in the inflammatory process. In a recent trial in patients suffered from eosinophilic esophagitis, after 2 years of the CRD-guided exclusion diet and specific immunotherapy, significant clinical improvement was observed, and 68% of patients were discharged (cure based on negative biopsy, no symptoms, and no medication intake). Our new objective was to evaluate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity by CRD in tears and serum from patients with vernal conjunctivitis and treat patients with identified triggering allergens by specific immunotherapy. Twenty-five patients with vernal conjunctivitis were evaluated. The identified triggering allergens were n Lol p 1 (11 cases), n Cyn d 1 (eight cases), group 4 and 6 grasses (six cases) and group 5 of grasses (five cases). Prick test and pollen IgE were positive in one case. Clinical improvement was observed in 13/25 vernal conjunctivitis patients after 1-year specific immunotherapy. CRD seems to be a more sensitive diagnostic tool compared with prick test and IgE detection. Specific CRD-led immunotherapy may achieve clinical improvements in vernal conjunctivitis patients.

  6. Component Resolved Diagnosis in Hymenoptera Anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsitz, D; Brockow, K

    2017-06-01

    Hymenoptera anaphylaxis is one of the leading causes of severe allergic reactions and can be fatal. Venom-specific immunotherapy (VIT) can prevent a life-threatening reaction; however, confirmation of an allergy to a Hymenoptera venom is a prerequisite before starting such a treatment. Component resolved diagnostics (CRD) have helped to better identify the responsible allergen. Many new insect venom allergens have been identified within the last few years. Commercially available recombinant allergens offer new diagnostic tools for detecting sensitivity to insect venoms. Additional added sensitivity to nearly 95% was introduced by spiking yellow jacket venom (YJV) extract with Ves v 5. The further value of CRD for sensitivity in YJV and honey bee venom (HBV) allergy is more controversially discussed. Recombinant allergens devoid of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants often help to identify the culprit venom in patients with double sensitivity to YJV and HBV. CRD identified a group of patients with predominant Api m 10 sensitization, which may be less well protected by VIT, as some treatment extracts are lacking this allergen. The diagnostic gap of previously undetected Hymenoptera allergy has been decreased via production of recombinant allergens. Knowledge of analogies in interspecies proteins and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants is necessary to distinguish relevant from irrelevant sensitizations.

  7. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  8. Resolving Gas-Phase Metallicity In Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carton, David

    2017-06-01

    Chapter 2: As part of the Bluedisk survey we analyse the radial gas-phase metallicity profiles of 50 late-type galaxies. We compare the metallicity profiles of a sample of HI-rich galaxies against a control sample of HI-'normal' galaxies. We find the metallicity gradient of a galaxy to be strongly correlated with its HI mass fraction {M}{HI}) / {M}_{\\ast}). We note that some galaxies exhibit a steeper metallicity profile in the outer disc than in the inner disc. These galaxies are found in both the HI-rich and control samples. This contradicts a previous indication that these outer drops are exclusive to HI-rich galaxies. These effects are not driven by bars, although we do find some indication that barred galaxies have flatter metallicity profiles. By applying a simple analytical model we are able to account for the variety of metallicity profiles that the two samples present. The success of this model implies that the metallicity in these isolated galaxies may be in a local equilibrium, regulated by star formation. This insight could provide an explanation of the observed local mass-metallicity relation. Chapter 3 We present a method to recover the gas-phase metallicity gradients from integral field spectroscopic (IFS) observations of barely resolved galaxies. We take a forward modelling approach and compare our models to the observed spatial distribution of emission line fluxes, accounting for the degrading effects of seeing and spatial binning. The method is flexible and is not limited to particular emission lines or instruments. We test the model through comparison to synthetic observations and use downgraded observations of nearby galaxies to validate this work. As a proof of concept we also apply the model to real IFS observations of high-redshift galaxies. From our testing we show that the inferred metallicity gradients and central metallicities are fairly insensitive to the assumptions made in the model and that they are reliably recovered for galaxies

  9. Resolved Parental Infertility and Children's Educational Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branigan, Amelia R; Helgertz, Jonas

    2017-06-01

    Although difficulty conceiving a child has long been a major medical and social preoccupation, it has not been considered as a predictor of long-term outcomes in children ultimately conceived. This is consistent with a broader gap in knowledge regarding the consequences of parental health for educational performance in offspring. Here we address that omission, asking how resolved parental infertility relates to children's academic achievement. In a sample of all Swedish births between 1988 and 1995, we find that involuntary childlessness prior to either a first or a second birth is associated with lower academic achievement (both test scores and GPA) in children at age 16, even if the period of infertility was prior to a sibling's birth rather than the child's own. Our results support a conceptualization of infertility as a cumulative physical and social experience with effects extending well beyond the point at which a child is born, and emphasize the need to better understand how specific parental health conditions constrain children's educational outcomes.

  10. Mechanistic photodecarboxylation of pyruvic acid: Excited-state proton transfer and three-state intersection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Xue-Ping; Fang, Qiu, E-mail: fangqiu917@bnu.edu.cn; Cui, Ganglong, E-mail: ganglong.cui@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Photochemistry, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-10-21

    Photodissociation dynamics of pyruvic acid experimentally differs from that of commonly known ketones. We have employed the complete active space self-consistent field and its multi-state second-order perturbation methods to study its photodissociation mechanism in the S{sub 0}, T{sub 1}, and S{sub 1} states. We have uncovered four nonadiabatic photodecarboxylation paths. (i) The S{sub 1} system relaxes via an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) to a hydrogen-transferred tautomer, near which an S{sub 1}/S{sub 0} conical intersection funnels the S{sub 1} to S{sub 0} state. Then, some trajectories continue completing the decarboxylation reaction in the S{sub 0} state; the remaining trajectories via a reverse hydrogen transfer return to the S{sub 0} minimum, from which a thermal decarboxylation reaction occurs. (ii) Due to a small S{sub 1} −T{sub 1} energy gap and a large S{sub 1}/T{sub 1} spin-orbit coupling, an efficient S{sub 1} → T{sub 1} intersystem crossing process happens again near this S{sub 1}/S{sub 0} conical intersection. When decaying to T{sub 1} state, a direct photodecarboxylation proceeds. (iii) Prior to ESIPT, the S{sub 1} system first decays to the T{sub 1} state via an S{sub 1} → T{sub 1} intersystem crossing; then, the T{sub 1} system evolves to a hydrogen-transferred tautomer. Therefrom, an adiabatic T{sub 1} decarboxylation takes place due to a small barrier of 7.7 kcal/mol. (iv) Besides the aforementioned T{sub 1} ESIPT process, there also exists a comparable Norrish type I reaction in the T{sub 1} state, which forms the ground-state products of CH{sub 3}CO and COOH. Finally, we have found that ESIPT plays an important role. It closes the S{sub 1}-T{sub 1} and S{sub 1}-S{sub 0} energy gaps, effecting an S{sub 1}/T{sub 1}/S{sub 0} three-state intersection region, and mediating nonadiabatic photodecarboxylation reactions of pyruvic acid.

  11. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-28

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  12. Panchromatic SED modelling of spatially resolved galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel J. B.; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2018-05-01

    We test the efficacy of the energy-balance spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting code MAGPHYS for recovering the spatially resolved properties of a simulated isolated disc galaxy, for which it was not designed. We perform 226 950 MAGPHYS SED fits to regions between 0.2 and 25 kpc in size across the galaxy's disc, viewed from three different sight-lines, to probe how well MAGPHYS can recover key galaxy properties based on 21 bands of UV-far-infrared model photometry. MAGPHYS yields statistically acceptable fits to >99 per cent of the pixels within the r-band effective radius and between 59 and 77 percent of pixels within 20 kpc of the nucleus. MAGPHYS is able to recover the distribution of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), specific SFR, dust luminosity, dust mass, and V-band attenuation reasonably well, especially when the pixel size is ≳ 1 kpc, whereas non-standard outputs (stellar metallicity and mass-weighted age) are recovered less well. Accurate recovery is more challenging in the smallest sub-regions of the disc (pixel scale ≲ 1 kpc), where the energy balance criterion becomes increasingly incorrect. Estimating integrated galaxy properties by summing the recovered pixel values, the true integrated values of all parameters considered except metallicity and age are well recovered at all spatial resolutions, ranging from 0.2 kpc to integrating across the disc, albeit with some evidence for resolution-dependent biases. These results must be considered when attempting to analyse the structure of real galaxies with actual observational data, for which the `ground truth' is unknown.

  13. Resolved Hapke parameter maps of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H.; Robinson, M. S.; Hapke, B.; Denevi, B. W.; Boyd, A. K.

    2014-08-01

    We derived spatially resolved near-global Hapke photometric parameter maps of the Moon from 21 months of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) multispectral observations using a novel "tile-by-tile method" (1° latitude by 1° longitude bins). The derived six parameters (w,b,c,BS0,hS, andθ¯p) for each tile were used to normalize the observed reflectance (standard angles i = g = 60°, e = 0° instead of the traditional angles i = g = 30°, e = 0°) within each tile, resulting in accurate normalization optimized for the local photometric response. Each pixel in the seven-color near-global mosaic (70°S to 70°N and 0°E to 360°E) was computed by the median of normalized reflectance from large numbers of repeated observations (UV: ˜50 and visible: ˜126 on average). The derived mosaic exhibits no significant artifacts with latitude or along the tile boundaries, demonstrating the quality of the normalization procedure. The derived Hapke parameter maps reveal regional photometric response variations across the lunar surface. The b, c (Henyey-Greenstein double-lobed phase function parameters) maps demonstrate decreased backscattering in the maria relative to the highlands (except 321 nm band), probably due to the higher content of both SMFe (submicron iron) and ilmenite in the interiors of back scattering agglutinates in the maria. The hS (angular width of shadow hiding opposition effect) map exhibits relatively lower values in the maria than the highlands and slightly higher values for immature highland crater ejecta, possibly related to the variation in a grain size distribution of regolith.

  14. Parameterized and resolved Southern Ocean eddy compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Mads B.; Jochum, Markus; Nuterman, Roman

    2018-04-01

    The ability to parameterize Southern Ocean eddy effects in a forced coarse resolution ocean general circulation model is assessed. The transient model response to a suite of different Southern Ocean wind stress forcing perturbations is presented and compared to identical experiments performed with the same model in 0.1° eddy-resolving resolution. With forcing of present-day wind stress magnitude and a thickness diffusivity formulated in terms of the local stratification, it is shown that the Southern Ocean residual meridional overturning circulation in the two models is different in structure and magnitude. It is found that the difference in the upper overturning cell is primarily explained by an overly strong subsurface flow in the parameterized eddy-induced circulation while the difference in the lower cell is mainly ascribed to the mean-flow overturning. With a zonally constant decrease of the zonal wind stress by 50% we show that the absolute decrease in the overturning circulation is insensitive to model resolution, and that the meridional isopycnal slope is relaxed in both models. The agreement between the models is not reproduced by a 50% wind stress increase, where the high resolution overturning decreases by 20%, but increases by 100% in the coarse resolution model. It is demonstrated that this difference is explained by changes in surface buoyancy forcing due to a reduced Antarctic sea ice cover, which strongly modulate the overturning response and ocean stratification. We conclude that the parameterized eddies are able to mimic the transient response to altered wind stress in the high resolution model, but partly misrepresent the unperturbed Southern Ocean meridional overturning circulation and associated heat transports.

  15. Subpicosecond oxygen trapping in the heme pocket of the oxygen sensor FixL observed by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglik, Sergei G; Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Yamashita, Taku; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H

    2007-05-01

    Dissociation of oxygen from the heme domain of the bacterial oxygen sensor protein FixL constitutes the first step in hypoxia-induced signaling. In the present study, the photodissociation of the heme-O2 bond was used to synchronize this event, and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution was implemented to characterize the heme configuration of the primary photoproduct. TR(3) measurements on heme-oxycomplexes are highly challenging and have not yet been reported. Whereas in all other known six-coordinated heme protein complexes with diatomic ligands, including the oxymyoglobin reported here, heme iron out-of-plane motion (doming) occurs faster than 1 ps after iron-ligand bond breaking; surprisingly, no sizeable doming is observed in the oxycomplex of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum FixL sensor domain (FixLH). This assessment is deduced from the absence of the iron-histidine band around 217 cm(-1) as early as 0.5 ps. We suggest that efficient ultrafast oxygen rebinding to the heme occurs on the femtosecond time scale, thus hindering heme doming. Comparing WT oxy-FixLH, mutant proteins FixLH-R220H and FixLH-R220Q, the respective carbonmonoxy-complexes, and oxymyoglobin, we show that a hydrogen bond of the terminal oxygen atom with the residue in position 220 is responsible for the observed behavior; in WT FixL this residue is arginine, crucially implicated in signal transmission. We propose that the rigid O2 configuration imposed by this residue, in combination with the hydrophobic and constrained properties of the distal cavity, keep dissociated oxygen in place. These results uncover the origin of the "oxygen cage" properties of this oxygen sensor protein.

  16. Creating diversified response profiles from a single quenchometric sensor element by using phase-resolved luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehan, Elizabeth C; Bukowski, Rachel M; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Titus, Albert H; Cartwright, Alexander N; Bright, Frank V

    2015-01-05

    We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier) phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i) can become highly non-linear; (ii) yield negative going responses; (iii) can be biphasic; and (iv) can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions).

  17. Femtosecond time-resolved hot carrier energy distributions of photoexcited semiconductor quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Chi-Hung; Burda, Clemens; Chen, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    Using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, we investigated hot carrier distributions in semiconductor cadmium selenide quantum dots. The relaxation processes represent the behavior of an ensemble of QDs. This concept is applied for analysis with the Fermi-Dirac distribution and relaxation processes among different electron-hole pair states. By extracting the experimental hot carrier distribution and fitting with the Fermi-Dirac function, we resolved the rapid thermalization processes, such as carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon interactions was resolved within one picosecond upon photoexcitation. The analysis, using the Fermi-Dirac distribution modulated by the density of states, provides a general route to understanding the carrier cooling and heat dissipation processes in quantum dot-based systems. (copyright 2012 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Time-resolved x-ray laser induced photoelectron spectroscopy of isochoric heated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.J.; Dunn, J.; Hunter, J.; Widmann, K.

    2005-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to probe the nonsteady-state evolution of the valence band electronic structure of laser heated ultrathin (50 nm) copper. A metastable phase is studied using a 527 nm wavelength 400 fs laser pulse containing 0.1-2.5 mJ laser energy focused in a large 500x700 μm 2 spot to create heated conditions of 0.07-1.8x10 12 W cm -2 intensity. Valence band photoemission spectra are presented showing the changing occupancy of the Cu 3d level with heating are presented. These picosecond x-ray laser induced time-resolved photoemission spectra of laser-heated ultrathin Cu foil show dynamic changes in the electronic structure. The ultrafast nature of this technique lends itself to true single-state measurements of shocked and heated materials

  19. Angle-resolved photoemission investigation of SmB{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlawenka, Peter; Rader, Oliver; Siemensmeyer, Konrad; Weschke, Eugen; Varykhalov, Andrei; Rienks, Emile [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (Germany); Shitsevalova, Natalya [Institute for Problems of Material Science, Kiev (Ukraine); Gabani, Slavomir; Flachbart, Karol [IEP, Slovak Academy of Science, Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-07-01

    Recently the mixed valence compound SmB{sub 6} has drawn great attention. Theoretically predicted surface states, which should result from a hybridisation of localised f-bands with conduction electrons and a band inversion, would make SmB{sub 6} the first realisation of a so called topological Kondo insulator. Conductivity and transport measurements, as well as spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy seem to fortify the scenario of a topological nature of the conductive surface. We investigate the surface electronic structure of SmB{sub 6} by means of high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements below 1 K. We will present new insights into the surface states that determine the low temperature conductivity of this material.

  20. Developments in time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction using rapid compression and decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Lin, Chuanlong; Rod, Eric; Bai, Ligang; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    Complementary advances in high pressure research apparatus and techniques make it possible to carry out time-resolved high pressure research using what would customarily be considered static high pressure apparatus. This work specifically explores time-resolved high pressure x-ray diffraction with rapid compression and/or decompression of a sample in a diamond anvil cell. Key aspects of the synchrotron beamline and ancillary equipment are presented, including source considerations, rapid (de)compression apparatus, high frequency imaging detectors, and software suitable for processing large volumes of data. A number of examples are presented, including fast equation of state measurements, compression rate dependent synthesis of metastable states in silicon and germanium, and ultrahigh compression rates using a piezoelectric driven diamond anvil cell

  1. Time-resolved Femtosecond Photon Echo Probes Bimodal Solvent Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, M.S; Duppen, K.; Wiersma, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    We report on time-resolved femtosecond photon echo experiments of a dye molecule in a polar solution. The photon echo is time resolved by mixing the echo with a femtosecond gate pulse in a nonlinear crystal. It is shown that the temporal profile of the photon echo allows separation of the

  2. 48 CFR 29.101 - Resolving tax problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... (d) Before purchasing goods or services from a foreign source, the contracting officer should consult... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resolving tax problems. 29... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS TAXES General 29.101 Resolving tax problems. (a) Contract tax problems are...

  3. 48 CFR 30.606 - Resolving cost impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resolving cost impacts. 30... impacts. (a) General. (1) The CFAO shall coordinate with the affected contracting officers before negotiating and resolving the cost impact when the estimated cost impact on any of their contracts is at least...

  4. Theoretical resolving power of a radiofrequency mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coc, A.; Le Gac, R.; Saint Simon, M. de; Thibault, C.; Touchard, F.

    1988-01-01

    Radiofrequency mass spectrometers of L.G. Smith's type can reach a resolving power of 10 6 -10 7 and a precision of 10 -9 -10 -10 . The resolving power, shape of peaks and limitations are described. As an example, the spectrometer to be used in an experiment aimed at measuring the anti p/p mass ratio is considered. (orig.)

  5. Study on sociological approach to resolve maintenance related social problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takayuki

    2007-01-01

    This study proposes a sociological approach to resolve maintenance related social problems. As a result of consideration, the followings were found. (1) In general, solutions to some kinds of questions can be deduced from basic laws using some theories or methodologies in the field of the natural science or engineering. The approach to resolve maintenance related social problems is similar to the approach in the natural science or engineering. (2) The points of view based on fundamental human rights, market principles and community principles, and so on, are very important in resolving maintenance related social problems and can be placed as theories or tools for resolution. (3) If such theories or tools for resolving maintenance related social problems as described above are systematically prepared, it is estimated that it becomes very much easier to resolve maintenance related social problems. (author)

  6. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy resolves individual nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond nanocrystals.

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo Camejo, S.; Adam, M.; Besbes, M.; Hugonin, J.; Jaques, V.; Greffet, J.; Roch, J.; Hell, S.; Treussart, F.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in nanodiamonds are highly promising for bioimaging and sensing. However, resolving individual NV centers within nanodiamond particles and the controlled addressing and readout of their spin state has remained a major challenge. Spatially stochastic super-resolution techniques cannot provide this capability in principle, whereas coordinate-controlled super-resolution imaging methods, like stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, have been predicted ...

  7. Strategies for Resolving the Cyber Attribution Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    involvement in cyber espionage and Internet censorship . The United States’ policies for responding to cyber events are still being developed...operational arm, although the United States does not currently support it.45 The IMPACT Global Response Centre, based in Cyberjaya, Malaysia , was set up

  8. Energy storage and redistribution in molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinze, J.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: chemistry and spectroscopy of molecules at high levels of excitation; energy and phase randomization in large molecules as probed by laser spectroscopy; intramolecular processes in isolated polyatomic molecules; pulse-probe measurements in low-temperature, low-pressure SF 6 ; the photodissociation dynamics of H 2 S and CF 3 NO; photofragment spectroscopy of the NO 2 dissociation; preparation, laser spectroscopy and predissociation of alkali dimers in supersonic nozzle beams; excited states of small molecules - collisional quenching and photodissociation; quantum-state-resolved scattering of lithium hydride; and molecular negative ions

  9. Highly-resolving Rutherford-scattering spectroscopy with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, C.

    2003-10-01

    in the present thesis for the first time the Browne-Buechner spectrometer for the highly resolving ion-beam analysis in the ion beam center Rossendorf is completely presented. A main topic of this theis lied in the apparative construction and the taking-into-operation of the spectrometer and the scattering chamber including the facilities for the sample treatment and characterization. In the framework of this thesis for the chosen measurement arrangement the experimental conditions were elaborated, which allow the routine-like application of the spectrometer for analyses of thin-film systems. for C and Li ions as incident particles especially the straggling was more precisely determined in a large range of materials. By means of the spectrometer also the interaction of the ion with the solid respectively single atoms on its surface could be studied. For the first time the mean charge-state after the single collision on a gold atom was determined for differently heavy ions in a wide energy range

  10. First John structure resolved: Exegetical analysis, Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron J. Bigalke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous attempts have been suggested regarding the structure of First John. The only nearly unanimous agreement amongst commentators is concerning the prologue (1:1–4 and the conclusion (5:13–21. The lack of unanimity can be frustrating for the majority of those who seek to understand the macrostructure of the First Epistle of John. Consequentially, some commentators have opined that it is impossible to determine a notable structure of First John, and the epistle is thus regarded as a relatively imprecise series of various thoughts that were composed on the basis of mere association. Many exegetes have therefore proposed suggested outlines to aid the understanding of First John as opposed to providing genuine efforts to articulate a discernable structure of the epistle. The final part of this exegetical analysis seeks to demonstrate that exegetes need not succumb to such pessimism because there does appear to be a discernable structure to First John. Providing and stating resolve concerning the First John structure is fundamental for understanding the revealed contents of the epistle.

  11. Spectral and time-resolved studies on ocular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, D.; Jentsch, S.; Schenke, S.; Hammer, M.; Biskup, C.; Gaillard, E.

    2007-07-01

    Measurements of endogeous fluorophores open the possibility for evaluation of metabolic state at the eye. For interpretation of 2-dimensional measurements of time-resolved auto fluorescence in 2 separate spectral ranges at the human eye, comparing measurements were performed on porcine eyes. Determining excitation and emission spectra, attention was drawn of proof of coenzymes NADH and FAD in isolated anatomical structures cornea, aqueous humor, lens, vitreous, neuronal retina, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choroid, and sclera. All these structures exhibit auto fluorescence, highest in lens. Excitation at 350 nm results in local fluorescence maxima at 460 nm, corresponding to NADH, in all structures. This short-wave excitation allows metabolic studies only at the anterior eye, because of the limited transmission of the ocular media. During excitation at 446 nm the existence of FAD is expressed by local fluorescence maxima at 530 nm. The composition fluorescence spectra allow no discrimination between single ocular structures. Approximating the dynamic fluorescence by a double exponential function, the shortest lifetimes were detected in RPE and neuronal retina. The histograms of mean lifetime t M cover each other on lens with cornea and also on sclera with choroid. Despite the lifetimes are close between RPE and neuronal retina, the relative contributions Q I are wide different. The gradient of trend lines in cluster diagrams of amplitudes α II vs. α I allows a discrimination of ocular structures.

  12. Resolving society's energy trilemma through the Energy Justice Metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffron, Raphael J.; McCauley, Darren; Sovacool, Benjamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions continue to increase to the detriment of society in many forms. One of the difficulties faced is the imbalance between the competing aims of economics, politics and the environment which form the trilemma of energy policy. This article advances that this energy trilemma can be resolved through energy justice. Energy justice develops the debate on energy policy to one that highlights cosmopolitanism, progresses thinking beyond economics and incorporates a new futuristic perspective. To capture these dynamics of energy justice, this research developed an Energy Justice Metric (EJM) that involves the calculation of several metrics: (1) a country (national) EJM; (2) an EJM for different energy infrastructure; and (3) an EJM which is incorporated into economic models that derive costs for energy infrastructure projects. An EJM is modeled for China, the European Union and the United States, and for different energy infrastructure in the United Kingdom. The EJM is plotted on a Ternary Phase Diagram which is used in the sciences for analyzing the relationship (trilemma) of three forms of matter. The development of an EJM can provide a tool for decision-making on energy policy and one that solves the energy trilemma with a just and equitable approach. - Highlights: • Energy justice advances energy policy with cosmopolitanism and new economic-thinking. • An Energy Justice Metric is developed and captures the dynamics of energy justice. • The Energy Justice Metric (EJM) compares countries, and energy infrastructure. • EJM provides an energy policy decision-making tool that is just and equitable.

  13. Spatially-resolved measurement of optically stimulated luminescence and time-resolved luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Mikhailik, V.B.

    2003-01-01

    Spatially-resolved measurements of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) were performed using a two-dimensional scanning system designed for use with planar samples. The scanning system employs a focused laser beam to stimulate a selected area of the sample, which is moved under the beam by a motorised stage. Exposure of the sample is controlled by an electronic shutter. Mapping of the distribution of OSL using a continuous wave laser source was obtained with sub-millimeter resolution for samples of sliced brick, synthetic single crystal quartz, concrete and dental ceramic. These revealed sporadic emission in the case of brick or concrete and significant spatial variation of emission for quartz and dental ceramic slices. Determinations of absorbed dose were performed for quartz grains within a slice of modern brick. Reconfiguration of the scanner with a pulsed laser source enabled quartz and feldspathic minerals within a ceramic sample to be thinner region. about 6 nm from the extrapolation of themeasuring the time-resolved luminescence spectrum

  14. Resolving the International Monetary Fund's Legitimacy Crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    Since the Asian financial crisis of 1997-1998 the International Monetary Fund (the Fund) has been embroiled in an international crisis of legitimacy. Assertions of a crisis are premised on the notions that the Fund's voting system is unfair, and that the Fund enforces homogenous policies onto...... borrowing member states and that loan programs tend to fail. Seen this way, poor institutional and policy design has led to a loss of legitimacy. But institutionalised inequalities or policy failure is not in itself sufficient to constitute an international crisis of legitimacy. This article provides...... a conceptually-driven discussion of the sources of the Fund's international crisis of legitimacy by investigating how its formal "foreground" institutional relations with its member states have become strained, and how informal "background" political and economic relationships are expanding in a way...

  15. Atom-resolving x-ray holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, B.; Hiort, T.; Materlik, G.; Nishino, Y.; Novikov, D. V.

    2000-01-01

    The current state of atomic resolution x-ray holography is discussed on the basis of theory and experimental results. X-ray holography is theoretically described in quantum theory. Presently-used experimental implementations are shown together with the data analysis used. Reconstructions of experimental and simulated holograms are compared for a Cu 3 Au crystal structure. Rigorous experimental realizations of pure direct and reciprocal x-ray holography methods are demonstrated, and future developments and applications of the method are suggested

  16. Precision angle-resolved autoionization resonances in Ar and Ne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrah, N.; Langer, B.; Gorczyca, T.W. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical work has shown that the electron angular distribution and the shape of the autoionization resonances are crucial to the understanding of certain types of electron-electron correlation. Autoionization resonances in Ne (Ar) result from the decay of the excited discrete state Ne{sup *} 2s2p{sup 6} np (Ar{sup *} 3s3p{sup 6} np) into the continuum state Ne{sup +} 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd) (Ar{sup +} 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5} + e{sup {minus}} (ks,kd)). Since the continuum can also be reached by direct photoionization, both paths add coherently, giving rise to interferences that produce the characteristic Beutler-Fano line shape. In this work, the authors report on quantitative angle-resolved electron spectrometry studies of (a) the Ne 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2s2p{sup 6} np (n=3-5) autoionizing resonances and the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 2p{sup 4}3s3p doubly excited resonance, (b) the Ar 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6} {r_arrow} 3s3p{sup 6} np (n=4-9) autoionization resonances and extended R-matrix calculations of the angular-distribution parameters for both Ne and Ar measurements. Their results are compared with previous theoretical work by Taylor.

  17. Resolving the Milky Way and Nearby Galaxies with WFIRST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalirai, Jasonjot

    High-resolution studies of nearby stellar populations have served as a foundation for our quest to understand the nature of galaxies. Today, studies of resolved stellar populations constrain fundamental relations -- such as the initial mass function of stars, the time scales of stellar evolution, the timing of mass loss and amount of energetic feedback, the color-magnitude relation and its dependency on age and metallicity, the stellar-dark matter connection in galaxy halos, and the build up of stellar populations over cosmic time -- that represent key ingredients in our prescription to interpret light from the Universe and to measure the physical state of galaxies. More than in any other area of astrophysics, WFIRST will yield a transformative impact in measuring and characterizing resolved stellar populations in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies. The proximity and level of detail that such populations need to be studied at directly map to all three pillars of WFIRST capabilities - sensitivity from a 2.4 meter space based telescope, resolution from 0.1" pixels, and large 0.3 degree field of view from multiple detectors. Our WFIRST GO Science Investigation Team (F) will develop three WFIRST (notional) GO programs related to resolved stellar populations to fully stress WFIRST's Wide Field Instrument. The programs will include a Survey of the Milky Way, a Survey of Nearby Galaxy Halos, and a Survey of Star-Forming Galaxies. Specific science goals for each program will be validated through a wide range of observational data sets, simulations, and new algorithms. As an output of this study, our team will deliver optimized strategies and tools to maximize stellar population science with WFIRST. This will include: new grids of IR-optimized stellar evolution and synthetic spectroscopic models; pipelines and algorithms for optimal data reduction at the WFIRST sensitivity and pixel scale; wide field simulations of MW environments and galaxy halos; cosmological simulations

  18. Indoor Measurement of Angle Resolved Light Absorption by Black Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Iandolo, Beniamino; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Angle resolved optical spectroscopy of photovoltaic (PV) samples gives crucial information on PV panels under realistic working conditions. Here, we introduce measurements of angle resolved light absorption by PV cells, performed indoors using a collimated high radiance broadband light source. Our...... indoor method offers a significant simplification as compared to measurements by solar trackers. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show characterization of black silicon solar cells. The experimental results showed stable and reliable optical responses that makes our setup suitable for indoor......, angle resolved characterization of solar cells....

  19. An analytic approach to resolving problems in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candee, D; Puka, B

    1984-06-01

    Education in ethics among practising professionals should provide a systematic procedure for resolving moral problems. A method for such decision-making is outlined using the two classical orientations in moral philosophy, teleology and deontology. Teleological views such as utilitarianism resolve moral dilemmas by calculating the excess of good over harm expected to be produced by each feasible alternative for action. The deontological view focuses on rights, duties, and principles of justice. Both methods are used to resolve the 1971 Johns Hopkins case of a baby born with Down's syndrome and duodenal atresia.

  20. An analytic approach to resolving problems in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candee, D; Puka, B

    1984-01-01

    Education in ethics among practising professionals should provide a systematic procedure for resolving moral problems. A method for such decision-making is outlined using the two classical orientations in moral philosophy, teleology and deontology. Teleological views such as utilitarianism resolve moral dilemmas by calculating the excess of good over harm expected to be produced by each feasible alternative for action. The deontological view focuses on rights, duties, and principles of justice. Both methods are used to resolve the 1971 Johns Hopkins case of a baby born with Down's syndrome and duodenal atresia. PMID:6234395

  1. Time-resolved production and detection of reactive atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.W.; Hurst, G.S.

    1977-09-01

    Cesium iodide in the presence of a buffer gas was dissociated with a pulsed ultraviolet laser, which will be referred to as the source laser. This created a population of atoms at a well defined time and in a compact, well defined volume. A second pulsed laser, with a beam that completely surrounded that of the first, photoionized the cesium after a known time delay. This laser will be referred to as the detector laser. It was determined that for short time delays, all of the cesium atoms were easily ionized. When focused, the source laser generated an extremely intense fluence. By accounting for the beam intensity profile it was shown that all of the molecules in the central portion of the beam can be dissociated and detected. Besides proving the feasibility of single-molecule detection, this enabled a determination of the absolute photodissociation cross section as a function of wavelength. Initial studies of the time decay of the cesium signal at low argon pressures indicated a non-exponential decay. This was consistent with a diffusion mechanism transporting cesium atoms out of the laser beam. Therefore, it was desired to conduct further experiments using a tightly focused source beam, passing along the axis of the detector beam. The theoretical behavior of this simple geometry accounting for diffusion and reaction is easily calculated. A diffusion coefficient can then be extracted by data fitting. If reactive decay is due to impurities constituting a fixed percentage of the buffer gas, then two-body reaction rates will scale linearly with pressure and three-body reaction rates will scale quadratically. Also, the diffusion coefficient will scale inversely with pressure. At low pressures it is conceivable that decay due to diffusion would be sufficiently rapid that all other processes can be neglected. Extraction of a diffusion coefficient would then be quite direct. Finally, study of the reaction of cesium and oxygen was undertaken

  2. A simultaneous multi-slice selective J-resolved experiment for fully resolved scalar coupling information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qing; Lin, Liangjie; Chen, Jinyong; Lin, Yanqin; Barker, Peter B.; Chen, Zhong

    2017-09-01

    Proton-proton scalar coupling plays an important role in molecular structure elucidation. Many methods have been proposed for revealing scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons. However, determining all JHH values within a fully coupled network remains as a tedious process. Here, we propose a method termed as simultaneous multi-slice selective J-resolved spectroscopy (SMS-SEJRES) for simultaneously measuring JHH values out of all coupling networks in a sample within one experiment. In this work, gradient-encoded selective refocusing, PSYCHE decoupling and echo planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) detection module are adopted, resulting in different selective J-edited spectra extracted from different spatial positions. The proposed pulse sequence can facilitate the analysis of molecular structures. Therefore, it will interest scientists who would like to efficiently address the structural analysis of molecules.

  3. Coarsely resolved topography along protein folding pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariel; Kostov, Konstantin S.; Berry, R. Stephen

    2000-03-01

    The kinetic data from the coarse representation of polypeptide torsional dynamics described in the preceding paper [Fernandez and Berry, J. Chem. Phys. 112, 5212 (2000), preceding paper] is inverted by using detailed balance to obtain a topographic description of the potential-energy surface (PES) along the dominant folding pathway of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). The topography is represented as a sequence of minima and effective saddle points. The dominant folding pathway displays an overall monotonic decrease in energy with a large number of staircaselike steps, a clear signature of a good structure-seeker. The diversity and availability of alternative folding pathways is analyzed in terms of the Shannon entropy σ(t) associated with the time-dependent probability distribution over the kinetic ensemble of contact patterns. Several stages in the folding process are evident. Initially misfolded states form and dismantle revealing no definite pattern in the topography and exhibiting high Shannon entropy. Passage down a sequence of staircase steps then leads to the formation of a nativelike intermediate, for which σ(t) is much lower and fairly constant. Finally, the structure of the intermediate is refined to produce the native state of BPTI. We also examine how different levels of tolerance to mismatches of side chain contacts influence the folding kinetics, the topography of the dominant folding pathway, and the Shannon entropy. This analysis yields upper and lower bounds of the frustration tolerance required for the expeditious and robust folding of BPTI.

  4. REMOVING BIASES IN RESOLVED STELLAR MASS MAPS OF GALAXY DISKS THROUGH SUCCESSIVE BAYESIAN MARGINALIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-García, Eric E. [Cerrada del Rey 40-A, Chimalcoyoc Tlalpan, Ciudad de México, C.P. 14630, México (Mexico); González-Lópezlira, Rosa A.; Bruzual A, Gustavo [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacán, C.P. 58089, México (Mexico); Magris C, Gladis, E-mail: martinezgarciaeric@gmail.com [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía, Apartado Postal 264, Mérida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2017-01-20

    Stellar masses of galaxies are frequently obtained by fitting stellar population synthesis models to galaxy photometry or spectra. The state of the art method resolves spatial structures within a galaxy to assess the total stellar mass content. In comparison to unresolved studies, resolved methods yield, on average, higher fractions of stellar mass for galaxies. In this work we improve the current method in order to mitigate a bias related to the resolved spatial distribution derived for the mass. The bias consists in an apparent filamentary mass distribution and a spatial coincidence between mass structures and dust lanes near spiral arms. The improved method is based on iterative Bayesian marginalization, through a new algorithm we have named Bayesian Successive Priors (BSP). We have applied BSP to M51 and to a pilot sample of 90 spiral galaxies from the Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey. By quantitatively comparing both methods, we find that the average fraction of stellar mass missed by unresolved studies is only half what previously thought. In contrast with the previous method, the output BSP mass maps bear a better resemblance to near-infrared images.

  5. Orbital Evolution and Orbital Phase Resolved Spectroscopy of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    binary. We have carried out orbital phase resolved spectroscopy to mea- ... agreement with a simple model of a spherically symmetric stellar wind from the .... has a set of Narrow Field Instruments (NFI) comprising one Low Energy Concen-.

  6. Using a referee to resolve shipper-receiver differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietjen, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Within the nuclear community, shipper-receiver differences generate considerable concern. Current methods of resolving these differences are discussed, prticularly the use of an umpire or referee. Numerous statistical problems connected with the present procedures are also considered

  7. Existence Results for a Family of Equations of Fractional Resolvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, R.W.; Qasem, S.A.; Zailan Siri

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with the presence and distinction of bounded m-solutions (type mild) for a family of generalized integral and differential equations of spot order with fractional resolvent and indefinite delay. (author)

  8. Motivations to Resolve Communication Dilemmas in Database-Mediated Collaboration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalman, Michael E; Monge, Peter; Fulk, Janet; Heino, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    ... it. This article develops and tests an expectancy model that predicts specific conditions under which collective benefits can be made to converge with private ones, thus resolving communication dilemmas...

  9. Attosecond-resolved photoionization of chiral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, S; Comby, A; Clergerie, A; Caillat, J; Descamps, D; Dudovich, N; Fabre, B; Géneaux, R; Légaré, F; Petit, S; Pons, B; Porat, G; Ruchon, T; Taïeb, R; Blanchet, V; Mairesse, Y

    2017-12-08

    Chiral light-matter interactions have been investigated for two centuries, leading to the discovery of many chiroptical processes used for discrimination of enantiomers. Whereas most chiroptical effects result from a response of bound electrons, photoionization can produce much stronger chiral signals that manifest as asymmetries in the angular distribution of the photoelectrons along the light-propagation axis. We implemented self-referenced attosecond photoelectron interferometry to measure the temporal profile of the forward and backward electron wave packets emitted upon photoionization of camphor by circularly polarized laser pulses. We measured a delay between electrons ejected forward and backward, which depends on the ejection angle and reaches 24 attoseconds. The asymmetric temporal shape of electron wave packets emitted through an autoionizing state further reveals the chiral character of strongly correlated electronic dynamics. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of cyclopropane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, P. R.; Taylor, J. W.; Carlson, Thomas A.; Whitley, T. A.; Grimm, F. A.

    1985-10-01

    The angular distribution parameter, β, determined for the valence orbitals (IP < 18 eV) of cyclopropane in the 10-30 eV photon energy range using dispersed polarized synchrotron radiation. The energy dependence of β for photoelectron energies between, 2 and 10 eV above threshold was found to be similar to those found previously for other σ orbitals. The effects of Jahn-Teller splitting on β for the 3e' orbital were found to be small but definitely present. The overall shape and magnitude of the β( hv) curve are, however, sufficiently for the different Jahn-Teller components that, for purposes of orbital assignments using β( hv) curves the shape and magnitude of the curves can be considered associated only with the initial state. Resonance photoionization features at a photon ener of ≈ 18 eV were observed in the 3e' and 3a' 1 orbitals and tentatively assigned to autoionization.

  11. Time-resolved Neutron Powder Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannetier, J.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a high-flux neutron source together with a large position sensitive detector (PSD) allows a powder diffraction pattern to be recorded at a time-scale of a few minutes so that crystalline systems under non-equilibrium conditions may now conveniently be investigated. This introduces a new dimension into powder diffraction (the time and transient phenomena like heterogeneous chemical reactions can now be easily studied. The instrumental parameters relevant for the design of such time-dependent experiments are briefly surveyed and the current limits of the method are discussed. The applications are illustrated by two kinds of experiment in the field of inorganic solid state chemistry: true kinetic studies of heterogeneous chemical reactions and thermodiffractometry experiments

  12. An analytic approach to resolving problems in medical ethics.

    OpenAIRE

    Candee, D; Puka, B

    1984-01-01

    Education in ethics among practising professionals should provide a systematic procedure for resolving moral problems. A method for such decision-making is outlined using the two classical orientations in moral philosophy, teleology and deontology. Teleological views such as utilitarianism resolve moral dilemmas by calculating the excess of good over harm expected to be produced by each feasible alternative for action. The deontological view focuses on rights, duties, and principles of justic...

  13. Extended resolvent and inverse scattering with an application to KPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiti, M.; Pempinelli, F.; Pogrebkov, A. K.; Prinari, B.

    2003-08-01

    We present in detail an extended resolvent approach for investigating linear problems associated to 2+1 dimensional integrable equations. Our presentation is based as an example on the nonstationary Schrödinger equation with potential being a perturbation of the one-soliton potential by means of a decaying two-dimensional function. Modification of the inverse scattering theory as well as properties of the Jost solutions and spectral data as follows from the resolvent approach are given.

  14. Extended resolvent and inverse scattering with an application to KPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiti, M.; Pempinelli, F.; Pogrebkov, A.K.; Prinari, B.

    2003-01-01

    We present in detail an extended resolvent approach for investigating linear problems associated to 2+1 dimensional integrable equations. Our presentation is based as an example on the nonstationary Schroedinger equation with potential being a perturbation of the one-soliton potential by means of a decaying two-dimensional function. Modification of the inverse scattering theory as well as properties of the Jost solutions and spectral data as follows from the resolvent approach are given

  15. Thermo-oxidative degradation study of melt-processed polyethylene and its blend with polyamide using time-resolved rheometry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salehiyan, Reza

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved mechanical spectroscopy (TRMS) was conducted to study the thermo-oxidative degradation of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) samples with different thermal histories and their blends with a polyamide (PA6) in the melt state. Neat...

  16. Grain-resolved elastic strains in deformed copper measured by three-dimensional X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2011-01-01

    This X-ray diffraction study reports the grain-resolved elastic strains in about 1000 randomly oriented grains embedded in a polycrystalline copper sample. Diffraction data were collected in situ in the undeformed state and at a plastic strain of 1.5% while the sample was under tensile load...

  17. Spatially-resolved studies of charge-density-wave phase slip and dynamics in NbSe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemay, S.G.; Adelman, T.L.; Zaitsev-Zotov, S.V.; Thorne, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    We review our spatially and temporally resolved studies of charge-density-wave (CDW) phase slip and dynamics in NbSe 3 . Measurements of the steady-state CDW current, phase slip and strain profiles and their transient evolutions in response to a change in current direction provide a detailed picture of the interplay between elastic deformations and plasticity in this material. (orig.)

  18. Time-resolved stimulated emission depletion and energy transfer dynamics in two-photon excited EGFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, T. A.; Robinson, N. A.; Marsh, R. J.; Blacker, T. S.; Armoogum, D. A.; Larijani, B.; Bain, A. J.

    2018-04-01

    Time and polarization-resolved stimulated emission depletion (STED) measurements are used to investigate excited state evolution following the two-photon excitation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). We employ a new approach for the accurate STED measurement of the hitherto unmeasured degree of hexadecapolar transition dipole moment alignment ⟨α40 ⟩ present at a given excitation-depletion (pump-dump) pulse separation. Time-resolved polarized fluorescence measurements as a function of pump-dump delay reveal the time evolution of ⟨α40 ⟩ to be considerably more rapid than predicted for isotropic rotational diffusion in EGFP. Additional depolarization by homo-Förster resonance energy transfer is investigated for both ⟨α20 ⟩ (quadrupolar) and ⟨α40 ⟩ transition dipole alignments. These results point to the utility of higher order dipole correlation measurements in the investigation of resonance energy transfer processes.

  19. A review of the analysis of complex time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Trevor A; Ghiggino, Kenneth P

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements (TRAMs) are widely used to probe the dynamics of the various processes that can lead to the depolarisation of emission following photoselection by polarised excitation. The most commonly investigated of these emission depolarising phenomena is molecular rotational motion, but TRAMs are very useful for determining the kinetics of a host of other processes. In this paper we review several examples for which we have observed in our laboratories initially unexpectedly complex temporal behaviour of the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy signal from relatively ‘simple’ chemical systems. In certain circumstances the anisotropy (i) decays on timescales when superficially it might be thought it should remain constant, (ii) shows marked ‘dip and rise’ behaviour in its intensity, or (iii) can change sign as the anisotropy evolves in time. Fundamentally simple processes, including molecular rotational motion, energy migration and excited state photophysics, can cause such behaviour. (topical review)

  20. Mix and Inject: Reaction Initiation by Diffusion for Time-Resolved Macromolecular Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schmidt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography unifies structure determination with chemical kinetics, since the structures of transient states and chemical and kinetic mechanisms can be determined simultaneously from the same data. To start a reaction in an enzyme, typically, an initially inactive substrate present in the crystal is activated. This has particular disadvantages that are circumvented when active substrate is directly provided by diffusion. However, then it is prohibitive to use macroscopic crystals because diffusion times become too long. With small micro- and nanocrystals diffusion times are adequately short for most enzymes and the reaction can be swiftly initiated. We demonstrate here that a time-resolved crystallographic experiment becomes feasible by mixing substrate with enzyme nanocrystals which are subsequently injected into the X-ray beam of a pulsed X-ray source.