WorldWideScience

Sample records for state kinetic analysis

  1. Kinetic Analysis for Macrocyclizations Involving Anionic Template at the Transition State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Martí-Centelles

    2012-01-01

    competitive oligomerization/polymerization processes yielding undesired oligomeric/polymeric byproducts. The effect of anions has also been included in the kinetic models, as they can act as catalytic templates in the transition state reducing and stabilizing the transition state. The corresponding differential equation systems for each kinetic model can be solved numerically. Through a comprehensive analysis of these results, it is possible to obtain a better understanding of the different parameters that are involved in the macrocyclization reaction mechanism and to develop strategies for the optimization of the desired processes.

  2. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic study of formation of lithium titanate by solid state route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonak, Sagar; Jain, Uttam; Sahu, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Krishnamurthy, Nagaiyar

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of lithium titanate from the solid state reaction of lithium carbonate and titanium oxide was studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetric technique. Thermogravimetric data for the reaction of lithium carbonate and titanium oxide was obtained at various heating rates. The methods such as Flynn–Wall–Ozawa and Kissinger–Akahira–Sunose were used to estimate the kinetic parameters from the obtained thermogravimetric data. The average activation energy for the formation of lithium titanate by solid state route was found to be 243 kJ/mol K. The reaction mechanism was determined by the method given by Malek. It was found that the three dimensional diffusion model best describes the reaction kinetics. A kinetic equation describing the reaction is proposed and reaction mechanism is discussed

  3. Steady state likelihood ratio sensitivity analysis for stiff kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, M; Vlachos, D G

    2015-01-28

    Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is an integral tool in the study of complex physical phenomena present in applications ranging from heterogeneous catalysis to biological systems to crystal growth and atmospheric sciences. Sensitivity analysis is useful for identifying important parameters and rate-determining steps, but the finite-difference application of sensitivity analysis is computationally demanding. Techniques based on the likelihood ratio method reduce the computational cost of sensitivity analysis by obtaining all gradient information in a single run. However, we show that disparity in time scales of microscopic events, which is ubiquitous in real systems, introduces drastic statistical noise into derivative estimates for parameters affecting the fast events. In this work, the steady-state likelihood ratio sensitivity analysis is extended to singularly perturbed systems by invoking partial equilibration for fast reactions, that is, by working on the fast and slow manifolds of the chemistry. Derivatives on each time scale are computed independently and combined to the desired sensitivity coefficients to considerably reduce the noise in derivative estimates for stiff systems. The approach is demonstrated in an analytically solvable linear system.

  4. Steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of halopropane conversion by a Rhodococcus haloalkane dehalogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, T; Pikkemaat, MG; Kingma, Jacob; Dijk, J; Janssen, DB

    2003-01-01

    Haloalkane dehalogenase from Rhodococcus rhodochrous NCIMB 13064 (DhaA) catalyzes the hydrolysis of carbon-halogen bonds in a wide range of haloalkanes. We examined the steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics of halopropane conversion by DhaA to illuminate mechanistic details of the

  5. Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of microalgae via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA): A state-of-the-art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Quang-Vu; Chen, Wei-Hsin

    2017-12-01

    Pyrolysis is a promising route for biofuels production from microalgae at moderate temperatures (400-600°C) in an inert atmosphere. Depending on the operating conditions, pyrolysis can produce biochar and/or bio-oil. In practice, knowledge for thermal decomposition characteristics and kinetics of microalgae during pyrolysis is essential for pyrolyzer design and pyrolysis optimization. Recently, the pyrolysis kinetics of microalgae has become a crucial topic and received increasing interest from researchers. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has been employed as a proven technique for studying microalgae pyrolysis in a kinetic control regime. In addition, a number of kinetic models have been applied to process the TGA data for kinetic evaluation and parameters estimation. This paper aims to provide a state-of-the art review on recent research activities in pyrolysis characteristics and kinetics of various microalgae. Common kinetic models predicting the thermal degradation of microalgae are examined and their pros and cons are illustrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Combination of Markov state models and kinetic networks for the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations of peptide folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, Isolde H; Fersht, Alan R; Settanni, Giovanni

    2011-06-09

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the TZ1 beta-hairpin peptide have been carried out using an implicit model for the solvent. The trajectories have been analyzed using a Markov state model defined on the projections along two significant observables and a kinetic network approach. The Markov state model allowed for an unbiased identification of the metastable states of the system, and provided the basis for commitment probability calculations performed on the kinetic network. The kinetic network analysis served to extract the main transition state for folding of the peptide and to validate the results from the Markov state analysis. The combination of the two techniques allowed for a consistent and concise characterization of the dynamics of the peptide. The slowest relaxation process identified is the exchange between variably folded and denatured species, and the second slowest process is the exchange between two different subsets of the denatured state which could not be otherwise identified by simple inspection of the projected trajectory. The third slowest process is the exchange between a fully native and a partially folded intermediate state characterized by a native turn with a proximal backbone H-bond, and frayed side-chain packing and termini. The transition state for the main folding reaction is similar to the intermediate state, although a more native like side-chain packing is observed.

  7. Detectable states, cycle fluxes, and motility scaling of molecular motor kinesin: An integrative kinetic graph theory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie

    2017-12-01

    The process by which a kinesin motor couples its ATPase activity with concerted mechanical hand-over-hand steps is a foremost topic of molecular motor physics. Two major routes toward elucidating kinesin mechanisms are the motility performance characterization of velocity and run length, and single-molecular state detection experiments. However, these two sets of experimental approaches are largely uncoupled to date. Here, we introduce an integrative motility state analysis based on a theorized kinetic graph theory for kinesin, which, on one hand, is validated by a wealth of accumulated motility data, and, on the other hand, allows for rigorous quantification of state occurrences and chemomechanical cycling probabilities. An interesting linear scaling for kinesin motility performance across species is discussed as well. An integrative kinetic graph theory analysis provides a powerful tool to bridge motility and state characterization experiments, so as to forge a unified effort for the elucidation of the working mechanisms of molecular motors.

  8. Evolution of inhibitor-resistant natural mutant forms of HIV-1 protease probed by pre-steady state kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, Maria Yu; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kaliberda, Elena N; Dronina, Maria A; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Kozyr, Arina V; Smirnov, Ivan V; Rumsh, Lev D; Fedorova, Olga S; Knorre, Dmitry G; Gabibov, Alexander G; Kuznetsov, Nikita A

    2017-11-01

    Pre-steady state kinetic analysis of mechanistic features of substrate binding and processing is crucial for insight into the evolution of inhibitor-resistant forms of HIV-1 protease. These data may provide a correct vector for rational drug design assuming possible intrinsic dynamic effects. These data should also give some clues to the molecular mechanism of protease action and resistance to inhibitors. Here we report pre-steady state kinetics of the interaction of wild type or mutant forms of HIV-1 protease with a FRET-labeled peptide. The three-stage "minimal" kinetic scheme with first and second reversible steps of substrate binding and with following irreversible peptide cleavage step adequately described experimental data. For the first time, a set of "elementary" kinetic parameters of wild type HIV-1 protease and its natural mutant inhibitor-resistant forms MDR-HM, ANAM-11 and prDRV4 were compared. Inhibitors of the first and second generation were used to estimate the inhibitory effects on HIV-1 protease activity. The resulting set of kinetic data supported that the mutant forms are kinetically unaffected by inhibitors of the first generation, proving their functional resistance to these compounds. The second generation inhibitor darunavir inhibited mutant forms MDR-HM and ANAM-11, but was ineffective against prDRV4. Our kinetic data revealed that these inhibitors induced different conformational changes in the enzyme and, thereby they have different mode of binding in the enzyme active site. These data confirmed hypothesis that the driving force of the inhibitor-resistance evolution is disruption of enzyme-inhibitor complex by changing of the contact network in the inhibitor binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Platelet kinetics: the state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyns, A. duP

    1984-01-01

    In this paper an overview of the state of the art of platelet kinetics 1982 is presented. The subjects considered include a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of some of the many radionuclide platelet labels, viz 51 Cr, 111 In, focussing briefly on models for analysis of platelets survival. (Auth.)

  10. Kinetic study of solid-state processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Jiri; Mitsuhashi, Takefumi

    2003-01-01

    A simple method for kinetic analysis of solid-state processes has been developed and the criteria capable of classifying different processes are explored. They provide a useful tool for the determination of the most suitable kinetic model. The method has been applied to the analysis of calorimetric data corresponding to the crystallization processes in amorphous ZrO 2 . It is found that the crystallization kinetics of amorphous powder sample exhibits a complex behavior under non-isothermal conditions. A two-parameter model provides a satisfactory description of the crystallization process for isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. This enables better control of crystallization extent in fine ZrO 2 powders that is important for preparation of zirconia ceramics with defined properties. (author)

  11. Thermochemical nonequilibrium analysis of O2+Ar based on state-resolved kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Gang; Boyd, Iain D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermochemical nonequilibrium studies for three lowest lying electronic states of O 2 . • The complete sets of the rovibrational state-to-state transition rates of O 2 +Ar. • Rovibrational relaxations and coupled chemical reactions of O 2 . • Nonequilibrium reaction rates of O 2 derived from the quasi-steady state assumption. - Abstract: The thermochemical nonequilibrium of the three lowest lying electronic states of molecular oxygen, O 2 (X 3 Σ g - ,a 1 Δ g ,b 1 Σ g + ), through interactions with argon is studied in the present work. The multi-body potential energy surfaces of O 2 +Ar are evaluated from the semi-classical RKR potential of O 2 in each electronic state. The rovibrational states and energies of each electronic state are calculated by the quantum mechanical method based on the present inter-nuclear potential of O 2 . Then, the complete sets of the rovibrational state-to-state transition rate coefficients of O 2 +Ar are calculated by the quasi-classical trajectory method including the quasi-bound states. The system of master equations constructed by the present state-to-state transition rate coefficients are solved to analyze the thermochemical nonequilibrium of O 2 +Ar in various heat bath conditions. From these studies, it is concluded that the vibrational relaxation and coupled chemical reactions of each electronic state needs to be treated as a separate nonequilibrium process, and rotational nonequilibrium needs to be considered at translational temperatures above 10,000 K

  12. Adsorption analysis equilibria and kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Do, Duong D

    1998-01-01

    This book covers topics of equilibria and kinetics of adsorption in porous media. Fundamental equilibria and kinetics are dealt with for homogeneous as well as heterogeneous particles. Five chapters of the book deal with equilibria and eight chapters deal with kinetics. Single component as well as multicomponent systems are discussed. In kinetics analysis, we deal with the various mass transport processes and their interactions inside a porous particle. Conventional approaches as well as the new approach using Maxwell-Stefan equations are presented. Various methods to measure diffusivity, such

  13. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals partially rate-limiting product release by parallel pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Murkin, Andrew S

    2012-07-03

    As part of the non-mevalonate pathway for the biosynthesis of the isoprenoid precursor isopentenyl pyrophosphate, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) reductoisomerase (DXR) catalyzes the conversion of DXP into 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) by consecutive isomerization and NADPH-dependent reduction reactions. Because this pathway is essential to many infectious organisms but is absent in humans, DXR is a target for drug discovery. In an attempt to characterize its kinetic mechanism and identify rate-limiting steps, we present the first complete transient kinetic investigation of DXR. Stopped-flow fluorescence measurements with Mycobacterium tuberculosis DXR (MtDXR) revealed that NADPH and MEP bind to the free enzyme and that the two bind together to generate a nonproductive ternary complex. Unlike the Escherichia coli orthologue, MtDXR exhibited a burst in the oxidation of NADPH during pre-steady-state reactions, indicating a partially rate-limiting step follows chemistry. By monitoring NADPH fluorescence during these experiments, the transient generation of MtDXR·NADPH·MEP was observed. Global kinetic analysis supports a model involving random substrate binding and ordered release of NADP(+) followed by MEP. The partially rate-limiting release of MEP occurs via two pathways--directly from the binary complex and indirectly via the MtDXR·NADPH·MEP complex--the partitioning being dependent on NADPH concentration. Previous mechanistic studies, including kinetic isotope effects and product inhibition, are discussed in light of this kinetic mechanism.

  15. Kinetic parameters from thermogravimetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    High performance polymeric materials are finding increased use in aerospace applications. Proposed high speed aircraft will require materials to withstand high temperatures in an oxidative atmosphere for long periods of time. It is essential that accurate estimates be made of the performance of these materials at the given conditions of temperature and time. Temperatures of 350 F (177 C) and times of 60,000 to 100,000 hours are anticipated. In order to survey a large number of high performance polymeric materials on a reasonable time scale, some form of accelerated testing must be performed. A knowledge of the rate of a process can be used to predict the lifetime of that process. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) has frequently been used to determine kinetic information for degradation reactions in polymeric materials. Flynn and Wall studied a number of methods for using TGA experiments to determine kinetic information in polymer reactions. Kinetic parameters, such as the apparent activation energy and the frequency factor, can be determined in such experiments. Recently, researchers at the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratory suggested that a graph of the logarithm of the frequency factor against the apparent activation energy can be used to predict long-term thermo-oxidative stability for polymeric materials. Such a graph has been called a kinetic map. In this study, thermogravimetric analyses were performed in air to study the thermo-oxidative degradation of several high performance polymers and to plot their kinetic parameters on a kinetic map.

  16. Transition-state analysis of a Vmax mutant of AMP nucleosidase by the application of heavy-atom kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, D.W.; Mentch, F.; Banks, G.A.; Horenstein, B.A.; Schramm, V.L.

    1991-01-01

    The transition state of the V max mutant of AMP nucleosidase from Azotobacter vinelandii has been characterized by heavy-atom kinetic isotope effects in the presence and absence of MgATP, the allosteric activator. The enzyme catalyzes hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of AMP at approximately 2% of the rate of the normal enzyme with only minor changes in the K m for substrate, the activation constant for MgATP, and the K i for formycin 5'-phosphate, a tight-binding competitive inhibitor. Isotope effects were measured as a function of the allosteric activator concentration that increases the turnover number of the enzyme from 0.006 s -1 . The kinetic isotope effects were measured with the substrates [1'- 3 H]AMP, [2'- 2 H]AMP, [9- 15 N]AMP, and [1',9- 14 C, 15 N]AMP. All substrates gave significant kinetic isotope effects in a pattern that establishes that the reaction expresses intrinsic kinetic isotope effects in the presence or absence of MgATP. Transition-state analysis using bond-energy and bond-order vibrational analysis indicated that the transition state for the mutant enzyme has a similar position in the reaction coordinate compared to that for the normal enzyme. The mutant enzyme is less effective in stabilizing the carbocation-like intermediate and in the ability to protonate N7 of adenine to create a better leaving group. This altered transition-state structure was confirmed by an altered substrate specificity for the mutant protein

  17. Pre-Steady-State Kinetic Analysis of Truncated and Full-Length Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA Polymerase Eta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jessica A.; Zhang, Likui; Sherrer, Shanen M.; Taylor, John-Stephen; Burgers, Peter M. J.; Suo, Zucai

    2010-01-01

    Understanding polymerase fidelity is an important objective towards ascertaining the overall stability of an organism's genome. Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase η (yPolη), a Y-family DNA polymerase, is known to efficiently bypass DNA lesions (e.g., pyrimidine dimers) in vivo. Using pre-steady-state kinetic methods, we examined both full-length and a truncated version of yPolη which contains only the polymerase domain. In the absence of yPolη's C-terminal residues 514–632, the DNA binding affinity was weakened by 2-fold and the base substitution fidelity dropped by 3-fold. Thus, the C-terminus of yPolη may interact with DNA and slightly alter the conformation of the polymerase domain during catalysis. In general, yPolη discriminated between a correct and incorrect nucleotide more during the incorporation step (50-fold on average) than the ground-state binding step (18-fold on average). Blunt-end additions of dATP or pyrene nucleotide 5′-triphosphate revealed the importance of base stacking during the binding of incorrect incoming nucleotides. PMID:20798853

  18. Pre-Steady-State Kinetic Analysis of Truncated and Full-Length Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA Polymerase Eta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Brown

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding polymerase fidelity is an important objective towards ascertaining the overall stability of an organism's genome. Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase η (yPolη, a Y-family DNA polymerase, is known to efficiently bypass DNA lesions (e.g., pyrimidine dimers in vivo. Using pre-steady-state kinetic methods, we examined both full-length and a truncated version of yPolη which contains only the polymerase domain. In the absence of yPolη's C-terminal residues 514–632, the DNA binding affinity was weakened by 2-fold and the base substitution fidelity dropped by 3-fold. Thus, the C-terminus of yPolη may interact with DNA and slightly alter the conformation of the polymerase domain during catalysis. In general, yPolη discriminated between a correct and incorrect nucleotide more during the incorporation step (50-fold on average than the ground-state binding step (18-fold on average. Blunt-end additions of dATP or pyrene nucleotide 5′-triphosphate revealed the importance of base stacking during the binding of incorrect incoming nucleotides.

  19. Kinetics of solid state phase transformations: Measurement and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    heating or cooling rate can also exert a crucial influence on the kinetic outcome is stressed. The kinetic ... A simple and general modelling methodology for understanding the kinetics of ... state is of interest on both basic and applied grounds.

  20. Steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis investigation of CO-O2 and CO-NO reactions over a commercial automotive catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oukaci, R.; Blackmond, D.G.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.; Gallaher, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA) is used to study two model reactions, CO oxidation and CO-NO reactions, on a typical formulation of a three-way auto-catalyst. Under steady-state conditions, abrupt switches in the isotopic composition of CO ( 12 C 16 O/ 13 C 18 O) were carried out to produce isotopic transients in both labeled reactants and products. Along with the determination of the average surface lifetimes and concentrations of reaction intermediates, an analysis of the transient responses along the carbon reaction pathway indicated that the distribution of active sites for the formation of CO 2 was bimodal for both reactions. Furthermore, relatively few surface sites contributed to the overall reaction rate

  1. Reactor kinetics - pulse and steady state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, B F; Morris, F M [Sandia Laboratories (United States)

    1974-07-01

    An analytical model has been developed which couples the nuclear and thermal characteristics of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) into a solution which describes both the neutron kinetics of the reactor and the temperature behavior of a fuel-moderator element. The model describes both pulse and steady state operations. This paper describes the important aspects of the reactor, the fuel- moderator elements, the neutron kinetic equations of the reactor, and the time-temperature behavior of a fuel-moderator element that is being subjected to the maximum power density in the core. The parameters which are utilized in the equations are divided into two classes, those that can be measured directly and those that are assumed to be known (each is described briefly). Some of the solutions which demonstrate the versatility of the analytical model are described. (author)

  2. A century of enzyme kinetic analysis, 1913 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth A

    2013-09-02

    This review traces the history and logical progression of methods for quantitative analysis of enzyme kinetics from the 1913 Michaelis and Menten paper to the application of modern computational methods today. Following a brief review of methods for fitting steady state kinetic data, modern methods are highlighted for fitting full progress curve kinetics based upon numerical integration of rate equations, including a re-analysis of the original Michaelis-Menten full time course kinetic data. Finally, several illustrations of modern transient state kinetic methods of analysis are shown which enable the elucidation of reactions occurring at the active sites of enzymes in order to relate structure and function. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of kinetic reaction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Turányi, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Chemical processes in many fields of science and technology, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, environmental modelling, process engineering, and systems biology, can be described by detailed reaction mechanisms consisting of numerous reaction steps. This book describes methods for the analysis of reaction mechanisms that are applicable in all these fields. Topics addressed include: how sensitivity and uncertainty analyses allow the calculation of the overall uncertainty of simulation results and the identification of the most important input parameters, the ways in which mechanisms can be reduced without losing important kinetic and dynamic detail, and the application of reduced models for more accurate engineering optimizations. This monograph is invaluable for researchers and engineers dealing with detailed reaction mechanisms, but is also useful for graduate students of related courses in chemistry, mechanical engineering, energy and environmental science and biology.

  4. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  5. Integrated stoichiometric, thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of steady state metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, R M T; Thiele, I; Provan, G; Nasheuer, H P

    2010-06-07

    The quantitative analysis of biochemical reactions and metabolites is at frontier of biological sciences. The recent availability of high-throughput technology data sets in biology has paved the way for new modelling approaches at various levels of complexity including the metabolome of a cell or an organism. Understanding the metabolism of a single cell and multi-cell organism will provide the knowledge for the rational design of growth conditions to produce commercially valuable reagents in biotechnology. Here, we demonstrate how equations representing steady state mass conservation, energy conservation, the second law of thermodynamics, and reversible enzyme kinetics can be formulated as a single system of linear equalities and inequalities, in addition to linear equalities on exponential variables. Even though the feasible set is non-convex, the reformulation is exact and amenable to large-scale numerical analysis, a prerequisite for computationally feasible genome scale modelling. Integrating flux, concentration and kinetic variables in a unified constraint-based formulation is aimed at increasing the quantitative predictive capacity of flux balance analysis. Incorporation of experimental and theoretical bounds on thermodynamic and kinetic variables ensures that the predicted steady state fluxes are both thermodynamically and biochemically feasible. The resulting in silico predictions are tested against fluxomic data for central metabolism in Escherichia coli and compare favourably with in silico prediction by flux balance analysis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Robustness Analysis of Kinetic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2009-01-01

    Kinetic structures in architecture follows a new trend which is emerging in responsive architecture coined by Nicholas Negroponte when he proposed that architecture may benefit from the integration of computing power into built spaces and structures, and that better performing, more rational...

  7. MBS Analysis Of Kinetic Structures Using ADAMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2009-01-01

    The present paper considers multibody system (MBS) analysis of kinetic structures using the software package ADAMS. Deployable, foldable, expandable and reconfigurable kinetic structures can provide a change in the geometric morphology of the envelope by contributing to making it adaptable to e.......g. changing external climate factors, in order to improve the indoor climate performance of the building. The derivation of equations of motion for such spatial mechanical systems is a challenging issue in scientific community. However, with new symbolic tools one can automatically derive equations in so......-called multibody system (MBS) formalism. The present paper considers MBS modeling of kinetic architectural structures using the software packages ADAMS. As a result, it is found that symbolic MBS simulation tools facilitate a useful evaluation environment for MBS users during a design phase of responsive kinetic...

  8. Excited state kinetics of anthracene-bridge-aniline intramolecular exciplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling; Hammershøj, Peter; Kjær, Kasper Skov

    2014-01-01

    excited anthracene state (LE) and an excited state complex (exciplex, EP) in non-polar solvents. The kinetics of the excited state processes were established in decalin from the time-resolved emission, and was shown to be strongly influenced by an electron-transfer state (ET). For quantitative studies...

  9. New Methods for Processing and Quantifying VO2 Kinetics to Steady State: VO2 Onset Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig R. McNulty

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of oxygen uptake (VO2 kinetics data handling may be too simplistic for the complex physiology involved in the underlying physiological processes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the VO2 kinetics to steady state across the full range of sub-ventilatory threshold work rates, with a particular focus on the VO2 onset kinetics. Ten healthy, moderately trained males participated in five bouts of cycling. Each bout involved 10 min at a percentage of the subject's ventilation threshold (30, 45, 60, 75, 90% from unloaded cycling. The VO2 kinetics was quantified using the conventional mono-exponential time constant (tau, τ, as well as the new methods for VO2 onset kinetics. Compared to linear modeling, non-linear modeling caused a deterioration of goodness of fit (main effect, p < 0.001 across all exercise intensities. Remainder kinetics were also improved using a modified application of the mono-exponential model (main effect, p < 0.001. Interestingly, the slope from the linear regression of the onset kinetics data is similar across all subjects and absolute exercise intensities, and thereby independent of subject fitness and τ. This could indicate that there are no functional limitations between subjects during this onset phase, with limitations occurring for the latter transition to steady state. Finally, the continuing use of mono-exponential modeling could mask important underlying physiology of more instantaneous VO2 responses to steady state. Consequently, further research should be conducted on this new approach to VO2 onset kinetics.

  10. A Series of Supramolecular Complexes for Solar Energy Conversion via Water Reduction to Produce Hydrogen: An Excited State Kinetic Analysis of Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II Photoinitiated Electron Collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamindri M. Arachchige

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-metal supramolecular complexes have been designed that photochemically absorb solar light, undergo photoinitiated electron collection and reduce water to produce hydrogen fuel using low energy visible light. This manuscript describes these systems with an analysis of the photophysics of a series of six supramolecular complexes, [{(TL2Ru(dpp}2RhX2](PF65 with TL = bpy, phen or Ph2phen with X = Cl or Br. The process of light conversion to a fuel requires a system to perform a number of complicated steps including the absorption of light, the generation of charge separation on a molecular level, the reduction by one and then two electrons and the interaction with the water substrate to produce hydrogen. The manuscript explores the rate of intramolecular electron transfer, rate of quenching of the supramolecules by the DMA electron donor, rate of reduction of the complex by DMA from the 3MLCT excited state, as well as overall rate of reduction of the complex via visible light excitation. Probing a series of complexes in detail exploring the variation of rates of important reactions as a function of sub-unit modification provides insight into the role of each process in the overall efficiency of water reduction to produce hydrogen. The kinetic analysis shows that the complexes display different rates of excited state reactions that vary with TL and halide. The role of the MLCT excited state is elucidated by this kinetic study which shows that the 3MLCT state and not the 3MMCT is likely that key contributor to the photoreduction of these complexes. The kinetic analysis of the excited state dynamics and reactions of the complexes are important as this class of supramolecules behaves as photoinitiated electron collectors and photocatalysts for the reduction of water to hydrogen.

  11. Transition state theory for enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an essay that discusses the concepts underlying the application of modern transition state theory to reactions in enzymes. Issues covered include the potential of mean force, the quantization of vibrations, the free energy of activation, and transmission coefficients to account for nonequilibrium effect, recrossing, and tunneling. PMID:26008760

  12. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    During the past year, we have made measurements of state-to-state energy transfer cross sections and radiative lifetimes for Xe*(6p,6p',7p) and Kr*(5p) states in xenon and krypton buffer gases. These results are relevant to kinetic models of both excimer lasers and the infrared xenon laser; and they are a significant improvement in the precision of the known radiative lifetimes. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Chemical kinetic functional sensitivity analysis: Elementary sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demiralp, M.; Rabitz, H.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is considered for kinetics problems defined in the space--time domain. This extends an earlier temporal Green's function method to handle calculations of elementary functional sensitivities deltau/sub i//deltaα/sub j/ where u/sub i/ is the ith species concentration and α/sub j/ is the jth system parameter. The system parameters include rate constants, diffusion coefficients, initial conditions, boundary conditions, or any other well-defined variables in the kinetic equations. These parameters are generally considered to be functions of position and/or time. Derivation of the governing equations for the sensitivities and the Green's funciton are presented. The physical interpretation of the Green's function and sensitivities is given along with a discussion of the relation of this work to earlier research

  14. Reaction kinetic analysis of reactor surveillance data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiie, T., E-mail: yoshiie@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Kinomura, A. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka-fu 590-0494 (Japan); Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    In the reactor pressure vessel surveillance data of a European-type pressurized water reactor (low-Cu steel), it was found that the concentration of matrix defects was very high, and a large number of precipitates existed. In this study, defect structure evolution obtained from surveillance data was simulated by reaction kinetic analysis using 15 rate equations. The saturation of precipitation and the growth of loops were simulated, but it was not possible to explain the increase in DBTT on the basis of the defect structures. The sub-grain boundary segregation of solutes was discussed for the origin of the DBTT increase.

  15. Kinetic Analysis of Horizontal Plyometric Exercise Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossow, Andrew J; Ebben, William P

    2018-05-01

    Kossow, AJ, DeChiara, TG, Neahous, SM, and Ebben, WP. Kinetic analysis of horizontal plyometric exercise intensity. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1222-1229, 2018-Plyometric exercises are frequently performed as part of a strength and conditioning program. Most studies assessed the kinetics of plyometric exercises primarily performed in the vertical plane. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the multiplanar kinetic characteristics of a variety of plyometric exercises, which have a significant horizontal component. This study also sought to assess sex differences in the intensity progression of these exercises. Ten men and 10 women served as subjects. The subjects performed a variety of plyometric exercises including the double-leg hop, standing long jump, single-leg standing long jump, bounding, skipping, power skipping, cone hops, and 45.72-cm hurdle hops. Subjects also performed the countermovement jump for comparison. All plyometric exercises were evaluated using a force platform. Dependent variables included the landing rate of force development and landing ground reaction forces for each exercise in the vertical, frontal, and sagittal planes. A 2-way mixed analysis of variance with repeated-measures for plyometric exercise type demonstrated main effects for exercise type for all dependent variables (p ≤ 0.001). There was no significant interaction between plyometric exercise type and sex for any of the variable assessed. Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons identified a number of differences between the plyometric exercises for the dependent variables assessed (p ≤ 0.05). These findings should be used to guide practitioners in the progression of plyometric exercise intensity, and thus program design, for those who require significant horizontal power in their sport.

  16. Immune adherence: a quantitative and kinetic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, T [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Research Inst.

    1978-09-01

    Quantitative and kinetic analysis of the immune-adherence reaction (IA) between C3b fragments and IA receptors as an agglutination reaction is difficult. Analysis is possible, however, by use of radio-iodinated bovine serum albumin as antigen at low concentrations (less than 200 ng/ml) and optimal concentration of antibody to avoid precipitation of antigen-antibody complexes with human erythrocytes without participation of complement. Antigen and antibody are reacted at 37/sup 0/C, complement is added, the mixture incubated and human erythrocytes added; after further incubation, ice-cold EDTA containing buffer is added and the erythrocytes centrifuged and assayed for radioactivity. Control cells reacted with heated guinea pig serum retained less than 5% of the added radioactivity. The method facilitates measurement of IA reactivity and permits more detailed analysis of the mechanism underlying the reaction.

  17. "Batch" kinetics in flow: online IR analysis and continuous control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jason S; Jensen, Klavs F

    2014-01-07

    Currently, kinetic data is either collected under steady-state conditions in flow or by generating time-series data in batch. Batch experiments are generally considered to be more suitable for the generation of kinetic data because of the ability to collect data from many time points in a single experiment. Now, a method that rapidly generates time-series reaction data from flow reactors by continuously manipulating the flow rate and reaction temperature has been developed. This approach makes use of inline IR analysis and an automated microreactor system, which allowed for rapid and tight control of the operating conditions. The conversion/residence time profiles at several temperatures were used to fit parameters to a kinetic model. This method requires significantly less time and a smaller amount of starting material compared to one-at-a-time flow experiments, and thus allows for the rapid generation of kinetic data. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Analysis of lipid peroxidation kinetics. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doktorov, Alexander B.; Lukzen, Nikita N.; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden

    2008-01-01

    concentrations of reactants or different ways of initiating the re-  action. Nor has it been possible to predict the time dependence of the  products. The reason for these problems is the complicated structure  of the kinetic scheme, which includes a chain reaction. In this work  we perform an in depth analysis......  The kinetics of the lipid peroxidation reaction is only partly under-  stood. Although the set of reactions constituting the overall reaction  is believed to be known, it has not been possible to predict how the  reaction will respond to a change of one or more of the parameters, e.g.  initial...... of the importance of the individual  reaction steps and we introduce a new quasi-stationary concentration  method based on the assumption that one or more concentrations vary  much slower than the others. We show that it is justified to use a  quasi-stationary concentration approximation for the alkyl radical L...

  19. Cell kinetics of GM-CFC in the steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, M.P.; MacVittie, T.J.; Dodgen, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics of cell turnover for myeloid/monocyte cells that form colonies in agar (GM-CFC) were measured through the progressive increase in their sensitivity to 313-nm light during a period of cell labeling with BrdCyd. Two components of cell killing with distinctly separate labeling kinetics revealed both the presence of two generations within the GM-CFC compartment and the properties of the kinetics of the precursors of the GM-CFC. These precursors of the GM-CFC were not assayable in a routine GM-CFC assay when pregnant mouse uterus extract and mouse L-cell-conditioned medium were used to stimulate colony formation but were revealed by the labeling kinetics of the assayable GM-CFC. Further, these precursor cells appeared to enter the assayable GM-CFC population from a noncycling state. This was evidenced by the failure of the majority of these cells to incorporate BrdCyd during five days of infusion. The half-time for cell turnover within this precursor compartment was measured to be approximately 5.5 days. Further, these normally noncycling cells proliferated rapidly in response to endotoxin. High-proliferative-potential colony-forming cells (HPP-CFC) were tested as a candidate for this precursor population. The results of the determination of the kinetics for these cells showed that the HPP-CFC exist largely in a Go state, existing at an average rate of once every four days. The slow turnover time for these cells and their response to endotoxin challenge are consistent with a close relationship between the HPP-CFC and the Go pool of cells that is the direct precursor of the GM-CFC

  20. Generic analysis of kinetically driven inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitou, Rio

    2018-04-01

    We perform a model-independent analysis of kinetically driven inflation (KDI) which (partially) includes generalized G-inflation and ghost inflation. We evaluate the background evolution splitting into the inflationary attractor and the perturbation around it. We also consider the quantum fluctuation of the scalar mode with a usual scaling and derive the spectral index, ignoring the contribution from the second-order products of slow-roll parameters. Using these formalisms, we find that within our generic framework the models of KDI which possess the shift symmetry of scalar field cannot create the quantum fluctuation consistent with the observation. Breaking the shift symmetry, we obtain a few essential conditions for viable models of KDI associated with the graceful exit.

  1. Molecular and Silica-Supported Molybdenum Alkyne Metathesis Catalysts: Influence of Electronics and Dynamics on Activity Revealed by Kinetics, Solid-State NMR, and Chemical Shift Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Deven P; Gordon, Christopher P; Fedorov, Alexey; Liao, Wei-Chih; Ehrhorn, Henrike; Bittner, Celine; Zier, Manuel Luca; Bockfeld, Dirk; Chan, Ka Wing; Eisenstein, Odile; Raynaud, Christophe; Tamm, Matthias; Copéret, Christophe

    2017-12-06

    Molybdenum-based molecular alkylidyne complexes of the type [MesC≡Mo{OC(CH 3 ) 3-x (CF 3 ) x } 3 ] (MoF 0 , x = 0; MoF 3 , x = 1; MoF 6 , x = 2; MoF 9 , x = 3; Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) and their silica-supported analogues are prepared and characterized at the molecular level, in particular by solid-state NMR, and their alkyne metathesis catalytic activity is evaluated. The 13 C NMR chemical shift of the alkylidyne carbon increases with increasing number of fluorine atoms on the alkoxide ligands for both molecular and supported catalysts but with more shielded values for the supported complexes. The activity of these catalysts increases in the order MoF 0 molecular and supported species. Detailed solid-state NMR analysis of molecular and silica-supported metal alkylidyne catalysts coupled with DFT/ZORA calculations rationalize the NMR spectroscopic signatures and discernible activity trends at the frontier orbital level: (1) increasing the number of fluorine atoms lowers the energy of the π*(M≡C) orbital, explaining the more deshielded chemical shift values; it also leads to an increased electrophilicity and higher reactivity for catalysts up to MoF 6 , prior to a sharp decrease in reactivity for MoF 9 due to the formation of stable metallacyclobutadiene intermediates; (2) the silica-supported catalysts are less active than their molecular analogues because they are less electrophilic and dynamic, as revealed by their 13 C NMR chemical shift tensors.

  2. Differential equation methods for simulation of GFP kinetics in non-steady state experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phair, Robert D

    2018-03-15

    Genetically encoded fluorescent proteins, combined with fluorescence microscopy, are widely used in cell biology to collect kinetic data on intracellular trafficking. Methods for extraction of quantitative information from these data are based on the mathematics of diffusion and tracer kinetics. Current methods, although useful and powerful, depend on the assumption that the cellular system being studied is in a steady state, that is, the assumption that all the molecular concentrations and fluxes are constant for the duration of the experiment. Here, we derive new tracer kinetic analytical methods for non-steady state biological systems by constructing mechanistic nonlinear differential equation models of the underlying cell biological processes and linking them to a separate set of differential equations governing the kinetics of the fluorescent tracer. Linking the two sets of equations is based on a new application of the fundamental tracer principle of indistinguishability and, unlike current methods, supports correct dependence of tracer kinetics on cellular dynamics. This approach thus provides a general mathematical framework for applications of GFP fluorescence microscopy (including photobleaching [FRAP, FLIP] and photoactivation to frequently encountered experimental protocols involving physiological or pharmacological perturbations (e.g., growth factors, neurotransmitters, acute knockouts, inhibitors, hormones, cytokines, and metabolites) that initiate mechanistically informative intracellular transients. When a new steady state is achieved, these methods automatically reduce to classical steady state tracer kinetic analysis. © 2018 Phair. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Supercritical kinetic analysis in simplified system of fuel debris using integral kinetic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuya, Delgersaikhan; Obara, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Kinetic analysis in simplified weakly coupled fuel debris system was performed. • The integral kinetic model was used to simulate criticality accidents. • The fission power and released energy during simulated accident were obtained. • Coupling between debris regions and its effect on the fission power was obtained. - Abstract: Preliminary prompt supercritical kinetic analyses in a simplified coupled system of fuel debris designed to roughly resemble a melted core of a nuclear reactor were performed using an integral kinetic model. The integral kinetic model, which can describe region- and time-dependent fission rate in a coupled system of arbitrary geometry, was used because the fuel debris system is weakly coupled in terms of neutronics. The results revealed some important characteristics of coupled systems, such as the coupling between debris regions and the effect of the coupling on the fission rate and released energy in each debris region during the simulated criticality accident. In brief, this study showed that the integral kinetic model can be applied to supercritical kinetic analysis in fuel debris systems and also that it can be a useful tool for investigating the effect of the coupling on consequences of a supercritical accident.

  4. Kinetic analysis of the human knee joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wiczkowski

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The pathology of the calcaneal (Achilles tendon constitutes a serious therapeutical and social problem. Indeed, this tendon is the strongest plantar flexor of the foot that plays an important role in the humangait. Although well known for a long time, no explicit description of the spontaneous subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon can be found in medical or biomechanical literature. So far, neither pathomechanism nor the underlying causes of the tendon’s disruption have been fully elucidated. Many authors concentrate mostly on medical and biological aspects of the condition. The commonly held view is that it is the vascular supply to the tendon that plays a crucial role in pathogenesis of the tendon’s injuries. In fact, the vasculature a change with time and after the age of 30 is significantly reduced leading to the development of regressive alterations within as well as the decrement of the mechanical strength of the tendon. Obviously, interdisciplinary approach encompassing not only medical and biological but also the broadly taken mechanical viewpoint is needed to more comprehensively describe and explain this phenomenon. In the present paper, kinetic analysis of the knee was employed to define the trajectory of the point of initial insertion of the medial head of gastrocnemius, which was then used to determine the point’s route within the motor area extending from the flexion to the full extension of the knee. The obtained data on the trajectory are further utilized to present and define the pathomechanism of the spontaneous rupture of the calcaneal tendon.

  5. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    We have made measurements of state-to-state deactivation cross sections and radiative lifetimes for Xe*(6p,6p',7p) and Kr*(5p) states in xenon and krypton buffer gases. These results are relevant to kinetic models and both excimer lasers and the infrared xenon laser; and they are a significant improvement in the precision of the known radiative lifetimes. This type of experiment can now be compared with recent calculations of state-to-state collisional relaxation in rare-gases by Hickman, Huestis, and Saxon. We have also made significant progress in the study of the electronic spectra of small molecules of the rare gases. Spectra have been obtained for Xe 2 , Xe 3 , Xe 4 , and larger clusters. As guidance for the larger clusters of the rare gases we have obtained the first multiphoton spectra for excitons in condensed xenon. In collaboration with research on the multiphoton spectra of the rare gases, we have continued experiments using synchrotron radiation in collaboration with the University of Hamburg. In experiments there we have observed excitation and fluorescence spectra for single xenon atoms at the surface, within the second layer, and within the bulk of large argon clusters

  6. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOME EXISTING KINETIC MODELS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biosorption of three heavy metal ions namely; Zn2+, Cu2+ and Mn2+ using five microorganisms namely; Bacillus circulans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus xylosus, Streptomyces rimosus and Yeast (Saccharomyces sp.) were studied. In this paper, the effectiveness of six existing and two proposed kinetic ...

  7. comparative analysis of some existing kinetic models with proposed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IGNATIUS NWIDI

    two statistical parameters namely; linear regression coefficient of correlation (R2) and ... Keynotes: Heavy metals, Biosorption, Kinetics Models, Comparative analysis, Average Relative Error. 1. ... If the flow rate is low, a simple manual batch.

  8. 3D nozzle flow simulations including state-to-state kinetics calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrone, L.; Tuttafesta, M.; Capitelli, M.; Schettino, A.; Pascazio, G.; Colonna, G.

    2014-12-01

    In supersonic and hypersonic flows, thermal and chemical non-equilibrium is one of the fundamental aspects that must be taken into account for the accurate characterization of the plasma. In this paper, we present an optimized methodology to approach plasma numerical simulation by state-to-state kinetics calculations in a fully 3D Navier-Stokes CFD solver. Numerical simulations of an expanding flow are presented aimed at comparing the behavior of state-to-state chemical kinetics models with respect to the macroscopic thermochemical non-equilibrium models that are usually used in the numerical computation of high temperature hypersonic flows. The comparison is focused both on the differences in the numerical results and on the computational effort associated with each approach.

  9. Norepinephrine metabolism in humans. Kinetic analysis and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, O.A.; Jacquez, J.A.; Zech, L.A.; Smith, M.J.; Sanfield, J.A.; Morrow, L.A.; Rosen, S.G.; Halter, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to quantify more precisely and to begin to address the problem of heterogeneity of the kinetics of distribution and metabolism of norepinephrine (NE) in humans, by using compartmental analysis. Steady-state NE specific activity in arterialized plasma during [ 3 H]NE infusion and postinfusion plasma disappearance of [ 3 H]NE were measured in eight healthy subjects in the supine and upright positions. Two exponentials were clearly identified in the plasma [ 3 H]NE disappearance curves of each subject studied in the supine (r = 0.94-1.00, all P less than 0.01) and upright (r = 0.90-0.98, all P less than 0.01) positions. A two-compartment model was the minimal model necessary to simultaneously describe the kinetics of NE in the supine and upright positions. The NE input rate into the extravascular compartment 2, estimated with the minimal model, increased with upright posture (1.87 +/- 0.08 vs. 3.25 +/- 0.2 micrograms/min per m2, P less than 0.001). Upright posture was associated with a fall in the volume of distribution of NE in compartment 1 (7.5 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.7 +/- 0.3 liters, P less than 0.001), and as a result of that, there was a fall in the metabolic clearance rate of NE from compartment 1 (1.80 +/- 0.11 vs. 1.21 +/- 0.08 liters/min per m2, P less than 0.001). We conclude that a two-compartment model is the minimal model that can accurately describe the kinetics of distribution and metabolism of NE in humans

  10. Transient Response and Steady-State Analysis of the Anode of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Based on Dual-Site Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xing

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An intrinsic time-dependent one-dimensional (1D model and a macro two-dimensional (2D model for the anode of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC are presented. The two models are based on the dual-site mechanism, which includes the coverage of intermediate species of methanol, OH, and CO (θM, θOH,Ru, and θCO,Pt on the surface of Pt and Ru. The intrinsic 1D model focused on the analysis of the effects of operating temperature, methanol concentration, and overpotential on the transient response. The macro 2D model emphasises the dimensionless distributions of methanol concentration, overpotential and current density in the catalyst layer which were affected by physical parameters such as thickness, specific area, and operating conditions such as temperature, bulk methanol concentration, and overpotential. The models were developed and solved in the PDEs module of COMSOL Multiphysics, giving good agreement with experimental data. The dimensionless distributions of methanol concentration, overpotential, and current density and the efficiency factor were calculated quantitatively. The models can be used to give accurate simulations for the polarisations of methanol fuel cell.

  11. Kinetic analysis of dynamic PET data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knittel, B.

    1983-12-01

    Our goal is to quantify regional physiological processes such as blood flow and metabolism by means of tracer kinetic modeling and positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental models are one way of characterizing the behavior of tracers in physiological systems. This paper describes a general method of estimating compartmental model rate constants from measurements of the concentration of tracers in blood and tissue, taken at multiple time intervals. A computer program which applies the method is described, and examples are shown for simulated and actual data acquired from the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph.

  12. Kinetic analysis of dynamic PET data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knittel, B.

    1983-12-01

    Our goal is to quantify regional physiological processes such as blood flow and metabolism by means of tracer kinetic modeling and positron emission tomography (PET). Compartmental models are one way of characterizing the behavior of tracers in physiological systems. This paper describes a general method of estimating compartmental model rate constants from measurements of the concentration of tracers in blood and tissue, taken at multiple time intervals. A computer program which applies the method is described, and examples are shown for simulated and actual data acquired from the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph

  13. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebouche, C.J.; Engel, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    This study was undertaken to quantitate the dynamic parameters of carnitine metabolism in the dog. Six mongrel dogs were given intravenous injections of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine and the specific radioactivity of carnitine was followed in plasma and urine for 19-28 days. The data were analyzed by kinetic compartmental analysis. A three-compartment, open-system model [(a) extracellular fluid, (b) cardiac and skeletal muscle, (c) other tissues, particularly liver and kidney] was adopted and kinetic parameters (carnitine flux, pool sizes, kinetic constants) were derived. In four of six dogs the size of the muscle carnitine pool obtained by kinetic compartmental analysis agreed (+/- 5%) with estimates based on measurement of carnitine concentrations in different muscles. In three of six dogs carnitine excretion rates derived from kinetic compartmental analysis agreed (+/- 9%) with experimentally measured values, but in three dogs the rates by kinetic compartmental analysis were significantly higher than the corresponding rates measured directly. Appropriate chromatographic analyses revealed no radioactive metabolites in muscle or urine of any of the dogs. Turnover times for carnitine were (mean +/- SEM): 0.44 +/- 0.05 h for extracellular fluid, 232 +/- 22 h for muscle, and 7.9 +/- 1.1 h for other tissues. The estimated flux of carnitine in muscle was 210 pmol/min/g of tissue. Whole-body turnover time for carnitine was 62.9 +/- 5.6 days (mean +/- SEM). Estimated carnitine biosynthesis ranged from 2.9 to 28 mumol/kg body wt/day. Results of this study indicate that kinetic compartmental analysis may be applicable to study of human carnitine metabolism

  14. Analysis of a kinetic multi-segment foot model part II: kinetics and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, Dustin A; Cooney, Kevin M; Buczek, Frank L

    2012-04-01

    Kinematic multi-segment foot models have seen increased use in clinical and research settings, but the addition of kinetics has been limited and hampered by measurement limitations and modeling assumptions. In this second of two companion papers, we complete the presentation and analysis of a three segment kinetic foot model by incorporating kinetic parameters and calculating joint moments and powers. The model was tested on 17 pediatric subjects (ages 7-18 years) during normal gait. Ground reaction forces were measured using two adjacent force platforms, requiring targeted walking and the creation of two sub-models to analyze ankle, midtarsal, and 1st metatarsophalangeal joints. Targeted walking resulted in only minimal kinematic and kinetic differences compared with walking at self selected speeds. Joint moments and powers were calculated and ensemble averages are presented as a normative database for comparison purposes. Ankle joint powers are shown to be overestimated when using a traditional single-segment foot model, as substantial angular velocities are attributed to the mid-tarsal joint. Power transfer is apparent between the 1st metatarsophalangeal and mid-tarsal joints in terminal stance/pre-swing. While the measurement approach presented here is limited to clinical populations with only minimal impairments, some elements of the model can also be incorporated into routine clinical gait analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-equilibrium plasma kinetics of reacting CO: an improved state to state approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; Capitelli, M.

    2017-12-01

    Non-equilibrium plasma kinetics of reacting CO for conditions typically met in microwave discharges have been developed based on the coupling of excited state kinetics and the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). Particular attention is given to the insertion in the vibrational kinetics of a complete set of electron molecule resonant processes linking the whole vibrational ladder of the CO molecule, as well as to the role of Boudouard reaction, i.e. the process of forming CO2 by two vibrationally excited CO molecules, in shaping the vibrational distribution of CO and promoting reaction channels assisted by vibrational excitation (pure vibrational mechanisms, PVM). PVM mechanisms can become competitive with electron impact dissociation processes (DEM) in the activation of CO. A case study reproducing the conditions of a microwave discharge has been considered following the coupled kinetics also in the post discharge conditions. Results include the evolution of EEDF in discharge and post discharge conditions highlighting the role of superelastic vibrational and electronic collisions in shaping the EEDF. Moreover, PVM rate coefficients and DEM ones are studied as a function of gas temperature, showing a non-Arrhenius behavior, i.e. the rate coefficients increase with decreasing gas temperature as a result of a vibrational-vibrational (V-V) pumping up mechanism able to form plateaux in the vibrational distribution function. The accuracy of the results is discussed in particular in connection to the present knowledge of the activation energy of the Boudouard process.

  16. Friction analysis of kinetic schemes : the friction coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.

    1995-01-01

    Friction analysis is proposed as the application of general control analysis to single enzymes to describe the control of elementary kinetic steps on the overall catalytic rate. For each transition, a friction coefficient is defined that measures the sensitivity of the turnover rate to the free

  17. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  18. Pre-steady-state Kinetics for Hydrolysis of Insoluble Cellulose by Cellobiohydrolase Cel7A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Olsen, Jens Elmerdahl; Præstgaard, Eigil

    2012-01-01

    The transient kinetic behavior of enzyme reactions prior to the establishment of steady state is a major source of mechanistic information, yet this approach has not been utilized for cellulases acting on their natural substrate, insoluble cellulose. Here, we elucidate the pre-steady-state regime...... for the exo-acting cellulase Cel7A using amperometric biosensors and an explicit model for processive hydrolysis of cellulose. This analysis allows the identification of a pseudo-steady-state period and quantification of a processivity number as well as rate constants for the formation of a threaded enzyme...... to unveil fundamental reasons for the distinctive variability in hydrolytic activity found in different cellulase-substrate systems....

  19. ANALYSIS OF KINETICS OF CAST IRON ALLOYING THROUGH SLAG PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of cast iron alloying through slag phase due to use of nickel and copper oxides is considered and the analysis of kinetics regularity of alloying in case of absence of fuse in the form of milled cast-iron chips in slag and at their presence in it is carried out.

  20. Kinetic analysis of sub-prompt-critical reactor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.

    1992-01-01

    Neutronic analysis of safety-related kinetics problems in experimental neutron multiplying assemblies has been carried out using a sub-prompt-critical reactor model. The model is based on the concept of a sub-prompt-critical nuclear reactor and the concept of instantaneous neutron multiplication in a reactor system. Computations of reactor power, period and reactivity using the model show excellent agreement with results obtained from exact kinetics method. Analytic expressions for the energy released in a controlled nuclear power excursion are derived. Application of the model to a Pulsed Fast Reactor gives its sensitivity between 4 and 5. (author). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Modelling fungal solid-state fermentation: The role of inactivation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.P.; Sonsbeek, H.M. van; Knol, W.; Tramper, J.; Geelhoed, W.; Peeters, M.; Rinzema, A.

    1999-01-01

    The theoretical mathematical models described in this paper are used to evaluate the effects of fungal biomass inactivation kinetics on a non- isothermal tray solid-state fermentation (SSF). The inactivation kinetics, derived from previously reported experiments done under isothermal conditions and

  2. A tool model for predicting atmospheric kinetics with sensitivity analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A package( a tool model) for program of predicting atmospheric chemical kinetics with sensitivity analysis is presented. The new direct method of calculating the first order sensitivity coefficients using sparse matrix technology to chemical kinetics is included in the tool model, it is only necessary to triangularize the matrix related to the Jacobian matrix of the model equation. The Gear type procedure is used to integrate amodel equation and its coupled auxiliary sensitivity coefficient equations. The FORTRAN subroutines of the model equation, the sensitivity coefficient equations, and their Jacobian analytical expressions are generated automatically from a chemical mechanism. The kinetic representation for the model equation and its sensitivity coefficient equations, and their Jacobian matrix is presented. Various FORTRAN subroutines in packages, such as SLODE, modified MA28, Gear package, with which the program runs in conjunction are recommended.The photo-oxidation of dimethyl disulfide is used for illustration.

  3. Oxidation Kinetics of Copper: An Experiment in Solid State Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisuzaki, Y.; Sanborn, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics in metals and the role defects play in diffusion-controlled reactions are discussed as background for a junior/senior-level experiment in the physical or inorganic chemistry laboratory. Procedures used and typical data obtained are provided for the experiment. (JN)

  4. Laser excitation kinetic phosphorimetry for uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1983-02-01

    Laser induced phosphorescence with time resolved photon counting detection has been used to measure uranium, as uranyl phosphate, in aqueous solution at room temperature. Demonstrated detection limits are below 10 parts per trillion. Multichannel scaler (MCS) photon counting is used for the rejection of laser and raman scattering, discrimination against prompt fluorescing species such as organics, and to provide a simultaneous determination of the uranyl emission lifetime. The lifetime is then used as a direct (photophysically correct) instrumental correction for matrix quenching and temperature effects. The MCS counting mode also allows rapid measurements (a few seconds at the ppb level, 5 minutes for pptr). Sample volumes of 2 to 3 ml have been used although 1/2 ml would be sufficient. The method has been used for: (1) evaluating uranium contamination in ultrapure solvents and trace analytical procedures, in the low part per trillion range, (2) directly measuring (without chemical pretreatment or separation) urine samples at the 10 ppb level, (3) direct measurements on drinking and ground waters at the sub ppb level, and (4) using oxidative digestion as the only preparation, both urine and brine waters have been measured at the sub ppb level. For the brine water analysis the determined value (0.36 ppb) agreed within 10% of the number determined by U-233 tracer - iron hydroxide coprecipitation - filament source mass spectrometric analysis

  5. The spatial kinetic analysis of accelerator-driven subcritical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.; An, Y.; Chen, X.

    1998-02-01

    The operation of the accelerator driven reactor with subcritical condition provides a more flexible choice of the reactor materials and of design parameters. A deep subcriticality is chosen sometime from the analysis of point kinetics. When a large reactor is operated in deep subcritical condition by using a localized spallation source, the power distribution has strong spatial dependence, and point kinetics does not provide proper analysis for reactor safety. In order to analyze the spatial and energy dependent kinetic behavior in the subcritical reactor, the authors developed a computation code which is composed of two parts, the first one is for creating the group cross section and the second part solves the multi-group kinetic diffusion equations. The reactor parameters such as the cross section of fission, scattering, and energy transfer among the several energy groups and regions are calculated by using a code modified from the Monte Carlo codes MCNPA and LAHET instead of the usual analytical method of ANISN, TWOTRAN codes. Thus the complicated geometry of the accelerator driven reactor core can be precisely taken into account. The authors analyzed the subcritical minor actinide transmutor studied by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using the code

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of amorphous and liquid states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granato, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The magnitude and temperature dependence of the liquid state shear modulus G, specific heat C p , diffusivity D, and viscosity η should all be closely related, according to the interstitialcy model, if a recent proposal by Dyre et al. is generally true. They suppose that the viscosity is given by η = η 0 exp (F/kT), where η 0 is a reference viscosity and F is given by the work required to shove aside neighboring particle in a diffusion process, where F = GV c and V c is a characteristic volume. In the interstitialcy model the high frequency thermodynamic liquid state shear modulus is given by G(T) = G 0 exp [-γ(T/T 0 - 1)], where G 0 is the shear modulus at a reference temperature T 0 , which can be taken as the glass temperature. The resulting non-Arrhenius behavior of the viscosity is compared with experimental data. A critical quantitative analysis for a Zr 41.2 Ti 13.8 Cu 12.5 Ni 10 Be 225 alloy does not support the shoving model, but the thermodynamic properties can be understood in terms of mixed interstitials composed of metal-beryllium complexes

  7. Characterization of nicotinamidases: steady state kinetic parameters, classwide inhibition by nicotinaldehydes, and catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jarrod B; Cen, Yana; Vrablik, Tracy L; Xu, Ping; Allen, Eleanor; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Sauve, Anthony A

    2010-12-14

    Nicotinamidases are metabolic enzymes that hydrolyze nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are widely distributed across biology, with examples found encoded in the genomes of Mycobacteria, Archaea, Eubacteria, Protozoa, yeast, and invertebrates, but there are none found in mammals. Although recent structural work has improved our understanding of these enzymes, their catalytic mechanism is still not well understood. Recent data show that nicotinamidases are required for the growth and virulence of several pathogenic microbes. The enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans regulate life span in their respective organisms, consistent with proposed roles in the regulation of NAD(+) metabolism and organismal aging. In this work, the steady state kinetic parameters of nicotinamidase enzymes from C. elegans, Sa. cerevisiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae (a pathogen responsible for human pneumonia), Borrelia burgdorferi (the pathogen that causes Lyme disease), and Plasmodium falciparum (responsible for most human malaria) are reported. Nicotinamidases are generally efficient catalysts with steady state k(cat) values typically exceeding 1 s(-1). The K(m) values for nicotinamide are low and in the range of 2 -110 μM. Nicotinaldehyde was determined to be a potent competitive inhibitor of these enzymes, binding in the low micromolar to low nanomolar range for all nicotinamidases tested. A variety of nicotinaldehyde derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors in kinetic assays. Inhibitions are consistent with reaction of the universally conserved catalytic Cys on each enzyme with the aldehyde carbonyl carbon to form a thiohemiacetal complex that is stabilized by a conserved oxyanion hole. The S. pneumoniae nicotinamidase can catalyze exchange of (18)O into the carboxy oxygens of nicotinic acid with H(2)(18)O. The collected data, along with kinetic analysis of several mutants, allowed us to propose a catalytic

  8. Determination of Model Kinetics for Forced Unsteady State Operation of Catalytic CH4 Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effendy Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic oxidation of methane for abating the emission vented from coal mine or natural gas transportation has been known as most reliable method. A reverse flow reactor operation has been widely used to oxidize this methane emission due to its capability for autothermal operation and heat production. The design of the reverse flow reactor requires a proper kinetic rate expression, which should be developed based on the operating condition. The kinetic rate obtained in the steady state condition cannot be applied for designing the reactor operated under unsteady state condition. Therefore, new approach to develop the dynamic kinetic rate expression becomes indispensable, particularly for periodic operation such as reverse flow reactor. This paper presents a novel method to develop the kinetic rate expression applied for unsteady state operation. The model reaction of the catalytic methane oxidation over Pt/-Al2O3 catalyst was used with kinetic parameter determined from laboratory experiments. The reactor used was a fixed bed, once-through operation, with a composition modulation in the feed gas. The switching time was set at 3 min by varying the feed concentration, feed flow rate, and reaction temperature. The concentrations of methane in the feed and product were measured and analysed using gas chromatography. The steady state condition for obtaining the kinetic rate expression was taken as a base case and as a way to judge its appropriateness to be applied for dynamic system. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction rate model was developed. The time period during one cycle was divided into some segments, depending on the ratio of CH4/O2. The experimental result shows that there were kinetic regimes occur during one cycle: kinetic regime controlled by intrinsic surface reaction and kinetic regime controlled by external diffusion. The kinetic rate obtained in the steady state operation was not appropriate when applied for unsteady state operation

  9. Relativistic quantum kinetic analysis of a pion--nucleon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    A relativistic plasma of nucleons interacting through pions via the usual isospin-invariant Yukawa coupling is analyzed in the framework of the covariant Wigner function technique. The method is manifestly covariant and the temperature effects are considered. The relativistic quantum BBGKY hierarchy for the pion--nucleon system is derived. By generalizing the Bogolioubov analysis of the classical BBGKY hierarchy a non-perturbative renormalizable method is elaborated which allows the solution of the kinetic problem in form of power series of two cluster parameters which measure the importance of correlations. In the lowest order of the cluster expansion (Hartree approximation of zero-order approximation) the quasi-nucleon Fock space is introduced, the fermion Wigner function in the thermodynamic equilibrium is obtained and the vacuum effects are renormalized. In this approximation the plasma behaves as a perfect Fermi gas of nucleons and antinucleons, but there exists an abnormal configuration with a uniform pion condensate which is unstable. In the next approximation (quadratic in the small parameters) the quasi-pion dispersion relation is obtained and the vacuum polarization tensor is renormalized. The quasi-pion rest-mass spectra (''plasma frequency'') and the effective-coupling behaviour as functions of the thermodynamic state are given. By estimating the size of the cluster parameters the self-consistency of the approximation scheme is proved. The quasi-pion Fock space is introduced and the quasi-pion equilibrium Wigner function is obtained. From these results the problem of the higher-order corrections to the Hartree thermodynamics is outlined

  10. Radioimmunoassay for phencyclidine: application to kinetic analysis in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.P.; Trevor, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    We report the development of a radioimmunoassay for phencyclidine (PCP) that is simple, rapid and sensitive to 0.5 ng/ml. Antibodies were raised in rabbits against the hapten, N-succinyl-3-aminophencyclidine. These antibodies proved to be very specific for PCP and exhibited less than 4% cross reactivity with the drug's two major metabolites. The assay was used for kinetic analysis of PCP in the rat following subcutaneous injection of 5 mg/kg of the drug. Serum and brain tissues were analyzed for PCP and the respective half lives were calculated to be 36 and 29 min for the α phase and 130 and 121 min for the β phase. The accuracy of the method was verified by concomitant assay of a number of kinetic samples by gas chromatography employing a nitrogen-phosphorus detector

  11. Maximizing kinetic performance in supercritical fluid chromatography using state-of-the-art instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand-Guillaume Perrenoud, Alexandre; Hamman, Chris; Goel, Meenakshi; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy; Fekete, Szabolcs

    2013-11-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), due to the introduction of state-of-the-art instruments and dedicated columns packed with small particles. However, the achievable kinetic performance and practical possibilities of such modern SFC instruments and columns has not been described in details until now. The goal of the present contribution was to provide some information about the optimal column dimensions (i.e. length, diameter and particle size) suitable for such state-of the-art systems, with respect to extra-column band broadening and system upper pressure limit. In addition, the reliability of the kinetic plot methodology, successfully applied in RPLC, was also evaluated under SFC conditions. Taking into account the system variance, measured at ∼85μL(2), on modern SFC instruments, a column of 3mm I.D. was ideally suited for the current technology, as the loss in efficiency remained reasonable (i.e. less than 10% decrease for k>6). Conversely, these systems struggle with 2.1mm I.D. columns (55% loss in N for k=5). Regarding particle size, columns packed with 5μm particles provided unexpectedly high minimum reduced plate height values (hmin=3.0-3.4), while the 3.5 and 1.7μm packing provided lower reduced plate heights hmin=2.2-2.4 and hmin=2.7-3.2, respectively. Considering the system upper pressure limit, it appears that columns packed with 1.7μm particles give the lowest analysis time for efficiencies up to 40,000-60,000 plates, if the mobile phase composition is in the range of 2-19% MeOH. The 3.5μm particles were attractive for higher efficiencies, particularly when the modifier percentage was above 20%, while 5μm was never kinetically relevant with modern SFC instruments, due to an obvious limitation in terms of upper flow rate value. The present work also confirms that the kinetic plot methodology could be successfully applied to SFC, without the need for isopycnic measurements, as the difference

  12. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XVI. Kinetic Relationships of the Intermediates in Steady State Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, A. A.; Kawaguchi, S.; Hayes, P.; Calvin, M.

    1952-06-05

    A kinetic study of the accumulation of C{sup 14} in the intermediates of steady state photosynthesis in C{sup 14}O{sub 2} provides information regarding the sequence of reactions involved. The work described applied the radio-chromatographic technique for analysis of the labeled early products. The simultaneous carboxylation reaction resulting in malic acid as well as phosphoglycerate is demonstrated in experiments at high light intensity. A comparison of radioactivities in a number of phosphorylated sugars as a function of time reveals concurrent synthesis of fructose and sedoheptulose phosphates followed by that of ribulose phosphates and later by that of glucose phosphates. The possibility that the cleavage of C{sub 4} compounds to C{sub 2} carbon dioxide acceptors may involve C{sub 7} and C{sub 5} sugars and evidence for this mechanism is presented.

  13. Kinetics studies following state-selective laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this contract was the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions relevant to the excited state chemistry observed in discharges. We studied deactivation reactions and excitation transfer in collisions of excited states of xenon and krypton atoms with Ar, Kr, Xe and chlorine. The reactant states were excited selectively in two-photon transitions using tunable u.v. and v.u.v. lasers. Excited states produced by the collision were observed by their fluorescence. Reaction rates were measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measured interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra were obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. Our research then required several categories of experiments in order to fully understand a reaction process: 1. High resolution laser spectroscopy of bound molecules or lineshapes of colliding pairs is used to determine potential curves for reactants. 2. Direct measurements of state-to-state reaction rates were measured by studying the time dependent loss of excited reactants and the time dependent formation of products. 3. The energy selectivity of a laser can be used to excite reactants on an excited surface with controlled internuclear configurations. For free states of reactants (as exist in a gas cell) this has been termed laser assisted reactions, while for initially bound states (as chemically bound reactants or dimers formed in supersonic beams) the experiments have been termed photo-fragmentation spectroscopy

  14. Kinetic Energy of Tornadoes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, Tyler; Elsner, James B

    2015-01-01

    Tornadoes can cause catastrophic destruction. Here total kinetic energy (TKE) as a metric of destruction is computed from the fraction of the tornado path experiencing various damage levels and a characteristic wind speed for each level. The fraction of the path is obtained from a model developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that combines theory with empirical data. TKE is validated as a useful metric by comparing it to other indexes and loss indicators. Half of all tornadoes have TKE exceeding 62.1 GJ and a quarter have TKE exceeding 383.2 GJ. One percent of the tornadoes have TKE exceeding 31.9 TJ. April has more energy than May with fewer tornadoes; March has more energy than June with half as many tornadoes. September has the least energy but November and December have the fewest tornadoes. Alabama ranks number one in terms of tornado energy with 2.48 PJ over the period 2007-2013. TKE can be used to help better understand the changing nature of tornado activity.

  15. Kinetic Energy of Tornadoes in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Fricker

    Full Text Available Tornadoes can cause catastrophic destruction. Here total kinetic energy (TKE as a metric of destruction is computed from the fraction of the tornado path experiencing various damage levels and a characteristic wind speed for each level. The fraction of the path is obtained from a model developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that combines theory with empirical data. TKE is validated as a useful metric by comparing it to other indexes and loss indicators. Half of all tornadoes have TKE exceeding 62.1 GJ and a quarter have TKE exceeding 383.2 GJ. One percent of the tornadoes have TKE exceeding 31.9 TJ. April has more energy than May with fewer tornadoes; March has more energy than June with half as many tornadoes. September has the least energy but November and December have the fewest tornadoes. Alabama ranks number one in terms of tornado energy with 2.48 PJ over the period 2007-2013. TKE can be used to help better understand the changing nature of tornado activity.

  16. Fluorescence lifetime components reveal kinetic intermediate states upon equilibrium denaturation of carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtseva, Elena V; Lashchuk, Olesya O; Gerasimova, Marina A; Melnik, Tatiana N; Nagibina, Galina S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2017-12-21

    In most cases, intermediate states of multistage folding proteins are not 'visible' under equilibrium conditions but are revealed in kinetic experiments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used in equilibrium denaturation studies. The technique allows for detecting changes in the conformation and environment of tryptophan residues in different structural elements of carbonic anhydrase II which in its turn has made it possible to study the intermediate states of carbonic anhydrase II under equilibrium conditions. The results of equilibrium and kinetic experiments using wild-type bovine carbonic anhydrase II and its mutant form with the substitution of leucine for alanine at position 139 (L139A) were compared. The obtained lifetime components of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence allowed for revealing that, the same as in kinetic experiments, under equilibrium conditions the unfolding of carbonic anhydrase II ensues through formation of intermediate states.

  17. Initial state dependence of nonlinear kinetic equations: The classical electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, M.C.; Cohen, E.G.D.; Dorfman, J.R.; Kirkpatrick, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    The method of nonequilibrium cluster expansion is used to study the decay to equilibrium of a weakly coupled inhomogeneous electron gas prepared in a local equilibrium state at the initial time, t=0. A nonlinear kinetic equation describing the long time behavior of the one-particle distribution function is obtained. For consistency, initial correlations have to be taken into account. The resulting kinetic equation-differs from that obtained when the initial state of the system is assumed to be factorized in a product of one-particle functions. The question of to what extent correlations in the initial state play an essential role in determining the form of the kinetic equation at long times is discussed. To that end, the present calculations are compared wih results obtained before for hard sphere gases and in general with strong short-range forces. A partial answer is proposed and some open questions are indicated

  18. Solid KHT tumor dispersal for flow cytometric cell kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallavicini, M.G.; Folstad, L.J.; Dunbar, C.

    1981-01-01

    A bacterial neutral protease was used to disperse KHT solid tumors into single cell suspensions suitable for routine cell kinetic analysis by flow cytometry and for clonogenic cell survival. Neutral protease disaggregation under conditions which would be suitable for routine tumor dispersal was compared with a trypsin/DNase procedure. Cell yield, clonogenic cell survival, DNA distributions of untreated and drug-perturbed tumors, rates of radioactive precursor incorporation during the cell cycle, and preferential cell cycle phase-specific cell loss were investigated. Tumors dispersed with neutral protease yielded approximately four times more cells than those dispersed with trypsin/DNase and approximately a 1.5-fold higher plating efficiency in a semisolid agar system. Quantitative analysis of DNA distributions obtained from untreated and cytosine-arabinoside-perturbed tumors produced similar results with both dispersal procedures. The rates of incorporation of tritiated thymidine during the cell cycle were also similar with neutral protease and trypsin/DNase dispersal. Preferential phase-specific cell loss was not obseved with either technique. We find that neutral protease provides good single cell suspensions of the KHT tumor for cell survival measurements and for cell kinetic analysis of drug-induced perturbations by flow cytometry. In addition, the high cell yields facilitate electronic cell sorting where large numbers of cells are often required

  19. Comparison of kinetic and fluid neutral models for attached and detached state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furubayashi, M.; Hoshino, K.; Toma, M.; Hatayama, A.; Coster, D.; Schneider, R.; Bonnin, X.; Kawashima, H.; Asakura, N.; Suzuki, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Neutral behavior has an important role in the transport simulations of the edge plasma. Most of the edge plasma transport codes treat neutral particles by a simple fluid model or a kinetic model. The fluid model allows faster calculations. However, the applicability of the fluid model is limited. In this study, simulation results of JT-60U from kinetic neutral model and fluid neutral model are compared under the attached and detached state, using the 2D edge plasma code package, SOLPS5.0. In the SOL region, no significant differences are observed in the upstream plasma profiles between kinetic and fluid neutral models. However, in the divertor region, large differences are observed in plasma and neutral profiles. Therefore, further optimization of the fluid neutral model should be performed. Otherwise kinetic neutral model should be used to analyze the divertor region.

  20. State switching kinetics for quasi-one-dimensional nanosystems: Effects of Finite length and irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petukhov, B. V., E-mail: petukhov@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics,” (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The state switching in an extended quasi-one-dimensional material is modeled by the stochastic formation of local new-state nuclei and their subsequent growth along the system axis. An analytical approach is developed to describe the influence of defects, dividing a sample into an ensemble of finite-length segments, on its state switching kinetics. As applied to magnetic systems, the method makes it possible to calculate magnetization curves for different defect concentrations and parameters of material.

  1. A method for estimation of elasticities in metabolic networks using steady state and dynamic metabolomics data and linlog kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Gulik Walter M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic modeling of metabolic reaction networks under in vivo conditions is a crucial step in order to obtain a better understanding of the (disfunctioning of living cells. So far dynamic metabolic models generally have been based on mechanistic rate equations which often contain so many parameters that their identifiability from experimental data forms a serious problem. Recently, approximative rate equations, based on the linear logarithmic (linlog format have been proposed as a suitable alternative with fewer parameters. Results In this paper we present a method for estimation of the kinetic model parameters, which are equal to the elasticities defined in Metabolic Control Analysis, from metabolite data obtained from dynamic as well as steady state perturbations, using the linlog kinetic format. Additionally, we address the question of parameter identifiability from dynamic perturbation data in the presence of noise. The method is illustrated using metabolite data generated with a dynamic model of the glycolytic pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on mechanistic rate equations. Elasticities are estimated from the generated data, which define the complete linlog kinetic model of the glycolysis. The effect of data noise on the accuracy of the estimated elasticities is presented. Finally, identifiable subset of parameters is determined using information on the standard deviations of the estimated elasticities through Monte Carlo (MC simulations. Conclusion The parameter estimation within the linlog kinetic framework as presented here allows the determination of the elasticities directly from experimental data from typical dynamic and/or steady state experiments. These elasticities allow the reconstruction of the full kinetic model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the determination of the control coefficients. MC simulations revealed that certain elasticities are potentially unidentifiable from dynamic data only

  2. Evaluation of kinetic phosphorescence analysis for the determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croatto, P.V.; Frank, I.W.; Johnson, K.D.; Mason, P.B.; Smith, M.M.

    1997-12-01

    In the past, New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has used a fluorometric method for the determination of sub-microgram quantities of uranium. In its continuing effort to upgrade and improve measurement technology, NBL has evaluated the commercially-available KPA-11 kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (Chemchek, Richland, WA). The Chemchek KPA-11 is a bench-top instrument which performs single-measurement, quench-corrected analyses for trace uranium. It incorporates patented kinetic phosphorimetry techniques to measure and analyze sample phosphorescence as a function of time. With laser excitation and time-corrected photon counting, the KPA-11 has a lower detection limit than conventional fluorometric methods. Operated with a personal computer, the state-of-the-art KPA-11 offers extensive time resolution and phosphorescence lifetime capabilities for additional specificity. Interferences are thereby avoided while obtaining precise measurements. Routine analyses can be easily and effectively accomplished, with the accuracy and precision equivalent to the pulsed-laser fluorometric method presently performed at NBL, without the need for internal standards. Applications of kinetic phosphorimetry at NBL include the measurement of trace level uranium in retention tank, waste samples, and low-level samples. It has also been used to support other experimental activities at NBL by the measuring of nanogram amounts of uranium contamination (in blanks) in isotopic sample preparations, and the determining of elution curves of different ion exchange resins used for uranium purification. In many cases, no pretreatment of samples was necessary except to fume them with nitric acid, and then to redissolve and dilute them to an appropriate concentration with 1 M HNO 3 before measurement. Concentrations were determined on a mass basis (microg U/g of solution), but no density corrections were needed since all the samples (including the samples used for calibration) were in the same density

  3. Reaction diffusion and solid state chemical kinetics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dybkov, V I

    2010-01-01

    This monograph deals with a physico-chemical approach to the problem of the solid-state growth of chemical compound layers and reaction-diffusion in binary heterogeneous systems formed by two solids; as well as a solid with a liquid or a gas. It is explained why the number of compound layers growing at the interface between the original phases is usually much lower than the number of chemical compounds in the phase diagram of a given binary system. For example, of the eight intermetallic compounds which exist in the aluminium-zirconium binary system, only ZrAl3 was found to grow as a separate

  4. Some Considerations on the Fundamentals of Chemical Kinetics: Steady State, Quasi-Equilibrium, and Transition State Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F.

    2017-01-01

    The elementary reaction sequence A ? I ? Products is the simplest mechanism for which the steady-state and quasi-equilibrium kinetic approximations can be applied. The exact integrated solutions for this chemical system allow inferring the conditions that must fulfill the rate constants for the different approximations to hold. A graphical…

  5. Tunable submillimeter sources applied to the excited state rotational spectroscopy and kinetics of CH3F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberg, W.A.M.; Fetterman, H.R.; Peck, D.D.; Goldsmith, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Tunable submillimeter radiation, generated and detected using optically pumped lasers and Schottky diode mixers, has been used in an infrared-submillimeter double resonance investigation of CH 3 F. This technique permits the direct observation of the molecular rotational spectra and kinetics of excited vibrational states and is particularly important for those molecules which are candidates for optically pumped submillimeter lasers

  6. Comparative analysis of solution methods of the punctual kinetic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez S, A.

    2003-01-01

    The following one written it presents a comparative analysis among different analytical solutions for the punctual kinetics equation, which present two variables of interest: a) the temporary behavior of the neutronic population, and b) The temporary behavior of the different groups of precursors of delayed neutrons. The first solution is based on a method that solves the transfer function of the differential equation for the neutronic population, in which intends to obtain the different poles that give the stability of this transfer function. In this section it is demonstrated that the temporary variation of the reactivity of the system can be managed as it is required, since the integration time for this method doesn't affect the result. However, the second solution is based on an iterative method like that of Runge-Kutta or the Euler method where the algorithm was only used to solve first order differential equations giving this way solution to each differential equation that conforms the equations of punctual kinetics. In this section it is demonstrated that only it can obtain a correct temporary behavior of the neutronic population when it is integrated on an interval of very short time, forcing to the temporary variation of the reactivity to change very quick way without one has some control about the time. In both methods the same change is used so much in the reactivity of the system like in the integration times, giving validity to the results graph the one the temporary behavior of the neutronic population vs. time. (Author)

  7. Kinetics of devolatilisation of forestry wastes from thermogravimetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapuerta, M.; Hernandez, J.J. [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad real (Spain). Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales; Rodriguez, J.J. [Repsol-YPF, Puertollano (Spain). Chemical Department

    2004-10-01

    The great potential of Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) wastes in the middle regions of Spain has motivated an increasing interest about the energy use of this material, either through combustion or gasification processes. Samples of these biomass wastes have been analysed by thermogravimetry under both inert and oxidant atmospheres, from room temperature up to 1100 K, at different heating rates: 10, 30, 40, 50 and 60 K min{sup -1}. An estimation of the proximate analysis of the samples was made from combination of both resulting weight loss curves. The devolatilisation process of the samples was divided into three non-interacting mass-loss events described as parallel first-order reactions, being the first event identified as the moisture loss process, the second one as the hemicellulose and cellulose decomposition process and the third one as that of lignin decomposition. A fitting algorithm to obtain the kinetic parameters permitted a good agreement with experimental results, as well as a good discrimination of the effect of the heating rate. Due to the non-homogeneous nature of the tested samples, the use of other conventional methods for obtaining the kinetic parameters has been proved to be inadequate. (author)

  8. Kinetic analysis of pulsed laser induced phosphorescence for uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdeiro, Nelida H.

    2003-01-01

    The laser induced kinetic phosphorescence allows the uranium determination in different kind of matrices, with a lower detection limit than those reached by other spectroscopic methods. It involves the uranyl ions excitation by a pulsed dye-laser source, followed by temporal resolution of the phosphorescence. This method is used for the determination of trace quantities of uranium in aqueous solution, with a suitable complexant agent, without chemical separation before the analysis. The objective of this paper is to present the results of uranium determinations in different standard samples, water, soil, filter and urine, and a comparison with other methods such as fluorimetry, alpha spectrometry and mass spectrometry. Moreover, the measurement conditions, the advantages and disadvantages, the sample preparation, the interferences and the detection limit are described. (author)

  9. Piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor for ricin detection and kinetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Wei Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, there has been no report on target molecules detection by a piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor. In order to evaluate the test performance and investigate the response dynamic characteristics of a piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor, a novel method for ricin detection and kinetic analysis based on a piezoresistive microcantilever aptasensor was proposed, where ricin aptamer was immobilised on the microcantilever surface by biotin-avidin binding system. Results showed that the detection limit of ricin was 0.04μg L−1 (S/N ≥ 3. A linear relationship between the response voltage and the concentration of ricin in the range of 0.2μg L−1-40μg L−1 was obtained, with the linear regression equation of ΔUe = 0.904C + 5.852 (n = 5, R = 0.991, p < 0.001. The sensor showed no response for abrin, BSA, and could overcome the influence of complex environmental disruptors, indicating high specificity and good selectivity. Recovery and reproducibility in the result of simulated samples (simulated water, soil, and flour sample determination met the analysis requirements, which was 90.5∼95.5% and 7.85%∼9.39%, respectively. On this basis, a reaction kinetic model based on ligand-receptor binding and the relationship with response voltage was established. The model could well reflect the dynamic response of the sensor. The correlation coefficient (R was greater than or equal to 0.9456 (p < 0.001. Response voltage (ΔUe and response time (t0 obtained from the fitting equation on different concentrations of ricin fitted well with the measured values.

  10. Analysis of Network Topologies Underlying Ethylene Growth Response Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Aaron M; McCollough, Forest W; Eldreth, Bryan L; Binder, Brad M; Abel, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Most models for ethylene signaling involve a linear pathway. However, measurements of seedling growth kinetics when ethylene is applied and removed have resulted in more complex network models that include coherent feedforward, negative feedback, and positive feedback motifs. The dynamical responses of the proposed networks have not been explored in a quantitative manner. Here, we explore (i) whether any of the proposed models are capable of producing growth-response behaviors consistent with experimental observations and (ii) what mechanistic roles various parts of the network topologies play in ethylene signaling. To address this, we used computational methods to explore two general network topologies: The first contains a coherent feedforward loop that inhibits growth and a negative feedback from growth onto itself (CFF/NFB). In the second, ethylene promotes the cleavage of EIN2, with the product of the cleavage inhibiting growth and promoting the production of EIN2 through a positive feedback loop (PFB). Since few network parameters for ethylene signaling are known in detail, we used an evolutionary algorithm to explore sets of parameters that produce behaviors similar to experimental growth response kinetics of both wildtype and mutant seedlings. We generated a library of parameter sets by independently running the evolutionary algorithm many times. Both network topologies produce behavior consistent with experimental observations, and analysis of the parameter sets allows us to identify important network interactions and parameter constraints. We additionally screened these parameter sets for growth recovery in the presence of sub-saturating ethylene doses, which is an experimentally-observed property that emerges in some of the evolved parameter sets. Finally, we probed simplified networks maintaining key features of the CFF/NFB and PFB topologies. From this, we verified observations drawn from the larger networks about mechanisms underlying ethylene

  11. Analysis of Network Topologies Underlying Ethylene Growth Response Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M. Prescott

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most models for ethylene signaling involve a linear pathway. However, measurements of seedling growth kinetics when ethylene is applied and removed have resulted in more complex network models that include coherent feedforward, negative feedback, and positive feedback motifs. However, the dynamical responses of the proposed networks have not been explored in a quantitative manner. Here, we explore (i whether any of the proposed models are capable of producing growth-response behaviors consistent with experimental observations and (ii what mechanistic roles various parts of the network topologies play in ethylene signaling. To address this, we used computational methods to explore two general network topologies: The first contains a coherent feedforward loop that inhibits growth and a negative feedback from growth onto itself (CFF/NFB. In the second, ethylene promotes the cleavage of EIN2, with the product of the cleavage inhibiting growth and promoting the production of EIN2 through a positive feedback loop (PFB. Since few network parameters for ethylene signaling are known in detail, we used an evolutionary algorithm to explore sets of parameters that produce behaviors similar to experimental growth response kinetics of both wildtype and mutant seedlings. We generated a library of parameter sets by independently running the evolutionary algorithm many times. Both network topologies produce behavior consistent with experimental observations and analysis of the parameter sets allows us to identify important network interactions and parameter constraints. We additionally screened these parameter sets for growth recovery in the presence of sub-saturating ethylene doses, which is an experimentally-observed property that emerges in some of the evolved parameter sets. Finally, we probed simplified networks maintaining key features of the CFF/NFB and PFB topologies. From this, we verified observations drawn from the larger networks about mechanisms

  12. Kinetic analysis of overlapping multistep thermal decomposition comprising exothermic and endothermic processes: thermolysis of ammonium dinitramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muravyev, Nikita V; Koga, Nobuyoshi; Meerov, Dmitry B; Pivkina, Alla N

    2017-01-25

    This study focused on kinetic modeling of a specific type of multistep heterogeneous reaction comprising exothermic and endothermic reaction steps, as exemplified by the practical kinetic analysis of the experimental kinetic curves for the thermal decomposition of molten ammonium dinitramide (ADN). It is known that the thermal decomposition of ADN occurs as a consecutive two step mass-loss process comprising the decomposition of ADN and subsequent evaporation/decomposition of in situ generated ammonium nitrate. These reaction steps provide exothermic and endothermic contributions, respectively, to the overall thermal effect. The overall reaction process was deconvoluted into two reaction steps using simultaneously recorded thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) curves by considering the different physical meanings of the kinetic data derived from TG and DSC by P value analysis. The kinetic data thus separated into exothermic and endothermic reaction steps were kinetically characterized using kinetic computation methods including isoconversional method, combined kinetic analysis, and master plot method. The overall kinetic behavior was reproduced as the sum of the kinetic equations for each reaction step considering the contributions to the rate data derived from TG and DSC. During reproduction of the kinetic behavior, the kinetic parameters and contributions of each reaction step were optimized using kinetic deconvolution analysis. As a result, the thermal decomposition of ADN was successfully modeled as partially overlapping exothermic and endothermic reaction steps. The logic of the kinetic modeling was critically examined, and the practical usefulness of phenomenological modeling for the thermal decomposition of ADN was illustrated to demonstrate the validity of the methodology and its applicability to similar complex reaction processes.

  13. Stochastic lumping analysis for linear kinetics and its application to the fluctuation relations between hierarchical kinetic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, De-Ming; Chang, Cheng-Hung [Institute of Physics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-14

    Conventional studies of biomolecular behaviors rely largely on the construction of kinetic schemes. Since the selection of these networks is not unique, a concern is raised whether and under which conditions hierarchical schemes can reveal the same experimentally measured fluctuating behaviors and unique fluctuation related physical properties. To clarify these questions, we introduce stochasticity into the traditional lumping analysis, generalize it from rate equations to chemical master equations and stochastic differential equations, and extract the fluctuation relations between kinetically and thermodynamically equivalent networks under intrinsic and extrinsic noises. The results provide a theoretical basis for the legitimate use of low-dimensional models in the studies of macromolecular fluctuations and, more generally, for exploring stochastic features in different levels of contracted networks in chemical and biological kinetic systems.

  14. Stochastic lumping analysis for linear kinetics and its application to the fluctuation relations between hierarchical kinetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, De-Ming; Chang, Cheng-Hung

    2015-05-14

    Conventional studies of biomolecular behaviors rely largely on the construction of kinetic schemes. Since the selection of these networks is not unique, a concern is raised whether and under which conditions hierarchical schemes can reveal the same experimentally measured fluctuating behaviors and unique fluctuation related physical properties. To clarify these questions, we introduce stochasticity into the traditional lumping analysis, generalize it from rate equations to chemical master equations and stochastic differential equations, and extract the fluctuation relations between kinetically and thermodynamically equivalent networks under intrinsic and extrinsic noises. The results provide a theoretical basis for the legitimate use of low-dimensional models in the studies of macromolecular fluctuations and, more generally, for exploring stochastic features in different levels of contracted networks in chemical and biological kinetic systems.

  15. Kinetic modeling of solid-state partitioning phase transformation with simultaneous misfit accommodation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Shaojie; Liu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Considering a spherical misfitting precipitate growing into a finite elastic-perfectly plastic supersaturated matrix, a kinetic modeling for such solid-state partitioning phase transformation is presented, where the interactions of interface migration, solute diffusion and misfit accommodation are analyzed. The linkage between interface migration and solute diffusion proceeds through interfacial composition and interface velocity; their effects on misfit accommodation are mainly manifested in an effective transformation strain, which depends on instantaneous composition field and precipitate size. Taking γ to α transformation of a binary Fe-0.5 at.% C alloy under both isothermal and continuous cooling conditions as examples, the effects of misfit accommodation on the coupling interface migration and solute diffusion are well evaluated and discussed. For the isothermal transformation, a counterbalancing influence between mechanical and chemical driving forces is found so that the mixed-mode transformation kinetics is not sensitive with respect to the elastic–plastic accommodation of the effective misfit strain. Different from the isothermal process, during the continuous cooling condition, the effects of misfit accommodation on the kinetics of solid-state partitioning phase transformation are mainly manifested in the great decrease of the transformation starting temperature and the thermodynamic equilibrium composition. The present kinetic modeling was applied to predict the experimentally measured γ/α transformation of Fe-0.47 at.% C alloy conducted with a cooling rate of 10 K min −1 and a good agreement was achieved.

  16. Characterization of electron states in dense plasmas and its use in atomic kinetics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.V.; Maron, Y.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a self-consistent statistical approach to account for plasma density effects in collisional-radiative kinetics. The approach is based on the characterization of three distinct types of electron states, namely, bound, collectivized, and free, and on the formalism of the effective statistical weights (ESW) of the bound states. The present approach accounts for individual and collective effects of the surrounding electrons and ions on atomic (ionic) electron states. High-accuracy expressions for the ESWs of bound states have been derived. The notions of ionization stage population, free electron density, and rate coefficient are redefined in accordance with the present characterization scheme. The modified expressions for the probabilities of electron-impact induced transitions as well as spontaneous and induced radiative transitions are then obtained. The influence of collectivized states on a dense plasma ionization composition is demonstrated to be strong. Examples of calculated ESWs and populations of ionic quantum states for steady state and transient plasmas are given

  17. Phosphorus (32 P) adsorption kinetics and equilibrium in soils of Pernambuco State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Lucivaldo Celestino.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the relationship between the P fixing capacity of various soils and their hydrous oxide content. The relationship with other soil variables was also analysed. This fixing capacity was evaluated through adsorption isotherms and isotopic exchange kinetics of 32 P in samples with high and low P concentrations. Samples from 11 soils, cultivated with sugar-cane, representing five soil classes (non-humic gley, red-yellow Podzolic, red-yellow latossolic, distrofic quartzitic sand and distrofic organic). The soils were sampled in the southern humid coastal region of the state of Pernambuco. Soil were sampled immediately after harvest of the plant-cane. The results of the basic soil chemical analysis showed that all soils had pH values in the acid range,varying from 3.87 to 6.31. Total organic C was always less than 12 mg C/g, except for the organic soil that had 75 mg C/g soil. In soils with R 1 /R 0 between 0,01 and 0,1 the proportion of resin P oscillated between 10 and 20 of the increase in total inorganic P, while in those with R 1 /R 0 > 0,1 the proportion was larger than 20% with one exception. (author). 44 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  18. Kinetic analysis of MHD ballooning modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1984-10-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the stability properties of the appropriate kinetically generalized form of MHD ballooning modes together with the usual trapped-particle drift modes is presented. The calculations are fully electromagnetic and include the complete dynamics associated with compressional ion acoustic waves. Trapped-particle effects along with all forms of collisionless dissipation are taken into account without approximations. The influence of collisions is estimated with a model Krook operator. Results from the application of this analysis to realistic tokamak operating conditions indicate that unstable short-wavelength modes with significant growth rates can extend from β = 0 to value above the upper ideal-MHD-critical-beta associated with the so-called second stability regime. Since the strength of the relevant modes appears to vary gradually with β, these results support a soft beta limit picture involving a continuous (rather than abrupt or hard) modification of anomalous transport already present in low-β-tokamaks. However, at higher beta the increasing dominance of the electromagnetic component of the perturbations indicated by these calculations could also imply significantly different transport scaling properties

  19. Application of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis to a Kinetic Model for Enzymatic Biodiesel Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Jason Anthony; Nordblad, Mathias; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the added benefits of using uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in the kinetics of enzymatic biodiesel production. For this study, a kinetic model by Fedosov and co-workers is used. For the uncertainty analysis the Monte Carlo procedure was used to statistically quantify...

  20. Kinetics of disorder-to-fcc phase transition via an intermediate bcc state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yongsheng; Nie Huifen; Bansil, Rama; Steinhart, Milos; Bang, Joona; Lodge, Timothy P.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering measurements reveal that a long-lived intermediate bcc state forms when a poly(styrene-b-isoprene) diblock copolymer solution in an isoprene selective solvent is rapidly cooled from the disordered micellar fluid at high temperature to an equilibrium fcc state. The kinetics of the epitaxial growth of the [111] fcc peak from the [110] bcc peak was obtained by fitting the scattering data to a simple model of the transformation. The growth of the [111] fcc peak agrees with the Avrami model of nucleation and growth kinetics with an exponent n=1.4, as does the initial decay of the [110] bcc peak, with an exponent n=1.3. The data were also found to be in good agreement with the Cahn model of grain boundary nucleation and growth

  1. Kinetics of photochromic processes in substituted dihydropyridines in the solid state and in solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sworakowski, J.; Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Lipinski, J.; Lewanowicz, A.; Sliwinska, E.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 356, - (2001), s. 163-173 ISSN 1058-725X. [International Conference on the Chemistry of the Organic Solid State /14./. Cambridge, 25.07.1999-30.07.1999] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1050901; GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : dihydropyridine * photochromism * reaction kinetics Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.457, year: 2001

  2. State and Kinetic Parameters Estimation of Bio-Ethanol Production with Immobilized Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaylova, Iva; Popova, Silviya; Kostov, Georgi; Ignatova, Maya; Lubenova, Velislava; Naydenova, Vessela; Pircheva, Desislava; Angelov, Mihail

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, state and kinetic parameters estimation based on extended Kalman filter (EKF) is proposed. Experimental data from alcoholic fermentation process with immobilized cells is used. The measurements of glucose and ethanol concentration are used as on-line measurements for observers design and biomass concentration is used for results verification. Biomass, substrate and product concentrations inside immobilized compounds are estimated using the proposed algorithm. Monitoring of the ...

  3. Nevada state revenues analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report analyzes the major sources of revenue to the Nevada State General Fund for purposes of estimating impacts associated with the siting of a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada. Each major revenue source is analyzed to identify relationships among the economic or demographic base, the revenue base, and the revenues generated. Trends and changes in the rates and/or base are highlighted. A model is developed for each revenue source to allow impact estimation

  4. Multi-GPU unsteady 2D flow simulation coupled with a state-to-state chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttafesta, Michele; Pascazio, Giuseppe; Colonna, Gianpiero

    2016-10-01

    In this work we are presenting a GPU version of a CFD code for high enthalpy reacting flow, using the state-to-state approach. In supersonic and hypersonic flows, thermal and chemical non-equilibrium is one of the fundamental aspects that must be taken into account for the accurate characterization of the plasma and state-to-state kinetics is the most accurate approach used for this kind of problems. This model consists in writing a continuity equation for the population of each vibrational level of the molecules in the mixture, determining at the same time the species densities and the distribution of the population in internal levels. An explicit scheme is employed here to integrate the governing equations, so as to exploit the GPU structure and obtain an efficient algorithm. The best performances are obtained for reacting flows in state-to-state approach, reaching speedups of the order of 100, thanks to the use of an operator splitting scheme for the kinetics equations.

  5. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of heterogeneous photocatalysis for semiconductor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoshun; Zhao, Xiujian; Terashima, Chiaki; Fujishima, Akira; Nakata, Kazuya

    2014-05-21

    Since the report of the Honda-Fujishima effect, heterogeneous photocatalysis has attracted much attention around the world because of its potential energy and environmental applications. Although great progresses have been made in recent years, most were focused on preparing highly-active photocatalysts and investigating visible light utilization. In fact, we are still unclear on the thermodynamic and kinetic nature of photocatalysis to date, which sometimes leads to misunderstandings for experimental results. It is timely to give a review and discussion on the thermodynamics and kinetics of photocatalysis, so as to direct future researches. However, there is an absence of a detailed review on this topic until now. In this article, we tried to review and discuss the thermodynamics and kinetics of photocatalysis. We explained the thermodynamic driving force of photocatalysis, and distinguished the functions of light and heat in photocatalysis. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model, the ˙OH oxidation mechanism, and the direct-indirect (D-I) kinetic model were reviewed and compared. Some applications of the D-I model to study photocatalytic kinetics were also discussed. The electron transport mode and its importance in photocatalysis were investigated. Finally, the intrinsic relation between the kinetics and the thermodynamics of photocatalytic reactions was discussed.

  6. Kinetic analysis of thermally relativistic flow with dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kojiro

    2011-01-01

    Nonequilibrium flow of thermally relativistic matter with dissipation is considered in the framework of the relativistic kinetic theory. As an object of the analysis, the supersonic rarefied flow of thermally relativistic matter around the triangle prism is analyzed using the Anderson-Witting model. Obtained numerical results indicate that the flow field changes in accordance with the flow velocity and temperature of the uniform flow owing to both effects derived from the Lorentz contraction and thermally relativistic effects, even when the Mach number of the uniform flow is fixed. The profiles of the heat flux along the stagnation streamline can be approximated on the basis of the relativistic Navier-Stokes-Fourier (NSF) law except for a strong nonequilibrium regime such as the middle of the shock wave and the vicinity of the wall, whereas the profile of the heat flux behind the triangle prism cannot be approximated on the basis of the relativistic NSF law owing to rarefied effects via the expansion behind the triangle prism. Additionally, the heat flux via the gradient of the static pressure is non-negligible owing to thermally relativistic effects. The profile of the dynamic pressure is different from that approximated on the basis of the NSF law, which is obtained by the Eckart decomposition. Finally, variations of convections of the mass and momentum owing to the effects derived from the Lorentz contraction and thermally relativistic effects are numerically confirmed.

  7. Isothermal reaction calorimetry as a tool for kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zogg, Andreas; Stoessel, Francis; Fischer, Ulrich; Hungerbuehler, Konrad

    2004-01-01

    Reaction calorimetry has found widespread application for thermal and kinetic analysis of chemical reactions in the context of thermal process safety as well as process development. This paper reviews the most important reaction calorimetric principles (heat-flow, heat-balance, power-compensation, and Peltier principle) and their applications in commercial or scientific devices. The discussion focuses on the different dynamic behavior of the main calorimetric principles during an isothermal reaction measurement. Examples of available reaction calorimeters are further compared considering their detection limit, time constant as well as temperature range. In a second part, different evaluation methods for the isothermally measured calorimetric data are reviewed and discussed. The methods will be compared, focusing especially on the fact that reaction calorimetric data always contains additional informations not directly related to the actual chemical reaction such as heat of mixing, heat of phase-transfer/change processes or simple measurement errors. Depending on the evaluation method applied such disturbances have a significant influence on the calculated reaction enthalpies or rate constants

  8. Pyrolysis and combustion kinetics of lycopodium particles in thermogravimetric analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Alireza Mostafavi; Sadjad Salavati; Hossein Beidaghy Dizaji; Mehdi Bidabadi

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is a kind of renewable energy which is used increasingly in different types of combustion systems or in the production of fuels like bio-oil. Lycopodium is a cellulosic particle, with good combustion properties, of which microscopic images show that these particles have spherical shapes with identical diameters of 31 μm. The measured density of these particles is 1.0779 g/cm2. Lycopodium particles contain 64.06% carbon, 25.56% oxygen, 8.55% hydrogen and 1.83% nitrogen, and no sulfur. Thermogravimetric analysis in the nitrogen environment indicates that the maximum of particle mass reduction occurs in the temperature range of 250−550 °C where the maximum mass reduction in the DTG diagrams also occurs in. In the oxygen environment, an additional peak can also be observed in the temperature range of 500−600 °C, which points to solid phase combustion and ignition temperature of lycopodium particles. The kinetics of reactions is determined by curve fitting and minimization of error.

  9. Thermal decomposition kinetics of sorghum straw via thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhyani, Vaibhav; Kumar, Jitendra; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2017-12-01

    The thermal decomposition of sorghum straw was investigated by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis, where the determination of kinetic triplet (activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and reaction model), was the key objective. The activation energy was determined using different isoconversional methods: Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO), Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS), Starink, Iterative method of Chai & Chen, Vyazovkin AIC method, and Li & Tang equation. The pre-exponential factor was calculated using Kissinger's equation; while the reaction model was predicted by comparison of z-master plot obtained from experimental values with the theoretical plots. The values of activation energy obtained from isoconversional methods were further used for evaluation of thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy. Results showed three zones of pyrolysis having average activation energy values of 151.21kJ/mol, 116.15kJ/mol, and 136.65kJ/mol respectively. The data was well fitting with two-dimension 'Valensi' model for conversion values from 0 to 0.4 with a coefficient of determination (R 2 ) value of 0.988, and with third order reaction model for values from 0.4 to 0.9 with an R 2 value of 0.843. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Multigroup perturbation model for kinetic analysis of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The scope of this work is the development of a multigroup perturbation theory for the purpose of Kinetic and dynamic analysis of nuclear reactors. The equations that describe the reactor behavior were presented in all generality and written in the shorthand notation of matrices and vectors. In the derivation of those equations indetermined operators and discretizing factors were introduced and then determined by comparision with conventional equations. Fick's Law was developed in higher orders for neutron and importance current density. The solution of the direct and adjoint fields were represented by combination of the eigenfunctions of the B and B* operators and the eigenvalue modulus equality was established mathematically. In the derivation of the reactivity expression the B operator perturbation was split in two non coupled to the flux form and level. The prompt neutrons effective mean life was derived from reactor equations and importance conservation. The establishment of the Nordheim's equation, although modified, was based on Gandini. Finally, a mathematical interpretation of the flux-trap region was avented. (author)

  11. Thermogravimetric and Kinetic Analysis of Raw and Torrefied Biomass Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopczyński Marcin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of torrefied biomass as a substitute for untreated biomass may decrease some technological barriers that exist in biomass co-firing technologies e.g. low grindability, high moisture content, low energy density and hydrophilic nature of raw biomass. In this study the TG-MS-FTIR analysis and kinetic analysis of willow (Salix viminalis L. and samples torrefied at 200, 220, 240, 260, 280 and 300 °C (TSWE 200, 220, 240, 260, 280 and 300, were performed. The TG-DTG curves show that in the case of willow and torrefied samples TSWE 200, 220, 240 and 260 there are pyrolysis and combustion stages, while in the case of TSWE 280 and 300 samples the peak associated with the pyrolysis process is negligible, in contrast to the peak associated with the combustion process. Analysis of the TG-MS results shows m/z signals of 18, 28, 29 and 44, which probably represent H2O, CO and CO2. The gaseous products were generated in two distinct ranges of temperature. H2O, CO and CO2 were produced in the 500 K to 650 K range with maximum yields at approximately 600 K. In the second range of temperature, 650 K to 800 K, only CO2 was produced with maximum yields at approximately 710 K as a main product of combustion process. Analysis of the FTIR shows that the main gaseous products of the combustion process were H2O, CO2, CO and some organics including bonds: C=O (acids, aldehydes and ketones, C=C (alkenes, aromatics, C-O-C (ethers and C-OH. Lignin mainly contributes hydrocarbons (3000-2800 cm−1, while cellulose is the dominant origin of aldehydes (2860-2770 cm−1 and carboxylic acids (1790-1650 cm−1. Hydrocarbons, aldehydes, ketones and various acids were also generated from hemicellulose (1790-1650 cm−1. In the kinetic analysis, the two-steps first order model (F1F1 was assumed. Activation energy (Ea values for the first stage (pyrolysis increased with increasing torrefaction temperature from 93 to 133 kJ/mol, while for the second stage (combustion it

  12. Thermodynamic Activity-Based Progress Curve Analysis in Enzyme Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiss, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    Macrokinetic Michaelis-Menten models based on thermodynamic activity provide insights into enzyme kinetics because they separate substrate-enzyme from substrate-solvent interactions. Kinetic parameters are estimated from experimental progress curves of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Three pitfalls are discussed: deviations between thermodynamic and concentration-based models, product effects on the substrate activity coefficient, and product inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transition state kinetics of Hg(II) adsorption at gibbsite-water interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weerasooriya, Rohan; Tobschall, Heinz J.; Seneviratne, Wasana; Bandara, Atula

    2007-01-01

    Kinetics of adsorption plays a pivotal factor in determining the bio-availability and mobility of Hg(II) in the environment. The kinetics of Hg(II) adsorption on gibbsite was examined as a function of pH, temperature and electrolyte type. Adsorption of Hg(II) was highly non-linear where the rate of Hg(II) retention was rapid initially and was followed by gradual or somewhat slow retention behavior with increasing contact time. The respective rate constants designated as k 1 (S-1: fast step) and k 2 (S-2: slow step). Always k 1 follows the order: k 1 ClO 4 >=k 1 (NO 3 ) 4 >>k 1 Cl . Such a relationship was not observed for the S-2 route. A two-step reaction model with pseudo-first order kinetics successfully described the adsorption rates of Hg(II) on gibbsite. Arrhenius and Erying models determined the thermodynamic parameters at activation states, which correspond to S-1 and S-2 routes. In a given system, always the activation energies showed a decrease with the pH. Gibbs free energy (ΔG numbersign ), enthalpy (ΔH numbersign ), and entropy (ΔS numbersign ) values of activation states were almost similar both in NaClO 4 and NaNO 3 which signal a similar Hg(II) adsorptive mechanism on gibbsite. The configurations of different Hg(II)-surface complexes were elucidated by transmission vibration spectroscopy

  14. An equation of state for purely kinetic k-essence inspired by cosmic topological defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben; Gonzalez, Eduardo L.; Queijeiro, Alfonso [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-06-15

    We investigate the physical properties of a purely kinetic k-essence model with an equation of state motivated in superconducting membranes. We compute the equation of state parameter w and discuss its physical evolution via a nonlinear equation of state. Using the adiabatic speed of sound and energy density, we restrict the range of parameters of the model in order to have an acceptable physical behavior. We study the evolution of the scale factor and address the question of the possible existence of finite-time future singularities. Furthermore, we analyze the evolution of the luminosity distance d{sub L} with redshift z by comparing (normalizing) it with the ΛCDM model. Since the equation of state parameter is z-dependent the evolution of the luminosity distance is also analyzed using the Alcock-Paczynski test. (orig.)

  15. Thermal decomposition and kinetics of coal and fermented cornstalk using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuyuan; Chang, Chun; Li, Pan; Han, Xiuli; Li, Hongliang; Fang, Shuqi; Chen, Junying; Ma, Xiaojian

    2018-07-01

    The thermal behavior and kinetics of Yiluo coal (YC) and the residues of fermented cornstalk (FC) were investigated in this study. The Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO) methods were used for the kinetic analysis of the pyrolysis process. The results showed that the activation energy (E α ) was increased with the increase of the thermal conversion rate (α), and the average values of E α of YC, FC and the blend (m YC /m FC  = 6/4) were 304.26, 224.94 and 233.46 kJ/mol, respectively. The order reaction model function for the blend was also developed by the master-plots method. By comparing the E a and the enthalpy, it was found that the blend was favored to format activated complex due to the lower potential energy barrier. Meanwhile, the average value of Gibbs free energy of the blend was 169.83 kJ/mol, and the changes of entropies indicated that the pyrolysis process was evolved from ordered-state to disordered-state. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Formation kinetics of gemfibrozil chlorination reaction products: analysis and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkosek, Wendy H; Peldszus, Sigrid; Huck, Peter M; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-07-01

    Aqueous chlorination kinetics of the lipid regulator gemfibrozil and the formation of reaction products were investigated in deionized water over the pH range 3 to 9, and in two wastewater matrices. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil was found to be highly dependent on pH. No statistically significant degradation of gemfibrozil was observed at pH values greater than 7. Gemfibrozil oxidation between pH 4 and 7 was best represented by first order kinetics. At pH 3, formation of three reaction products was observed. 4'-C1Gem was the only reaction product formed from pH 4-7 and was modeled with zero order kinetics. Chlorine oxidation of gemfibrozil in two wastewater matrices followed second order kinetics. 4'-C1Gem was only formed in wastewater with pH below 7. Deionized water rate kinetic models were applied to two wastewater effluents with gemfibrozil concentrations reported in literature in order to calculate potential mass loading rates of 4'C1Gem to the receiving water.

  17. Sensitivity analysis of intracellular signaling pathway kinetics predicts targets for stem cell fate control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alborz Mahdavi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Directing stem cell fate requires knowledge of how signaling networks integrate temporally and spatially segregated stimuli. We developed and validated a computational model of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3 pathway kinetics, a signaling network involved in embryonic stem cell (ESC self-renewal. Our analysis identified novel pathway responses; for example, overexpression of the receptor glycoprotein-130 results in reduced pathway activation and increased ESC differentiation. We used a systematic in silico screen to identify novel targets and protein interactions involved in Stat3 activation. Our analysis demonstrates that signaling activation and desensitization (the inability to respond to ligand restimulation is regulated by balancing the activation state of a distributed set of parameters including nuclear export of Stat3, nuclear phosphatase activity, inhibition by suppressor of cytokine signaling, and receptor trafficking. This knowledge was used to devise a temporally modulated ligand delivery strategy that maximizes signaling activation and leads to enhanced ESC self-renewal.

  18. Solid-state reaction kinetics and optical studies of cadmium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Madhu; Gupta, Rashmi; Singh, Harjinder; Bamzai, K. K.

    2018-04-01

    The growth of cadmium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate was successfully carried out by using room temperature solution technique i.e., gel encapsulation technique. Grown crystals were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). The structure of the grown crystal belongs to orthorhombic crystal system and crystallizes in centrosymmetric space group. Kinetics of the decomposition of the grown crystals were studied by non-isothermal analysis. Thermo gravimetric / differential thermo analytical (TG/DTA) studies revealed that the grown crystal is stable upto 119 °C. The various steps involved in the thermal decomposition of the material have been analysed using Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern and Piloyan-Novikova equations for evaluating various kinetic parameters. The optical studies shows that the grown crystals possess wide transmittance in the visible region and significant optical band gap of 5.5ev with cut off wavelength of 260 nm.

  19. Solid-state reaction kinetics of neodymium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rashmi; Slathia, Goldy; Bamzai, K. K.

    2018-05-01

    Neodymium doped magnesium hydrogen phosphate (NdMHP) crystals were grown by using gel encapsulation technique. Structural characterization of the grown crystals has been carried out by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) and it revealed that NdMHP crystals crystallize in orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pbca. Kinetics of the decomposition of the grown crystals has been studied by non-isothermal analysis. The estimation of decomposition temperatures and weight loss has been made from the thermogravimetric/differential thermo analytical (TG/DTA) in conjuncture with DSC studies. The various steps involved in the thermal decomposition of the material have been analysed using Horowitz-Metzger, Coats-Redfern and Piloyan-Novikova equations for evaluating various kinetic parameters.

  20. Ground-state kinetics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Li, Hao; Trabolsi, Ali; Coskun, Ali; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-02-18

    The ability to design and confer control over the kinetics of theprocesses involved in the mechanisms of artificial molecular machines is at the heart of the challenge to create ones that can carry out useful work on their environment, just as Nature is wont to do. As one of the more promising forerunners of prototypical artificial molecular machines, chemists have developed bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) over the past couple of decades. These bistable MIMs generally come in the form of [2]rotaxanes, molecular compounds that constitute a ring mechanically interlocked around a dumbbell-shaped component, or [2]catenanes, which are composed of two mechanically interlocked rings. As a result of their interlocked nature, bistable MIMs possess the inherent propensity to express controllable intramolecular, large-amplitude, and reversible motions in response to redox stimuli. In this Account, we rationalize the kinetic behavior in the ground state for a large assortment of these types of bistable MIMs, including both rotaxanes and catenanes. These structures have proven useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery to molecular electronic devices. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs can switch between two different isomeric states. The favored isomer, known as the ground-state co-conformation (GSCC) is in equilibrium with the less favored metastable state co-conformation (MSCC). The forward (kf) and backward (kb) rate constants associated with this ground-state equilibrium are intimately connected to each other through the ground-state distribution constant, KGS. Knowing the rate constants that govern the kinetics and bring about the equilibration between the MSCC and GSCC, allows researchers to understand the operation of these bistable MIMs in a device setting and apply them toward the construction of artificial molecular machines. The three biggest influences on the ground-state rate constants arise from

  1. IBIS, FBR 3-D Steady-State and Kinetics with Thermohydraulic Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomura, Mamoru; Tada, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; An, Shigehiro

    1987-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The IBIS code performs steady state and kinetics calculations based on a three-dimensional nuclear diffusion kinetics with thermal hydraulic feedback. It can calculate the following values in hexagonal-Z geometry of a fast breeder reactor core through the progress of transient: (1) Net reactivity; (2) Total and group-wise delayed neutron fraction; (3) Group-wise delayed neutron precursor concentration; (4) Total power and energy; (5) Space dependent neutron flux in each energy group; (6) Space dependent temperature of each material; (7) Maximum temperature of each material and its location. 2 - Method of solution: The quasi-static method is adopted to solve the three-dimensional nuclear diffusion kinetics problem. The method is the same as employed in the code QX1. The shape function equation is solved with the finite difference treatment as used in the codes CITATION and HONEYCOMB. One-dimensional thermo-hydraulics is solved with a model similar to that given in the code SASLA. Sodium boiling can be taken into account. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The number of neutron energy groups is fixed to 3 groups in the present version of the code

  2. Nodal kinetics model upgrade in the Penn State coupled TRAC/NEM codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam, Tara M.; Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Baratta, Anthony J.; Finnemann, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    The Pennsylvania State University currently maintains and does development and verification work for its own versions of the coupled three-dimensional kinetics/thermal-hydraulics codes TRAC-PF1/NEM and TRAC-BF1/NEM. The subject of this paper is nodal model enhancements in the above mentioned codes. Because of the numerous validation studies that have been performed on almost every aspect of these codes, this upgrade is done without a major code rewrite. The upgrade consists of four steps. The first two steps are designed to improve the accuracy of the kinetics model, based on the nodal expansion method. The polynomial expansion solution of 1D transverse integrated diffusion equation is replaced with a solution, which uses a semi-analytic expansion. Further the standard parabolic polynomial representation of the transverse leakage in the above 1D equations is replaced with an improved approximation. The last two steps of the upgrade address the code efficiency by improving the solution of the time-dependent NEM equations and implementing a multi-grid solver. These four improvements are implemented into the standalone NEM kinetics code. Verification of this code was accomplished based on the original verification studies. The results show that the new methods improve the accuracy and efficiency of the code. The verification of the upgraded NEM model in the TRAC-PF1/NEM and TRAC-BF1/NEM coupled codes is underway

  3. Effect of sepsis on VLDL kinetics: responses in basal state and during glucose infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.R.; Shaw, J.H.; Durkot, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of gram-negative sepsis on the kinetics and oxidation of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) fatty acids was assessed in conscious dogs in the normal state and 24 h after infusion of live Escherichia coli. VLDL, labeled with [2- 3 H]glycerol and [1- 14 C]palmitic acid, was used to trace VLDL kinetics and oxidation, and [1- 13 C]palmitic acid bound to albumin was infused simultaneously to quantify kinetics and oxidation of free fatty acid (FFA) in plasma. Sepsis caused a fivefold increase in the rate of VLDL production (RaVLDL). In the control dogs, the direct oxidation of VLDL-fatty acids was not an important contributor to their overall energy metabolism, but in dogs with sepsis, 17% of the total rate of CO2 production could be accounted for by VLDL-fatty acid oxidation. When glucose was infused into dogs with insulin and glucagon levels clamped at basal levels (by means of infusion of somatostatin and replacement of the hormones), RaVLDL increased significantly in the control dogs, but it did not increase further in dogs with sepsis. The authors conclude that the increase in triglyceride concentration in fasting dogs with gram-negative sepsis is the result of an increase in VLDL production and that the fatty acids in VLDL can serve as an important source of energy in sepsis

  4. Characterization of Nicotinamidases: Steady-State Kinetic Parameters, Class-wide Inhibition by Nicotinaldehydes and Catalytic Mechanism†

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Vrablik, Tracy L.; Xu, Ping; Allen, Eleanor; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Sauve, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinamidases are metabolic enzymes that hydrolyze nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are widely distributed across biology, with examples found encoded in the genomes of Mycobacteria, Archaea, Eubacteria, Protozoa, yeast and invertebrates but there are none found in mammals. Although recent structural work has improved understanding of these enzymes, their catalytic mechanism is still not well understood. Recent data shows that nicotinamidases are required for growth and virulence of several pathogenic microbes. The enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans regulate lifespan in their respective organisms, consistent with proposed roles in the regulation of NAD+ metabolism and organismal aging. In this manuscript, the steady state kinetic parameters of nicotinamidase enzymes from C. elegans, S. cerevisiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae (a pathogen responsible for human pneumonia), Borrelia burgdorferi (the pathogen that causes Lyme Disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (responsible for most human malaria) are reported. Nicotinamidases are generally efficient catalysts with steady state kcat values typically exceeding 1 s−1. The Km values for nicotinamide are low and are in the range from 2 – 110 µM. Nicotinaldehyde was determined to be a potent competitive inhibitor of these enzymes, binding in the low µM to low nM range for all nicotinamidases tested. A variety of nicotinaldehyde derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors in kinetic assays. Inhibitions are consistent with reaction of the universally conserved catalytic Cys on each enzyme with the aldehyde carbonyl carbon to form a thiohemiacetal complex which is stabilized by a conserved oxyanion hole. The S. pneumoniae nicotinamidase can catalyse exchange of 18O into the carboxy oxygens of nicotinic acid with 18O-water. The collected data, along with kinetic analysis of several mutants, allowed us to propose a catalytic mechanism that explains

  5. Kinetics of phosphorus sorption in soils in the state of Paraíba¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmannuella Costa Santos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The soil P sorption capacity has been studied for many years, but little attention has been paid to the rate of this process, which is relevant in the planning of phosphate fertilization. The purpose of this experiment was to assess kinetics of P sorption in 12 representative soil profiles of the State of Paraíba (Brazil, select the best data fitting among four equations and relate these coefficients to the soil properties. Samples of 12 soils with wide diversity of physical, chemical and mineralogical properties were agitated in a horizontal shaker, with 10 mmo L-1 CaCl2 solution containing 6 and 60 mg L-1 P, for periods of 5, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 420, 720, 1,020, and 1,440 min. After each shaking period, the P concentration in the equilibrium solution was measured and three equations were fitted based on the Freundlich equation and one based on the Elovich equation, to determine which soil had the highest sorption rate (kinetics and which soil properties correlated to this rate. The kinetics of P sorption in soils with high maximum P adsorption capacity (MPAC was fast for 30 min at the lower initial P concentration (6 mg L-1. No difference was observed between soils at the higher initial P concentration (60 mg L-1. The P adsorption kinetics were positively correlated with clay content, MPAC and the amount of Al extracted with dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate. The data fitted well to Freundlich-based equations equation, whose coefficients can be used to predict P adsorption rates in soils.

  6. A robust state-space kinetics-guided framework for dynamic PET image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, S; Alessio, A M; Kinahan, P E; Liu, H; Shi, P

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic PET image reconstruction is a challenging issue due to the low SNR and the large quantity of spatio-temporal data. We propose a robust state-space image reconstruction (SSIR) framework for activity reconstruction in dynamic PET. Unlike statistically-based frame-by-frame methods, tracer kinetic modeling is incorporated to provide physiological guidance for the reconstruction, harnessing the temporal information of the dynamic data. Dynamic reconstruction is formulated in a state-space representation, where a compartmental model describes the kinetic processes in a continuous-time system equation, and the imaging data are expressed in a discrete measurement equation. Tracer activity concentrations are treated as the state variables, and are estimated from the dynamic data. Sampled-data H ∞ filtering is adopted for robust estimation. H ∞ filtering makes no assumptions on the system and measurement statistics, and guarantees bounded estimation error for finite-energy disturbances, leading to robust performance for dynamic data with low SNR and/or errors. This alternative reconstruction approach could help us to deal with unpredictable situations in imaging (e.g. data corruption from failed detector blocks) or inaccurate noise models. Experiments on synthetic phantom and patient PET data are performed to demonstrate feasibility of the SSIR framework, and to explore its potential advantages over frame-by-frame statistical reconstruction approaches.

  7. Theory of warm ionized gases: equation of state and kinetic Schottky anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capolupo, A; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

    2013-10-01

    Based on accurate Lennard-Jones-type interaction potentials, we derive a closed set of state equations for the description of warm atomic gases in the presence of ionization processes. The specific heat is predicted to exhibit peaks in correspondence to single and multiple ionizations. Such kinetic analog in atomic gases of the Schottky anomaly in solids is enhanced at intermediate and low atomic densities. The case of adiabatic compression of noble gases is analyzed in detail and the implications on sonoluminescence are discussed. In particular, the predicted plasma electron density in a sonoluminescent bubble turns out to be in good agreement with the value measured in recent experiments.

  8. Microscopic theory of warm ionized gases: equation of state and kinetic Schottky anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capolupo, A; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

    2013-01-01

    Based on accurate Lennard-Jones type interaction potentials, we derive a closed set of state equations for the description of warm atomic gases in the presence of ionization processes. The specific heat is predicted to exhibit peaks in correspondence to single and multiple ionizations. Such kinetic analogue in atomic gases of the Schottky anomaly in solids is enhanced at intermediate and low atomic densities. The case of adiabatic compression of noble gases is analyzed in detail and the implications on sonoluminescence are discussed.

  9. Kinetic Analysis of the Thermal Processing of Silica and Organosilica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappert, Emiel; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.; Benes, Nieck Edwin; Nijmeijer, Arian

    2014-01-01

    The incorporation of an organic group into sol–gel-derived silica causes significant changes in the structure and properties of these materials. Therefore, the thermal treatment of organosilica materials may require a different approach. In the present paper, kinetic parameters (activation energy,

  10. Kinetics analysis of step and jump forward lunge among badminton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine and compare the kinetics during step forward lunge (SFL) and jump forward lunge (JFL) in badminton. Fifteen university badminton players (mean age = 22.07 ± 1.39 years old) were recruited and were assigned to perform SFL and JFL while holding a badminton racquet using their ...

  11. PADÉ APPROXIMANTS FOR THE EQUATION OF STATE FOR RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMICS BY KINETIC THEORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Shang-Hsi; Yang, Jaw-Yen, E-mail: shanghsi@gmail.com [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10764, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-20

    A two-point Padé approximant (TPPA) algorithm is developed for the equation of state (EOS) for relativistic hydrodynamic systems, which are described by the classical Maxwell–Boltzmann statistics and the semiclassical Fermi–Dirac statistics with complete degeneracy. The underlying rational function is determined by the ratios of the macroscopic state variables with various orders of accuracy taken at the extreme relativistic limits. The nonunique TPPAs are validated by Taub's inequality for the consistency of the kinetic theory and the special theory of relativity. The proposed TPPA is utilized in deriving the EOS of the dilute gas and in calculating the specific heat capacity, the adiabatic index function, and the isentropic sound speed of the ideal gas. Some general guidelines are provided for the application of an arbitrary accuracy requirement. The superiority of the proposed TPPA is manifested in manipulating the constituent polynomials of the approximants, which avoids the arithmetic complexity of struggling with the modified Bessel functions and the hyperbolic trigonometric functions arising from the relativistic kinetic theory.

  12. Role of conformational dynamics in kinetics of an enzymatic cycle in a nonequilibrium steady state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Wei; Xie, X. Sunney; Bagchi, Biman

    2009-08-01

    Enzyme is a dynamic entity with diverse time scales, ranging from picoseconds to seconds or even longer. Here we develop a rate theory for enzyme catalysis that includes conformational dynamics as cycling on a two-dimensional (2D) reaction free energy surface involving an intrinsic reaction coordinate (X) and an enzyme conformational coordinate (Q). The validity of Michaelis-Menten (MM) equation, i.e., substrate concentration dependence of enzymatic velocity, is examined under a nonequilibrium steady state. Under certain conditions, the classic MM equation holds but with generalized microscopic interpretations of kinetic parameters. However, under other conditions, our rate theory predicts either positive (sigmoidal-like) or negative (biphasic-like) kinetic cooperativity due to the modified effective 2D reaction pathway on X-Q surface, which can explain non-MM dependence previously observed on many monomeric enzymes that involve slow or hysteretic conformational transitions. Furthermore, we find that a slow conformational relaxation during product release could retain the enzyme in a favorable configuration, such that enzymatic turnover is dynamically accelerated at high substrate concentrations. The effect of such conformation retainment in a nonequilibrium steady state is evaluated.

  13. Single-cell analysis of transcription kinetics across the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Samuel O; Xu, Heng; Nagarkar-Jaiswal, Sonal; Freire, Pablo R; Zwaka, Thomas P; Golding, Ido

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is a highly stochastic process. To infer transcription kinetics for a gene-of-interest, researchers commonly compare the distribution of mRNA copy-number to the prediction of a theoretical model. However, the reliability of this procedure is limited because the measured mRNA numbers represent integration over the mRNA lifetime, contribution from multiple gene copies, and mixing of cells from different cell-cycle phases. We address these limitations by simultaneously quantifying nascent and mature mRNA in individual cells, and incorporating cell-cycle effects in the analysis of mRNA statistics. We demonstrate our approach on Oct4 and Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells. Both genes follow similar two-state kinetics. However, Nanog exhibits slower ON/OFF switching, resulting in increased cell-to-cell variability in mRNA levels. Early in the cell cycle, the two copies of each gene exhibit independent activity. After gene replication, the probability of each gene copy to be active diminishes, resulting in dosage compensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12175.001 PMID:26824388

  14. The analysis of one-dimensional reactor kinetics benchmark computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidell, J.

    1975-11-01

    During March 1973 the European American Committee on Reactor Physics proposed a series of simple one-dimensional reactor kinetics problems, with the intention of comparing the relative efficiencies of the numerical methods employed in various codes, which are currently in use in many national laboratories. This report reviews the contributions submitted to this benchmark exercise and attempts to assess the relative merits and drawbacks of the various theoretical and computer methods. (author)

  15. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A

    2014-03-28

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-"coupled"- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz-Kalos-Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB

  16. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-“coupled”- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz–Kalos–Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary

  17. Kinetic insights over a PEMFC operating on stationary and oscillatory states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Andressa; Gonzalez, Ernesto R; Eiswirth, Markus

    2011-12-01

    Kinetic investigations in the oscillatory state have been carried out in order to shed light on the interplay between the complex kinetics exhibited by a proton exchange membrane fuel cell fed with poisoned H(2) (108 ppm of CO) and the other in serie process. The apparent activation energy (E(a)) in the stationary state was investigated in order to clarify the E(a) observed in the oscillatory state. The apparent activation energy in the stationary state, under potentiostatic control, rendered (a) E(a) ≈ 50-60 kJ mol(-1) over 0.8 V < E < 0.6 V and (b) E(a) ≈ 10 kJ mol(-1) at E = 0.3 V. The former is related to the H(2) adsorption in the vacancies of the surface poisoned by CO and the latter is correlated to the process of proton conductivity in the membrane. The dependence of the period-one oscillations on the temperature yielded a genuine Arrhenius dependence with two E(a) values: (a) E(a) around 70 kJ mol(-1), at high temperatures, and (b) E(a) around 10-15 kJ mol(-1), at lower temperatures. The latter E(a) indicates the presence of protonic mass transport coupled to the essential oscillatory mechanism. These insights point in the right direction to predict spatial couplings between anode and cathode as having the highest strength as well as to speculate the most likely candidates to promote spatial inhomogeneities. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Nonequilibrium steady state of biochemical cycle kinetics under non-isothermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao; Ge, Hao

    2018-04-01

    The nonequilibrium steady state of isothermal biochemical cycle kinetics has been extensively studied, but that under non-isothermal conditions has been much less extensively investigated. When the heat exchange between subsystems is slow, the isothermal assumption of the whole system breaks down, as is true for many types of living organisms. Here, starting with a four-state model of molecular transporter across the cell membrane, we generalize the nonequilibrium steady-state theory of isothermal biochemical cycle kinetics to the circumstances with non-uniform temperatures of subsystems in terms of general master equation models. We obtain a new thermodynamic relationship between the chemical reaction rates and thermodynamic potentials in non-isothermal circumstances, based on the overdamped dynamics along the continuous reaction coordinate. We show that the entropy production can vary up to 3% in real cells, even when the temperature difference across the cell membrane is only approximately 1 K. We then decompose the total thermodynamic driving force into its thermal and chemical components and predict that the net flux of molecules transported by the molecular transporter can potentially go against the temperature gradient in the absence of a chemical driving force. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the simple application of the isothermal transition-state rate formula for each chemical reaction in terms of only the reactant’ temperature is not thermodynamically consistent. Therefore, we mathematically derive several revised reaction rate formulas that are not only consistent with the new thermodynamic relationship but also approximate the exact reaction rate better than Kramers’ rate formula under isothermal conditions.

  19. SON68 nuclear glass dissolution kinetics: Current state of knowledge and basis of the new GRAAL model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frugier, P. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)], E-mail: pierre.frugier@cea.fr; Gin, S.; Minet, Y.; Chave, T. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Bonin, B. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DIR/DS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Godon, N.; Lartigue, J.-E.; Jollivet, P. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD/SECM/LCLT, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Ayral, A. [IEM/CNRS-ENSCM Universite Montpellier 2, CC 047, Place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); De Windt, L. [ENSMP, CG, 35 rue St Honore, 77305 Fontainebleau cedex (France); Santarini, G. [CEA Saclay HC/CAB, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2008-10-15

    This article summarizes the present state of knowledge concerning aqueous alteration of R7T7-type nuclear containment glasses, represented mainly by the inactive reference glass designated SON68. Based on this review, we propose to describe the glass alteration kinetics up to and including the final residual rate regime by means of a new mechanistic model known as GRAAL (glassreactivitywithallowanceforthealterationlayer). Phenomenological analysis findings are reviewed for the various glass alteration regimes: interdiffusion, initial rate, rate drop, residual rate and, under very particular circumstances, resumption of alteration. These alteration regimes are associated with predominant mechanisms. Published work interpreting and modeling these mechanisms was examined in detail. There is a broad consensus on the general mechanisms of the initial rate and even the interdiffusion regime, whereas the mechanisms controlling the rate drop remain a subject of dispute not only with regard to nuclear glasses but also for the dissolution of silicate minerals. The reaction affinity responsible for the rate drop is expressed differently by different authors and depending on the underlying theories. The disagreement concerns the nature of the phase (glass or gel) or the activated complex controlling the rate drop, which in turn determines the elements that must be taken into account in the overall affinity term. Progress in recent years, especially in identifying the mechanisms responsible for the residual rate, has shed new light on these issues, allowing us to propose new theoretical foundations for modeling the different kinetic regimes of SON68 nuclear glass dissolution. The GRAAL model considers that water diffusion in the passivating reaction zone (the gel formed under saturation conditions) is a rate-limiting step in the overall glass dissolution kinetics. Moreover, this passivation zone is a soluble phase whose stability is directly dependent on the nature of the

  20. Development of an inelastic stress analysis code 'KINE-T' and its evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobatake, K.; Takahashi, S.; Suzuki, M.

    1977-01-01

    Referring to the ASME B and PVC Code Case 1592-7, the inelastic stress analysis is required for the designs of the class 1 components in elevated temperature if the results of the elastic stress analysis and/or simplified inelastic analysis do not satisfy the requirements. Authors programmed a two-dimensional axisymmetric inelastic analysis code 'KINE-T', and carried out its evaluations and an application. This FEM code is based on the incremental method and the following: elastic-plastic constitutive equation (yield condition of von Mises; flow rule of Prandtl-Reuss; Prager's hardening rule); creep constitutive equation (equation of state approach; flow rule of von Mises; strain hardening rule); the temperature dependency of the yield function is considered; solution procedure of the assembled stiffness matrix is the 'initial stress method'. After the completion of the programming, authors compared the output with not only theoretical results but also with those of the MARC code and the ANSYS code. In order to apply the code to the practical designing, authors settled a quasi-component two-dimensional axisymmetric model and a loading cycle (500 cycles). Then, an inelastic analysis and its integrity evaluation are carried out

  1. Kinetic therapy reduces complications and shortens hospital stay in patients with cardiogenic shock - a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Gregor; Flemming, Kerstin; Ziegs, Enrico; Haacke, Katrin; Rauwolf, Thomas; Strasser, Ruth H

    2007-03-01

    Kinetic therapy (KT) has been shown to reduce complications and to shorten hospital stay in trauma patients. Data in non-surgical patients are inconclusive, and kinetic therapy has not been tested in patients with cardiogenic shock. The present analysis compares KT with standard care in patients with cardiogenic shock. A retrospective analysis of 133 patients with cardiogenic shock admitted to 1 academic heart center was performed. Patients with standard care (SC, turning every 2 h by the staff) were compared with kinetic therapy (KT, using oscillating air-flotation beds). 68 patients with KT were compared with 65 patients with SC. Length of ventilator therapy was 11 days in KT and 18 days in SC (p=0.048). The mortality was comparable in both groups. Pneumonia occurred in 14 patients in KT and 39 patients in SC (ppatients treated with kinetic therapy. The use of KT shortens hospital stay and reduces rates of pneumonia and pressure ulcers as compared to SC.

  2. Comparative analysis of mineral and secundary raw materials screening kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of screening shows screening performance compared to an ideal screening to achieve a complete separation of the fractions without the presence of grains of size less than the mesh openings left on sieve and grains of size larger than the mesh opening that passed through the sieve. Efficiency is growing rapidly and after a certain time is reduced. This is explained by the fact that the speed of screening depends on the percentage of 'small', 'small-to large' and 'large' grain. The paper shows how for the given grain, their shape and density affect the kinetics of screening.

  3. Kinetically blocked stable heptazethrene and octazethrene: Closed-shell or open-shell in the ground state?

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuan

    2012-09-12

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with an open-shell singlet biradical ground state are of fundamental interest and have potential applications in materials science. However, the inherent high reactivity makes their synthesis and characterization very challenging. In this work, a convenient synthetic route was developed to synthesize two kinetically blocked heptazethrene (HZ-TIPS) and octazethrene (OZ-TIPS) compounds with good stability. Their ground-state electronic structures were systematically investigated by a combination of different experimental methods, including steady-state and transient absorption spectroscopy, variable temperature NMR, electron spin resonance (ESR), superconducting quantum interfering device (SQUID), FT Raman, and X-ray crystallographic analysis, assisted by unrestricted symmetry-broken density functional theory (DFT) calculations. All these demonstrated that the heptazethrene derivative HZ-TIPS has a closed-shell ground state while its octazethrene analogue OZ-TIPS with a smaller energy gap exists as an open-shell singlet biradical with a large measured biradical character (y = 0.56). Large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross sections (σ(2)) were determined for HZ-TIPS (σ(2)max = 920 GM at 1250 nm) and OZ-TIPS (σ(2)max = 1200 GM at 1250 nm). In addition, HZ-TIPS and OZ-TIPS show a closely stacked 1D polymer chain in single crystals. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Homotopy analysis solutions of point kinetics equations with one delayed precursor group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qian; Luo Lei; Chen Zhiyun; Li Haofeng

    2010-01-01

    Homotopy analysis method is proposed to obtain series solutions of nonlinear differential equations. Homotopy analysis method was applied for the point kinetics equations with one delayed precursor group. Analytic solutions were obtained using homotopy analysis method, and the algorithm was analysed. The results show that the algorithm computation time and precision agree with the engineering requirements. (authors)

  5. CRYSTALLIZATION KINETICS OF GLASS-CERAMICS BY DIFFERENTIAL THERMAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. NOZAD

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization behavior of fluorphlogopite, a glass-ceramic in the MgO–SiO2–Al2O3–K2O–B2O3–F system, was studied by substitution of Li2O for K2O in the glass composition. DTA, XRD and SEM were used for the study of crystallization behavior, formed phases and microstructure of the resulting glass-ceramics. Crystallization kinetics of the glass was investigated under non-isothermal conditions, using the formal theory of transformations for heterogeneous nucleation. The crystallization results were analyzed, and both the activation energy of crystallization process as well as the crystallization mechanism were characterized. Calculated kinetic parameters indicated that the appropriate crystallization mechanism was bulk crystallization for base glass and the sample with addition of Li2O. Non-isothermal DTA experiments showed that the crystallization activation energies of base glasses was in the range of 234-246 KJ/mol and in the samples with addition of Li2O was changed to the range of 317-322 KJ/mol.

  6. A Critical View on In Vitro Analysis of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) Transport Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaby, Lasse; Brodin, Birger

    2017-09-01

    Transport proteins expressed in the different barriers of the human body can have great implications on absorption, distribution, and excretion of drug compounds. Inhibition or saturation of a transporter can potentially alter these absorbtion, distribution, metabolism and elimination properties and thereby also the pharmacokinetic profile and bioavailability of drug compounds. P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) is an efflux transporter which is present in most of the barriers of the body, including the small intestine, the blood-brain barrier, the liver, and the kidney. In all these tissues, P-gp may mediate efflux of drug compounds and may also be a potential site for drug-drug interactions. Consequently, there is a need to be able to predict the saturation and inhibition of P-gp and other transporters in vivo. For this purpose, Michaelis-Menten steady-state analysis has been applied to estimate kinetic parameters, such as K m and V max , for carrier-mediated transport, whereas half-maximal inhibitor concentration (IC 50 ) and the disassociation constant for an inhibitor/P-gp complex (K i ) have been determined to estimate P-gp inhibition. This review addresses in vitro methods commonly used to study P-gp transport kinetics and aims at providing a critical evaluation of the application of steady-state Michaelis-Menten analysis of kinetic parameters for substrate/P-gp interactions. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinetic global analysis of Alfven eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.

    2002-01-01

    Systematic study on low to medium n (toroidal mode number) Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in tokamaks and helical systems is presented. Linear stability of AE in the presence of energetic ions was studied using the kinetic full-wave code TASK/WM.We have reproduced the destabilizing effect of toroidal co-rotation on TAE for JT-60U parameters. We have found the existence of reversed-shear-induced Alfven eigenmode (RSAE) which localizes near the q minimum in a reversed magnetic shear configuration. Two kinds of mode structures are identified for energetic particle mode (EPM) below the TAE frequency gap. The coupling to lower-frequency modes such as drift waves and MHD modes as well as the effect of trapped particles are also taken into account. For a helical plasma, the existence of GAE in the central region and TAE in the off-axis region was confirmed. (author)

  8. Presteady-state and steady-state kinetic properties of human cytochrome c oxidase. Identification of rate-limiting steps in mammalian cytochrome c oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuilenburg, A. B.; Gorren, A. C.; Dekker, H. L.; Nieboer, P.; van Gelder, B. F.; Muijsers, A. O.

    1992-01-01

    Human cytochrome c oxidase was purified in a fully active form from heart and skeletal muscle. The enzyme was selectively solubilised with octylglucoside and KCl from submitochondrial particles followed by ammonium sulphate fractionation. The presteady-state and steady-state kinetic properties of

  9. Crystallization kinetics of poly-(lactic acid) with and without talc: Optical microscopy and calorimetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaa, Z.; Boutaous, M.; Rousset, F.; Fulchiron, R.; Zinet, M.; Xin, S.; Bourgin, P.

    2014-05-01

    Poly-(lactic acid) or PLA is a biodegradable polymer synthesized from renewable resources. Recently, the discovery of new polymerization routes has allowed increasing the produced volumes. As a consequence, PLA is becoming of great interest for reducing the dependence on petroleum-based plastics. Because of its interesting mechanical properties, PLA is seen as a potential substitute for some usual polymers. However, its relatively slow crystallization kinetics can be a disadvantage with regard to industrial applications. The crystallization kinetics of PLA can be enhanced by adding nucleating agents, which also influences on crystalline morphology and rheological behavior. In the present work, the isothermal quiescent crystallization kinetics of both neat PLA and PLA/talc composite (5 wt% talc) are investigated. The effects of talc on the overall crystallization kinetics and on the crystalline morphology are analyzed using both optical microscopy measurements and thermal analysis by differential scanning calorimetry.

  10. Deconvolution analysis of sup(99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate kinetics in metabolic bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knop, J.; Kroeger, E.; Stritzke, P.; Schneider, C.; Kruse, H.P.

    1981-02-01

    The kinetics of sup(99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) and /sup 47/Ca were studied in three patients with osteoporosis, three patients with hyperparathyroidism, and two patients with osteomalacia. The activities of sup(99m)Tc-MDP were recorded in the lumbar spine, paravertebral soft tissues, and in venous blood samples for 1 h after injection. The results were submitted to deconvolution analysis to determine regional bone accumulation rates. /sup 47/Ca kinetics were analysed by a linear two-compartment model quantitating short-term mineral exchange, exchangeable bone calcium, and calcium accretion. The sup(99m)Tc-MDP accumulation rates were small in osteoporosis, greater in hyperparathyroidism, and greatest in osteomalacia. No correlations were obtained between sup(99m)Tc-MDP bone accumulation rates and the results of /sup 47/Ca kinetics. However, there was a significant relationship between the level of serum alkaline phosphatase and bone accumulation rates (R = 0.71, P < 0.025). As a result deconvolution analysis of regional sup(99m)Tc-MDP kinetics in dynamic bone scans might be useful to quantitate osseous tracer accumulation in metabolic bone disease. The lack of correlation between the results of sup(99m)Tc-MDP kinetics and /sup 47/Ca kinetics might suggest a preferential binding of sup(99m)Tc-MDP to the organic matrix of the bone, as has been suggested by other authors on the basis of experimental and clinical investigations.

  11. A Markov State-based Quantitative Kinetic Model of Sodium Release from the Dopamine Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Asghar M.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins that are responsible for reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to terminate a neuronal signal and enable subsequent neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic neuron. The release of one sodium ion from the crystallographically determined sodium binding site Na2 had been identified as an initial step in the transport cycle which prepares the transporter for substrate translocation by stabilizing an inward-open conformation. We have constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of human DAT (hDAT) to explore the mechanism of this sodium release. Our results quantify the release process triggered by hydration of the Na2 site that occurs concomitantly with a conformational transition from an outward-facing to an inward-facing state of the transporter. The kinetics of the release process are computed from the MSM, and transition path theory is used to identify the most probable sodium release pathways. An intermediate state is discovered on the sodium release pathway, and the results reveal the importance of various modes of interaction of the N-terminus of hDAT in controlling the pathways of release.

  12. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomin, Vladimir I.; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited-state

  13. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomin, Vladimir I., E-mail: tomin@apsl.edu.pl; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-10-15

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited-state

  14. A static analysis method to determine the availability of kinetic energy from wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rawn, B.G.; Gibescu, M.; Kling, W.L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces definitions and an analysis method for estimating how much kinetic energy can be made available for inertial response from a wind turbine over a year, and how much energy capture must be sacrificed to do so. The analysis is based on the static characteristics of wind turbines,

  15. RETRAN-3D MOD003 Peach Bottom Turbine Trip 2 Multidimensional Kinetics Analysis Models and Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Michitsugu; Ogura, Katsunori; Gose, Garry C.; Wu, J.-Y.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 Turbine Trip Test 2 (PB2/TT2) has been performed using RETRAN-3D MOD003. The purpose of the analysis was to investigate the PB2/TT2 overpressurization transient using the RETRAN-3D multidimensional kinetics model

  16. Treating experimental data of inverse kinetic method by unitary linear regression analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yusen; Chen Xiaoliang

    2009-01-01

    The theory of treating experimental data of inverse kinetic method by unitary linear regression analysis was described. Not only the reactivity, but also the effective neutron source intensity could be calculated by this method. Computer code was compiled base on the inverse kinetic method and unitary linear regression analysis. The data of zero power facility BFS-1 in Russia were processed and the results were compared. The results show that the reactivity and the effective neutron source intensity can be obtained correctly by treating experimental data of inverse kinetic method using unitary linear regression analysis and the precision of reactivity measurement is improved. The central element efficiency can be calculated by using the reactivity. The result also shows that the effect to reactivity measurement caused by external neutron source should be considered when the reactor power is low and the intensity of external neutron source is strong. (authors)

  17. Determination of steady state and nonsteady-state glycerol kinetics in humans using deuterium-labeled tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beylot, M.; Martin, C.; Beaufrere, B.; Riou, J.P.; Mornex, R.

    1987-01-01

    Using deuterium-labeled glycerol as tracer and gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques for the determination of isotopic enrichment, we have developed a simple and ethically acceptable method of determining glycerol appearance rate in humans under steady-state and nonsteady-state conditions. In normal subjects, the appearance rate of glycerol in the post-absorptive state was 2.22 +/- 0.20 mumol X kg-1 X min-1, a value in agreement with those reported in studies with radioactively labeled tracers. The ratio nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) appearance rate/glycerol appearance rate ranged from 1.95 to 3.40. In insulin-dependent diabetic patients with a mild degree of metabolic control, the appearance rate of glycerol was 2.48 +/- 0.29 mumol X kg-1 X min-1. The volume of distribution of glycerol, determined by the bolus injection technique, was (mean) 0.306 l X kg-1 in normal subjects and 0.308 l X kg-1 in insulin-independent diabetic patients. To evaluate the usefulness of the method for determination of glycerol kinetics in nonsteady-state conditions, we infused six normal subjects with natural glycerol and calculated the isotopically determined glycerol appearance rate using a single compartment model (volume of distribution 0.31 l X kg-1). During these tests, the expected glycerol appearance rates were successively 5.03 +/- 0.33, 7.48 +/- 0.39, 9.94 +/- 0.34, 7.48 +/- 0.39, and 5.03 +/- 0.33 mumol +/- kg-1 X min-1, whereas the corresponding isotopically determined appearance rates were 4.62 +/- 0.45, 6.95 +/- 0.56, 10.85 +/- 0.51, 7.35 +/- 0.34, and 5.28 +/- 0.12 mumol X kg-1 X min-1

  18. Heterogeneous dissolution kinetics as a method of the granulometric analysis of polydispersed solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melichar, F.; Pourova, D.; Simova, L.; Zvonickova, J.

    1976-05-01

    The principles of determining the granulometric composition of polydisperse solids from kinetic data on the solubilities thereof are given in the theoretical part of the report. The conditions are stated under which characteristic curves (equations) may be determined. These equations define the relationship between the dissolved polydisperse fraction and the relative decrease of the characteristic size of the polydisperse particles. The characteristic curves are specific for the given granulometric polydispersion state. The experimentally determined characteristic curves, which are expressed analytically by means of an equivalent function, are analyzed using three independent methods, which make it possible to determine the granulometric composition of the dissolved polydispersion: the method of the ''reversed geometrical model'', the Akselrud model method, the granulometric atlas method. The granulometric compositions determined by these methods are compared and discussed. The methods proposed may be considered as further applicable methods in the granulometric particle analysis within the size range of 1 to 700 μm defining predominantly the granulometric spectrum of the primary dispersion, i.e. the deagglomerated particles. (author)

  19. Study on the numerical analysis of nuclear reactor kinetics equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    A two-step alternating direction explict method is proposed for the solution of the space-and time-dependent diffusion theory reactor kinetics equations in two space dimensions as a special case of the general class of alternating direction implicit method and the truncation error of this method is estimated. To test the validity of this method it is applied to the Pressurized Water Reactor and CANDU-PHW reactor which have been operating and underconstructing in Korea. The time dependent neutron flux of the PWR reactor during control rod insertion and time dependent neutronic power of CANDU-PHW reactor in the case of postulated loss of coolant accident are obtained from the numerical calculation results. The results of the PWR reactor problem are shown the close agreement between implicit-difference method used in the TWIGL program and this method, and the results of the CANDU-PHW reactor are compared with the results of improved quasistic method and modal method. (Author)

  20. Multisteps Global Kinetic Analysis of MSW Slow Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Aries Himawanto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to find relationships between single components slow pyrolysis characteristics and mixed component slow pyrolysis characteristics of segregated municipal solid wastes (MSW. The material of this research consists of organic wastes (bamboo wastes and banana leaves wastes and inorganic wastes (styrofoam wastes and snack wrapping wastes. The materials which used to study were the unprosessing waste. The samples were collected, dried and crushed until passing 20 mesh shieves then characterized in self manufactured macro balance. The thermogravimetry analyses were done to find the MSW slow pyrolysis characteristics. The 20 gram sample was placed in the furnace whose temperature is increased with 10 0C/min heating rate until reached 400 0 final temperature and held for 30 minutes before the sample is cooled into room temperature. One hundred ml/min nitrogen introduced from the bottom of furnace as a swept gas. The results of the research show that the global kinetic method could be used to predict the MSW single component activation energy but it should be modified to calculate the mixed sample activation energy . The predictive activation energy values which calculated based on weighed sum of single component have 18.5 % deviations if compared with experimental result.

  1. k-OptForce: integrating kinetics with flux balance analysis for strain design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Chowdhury

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Computational strain design protocols aim at the system-wide identification of intervention strategies for the enhanced production of biochemicals in microorganisms. Existing approaches relying solely on stoichiometry and rudimentary constraint-based regulation overlook the effects of metabolite concentrations and substrate-level enzyme regulation while identifying metabolic interventions. In this paper, we introduce k-OptForce, which integrates the available kinetic descriptions of metabolic steps with stoichiometric models to sharpen the prediction of intervention strategies for improving the bio-production of a chemical of interest. It enables identification of a minimal set of interventions comprised of both enzymatic parameter changes (for reactions with available kinetics and reaction flux changes (for reactions with only stoichiometric information. Application of k-OptForce to the overproduction of L-serine in E. coli and triacetic acid lactone (TAL in S. cerevisiae revealed that the identified interventions tend to cause less dramatic rearrangements of the flux distribution so as not to violate concentration bounds. In some cases the incorporation of kinetic information leads to the need for additional interventions as kinetic expressions render stoichiometry-only derived interventions infeasible by violating concentration bounds, whereas in other cases the kinetic expressions impart flux changes that favor the overproduction of the target product thereby requiring fewer direct interventions. A sensitivity analysis on metabolite concentrations shows that the required number of interventions can be significantly affected by changing the imposed bounds on metabolite concentrations. Furthermore, k-OptForce was capable of finding non-intuitive interventions aiming at alleviating the substrate-level inhibition of key enzymes in order to enhance the flux towards the product of interest, which cannot be captured by stoichiometry-alone analysis

  2. Visual evaluation of kinetic characteristics of PET probe for neuroreceptors using a two-phase graphic plot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Ikoma, Yoko; Seki, Chie; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ichise, Masanori; Suhara, Tetsuya; Kanno, Iwao

    2017-05-01

    Objectives In PET studies for neuroreceptors, tracer kinetics are described by the two-tissue compartment model (2-TCM), and binding parameters, including the total distribution volume (V T ), non-displaceable distribution volume (V ND ), and binding potential (BP ND ), can be determined from model parameters estimated by kinetic analysis. The stability of binding parameter estimates depends on the kinetic characteristics of radioligands. To describe these kinetic characteristics, we previously developed a two-phase graphic plot analysis in which V ND and V T can be estimated from the x-intercept of regression lines for early and delayed phases, respectively. In this study, we applied this graphic plot analysis to visual evaluation of the kinetic characteristics of radioligands for neuroreceptors, and investigated a relationship between the shape of these graphic plots and the stability of binding parameters estimated by the kinetic analysis with 2-TCM in simulated brain tissue time-activity curves (TACs) with various binding parameters. Methods 90-min TACs were generated with the arterial input function and assumed kinetic parameters according to 2-TCM. Graphic plot analysis was applied to these simulated TACs, and the curvature of the plot for each TAC was evaluated visually. TACs with several noise levels were also generated with various kinetic parameters, and the bias and variation of binding parameters estimated by kinetic analysis were calculated in each TAC. These bias and variation were compared with the shape of graphic plots. Results The graphic plots showed larger curvature for TACs with higher specific binding and slower dissociation of specific binding. The quartile deviations of V ND and BP ND determined by kinetic analysis were smaller for radioligands with slow dissociation. Conclusions The larger curvature of graphic plots for radioligands with slow dissociation might indicate a stable determination of V ND and BP ND by kinetic analysis. For

  3. A resource facility for kinetic analysis: modeling using the SAAM computer programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, D M; Boston, R C; Jacquez, J A; Zech, L

    1989-01-01

    Kinetic analysis and integrated system modeling have contributed significantly to understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of metabolic systems in humans and animals. Many experimental biologists are aware of the usefulness of these techniques and recognize that kinetic modeling requires special expertise. The Resource Facility for Kinetic Analysis (RFKA) provides this expertise through: (1) development and application of modeling technology for biomedical problems, and (2) development of computer-based kinetic modeling methodologies concentrating on the computer program Simulation, Analysis, and Modeling (SAAM) and its conversational version, CONversational SAAM (CONSAM). The RFKA offers consultation to the biomedical community in the use of modeling to analyze kinetic data and trains individuals in using this technology for biomedical research. Early versions of SAAM were widely applied in solving dosimetry problems; many users, however, are not familiar with recent improvements to the software. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint biomedical researchers in the dosimetry field with RFKA, which, together with the joint National Cancer Institute-National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute project, is overseeing SAAM development and applications. In addition, RFKA provides many service activities to the SAAM user community that are relevant to solving dosimetry problems.

  4. Kinetic modeling and dynamic analysis of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to bioethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadbahr, Jalil; Khan, Faisal; Zhang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Deeper understanding of saccharification and fermentation process. • A new kinetic model for dynamic analysis of the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. • Testing and validation of kinetic model. - Abstract: Kinetic modeling and dynamic analysis of the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of cellulose to ethanol was carried out in this study to determine the key reaction kinetics parameters and product inhibition features of the process. To obtain the more reliable kinetic parameters which can be applied for a wide range of operating conditions, batch SSF experiments were carried out at three enzyme loadings (10, 15 and 20 FPU/g cellulose) and two levels of initial concentrations of fermentable sugars (glucose and mannose). Results indicated that the maximum ethanol yield and concentration were achieved at high level of sugar concentrations with intermediate enzyme loading (15 FPU/g cellulose). Dynamic analysis of the acquired experimental results revealed that cellulase inhibition by cellobiose plays the most important role at high level of enzyme loading and low level of initial sugar concentrations. The inhibition of glucose becomes significant when high concentrations of sugars were present in the feedstock. Experimental results of SSF process also reveal that an efficient mixing between the phases helps to improve the ethanol yield significantly.

  5. Implicit unified gas-kinetic scheme for steady state solutions in all flow regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yajun; Zhong, Chengwen; Xu, Kun

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an implicit unified gas-kinetic scheme (UGKS) for non-equilibrium steady state flow computation. The UGKS is a direct modeling method for flow simulation in all regimes with the updates of both macroscopic flow variables and microscopic gas distribution function. By solving the macroscopic equations implicitly, a predicted equilibrium state can be obtained first through iterations. With the newly predicted equilibrium state, the evolution equation of the gas distribution function and the corresponding collision term can be discretized in a fully implicit way for fast convergence through iterations as well. The lower-upper symmetric Gauss-Seidel (LU-SGS) factorization method is implemented to solve both macroscopic and microscopic equations, which improves the efficiency of the scheme. Since the UGKS is a direct modeling method and its physical solution depends on the mesh resolution and the local time step, a physical time step needs to be fixed before using an implicit iterative technique with a pseudo-time marching step. Therefore, the physical time step in the current implicit scheme is determined by the same way as that in the explicit UGKS for capturing the physical solution in all flow regimes, but the convergence to a steady state speeds up through the adoption of a numerical time step with large CFL number. Many numerical test cases in different flow regimes from low speed to hypersonic ones, such as the Couette flow, cavity flow, and the flow passing over a cylinder, are computed to validate the current implicit method. The overall efficiency of the implicit UGKS can be improved by one or two orders of magnitude in comparison with the explicit one.

  6. A three-state kinetic agent-based model to analyze tax evasion dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crokidakis, Nuno

    2014-11-01

    In this work we study the problem of tax evasion on a fully-connected population. For this purpose, we consider that the agents may be in three different states, namely honest tax payers, tax evaders and undecided, that are individuals in an intermediate class among honests and evaders. Every individual can change his/her state following a kinetic exchange opinion dynamics, where the agents interact by pairs with competitive negative (with probability q) and positive (with probability 1-q) couplings, representing agreement/disagreement between pairs of agents. In addition, we consider the punishment rules of the Zaklan econophysics model, for which there is a probability pa of an audit each agent is subject to in every period and a length of time k detected tax evaders remain honest. Our results suggest that below the critical point qc=1/4 of the opinion dynamics the compliance is high, and the punishment rules have a small effect in the population. On the other hand, for q>qc the tax evasion can be considerably reduced by the enforcement mechanism. We also discuss the impact of the presence of the undecided agents in the evolution of the system.

  7. Environment-sensitive quinolone demonstrating long-lived fluorescence and unusually slow excited-state intramolecular proton transfer kinetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zamotaiev, O. M.; Shvadchak, Volodymyr; Sych, T. P.; Melnychuk, N. A.; Yushchenko, Dmytro A.; Mely, Y.; Pivovarenko, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2016), č. článku 034004. ISSN 2050-6120 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : quinolone * fluorescent probes * local polarity * hydration * excited-state intramolecular proton transfer * kinetics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2016

  8. Validation of Bayesian analysis of compartmental kinetic models in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, Arkadiusz; Li, Quanzheng; El Fakhri, Georges; Alpert, Nathaniel M

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic compartmental analysis is frequently used to compute physiologically relevant quantitative values from time series of images. In this paper, a new approach based on Bayesian analysis to obtain information about these parameters is presented and validated. The closed-form of the posterior distribution of kinetic parameters is derived with a hierarchical prior to model the standard deviation of normally distributed noise. Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are used for numerical estimation of the posterior distribution. Computer simulations of the kinetics of F18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) are used to demonstrate drawing statistical inferences about kinetic parameters and to validate the theory and implementation. Additionally, point estimates of kinetic parameters and covariance of those estimates are determined using the classical non-linear least squares approach. Posteriors obtained using methods proposed in this work are accurate as no significant deviation from the expected shape of the posterior was found (one-sided P>0.08). It is demonstrated that the results obtained by the standard non-linear least-square methods fail to provide accurate estimation of uncertainty for the same data set (P<0.0001). The results of this work validate new methods for a computer simulations of FDG kinetics. Results show that in situations where the classical approach fails in accurate estimation of uncertainty, Bayesian estimation provides an accurate information about the uncertainties in the parameters. Although a particular example of FDG kinetics was used in the paper, the methods can be extended for different pharmaceuticals and imaging modalities. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermochemistry and micro-kinetic analysis of methanol synthesis on ZnO (0001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Andrew James; Sehested, Jens; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we examine the thermochemistry of methanol synthesis intermediates using density functional theory (DFT) and analyze the methanol synthesis reaction network using a steady-state micro-kinetic model. The energetics for methanol synthesis over Zn-terminated ZnO (0001) are obtained from...... DFT calculations using the RPBE and BEEF-vdW functionals. The energies obtained from the two functionals are compared and it is determined that the BEEF-vdW functional is more appropriate for the reaction. The BEEF-vdW energetics are used to construct surface phase diagrams as a function of CO, H2O......, and H2 chemical potentials. The computed binding energies along with activation barriers from literature are used as inputs for a mean-field micro-kinetic model for methanol synthesis including the CO and CO2 hydrogenation routes and the water–gas shift reaction. The kinetic model is used to investigate...

  10. AIM analysis, synthetic, kinetic and mechanistic investigations of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    analysis (NPA), atoms in molecules (AIM) methods and CHelpG keyword. ... obtained from studies of the effect of solvent, structure of reactions (different alkyl groups within the dialkyl ...... compounds) have provided useful evidence for steps 1.

  11. Thermal degradation kinetics and isoconversional analysis of biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)/organomodified montmorillonite nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilias, Dimitris S.; Panayotidou, Elpiniki; Zuburtikudis, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/organically modified clay nanocomposites were prepared by the melt mixing method and were characterized using wide-angle X-ray diffraction. Their thermal degradation kinetics was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis at various heating rates. Further kinetic analysis was performed using isoconversional methods and the invariant kinetic parameters method was used to estimate the so-called 'true' kinetic parameters, i.e. the pre-exponential factor, A and the activation energy, E, as well as the reaction model. It was found that intercalated structures are formed and the thermal stability of the material is improved by the addition of the nano-filler. From the isoconversional analysis, it was found that the activation energy does not vary significantly with the degree of degradation denoting degradation in one step with similar values for pure PHB and for all nanocomposites. Using the invariant kinetic parameters method, it was found that the model that best describes the experimental data was that of Sestak-Berggren's with f(a) = α n (1 - α) m , where the value of n is always larger than m and is increasing with the amount of the nano-filler. The value of the 'true' activation energy was found to be about 100 kJ mol -1 for all nanocomposites and the pre-exponential factor for PHB was estimated equal to 5.35 x 10 9 min -1 . Finally, the values of the kinetic rate constant k were found to decrease with the amount of the nano-filler up to 3 wt%, while for amounts larger than 3 wt% k increased reaching a value greater than that of pure PHB for the 10 wt% nanocomposites.

  12. Development and Sensitivity Analysis of a Fully Kinetic Model of Sequential Reductive Dechlorination in Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malaguerra, Flavio; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2011-01-01

    experiments of complete trichloroethene (TCE) degradation in natural sediments. Global sensitivity analysis was performed using the Morris method and Sobol sensitivity indices to identify the most influential model parameters. Results show that the sulfate concentration and fermentation kinetics are the most...

  13. Modelling and simulation of a transketolase mediated reaction: Sensitivity analysis of kinetic parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayar, N.A.; Chen, B.H.; Lye, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we have used a proposed mathematical model, describing the carbon-carbon bond format ion reaction between beta-hydroxypyruvate and glycolaldehyde to synthesise L-erythrulose, catalysed by the enzyme transketolase, for the analysis of the sensitivity of the process to its kinetic...

  14. In silico modelling and analysis of ribosome kinetics and aa-tRNA competition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bošnački, D.; Pronk, T.E.; de Vink, E.P.

    2008-01-01

    We present a formal analysis of ribosome kinetics using probabilistic model checking and the tool Prism. We compute different parameters of the model, like probabilities of translation errors and average insertion times per codon. The model predicts strong correlation to the quotient of the

  15. On the graph and systems analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks with mass action kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Schaft, Arjan van der

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recent progresses on the interplay between the graph theory and systems theory, we revisit the analysis of reversible chemical reaction networks described by mass action kinetics by reformulating it using the graph knowledge of the underlying networks. Based on this formulation, we

  16. Noise and ac impedance analysis of ion transfer kinetics at the micro liquid/liquid interface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Josypčuk, Oksana; Holub, Karel; Mareček, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 56, JUL 2015 (2015), s. 43-45 ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-04630S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : noise analysis * liquid/liquid interface * ion transfer kinetics Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.569, year: 2015

  17. Polyadenylation state microarray (PASTA) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilharz, Traude H; Preiss, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all eukaryotic mRNAs terminate in a poly(A) tail that serves important roles in mRNA utilization. In the cytoplasm, the poly(A) tail promotes both mRNA stability and translation, and these functions are frequently regulated through changes in tail length. To identify the scope of poly(A) tail length control in a transcriptome, we developed the polyadenylation state microarray (PASTA) method. It involves the purification of mRNA based on poly(A) tail length using thermal elution from poly(U) sepharose, followed by microarray analysis of the resulting fractions. In this chapter we detail our PASTA approach and describe some methods for bulk and mRNA-specific poly(A) tail length measurements of use to monitor the procedure and independently verify the microarray data.

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of the polymerization of polyurethanes by a rheological method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucio, Beatriz; Fuente, José Luis de la, E-mail: fuentegj@inta.es

    2016-02-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis for the formation of a functional polyurethane (PU) has been carried out. • Rheological parameters were used to obtain the profile of the resin's curing degree. • Kamal-Sourour autocatalytic kinetic model describes well this polyaddition reaction. • A deeper understanding of the mechanism of PU systems has been achieved. • This metallo-PU finds its application in the chemistry of advanced energetic materials. - Abstract: As part of an investigation into the mechanism and chemorheology of linear segmented polyurethane (PU) systems, this paper presents the kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the reaction between an advanced functional metallo-polyol derivative of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), (ferrocenylbutyl)dimethylsilane grafted HTPB, and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI). The evolution of viscoelastic properties, such as the storage modulus (G′), was recorded in bulk under isothermal conditions at four different temperatures between 50 and 80 °C, and a resin curing degree profile was obtained for this elastic modulus. The use of the Kamal-Sourour autocatalytic kinetic model was proposed, describing the overall curing process perfectly. All the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, including reaction orders, kinetic constants and activation energy, were determined for the polyaddition reaction under study. A relevant autocatalysis effect, promoted by the urethane group, has been found. The isoconversion method was also used to analyze the variation of the global activation energy with conversion. The global activation energy increases slightly as the curing reaction proceeds with a maximum value reached at approximately 30% conversion. In addition, the Eyring parameters were calculated from the obtained kinetic data.

  19. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of the polymerization of polyurethanes by a rheological method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucio, Beatriz; Fuente, José Luis de la

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis for the formation of a functional polyurethane (PU) has been carried out. • Rheological parameters were used to obtain the profile of the resin's curing degree. • Kamal-Sourour autocatalytic kinetic model describes well this polyaddition reaction. • A deeper understanding of the mechanism of PU systems has been achieved. • This metallo-PU finds its application in the chemistry of advanced energetic materials. - Abstract: As part of an investigation into the mechanism and chemorheology of linear segmented polyurethane (PU) systems, this paper presents the kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the reaction between an advanced functional metallo-polyol derivative of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), (ferrocenylbutyl)dimethylsilane grafted HTPB, and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI). The evolution of viscoelastic properties, such as the storage modulus (G′), was recorded in bulk under isothermal conditions at four different temperatures between 50 and 80 °C, and a resin curing degree profile was obtained for this elastic modulus. The use of the Kamal-Sourour autocatalytic kinetic model was proposed, describing the overall curing process perfectly. All the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters, including reaction orders, kinetic constants and activation energy, were determined for the polyaddition reaction under study. A relevant autocatalysis effect, promoted by the urethane group, has been found. The isoconversion method was also used to analyze the variation of the global activation energy with conversion. The global activation energy increases slightly as the curing reaction proceeds with a maximum value reached at approximately 30% conversion. In addition, the Eyring parameters were calculated from the obtained kinetic data.

  20. Kinetics and mechanical stability of the fibril state control fibril formation time of polypeptide chains: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Li, Mai Suan; Kmiecik, Sebastian; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Buhimschi, Irina Alexandra

    2018-06-01

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite much progress in the understanding of the protein aggregation process, the factors governing fibril formation rates and fibril stability have not been fully understood. Using lattice models, we have shown that the fibril formation time is controlled by the kinetic stability of the fibril state but not by its energy. Having performed all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations with the GROMOS43a1 force field for full-length amyloid beta peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42 and truncated peptides, we demonstrated that kinetic stability can be accessed via mechanical stability in such a way that the higher the mechanical stability or the kinetic stability, the faster the fibril formation. This result opens up a new way for predicting fibril formation rates based on mechanical stability that may be easily estimated by steered molecular dynamics.

  1. Comparative analysis among several methods used to solve the point kinetic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, Anderson L.; Goncalves, Alessandro da C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this work consists on the methodology development for comparison of several methods for the kinetics equations points solution. The evaluated methods are: the finite differences method, the stiffness confinement method, improved stiffness confinement method and the piecewise constant approximations method. These methods were implemented and compared through a systematic analysis that consists basically of confronting which one of the methods consume smaller computational time with higher precision. It was calculated the relative which function is to combine both criteria in order to reach the goal. Through the analyses of the performance factor it is possible to choose the best method for the solution of point kinetics equations. (author)

  2. Comparative analysis among several methods used to solve the point kinetic equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Anderson L.; Goncalves, Alessandro da C.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; E-mails: alupo@if.ufrj.br; agoncalves@con.ufrj.br; aquilino@lmp.ufrj.br; fernando@con.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    The main objective of this work consists on the methodology development for comparison of several methods for the kinetics equations points solution. The evaluated methods are: the finite differences method, the stiffness confinement method, improved stiffness confinement method and the piecewise constant approximations method. These methods were implemented and compared through a systematic analysis that consists basically of confronting which one of the methods consume smaller computational time with higher precision. It was calculated the relative which function is to combine both criteria in order to reach the goal. Through the analyses of the performance factor it is possible to choose the best method for the solution of point kinetics equations. (author)

  3. Development of 3-dimensional neutronics kinetics analysis code for CANDU-PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. W.; Kim, C. H.; Hong, I. S.

    2005-02-01

    The followings are the major contents and scope of the research : development of kinetics power calculation module, formulation of space-dependent neutron transient analysis - implementation of 3-D and 2-G unified nodal method, verification of the kinetics module by benchmark problem - 3-D PHWR kinetics benchmark problem suggested by AECL, reactor trip simulation by shutdown system 1 in Wolsong unit 2. Development of a dynamic linked library code, SCAN D LL, for the coupled calculation with RELAP-CANDU : modeling of shutdown system 1, development of automatic shutdown module - automatic trip module based on rate log power control logic, automatic insertion of shutdown system 1. Development of a link code for coupled calculation - development of SCAN D LL(windows version), verification of coupled code by - 40% reactor inlet header break LOCA power pulse, 100% reactor outlet header break LOCA power pulse, 50% pump suction break LOCA power pulse

  4. Characteristics and kinetic studies of Hydrilla verticillata pyrolysis via thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiquan; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Genbao; Chen, Xiaojuan; Hu, Mian; Laghari, Mahmood; Wang, Xun; Guo, Dabin

    2015-10-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics and kinetic of Hydrilla verticillata (HV) have been investigated using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that the pyrolysis behavior of HV can be divided into two independent stages. The kinetics of Stage I was investigated using a distributed activation energy model (DAEM) with discrete 99 first-order reactions. Stage II was an independent stage which corresponds to the decomposition of calcium oxalate, whose kinetics was studied using iso-conversional method together with compensation effect and master-plots method. The activation energies ranged from 92.39 to 506.17 and 190.42 to 222.48 kJ/mol for the first and second stages respectively. Calculated data gave very good fit to the experimental data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of senior high school student understanding on gas kinetic theory material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anri, Y.; Maknun, J.; Chandra, D. T.

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this research conducted to find out student understanding profile about gas kinetic theory. Particularly, on ideal gas law material, ideal gas equations and kinetic energy of ideal gas. This research was conducted on student of class XII in one of the schools in Bandung. This research is a descriptive research. The data of this research collected by using test instrument which was the essay that has been developed by the researcher based on Bloom’s Taxonomy revised. Based on the analysis result to student answer, this research discovered that whole student has low understanding in the material of gas kinetic theory. This low understanding caused of the misconception of the student, student attitude on physic subjects, and teacher teaching method who are less helpful in obtaining clear pictures in material being taught.

  6. Mechanistic study of manganese-substituted glycerol dehydrogenase using a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Baishan; Niu, Jin; Ren, Hong; Guo, Yingxia; Wang, Shizhen

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic insights regarding the activity enhancement of dehydrogenase by metal ion substitution were investigated by a simple method using a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. By profiling the binding energy of both the substrate and product, the metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was revealed. Glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) from Klebsiella pneumoniae sp., which demonstrated an improvement in activity by the substitution of a zinc ion with a manganese ion, was used as a model for the mechanistic study of metal ion substitution. A kinetic model based on an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism was proposed considering the noncompetitive product inhibition of dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and the competitive product inhibition of NADH. By obtaining preliminary kinetic parameters of substrate and product inhibition, the number of estimated parameters was reduced from 10 to 4 for a nonlinear regression-based kinetic parameter estimation. The simulated values of time-concentration curves fit the experimental values well, with an average relative error of 11.5% and 12.7% for Mn-GDH and GDH, respectively. A comparison of the binding energy of enzyme ternary complex for Mn-GDH and GDH derived from kinetic parameters indicated that metal ion substitution accelerated the release of dioxyacetone. The metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was explicated.

  7. Mechanistic study of manganese-substituted glycerol dehydrogenase using a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baishan Fang

    Full Text Available Mechanistic insights regarding the activity enhancement of dehydrogenase by metal ion substitution were investigated by a simple method using a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. By profiling the binding energy of both the substrate and product, the metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was revealed. Glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH from Klebsiella pneumoniae sp., which demonstrated an improvement in activity by the substitution of a zinc ion with a manganese ion, was used as a model for the mechanistic study of metal ion substitution. A kinetic model based on an ordered Bi-Bi mechanism was proposed considering the noncompetitive product inhibition of dihydroxyacetone (DHA and the competitive product inhibition of NADH. By obtaining preliminary kinetic parameters of substrate and product inhibition, the number of estimated parameters was reduced from 10 to 4 for a nonlinear regression-based kinetic parameter estimation. The simulated values of time-concentration curves fit the experimental values well, with an average relative error of 11.5% and 12.7% for Mn-GDH and GDH, respectively. A comparison of the binding energy of enzyme ternary complex for Mn-GDH and GDH derived from kinetic parameters indicated that metal ion substitution accelerated the release of dioxyacetone. The metal ion's role in catalysis enhancement was explicated.

  8. Development, validation and application of multi-point kinetics model in RELAP5 for analysis of asymmetric nuclear transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Santosh K., E-mail: santosh@aerb.gov.in [Nuclear Safety Analysis Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai 400094 (India); Obaidurrahman, K. [Nuclear Safety Analysis Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai 400094 (India); Iyer, Kannan N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Gaikwad, Avinash J. [Nuclear Safety Analysis Division, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • A multi-point kinetics model is developed for RELAP5 system thermal hydraulics code. • Model is validated against extensive 3D kinetics code. • RELAP5 multi-point kinetics formulation is used to investigate critical break for LOCA in PHWR. - Abstract: Point kinetics approach in system code RELAP5 limits its use for many of the reactivity induced transients, which involve asymmetric core behaviour. Development of fully coupled 3D core kinetics code with system thermal-hydraulics is the ultimate requirement in this regard; however coupling and validation of 3D kinetics module with system code is cumbersome and it also requires access to source code. An intermediate approach with multi-point kinetics is appropriate and relatively easy to implement for analysis of several asymmetric transients for large cores. Multi-point kinetics formulation is based on dividing the entire core into several regions and solving ODEs describing kinetics in each region. These regions are interconnected by spatial coupling coefficients which are estimated from diffusion theory approximation. This model offers an advantage that associated ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing multi-point kinetics formulation can be solved using numerical methods to the desired level of accuracy and thus allows formulation based on user defined control variables, i.e., without disturbing the source code and hence also avoiding associated coupling issues. Euler's method has been used in the present formulation to solve several coupled ODEs internally at each time step. The results have been verified against inbuilt point-kinetics models of RELAP5 and validated against 3D kinetics code TRIKIN. The model was used to identify the critical break in RIH of a typical large PHWR core. The neutronic asymmetry produced in the core due to the system induced transient was effectively handled by the multi-point kinetics model overcoming the limitation of in-built point kinetics model

  9. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Analysis of Acetyl-CoA Activation of Staphylococcus aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhold, Lauren E; Bridges, Lance C; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Zeczycki, Tonya N

    2017-07-11

    Allosteric regulation of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) activity is pivotal to maintaining metabolic homeostasis. In contrast, dysregulated PC activity contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, rendering PC a possible target for allosteric therapeutic development. Recent research efforts have focused on demarcating the role of acetyl-CoA, one of the most potent activators of PC, in coordinating catalytic events within the multifunctional enzyme. Herein, we report a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of acetyl-CoA activation of the Staphylococcus aureus PC (SaPC)-catalyzed carboxylation of pyruvate to identify novel means by which acetyl-CoA synchronizes catalytic events within the PC tetramer. Kinetic and linked-function analysis, or thermodynamic linkage analysis, indicates that the substrates of the biotin carboxylase and carboxyl transferase domain are energetically coupled in the presence of acetyl-CoA. In contrast, both kinetic and energetic coupling between the two domains is lost in the absence of acetyl-CoA, suggesting a functional role for acetyl-CoA in facilitating the long-range transmission of substrate-induced conformational changes within the PC tetramer. Interestingly, thermodynamic activation parameters for the SaPC-catalyzed carboxylation of pyruvate are largely independent of acetyl-CoA. Our results also reveal the possibility that global conformational changes give rise to observed species-specific thermodynamic activation parameters. Taken together, our kinetic and thermodynamic results provide a possible allosteric mechanism by which acetyl-CoA coordinates catalysis within the PC tetramer.

  10. Modeling capsid kinetics assembly from the steady state distribution of multi-sizes aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hozé, Nathanaël; Holcman, David

    2014-01-24

    The kinetics of aggregation for particles of various sizes depends on their diffusive arrival and fusion at a specific nucleation site. We present here a mean-field approximation and a stochastic jump model for aggregates at equilibrium. This approach is an alternative to the classical Smoluchowski equations that do not have a close form and are not solvable in general. We analyze these mean-field equations and obtain the kinetics of a cluster formation. Our approach provides a simplified theoretical framework to study the kinetics of viral capsid formation, such as HIV from the self-assembly of the structural proteins Gag.

  11. Kinetic research on heterogeneously catalysed processes: a questionnaire on the state-of-the-art in industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, A.N.R.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Marin, G.B.; Steijns, M.H.G.M.

    1997-01-01

    On the initiative of the Working Party `Chemical Engineering in the Applications of Catalysis¿ of the European Federation of Chemical Engineering an assessment of the issues in the determination and application of kinetic data within the European industry was performed. The basis of the analysis

  12. Physicochemical analysis and nonisothermal kinetic study of sertraline–lactose binary mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak Ghaderi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the physicochemical stability of sertraline with lactose was evaluated in drug-excipient binary mixtures. Different physicochemical methods such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry were applied to confirm the incompatibility. The final aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetic parameters using a fast and sensitive DSC method. Solid-state kinetic parameters were derived from nonisothermally stressed physical mixtures using different thermal models such as Friedman, Flynn–Wall–Ozawa, and Kissinger–Akahira–Sunose. Overall, the instability of sertraline with lactose was successfully evaluated. Further confirmation was made by tracking the Maillard reaction product of sertraline and lactose by mass spectrometry. DSC scans provided important information about the stability of sertraline in solid-state condition and also revealed the related thermokinetic parameters in order to understand the nature of the chemical instability.

  13. Physicochemical analysis and nonisothermal kinetic study of sertraline-lactose binary mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Faranak; Nemati, Mahboob; Siahi-Shadbad, Mohammad Reza; Valizadeh, Hadi; Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz

    2017-07-01

    In the present study the physicochemical stability of sertraline with lactose was evaluated in drug-excipient binary mixtures. Different physicochemical methods such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry were applied to confirm the incompatibility. The final aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetic parameters using a fast and sensitive DSC method. Solid-state kinetic parameters were derived from nonisothermally stressed physical mixtures using different thermal models such as Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose. Overall, the instability of sertraline with lactose was successfully evaluated. Further confirmation was made by tracking the Maillard reaction product of sertraline and lactose by mass spectrometry. DSC scans provided important information about the stability of sertraline in solid-state condition and also revealed the related thermokinetic parameters in order to understand the nature of the chemical instability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Thermogravimetric and Kinetic Analysis of Cassava Starch Based Bioplastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanang Eko Wahyuningtyas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cassava starch based bioplasticfor packaging application has great potency because of the various starch-producing plants in Indonesia.Bioplasticcan contribute to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels andpetroleumthat can solve the environmentalproblem.Thepurpose of this research is to find out the thermal decomposition and the activation energy of cassava starch based bioplastic. The methods weresynthesis bioplastic with cassava starch as main component and glycerol as plasticizer. The thermogravimetry analysis was conducted to obtain the decomposition process mechanism of bioplastic and the heating valueof bioplasticwas measured  using theadiabatic bomb calorimetric.  Data analysis was conducted using  a fitting model approach with an acikalin method to determine the activation energy. The result of thethermogravimetricanalysis showed thatbioplasticisgraduallydecomposedto the moisture, volatilematter, fixed carbon, andash in four stages mechanism. Totally decomposition of bioplastic was 530°C, then all of bioplastic was become the ash. The activation energy in the early and primary thermal decomposition stages are 1.27 kJ/moland 22.62 kJ/mol, respectively and heating valueof bioplastic is 15.16 MJ/kg.

  15. Kinetic and electron-electron energies for convex sums of ground state densities with degeneracies and fractional electron number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Mel, E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Anderson, James S. M.; Zadeh, Farnaz Heidar; Ayers, Paul W., E-mail: ayers@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: mlevy@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-05-14

    Properties of exact density functionals provide useful constraints for the development of new approximate functionals. This paper focuses on convex sums of ground-level densities. It is observed that the electronic kinetic energy of a convex sum of degenerate ground-level densities is equal to the convex sum of the kinetic energies of the individual degenerate densities. (The same type of relationship holds also for the electron-electron repulsion energy.) This extends a known property of the Levy-Valone Ensemble Constrained-Search and the Lieb Legendre-Transform refomulations of the Hohenberg-Kohn functional to the individual components of the functional. Moreover, we observe that the kinetic and electron-repulsion results also apply to densities with fractional electron number (even if there are no degeneracies), and we close with an analogous point-wise property involving the external potential. Examples where different degenerate states have different kinetic energy and electron-nuclear attraction energy are given; consequently, individual components of the ground state electronic energy can change abruptly when the molecular geometry changes. These discontinuities are predicted to be ubiquitous at conical intersections, complicating the development of universally applicable density-functional approximations.

  16. Revealing kinetics and state-dependent binding properties of IKur-targeting drugs that maximize atrial fibrillation selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinwood, Nicholas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora

    2017-09-01

    The KV1.5 potassium channel, which underlies the ultra-rapid delayed-rectifier current (IKur) and is predominantly expressed in atria vs. ventricles, has emerged as a promising target to treat atrial fibrillation (AF). However, while numerous KV1.5-selective compounds have been screened, characterized, and tested in various animal models of AF, evidence of antiarrhythmic efficacy in humans is still lacking. Moreover, current guidelines for pre-clinical assessment of candidate drugs heavily rely on steady-state concentration-response curves or IC50 values, which can overlook adverse cardiotoxic effects. We sought to investigate the effects of kinetics and state-dependent binding of IKur-targeting drugs on atrial electrophysiology in silico and reveal the ideal properties of IKur blockers that maximize anti-AF efficacy and minimize pro-arrhythmic risk. To this aim, we developed a new Markov model of IKur that describes KV1.5 gating based on experimental voltage-clamp data in atrial myocytes from patient right-atrial samples in normal sinus rhythm. We extended the IKur formulation to account for state-specificity and kinetics of KV1.5-drug interactions and incorporated it into our human atrial cell model. We simulated 1- and 3-Hz pacing protocols in drug-free conditions and with a [drug] equal to the IC50 value. The effects of binding and unbinding kinetics were determined by examining permutations of the forward (kon) and reverse (koff) binding rates to the closed, open, and inactivated states of the KV1.5 channel. We identified a subset of ideal drugs exhibiting anti-AF electrophysiological parameter changes at fast pacing rates (effective refractory period prolongation), while having little effect on normal sinus rhythm (limited action potential prolongation). Our results highlight that accurately accounting for channel interactions with drugs, including kinetics and state-dependent binding, is critical for developing safer and more effective pharmacological anti

  17. Screw-vector bond graphs for kinetic-static modelling and analysis of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidard, Catherine

    1994-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the kinetic-static modelling and analysis of spatial mechanisms used in robotics systems. A framework is proposed, which embodies a geometrical and a network approach for kinetic-static modelling. For this purpose we use screw theory and bond graphs. A new form of bond graphs is introduced: the screw-vector bond graph, whose power variables are defined to be wrenches and twists expressed as intrinsic screw-vectors. The mechanism is then identified as a network, whose components are kinematic pairs and whose topology is described by a directed graph. A screw-vector Simple Junction Structure represents the topological constraints. Kinematic pairs are represented by one-port elements, defined by two reciprocal screw-vector spaces. Using dual bases of screw-vectors, a generic decomposition of kinematic pair elements is given. The reduction of kinetic-static models of series and parallel kinematic chains is used in order to derive kinetic-static functional models in geometric form. Thereupon, the computational causality assignment is adapted for the graphical analysis of the mobility and the functioning of spatial mechanisms, based on completely or incompletely specified models. (author) [fr

  18. Two dimensional kinetic analysis of electrostatic harmonic plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca-Pongutá, E. C.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Yoon, P. H. [IPST, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); SSR, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Electrostatic harmonic Langmuir waves are virtual modes excited in weakly turbulent plasmas, first observed in early laboratory beam-plasma experiments as well as in rocket-borne active experiments in space. However, their unequivocal presence was confirmed through computer simulated experiments and subsequently theoretically explained. The peculiarity of harmonic Langmuir waves is that while their existence requires nonlinear response, their excitation mechanism and subsequent early time evolution are governed by essentially linear process. One of the unresolved theoretical issues regards the role of nonlinear wave-particle interaction process over longer evolution time period. Another outstanding issue is that existing theories for these modes are limited to one-dimensional space. The present paper carries out two dimensional theoretical analysis of fundamental and (first) harmonic Langmuir waves for the first time. The result shows that harmonic Langmuir wave is essentially governed by (quasi)linear process and that nonlinear wave-particle interaction plays no significant role in the time evolution of the wave spectrum. The numerical solutions of the two-dimensional wave spectra for fundamental and harmonic Langmuir waves are also found to be consistent with those obtained by direct particle-in-cell simulation method reported in the literature.

  19. The protonation state around TyrD/TyrD• in photosystem II is reflected in its biphasic oxidation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Ho, Felix; Ahmadova, Nigar; Brinkert, Katharina; Hammarström, Leif; Mamedov, Fikret; Styring, Stenbjörn

    2017-02-01

    The tyrosine residue D2-Tyr160 (Tyr D ) in photosystem II (PSII) can be oxidized through charge equilibrium with the oxygen evolving complex in PSII. The kinetics of the electron transfer from Tyr D has been followed using time-resolved EPR spectroscopy after triggering the oxidation of pre-reduced Tyr D by a short laser flash. After its oxidation Tyr D is observed as a neutral radical (Tyr D • ) indicating that the oxidation is coupled to a deprotonation event. The redox state of Tyr D was reported to be determined by the two water positions identified in the crystal structure of PSII [Saito et al. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 7690]. To assess the mechanism of the proton coupled electron transfer of Tyr D the oxidation kinetics has been followed in the presence of deuterated buffers, thereby resolving the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of Tyr D oxidation at different H/D concentrations. Two kinetic phases of Tyr D oxidation - the fast phase (msec-sec time range) and the slow phase (tens of seconds time range) were resolved as was previously reported [Vass and Styring (1991) Biochemistry 30, 830]. In the presence of deuterated buffers the kinetics was significantly slower compared to normal buffers. Furthermore, although the kinetics were faster at both high pH and pD values the observed KIE was found to be similar (~2.4) over the whole pL range investigated. We assign the fast and slow oxidation phases to two populations of PSII centers with different water positions, proximal and distal respectively, and discuss possible deprotonation events in the vicinity of Tyr D . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensitivity analysis in oxidation ditch modelling: the effect of variations in stoichiometric, kinetic and operating parameters on the performance indices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abusam, A.A.A.; Keesman, K.J.; Straten, van G.; Spanjers, H.; Meinema, K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the factorial sensitivity analysis methodology in studying the influence of variations in stoichiometric, kinetic and operating parameters on the performance indices of an oxidation ditch simulation model (benchmark). Factorial sensitivity analysis

  1. Kinetic behavior of manganese in mangrove ecosystem - Itacuruca, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canesin, Fatima de Paiva; Bellido Junior, Alfredo Victor

    2002-01-01

    The redox cycling of manganese has pronounced effects on the adsorption of trace elements onto oxide surfaces is leaving these unavailable for the biota. Specific constants for the kinetics oxidation reaction of Mn in mangrove ecosystems have been measured. Water samples with different characteristics were collected in a tidal creek in a mangrove forest growth at Itacuruca, RJ. The methodology used to study the kinetics was, incubation of the water, in laboratory, with Mn-54. The oxides precipitates were filtered at constant intervals of time. The Mn-54 decay on the filters and filtrates were counted, for 600 s, in HPGe and associated electronics ORTEC. Ln A x t diagram showed an autocatalytic kinetic behavior. Temperature, pH, O 2 dissolved, salinity, Mn (II) and Mn (IV) were appraised. The rate constant k ' 1 1 varied from 1,0 x 10 -5 to 4,0 x 10 -5 s -1 . The k ' 2 rate constant had a larger variation, according to the other kinetic model that shows more of a heterogeneous affect, or catalysis via bacteria. We found a mean half life for Mn(II) of 12 h for the homogeneous kinetics in the mangrove. Rate constants increased with the pH, temperature, O 2 dissolved, tide height, and decrease with salinity. (author)

  2. Global Kinetic Analysis of Mammalian E3 Reveals pH-dependent NAD+/NADH Regulation, Physiological Kinetic Reversibility, and Catalytic Optimum*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxley, Michael A.; Beard, Daniel A.; Bazil, Jason N.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian E3 is an essential mitochondrial enzyme responsible for catalyzing the terminal reaction in the oxidative catabolism of several metabolites. E3 is a key regulator of metabolic fuel selection as a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc). E3 regulates PDHc activity by altering the affinity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, an inhibitor of the enzyme complex, through changes in reduction and acetylation state of lipoamide moieties set by the NAD+/NADH ratio. Thus, an accurate kinetic model of E3 is needed to predict overall mammalian PDHc activity. Here, we have combined numerous literature data sets and new equilibrium spectroscopic experiments with a multitude of independently collected forward and reverse steady-state kinetic assays using pig heart E3. The latter kinetic assays demonstrate a pH-dependent transition of NAD+ activation to inhibition, shown here, to our knowledge, for the first time in a single consistent data set. Experimental data were analyzed to yield a thermodynamically constrained four-redox-state model of E3 that simulates pH-dependent activation/inhibition and active site redox states for various conditions. The developed model was used to determine substrate/product conditions that give maximal E3 rates and show that, due to non-Michaelis-Menten behavior, the maximal flux is different compared with the classically defined kcat. PMID:26644471

  3. Deconvolution analysis of sup(99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate kinetics in metabolic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knop, J.; Kroeger, E.; Stritzke, P.; Schneider, C.; Kruse, H.P.; Hamburg Univ.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetics of sup(99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) and 47 Ca were studied in three patients with osteoporosis, three patients with hyperparathyroidism, and two patients with osteomalacia. The activities of sup(99m)Tc-MDP were recorded in the lumbar spine, paravertebral soft tissues, and in venous blood samples for 1 h after injection. The results were submitted to deconvolution analysis to determine regional bone accumulation rates. 47 Ca kinetics were analysed by a linear two-compartment model quantitating short-term mineral exchange, exchangeable bone calcium, and calcium accretion. The sup(99m)Tc-MDP accumulation rates were small in osteoporosis, greater in hyperparathyroidism, and greatest in osteomalacia. No correlations were obtained between sup(99m)Tc-MDP bone accumulation rates and the results of 47 Ca kinetics. However, there was a significant relationship between the level of serum alkaline phosphatase and bone accumulation rates (R = 0.71, P 47 Ca kinetics might suggest a preferential binding of sup(99m)Tc-MDP to the organic matrix of the bone, as has been suggested by other authors on the basis of experimental and clinical investigations. (orig.)

  4. Measures of the zero power nuclear reactor's kinetic parameters with application of noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, F.R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish an experimental technique based on noise analysis for measuring the ratio of kinetic parameters β/ Λ and the power of the Zero Power Nuclear Reactor IPEN-MB 01. A through study of the microscopic and macroscopic noise analysis techniques has been carried out. The Langevin technique and the point kinetic model were chosen to describe the stochastic phenomena that occur in the zero power reactor. Measurements have been made using two compensated ionization chambers localized in the water reflector at symmetric positions in order to minimize spatial effects on the neutron flux fluctuation. Power calibrations based on the low frequency plateau of the cross-power spectral density has also been carried out. (author)

  5. Distributed activation energy model for kinetic analysis of multi-stage hydropyrolysis of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Li, W.; Wang, N.; Li, B. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Inst. of Coal Chemistry

    2003-07-01

    Based on the new analysis of distributed activation energy model, a bicentral distribution model was introduced to the analysis of multi-stage hydropyrolysis of coal. The hydropyrolysis for linear temperature programming with and without holding stage were mathematically described and the corresponding kinetic expressions were achieved. Based on the kinetics, the hydropyrolysis (HyPr) and multi-stage hydropyrolysis (MHyPr) of Xundian brown coal was simulated. The results shows that both Mo catalyst and 2-stage holding can lower the apparent activation energy of hydropyrolysis and make activation energy distribution become narrow. Besides, there exists an optimum Mo loading of 0.2% for HyPy of Xundian lignite. 10 refs.

  6. Line shape and thermal Kinetics analysis of the Fe2+ -band in Brazilian Green beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotani, S.; Furtado, W.; Antonini, R.; Dias, O.L.

    1988-03-01

    The optical absorption spectra study through isothermal treatments of the σ- and Π-polarized bands of Fe 2+ -band is reported. It was shown a linear correlation between these bands through thermal treatments. Irradiation with γ-rays from 60 Co, showed the decrease of this band. The line shape analysis and the discussions lend us to assign the Π- and σ-polarized bands to Fe 2+ ions in the structural channels with and without neighbour water molecules, respectively. The kinetics analysis through a ''bimolecular-like'' model gives untrapping parameter with Arrhenius behavior. The retrapping and recombination parameters showed a behavior proportional to T 1/2 - T 1/2 o which were explained from free electron distribution of velocities and minimum untrapped electron energy due to a potential barrier of the trap. The kinetics cut-off temperature, T 0 , agrees with the previous experimental observation. (author) [pt

  7. Cortical surface-based analysis reduces bias and variance in kinetic modeling of brain PET data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Douglas N; Svarer, Claus; Fisher, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory (i.e., voxelwise) spatial methods are commonly used in neuroimaging to identify areas that show an effect when a region-of-interest (ROI) analysis cannot be performed because no strong a priori anatomical hypothesis exists. However, noise at a single voxel is much higher than noise...... in a ROI making noise management critical to successful exploratory analysis. This work explores how preprocessing choices affect the bias and variability of voxelwise kinetic modeling analysis of brain positron emission tomography (PET) data. These choices include the use of volume- or cortical surface...

  8. The derivative assay--an analysis of two fast components of DNA rejoining kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The DNA rejoining kinetics of human U-118 MG cells were studied after gamma-irradiation with 4 Gy. The analysis of the sealing rate of the induced DNA strand breaks was made with a modification of the DNA unwinding technique. The modification meant that rather than just monitoring the number of existing breaks at each time of analysis, the velocity, at which the rejoining process proceeded, was determined. Two apparent first-order components of single-strand break repair could be identified during the 25 min of analysis. The half-times for the two components were 1.9 and 16 min, respectively

  9. Kinetic parameters of nitridation of molybdenum and niobium alloys with various structure states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodkin, G.A.; Bulgach, A.A.; Likhacheva, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    Effect of preliminary plastic strain under rolling on kinetic parameters of nitridation of VN-2AEh, VN-3 niobium alloys and molybdenum alloy with hafnium is investigated. Extreme character of dependence of kinetic parameters of nitridation on the degree of reduction under rolling is determined. Preliminary plastic strain at negligible reduction is shown to accelerate growth of the zone of internal nitridation and decelerates growth of the nitride zone. Nitrogen atom removal from the surface to the centre is retarded at the increase of the degree of reduction up to 50% and higher. The degree of deformations is the higher the lower nitridation temperature is

  10. Thermal behavior and kinetics assessment of ethanol/gasoline blends during combustion by thermogravimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3, CEP 12.516-410 Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil); U.T.P. – Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Pereira, Risaralda (Colombia))" data-affiliation=" (UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Campus of Guaratinguetá, Department of Energy, Laboratory of Combustion and Carbon Capture LC3, CEP 12.516-410 Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil); U.T.P. – Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Pereira, Risaralda (Colombia))" >Rios Quiroga, Luis Carlos; 3, CEP 12.516-410 Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil))" data-affiliation=" (UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Campus of Guaratinguetá, Department of Energy, Laboratory of Combustion and Carbon Capture LC3, CEP 12.516-410 Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil))" >Balestieri, José 3, CEP 12.516-410 Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil))" data-affiliation=" (UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Campus of Guaratinguetá, Department of Energy, Laboratory of Combustion and Carbon Capture LC3, CEP 12.516-410 Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil))" >Antonio Perrella; 3, CEP 12.516-410 Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil))" data-affiliation=" (UNESP – Univ Estadual Paulista, Campus of Guaratinguetá, Department of Energy, Laboratory of Combustion and Carbon Capture LC3, CEP 12.516-410 Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil))" >Ávila, Ivonete

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition events were obtained. • Thermal analysis was used as a tool for understanding combustion processes. • Blends would be classified using thermogravimetric analysis technics. • Synergistic effect of ethanol mixed with gasoline was studied and defined. • Relative error and activation energy values were used to analyze the synergy. - Abstract: The use of ethanol as a fuel or as an additive blended with gasoline is very important for most countries, which aim to reduce the heavy dependence on fossil fuels and mitigate greenhouse gases emission. An increased use of ethanol-gasoline blends has placed great relevance on acquiring knowledge about their physical and chemical properties. Thus, knowledge of such properties favors a better understanding of the effect of the percentage of ethanol/gasoline blends on engine performance. Thence, the present study has established a correlation between activation energy and synergetic effects, obtained by a thermal analysis, and ethanol content in gasoline for different blends in order to use this technique as a tool to classify these blends in the process in order to obtain useful energy in spark ignition engines. For such a purpose, a kinetic study has been conducted through a simultaneous thermal analysis system – TGA (thermogravimetry analysis) and DTA (differential thermal analysis) by following the methodology of non-isothermal tests. Thermogravimetric tests were performed and fuel activation energies for gasoline, ethanol, and percentages of 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 50, and 75% (%v) ethanol mixed with gasoline, which was achieved by the model free kinetics. The analysis results suggest that the theoretical curves characteristics of the thermal decomposition of ethanol-gasoline blends are rather different due to their ethanol content. Furthermore, it was observed significant interactions and synergistic effects, especially regarding those with low ethanol

  11. Neurologic state transitions in the eye and brain: kinetics of loss and recovery of vision and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whinnery, Typ; Forster, Estrella M

    2015-01-01

    Visual alterations, peripheral light loss (PLL) and blackout (BO), are components of acceleration (+Gz) induced loss of consciousness (LOC) and recovery of consciousness (ROC). The kinetics of loss of vision (LOV) and recovery of vision (ROV) were determined utilizing ocular pressure induced retinal ischemia and compared to the kinetics of LOC and ROC resulting from +Gz-induced cephalic nervous system (CPNS) ischemia. The time from self-induced retinal ischemia in completely healthy subjects (N = 104) to the onset of PLL and complete BO was measured. The time from release of ocular pressure, with return of normal retinal circulation, to the time for complete recovery of visual fields was also measured. The kinetics of pressure induced LOV and ROV was compared with previously developed kinetics of +Gz-induced LOC and ROC focusing on the rapid onset, vertical arm, of the +Gz-induced LOC and ROC curves. The time from onset of increased ocular pressure, immediately inducing retinal ischemia, to PLL was 5.04 s with the time to BO being 8.73 s. Complete recovery of the visual field from BO following release of ocular pressure, immediately abolishing retinal ischemia, was 2.74 s. These results confirm experimental findings that visual loss is frequently not experienced prior to LOC during exposure to rapid onset, high levels of +Gz-stress above tolerance. Offset of pressure induced retinal ischemia to ROV was 2.74 s, while the time from offset of +Gz-induced CPNS ischemia to ROC was 5.29 s. Recovery of retinal function would be predicted to be complete before consciousness is regained following +Gz-induced LOC. Ischemia onset time normalization in neurologic tissues permits comparison between different stress-induced times to altered function. The +Gz-time tolerance curves for LOV and LOC provide comparison and integration of neurologic state transition kinetics in the retina and CPNS.

  12. Structural and kinetic analysis of the unnatural fusion protein 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase::stilbene synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yechun; Yi, Hankuil; Wang, Melissa; Yu, Oliver; Jez, Joseph M. (WU); (Danforth)

    2012-10-24

    To increase the biochemical efficiency of biosynthetic systems, metabolic engineers have explored different approaches for organizing enzymes, including the generation of unnatural fusion proteins. Previous work aimed at improving the biosynthesis of resveratrol, a stilbene associated a range of health-promoting activities, in yeast used an unnatural engineered fusion protein of Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase (At4CL1) and Vitis vinifera (grape) stilbene synthase (VvSTS) to increase resveratrol levels 15-fold relative to yeast expressing the individual enzymes. Here we present the crystallographic and biochemical analysis of the 4CL::STS fusion protein. Determination of the X-ray crystal structure of 4CL::STS provides the first molecular view of an artificial didomain adenylation/ketosynthase fusion protein. Comparison of the steady-state kinetic properties of At4CL1, VvSTS, and 4CL::STS demonstrates that the fusion protein improves catalytic efficiency of either reaction less than 3-fold. Structural and kinetic analysis suggests that colocalization of the two enzyme active sites within 70 {angstrom} of each other provides the basis for enhanced in vivo synthesis of resveratrol.

  13. A second dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (Type A) of the human pathogen Enterococcus faecalis: expression, purification, and steady-state kinetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkeviciene, J; Jiang, W; Locke, G; Kopcho, L M; Rogers, M J; Copeland, R A

    2000-05-01

    We report the identification, expression, and characterization of a second Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODase A) from the human pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. The enzyme consists of a polypeptide chain of 322 amino acids that shares 68% identity with the cognate type A enzyme from the bacterium Lactococcus lactis. E. faecalis DHODase A catalyzed the oxidation of l-dihydroorotate while reducing a number of substrates, including fumarate, coenzyme Q(0), and menadione. The steady-state kinetic mechanism has been determined with menadione as an oxidizing substrate at pH 7.5. Initial velocity and product inhibition data suggest that the enzyme follows a two-site nonclassical ping-pong kinetic mechanism. The absorbance of the active site FMN cofactor is quenched in a concentration-dependent manner by titration with orotate and barbituric acid, two competitive inhibitors with respect to dihydroorotate. In contrast, titration of the enzyme with menadione had no effect on FMN absorbance, consistent with nonoverlapping binding sites for dihyroorotate and menadione, as suggested from the kinetic mechanism. The reductive half-reaction has been shown to be only partially rate limiting, and an attempt to evaluate the slow step in the overall reaction has been made by simulating orotate production under steady-state conditions. Our data indicate that the oxidative half-reaction is a rate-limiting segment, while orotate, most likely, retains significant affinity for the reduced enzyme, as suggested by the product inhibition pattern. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Thermogravimetric Analysis and Kinetic Study on Pyrolysis of Veteri-narian Solid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Rojas González

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Institutional waste from clinical centers can be classified as those coming from health institutions dedicated to human attention and those coming from centers for animal veterinary care. The latter are mainly hazardous wastes, hence their disposal requires incineration. Most of such waste is organic, and it is possible, therefore, to take advantage of their energetic power in combustion or pyrolysis processes. This work is motivated because no literature was found on the pyrolysis kinetics veterinary waste, as this kind of studies are mainly focused on hospital waste of human health care. Method: The kinetics of pyrolysis is characterized and studied by means of thermogravimetric analysis of 6 major veterinary waste (gauze, cotton swabs, cotton, nails, hair, plastic syringes. The characterization is performed by proximate and elemental analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. Reactivity characteristics and pyrolytic capability of wastes are established. The kinetics study on pyrolysis was carried out by determining the kinetic triplet by isoconversional Starink method. Results: It was established that the pyrolysis index increases with the heating rate and that the thermal degradation depends on the material type of the waste. Similarly, it was found that the temperature (ΔT = Tf - Ti for the thermal decomposition of veterinary waste is: ΔTnails> ΔThair > ΔTcotton swabs > ΔTgauze > ΔTcotton > ΔTplastic syringes; the activation energy is Enails> E hair > Eplastic syringes > Ecotton swabs > E gauze > Ecotton, and the reaction order is: n hair > nnails > ncotton swabs > ncotton > n gauze > n plastic syringes. Conclusions: These results suggest the possibility of using veterinary wastes for power generation, providing an alternative for sustainable energy development to cities in continuous growth, from both, energetic and environmental points of view.

  15. The influence of temperature on kinetics in solid-state fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.P.; Rinzema, A.; Tramper, J.; Sonsbeek, H.M. van; Hage, J.C.; Kaynak, A.; Knol, W.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, correlations between temperature and kinetics of Trichoderma reesei QM9414 growing on wheat bran are described in terms of glucosamine production, oxygen consumption, and carbon dioxide production. Maximum growth temperature (T(max)) being approximately 314 K, is estimated by

  16. Optically Controlled Electron-Transfer Reaction Kinetics and Solvation Dynamics : Effect of Franck-Condon States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Kriti; Patra, Aniket; Dhole, Kajal; Samanta, Alok Kumar; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results for optically controlled electron-transfer reaction kinetics (ETRK) and nonequilibrium solvation dynamics (NESD) of Coumarin 480 in DMPC vesicle show their dependence on excitation wavelength λex. However, the celebrated Marcus theory and linear-response-theory-based approaches

  17. A two-phase kinetic model for fungal growth in solid-state cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamidi-Esfahani, Z.; Hejazi, P.; Abbas Shojaosadati, S.; Hoogschagen, M.J.; Vasheghani-Farahani, E.; Rinzema, A.

    2007-01-01

    A new two-phase kinetic model including exponential and logistic models was applied to simulate the growth rate of fungi at various temperatures. The model parameters, expressed as a function of temperature, were determined from the oxygen consumption rate of Aspergillus niger during cultivation on

  18. Validity of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board for Kinetic Gait Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Eguchi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB has been suggested as an inexpensive, portable and accessible alternative to costly laboratory-grade force plates for measuring the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF and center of pressure (COP. Kinetic gait analysis provides important information for the rehabilitation of patients with gait disorders; however, the validity of the WBB for measuring kinetic gait parameters has not been evaluated. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of walking force measurements—which change dynamically in a short period of stance time—collected with the WBB. Three healthy adults were asked to walk 10 steps along both straight and curved paths in clockwise (CW and counterclockwise (CCW directions while measurements were taken using the WBB and the force plate. The accuracy of the vGRF, COP trajectory, and stance duration were evaluated using the root-mean-square error (RMSE, Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Bland–Altman plots (BAPs to compare the WBB and the force plate. The results of the vGRF showed high accuracy (r > 0.96 and %RMSE < 6.1% in the mean values, and the stance duration as defined by the vGRF and COP trajectory was equivalent to that of commercial instrumented insoles, which are used as an alternative to the force plates. From these results, we determined that the WBB may be used for kinetic gait analysis in clinical settings where lower accuracy is acceptable.

  19. Pre-steady-state kinetics of Escherichia coli aspartate aminotransferase catalyzed reactions and thermodynamic aspects of its substrate specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramitsu, Seiki; Hiromi, Keitaro; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Morino, Yoshimasa; Kagamiyama, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The four half-transamination reactions [the pyridoxal form of Escherichia coli aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) with aspartate or glutamate and the pyridoxamine form of the enzyme with oxalacetate or 2-oxoglutarate] were followed in a stopped-flow spectrometer by monitoring the absorbance change at either 333 or 358 nm. The reaction progress curves in all cases gave fits to a monophasic exponential process. Kinetic analyses of these reactions showed that each half-reaction is composed of the following three processes: (1) the rapid binding of an amino acid substrate to the pyridoxal form of the enzyme; (2) the rapid binding of the corresponding keto acid to the pyridoxamine form of the enzyme; (3) the rate-determining interconversion between the two complexes. This mechanism was supported by the findings that the equilibrium constants for half- and overall-transamination reactions and the steady-state kinetic constants agreed well with the predicted values on the basis of the above mechanism using pre-steady-state kinetic parameters. The significant primary kinetic isotope effect observed in the reaction with deuterated amino acid suggests that the withdrawal of the α-proton of the substrates is rate determining. The pyridoxal form of E. coli AspAT reacted with a variety of amino acids as substrates. The substrate specificity of the E. coli enzyme was much broader than that of pig isoenzymes, reflecting some subtle but distinct difference in microenvironment accommodating the side chain of the substrate between e. coli and mammalian AspATs

  20. Analysis for the Sorption Kinetics of Ag Nanoparticles on Natural Clinoptilolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Ruíz-Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic adsorption behavior of silver nanoparticles deposited on a natural zeolite from Oaxaca is presented. Theoretical models as Lagergren first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion were employed and compared with experimental data obtained by atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique. Correlation factors R2 of the order of 0.99 were observed. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the silver nanoparticles were homogeneously distributed on the zeolite. Additionally, chemical characterization of the material was carried out through a dilution process with lithium metaborate. An average value of 9.3 in the Si/Al ratio was observed and related to the kinetic adsorption behavior of the zeolite.

  1. A Numerical Procedure for Model Identifiability Analysis Applied to Enzyme Kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daele, Timothy, Van; Van Hoey, Stijn; Gernaey, Krist

    2015-01-01

    The proper calibration of models describing enzyme kinetics can be quite challenging. In the literature, different procedures are available to calibrate these enzymatic models in an efficient way. However, in most cases the model structure is already decided on prior to the actual calibration...... and Pronzato (1997) and which can be easily set up for any type of model. In this paper the proposed approach is applied to the forward reaction rate of the enzyme kinetics proposed by Shin and Kim(1998). Structural identifiability analysis showed that no local structural model problems were occurring......) identifiability problems. By using the presented approach it is possible to detect potential identifiability problems and avoid pointless calibration (and experimental!) effort....

  2. From thermometric to spectrophotometric kinetic-catalytic methods of analysis. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Víctor; González, Alba; Danchana, Kaewta

    2017-05-15

    Kinetic-catalytic analytical methods have proved to be very easy and highly sensitive strategies for chemical analysis, that rely on simple instrumentation [1,2]. Molecular absorption spectrophotometry is commonly used as the detection technique. However, other detection systems, like electrochemical or thermometric ones, offer some interesting possibilities since they are not affected by the color or turbidity of the samples. In this review some initial experience with thermometric kinetic-catalytic methods is described, up to our current experience exploiting spectrophotometric flow techniques to automate this kind of reactions, including the use of integrated chips. Procedures for determination of inorganic and organic species in organic and inorganic matrices are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal Analysis On The Kinetics Of Magnesium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxides In Different Heating Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Y.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal decomposition of magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxides (LDHs was investigated by thermogravimetry analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC methods in argon environment. The influence of heating rates (including 2.5, 5, 10, 15 and 20K/min on the thermal behavior of LDHs was revealed. By the methods of Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, the thermal kinetic parameters of activation energy and pre-exponential factor for the exothermic processes under non-isothermal conditions were calculated using the analysis of corresponding DSC curves.

  4. Analysis of cell kinetics after gamma ray irradiation using anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1989-01-01

    The cell cycle was analyzed using anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody, and changes in cell kinetics after gamma ray irradiation as evaluated by this BrdU-PI double staining were compared with those evaluated by the DNA histogram method based on PI staining. The effect of irradiation on the cell kinetics has been studied according primarily to the number of G2 blocked cells. By the present BrdU method, rapid transition of the G1-S phase was observed within 2 hours of irradiation, and then G1 block was observed. Cells in the S phase progressed to the G2 + M cells returned to the G1 phase after 18 or more hours. These initial G1 blocked cells induced by irradiation were confirmed for the fist time by the present BrdU-PI double staining. By the conventional method based on the DNA histogram, accurate determination of S cell fraction was difficult due to overlapping of the DNA contents of G1 cells and early S cells and those of late S cells and G2 cells. On the other hand, BrdU-PI double staining allowed direct differentiation of G1, S, and G2 + M cells, especially between G1-S and S-G2 + M cells. The analysis of cell kinetics using BrdU is advantageous over the conventional autoradiographic methods in that it allowed more rapid assay with very high sensitivity. In addition, BrdU is alrady used clinically as an enhancement agent in radiation therapy for cancer. The present method is considered to be indispensable for evaluation of the percentage of S cells in the tumor tissue and analysis of cell kinetics after irradiation and chemotherapy against cancer. (author)

  5. A comparative investigation of 18F kinetics in receptors: a compartment model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Anjani K.; Swatantra; Kaushik, A.; Mishra, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Some authors reported that 18 F kinetics might be useful for evaluation of neuro receptors. We hypothesized that 18 F kinetics may show some information about neuronal damage, and each rate constant might have statistically significant correlation with WO function. The purpose of this study was to investigate 99m Tc MIBI kinetics through a compartment model analysis. Each rate constant from compartment analysis was compared with WO, T1/2, and (H/M) ratio in early and delayed phase. Different animal model were studied. After an injection the dynamic planar imaging was performed on a dual-headed digital gamma camera system for 30 minutes. An ROI was drawn manually to assess the global kinetics of 18 F. By using the time-activity curve (TAC) of ROI as a response tissue function and the TAC of Aorta as an input function, we analysed 18 F pharmacokinetics through a 2-compartment model. We defined k1 as influx rate constant, k2 as out flux rate constant and k3 as specific uptake rate constant. And we calculated k1/k2 as distribution volume (Vd), k1k3/k2 as specific uptake (SU), and k1k3/(k2+k3) as clearance. For non-competitive affinity studies of PET two modelling parameters distribution volume (DV) and Bmax / Kd are also calculated. Results: Statistically significant correlations were seen between k2 and T1/2 (P 18 F at the injection had relation to the uptake of it at 30 minutes and 2 hours after the injection. Furthermore, some indexes had statistically significant correlation with DV and Bmax. These compartment model approaches may be useful to estimate the other related studies

  6. State-Space Formulation for Circuit Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Marin, T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new state-space approach for temporal analysis of electrical circuits. The method systematically obtains the state-space formulation of nondegenerate linear networks without using concepts of topology. It employs nodal/mesh systematic analysis to reduce the number of undesired variables. This approach helps students to…

  7. Development of a generalized stochastic model for the analysis of monoenergetic space-time nuclear factor Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Nhu Viet Ha

    2011-02-01

    To predict the space-time dependent behavior of a nuclear reactor, the conventional space-dependent kinetics equations are widely used for treating the spatial variables. However, the solutions of such deterministic space-dependent kinetics equations, which give only the mean values of the neutron population and the delayed neutron precursor concentrations, do not offer sufficient insight into the actual dynamic processes within a reactor, where the interacting populations vary randomly with space and time. It is also noted that at high power levels, the random behavior of a reactor is negligible but at low power levels, such as at start-up, random fluctuations in population dynamics can be significant. To mathematically describe the evolution of the state of a nuclear reactor using a set of stochastic kinetics equations, the forward stochastic model (FSM) in stochastic kinetics theory is devised through the concept of reactor transition probability and its probability generating function as the spatial domain of a reactor is partitioned into a number of space cells. Nevertheless, the FSM equations for the mean value of neutron and precursor distribution are deterministic-like. Furthermore, the numerical treatment of the FSM equations for the means, variances, and covariances is quite complicated and time-consuming. In the present study, a generalized stochastic model (called the stochastic space-dependent kinetics model or SSKM) based on the FSM and the Its stochastic differential equations was newly developed for the analysis of monoenergetic spacetime nuclear reactor kinetics in one dimension. First, the FSM equations for determining the mean values of neutron and delayed-neutron precursor populations were considered as the deterministic ones without taking into account their variances and covariances. Second, the system of interest was randomized again in the light of the Its stochastic differential equations in order to derive the SSKM. The proposed model

  8. Kinetics Analysis of Synthesis Reaction of Struvite With Air-Flow Continous Vertical Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edahwati, L.; Sutiyono, S.; Muryanto, S.; Jamari, J.; Bayuseno, dan A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Kinetics reaction is a knowledge about a rate of chemical reaction. The differential of the reaction rate can be determined from the reactant material or the formed material. The reaction mechanism of a reactor may include a stage of reaction occurring sequentially during the process of converting the reactants into products. In the determination of reaction kinetics, the order of reaction and the rate constant reaction must be recognized. This study was carried out using air as a stirrer as a medium in the vertical reactor for crystallization of struvite. Stirring is one of the important aspects in struvite crystallization process. Struvite crystals or magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrates (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) is commonly formed in reversible reactions and can be generated as an orthorhombic crystal. Air is selected as a stirrer on the existing flow pattern in the reactor determining the reaction kinetics of the crystal from the solution. The experimental study was conducted by mixing an equimolar solution of 0.03 M NH4OH, MgCl2 and H3PO4 with a ratio of 1: 1: 1. The crystallization process of the mixed solution was observed in an inside reactor at the flow rate ranges of 16-38 ml/min and the temperature of 30°C was selected in the study. The air inlet rate was kept constant at 0.25 liters/min. The pH solution was adjusted to be 8, 9 and 10 by dropping wisely of 1 N KOH solution. The crystallization kinetics was examined until the steady state of the reaction was reached. The precipitates were filtered and dried at a temperature for subsequent material characterization, including Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and XRD (X-Ray diffraction) method. The results show that higher flow rate leads to less mass of struvite.

  9. Steady-state kinetics of substrate binding and iron release in tomato ACC oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrower, J S; Blalock, R; Klinman, J P

    2001-08-14

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACC oxidase) catalyzes the last step in the biosynthetic pathway of the plant hormone, ethylene. This unusual reaction results in the oxidative ring cleavage of 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylate (ACC) into ethylene, cyanide, and CO2 and requires ferrous ion, ascorbate, and molecular oxygen for catalysis. A new purification procedure and assay method have been developed for tomato ACC oxidase that result in greatly increased enzymatic activity. This method allowed us to determine the rate of iron release from the enzyme and the effect of the activator, CO2, on this rate. Initial velocity studies support an ordered kinetic mechanism where ACC binds first followed by O2; ascorbate can bind after O2 or possibly before ACC. This kinetic mechanism differs from one recently proposed for the ACC oxidase from avocado.

  10. Isotope exchange kinetic of phosphorus in soils from Pernambuco State -Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, F.J.B. de.

    1989-12-01

    The applicability of isotopic exchange kinetics of 32 p to characterize phosphorus available to plants and to diagnose the reactivity of soil-fertilizer-P in six soils from Pernambuco is described. This methodology was compared with anion exchange resin, isotopic exchange equilibrium methods (E-value and L-value) and P absorption by plants. The first greenhouse experiment had the following treatments: 1) with P and, 2) with addition of 43.7 mg P/Kg of soil, incubated for O, 42 and 84 days before seeding. The kinetic of isotopic exchange (KIE), resin-P and E-value were determined before seeding and after harvesting pearl millet grown for 42 days. Results indicated that the KIE parameters rated the soils more efficiently, in terms of available P and soil-fertilizer-P reactivity, than resin-P, E-value and L-value. (author). 38 refs, 2 figs, 18 tabs

  11. Role of the Disulfide Bond in Prion Protein Amyloid Formation: A Thermodynamic and Kinetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryo

    2018-02-27

    Prion diseases are associated with the structural conversion of prion protein (PrP) to a β-sheet-rich aggregate, PrP Sc . Previous studies have indicated that a reduction of the disulfide bond linking C179 and C214 of PrP yields an amyloidlike β-rich aggregate in vitro. To gain mechanistic insights into the reduction-induced aggregation, here I characterized how disulfide bond reduction modulates the protein folding/misfolding landscape of PrP, by examining 1) the equilibrium stabilities of the native (N) and aggregated states relative to the unfolded (U) state, 2) the transition barrier separating the U and aggregated states, and 3) the final structure of amyloidlike misfolded aggregates. Kinetic and thermodynamic experiments revealed that disulfide bond reduction decreases the equilibrium stabilities of both the N and aggregated states by ∼3 kcal/mol, without changing either the amyloidlike aggregate structure, at least at the secondary structural level, or the transition barrier of aggregation. Therefore, disulfide bond reduction modulates the protein folding/misfolding landscape by entropically stabilizing disordered states, including the U and transition state of aggregation. This also indicates that the equilibrium stability of the N state, but not the transition barrier of aggregation, is the dominant factor determining the reduction-induced aggregation of PrP. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Combustion kinetics of hydrochar produced from hydrothermal carbonisation of Karanj (Pongamia pinnata) fruit hulls via thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Azharul; Kabir, G; Asif, M; Hameed, B H

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the combustion profile and kinetics of hydrochar produced from hydrothermal carbonisation (HTC) of Karanj fruit hulls (KFH). The HTC-KFH hydrochar combustion kinetics was investigated at 5, 10, and 20°C/min by thermogravimetric analysis. The kinetics model, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose revealed the combustion kinetics parameters for the extent of conversion from 0.1 to 0.8; the activation energy varies from 114 to 67 kJ/mol respectively. The hydrochar combustion followed multi-steps kinetics; the Coats-Redfern models predicted the activation energies and pre-exponential constants for the hydrochar combustion zones. The diffusion models are the effective mechanism in the second and third zone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multicompartmental analysis of the kinetics of monoclonal antibody in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, K.; De Nardo, G.L.; De Nardo, S.J.; Peng, J.S.; Macey, D.J.; Hisada, K.; Tonami, N.

    1985-01-01

    Multicompartmental models were applied for analysis of kinetics of iodide labeled monoclonal antibody in cancer patients. About 14 compartments such as intravascular antibody pool, interstitial antibody pool, antibody processors, tumor antigen site, intravascular immune complex pool, intravascular iodide pool, and urine iodide pool were assumed. This model accounts for three molecular species, the antibody, and antibody complex, and free iodide or iodinated peptides. Patients were injected with I-123-Lym-1 IgG2a (anti B cell lymphoma antibody). After injection, blood and urine samples were sequentially collected. Plasma and urine were separated by HPLC into fractions of intact antibody, immune complex, and free iodide. This information was used for input data in the theoretical model. SAAM computer program was used to solve these compartmental models. Published linear rate constants for human serum albumin and human non-immune IgG were initially used. However, data calculated from the model differed from observed curves in several respects. The kinetics of mouse monoclonal antibody, a foreign protein in a patient, were significantly different from those reported for human IgG. When a nonlinear, saturable hepatic processor was incorporated in the model, calculated data fit the observed data better. This kinetic model provides a basis for calculating radiation doses for radioiodinated antibodies

  14. Pyrolysis kinetics and thermal behavior of waste sawdust biomass using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ranjeet Kumar; Mohanty, Kaustubha

    2018-03-01

    The present study reports pyrolysis behavior of three waste biomass using thermogravimetric analysis to determine kinetic parameters at five different heating rates. Physiochemical characterization confirmed that these biomass have the potential for fuel and energy production. Pyrolysis experiments were carried out at five different heating rates (5-25 °C min -1 ). Five model-free methods such as Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS), Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (OFW), Friedman, Coats-Redfern, and distributed activation energy (DAEM) were used to calculate the kinetic parameters. The activation energy was found to be 171.66 kJ mol -1 , 148.44 kJ mol -1 , and 171.24 kJ mol -1 from KAS model; 179.29 kJ mol -1 , 156.58 kJ mol -1 , and 179.47 kJ mol -1 from OFW model; 168.58 kJ mol -1 , 181.53 kJ mol -1 , and 184.61 kJ mol -1 from Friedman model; and 206.62 kJ mol -1 , 171.63 kJ mol -1 , and 160.45 kJ mol -1 from DAEM model for PW, SW, AN biomass respectively. The calculated kinetic parameters are in good agreement with other reported biomass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of a kinetic multi-segment foot model. Part I: Model repeatability and kinematic validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, Dustin A; Cooney, Kevin M; Buczek, Frank L

    2012-04-01

    Kinematic multi-segment foot models are still evolving, but have seen increased use in clinical and research settings. The addition of kinetics may increase knowledge of foot and ankle function as well as influence multi-segment foot model evolution; however, previous kinetic models are too complex for clinical use. In this study we present a three-segment kinetic foot model and thorough evaluation of model performance during normal gait. In this first of two companion papers, model reference frames and joint centers are analyzed for repeatability, joint translations are measured, segment rigidity characterized, and sample joint angles presented. Within-tester and between-tester repeatability were first assessed using 10 healthy pediatric participants, while kinematic parameters were subsequently measured on 17 additional healthy pediatric participants. Repeatability errors were generally low for all sagittal plane measures as well as transverse plane Hindfoot and Forefoot segments (median<3°), while the least repeatable orientations were the Hindfoot coronal plane and Hallux transverse plane. Joint translations were generally less than 2mm in any one direction, while segment rigidity analysis suggested rigid body behavior for the Shank and Hindfoot, with the Forefoot violating the rigid body assumptions in terminal stance/pre-swing. Joint excursions were consistent with previously published studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Kinematic and kinetic analysis of overhand, sidearm and underhand lacrosse shot techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Charles A J; Katz, Larry; Stergiou, Pro; Stefanyshyn, Darren; Tomaghelli, Luciano

    2017-12-01

    Lacrosse requires the coordinated performance of many complex skills. One of these skills is shooting on the opponents' net using one of three techniques: overhand, sidearm or underhand. The purpose of this study was to (i) determine which technique generated the highest ball velocity and greatest shot accuracy and (ii) identify kinematic and kinetic variables that contribute to a high velocity and high accuracy shot. Twelve elite male lacrosse players participated in this study. Kinematic data were sampled at 250 Hz, while two-dimensional force plates collected ground reaction force data (1000 Hz). Statistical analysis showed significantly greater ball velocity for the sidearm technique than overhand (P  0.05). Kinematic and kinetic variables were not significantly correlated to shot accuracy or velocity across all shot types; however, when analysed independently, the lead foot horizontal impulse showed a negative correlation with underhand ball velocity (P = 0.042). This study identifies the technique with the highest ball velocity, defines kinematic and kinetic predictors related to ball velocity and provides information to coaches and athletes concerned with improving lacrosse shot performance.

  18. Pyrolysis kinetics and thermodynamic parameters of castor (Ricinus communis) residue using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ravneet; Gera, Poonam; Jha, Mithilesh Kumar; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2018-02-01

    Castor plant is a fast-growing, perennial shrub from Euphorbiaceae family. More than 50% of the residue is generated from its stems and leaves. The main aim of this work is to study the pyrolytic characteristics, kinetics and thermodynamic properties of castor residue. The TGA experiments were carried out from room temperature to 900 °C under an inert atmosphere at different heating rates of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 40 °C/min. The kinetic analysis was carried using different models namely Kissinger, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO) and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS). The average E ɑ calculated by FWO and KAS methods were 167.10 and 165.86 kJ/mole respectively. Gibbs free energy varied from 150.62-154.33 to 150.59-154.65 kJ/mol for FWO and KAS respectively. The HHV of castor residue was 14.43 MJ/kg, considered as potential feedstock for bio-energy production. Kinetic and thermodynamic results will be useful input for the design of pyrolytic process using castor residue as feedstock. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In-depth investigation on the pyrolysis kinetics of raw biomass. Part I: kinetic analysis for the drying and devolatilization stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Zheng, Yan; Zhu, Xifeng

    2013-03-01

    An in-depth investigation was conducted on the kinetic analysis of raw biomass using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), from which the activation energy distribution of the whole pyrolysis process was obtained. Two different stages, namely, drying stage (Stage I) and devolatilization stage (Stage II), were shown in the pyrolysis process in which the activation energy values changed with conversion. The activation energy at low conversions (below 0.15) in the drying stage ranged from 10 to 30 kJ/mol. Such energy was calculated using the nonisothermal Page model, known as the best model to describe the drying kinetics. Kinetic analysis was performed using the distributed activation energy model in a wide range of conversions (0.15-0.95) in the devolatilization stage. The activation energy first ranged from 178.23 to 245.58 kJ/mol and from 159.66 to 210.76 kJ/mol for corn straw and wheat straw, respectively, then increasing remarkably with an irregular trend. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Kinetic analysis of volatile formation in milk subjected to pressure-assisted thermal treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Landaverde, P A; Qian, M C; Torres, J A

    2007-09-01

    Volatile formation in milk subjected to pressure-assisted thermal processing (PATP) was investigated from a reaction kinetic analysis point of view to illustrate the advantages of this technology. The concentration of 27 volatiles of different chemical class in milk subjected to pressure, temperature, and time treatments was fitted to zero-, 1st-, and 2nd-order chemical reaction models. Temperature and pressure effects on rate constants were analyzed to obtain activation energy (E(a)) and activation volume (deltaV*) values. Hexanal, heptanal, octanal, nonanal, and decanal followed 1st-order kinetics with rate constants characterized by E(a) values decreasing with pressure reflecting negative deltaV* values. Formation of 2-methylpropanal, 2,3-butanedione, and hydrogen sulfide followed zero-order kinetics with rate constants increasing with temperature but with unclear pressure effects. E(a) values for 2-methylpropanal and 2,3-butanedione increased with pressure, that is, deltaV* > 0, whereas values for hydrogen sulfide remained constant, that is, deltaV* = 0. The concentration of all other volatiles, including methanethiol, remained unchanged in pressure-treated samples, suggesting large negative deltaV* values. The concentration of methyl ketones, including 2-pentanone, 2-hexanone, 2-heptanone, 2-octanone, 2-nonanone, 2-decanone, and 2-undecanone, was independent of pressure and pressure-holding time. PATP promoted the formation of few compounds, had no effect on some, and inhibited the formation of volatiles reported to be factors of the consumer rejection of "cooked" milk flavor. The kinetic behavior observed suggested that new reaction formation mechanisms were not likely involved in volatile formation in PATP milk. The application of the Le Chatelier principle frequently used to explain the high quality of pressure-treated foods, often with no supporting experimental evidence, was not necessary.

  1. Synthetic spectral analysis of a kinetic model for slow-magnetosonic waves in solar corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, Wenzhi; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China, E-mail: jshept@gmail.com (China); Zhang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Vocks, Christian [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, 14482, Potsdam (Germany); Marsch, Eckart [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, 24118 Kiel (Germany); Peter, Hardi [Max Plank Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-03-25

    We propose a kinetic model of slow-magnetosonic waves to explain various observational features associated with the propagating intensity disturbances (PIDs) occurring in the solar corona. The characteristics of slow mode waves, e.g, inphase oscillations of density, velocity, and thermal speed, are reproduced in this kinetic model. Moreover, the red-blue (R-B) asymmetry of the velocity distribution as self-consistently generated in the model is found to be contributed from the beam component, as a result of the competition between Landau resonance and Coulomb collisions. Furthermore, we synthesize the spectral lines and make the spectral analysis, based on the kinetic simulation data of the flux tube plasmas and the hypothesis of the surrounding background plasmas. It is found that the fluctuations of parameters of the synthetic spectral lines are basically consistent with the observations: (1) the line intensity, Doppler shift, and line width are fluctuating in phase; (2) the R-B asymmetry usually oscillate out of phase with the former three parameters; (3) the blueward asymmetry is more evident than the redward asymmetry in the R-B fluctuations. The oscillations of line parameters become weakened for the case with denser surrounding background plasmas. Similar to the observations, there is no doubled-frequency oscillation of the line width for the case with flux-tube plasmas flowing bulkly upward among the static background plasmas. Therefore, we suggest that the “wave + beam flow” kinetic model may be a viable interpretation for the PIDs observed in the solar corona.

  2. Experimental test of a four-level kinetic model for excited-state intramolecular proton transfer dye lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costela, A; Munnoz, J M; Douhal, A; Figuera, J M; Acuna, A U [Inst. de Quimica Fisica ' ' Rocasolano' ' , C.S.I.C., Madrid (Spain)

    1989-11-01

    The nanosecond pulses of a dye laser oscillator based on the excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer reaction (IPT) of salicylamide and 2'-hydroxylphenyl benzimidazole dyes have been studied as a function of several experimental parameters. To explain the operation of this laser a numerical four-level kinetic model was developed until the lasing properties of these dyes, in the presence of a variable oxygen concentration and pumped with a double pulse technique, could be reproduced. This was possible only by assuming that the efficiency of the laser is controlled by the absorption cross-section of a transient state with a lifetime in the nanosecond-picosecond range, which was tentatively identified as a ground state tautomeric species. (orig.).

  3. Kinetics study of hydrochlorothiazide lactose liquid state interaction using conventional isothermal arrhenius method under basic and neutral conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak Ghaderi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Maillard reaction of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ and lactose has been previously demonstrated in pharmaceutical formulations. In this study, the activation energy of - hydrohlorothiazide and lactose interaction in the liquid state was ascertained under basic and neutral conditions. Conventional isothermal High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC technique was employed to ascertain the kinetic parameters using Arrhenius method. Results: The activation energy obtained was 82.43 and 100.28 kJ/mol under basic and neutral conditions, respectively. Consequently, it can be inferred that Maillard reaction is significantly affected by pH, which can be used as a control factor whenever the reaction potentially occurs.

  4. Determination of the temperature coefficients and the kinetic parameters for the HTTR safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuhara, K.; Nakata, T.; Murata, I.; Yamashita, K.; Shindo, R.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the calculational methods which were employed to determine the temperature coefficients and the kinetic parameters for the safety analysis in the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor). The temperature coefficients (doppler, moderator temperature) and the kinetic parameters (prompt neutron life time; l, effective delayed neutron fraction; β eff) are important for the point model core dynamic analysis and should be evaluated properly. The temperature coefficients were calculated by the whole core model. Doppler coefficient was evaluated under the conditions of all control rods withdrawn and the uniform change of fuel temperature. The minimum and the maximum value of the evaluated doppler coefficients in a burnup cycle are -4.6x10 -5 and -1.5x10 -5 ΔK/K/deg. C respectively. The moderator temperature coefficient was evaluated under the conditions of all control rods withdrawn and the uniform change of moderator temperature. The minimum and the maximum value of the evaluated moderator temperature coefficients in a burnup cycle are -17.1x10 -5 and 0.99x10 -5 ΔK/K/deg. C respectively. In spite of positive moderator temperature coefficient, the power coefficient is always negative. Therefore the HTTR possesses inherent power-suppressing feed back characteristic in all operating condition. We surveyed the effects of the Xe existence, the control rods existence, the fuel temperature and the region in which the temperature was changed on the moderator temperature coefficients. The kinetic parameters were calculated by the perturbation method with the whole core model. The minimum and the maximum value of the evaluated effective delayed neutron fraction (β eff) are 0.0047 and 0.0065 respectively. These of the evaluated prompt neutron life time (l) are 0.67 and 0.78 ms respectively. We have surveyed the effects of the fuel depletion and the core power level on these parameters, and considered these effects on the kinetic parameters. From

  5. Thermodynamic-state and kinetic-process dependent dual ferromagnetic states in high-Si content FeMn(PSi) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guijiang; Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2015-01-01

    We have found that thermodynamic state and kinetic process co-determine the dual ferromagnetic (FM) orders in high-Si content FeMnP 1−x Si x (0.25 < x < 0.5). Alloys undergoing high temperature annealing and quenching process prefer a high magnetic moment FM state in a chemically partial disordered structure with low c/a ratio. This mechanism is suggested to be responsible for the often discussed virgin effect as well. A chemically ordered structure obtained by a slow cooling process from a relatively low annealing temperature and the increase in Si content stabilize a metastable lattice with high c/a ratio and FM order with low magnetic moment. The non-simultaneity of the magnetic and structural transitions can be responsible for the occurrence of FM state in the high c/a range. Thus, a c/a ratio that changes from high to low is physically plausible to stabilize the metastable FM order at low temperature. Our theoretical observations indicate that suitable thermodynamic state and kinetic diffusion process is crucial for optimizing magnetocaloric properties and exploring feasible magnetocaloric materials

  6. Derringer desirability and kinetic plot LC-column comparison approach for MS-compatible lipopeptide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Hondt, Matthias; Verbeke, Frederick; Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-06-01

    Lipopeptides are currently re-emerging as an interesting subgroup in the peptide research field, having historical applications as antibacterial and antifungal agents and new potential applications as antiviral, antitumor, immune-modulating and cell-penetrating compounds. However, due to their specific structure, chromatographic analysis often requires special buffer systems or the use of trifluoroacetic acid, limiting mass spectrometry detection. Therefore, we used a traditional aqueous/acetonitrile based gradient system, containing 0.1% (m/v) formic acid, to separate four pharmaceutically relevant lipopeptides (polymyxin B 1 , caspofungin, daptomycin and gramicidin A 1 ), which were selected based upon hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). In total, the performance of four different C18 columns, including one UPLC column, were evaluated using two parallel approaches. First, a Derringer desirability function was used, whereby six single and multiple chromatographic response values were rescaled into one overall D -value per column. Using this approach, the YMC Pack Pro C18 column was ranked as the best column for general MS-compatible lipopeptide separation. Secondly, the kinetic plot approach was used to compare the different columns at different flow rate ranges. As the optimal kinetic column performance is obtained at its maximal pressure, the length elongation factor λ ( P max / P exp ) was used to transform the obtained experimental data (retention times and peak capacities) and construct kinetic performance limit (KPL) curves, allowing a direct visual and unbiased comparison of the selected columns, whereby the YMC Triart C18 UPLC and ACE C18 columns performed as best. Finally, differences in column performance and the (dis)advantages of both approaches are discussed.

  7. Variation of ratio kinetic profiles as a simple and novel spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous kinetic analysis of binary mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseri Abdolhossein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new and very simple kinetic - spectrophotometric method is developed for the simultaneous determination of binary mixtures without prior separational steps. The method is based on the calculation of the variation of ratio kinetic profiles. The mathematical explanation of the procedure is also illustrated. The proposed method can be used for simultaneous determination of two analytes A and B that react with the same reagent to give the same absorbing species. In order to evaluate the applicability of the method, a model data as well as an experimental data were tested. The results from experimental data relating to the simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of Co (II and V (IV based on their oxidation reactions with Fe (III in the presence 1, 10- Phenanthroline (Phen in micellar media were presented as a real model for resolution of the binary systems. The applicability of the method in tap water and synthesized alloy samples was also assessed by spiking experiments with different amount of Co (II and V (IV.

  8. Kinetic study of the effects of calcium ions on cationic artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase: calcium binding, steady-state kinetics and reactions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Sidrach, Lara; Chazarra, Soledad; Varón, Ramón; Tudela, José; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno

    2004-01-01

    The apparent catalytic constant (k(cat)) of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) peroxidase (AKPC) with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) increased 130-fold in the presence of calcium ions (Ca2+) but the affinity (K(m)) of the enzyme for ABTS was 500 times lower than for Ca2+-free AKPC. AKPC is known to exhibit an equilibrium between 6-aquo hexa-coordinate and penta-coordinate forms of the haem iron that is modulated by Ca2+ and affects compound I formation. Measurements of the Ca2+ dissociation constant (K(D)) were complicated by the water-association/dissociation equilibrium yielding a global value more than 1000 times too high. The value for the Ca2+ binding step alone has now been determined to be K(D) approximately 10 nM. AKPC-Ca2+ was more resistant to inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and exhibited increased catalase activity. An analysis of the complex H(2)O(2) concentration dependent kinetics of Ca2+-free AKPC is presented.

  9. Kinetics of exchange between zero-, one-, and two-hydrogen-bonded states of methyl and ethyl acetate in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuntonov, Lev; Pazos, Ileana M; Ma, Jianqiang; Gai, Feng

    2015-03-26

    It has recently been shown that the ester carbonyl stretching vibration can be used as a sensitive probe of local electrostatic field in molecular systems. To further characterize this vibrational probe and extend its potential applications, we studied the kinetics of chemical exchange between differently hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) ester carbonyl groups of methyl acetate (MA) and ethyl acetate (EA) in methanol. We found that, while both MA and EA can form zero, one, or two H-bonds with the solvent, the population of the 2hb state in MA is significantly smaller than that in EA. Using a combination of linear and nonlinear infrared measurements and numerical simulations, we further determined the rate constants for the exchange between these differently H-bonded states. We found that for MA the chemical exchange reaction between the two dominant states (i.e., 0hb and 1hb states) has a relaxation rate constant of 0.14 ps(-1), whereas for EA the three-state chemical exchange reaction occurs in a predominantly sequential manner with the following relaxation rate constants: 0.11 ps(-1) for exchange between 0hb and 1hb states and 0.12 ps(-1) for exchange between 1hb and 2hb states.

  10. Oxidation kinetics and auger microprobe analysis of some oxidized zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploc, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics at 300 o C in dry oxygen of 0.5 wt% binary alloys of iron, nickel, and chromium in zirconium were determined for several surface preparations. Further, chemical profiles of the oxides as they existed on the matrix and on the precipitates were obtained by sputtering and Auger electron analysis. The appearance of 'breakaway' oxidation was controlled by the surface finish of the alloy, a variable that could be used to eliminate the phenomenon for all alloys except the Zr/Ni binary, which required β-quenching to accomplish the same purpose. (author)

  11. Kinetic analysis of the thermal decomposition of Li4Ti5O12 pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo A. Mosqueda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A single dynamic kinetic analysis, describing the surface decomposition of Li4Ti5O12 pellets, has been performed. Samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The analyses were performed between 1000 and 1100°C and different times, perceiving the Li4Ti5O12 decomposition to Li2Ti3O7, with a loss of lithium. As expected, more rapid decomposition behaviour was found at higher temperatures. Finally, the activation energy for this decomposition of Li4Ti5O12 to Li2Ti3O7 was estimated to be equal to 383 kJ/mol.

  12. Kinetic analysis of laser induced phosphorescence in uranyl phosphate for improved analytical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1983-10-01

    Pulsed dye-laser excitation with multichannel scaler photon counting is used to obtain time resolved emission spectra of uranyl ions in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis of this data corrects for matrix quenching and temperature effects which reduce the quantum yield of the uranyl ion luminescence. The method gives accurate measurements without separative prechemistry or the use of internal standards. Detection limits of one part-per-trillion (pptr) have been demonstrated, and in samples with concentrations greater than 100 pptr, relative standard deviations of less than 3% are achieved routinely

  13. Spectral and kinetic analysis of radiation induced optical attenuation in silica: towards intrinsic fibre optic dosimetry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgermans, P.

    2002-01-01

    The document is an abstract of a PhD thesis. The PhD work concerns the detailed investigation of the behaviour of optical fibres in radiation fields such as is the case for various nuclear and space application,s. The core of the work concerns the spectral and kinetic analysis of the radiation induced optical attenuation. Models describing underlying physical phenomena, both for the spectral and the time dimensions, have been developed. The potential of silica optical fibre waveguides for intrinsic dosimetry has been assessed by employing specific properties of radiation induced defects in the silica waveguide material

  14. Kinetic analysis of the termal decomposition of colombian vacuum residua by termogravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Andrey Diaz Mateus

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Five different Colombian vacuum residues were thermally decomposed in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Three heating rates were employed to heat the sample up to 650°C. The kinetic analysis was performed by the Coats-Redfern method to describe the non-isothermal pyrolysis of the residua, a reaction model where the reaction order gradually increases from first to second order is proposed and an excellent agreement of the experimental with the calculated data is presented. The results also indicate that the pyrolysis of a vacuum residue cannot be modeled by a single reaction mechanism.

  15. Analysis of the effect on growth kinetics of gamma prima phase in Inconel 713C alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorp, S.I.; Versaci, R.A.; Ges, A.; Palacio, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    This work shows the analysis of the effect on growth kinetics of gamma prima phase in Inconel 713C alloy of two thermic treatments. In this study, SEM are used and the results are analyzed by means of the theory developed by Lifshitz, Slyozov and Wagner (LSW theory). The findings have revealed that with such theory it is not possible to determine if the process of growth is controlled either through diffusion or through diffusion in the interface as to the time employed in the experiment (2600 hours); the time required is approximately 10000 hours. (Author)

  16. Purification of SUMO conjugating enzymes and kinetic analysis of substrate conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Ali A.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMO conjugation to protein substrates requires the concerted action of a dedicated E2 ubiquitin conjugation enzyme (Ubc9) and associated E3 ligases. Although Ubc9 can directly recognize and modify substrate lysine residues that occur within a consensus site for SUMO modification, E3 ligases can redirect specificity and enhance conjugation rates during SUMO conjugation in vitro and in vivo. In this chapter, we will describe methods utilized to purify SUMO conjugating enzymes and model substrates which can be used for analysis of SUMO conjugation in vitro. We will also describe methods to extract kinetic parameters during E3-dependent or E3-independent substrate conjugation. PMID:19107417

  17. Blood, urine, and hair kinetic analysis following an acute lead intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, G; Keutgens, A; Schoofs, R; Kotolenko, S; Denooz, R; Charlier, C

    2011-01-01

    A case of lead exposure resulting from the accidental ingestion of a lead-containing solution is reported. Because of clinical management rapidly performed through chelation therapy by 2,3-dimercaptopropane sulfonate sodium and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid, blood lead levels of this 51-year-old patient were moderate (412.9 μg/L) and no clinical symptoms were observed. Numerous blood and urine samples were collected for kinetic analysis of lead elimination. However, we report the first case in which hair samples were analyzed to determine the excretion level of lead after acute intoxication.

  18. Impact of spatial kinetics in severe accident analysis for a large HWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, E.E.

    1994-01-01

    The impact on spatial kinetics on the analysis of severe accidents initiated by the unprotected withdrawal of one or more control rods is investigated for a large heavy water reactor. Large inter- and intra-assembly power shifts are observed, and the importance of detailed geometrical modeling of fuel assemblies is demonstrated. Neglect of space-time effects is shown to lead to erroneous estimates of safety margins, and of accident consequences in the event safety margins are exceeded. The results and conclusions are typical of what would be expected for any large, loosely coupled core

  19. Analysis of the kinetic mechanism of recombinant human isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase (Icmt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baron Rudi A

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (Icmt is the third of three enzymes that posttranslationally modify proteins that contain C-terminal CaaX motifs. The processing of CaaX proteins through this so-called prenylation pathway via a route initiated by addition of an isoprenoid lipid is required for both membrane targeting and function of the proteins. The involvement of many CaaX proteins such as Ras GTPases in oncogenesis and other aberrant proliferative disorders has led to the targeting of the enzymes involved in their processing for therapeutic development, necessitating a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the enzymes. Results In this study, we have investigated the kinetic mechanism of recombinant human Icmt. In the reaction catalyzed by Icmt, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet provides the methyl group that is transferred to the second substrate, the C-terminal isoprenylated cysteine residue of a CaaX protein, thereby generating a C-terminal prenylcysteine methyl ester on the protein. To facilitate the kinetic analysis of Icmt, we synthesized a new small molecule substrate of the enzyme, biotin-S-farnesyl-L-cysteine (BFC. Initial kinetic analysis of Icmt suggested a sequential mechanism for the enzyme that was further analyzed using a dead end competitive inhibitor, S-farnesylthioacetic acid (FTA. Inhibition by FTA was competitive with respect to BFC and uncompetitive with respect to AdoMet, indicating an ordered mechanism with SAM binding first. To investigate the order of product dissociation, product inhibition studies were undertaken with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy and the N-acetyl-S-farnesyl-L-cysteine methylester (AFCME. This analysis indicated that AdoHcy is a competitive inhibitor with respect to AdoMet, while AFCME shows a noncompetitive inhibition with respect to BFC and a mixed-type inhibition with respect to AdoMet. These studies established that AdoHcy is the final product released, and

  20. A kinetic and equilibrium analysis of silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition on monofilaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical kinetics of atmospheric pressure silicon carbide (SiC) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from dilute silane and propane source gases in hydrogen is numerically analyzed in a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for CVD on monofilaments. The chemical composition of the SiC deposit is assessed both from the calculated total fluxes of carbon and silicon and from chemical equilibrium considerations for the prevailing temperatures and species concentrations at and along the filament surface. The effects of gas and surface chemistry on the evolution of major gas phase species are considered in the analysis.

  1. Acceleration and sensitivity analysis of lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations using parallel processing and rate constant rescaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, M; Robie, T; Vlachos, D G

    2017-10-28

    Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation provides insights into catalytic reactions unobtainable with either experiments or mean-field microkinetic models. Sensitivity analysis of KMC models assesses the robustness of the predictions to parametric perturbations and identifies rate determining steps in a chemical reaction network. Stiffness in the chemical reaction network, a ubiquitous feature, demands lengthy run times for KMC models and renders efficient sensitivity analysis based on the likelihood ratio method unusable. We address the challenge of efficiently conducting KMC simulations and performing accurate sensitivity analysis in systems with unknown time scales by employing two acceleration techniques: rate constant rescaling and parallel processing. We develop statistical criteria that ensure sufficient sampling of non-equilibrium steady state conditions. Our approach provides the twofold benefit of accelerating the simulation itself and enabling likelihood ratio sensitivity analysis, which provides further speedup relative to finite difference sensitivity analysis. As a result, the likelihood ratio method can be applied to real chemistry. We apply our methodology to the water-gas shift reaction on Pt(111).

  2. Pyrolysis behaviors and kinetic studies on Eucalyptus residues using thermogravimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhihua; Zhu, Quanjie; Wang, Xun; Xiao, Bo; Liu, Shiming

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The first study on pyrolysis characteristics and kinetic of Eucalyptus residues. • Pyrolysis process can be divided into three stages using differential DTG method. • A new modified discrete DAEM showed better than Gaussian DAEM for kinetic studies. • Variations of activation energy reveal the mechanism change during pyrolysis process. - Abstract: The pyrolysis behaviors and kinetics of Eucalyptus leaves (EL), Eucalyptus bark (EB) and Eucalyptus sawdust (ESD) were investigated by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) technique. Three stages for EL, EB and ESD pyrolysis have been divided using differential derivative thermogravimetric (DDTG) method and the second stage is the main pyrolysis process with approximately 86.93% (EL), 88.96% (EB) and 97.84% (ESD) weight loss percentages. Kinetic parameters of Gaussian distributed activation energy model (DAEM) for EL, EB and ESD pyrolysis are: distributed centers (E_0) of 141.15 kJ/mol (EL), 149.21 kJ/mol (EB), 175.79 kJ/mol (ESD), standard deviations (σ) of 18.35 kJ/mol (EL), 18.37 kJ/mol (EB), 14.41 kJ/mol (ESD) and pre-exponential factors (A) of 1.15E+10 s"−"1 (EL), 4.34E+10 s"−"1 (EB), 7.44E+12 s"−"1 (ESD). A new modified discrete DAEM was performed and showed excellent fits to experimental data than Gaussian DAEM. According to the modified discrete DAEM, the activation energies are in ranges of 122.67–308.64 kJ/mol, 118.72–410.80 kJ/mol and 108.39–192.93 kJ/mol for EL, EB and ESD pyrolysis, respectively. The pre-exponential factors of discrete DAEM have wide ranges of 4.84E+13–6.12E+22 s"−"1 (EL), 1.91E+12–4.51E+25 s"−"1 (EB) and 63.43–4.36E+11 s"−"1 (ESD). The variation of activation energy versus conversion reveals the mechanism change during pyrolysis process. The kinetic data would be of immense benefit to model, design and develop suitable thermo-chemical systems for the application of Eucalyptus residues.

  3. CFD analysis of the dynamic behaviour of a fuel rod subchannel in a supercritical water reactor with point kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampomah-Amoako, Emmanuel; Akaho, Edward H.K.; Nyarko, Benjamin J.B.; Ambrosini, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The analysis of flow stability of nuclear fuel subchannels with supercritical water is presented. • The results obtained by a CFD code are compared with those of a system code. • The model includes also heat conduction in the fuel rod and point neutron kinetics. - Abstract: The paper presents the analysis by a CFD code of coupled neutronic–thermal hydraulic instabilities in a subchannel slice belonging to a square lattice assembly. The work represents a further phase in the assessment of the suitability of CFD codes for studies of flow stability of supercritical fluids; the research started in previous work with the analysis of bare 2D circular pipes and already addressed 3D subchannel slices with no allowance for heat conduction or neutronic effects. In the present phase, a more realistic system is considered, dealing with a slice of a fuel assembly subchannel containing the regions of the pellet, the gap and the cladding and including also the effect of inlet and outlet throttling. The adopted neutronic model is a point kinetics one, including six delayed neutron groups with global Doppler and fluid density feedbacks. The response of the model to perturbations applied starting from a steady-state condition at the rated power is compared with that of a similar model developed for a 1D system code. Upward, horizontal and downward flow orientations are addressed making use of a uniform power profile and changing relevant parameters as the gap equivalent conductance and the density reactivity coefficient. A bottom-peaked power profile is also considered in the case of vertical upward flow. Though the adopted model can still be considered simple in comparison with actual details of fuel assemblies, the obtained results demonstrate the potential of the adopted methodology for more accurate analyses to be made with larger computational resources

  4. Kinetics of solid state phase transformation UAl3 + Al -> UAl4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, C.A. da.

    1986-01-01

    The Kinetics of phase transformation UAl 3 + Al -> UAl 4 of two Al-U alloys, with 31.4 and 33.4 wt% U respectively, was studied by quantitative microscopy. The results have shown that this transformation is a nucleation and thermally activated growth process. The nucleation occurs heterogeneously at the UAl 3 /Al (∞) interfaces and the growth is controlled by volume diffusion. The empirical activation energy of the process was determined, which mean value is about 54.8 Kcal/mol. The growth Kinetic of UAl 4 phase is a parabolic law. The UAl 4 /UAl 3 and UAl 4 /Al (∞) interfaces migrates in opposite directions, with the UAl 4 /UAl 3 interface velocity being approximately 5 times greater than that of UAl 4 /Al (∞) interface. The chemical diffusion coefficient of Al and U in the UAl 4 phase were evaluated to be of the order of 10 -9 cm 2 /s at 600 0 C. (author) [pt

  5. Resonant power processors. I - State plane analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oruganti, R.; Lee, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    State-plane techniques in conjunction with piecewise-linear analysis is employed to study the steady-state and transient characteristics of a series resonant converter. With the direct viewing of the resonant tank energy and the device switching instants, the state portrayal provides unique insights into the complex behavior of the converter. Operation of the converter under both continuous and discontinuous current modes and at frequencies both below and above resonant frequency are discussed.

  6. Non-invasive differentiation of pancreatic lesions: is analysis of FDG kinetics superior to semiquantitative uptake value analysis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitzsche, E.U.; Hoegerle, S.; Mix, M.; Brink, I.; Otte, A.; Moser, E.

    2002-01-01

    The diagnostic utility of fluorine-18 2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) for the non-invasive differentiation of focal pancreatic lesions originating from cancer or chronic pancreatitis by combined visual image interpretation and semiquantitative uptake value analysis has been documented. However, in clinical routine some misdiagnosis is still observed. This is because there is potential overlap between the semiquantitative uptake values obtained for active inflammatory lesions and cancer. Therefore, this prospective study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that analysis of dynamic kinetics of focal pancreatic lesions based on FDG PET may more accurately determine the benign or malignant nature of such lesions. Thirty patients (56±17 years) were studied dynamically with FDG PET for a period of 60-90 min. Patients were assigned to one of four groups: control, acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer. Two observers, blinded to the clinical data, analysed the time-activity curves of FDG kinetics based on region of interest analysis. The diagnosis predicted by FDG PET was compared with the result of histological examination of the surgical specimen. Analysis of FDG kinetics revealed significant differences in the shape of the time-activity curve for controls, pancreatic cancer and inflammatory disease. Surprisingly, there was no significant difference in the time-activity curve shape for chronic pancreatitis and acute pancreatitis; this is, however, not a clinical issue. Furthermore, acquisition time (60 min vs 90 min) did not affect interpretation of the time-activity curve, so that scanning time may be regularly shortened to 60 min. Interobserver agreement was 1. Based on these findings, non-invasive differentiation between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis was correctly predicted in all cases, as confirmed by histology. In addition, the specificity was increased compared with that obtained from standardised

  7. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, David R.

    2010-01-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N (ge) 3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N = 0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  8. Path dependent magnetic states and evidence of kinetically arrested states in Nd doped LaFe{sub 11.5}Al{sub 1.5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Pallab; Nath, R., E-mail: rnath@iisertvm.ac.in

    2017-03-15

    First order antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition and path dependent magnetic states in La{sub 1−x}Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 11.5}Al{sub 1.5} for x∼0.1 are studied at low temperatures via powder x-ray diffraction, magnetization, and specific heat measurements. X-ray diffraction measurements suggest that around 8% of high temperature antiferromagnetic phase is converted to ferromagnetic phase at low temperatures in zero field cooling. A systematic study of temperature and magnetic field dependent magnetization measurements show a non-monotonic variation of upper critical field and re-entrant antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic transition while warming at an applied magnetic field under zero-field-cooled condition. This has been interpreted in the framework of kinetic arrest model for first order magnetic transition. It is also found that the antiferromagnetic phase is in the non-equilibrium state and behaves as a glass-like magnetic state at low temperatures. The specific heat in field-temperature space is studied and found to have a lower electronic contribution for the non-equilibrium antiferromagnetic state, compared to the equilibrium ferromagnetic state in this compound. - Highlights: • Structural and magnetic properties of La{sub 0.9}Nd{sub 0.1}Fe{sub 11.5}Al{sub 1.5} are investigated. • It shows coexistence and path dependent AFM and FM phases at low temperatures. • The AFM and FM phase fractions were estimated from the x-ray diffraction pattern. • Re-entrant transition and a non-monotonic variation of upper critical field. • The glass like AFM state is explained by the kinetic arrest model.

  9. Compartmental modeling alternatives for kinetic analysis of pet neurotransmitter receptor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppe, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    With the increased interest in studying neurotransmitter and receptor function in vivo, imaging procedures using positron emission tomography have presented new challenges for kinetic modeling and analysis of data. The in vivo behavior of radiolabeled markers for examining these neurotransmitter systems can be quite complex and, therefore, the implementation of compartmental models for data analysis is similarly complex. Often, the variability in the estimates of model parameters representing neurotransmitter or receptor densities, association and dissociation rates, or rates of incorporation or turnover does not permit reliable interpretation of the data. When less complex analyses are used, these model parameters may be biased and thus also do not yield the information being sought. Examination of trade-offs between uncertainty and bias in the parameters of interest may be used to select a compartmental model configuration with an appropriate level of complexity. Modeling alternatives will be discussed for radioligands with varying kinetic properties, such as those that bind reversibly and rapidly and others that bind nearly irreversibly. Specific problems, such as those occurring when a radioligand is open-quotes flow limitedclose quotes also will be discussed

  10. Characterization of the efficiency of microbore liquid chromatography columns by van Deemter and kinetic plot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Terence; Loeker, Denise; Teutenberg, Thorsten; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-10-01

    The efficiency of miniaturized liquid chromatography columns with inner diameters between 200 and 300 μm has been investigated using a dedicated micro-liquid chromatography system. Fully porous, core-shell and monolithic commercially available stationary phases were compared applying van Deemter and kinetic plot analysis. The sub-2 μm fully porous as well as the 2.7 μm core-shell particle packed columns showed superior efficiency and similar values for the minimum reduced plate heights (2.56-2.69) before correction for extra-column contribution compared to normal-bore columns. Moreover, the influence of extra-column contribution was investigated to demonstrate the difference between apparent and intrinsic efficiency by replacing the column by a zero dead volume union to determine the band spreading caused by the system. It was demonstrated that 72% of the intrinsic efficiency could be reached. The results of the kinetic plot analysis indicate the superior performance of the sub-2 μm fully porous particle packed column for ultra-fast liquid chromatography. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Kinetic Model of LiFePO4 Formation Using Non-Isothermal Thermogravimetric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Halim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation reaction of LiFePO4 from decomposition of precursors LiOH, FeSO4.7H2O and (NH42HPO4 with mol ratio of Li:Fe:P=1:1:1 was investigated. The experiment was carried out by thermogravimetric differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA method using nitrogen as atmosfer at a constant heating rate to obtain kinetic constant parameters. Several heating rates were selected, there are 5, 7, 10, 15, 17.5, 22.5 and 25 °C/min. Activation energy, pre-exponential factor and reaction order were taken using Kissinger method and obtained respectively 56.086 kJ/mol, 6.95×108 min-1, and 1.058. Based on fitting result between reaction model and experiment were obtained that reaction obeyed the three dimension diffusion model. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 19th September 2013; Revised: 9th December 2013; Accepted: 23rd January 2014 [How to Cite: Halim, A., Widiyastuti, W., Setyawan, H., Winardi, S. (2014. Kinetic of LiFePO4 For-mation Using Non-isothermal Thermogravimetric Analysis. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (1: 60-65. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.1.5508.60-65][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.1.5508.60-65] 

  12. Dosimetric features and kinetic analysis of thermoluminescence from ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chithambo, M. L.

    2012-08-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) from beta irradiated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene has been studied for measurements between 30 and 200 °C. An aliquot studied in this work produced TL glow curves consisting of two peaks, the main peak at 88 °C and a weaker intensity peak at 148 °C for heating at 1 °C s-1 following an excitation dose of 215 Gy. The position of the main peak is poorly reproducible for heating rates of 0.2 and 0.6 °C s-1 investigated with the peak position decreasing when the sample is freshly irradiated and the TL re-measured. The said change in peak position is however less of an effect for measurements made at 1 °C s-1 with the peak position being fairly reproducible in this case. Further measurements of the dosimetric properties of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene showed that its dose response is linear from 26 Gy to about 161 Gy but exhibits slower growth in intensity with dose from about 860 Gy after regions of sub- and supra-linearity in between. If the TL is not measured immediately after irradiation, the signal fades with the delay approximately exponentially. In addition, a number of tests including phosphorescence analysis showed the possibility that the order of kinetics might not be unique but sensitive to several factors including measurement temperature. Thus for instance, the dependence of the peak position on the stop temperature in the partial heating procedure Tm - Tstop implied first-order kinetics but analysis of the geometrical factor μg for the same set of data gave μg = 0.46 ± 0.03 a value corresponding to characteristics somewhat intermediate between first and second order. In comparison, the results of analysis of the phosphorescence recorded at several temperatures on the rising edge of the main peak were only in agreement for measurements at 40 °C with general-order analysis suggesting second-order kinetics apply as did TL-like transformation of the monotonic phosphorescence decay. Both results were

  13. Noise-Induced Modulation of the Relaxation Kinetics around a Non-Equilibrium Steady State of Non-Linear Chemical Reaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confi...

  14. Kinetic and energetic analysis of lipid accumulation in batch culture of Rhodotorula glutinis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, J.G.; Rhee, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Kinetic and energetic analyses were made to describe the accumulation of lipid Rhodotorula glutinis more quantitatively. Accumulation of lipid in yeast was controlled by kinetic factors. The energetic efficiency of lipid formation was higher than that of growth. 18 references.

  15. Multiphasic analysis of gas production kinetics for in vitro fermentation of ruminant feeds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, J.C.J.; Cone, J.W.; Williams, B.A.; Debersaques, F.M.A.; Lantinga, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed time-related gas production techniques to quantify the kinetics of ruminant feed fermentation have a high resolution. Consequently, fermentation processes with clearly contrasting gas production kinetics can be identified. Parameterization of the separate processes is possible

  16. Numerical Investigation of Desulfurization Kinetics in Gas-Stirred Ladles by a Quick Modeling Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Nastac, Laurentiu; Pitts-Baggett, April; Yu, Qiulin

    2018-03-01

    A quick modeling analysis approach for predicting the slag-steel reaction and desulfurization kinetics in argon gas-stirred ladles has been developed in this study. The model consists of two uncoupled components: (i) a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for predicting the fluid flow and the characteristics of slag-steel interface, and (ii) a multicomponent reaction kinetics model for calculating the desulfurization evolution. The steel-slag interfacial area and mass transfer coefficients predicted by the CFD simulation are used as the processing data for the reaction model. Since the desulfurization predictions are uncoupled from the CFD simulation, the computational time of this uncoupled predictive approach is decreased by at least 100 times for each case study when compared with the CFD-reaction kinetics fully coupled model. The uncoupled modeling approach was validated by comparing the evolution of steel and slag compositions with the experimentally measured data during ladle metallurgical furnace (LMF) processing at Nucor Steel Tuscaloosa, Inc. Then, the validated approach was applied to investigate the effects of the initial steel and slag compositions, as well as different types of additions during the refining process on the desulfurization efficiency. The results revealed that the sulfur distribution ratio and the desulfurization reaction can be promoted by making Al and CaO additions during the refining process. It was also shown that by increasing the initial Al content in liquid steel, both Al oxidation and desulfurization rates rapidly increase. In addition, it was found that the variation of the initial Si content in steel has no significant influence on the desulfurization rate. Lastly, if the initial CaO content in slag is increased or the initial Al2O3 content is decreased in the fluid-slag compositional range, the desulfurization rate can be improved significantly during the LMF process.

  17. Kinetic analysis of concurrent activation potentiation during back squats and jump squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, William P; Kaufmann, Clare E; Fauth, McKenzie L; Petushek, Erich J

    2010-06-01

    Concurrent activation potentiation enhances muscular force during open kinetic chain isometric and isokinetic exercises via remote voluntary contractions (RVCs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of RVCs on the performance of closed kinetic chain ground-based exercises. Subjects included 13 men (21.4+/-1.5 years) who performed the back squat and jump squat in 2 test conditions. The RVC condition included performing the test exercises while clenching the jaw on a mouth guard, forcefully gripping and pulling the barbell down into the trapezius, and performing a Valsalva maneuver. The normal condition (NO-RVC) included performing the test exercises without RVCs. Exercises were assessed with a force platform. Peak ground reaction force (GRF), rate of force development (RFD) during the first 100 milliseconds (RFD-100), RFD to peak GRF (RFD-P), and jump squat height (JH) were calculated from the force-time records. Data were analyzed using an analysis of variance. Results reveal that GRF and RFD-100 were higher in the RVC compared with the NO-RVC condition for both the back squat and jump squat (psquat (psquat (p=0.82). The JH was higher in the RVC compared to the NO-RVC condition for the jump squat (pkinetic chain exercises for most of the outcome variables assessed, yielding a 2.9-32.3% greater performance. Practitioners should encourage athletes to use RVCs to improve the acute training effect of exercises such as those used in this study.

  18. Numerical Investigation of Desulfurization Kinetics in Gas-Stirred Ladles by a Quick Modeling Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Nastac, Laurentiu; Pitts-Baggett, April; Yu, Qiulin

    2018-06-01

    A quick modeling analysis approach for predicting the slag-steel reaction and desulfurization kinetics in argon gas-stirred ladles has been developed in this study. The model consists of two uncoupled components: (i) a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for predicting the fluid flow and the characteristics of slag-steel interface, and (ii) a multicomponent reaction kinetics model for calculating the desulfurization evolution. The steel-slag interfacial area and mass transfer coefficients predicted by the CFD simulation are used as the processing data for the reaction model. Since the desulfurization predictions are uncoupled from the CFD simulation, the computational time of this uncoupled predictive approach is decreased by at least 100 times for each case study when compared with the CFD-reaction kinetics fully coupled model. The uncoupled modeling approach was validated by comparing the evolution of steel and slag compositions with the experimentally measured data during ladle metallurgical furnace (LMF) processing at Nucor Steel Tuscaloosa, Inc. Then, the validated approach was applied to investigate the effects of the initial steel and slag compositions, as well as different types of additions during the refining process on the desulfurization efficiency. The results revealed that the sulfur distribution ratio and the desulfurization reaction can be promoted by making Al and CaO additions during the refining process. It was also shown that by increasing the initial Al content in liquid steel, both Al oxidation and desulfurization rates rapidly increase. In addition, it was found that the variation of the initial Si content in steel has no significant influence on the desulfurization rate. Lastly, if the initial CaO content in slag is increased or the initial Al2O3 content is decreased in the fluid-slag compositional range, the desulfurization rate can be improved significantly during the LMF process.

  19. Simultaneous kinetic spectrophotometric analysis of five synthetic food colorants with the aid of chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yongnian; Wang, Yong; Kokot, Serge

    2009-04-30

    This paper describes a simple and sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method for the simultaneous determination of Amaranth, Ponceau 4R, Sunset Yellow, Tartrazine and Brilliant Blue in mixtures with the aid of chemometrics. The method involved two coupled reactions, viz. the reduction of iron(III) by the analytes to iron(II) in sodium acetate/hydrochloric acid solution (pH 1.71) and the chromogenic reaction between iron(II) and hexacyanoferrate(III) ions to yield a Prussian blue peak at 760 nm. The spectral data were recorded over the 500-1000 nm wavelength range every 2s for 600 s. The kinetic data were collected at 760 nm and 600 s, and linear calibration models were satisfactorily constructed for each of the dyes with detection limits in the range of 0.04-0.50 mg L(-1). Multivariate calibration models for kinetic data were established and verified for methods such as the Iterative target transform factor analysis (ITTFA), principal component regression (PCR), partial least squares (PLS), and principal component-radial basis function-artificial neural network (PC-RBF-ANN) with and without wavelet packet transform (WPT) pre-treatment. The PC-RBF-ANN with WPT calibration performed somewhat better than others on the basis of the %RPE(T) (approximately 9) and %Recovery parameters (approximately 108), although the effect of the WPT pre-treatment was marginal (approximately 0.5% RPE(T)). The proposed method was applied for the simultaneous determination of the five colorants in foodstuff samples, and the results were comparable with those from a reference HPLC method.

  20. Occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes: analysis for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and assessment of numerical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Félix Monteiro; Oliveira, Samuel Conceição

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes is analyzed for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An assessment of numerical methods is performed to solve the boundary value problem generated by the mathematical modeling of diffusion and reaction processes under steady state and isothermal conditions. Two classes of numerical methods were employed: shooting and collocation. The shooting method used the ode function from Scilab software. The collocation methods included: that implemented by the bvode function of Scilab, the orthogonal collocation, and the orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The methods were validated for simplified forms of the Michaelis-Menten equation (zero-order and first-order kinetics), for which analytical solutions are available. Among the methods covered in this article, the orthogonal collocation on finite elements proved to be the most robust and efficient method to solve the boundary value problem concerning Michaelis-Menten kinetics. For this enzyme kinetics, it was found that the dead core can occur when verified certain conditions of diffusion-reaction within the catalytic particle. The application of the concepts and methods presented in this study will allow for a more generalized analysis and more accurate designs of heterogeneous enzymatic reactors.

  1. Nutrient Removal from Wastewater using Microalgae: A Kinetic Evaluation and Lipid Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the performance of mixed microalgal bioreactors in treating three differenttypes of wastewaters - kitchen wastewater (KWW), palm oil mill effluent (POME), and pharmaceutical wastewater (PWW) in semi-continuous mode and to analyze the lipid content in the harvested algal biomass. The reactors were monitored for total nitrogen and phosphate removal at eight solid retention times (SRTs) - 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 days. The nutrient uptake kinetic parameters were quantified using linearized Michaelis-Menten and Monod models at steady-state conditions. The nutrient removal efficiency and lipid production were found to be higher in KWW when compared with the other wastewaters. Saturated fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0, and C18:1) accounted for more than 60% of the algal fatty acids for all the wastewaters. The lipid is, therefore, considered suitable for synthesizing biodiesel.

  2. A Poisson-like closed-form expression for the steady-state wealth distribution in a kinetic model of gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jane Bernadette Denise M.; Esguerra, Jose Perico H.

    2017-08-01

    An approximate but closed-form expression for a Poisson-like steady state wealth distribution in a kinetic model of gambling was formulated from a finite number of its moments, which were generated from a βa,b(x) exchange distribution. The obtained steady-state wealth distributions have tails which are qualitatively similar to those observed in actual wealth distributions.

  3. Three-dimensional space-time kinetic analysis with CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D of the NEACRP PWR rod ejection benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferroukhi, H.; Coddington, P

    2001-03-01

    One of the activities within the STARS project, in the Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Behaviour; is the development of a coupling methodology between the three-dimensional, space-time kinetics codes CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D in order to perform core and plant transient analyses of the Swiss LWRs. The CORETRAN code is a 3-D full-core simulator, intended to be used for core-related analyses, while RETRAN-3D is the three-dimensional kinetics version of the plant system code RETRAN, and can therefore be used for best-estimate analyses of a wide range of transients in both PWRs and BWRs. Because the neutronics solver in both codes is based on the same kinetics model, one important advantage is that the codes can be coupled so that the initial conditions for a RETRAN-3D plant analysis are generated by a detailed-core, steady-state calculation using CORETRAN. As a first step towards using CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D for kinetic applications, the NEACRP PWR rod ejection benchmark has been analyzed with both codes, and is presented in this paper. The first objective is to verify the consistency between the static and kinetic solutions of the two codes, and so gain confidence in the coupling methodology. The second objective is to assess the CORETRAN and RETRAN-3D solutions for a well-defined RIA transient, comparing with previously published results. In parallel, several sensitivity studies have been performed in an attempt to identify models and calculational options important for a correct analysis of an RIA event in a LWR using these two codes. (author)

  4. Kinetic magnetic resonance imaging analysis of lumbar segmental mobility in patients without significant spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yanlin; Aghdasi, Bayan G; Montgomery, Scott R; Inoue, Hirokazu; Lu, Chang; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine lumbar segmental mobility using kinetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with minimal lumbar spondylosis. Mid-sagittal images of patients who underwent weight-bearing, multi-position kinetic MRI for symptomatic low back pain or radiculopathy were reviewed. Only patients with a Pfirrmann grade of I or II, indicating minimal disc disease, in all lumbar discs from L1-2 to L5-S1 were included for further analysis. Translational and angular motion was measured at each motion segment. The mean translational motion of the lumbar spine at each level was 1.38 mm at L1-L2, 1.41 mm at L2-L3, 1.14 mm at L3-L4, 1.10 mm at L4-L5 and 1.01 mm at L5-S1. Translational motion at L1-L2 and L2-L3 was significantly greater than L3-4, L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels (P lumbar spine was highest at L2-L3 (22.45 %) and least at L5/S1 (14.71 %) (P lumbar segmental mobility in patients without significant degenerative disc disease and found that translational motion was greatest in the proximal lumbar levels whereas angular motion was similar in the mid-lumbar levels but decreased at L1-L2 and L5-S1.

  5. Assay of phospholipases A2 and their inhibitors by kinetic analysis in the scooting mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Kumar Jain

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Several cellular processes are regulated by interfacial catalysis on biomembrane surfaces. Phospholipases A2 (PLA2 are interesting not only as prototypes for interfacial catalysis, but also because they mobilize precursors for the biosynthesis of eicosanoids and platelet activating factor, and these agents ultimately control a wide range of secretory and inflammatory processes. Since PLA2 carry out their catalytic function at membrane surfaces, the kinetics of these enzymes depends on what the enzyme ‘sees’ at the interface, and thus the observed rate is profoundly influenced by the organization and dynamics of the lipidwater interface (‘quality of the interface’. In this review we elaborate the advantages of monitoring interfacial catalysis in the scooting mode, that is, under the conditions where the enzyme remains bound to vesicles for several thousand catalytic turnover cycles. Such a highly processive catalytic turnover in the scooting mode is useful for a rigorous and quantitative characterization of the kinetics of interfacial catalysis. This analysis is now extended to provide insights into designing strategy for PLA2 assays and screens for their inhibitors.

  6. Analysis of kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic patterns during root canal preparation with rotary and manual instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braulio Pasternak-Júnior

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the muscular activity during root canal preparation through kinematics, kinetics, and electromyography (EMG. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The operators prepared one canal with RaCe rotary instruments and another with Flexo-files. The kinematics of the major joints was reconstructed using an optoelectronic system and electromyographic responses of the flexor carpi radialis, extensor carpi radialis, brachioradialis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius were recorded. The joint torques of the shoulder, elbow and wrist were calculated using inverse dynamics. In the kinematic analysis, angular movements of the wrist and elbow were classified as low risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. With respect to the shoulder, the classification was medium-risk. RESULTS: There was no significant difference revealed by the kinetic reports. The EMG results showed that for the middle deltoid and upper trapezius the rotary instrumentation elicited higher values. The flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis, as well as the brachioradialis showed a higher value with the manual method. CONCLUSION: The muscular recruitment for accomplishment of articular movements for root canal preparation with either the rotary or manual techniques is distinct. Nevertheless, the rotary instrument presented less difficulty in the generation of the joint torque in each articulation, thus, presenting a greater uniformity of joint torques.

  7. Analysis of kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic patterns during root canal preparation with rotary and manual instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    PASTERNAK-JÚNIOR, Braulio; de SOUSA NETO, Manoel Damião; DIONÍSIO, Valdeci Carlos; PÉCORA, Jesus Djalma; SILVA, Ricardo Gariba

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study assessed the muscular activity during root canal preparation through kinematics, kinetics, and electromyography (EMG). Material and Methods The operators prepared one canal with RaCe rotary instruments and another with Flexo-files. The kinematics of the major joints was reconstructed using an optoelectronic system and electromyographic responses of the flexor carpi radialis, extensor carpi radialis, brachioradialis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, middle deltoid, and upper trapezius were recorded. The joint torques of the shoulder, elbow and wrist were calculated using inverse dynamics. In the kinematic analysis, angular movements of the wrist and elbow were classified as low risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders. With respect to the shoulder, the classification was medium-risk. Results There was no significant difference revealed by the kinetic reports. The EMG results showed that for the middle deltoid and upper trapezius the rotary instrumentation elicited higher values. The flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis, as well as the brachioradialis showed a higher value with the manual method. Conclusion The muscular recruitment for accomplishment of articular movements for root canal preparation with either the rotary or manual techniques is distinct. Nevertheless, the rotary instrument presented less difficulty in the generation of the joint torque in each articulation, thus, presenting a greater uniformity of joint torques. PMID:22437679

  8. Analysis of Kinetic Parameter Effect on Reactor Operation Stability of the RSG-GAS Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokhmadi

    2007-01-01

    Kinetic parameter has influence to behaviour on RSG-GAS reactor operation. In this paper done is the calculation of reactivity curve, period-reactivity relation and low power transfer function in silicide fuel. This parameters is necessary and useful for reactivity characteristic analysis and reactor stability. To know the reactivity response, it was done reactivity insertion at power 1 watt using POKDYN code because at this level of power no feedback reactivity so important for reactor operation safety. The result of calculation showed that there is no change of significant a period-reactivity relation and transfer function at low power for 2.96 gU/cc, 3.55 gU/cc and 4.8 gU/cc density of silicide fuels. The result of the transfer function at low power showed that the reactor is critical stability with no feedback. The result of calculation also showed that reactivity response no change among three kinds of fuel densities. It can be concluded that from kinetic parameter point of view period-reactivity relation, transfer function at low power, and reactivity response are no change reactor operation from reactivity effect when fuel exchanged. (author)

  9. Pyrolysis kinetics of raw and hydrothermally carbonized Karanj (Pongamia pinnata) fruit hulls via thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Azharul; Asif, M; Hameed, B H

    2015-03-01

    The pyrolysis of karanj fruit hulls (KFH) and karanj fruit hull hydrothermal carbonization (KFH-HTC) hydrochar was thermogravimetrically investigated under a nitrogen environment at 5 °C/min, 10 °C/min, and 20 °C/min. The pyrolysis decomposition of KFH biomass was faster than that of KFH-HTC hydrochar because of the high volatility and fixed carbon of KFH biomass. Weight loss percentage was also affected by the heating rates. The kinetic data were evaluated with the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods. The activation energy values obtained with these two methods were 61.06 and 68.53 kJ/mol for KFH biomass and 130.49 and 135.87 kJ/mol for KFH-HTC hydrochar, respectively. The analysis of kinetic process mechanisms was verified with the Coats-Redfern method. KFH-HTC hydrochar may play a potential role in transforming biomass to energy-rich feedstock for thermochemical applications because of its high heating value, high fixed carbon, and low ash and sulfur contents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Characteristics and kinetic study on pyrolysis of five lignocellulosic biomass via thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihua; Hu, Mian; Zhu, Xiaolei; Guo, Dabin; Liu, Shiming; Hu, Zhiquan; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Jingbo; Laghari, Mahmood

    2015-09-01

    Pyrolysis characteristics and kinetic of five lignocellulosic biomass pine wood sawdust, fern (Dicranopteris linearis) stem, wheat stalk, sugarcane bagasse and jute (Corchorus capsularis) stick were investigated using thermogravimetric analysis. The pyrolysis of five lignocellulosic biomass could be divided into three stages, which correspond to the pyrolysis of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin, respectively. Single Gaussian activation energy distributions of each stage are 148.50-201.13 kJ/mol with standard deviations of 2.60-13.37 kJ/mol. The kinetic parameters of different stages were used as initial guess values for three-parallel-DAEM model calculation with good fitting quality and fast convergence rate. The mean activation energy ranges of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin were 148.12-164.56 kJ/mol, 171.04-179.54 kJ/mol and 175.71-201.60 kJ/mol, with standard deviations of 3.91-9.89, 0.29-1.34 and 23.22-27.24 kJ/mol, respectively. The mass fractions of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin in lignocellulosic biomass were respectively estimated as 0.12-0.22, 0.54-0.65 and 0.17-0.29. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Photoacoustic Analysis of the Penetration Kinetics of Cordia verbenacea DC in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, S. S.; Barja, P. R.

    2012-11-01

    Phonophoresis consists of the utilization of ultrasound radiation associated to pharmacological agents in order to enhance transdermal penetration of applied drugs. It is a widely employed resource in physiotherapy practice, normally associated with anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Acheflan. This drug was developed in Brazil from the essential oil of Cordia verbenacea DC, a native plant of the Brazilian southern coast. In previous studies, the photoacoustic (PA) technique proved effective in the study of the penetration kinetics of topically applied products and in the evaluation of drug delivery after phonophoresis application. The present work aimed to evaluate the penetration kinetics of Acheflan in human skin, employing in vivo PA measurements after massage application or phonophoresis application. Ten volunteers (aged between 18 and 30 years) took part in the study. Time evolution of the PA signal was fitted to a Boltzmann curve, S-shaped. After statistical analysis, PA measurements have shown drug penetration for both application forms, but drug delivery was more evident after phonophoresis application, with a characteristic penetration time of less than 15 min for the stratum corneum.

  12. Kinetic analysis of the effects of target structure on siRNA efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiawen; Zhang, Wenbing

    2012-12-01

    RNAi efficiency for target cleavage and protein expression is related to the target structure. Considering the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) as a multiple turnover enzyme, we investigated the effect of target mRNA structure on siRNA efficiency with kinetic analysis. The 4-step model was used to study the target cleavage kinetic process: hybridization nucleation at an accessible target site, RISC-mRNA hybrid elongation along with mRNA target structure melting, target cleavage, and enzyme reactivation. At this model, the terms accounting for the target accessibility, stability, and the seed and the nucleation site effects are all included. The results are in good agreement with that of experiments which show different arguments about the structure effects on siRNA efficiency. It shows that the siRNA efficiency is influenced by the integrated factors of target's accessibility, stability, and the seed effects. To study the off-target effects, a simple model of one siRNA binding to two mRNA targets was designed. By using this model, the possibility for diminishing the off-target effects by the concentration of siRNA was discussed.

  13. A kinetic analysis of kappa-opioid agonist binding using the selective radioligand (/sup 3/H)U69593

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.A.; Hunter, J.C.; Hill, R.G.; Hughes, J.

    1989-07-01

    The interaction of the nonselective opioid ligand (3H)bremazocine and of the kappa-opioid (3H)U69593 with the kappa-receptor was investigated in guinea-pig cortical membranes. Each radioligand bound to a single population of high-affinity sites, although (3H)U69593 apparently recognised only 70% of those sites labelled by (3H)bremazocine. Naloxone and the kappa-selective ligands U69593 and PD117302 exhibited full inhibition of the binding of both radioligands. Kinetic analysis demonstrated biphasic rates of association and dissociation for both (3H)bremazocine and (3H)U69593. Detailed analysis of the binding of (3H)U69593 revealed that the fast rate of association was dependent on radioligand concentration, in contrast to the slow rate, which was independent of ligand concentration. Guanylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate (GppNHp) inhibited binding of (3H)U69593; saturation analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of GppNHp resulted in a decrease in affinity without any significant change in binding capacity. GppNHp attenuated the formation of the slow component of (3H)U69593 binding, while accelerating the fast component. The data are consistent with the formation of a high-affinity complex between the kappa-receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. Guanine nucleotides promote the dissociation of this ternary complex and the stabilisation of a lower-affinity state of the receptor.

  14. Understanding the Formation of Kinetically Stable Compounds and the Development of Thin Film Pair Distribution Function Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Suzannah Rebecca

    Navigating the synthesis landscape poses many challenges when developing novel solid state materials. Advancements in both synthesis and characterization are necessary to facilitate the targeting of specific materials. This dissertation discusses the formation of chalcogenide heterostructures and their properties in the first part and the development of thin film pair distribution function analysis (tfPDF) in the second part. The heterostructures were formed by the self-assembly of designed precursors deposited by physical vapor deposition in a modulated elemental reactants approach, which provides the control and predictability to synthesis. Specifically, a series of (BiSe)1+delta(TiSe2) n, where n = 2,3,&4, were synthesized to explore the extent of charge transfer from the BiSe to TiSe2 layers. To further explore the role Bi plays in charge donation, a family of structurally similar compounds, (Bix Sn1-xSe)1+deltaTiSe2, where 0≥x≥1, were synthesized and characterized. Electrical measurements show doping efficiency decreases as x increases, correlated with the structural distortion and the formation of periodic antiphase boundaries containing Bi-Bi pairs. The first heterostructures composed of three unique structural types were synthesized and Bi2Se3 layer thickness was used to tune electrical properties and further explore charge transfer. To better understand the potential energy landscape on which these kinetically stable compounds exist, two investigations were undertaken. The first was a study of the formation and subsequent decomposition of [(BiSe)1+delta]n(TiSe2)n compounds, where n= 2&3, the second an investigation of precursor structure for thermodynamically stable FeSb2 and kinetically stable FeSb3. The second section describes the development of thin film pair distribution function analysis, a technique in which total scattering data for pair distribution function (PDF) analysis is obtained from thin films, suitable for local structure analysis

  15. Wetting of biopolymer coatings: contact angle kinetics and image analysis investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Stefano; Introzzi, Laura; Biagioni, Paolo; Holz, Torsten; Schiraldi, Alberto; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2011-06-21

    The surface wetting of five biopolymers, used as coating materials for a plastic film, was monitored over a span of 8 min by means of the optical contact angle technique. Because most of the total variation was observed to occur during the first 60 s, we decided to focus on this curtailed temporal window. Initial contact angle values (θ(0)) ranged from ∼91° for chitosan to ∼30° for pullulan. However, the water drop profile began to change immediately following drop deposition for all biocoatings, confirming that the concept of water contact angle equilibrium is not applicable to most biopolymers. First, a three-parameter decay equation [θ(t) = θ(0) exp(kt(n))] was fit to the experimental contact angle data to describe the kinetics of the contact angle change for each biocoating. Interestingly, the k constant correlated well with the contact angle evolution rate and the n exponent seemed to be somehow linked to the physicochemical phenomena underlying the overall kinetics process. Second, to achieve a reliable description of droplet evolution, the contact angle (CA) analysis was coupled with image analysis (IA) through a combined geometric/trigonometric approach. Absorption and spreading were the key factors governing the overall mechanism of surface wetting during the 60 s analysis, although the individual quantification of both phenomena demonstrated that spreading provided the largest contribution for all biopolymers, with the only exception of gelatin, which showed two quasi-equivalent and counterbalancing effects. The possible correlation between these two phenomena and the topography of the biopolymer surfaces are then discussed on the basis of atomic force microscopy analyses. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. A practical approach to the sensitivity analysis for kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Max J.; Engelmann, Felix; Matera, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have become a vital tool for predictive quality atomistic understanding of complex surface chemical reaction kinetics over a wide range of reaction conditions. In order to expand their practical value in terms of giving guidelines for the atomic level design of catalytic systems, it is very desirable to readily evaluate a sensitivity analysis for a given model. The result of such a sensitivity analysis quantitatively expresses the dependency of the turnover frequency, being the main output variable, on the rate constants entering the model. In the past, the application of sensitivity analysis, such as degree of rate control, has been hampered by its exuberant computational effort required to accurately sample numerical derivatives of a property that is obtained from a stochastic simulation method. In this study, we present an efficient and robust three-stage approach that is capable of reliably evaluating the sensitivity measures for stiff microkinetic models as we demonstrate using the CO oxidation on RuO2(110) as a prototypical reaction. In the first step, we utilize the Fisher information matrix for filtering out elementary processes which only yield negligible sensitivity. Then we employ an estimator based on the linear response theory for calculating the sensitivity measure for non-critical conditions which covers the majority of cases. Finally, we adapt a method for sampling coupled finite differences for evaluating the sensitivity measure for lattice based models. This allows for an efficient evaluation even in critical regions near a second order phase transition that are hitherto difficult to control. The combined approach leads to significant computational savings over straightforward numerical derivatives and should aid in accelerating the nano-scale design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  17. Cycle kinetics, steady state thermodynamics and motors-a paradigm for living matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Hong

    2005-01-01

    An integration of the stochastic mathematical models for motor proteins with Hill's steady state thermodynamics yields a rather comprehensive theory for molecular motors as open systems in the nonequilibrium steady state. This theory, a natural extension of Gibbs' approach to isothermal molecular systems in equilibrium, is compared with other existing theories with dissipative structures and dynamics. The theory of molecular motors might be considered as an archetype for studying more complex open biological systems such as biochemical reaction networks inside living cells

  18. Coherent states, pseudodifferential analysis and arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterberger, André

    2012-06-01

    Basic questions regarding families of coherent states include describing some constructions of such and the way they can be applied to operator theory or partial differential equations. In both questions, pseudodifferential analysis is important. Recent developments indicate that they can contribute to methods in arithmetic, especially modular form theory. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’.

  19. Steady state kinetic model for the binding of substrates and allosteric effectors to Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Larsen, Sine

    2000-01-01

    A steady state kinetic investigation of the Pi activation of 5-phospho-D-ribosyl α-1-diphosphate synthase from Escherichia coli suggests that Pi can bind randomly to the enzyme either before or after an ordered addition of free Mg2+ and substrates. Unsaturation with ribose 5-phosphate increased...... the apparent cooperativity of Pi activation. At unsaturating Pi concentrations partial substrate inhibition by ribose 5-phosphate was observed. Together these results suggest that saturation of the enzyme with Pi directs the subsequent ordered binding of Mg2+ and substrates via a fast pathway, whereas...... saturation with ribose 5-phosphate leads to the binding of Mg2+ and substrates via a slow pathway where Pi binds to the enzyme last. The random mechanism for Pi binding was further supported by studies with competitive inhibitors of Mg2+, MgATP, and ribose 5-phosphate that all appeared noncompetitive when...

  20. Evaluation of estimated creatinine clearance before steady state in acute kidney injury by creatinine kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashiro, Masatomo; Ochiai, Miyuki; Fujisawa, Nao; Kadoya, Yuko; Kamata, Tadashi

    2012-08-01

    A simple method to calculate estimated creatinine clearance using two serum creatinine concentration (Cr) values in acute kidney injury (AKI) was developed (eCrCl-AKI). We aimed to evaluate its accuracy and to clarify its contribution to the classification of AKI. We validated the errors in eCrCl-AKI in a simulation study after various reductions in creatinine clearance (CrCl) at various levels of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We compared the eCrCl-AKI-based classification of RIFLE criteria with the Cr-based classification or that proposed by Waikar and Bonventre. The regression equations of eCrCl-AKI on time were determined and Cr values were reconstructed by creatinine kinetics substituting CrCl with eCrCl-AKI in actual patients. Most errors in eCrCl-AKI were relatively small (from -13.6 to +7.9%) with the exception of two Cr values that straddled the changing trend of Cr. The classification according to RIFLE criteria based on Cr was unstable and did not enable adequate classification, especially in milder reductions of CrCl with advanced CKD. The classification based on eCrCl-AKI was stable and enabled adequate classification. There were good agreements between measured Cr and reconstructed Cr with eCrCl-AKI. The regression equations of eCrCl-AKI revealed changes of renal function that were unexpected only from fluctuations of Cr. eCrCl-AKI can provide relatively accurate estimates for fluctuating CrCl. eCrCl-AKI enables more stable and earlier classification of AKI than Cr, at least in the simulation study. The more widespread use of eCrCl-AKI in actual clinical settings of AKI is necessary to evaluate this formula.

  1. Upper limb joint kinetic analysis during tennis serve: Assessment of competitive level on efficiency and injury risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C; Bideau, B; Ropars, M; Delamarche, P; Kulpa, R

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the joint kinetics and stroke production efficiency for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist during the serve between professionals and advanced tennis players and to discuss their potential relationship with given overuse injuries. Eleven professional and seven advanced tennis players were studied with an optoelectronic motion analysis system while performing serves. Normalized peak kinetic values of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints were calculated using inverse dynamics. To measure serve efficiency, all normalized peak kinetic values were divided by ball velocity. t-tests were used to determine significant differences between the resultant joint kinetics and efficiency values in both groups (advanced vs professional). Shoulder inferior force, shoulder anterior force, shoulder horizontal abduction torque, and elbow medial force were significantly higher in advanced players. Professional players were more efficient than advanced players, as they maximize ball velocity with lower joint kinetics. Since advanced players are subjected to higher joint kinetics, the results suggest that they appeared more susceptible to high risk of shoulder and elbow injuries than professionals, especially during the cocking and deceleration phases of the serve. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of solid-phase interaction of alkali metal carbonates with arsenic pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashinkin, A.S.; Buketov, E.A.; Isabaeva, S.M.; Kasenov, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The thermodynamic analysis of solid-phase reactions of alkali metal carbonates with arsenic pentoxide showing the possibility of formation of all arsenates at a higher than the room temperature is performed. Energetically most advantageous is formation of meta-arsenates. It is shown that temperature increase favours the reaction process. By Gibbs standard energy decrease the reactions form the Li>Na>K>Rb>Cs series. On the base of calculation data linear dependence of Gibbs standard energy in reactions on the atomic number of alkali metalis established. By the continuous weighing method the kinetics of interaction of alkali metal carbonates with arsenic pentoxide under isothermal conditions in the 450-500 deg C range is studied. Studies is the dependence of apparent energy of interaction of carbonates wih As 2 0 5 an atomic parameters of al

  3. 15N kinetic analysis of N2O production by Nitrosomonas europaea: an examination of nitrifier denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poth, M.; Focht, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    A series of 15 N isotope tracer experiments showed that Nitrosomonas europaea produces nitrous oxide only under oxygen-limiting conditions and that the labeled N from nitrite, but not nitrate, is incorporated into nitrous oxide, indicating the presence of the denitrifying enzyme nitrite reductase. A kinetic analysis of the m/z 44, 45, and 46 nitrous oxide produced by washed cell suspensions of N. europaea when incubated with 4 mM ammonium (99% 14 N) and 0.4 mM nitrite (99% 15 N) was performed. No labeled nitirte was reduced to ammonium. All labeled material added was accounted for as either nitrite or nitrous oxide. The hypothesis that nitrous oxide is produced directly from nitrification was rejected since (i) it does not allow for the large amounts of double-labeled (m/z 46) nitrous oxide observed; (ii) the observed patterns of m/z 44, 45, 46 nitrous oxide were completely consistent with a kinetic analysis based on denitrification as the sole mechanism of nitrous oxide production but not with a kinetic analysis based on both mechanisms; (iii) the asymptotic ratio of m/z 45 to m/z 46 nitrous oxide was consistent with denitrification kinetics but inconsistent with nitrification kinetics, which predicted no limit to m/z 45 production. It is concluded that N. europaea is a denitrifier which, under conditions of oxygen stress, uses nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor and produces nitrous oxide

  4. Pyrolysis Characteristics and Kinetic Analysis of Sediment from the Dianchi Lake in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfen Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis properties and kinetic analysis of lake sediment, as well as evolution characteristics of the gaseous products at 5°C/min, 10°C/min, and 20°C/min, were investigated by TG-FTIR. Comparison to the TG and DTG curves at different heating rates, the pyrolysis process at 10°C/min could describe the sediment pyrolysis characteristics better than at 5°C/min and 20°C/min; thus the process of sediment pyrolysis could be considered as four stages. From the kinetics analysis, the nth-order chemical reaction model was suitable to describe the sediment pyrolysis reaction well. The values of n were within 2.55–3.42 and activation energy E was ranged from 15.83 KJ/mol to 57.92 KJ/mol at different heating rates. The gaseous products of H2O, CO2, CO, CH4, and SO2 and several functional groups (C-H, C=O, and C-O could be found from the IR spectrum. From the evolution characteristics with the temperature, there were two evolution peaks for CO2 and one peak for CH4 and SO2. However, the evolution of CO always increased. Besides, the evolution peak for CO2, CH4, and SO2 all shifted to the low temperature region with the decrease of heating rate. The results could provide theoretical basis for harmless treatment and resource utilization of lake sediment.

  5. An Integrated Circuit for Chip-Based Analysis of Enzyme Kinetics and Metabolite Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Boon Chong; Macdonald, Alasdair Iain; Martin, Christopher; Streklas, Angelos J; Campbell, Gordon; Al-Rawhani, Mohammed A; Nemeth, Balazs; Grant, James P; Barrett, Michael P; Cumming, David R S

    2016-06-01

    We have created a novel chip-based diagnostic tools based upon quantification of metabolites using enzymes specific for their chemical conversion. Using this device we show for the first time that a solid-state circuit can be used to measure enzyme kinetics and calculate the Michaelis-Menten constant. Substrate concentration dependency of enzyme reaction rates is central to this aim. Ion-sensitive field effect transistors (ISFET) are excellent transducers for biosensing applications that are reliant upon enzyme assays, especially since they can be fabricated using mainstream microelectronics technology to ensure low unit cost, mass-manufacture, scaling to make many sensors and straightforward miniaturisation for use in point-of-care devices. Here, we describe an integrated ISFET array comprising 2(16) sensors. The device was fabricated with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. Unlike traditional CMOS ISFET sensors that use the Si3N4 passivation of the foundry for ion detection, the device reported here was processed with a layer of Ta2O5 that increased the detection sensitivity to 45 mV/pH unit at the sensor readout. The drift was reduced to 0.8 mV/hour with a linear pH response between pH 2-12. A high-speed instrumentation system capable of acquiring nearly 500 fps was developed to stream out the data. The device was then used to measure glucose concentration through the activity of hexokinase in the range of 0.05 mM-231 mM, encompassing glucose's physiological range in blood. Localised and temporal enzyme kinetics of hexokinase was studied in detail. These results present a roadmap towards a viable personal metabolome machine.

  6. Distribution and kinetics of glucose in rats analyzed by noncompartmental and compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, M.; Radziuk, J.; Hetenyi, G. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The steady-state kinetics and distribution of glucose were assessed using noncompartmental and various two-compartment models in rats that were infused with insulin (+/- euglycemic clamping), methylprednisolone (MP), or phlorizin (PHL) as well as rats injected with protamine-zinc-insulin (PZI) or rendered diabetic. Decreases in clearance of glucose (PCR) were greatest with insulin infusion, followed by PHL, MP, and PZI treatments. PCR decreased in diabetes to 25% of normal. With hyperinsulinemia and euglycemia, turnover rates were 1.18 times the rate of glucose infusion. In normal rats the ratio of the contents of the two compartments was 0.6-0.8 (depending on the model). Significant increases, of between 2.8 and 5.2, were observed with insulin infusion and between 0.8 and 1.8 with PHL, again depending on the model. Because PHL-induced changes in PCR are renal, these data suggest that variations in glucose distribution depend on changes in PCR as well as insulin. The intercompartmental rate constant decreased, and the noncompartmental volume of distribution increased to reflect the above changes. In non-steady-state studies, glucose release increased in response to insulin but not to PHL in contrast to other species

  7. Thermogravimetric analysis and kinetic study of bamboo waste treated by Echinodontium taxodii using a modified three-parallel-reactions model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbo; Liu, Fang; Ke, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effect of pretreatment with Echinodontium taxodii on thermal decomposition characteristics and kinetics of bamboo wastes was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed fungal pretreatment can enhance the thermal degradation of bamboo. The negative effect of extractives in bamboo on the thermal decomposition can be decreased by the pretreatment. A modified three-parallel-reactions model based on isolated lignin was firstly proposed to study pyrolysis kinetics of bamboo lignocellulose. Kinetic analysis showed that with increasing pretreatment time fungal delignification was enhanced to transform the lignin component with high activation energy into that with low activation energy and raise the cellulose content in bamboo, making the thermal decomposition easier. These results demonstrated fungal pretreatment provided a potential way to improve thermal conversion efficiency of bamboo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. DDGS chars gasification with CO{sub 2}: a kinetic study using TG analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Xiangmei; Jong, Wiebren de; Fu, Ningjie; Verkooijen, Adrian H.M. [Delft University of Technology, Process and Energy Department, Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering, Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    Dry Distiller's Grains with Solubles (DDGS) is a by-product during ethanol production from cereals which is currently mainly used as feedstock for cattle. With the growth of the ethanol industry, the increasing supply of DDGS may saturate the livestock feed market; thus, its potential applications need to be explored. DDGS gasification in a 100-kW{sub th} circulating fluidized bed (CFB) steam-O{sub 2} blown gasifier has been studied. However, the modeling of DDGS gasification process encounters difficulties due to the unavailable knowledge of DDGS char gasification kinetics. Therefore, in this paper, gasification kinetics of DDGS char with CO{sub 2} was investigated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Two different types of char samples have been tested. Char type one (PYR-Char) was obtained after DDGS pyrolysis in a TGA at a final temperature of 750 C or 850 C for 20 min. Char type two (CFB-Char) was obtained after DDGS gasification in the 100-kW{sub th} CFB gasifier within the temperature range of 790 C to 820 C with a steam/biomass mass ratio of 0.81 and oxygen to biomass stoichiometric ratio of approximately 0.38. The influences of pyrolysis temperature (750 C, 850 C), heating rate (10 C/min, 30 C/min, 50 C/min, 70 C/min), CO{sub 2} concentration (10, 20, 30 vol.%), and gasification temperature (900 C, 1,000 C, 1,100 C) on the reaction rate of char-CO{sub 2} reaction were determined. Two representative gas-solid reaction models, the volumetric reaction model (VRM) and the shrinking core model (SCM) were applied in order to determine kinetic parameters. It was found that the calculated activation energy (E{sub a}) values using SCM were slightly lower than those using VRM. The calculated E{sub a} values for PYR-Char using both models were in the range of 100-165 kJ/mol, while the calculated E{sub a} values for CFB-Char were in the range of 55-100 kJ/mol. It was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that CFB-Char was more fragile and PYR

  9. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation: Progress report, March 15, 1988--March 14, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this contract is the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions following two-photon laser excitation. We have chosen to study reactions of Xe 5p 5 np because of their relevance to the XeCl excimer laser. We are studying deactivation reactions in collisions with heavy atoms such as Ar, Kr, and Xe and reactive collisions with chlorides. The reactants are excited by multiphoton laser absorption. Product channels are observed by their fluorescence, or by laser induced fluorescence using a second color laser. Reaction rates are measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measure interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra are obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. 11 refs. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Kinetics analysis of two-stage austenitization in supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    The martensite-to-austenite transformation in X4CrNiMo16-5-1 supermartensitic stainless steel was followed in-situ during isochronal heating at 2, 6 and 18 K min−1 applying energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction at the BESSY II facility. Austenitization occurred in two stages, separated...... that the austenitization kinetics is governed by Ni-diffusion and that slow transformation kinetics separating the two stages is caused by soft impingement in the martensite phase. Increasing the lath width in the kinetics model had a similar effect on the austenitization kinetics as increasing the heating-rate....

  11. A coupled 3-D kinetics/system thermal-hydraulic analysis of main steam line break accident for Optimized Power Reactor 1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Yung Kwon; Choi, Chul Jin; Kim, Eun Kee; Lee, Sang Yong [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the coupled 3-D neutronics/thermal-hydraulic analysis of hypothetical main steam line break (MSLB) accident for Optimized Power Reactor 1000. One of the major concerns of this accident is a return-to-power occurrence accompanied with extremely large radial peaking near the stuck Control Element Assembly (CEA). The conventional point kinetics application does not properly account for this kind of asymmetric and local core behavior. Therefore, the current licensing method of point kinetics application introduces some uncertainties and conservatisms in the physics parameters generation, e.g., the static net scram rod worth, moderator cooldown reactivity, Doppler reactivity, and a 3-D peaking factor. The recently developed UNICORN-TM code system is applied for the 3-D coupled calculation, where neutronics code MASTER is coupled with the best-estimate system transient code RETRAN. The 3-D coupled results were assessed in comparison with those by point kinetics application using stand-alone RETRAN application. To quantify the 3-D reactivity benefits over point kinetics, both calculations assumed the accidents to be initiated from the same core state, e.g., end of cycle burnup, fuel and CEA configuration with the same initial moderator and Doppler temperature coefficient, and with initial system thermal-hydraulic condition. The core physics parameters required for point kinetics application were produced using MASTER with the method and procedure consistent with the current licensing application. The occurrence of return-to-power was simulated by intentionally reducing the net CEA worth in order to assess the spatial power distribution and local T-H effect on the dynamic reactivity feedback. The results have demonstrated that the 3-D analysis removes some of the conservatisms inherent in point kinetics analysis mainly caused by the inability to properly account for local reactivity feedback effects during return-to-power transient

  12. A coupled 3-D kinetics/system thermal-hydraulic analysis of main steam line break accident for Optimized Power Reactor 1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Yung Kwon; Choi, Chul Jin; Kim, Eun Kee; Lee, Sang Yong

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the coupled 3-D neutronics/thermal-hydraulic analysis of hypothetical main steam line break (MSLB) accident for Optimized Power Reactor 1000. One of the major concerns of this accident is a return-to-power occurrence accompanied with extremely large radial peaking near the stuck Control Element Assembly (CEA). The conventional point kinetics application does not properly account for this kind of asymmetric and local core behavior. Therefore, the current licensing method of point kinetics application introduces some uncertainties and conservatisms in the physics parameters generation, e.g., the static net scram rod worth, moderator cooldown reactivity, Doppler reactivity, and a 3-D peaking factor. The recently developed UNICORN-TM code system is applied for the 3-D coupled calculation, where neutronics code MASTER is coupled with the best-estimate system transient code RETRAN. The 3-D coupled results were assessed in comparison with those by point kinetics application using stand-alone RETRAN application. To quantify the 3-D reactivity benefits over point kinetics, both calculations assumed the accidents to be initiated from the same core state, e.g., end of cycle burnup, fuel and CEA configuration with the same initial moderator and Doppler temperature coefficient, and with initial system thermal-hydraulic condition. The core physics parameters required for point kinetics application were produced using MASTER with the method and procedure consistent with the current licensing application. The occurrence of return-to-power was simulated by intentionally reducing the net CEA worth in order to assess the spatial power distribution and local T-H effect on the dynamic reactivity feedback. The results have demonstrated that the 3-D analysis removes some of the conservatisms inherent in point kinetics analysis mainly caused by the inability to properly account for local reactivity feedback effects during return-to-power transient

  13. Large-scale kinetic energy spectra from Eulerian analysis of EOLE wind data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, M.

    1975-01-01

    A data set of 56,000 winds determined from the horizontal displacements of EOLE balloons at the 200 mb level in the Southern Hemisphere during the period October 1971-February 1972 is utilized for the computation of planetary- and synoptic-scale kinetic energy space spectra. However, the random distribution of measurements in space and time presents some problems for the spectral analysis. Two different approaches are used, i.e., a harmonic analysis of daily wind values at equi-distant points obtained by space-time interpolation of the data, and a correlation method using the direct measurements. Both methods give similar results for small wavenumbers, but the second is more accurate for higher wavenumbers (k above or equal to 10). The spectra show a maximum at wavenumbers 5 and 6 due to baroclinic instability and then decrease for high wavenumbers up to wavenumber 35 (which is the limit of the analysis), according to the inverse power law k to the negative p, with p close to 3.

  14. Modal and Dynamic Analysis of a Vehicle with Kinetic Dynamic Suspension System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangji Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel kinetic dynamic suspension (KDS system is presented for the cooperative control of the roll and warp motion modes of off-road vehicles. The proposed KDS system consists of two hydraulic cylinders acting on the antiroll bars. Hence, the antiroll bars are not completely replaced by the hydraulic system, but both systems are installed. In this paper, the vibration analysis in terms of natural frequencies of different motion modes in frequency domain for an off-road vehicle equipped with different configurable suspension systems is studied by using the modal analysis method. The dynamic responses of the vehicle with different configurable suspension systems are investigated under different road excitations and maneuvers. The results of the modal and dynamic analysis prove that the KDS system can reduce the roll and articulation motions of the off-road vehicle without adding extra bounce stiffness and deteriorating the ride comfort. Furthermore, the roll stiffness is increased and the warp stiffness is decreased by the KDS system, which could significantly enhance handing performance and off-road capability.

  15. Cell kinetics, DNA integrity, differentiation, and lipid fingerprinting analysis of rabbit adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretto, Letícia Siqueira de Sá; Lessio, Camila; Sawaki e Nakamura, Ahy Natally; Lo Turco, Edson Guimarães; da Silva, Camila Gonzaga; Zambon, João Paulo; Gozzo, Fábio César; Pilau, Eduardo Jorge; de Almeida, Fernando Gonçalves

    2014-10-01

    Human adipose tissue has been described as a potential alternative reservoir for stem cells. Although studies have been performed in rabbits using autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC), these cells have not been well characterized. The primary objectives of this study were to demonstrate the presence of adipose-derived stem cells isolated from rabbit inguinal fat pads and to characterize them through osteogenic and adipogenic in vitro differentiation and lipid fingerprinting analysis. The secondary objective was to evaluate cell behavior through growth kinetics, cell viability, and DNA integrity. Rabbit ADSCs were isolated to determine the in vitro growth kinetics and cell viability. DNA integrity was assessed by an alkaline Comet assay in passages 0 and 5. The osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by Von Kossa, and Alizarin Red S staining and adipogenic differentiation were assessed by Oil Red O staining. Lipid fingerprinting analyses of control, adipogenic, and osteogenic differentiated cells were performed by MALDI-TOF/MS. We demonstrate that rabbit ADSC have a constant growth rate at the early passages, with increased DNA fragmentation at or after passage 5. Rabbit ADSC viability was similar in passages 2 and 5 (90.7% and 86.6%, respectively), but there was a tendency to decreased cellular growth rate after passage 3. The ADSC were characterized by the expression of surface markers such as CD29 (67.4%) and CD44 (89.4%), using CD 45 (0.77%) as a negative control. ADSC from rabbits were successfully isolated form the inguinal region. These cells were capable to differentiate into osteogenic and adipogenic tissue when they were placed in inductive media. After each passage, there was a trend towards decreased cell growth. On the other hand, DNA fragmentation increased at each passage. ADSC had a different lipid profile when placed in control, adipogenic, or osteogenic media.

  16. Stoichiometric and kinetic analysis of extreme halophilic Archaea on various substrates in a corrosion resistant bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Seyer, Bernhard; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-25

    Extreme halophilic Archaea are extremophile species which can thrive in hypersaline environments of up to 3-5 M sodium chloride concentration. Although their ecology and physiology are widely identified on the microbiological level, little emphasis has been laid on quantitative bioprocess development with extreme halophiles. The goal of this study was to establish, on the one hand, a methodological basis for quantitative bioprocess analysis of extreme halophilic Archaea with an extreme halophilic strain as an example. Firstly, as a novel usage, a corrosion resistant bioreactor setup for extreme halophiles has been implemented. Then, paying special attention to total bioprocess quantification approaches, an indirect method for biomass quantification using on-line process signals was introduced. Subsequently, robust quantitative data evaluation methods for halophiles could be developed, providing defined and controlled cultivation conditions in the bioreactor and therefore obtaining suitable quality of on-line as well as off-line datasets. On the other hand, new physiological results of extreme halophiles in bioreactor have also been obtained based on the quantitative methodological tools. For the first time, quantitative data on stoichiometry and kinetics were collected and evaluated on different carbon sources. The results on various substrates were interpreted, with proposed metabolic mechanisms, by linking to the reported primary carbon metabolism of extreme halophilic Archaea. Moreover, results of chemostat cultures demonstrated that extreme halophilic organisms show Monod-kinetics on different sole carbon sources. A diauxic growth pattern was described on a mixture of substrates in batch cultivations. In addition, the methodologies presented here enable one to characterize the utilized strain Haloferax mediterranei (HFX) as a potential new host organism. Thus, this study offers a strong methodological basis as well as a fundamental physiological assessment for

  17. Novel HPC-ibuprofen conjugates: synthesis, characterization, thermal analysis and degradation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.A.; Lodhi, B.A.; Abbas, K.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring hydrophilic polysaccharides are advantageously used as drug carriers because they provide a mechanism to improve drug action. Hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) is water-soluble, biocompatible and bears hydroxyl groups for drug conjugation outside the parent polymeric chains. This unique geometry allows the attachment of drug molecules with higher covalent loading. The HPC-Ibuprofen conjugates as macromolecular prodrugs were therefore synthesized employing homogenous and one pot reaction methodologies using p-toluenesulfonyl chloride in N,N-dimethylacetamide solvent at 80 degree C for 24 h under nitrogen atmosphere. The imidazole was used as a base for neutralization of acidic impurities. Present strategy appeared effective to get high yield (77-81%) and high degree of drug substitution (DS 0.88-1.40) onto the HPC polymer as determined by the acid-base titration and verified by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The gel permeation chromatography has shown uni-modal absorption which indicates no significant degradation of polymer during reaction. Macromolecular prodrugs with different DS of ibuprofen were synthesized, purified, characterized and found soluble in organic solvents. From thermogravimetric analysis, initial, maximum and final degradation temperatures of the conjugates were calculated and compared for relative thermal stability. Thermal degradation kinetics was also studied and results have indicated that degradation of conjugates follows about first order kinetics as calculated by Kissinger model. The energy of activation was also found moderate 92.38, 99.34 and 87.34 kJ/mol as calculated using Friedman, Broido and Chang models. It was found that these novel prodrugs of ibuprofen were thermally stable therefore these may have potential pharmaceutical applications. (author)

  18. Non-Parametric Kinetic (NPK Analysis of Thermal Oxidation of Carbon Aerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Seifi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, much attention has been paid to aerogel materials (especially carbon aerogels due to their potential uses in energy-related applications, such as thermal energy storage and thermal protection systems. These open cell carbon-based porous materials (carbon aerogels can strongly react with oxygen at relatively low temperatures (~ 400°C. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the thermal performance of carbon aerogels in view of their energy-related applications at high temperatures and under thermal oxidation conditions. The objective of this paper is to study theoretically and experimentally the oxidation reaction kinetics of carbon aerogel using the non-parametric kinetic (NPK as a powerful method. For this purpose, a non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis, at three different heating rates, was performed on three samples each with its specific pore structure, density and specific surface area. The most significant feature of this method, in comparison with the model-free isoconversional methods, is its ability to separate the functionality of the reaction rate with the degree of conversion and temperature by the direct use of thermogravimetric data. Using this method, it was observed that the Nomen-Sempere model could provide the best fit to the data, while the temperature dependence of the rate constant was best explained by a Vogel-Fulcher relationship, where the reference temperature was the onset temperature of oxidation. Moreover, it was found from the results of this work that the assumption of the Arrhenius relation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant led to over-estimation of the apparent activation energy (up to 160 kJ/mol that was considerably different from the values (up to 3.5 kJ/mol predicted by the Vogel-Fulcher relationship in isoconversional methods

  19. A new quantitative analysis on nitriding kinetics in the oxidized Zry-4 at 900-1200 .deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sanggi [ACT Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Two major roles of nitrogen on the zirconium based cladding degradation were identified: mechanical degradation of the cladding, and the additional chemical heat release. It has long been known that accelerated oxidation can occur in air due to the nitrogen. In addition, significant uptake of nitrogen can also occur. The nitriding of pre-oxidized zirconium based alloys leads to micro porous and less coherent oxide scales. This paper aims to quantitatively investigate the nitriding mechanism and kinetics by proposing a new methodology that is coupled with the mass balance analysis and the optical microscope image processing analysis. A new quantitative analysis methodology is described in chapter 2 and the investigation of the nitriding kinetics is performed in chapter 3. The experimental details are previously reported in. Previously only qualitative analysis was performed in, and hence the quantitative analysis will be performed in this paper. In this paper, the nitriding kinetics and mechanism were quantitatively analyzed by the new proposed analysis methods: the mass balance analysis and the optical microscope image processing analysis. Using these combined methods, the mass gain curves and the optical microscopes are analyzed in very detail, and the mechanisms of nitriding accelerated, stabilized and saturated behaviors were well understood. This paper has two very distinctive achievements as follows: 1) Development of very effective quantitative analysis methods only using two main results of oxidation tests: No detailed analytical sample measurements (e.g. TEM, EPMA and so on.) were required. These methods can effectively reduce the cost and effort of the post-test investigation. 2) The first identification of the nitriding behaviors and its very accurate analysis in a quantitative way. Based on this quantitative analysis results on the nitriding kinetics, these new findings will contribute significantly the understanding the air oxidation behaviors and model

  20. Oxidation of tertiary amines by cytochrome p450-kinetic isotope effect as a spin-state reactivity probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunsen; Wu, Wei; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Shaik, Sason

    2009-08-24

    Two types of tertiary amine oxidation processes, namely, N-dealkylation and N-oxygenation, by compound I (Cpd I) of cytochrome P450 are studied theoretically using hybrid DFT calculations. All the calculations show that both N-dealkylation and N-oxygenation of trimethylamine (TMA) proceed preferentially from the low-spin (LS) state of Cpd I. Indeed, the computed kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the rate-controlling hydrogen abstraction step of dealkylation show that only the KIE(LS) fits the experimental datum, whereas the corresponding value for the high-spin (HS) process is much higher. These results second those published before for N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA), and as such, they further confirm the conclusion drawn then that KIEs can be a sensitive probe of spin state reactivity. The ferric-carbinolamine of TMA decomposes most likely in a non-enzymatic reaction since the Fe-O bond dissociation energy (BDE) is negative. The computational results reveal that in the reverse reaction of N-oxygenation, the N-oxide of aromatic amine can serve as a better oxygen donor than that of aliphatic amine to generate Cpd I. This capability of the N-oxo derivatives of aromatic amines to transfer oxygen to the heme, and thereby generate Cpd I, is in good accord with experimental data previously reported.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of autotrophic N removal by a granule based bioreactor: Influence of mass transfer versus microbial kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsgaard, Anna Katrine; Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Gernaey, Krist

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive and global sensitivity analysis was conducted under a range of operating conditions. The relative importance of mass transfer resistance versus kinetic parameters was studied and found to depend on the operating regime as follows: Operating under the optimal loading ratio of 1.90 ...

  2. Analysis of thermoluminescence kinetics of Mg2SiO4:Tb compounds employing an interactive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcazzo, J.; Prokic, M.; Santiago, M.; Molina, P.; Caselli, E.

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics involved in the thermoluminescence (TL) of Mg 2 SiO 4 :Tb compounds has been investigated by unfolding glow curves employing both the General Order model and a model that takes into account interactions among traps. The dependence of the glow curve shape on dose is only correctly described if interaction among traps is included in the analysis.

  3. A kinetic analysis of manual wheelchair propulsion during start-up on select indoor and outdoor surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koontz, AM; Cooper, RA; Boninger, ML; Yang, YS; Impink, BG; van der Woude, LHV

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a kinetic analysis of manual wheelchair propulsion during start-LIP on select indoor and Outdoor surfaces. Eleven manual wheelchairs were fitted with a SMART(Wheel) and their users were asked to Push on a Course consisting of high- and low-pile carpet,

  4. Linear Covariance Analysis and Epoch State Estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. Landis; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends in two directions the results of prior work on generalized linear covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. The first is an improved treatment of process noise in the batch, or epoch state, estimator with an epoch time that may be later than some or all of the measurements in the batch. The second is to account for process noise in specifying the gains in the epoch state estimator. We establish the conditions under which the latter estimator is equivalent to the Kalman filter.

  5. Universal sol state behavior and gelation kinetics in mixed clay dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujala, Ravi Kumar; Pawar, Nisha; Bohidar, H B

    2011-05-03

    Sol and gel state behavior, in aqueous salt free dispersions, of clays Laponite (L) and Na montmorillonite (MMT) was studied at various mixing ratios (L:MMT = r = 1:0.5, 1:1, and 1:2). In the sol state, the zeta potential and gelation concentration of L-MMT obeyed the universal relation, X(L-MMT) = (rX(L) + X(MMT))/(1 + r), where X is zeta potential or gelation concentration (c(g)), implying that these properties are linear combinations of the same of their individual components. The low frequency storage modulus (G(0)'), relative viscosity (η(r)), and apparent cluster size (R) could be universally described by the power-law, G(0)' ∼ ((c/c(g)) - 1)(t) (c > c(g)), and η(r), R ∼ (1 - (c/c(g)))(-k,ν) (c < c(g)), with t = 1.5, k = 1.1, and υ = 0.8 close to the gelation concentration, for r = 1:1 cogel, consistent with the percolation model description of gelation. Interestingly, the hyperscaling relation δ = t/(k + t) yielded δ = 0.56 not too different from the predicted value ∼0.7, while the experimental value of δ obtained from G''(ω) ∼ ω(δ) close to c ≈ c(g) yielded δ = 1.5, which was at variance with the hyperscaling result. The experimental data, on hand, mostly supported percolation type gelation mechanism. As the cogels were slowly heated, at a characteristic temperature, T(g), a sharp increase in G' value was noticed, implying a transition to gel hardening (a new phase state). The temperature-dependent behavior followed the power-law description, G' ∼ (T(g) - T)(-γ) (T < T(g)), with γ = 0.40 ± 0.05 invariant of composition of the cogel, whereas for MMT and Laponite, γ = 0.25 and 0.55, respectively. It has been shown that the cogel has significantly enhanced mechanical (G(0) increased by 10 times for r = 1:1 cogel) and thermal properties (T(g) increased by 13 °C for 1:1 cogel) that can be exploited to design customized soft materials.

  6. Kinetic analysis of dechlorination and oxidation of PrOCl by using a non-isothermal TG method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.C.; Eun, H.C.; Cho, Y.Z.; Lee, H.S.; Kim, I.T.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal dechlorination and oxidation process of praseodymium oxychloride, PrOCl, was studied from the view point of reaction kinetics. On the basis of data of thermogravimetry under different oxygen partial pressures at various heating rates, a kinetic analysis was performed using an isoconversional method and a master plot method. The results of the isoconversional method of TG data suggested that the dechlorination and oxidation of PrOCl followed a single step with activation energy of 112.6 ± 3.4 kJ mol -1 , and from master plot methods, the reaction was described by a linear-contracting phase boundary reaction

  7. Formulation, construction and analysis of kinetic models of metabolism: A review of modelling frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saa, Pedro A.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2017-01-01

    Kinetic models are critical to predict the dynamic behaviour of metabolic networks. Mechanistic kinetic models for large networks remain uncommon due to the difficulty of fitting their parameters. Recent modelling frameworks promise new ways to overcome this obstacle while retaining predictive ca...

  8. Thermal analysis and kinetics of coal during oxy-fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowska-Golachowska, Monika

    2017-08-01

    The pyrolysis and oxy-fuel combustion characteristics of Polish bituminous coal were studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. Pyrolysis tests showed that the mass loss profiles were almost similar up to 870°C in both N2 and CO2 atmospheres, while further mass loss occurred in CO2 atmosphere at higher temperatures due to char-CO2 gasification. Replacement of N2 in the combustion environment by CO2 delayed the combustion of bituminous coal. At elevated oxygen levels, TG/DTG profiles shifted through lower temperature zone, ignition and burnout temperatures decreased and mass loss rate significantly increased and complete combustion was achieved at lower temperatures and shorter times. Kinetic analysis for the tested coal was performed using Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) method. The activation energies of bituminous coal combustion at the similar oxygen content in oxy-fuel with that of air were higher than that in air atmosphere. The results indicated that, with O2 concentration increasing, the activation energies decreased.

  9. A path flux analysis method for the reduction of detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wenting; Ju, Yiguang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Chen, Zheng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gou, Xiaolong [School of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2010-07-15

    A direct path flux analysis (PFA) method for kinetic mechanism reduction is proposed and validated by using high temperature ignition, perfect stirred reactors, and steady and unsteady flame propagations of n-heptane and n-decane/air mixtures. The formation and consumption fluxes of each species at multiple reaction path generations are analyzed and used to identify the important reaction pathways and the associated species. The formation and consumption path fluxes used in this method retain flux conservation information and are used to define the path indexes for the first and the second generation reaction paths related to a targeted species. Based on the indexes of each reaction path for the first and second generations, different sized reduced chemical mechanisms which contain different number of species are generated. The reduced mechanisms of n-heptane and n-decane obtained by using the present method are compared to those generated by the direct relation graph (DRG) method. The reaction path analysis for n-decane is conducted to demonstrate the validity of the present method. The comparisons of the ignition delay times, flame propagation speeds, flame structures, and unsteady spherical flame propagation processes showed that with either the same or significantly less number of species, the reduced mechanisms generated by the present PFA are more accurate than that of DRG in a broad range of initial pressures and temperatures. The method is also integrated with the dynamic multi-timescale method and a further increase of computation efficiency is achieved. (author)

  10. Quantitative analysis of ibuprofen in pharmaceuticals and human control serum using kinetic spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SNEZANA S. MITIC

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop a new kinetic spectrophoto-metric method for the determination of ibuprofen in pharmaceutical for-mulations. Ibuprofen was determined in an acidic ethanolic medium by monitoring the rate of appearance of 1-nitroso-2-naphthol, resulting from the displacement by ibuprofen of Co(III from the tris(1-nitroso-2-naptholatocobalt(III complex. The optimum operating conditions regarding reagent concentrations and temperature were established. The tangent method was adopted for constructing the calibration curve, which was found to be linear over the concentration range 0.21–1.44 and 1.44–2.06 µg ml-1. The optimized conditions yielded a theoretical detection limit of 0.03 µg ml-1 based on the 3.3 S0 criterion. The interference effects of the usual excipients of powdery drugs, foreign ions and amino acids on the reaction rate were studied in order to assess the selectivity of the method. The developed procedure was successfully applied for the rapid determination of ibuprofen in commercial pharmaceutical formulations and human control serum. The unique features of this procedure are that the determination can be performed at room temperature and the analysis time is short. The newly developed method is simple, inexpensive and efficient for use in the analysis of a large number of samples.

  11. Combustion behavior and kinetics of low-lipid microalgae via thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Chao; Liu, Zhengang; Han, Guanghua; Peng, Nana; Fan, Aonan

    2015-04-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis were employed to investigate combustion characteristics of two low-lipid microalgae, Chlorella pyrenoidosa (CP) and Spirulina platensis (SP) and iso-conversional Starink approach was used to calculate the kinetic parameters in the present study. The results showed that three stages of mass loss, including dehydration, devolatilization and char oxidation, were observed during combustion of both of two low-lipid microalgae. The whole weight loss of combustion of two microalgae was both shifted to higher temperature zones with increased heating rates from 10 to 40 K/min. In the 0.1-0.9 conversion range, the apparent activation energy of CP increased first from 51.96 to 79.53 kJ/mol, then decreased to 55.59 kJ/mol. Finally, it slightly increased to 67.27 kJ/mol. In the case of SP, the apparent activation energy gradually increased from 68.51 to 91.06 kJ/mol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pyrolysis and oxy-fuel combustion characteristics and kinetics of petrochemical wastewater sludge using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbiao; Mu, Lin; Cai, Jingcheng; Yao, Pikai; Song, Xigeng; Yin, Hongchao; Li, Aimin

    2015-12-01

    The pyrolysis and oxy-fuel combustion characteristics of petrochemical wastewater sludge (PS) were studied in air (O2/N2) and oxy-fuel (O2/CO2) atmospheres using non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Pyrolysis experiments showed that the weight loss profiles were almost similar up to 1050K in both N2 and CO2 atmospheres, while further weight loss took place in CO2 atmosphere at higher temperatures due to char-CO2 gasification. Compared with 20%O2/80%N2, the drying and devolatilization stage of PS were delayed in 20%O2/80%CO2 due to the differences in properties of the diluting gases. In oxy-fuel combustion experiments, with O2 concentration increasing, characteristic temperatures decreased, while characteristic combustion rates and combustion performance indexes increased. Kinetic analysis of PS decomposition under various atmospheres was performed using Coats-Redfern approach. The results indicated that, with O2 concentration increasing, the activation energies of Step 1 almost kept constant, while the values of subsequent three steps increased. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel degradation pathway and kinetic analysis for buprofezin removal by newly isolated Bacillus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangli; Xu, Dayong; Xiong, Minghua; Zhang, Hui; Li, Feng; Liu, Yuan

    2016-09-15

    Given the intensive and widespread application of the pesticide, buprofezin, its environmental residues potentially pose a problem; yet little is known about buprofezin's kinetic and metabolic behaviors. In this study, a novel gram-positive strain, designated BF-5, isolated from aerobic activated sludge, was found to be capable of metabolizing buprofezin as its sole energy, carbon, and nitrogen source. Based on its physiological and biochemical characteristics, other aspects of its phenotype, and a phylogenetic analysis, strain BF-5 was identified as Bacillus sp. This study investigated the effect of culture conditions on bacterial growth and substrate degradation, such as pH, temperature, initial concentration, different nitrogen source, and additional nitrogen sources as co-substrates. The degradation rate parameters, qmax, Ks, Ki and Sm were determined to be 0.6918 h(-1), 105.4 mg L(-1), 210.5 mg L(-1), and 148.95 mg L(-1) respectively. The capture of unpublished potential metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis has led to the proposal of a novel degradation pathway. Taken together, our results clarify buprofezin's biodegradation pathway(s) and highlight the promising potential of strain BF-5 in bioremediation of buprofezin-contaminated environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of kinetic inductance of superconducting wires and application for measuring flux state of Josephson-junction loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazu, Y.; Yokoyama, T

    2004-10-01

    In order to realize strong coupling in a system of multiple flux qubits with a DC-SQUID, the use of kinetic inductance is advantageous because it can be much larger than geometrical inductance for narrow superconducting wires. We measured the inductance associated with narrow Al wires, and estimated the contributions of kinetic and geometrical inductances. The London penetration depth which determines the kinetic inductance is evaluated. We fabricated samples of two Josephson-junction loops and a DC-SQUID which are all coupled with kinetic inductances. The observed magnetic flux due to the loops is in good agreement with the result of numerical simulation based on the estimated inductances.

  15. Analysis of heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics studied by two different pseudo-random binary sequence work rate amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, U; Koschate, J; Schiffer, T; Schneider, S; Hoffmann, U

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the kinetics responses of heart rate (HR), pulmonary (V˙O 2 pulm) and predicted muscular (V˙O 2 musc) oxygen uptake between two different pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) work rate (WR) amplitudes both below anaerobic threshold. Eight healthy individuals performed two PRBS WR protocols implying changes between 30W and 80W and between 30W and 110W. HR and V˙O 2 pulm were measured beat-to-beat and breath-by-breath, respectively. V˙O 2 musc was estimated applying the approach of Hoffmann et al. (Eur J Appl Physiol 113: 1745-1754, 2013) considering a circulatory model for venous return and cross-correlation functions (CCF) for the kinetics analysis. HR and V˙O 2 musc kinetics seem to be independent of WR intensity (p>0.05). V˙O 2 pulm kinetics show prominent differences in the lag of the CCF maximum (39±9s; 31±4s; p<0.05). A mean difference of 14W between the PRBS WR amplitudes impacts venous return significantly, while HR and V˙O 2 musc kinetics remain unchanged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative analysis of myocardial kinetics of 15-p-[iodine-125] iodophenylpentadecanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrado, T.R.; Holden, J.E.; Ng, C.K.; Raffel, D.M.; Gatley, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Myocardial extraction and the characteristic tissue clearance of radioactivity following bolus injections of a radioiodinated ( 125 I) long chain fatty acid (LCFA) analog 15-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) were examined in the isolated perfused working rat heart. Radioactivity remaining in the heart was monitored with external scintillation probes. A compartmental model which included nonesterified tracer, catabolite, and complex lipid compartments successfully fitted tissue time-radioactivity residue curves, and gave a value for the rate of IPPA oxidation 1.8 times that obtained from steady-state release of tritiated water from labeled palmitic acid. The technique was sensitive to the impairment of LCFA oxidation in hearts of animals treated with the carnitine palmitoyltransferase I inhibitor, 2[5(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate (POCA). IPPA or similar modified fatty acids may be better than 11 C-labeled physiological fatty acids such as palmitate in this type of study, because efflux of unoxidized tracer and catabolite(s) from the heart are kinetically more distinct, and their contributions to the early data can be reliably separated. This technique may be suitable for extension to in vivo measurements with position tomography and appropriate modified fatty acids

  17. Quantitative analysis of myocardial kinetics of 15-p-(iodine-125) iodophenylpentadecanoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGrado, T.R.; Holden, J.E.; Ng, C.K.; Raffel, D.M.; Gatley, S.J.

    1989-07-01

    Myocardial extraction and the characteristic tissue clearance of radioactivity following bolus injections of a radioiodinated (/sup 125/I) long chain fatty acid (LCFA) analog 15-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) were examined in the isolated perfused working rat heart. Radioactivity remaining in the heart was monitored with external scintillation probes. A compartmental model which included nonesterified tracer, catabolite, and complex lipid compartments successfully fitted tissue time-radioactivity residue curves, and gave a value for the rate of IPPA oxidation 1.8 times that obtained from steady-state release of tritiated water from labeled palmitic acid. The technique was sensitive to the impairment of LCFA oxidation in hearts of animals treated with the carnitine palmitoyltransferase I inhibitor, 2(5(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl)oxirane-2-carboxylate (POCA). IPPA or similar modified fatty acids may be better than /sup 11/C-labeled physiological fatty acids such as palmitate in this type of study, because efflux of unoxidized tracer and catabolite(s) from the heart are kinetically more distinct, and their contributions to the early data can be reliably separated. This technique may be suitable for extension to in vivo measurements with position tomography and appropriate modified fatty acids.

  18. Quantitative analysis of myocardial kinetics of 15-p-[iodine-125] iodophenylpentadecanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrado, T R; Holden, J E; Ng, C K; Raffel, D M; Gatley, S J

    1989-07-01

    Myocardial extraction and the characteristic tissue clearance of radioactivity following bolus injections of a radioiodinated (125I) long chain fatty acid (LCFA) analog 15-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (IPPA) were examined in the isolated perfused working rat heart. Radioactivity remaining in the heart was monitored with external scintillation probes. A compartmental model which included nonesterified tracer, catabolite, and complex lipid compartments successfully fitted tissue time-radioactivity residue curves, and gave a value for the rate of IPPA oxidation 1.8 times that obtained from steady-state release of tritiated water from labeled palmitic acid. The technique was sensitive to the impairment of LCFA oxidation in hearts of animals treated with the carnitine palmitoyltransferase I inhibitor, 2[5(4-chlorophenyl)pentyl]oxirane-2-carboxylate (POCA). IPPA or similar modified fatty acids may be better than 11C-labeled physiological fatty acids such as palmitate in this type of study, because efflux of unoxidized tracer and catabolite(s) from the heart are kinetically more distinct, and their contributions to the early data can be reliably separated. This technique may be suitable for extension to in vivo measurements with position tomography and appropriate modified fatty acids.

  19. Improving estimation of kinetic parameters in dynamic force spectroscopy using cluster analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2018-03-01

    Dynamic Force Spectroscopy (DFS) is a widely used technique to characterize the dissociation kinetics and interaction energy landscape of receptor-ligand complexes with single-molecule resolution. In an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM)-based DFS experiment, receptor-ligand complexes, sandwiched between an AFM tip and substrate, are ruptured at different stress rates by varying the speed at which the AFM-tip and substrate are pulled away from each other. The rupture events are grouped according to their pulling speeds, and the mean force and loading rate of each group are calculated. These data are subsequently fit to established models, and energy landscape parameters such as the intrinsic off-rate (koff) and the width of the potential energy barrier (xβ) are extracted. However, due to large uncertainties in determining mean forces and loading rates of the groups, errors in the estimated koff and xβ can be substantial. Here, we demonstrate that the accuracy of fitted parameters in a DFS experiment can be dramatically improved by sorting rupture events into groups using cluster analysis instead of sorting them according to their pulling speeds. We test different clustering algorithms including Gaussian mixture, logistic regression, and K-means clustering, under conditions that closely mimic DFS experiments. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we benchmark the performance of these clustering algorithms over a wide range of koff and xβ, under different levels of thermal noise, and as a function of both the number of unbinding events and the number of pulling speeds. Our results demonstrate that cluster analysis, particularly K-means clustering, is very effective in improving the accuracy of parameter estimation, particularly when the number of unbinding events are limited and not well separated into distinct groups. Cluster analysis is easy to implement, and our performance benchmarks serve as a guide in choosing an appropriate method for DFS data analysis.

  20. Steady-state kinetics of proguanil and its active metabolite, cycloguanil, in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edstein, M D; Veenendaal, J R; Scott, H V; Rieckmann, K H

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of proguanil and its active metabolite, cycloguanil, were determined at steady-state in 6 healthy male volunteers after daily administration of 2 Paludrine tablets (200 mg proguanil hydrochloride). A maximum plasma proguanil concentration of 130.3 +/- 16.0 ng/ml (mean +/- SD) was reached at 3.8 +/- 1.3 h while a maximum cycloguanil concentration of 52.0 +/- 15.2 ng/ml was obtained at 5.3 +/- 1.0 h after dosing. The elimination half-lives of proguanil and cycloguanil were 14.5 +/- 3.0 h and 11.7 +/- 3.1 h, respectively. The plasma clearance of proguanil was 1.43 +/- 0.33 l/h/kg and the apparent volume of distribution was 30.7 +/- 12.3 l/kg. Renal clearance of proguanil (0.33 +/- 0.19 l/h/kg) was about 23% of the plasma clearance and 35.6 +/- 9.6% of the oral dose was recovered as proguanil and cycloguanil.

  1. Reaction of hydrogen with Ag(111): binding states, minimum energy paths, and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Alejandro; Schlunke, Anna; Haynes, Brian S

    2006-08-31

    The interaction of atomic and molecular hydrogen with the Ag(111) surface is studied using periodic density functional total-energy calculations. This paper focuses on the site preference for adsorption, ordered structures, and energy barriers for H diffusion and H recombination. Chemisorbed H atoms are unstable with respect to the H(2) molecule in all adsorption sites below monolayer coverage. The three-hollow sites are energetically the most favorable for H chemisorption. The binding energy of H to the surface decreases slightly up to one monolayer, suggesting a small repulsive H-H interaction on nonadjacent sites. Subsurface and vacancy sites are energetically less favorable for H adsorption than on-top sites. Recombination of chemisorbed H atoms leads to the formation of gas-phase H(2) with no molecular chemisorbed state. Recombination is an exothermic process and occurs on the bridge site with a pronounced energy barrier. This energy barrier is significantly higher than that inferred from experimental temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies. However, there is significant permeability of H atoms through the recombination energy barrier at low temperatures, thus increasing the rate constant for H(2) desorption due to quantum tunneling effects, and improving the agreement between experiment and theory.

  2. Analysis of the kinetics of ovine follitropin agonist-antagonist interactions with pig ovarian membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebok, K.; De Lean, A.; Sairam, M.R.

    1987-06-16

    The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ovine follitropin (oFSH) and /sup 125/I-labeled deglycosylated ovine follitropin (DG-oFSH) to porcine granulosa cell membranes was studied at equilibrium and nonequilibrium binding conditions and statically analyzed. Saturation and competition binding experiments revealed homogeneity in the population of binding sites labeled with /sup 125/I-oFSH, having a pK estimation of approx.10. /sup 125/I-DG-oFSH similarly interacts with a single uniform class of receptors of equal affinity (pK approx. 10) and binding capacity as oFSH. In contrast, displacement experiments using /sup 125/I-DG-oFSH as tracer and unlabeled oFSH as competing ligand demonstrate slope factors less than unity, suggesting apparent heterogeneity of sites not observed with /sup 125/I-DG-oFSH vs. DG-oFSH competition experiments. Under these conditions, it appears that FSH binds to two sites in near equal proportion but of unequal affinities. The total specific binding capacities of these sites equal those observed in /sup 125/I-DG-oFSH/unlabeled DG-oFSH competition experiments. Analysis of oFSH association kinetics at 37 /sup 0/C by curve-fitting methods is best explained by a biexponential rate equation describing a fast and a slow association component that are equally distributed. DG-oFSH demonstrates a disproportionately greater amount of fast vs. slow binding component. Dissociation, promoted by the same unlabeled hormone, of bound /sup 125/I-DG-oFSH and /sup 125/I-oFSH induces biphasic kinetics consisting of a fast and a slow dissociable pool of prebound tracer. Computer analysis reveals that both tracers dissociate with similar fast t/sub 1/2/ times; however, DG-oFSH exhibited a t/sub 1/2/ approximately 2 times slower for the component vs. oFSH. From this study, it is concluded that oFSH and DG-oFSH bind to the receptor(s) in a complex reaction scheme, more so for oFSH than DG-oFSH.

  3. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan David Kijlstra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening.

  4. Steady-state kinetics and dynamics of morphine in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christrup, Lona Louring; Sjøgren, P; Jensen, N H

    1999-01-01

    Eighteen patients suffering from chronic pain due to cancer completed a balanced, double-blind, double-dummy, two period cross-over trial comparing the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of morphine and its metabolites, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide, after...... samples for analysis of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, and morphine-6-glucuronide were obtained. Pain intensity, sedation, and continuous reaction time (CRT) were assessed. No significant differences could be demonstrated in AUC/dose, Cmin, Cmax or fluctuation index values between the two treatments...... and the variability in the data, the statistical power of the test was only 0.074. The risk of a type II error is 0.926. These data demonstrate the PK and PD similarities and differences between CR and IR morphine. They suggest that there may be a relationship between Tmax (determined by absorption rate) and sedation...

  5. Sensitivity analysis of large system of chemical kinetic parameters for engine combustion simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, H; Sanz-Argent, J; Petitpas, G; Havstad, M; Flowers, D

    2012-04-19

    In this study, the authors applied the state-of-the art sensitivity methods to downselect system parameters from 4000+ to 8, (23000+ -> 4000+ -> 84 -> 8). This analysis procedure paves the way for future works: (1) calibrate the system response using existed experimental observations, and (2) predict future experiment results, using the calibrated system.

  6. Study of the decomposition of phase stabilized ammonium nitrate (PSAN) by simultaneous thermal analysis: determination of kinetic parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, P. N.; Pedroso, L. M.; Portugal, A. A.; Campos, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) has been extensively used both in explosive and propellant formulations. Unlike AN, there is a lack of information about the thermal decomposition and related kinetic analysis of phase stabilized ammonium nitrate (PSAN). Simultaneous thermal analysis (DSC-TG) has been used in the thermal characterisation of a specific type of PSAN containing 1.0% of NiO (stabilizing agent) and 0.5% of Petro (anti-caking agent) as additives. Repeated runs covering the nominal heating rate...

  7. LSENS: A General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code for homogeneous gas-phase reactions. Part 1: Theory and numerical solution procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan

    1994-01-01

    LSENS, the Lewis General Chemical Kinetics and Sensitivity Analysis Code, has been developed for solving complex, homogeneous, gas-phase chemical kinetics problems and contains sensitivity analysis for a variety of problems, including nonisothermal situations. This report is part 1 of a series of three reference publications that describe LENS, provide a detailed guide to its usage, and present many example problems. Part 1 derives the governing equations and describes the numerical solution procedures for the types of problems that can be solved. The accuracy and efficiency of LSENS are examined by means of various test problems, and comparisons with other methods and codes are presented. LSENS is a flexible, convenient, accurate, and efficient solver for chemical reaction problems such as static system; steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow; reaction behind incident shock wave, including boundary layer correction; and perfectly stirred (highly backmixed) reactor. In addition, the chemical equilibrium state can be computed for the following assigned states: temperature and pressure, enthalpy and pressure, temperature and volume, and internal energy and volume. For static problems the code computes the sensitivity coefficients of the dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of the dependent variables and/or the three rate coefficient parameters of the chemical reactions.

  8. The Kinetics of Joined Action of Triplet-Triplet Annihilation and First-Order Decay of Molecules in T1 State in the Case of Nondominant First-Order Process: The Kinetic Model in the Case of Spatially Periodic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Borowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the model developed for estimation of the diffusion coefficient of the molecules in the triplet state is presented. The model is based on the intuitive modification of the Smoluchowski equation for the time-dependent rate parameter. Since the sample is irradiated with the spatially periodic pattern nonexponential effects can be expected in the areas of the constructive interference of the exciting laser beams. This nonexponential effects introduce changes in the observed kinetics of the diffusion-controlled triplet-triplet annihilation. Due to irradiation with so-called long excitation pulse these non-exponential effects are very weak, so they can be described with introducing very simple correction to the kinetic model described in the first paper of this series. The values of diffusion coefficient of anthracene are used to calculate the annihilation radius from the data for spatially homogeneous excitation.

  9. Kinetic analysis of interaction between N atoms and O-covered Ru(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kai; Kleyn, A. W.; Gleeson, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Eley-Rideal (ER) reactions involving neutral atoms heavier than hydrogen reacting with adsorbed atoms of similar mass were first observed in recent molecular beam experiments by Zaharia et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 053201 (2014)]. Through analysis of two types of measurements, they obtained different estimations for the N–O ER reaction cross section, one of which is unexpectedly high. This was qualitatively accounted for by invoking a secondary effect whereby the presence of N adatoms on the surface acted to “shield” O adatoms from prompt recombinative desorption. We apply a rate equation model that includes two ER processes involving different adsorbed species (N–O ad and N–N ad ) and an N-adsorption process to the full-beam exposure subset of the experimental data in order to study the reaction kinetics. Values for the individual reaction cross sections are derived. The measured N 2 response can be well described by the model, but it is insufficient to completely describe the NO response. Modeling of different exposures is used to evaluate the qualitative picture presented by Zaharia et al

  10. Qualitative and kinetic analysis of torrefaction of lignocellulosic biomass using DSC-TGA-FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimal Acharya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Torrefaction is a thermochemical conversion technique to improve the fuel properties of lignocellulosic biomass by treating at temperature 200 ℃-300 ℃ in the minimum oxygen environment for a reasonable residence time. In this study, thermal decomposition and thermal activities of miscanthus and wheat straw during the torrefaction at 200 ℃, 275 ℃, and 300 ℃ in a nitrogen environment for 45 minutes of residence time are analyzed in a simultaneous thermogravimetric analyzer (micro TGA with a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and a macro-TGA. The output of the micro TGA is fed into the Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR and qualitative analysis of the gaseous product is carried out. The composition of different gas products during the torrefaction of biomass are compared critically and kinetics were analyzed. It is found that the weight loss due to degradation of initial biomass in second stage (torrefaction process is a much faster conversion process than the weight loss process in the first stage (drying process. The weight loss of biomass increases with increase in the residence time and torrefaction treatment temperatures. The yield after torrefaction is a solid bio-coal product. The torrefied product were less reactive and has nearly 25% better heating value than the raw biomass. Between the two feedstocks studied, torrefied miscanthus proved to be a more stable fuel than the torrefied wheat straw. The major gaseous components observed during torrefaction are water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, 1,2-Dibromethylene.

  11. Analysis of fluid fuel flow to the neutron kinetics on molten salt reactor FUJI-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro, E-mail: indartaaji@s.itb.ac.id [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Waris, Abdul, E-mail: awaris@fi.itb.ac.id; Permana, Sidik [Nuclear Physics & Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Molten Salt Reactor is a reactor are operating with molten salt fuel flowing. This condition interpret that the neutron kinetics of this reactor is affected by the flow rate of the fuel. This research analyze effect by the alteration velocity of the fuel by MSR type Fuji-12, with fuel composition LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ThF{sub 4}-{sup 233}UF{sub 4} respectively 71.78%-16%-11.86%-0.36%. Calculation process in this study is performed numerically by SOR and finite difference method use C programming language. Data of reactivity, neutron flux, and the macroscopic fission cross section for calculation process obtain from SRAC-CITATION (Standard thermal Reactor Analysis Code) and JENDL-4.0 data library. SRAC system designed and developed by JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). This study aims to observe the effect of the velocity of fuel salt to the power generated from neutron precursors at fourth year of reactor operate (last critical condition) with number of multiplication effective; 1.0155.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of cement slurries additives with epoxy resins - kinetics, thermodynamic and calorimetric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, A.M.G.; Andrade Junior, M.A.S.; Cestari, A.R.; Vieira, E.F.S.

    2010-01-01

    Cement has been used in the world, presenting a wide versatility. However, due to its chemical nature, it is subject to several types of chemical damages, especially for agents of acidic nature. With the purpose of increase its life-time, new cement slurries have been modified with the addition of specific additives. The objective of this work is to modify cement slurries with epoxy resins, which promote higher resistance of those materials in relation to acid attacks. Three cement slurries were synthesized with epoxy resins and a standard slurries, which was composed by cement and water. After 30 days of hydration, the samples were characterized by XDR, FTIR and thermal analysis (TG and DSC). The hydration processes of the cement slurries were studied by heat-conduction microcalorimetry. A kinetic study of HCl interaction with the new slurries were performed by the batch methodology at 25, 35, 45 e 55 deg C. It was verified that the addition of the polymers delayed the processes of hydration of the slurries, decreasing the flow of heat released as a function of the amount of added resin and, increased the resistance of those slurries to the acid attack. (author)

  13. In situ synchrotron XRD analysis of the kinetics of spodumene phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Moore, Radhika; Mann, Jason P; Montoya, Alejandro; Haynes, Brian S

    2018-04-25

    The phase transition by thermal activation of natural α-spodumene was followed by in situ synchrotron XRD in the temperature range 896 to 940 °C. We observed both β- and γ-spodumene as primary products in approximately equal proportions. The rate of the α-spodumene inversion is first order and highly sensitive to temperature (apparent activation energy ∼800 kJ mol-1). The γ-spodumene product is itself metastable, forming β-spodumene, with the total product mass fraction ratio fγ/fβ decreasing as the conversion of α-spodumene continues. We found the relationship between the product yields and the degree of conversion of α-spodumene to be the same at all temperatures in the range studied. A model incorporating first order kinetics of the α- and γ-phase inversions with invariant rate constant ratio describes the results accurately. Theoretical phonon analysis of the three phases indicates that the γ phase contains crystallographic instabilities, whilst the α and β phases do not.

  14. Analysis of fluid fuel flow to the neutron kinetics on molten salt reactor FUJI-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aji, Indarta Kuncoro; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2015-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactor is a reactor are operating with molten salt fuel flowing. This condition interpret that the neutron kinetics of this reactor is affected by the flow rate of the fuel. This research analyze effect by the alteration velocity of the fuel by MSR type Fuji-12, with fuel composition LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 - 233 UF 4 respectively 71.78%-16%-11.86%-0.36%. Calculation process in this study is performed numerically by SOR and finite difference method use C programming language. Data of reactivity, neutron flux, and the macroscopic fission cross section for calculation process obtain from SRAC-CITATION (Standard thermal Reactor Analysis Code) and JENDL-4.0 data library. SRAC system designed and developed by JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). This study aims to observe the effect of the velocity of fuel salt to the power generated from neutron precursors at fourth year of reactor operate (last critical condition) with number of multiplication effective; 1.0155

  15. Kinetic analysis and chemical modification studies of nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase from yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Nicotinate phosphoribosyltransferase (NaPRTase) from Baker's yeast catalyzes the formation of nicotinate mononucleotide (NaMN) and pyrophosphate from phosphoribosyl α-1-pyrophosphate and nicotinate, concomitant with ATP hydrolysis. Using purified NaPRTase, initial velocity measurements were performed varying one substrate concentration at different fixed levels of the second substrate and maintaining the third substrate constant. Subsequently, an exchange of label was observed between ATP and [ 14 C]-ADP. This rate of exchange was inhibited by PRibPP and pyrophosphate. Incubations of NaPRTase with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate followed by sodium borohydride reduction led to inactivation of the enzyme. Pyridoxal was a less effective inhibitor than pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The inactivation of the enzyme by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was reversible upon flow dialysis, whereas reduction of the enzyme-pyridoxal complex with sodium borohydride rendered the inhibition irreversible. The presence of ATP or PRibPP, with or with Mg 2+ , provided protection against this inactivation, while a kinetic analysis revealed the inhibition to be competitive, and noncompetitive, respectively. One mole of [ 3 H]-pyridoxal phosphate was required to completely inactivate the enzyme, which was reduced in the presence of MgATP and MgPRibPP to 0.2 and 0.6, respectively. No incorporation of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate was observed in the combination of both of the two substrates

  16. Adsorption Characteristics of Norfloxacin by Biochar Prepared by Cassava Dreg: Kinetics, Isotherms, and Thermodynamic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Feng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biochars (BC generated from biomass residues have been recognized as effective sorbents for organic compounds. In this study, biochars as adsorbents for the removal of norfloxacin (NOR from aqueous solutions were evaluated. Biochars were prepared from cassava dregs at 350 °C, 450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C, and 750 °C, respectively (labeled as BC350, BC450, BC550, BC650, and BC750. The results showed that the kinetic data were best fitted to the pseudo second-order model, indicating that the sorption was governed by the availability of sorption sites on the biochar surfaces rather than the NOR concentration in the solution. Sorption isotherms of NOR were well described by the Freundlich model, and the Freundlich coefficients (lgkF increased with the pyrolysis temperature of biochars. Thermodynamic analysis indicated the feasibility and spontaneity of the NOR adsorption process. The NOR adsorption on BC450, BC550, BC650, and BC750 was an endothermic process, while an exothermic process occurred for BC350. FTIR studies further suggested that the adsorption mechanism was possibly attributable to H-bond and π-π interactions between NOR and biochars. Overall, this work constitutes a basis for further research considering the bioavailability and toxicity of antibiotics in the presence of biochar.

  17. Comparative kinetic analysis of89 Sr,60 Co and65 Zn Uptake by human bone powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Fatah, A.T.A.; Essa, M.W.A.; Mohamed, S.A.; Molokhia, M.K.

    1990-01-01

    Human bone powder samples were prepared from recent femurs. The Bone particles range between 30 and 40 MU in diameter. One portion of this powder was prepared fat-free (FFB), the second portion as protein-free (PFB) and the last portion was left as raw bone powder-(RB). The sequence of uptake of 89 Sr by these types of bone powder is : FFB > RB > PFB, while that of 60 Co and 65 Zn is: PFB > FFB > RB. Kinetic analysis of the uptake curves of the 3 isotopes indicated that these processes proceed in 3 distinct steps; very fast initial, moderate intermediate and slow last step. The obtained rates of uptake indicated that : (1) the uptake by PEB is faster in its third step than the other types, (2) the most predominant step in case of 89 Sr and 60 Co is the third step (ion exchange step) while in case of 65 Zn it is the first step (physical adsorption), (3) defatenisation or deproteinisation, in general, inhances the uptake process

  18. A novel flow-based strategy for implementing differential kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortes, Paula R.; Meneses, Silvia R.P.; Zagatto, Elias A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Differential kinetic analysis can be implemented in a multi-pumping flow system, and this was demonstrated in relation to an improved spectrophotometric catalytic determination of iron and vanadium in Fe-V alloys. The method exploited the influence of Fe(II) and V(IV) on the rate of iodide oxidation by Cr(VI) under acidic conditions; therefore the Jones reductor was needed. The sample was inserted into an acidic KI stream that acted also as carrier stream, and a Cr(VI) solution was added by confluence. Successive measurements were performed during sample passage through the detector, each one related to a different yet reproducible condition for reaction development. Data treatment involved multivariate calibration by the PLS algorithm. The proposed system is very simple and rugged, allowing about 50 samples to be run per hour, meaning 48 mg KI per determination. The first two latent variables carry ca. 94% of the analytical information, pointing out that the intrinsic dimensionality of the data set is two. Results are in agreement with inductively coupled argon plasma-optical emission spectrometry

  19. Research on the Combustion Characteristics and Kinetic Analysis of the Recycling Dust for a COREX Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermogravimetric analysis of recycling dust (RD from the melter gasifier of COREX, coke1 (C-1, coke2 (C-2 and coal char (CC under 70% oxygen atmosphere was carried out using thermal balance. The chemical composition and physical structure of the samples were investigated. The characteristic temperatures and comprehensive combustion characteristic indexes were calculated and kinetic parameters during the combustion process were calculated as well using a distributed activation energy model (DAEM. The results show that the carbon in the recycling dust originates from unconsumed CC and coke fines, and the average stacking height of carbon in RD is larger than that of C-1, C-2 and CC. The conversion curves of RD are different from those of C-1, C-2 and CC, and there are two peaks in the RD conversion rate curves. The combustion profiles of RD moves to a higher temperature zone with increasing heating rates. The average activation energies of their combustion process for RD, C-1, C-2 and CC range from 191.84 kJ/mol to 128.31 kJ/mol. The activation energy for recycling dust increases as the fractional conversion increases, but the value for C-1, C-2 and CC decreases with increasing conversion, indicating different combustion mechanisms.

  20. Integrated kinematics-kinetics-plantar pressure data analysis: a useful tool for characterizing diabetic foot biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawacha, Zimi; Guarneri, Gabriella; Cristoferi, Giuseppe; Guiotto, Annamaria; Avogaro, Angelo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2012-05-01

    The fundamental cause of lower-extremity complications in diabetes is chronic hyperglycemia leading to diabetic foot ulcer pathology. While the relationship between abnormal plantar pressure distribution and plantar ulcers has been widely investigated, little is known about the role of shear stress. Moreover, the mutual relationship among plantar pressure, shear stress, and abnormal kinematics in the etiology of diabetic foot has not been established. This lack of knowledge is determined by the lack of commercially available instruments which allow such a complex analysis. This study aims to develop a method for the simultaneous assessment of kinematics, kinetics, and plantar pressure on foot subareas of diabetic subjects by means of combining three commercial systems. Data were collected during gait on 24 patients (12 controls and 12 diabetic neuropathics) with a motion capture system synchronized with two force plates and two baropodometric systems. A four segment three-dimensional foot kinematics model was adopted for the subsegment angles estimation together with a three segment model for the plantar sub-area definition during gait. The neuropathic group exhibited significantly excessive plantar pressure, ground reaction forces on each direction, and a reduced loading surface on the midfoot subsegment (pfoot ulcerations, and help planning prevention programs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of exergy loss of gasoline surrogate combustion process based on detailed chemical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Hongjie; Yan, Feng; Yu, Hao; Su, W.H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We explored the exergy loss sources of gasoline engine like combustion process. • The model combined non-equilibrium thermodynamics with detailed chemical kinetics. • We explored effects of initial conditions on exergy loss of combustion process. • Exergy loss decreases 15% of fuel chemical exergy by design of initial conditions. • Correspondingly, the second law efficiency increases from 38.9% to 68.9%. - Abstract: Chemical reaction is the most important source of combustion irreversibility in premixed conditions, but details of the exergy loss mechanisms have not been explored yet. In this study numerical analysis based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics combined with detailed chemical kinetics is conducted to explore the exergy loss mechanism of gasoline engine like combustion process which is simplified as constant volume combustion. The fuel is represented by the common accepted gasoline surrogates which consist of four components: iso-octane (57%), n-heptane (16%), toluene (23%), and 2-pentene (4%). We find that overall exergy loss is mainly composed of three peaks along combustion generated from chemical reactions in three stages, the conversion from large fuel molecules into small molecules (as Stage 1), the H 2 O 2 loop-related reactions (as Stage 2), and the violent oxidation reactions of CO, H, and O (as Stage 3). The effects of individual combustion boundaries, including temperature, pressure, equivalence ratio, oxygen concentration, on combustion exergy loss have been widely investigated. The combined effects of combustion boundaries on the total loss of gasoline surrogates are also investigated. We find that in a gasoline engine with a compression ratio of 10, the total loss can be reduced from 31.3% to 24.3% using lean combustion. The total loss can be further reduced to 22.4% by introducing exhaust gas recirculation and boosting the inlet charge. If the compression ratio is increased to 17, the total loss can be decreased to

  2. General Methods for Analysis of Sequential “n-step” Kinetic Mechanisms: Application to Single Turnover Kinetics of Helicase-Catalyzed DNA Unwinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucius, Aaron L.; Maluf, Nasib K.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2003-01-01

    Helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding is often studied using “all or none” assays that detect only the final product of fully unwound DNA. Even using these assays, quantitative analysis of DNA unwinding time courses for DNA duplexes of different lengths, L, using “n-step” sequential mechanisms, can reveal information about the number of intermediates in the unwinding reaction and the “kinetic step size”, m, defined as the average number of basepairs unwound between two successive rate limiting steps in the unwinding cycle. Simultaneous nonlinear least-squares analysis using “n-step” sequential mechanisms has previously been limited by an inability to float the number of “unwinding steps”, n, and m, in the fitting algorithm. Here we discuss the behavior of single turnover DNA unwinding time courses and describe novel methods for nonlinear least-squares analysis that overcome these problems. Analytic expressions for the time courses, fss(t), when obtainable, can be written using gamma and incomplete gamma functions. When analytic expressions are not obtainable, the numerical solution of the inverse Laplace transform can be used to obtain fss(t). Both methods allow n and m to be continuous fitting parameters. These approaches are generally applicable to enzymes that translocate along a lattice or require repetition of a series of steps before product formation. PMID:14507688

  3. General methods for analysis of sequential "n-step" kinetic mechanisms: application to single turnover kinetics of helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucius, Aaron L; Maluf, Nasib K; Fischer, Christopher J; Lohman, Timothy M

    2003-10-01

    Helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding is often studied using "all or none" assays that detect only the final product of fully unwound DNA. Even using these assays, quantitative analysis of DNA unwinding time courses for DNA duplexes of different lengths, L, using "n-step" sequential mechanisms, can reveal information about the number of intermediates in the unwinding reaction and the "kinetic step size", m, defined as the average number of basepairs unwound between two successive rate limiting steps in the unwinding cycle. Simultaneous nonlinear least-squares analysis using "n-step" sequential mechanisms has previously been limited by an inability to float the number of "unwinding steps", n, and m, in the fitting algorithm. Here we discuss the behavior of single turnover DNA unwinding time courses and describe novel methods for nonlinear least-squares analysis that overcome these problems. Analytic expressions for the time courses, f(ss)(t), when obtainable, can be written using gamma and incomplete gamma functions. When analytic expressions are not obtainable, the numerical solution of the inverse Laplace transform can be used to obtain f(ss)(t). Both methods allow n and m to be continuous fitting parameters. These approaches are generally applicable to enzymes that translocate along a lattice or require repetition of a series of steps before product formation.

  4. Kinetic analysis of dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole PET correlates with radiation treatment outcome in head-and-neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulsen Frank

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia compromises local control in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC. In order to determine the value of [18F]-fluoromisonidazole (Fmiso with regard to tumor hypoxia, a patient study with dynamic Fmiso PET was performed. For a better understanding of tracer uptake and distribution, a kinetic model was developed to analyze dynamic Fmiso PET data. Methods For 15 HNC patients, dynamic Fmiso PET examinations were performed prior to radiotherapy (RT treatment. The data was analyzed using a two compartment model, which allows the determination of characteristic hypoxia and perfusion values. For different parameters, such as patient age, tumor size and standardized uptake value, the correlation to treatment outcome was tested using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U-test. Statistical tests were also performed for hypoxia and perfusion parameters determined by the kinetic model and for two different metrics based on these parameters. Results The kinetic Fmiso analysis extracts local hypoxia and perfusion characteristics of a tumor tissue. These parameters are independent quantities. In this study, different types of characteristic hypoxia-perfusion patterns in tumors could be identified. The clinical verification of the results, obtained on the basis of the kinetic analysis, showed a high correlation of hypoxia-perfusion patterns and RT treatment outcome (p = 0.001 for this initial patient group. Conclusion The presented study established, that Fmiso PET scans may benefit from dynamic acquisition and analysis by a kinetic model. The pattern of distribution of perfusion and hypoxia in the tissue is correlated to local control in HNC.

  5. Kinetic analysis of batch ethanol acetylation in isothermal non-stationary multiphase systems by lyophilized mycelium of Aspergillus oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Palazzi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A relatively complex network of reactions has been investigated, using as a network model the isothermal batch esterification of acetic acid with ethanol in n-heptane catalyzed by lyophilized mycelium of Aspergillus oryzae. The kinetic analysis was firstly carried out on the whole system, without any simplification, by means of the well-known integral method. Owing to the poor results obtained by this way, we developed an alternative approach, combining initial rates and integral analysis and reducing the number of empirical parameters to be determined by the use of equilibrium data. All the values of the parameters calculated according to this "composite" approach to kinetic analysis well correlate with experimental data.

  6. Development of a calculation method for one dimensional kinetic analysis in fission reactors, with feedback effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paixao, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    The methodology used in the WIGLE3 computer code is studied. This methodology has been applied for the steady-state and transient solutions of the one-dimensional, two-group, diffusion equations in slab geometry, in axial type probelm analysis. It's also studied, based in a WIGLE3 computer code, reactor representative models, considering non-boiling heat transfer. A steady-state program for control rod bank position search- CITER 1D- has been developed. Some criticality research on the proposed system has been done using different control rod bank initial positions, time steps and convergence parameters. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of ultra-high pressure and heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agriculture/Synergetic Innovation Center of Food Safety and Nutrition, Nanjing ... Purpose: To undertake comparative kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the interaction of bovine ..... efficacy evaluation of anti-cancer drugs in apoptosis.

  8. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for the modeling of transients with interaction of thermal hydraulics and neutron kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeren Kliem; Siegfried Mittag; Siegfried Langenbuch

    2005-01-01

    performance, different neutron kinetic parameters were included into the list of possible sources of uncertainties. These are the burn-up state of the core, the control rod efficiency for different control rod groups and the coefficients for Doppler and moderator density feed back. By use of the SUSA package, sets of input data with statistical variation of the relevant parameter values were generated for a large number of runs of the coupled codes for each transient. New tools were developed for the automated implementation of the varied input parameters into the different input decks of the DYN3D/ATHLET code. The same concerns the extraction of result parameters from the output data of the calculations and statistical analysis of these results. Time-dependent rank correlation coefficients were calculated showing the influence of the varied parameters on the output parameter under investigation. The most interesting output parameters are the physical parameters for which experimental data are available. First of all, these are the core power, upper plenum pressure, core outlet and loop temperatures. The calculation results allowed also the determination of time-dependent tolerance intervals for given coverage and confidence. (authors)

  9. Causal role of thalamic interneurons on brain state transitions: a study using a neural mass model implementing synaptic kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basabdatta Sen Bhattacharya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies on the Lateral Geniculate Nucleus (LGN of mammals and rodents show that the inhibitory interneurons (IN receive around 47.1% of their afferents from the retinal spiking neurons, and constitute around 20 - 25% of the LGN cell population. However, there is a definite gap in knowledge about the role and impact of IN on thalamocortical dynamics in both experimental and model-based research. We use a neural mass computational model of the LGN with three neural populations viz. IN, thalamocortical relay (TCR, thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN, to study the causality of IN on LGN oscillations and state-transitions. The synaptic information transmission in the model is implemented with kinetic modelling, facilitating the linking of low-level cellular attributes with high-level population dynamics. The model is parameterised and tuned to simulate both Local Field Potential (LFP of LGN and electroencephalogram (EEG of visual cortex in an awake resting state with eyes closed and dominant frequency within the alpha (8-13 Hz band. The results show that: First, the response of the TRN is suppressed in the presence of IN in the circuit; disconnecting the IN from the circuit effects a dramatic change in the model output, displaying high amplitude synchronous oscillations within the alpha band in both TCR and TRN. These observations conform to experimental reports implicating the IN as the primary inhibitory modulator of LGN dynamics in a cognitive state, and that reduced cognition is achieved by suppressing the TRN response. Second, the model validates steady state visually evoked potential response in humans corresponding to periodic input stimuli; however, when the IN is disconnected from the circuit, the output power spectra do not reflect the input frequency. This agrees with experimental reports underpinning the role of IN in efficient retino-geniculate information transmission. Third, a smooth transition from alpha to theta band is

  10. Analysis of insulation material deterioration under the LOCA simulated environment on the basis of reaction kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Sohei; Kusama, Yasuo; Ito, Masayuki; Yagi, Toshiaki; Yoshikawa, Masato (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma. Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment)

    1982-12-01

    In the type test of the electric cables installed in reactor containment vessels, it is considerably difficult to perform the testing over a year once in a while to simulate the accidental environment containing radiation and high temperature steam. Two requirements which seem to be more realistic as compared with the above mentioned testing method are inconsistent with each other. To solve this problem, a general rule of deterioration or the expression by an equation is necessary, which enables the extrapolation to show that a short term testing stands on the safety side. The authors have tried to numerically analyze the change of mechanical characteristics of ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) and Hypalon which are, important as the materials for PH cables (fire-retardant, EP rubber-insulated, chlorosulfonated polyethylene-sheathed cable), in a complex environment of radiation, steam and chemical spray simulating PWR LOCA conditions. In this report, a method is proposed to analyze and estimate the properties by the regression analysis technique on the basis of reaction kinetics, and the analyzed results are described in the order of experiment, analysis method and the results and consideration. The deterioration of the elongation P = e/esub(o) of EPR and Hypalon in the above described complex environment can be represented by the equation - dP/dt = KPsup(n). The exponent n varied in the cases when air is contained or not in that environment, suggesting that the different reactions are dominant in both conditions, respectively. For EPR, n was close to 2 if air was not contained and close to 1 if air was contained in the system.

  11. Automated analysis of information processing, kinetic independence and modular architecture in biochemical networks using MIDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowsher, Clive G

    2011-02-15

    Understanding the encoding and propagation of information by biochemical reaction networks and the relationship of such information processing properties to modular network structure is of fundamental importance in the study of cell signalling and regulation. However, a rigorous, automated approach for general biochemical networks has not been available, and high-throughput analysis has therefore been out of reach. Modularization Identification by Dynamic Independence Algorithms (MIDIA) is a user-friendly, extensible R package that performs automated analysis of how information is processed by biochemical networks. An important component is the algorithm's ability to identify exact network decompositions based on both the mass action kinetics and informational properties of the network. These modularizations are visualized using a tree structure from which important dynamic conditional independence properties can be directly read. Only partial stoichiometric information needs to be used as input to MIDIA, and neither simulations nor knowledge of rate parameters are required. When applied to a signalling network, for example, the method identifies the routes and species involved in the sequential propagation of information between its multiple inputs and outputs. These routes correspond to the relevant paths in the tree structure and may be further visualized using the Input-Output Path Matrix tool. MIDIA remains computationally feasible for the largest network reconstructions currently available and is straightforward to use with models written in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML). The package is distributed under the GNU General Public License and is available, together with a link to browsable Supplementary Material, at http://code.google.com/p/midia. Further information is at www.maths.bris.ac.uk/~macgb/Software.html.

  12. Numerical analysis of entropy generation in an annular microcombustor using multistep kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jejurkar, Swarup Y.; Mishra, D.P.

    2013-01-01

    Entropy generation by combustion and additional irreversibility due to heat loss was studied numerically for a premixed flame based microcombustor. Detailed axisymmetric reactive flow model employing a 21 step–9 species reaction mechanism for hydrogen–air mixture was considered. The analysis identified reactions contributing most of the entropy generated in combustion. These reactions are removed from thermodynamic equilibrium in the low temperature region between 400 and 700 K of the flame and a combination of their high affinity and low temperature induces entropy generation in this region. Single step kinetics and a reduced scheme neglecting HO 2 is consequently incapable of accurately calculating the entropy generation and second law performance. Overall entropy generation rates increased from lean to rich mixtures in the range Φ = 0.5–1.4 and were dominated by combustion reactions. Characterization of combustor performance in terms of second law efficiency showed that availability reduction by wall heat losses and combustion irreversibility were of the same order for stoichiometric and both decreased for rich flames. On the other hand, near-quenching fuel lean flames (Φ≤0.75) suffered mostly from combustion irreversibility. These trends caused the minimum efficiency (maximum thermodynamic irreversibility) point to locate near stoichiometric fuel–air composition. -- Highlights: ► Reaction set dominating heat release and entropy generation involve HO 2 . ► Entropy generation increased from lean to rich Φ. ► Second law efficiency is minimum at stoichiometric Φ. ► Post-flame heat loss, transport processes needed in microcombustor entropy analysis

  13. Swelling analysis of austenitic stainless steels by means of ion irradiation and kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohyama, Akira; Donomae, Takako

    1999-03-01

    The influences of irradiation environment on the swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel has been studied, to aid understanding the origin of the difference in swelling response of PNC316 stainless steel in fuel-pin environment and in materials irradiation capsules, in terms of irradiation conditions, damage mechanism and material conditions. This work focused on the theoretical investigation of the influence of temperature variation on microstructural development of austenitic stainless steels during irradiation, using a kinetic rate theory model. A modeling and calculation on non-steady irradiation effects were first carried out. A fully dynamic model of point defect evolution and extended defect development, which accounts for cascade damage, was developed and successfully applied to simulate the interstitial loop evolution in low temperature regimes. The influence of cascade interstitial clustering on dislocation loop formation has also been assessed. The establishment of a basis for general assessment of non-steady irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steels was advanced. The developed model was applied to evaluate the influences of temperature variation in formerly carried out CMIR and FFTF/MFA-1 FBR irradiation experiments. The results suggested the gradual approach of microstructural features to equilibrium states in all the temperature variation conditions and no sign of anomalous behavior was noted. On the other hand, there is the influence of temperature variation on microstructural development under the neutron irradiation, like CMIR. So there are some possibilities of the work of mechanism which is not taken care on this model, for example the effect of the precipitate behavior which is sensitive to irradiation temperature. (author)

  14. Development of calculation method for one-dimensional kinetic analysis in fission reactors, including feedback effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paixao, S.B.; Marzo, M.A.S.; Alvim, A.C.M.

    1986-01-01

    The calculation method used in WIGLE code is studied. Because of the non availability of such a praiseworthy solution, expounding the method minutely has been tried. This developed method has been applied for the solution of the one-dimensional, two-group, diffusion equations in slab, axial analysis, including non-boiling heat transfer, accountig for feedback. A steady-state program (CITER-1D), written in FORTRAN 4, has been implemented, providing excellent results, ratifying the developed work quality. (Author) [pt

  15. Malonic acid concentration as a control parameter in the kinetic analysis of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction under batch conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagojević, Slavica M; Anić, Slobodan R; Cupić, Zeljko D; Pejić, Natasa D; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana Z

    2008-11-28

    The influence of the initial malonic acid concentration [MA]0 (8.00 x 10(-3) sulfuric acid (1.00 mol dm(-3)) and cerium sulfate (2.50 x 10(-3) mol dm(-3)) on the dynamics and the kinetics of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactions was examined under batch conditions at 30.0 degrees C. The kinetics of the BZ reaction was analyzed by the earlier proposed method convenient for the examinations of the oscillatory reactions. In the defined region of parameters where oscillograms with only large-amplitude relaxation oscillations appeared, the pseudo-first order of the overall malonic acid decomposition with a corresponding rate constant of 2.14 x 10(-2) min(-1) was established. The numerical results on the dynamics and kinetics of the BZ reaction, carried out by the known skeleton model including the Br2O species, were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The already found saddle node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation point in transition from a stable quasi-steady state to periodic orbits and vice versa is confirmed by both experimental and numerical investigations of the system under consideration. Namely, the large-amplitude relaxation oscillations with increasing periods between oscillations in approaching the bifurcation points at the beginning and the end of the oscillatory domain, together with excitability of the stable quasi-steady states in their vicinity are obtained.

  16. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF KINETIC CONSTANTS AS A TOOL FOR ELUCIDATING THE POLYMERIZATION MECHANISM OF ACRYL-FURANIC COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgen Lange

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available By means of the sensitivity analysis of kinetics constants in a proposed mechanism for radical polymerization of acrylfuranic compounds [Furfuryl Acrylate (FA and Methacrylate (FM],it is elucidated which elementary steps are relevant in the phenomenology. In this analysis, the application of Come's methodology allows to classify the elementary steps of a mechanism in three categories: Non-sensible, Non-determinant, Sensible. The results obtained with this tool in modeling of experimental data in free radical polymerization of FA and FM suggest that kinetic mechanism consists mainly on five elementary steps: 1 Primary initiation, 2 propagation, 3 degradative transfers (which include intermolecular and primary, 4 re-initiation and 5 cross-termination. Thus, taking into account these elementary steps in mathematical modeling, the polymerization of FA and FM in different experimental conditions was successfully simulated.

  17. Kinetics of CO2 diffusion in human carbonic anhydrase: a study using molecular dynamics simulations and the Markov-state model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gong; Kong, Xian; Lu, Diannan; Wu, Jianzhong; Liu, Zheng

    2017-05-10

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, in combination with the Markov-state model (MSM), were applied to probe CO 2 diffusion from an aqueous solution into the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCA-II), an enzyme useful for enhanced CO 2 capture and utilization. The diffusion process in the hydrophobic pocket of hCA-II was illustrated in terms of a two-dimensional free-energy landscape. We found that CO 2 diffusion in hCA-II is a rate-limiting step in the CO 2 diffusion-binding-reaction process. The equilibrium distribution of CO 2 shows its preferential accumulation within a hydrophobic domain in the protein core region. An analysis of the committors and reactive fluxes indicates that the main pathway for CO 2 diffusion into the active site of hCA-II is through a binding pocket where residue Gln 136 contributes to the maximal flux. The simulation results offer a new perspective on the CO 2 hydration kinetics and useful insights toward the development of novel biochemical processes for more efficient CO 2 sequestration and utilization.

  18. Analysis of the kinetics of the fragile fracture process in Mo monocrystals in quasi-relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamayo Meza, Pedro; Bautista Godinez, Eric Gustavo; Yermishkin, Viacheslav

    2008-01-01

    The method of quasi-relaxation, generally known as the force relaxation method, has been widely applied in the study of elementary dislocational processes. It is essential for the study and analysis of thermoactivated mechanisms, for the determination of the energy of interaction between dislocations and inclusions, in the definition of the dislocational constants, to predict the development of creep, and even for the study of fracture kinetics. For the first time the use of the quasi-relaxation method for evaluating the fragile fracture tendency was presented in the work. However, as usually carried out, the use of mass specimens and the development of a considerable plastic deformation in the vertex of the crack-notch sample limits the possibilities for this method. Many studies analyze the theoretical aspects of the fracture process, and the obtention of reliable quantitative information about the behavior of the dislocation based on an analytical description of the process, and how and when it influences the conditions under which the final catastrophic fracture occurs. This work proposes a new method to analyze the effect of a tension concentrator on the surface of Mo monocrystal specimens. The relaxation of the force and the increase in the crack opening is related to the development of the plastic zone in its vertex with the help of the Irwin correction. During the relaxation, the crack-groove grows until it attains the length of the plastic zone. Specimens with and without force concentrators were tested in quasi-relaxation. The cracks appearing under these conditions are analyzed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The crack appearing in the specimens under load conditions, whose development produced heavy force relaxation, allowed the force relaxation value to be defined and compared in the specimens with and without tension concentrators (au)

  19. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W Lee

    Full Text Available With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data

  20. Kinetic compartmental analysis of carnitine metabolism in the human carnitine deficiency syndromes. Evidence for alterations in tissue carnitine transport.

    OpenAIRE

    Rebouche, C J; Engel, A G

    1984-01-01

    The human primary carnitine deficiency syndromes are potentially fatal disorders affecting children and adults. The molecular etiologies of these syndromes have not been determined. In this investigation, we considered the hypothesis that these syndromes result from defective transport of carnitine into tissues, particularly skeletal muscle. The problem was approached by mathematical modeling, by using the technique of kinetic compartmental analysis. A tracer dose of L-[methyl-3H]carnitine wa...

  1. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer: A TRANSIENT-STATE KINETICS, DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS, EPR, AND NMR STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-09-18

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn(2+), and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Enabling Collaborative Analysis: State Evaluation Groups, the Electronic State File, and Collaborative Analysis Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldridge, C.; Gagne, D.; Wilson, B.; Murray, J.; Gazze, C.; Feldman, Y.; Rorif, F.

    2015-01-01

    The timely collection and analysis of all safeguards relevant information is the key to drawing and maintaining soundly-based safeguards conclusions. In this regard, the IAEA has made multidisciplinary State Evaluation Groups (SEGs) central to this process. To date, SEGs have been established for all States and tasked with developing State-level approaches (including the identification of technical objectives), drafting annual implementation plans specifying the field and headquarters activities necessary to meet technical objectives, updating the State evaluation on an ongoing basis to incorporate new information, preparing an annual evaluation summary, and recommending a safeguards conclusion to IAEA senior management. To accomplish these tasks, SEGs need to be staffed with relevant expertise and empowered with tools that allow for collaborative access to, and analysis of, disparate information sets. To ensure SEGs have the requisite expertise, members are drawn from across the Department of Safeguards based on their knowledge of relevant data sets (e.g., nuclear material accountancy, material balance evaluation, environmental sampling, satellite imagery, open source information, etc.) or their relevant technical (e.g., fuel cycle) expertise. SEG members also require access to all available safeguards relevant data on the State. To facilitate this, the IAEA is also developing a common, secure platform where all safeguards information can be electronically stored and made available for analysis (an electronic State file). The structure of this SharePoint-based system supports IAEA information collection processes, enables collaborative analysis by SEGs, and provides for management insight and review. In addition to this common platform, the Agency is developing, deploying, and/or testing sophisticated data analysis tools that can synthesize information from diverse information sources, analyze diverse datasets from multiple viewpoints (e.g., temporal, geospatial

  3. Principles of chemical kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    House, James E

    2007-01-01

    James House's revised Principles of Chemical Kinetics provides a clear and logical description of chemical kinetics in a manner unlike any other book of its kind. Clearly written with detailed derivations, the text allows students to move rapidly from theoretical concepts of rates of reaction to concrete applications. Unlike other texts, House presents a balanced treatment of kinetic reactions in gas, solution, and solid states. The entire text has been revised and includes many new sections and an additional chapter on applications of kinetics. The topics covered include quantitative rela

  4. Stochastic kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombino, A.; Mosiello, R.; Norelli, F.; Jorio, V.M.; Pacilio, N.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear system kinetics is formulated according to a stochastic approach. The detailed probability balance equations are written for the probability of finding the mixed population of neutrons and detected neutrons, i.e. detectrons, at a given level for a given instant of time. Equations are integrated in search of a probability profile: a series of cases is analyzed through a progressive criterium. It tends to take into account an increasing number of physical processes within the chosen model. The most important contribution is that solutions interpret analytically experimental conditions of equilibrium (moise analysis) and non equilibrium (pulsed neutron measurements, source drop technique, start up procedures)

  5. Computed functional analysis of 99mTc EHIDA kinetics in patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, V.; Cihak, I; Nicek, F; Horak, J.

    1987-01-01

    It is presented a method of EHIDA (dietyl-imino-acetanilido-diacetic acid) kinetic analysing in patients, particularly the kinetic in the hepatic parenchima. A group of 367 patients with different hepatobiliary or other gastrointestinal deseases, was examined and each studied was quantified either in whole extent or at least partially. The scintigraphy is made with several small modifications of the commonly known methods. The hepatic curve is analysed by a computer programme. The results obtained in the whole group of patients were submitted to a statistical evaluation to obtain general conclusions. (M.E.L.) [es

  6. Model-fitting approach to kinetic analysis of non-isothermal oxidation of molybdenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi Kahrizsangi, R.; Abbasi, M. H.; Saidi, A.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of molybdenite oxidation was studied by non-isothermal TGA-DTA with heating rate 5 d eg C .min -1 . The model-fitting kinetic approach applied to TGA data. The Coats-Redfern method used of model fitting. The popular model-fitting gives excellent fit non-isothermal data in chemically controlled regime. The apparent activation energy was determined to be about 34.2 kcalmol -1 With pre-exponential factor about 10 8 sec -1 for extent of reaction less than 0.5

  7. In-silico analysis on biofabricating vascular networks using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    We present a computational modeling approach to study the fusion of multicellular aggregate systems in a novel scaffold-less biofabrication process, known as ‘bioprinting’. In this novel technology, live multicellular aggregates are used as fundamental building blocks to make tissues or organs (collectively known as the bio-constructs,) via the layer-by-layer deposition technique or other methods; the printed bio-constructs embedded in maturogens, consisting of nutrient-rich bio-compatible hydrogels, are then placed in bioreactors to undergo the cellular aggregate fusion process to form the desired functional bio-structures. Our approach reported here is an agent-based modeling method, which uses the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm to evolve the cellular system on a lattice. In this method, the cells and the hydrogel media, in which cells are embedded, are coarse-grained to material’s points on a three-dimensional (3D) lattice, where the cell–cell and cell–medium interactions are quantified by adhesion and cohesion energies. In a multicellular aggregate system with a fixed number of cells and fixed amount of hydrogel media, where the effect of cell differentiation, proliferation and death are tactically neglected, the interaction energy is primarily dictated by the interfacial energy between cell and cell as well as between cell and medium particles on the lattice, respectively, based on the differential adhesion hypothesis. By using the transition state theory to track the time evolution of the multicellular system while minimizing the interfacial energy, KMC is shown to be an efficient time-dependent simulation tool to study the evolution of the multicellular aggregate system. In this study, numerical experiments are presented to simulate fusion and cell sorting during the biofabrication process of vascular networks, in which the bio-constructs are fabricated via engineering designs. The results predict the feasibility of fabricating the vascular

  8. In-silico analysis on biofabricating vascular networks using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Qi

    2014-03-01

    We present a computational modeling approach to study the fusion of multicellular aggregate systems in a novel scaffold-less biofabrication process, known as 'bioprinting'. In this novel technology, live multicellular aggregates are used as fundamental building blocks to make tissues or organs (collectively known as the bio-constructs,) via the layer-by-layer deposition technique or other methods; the printed bio-constructs embedded in maturogens, consisting of nutrient-rich bio-compatible hydrogels, are then placed in bioreactors to undergo the cellular aggregate fusion process to form the desired functional bio-structures. Our approach reported here is an agent-based modeling method, which uses the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm to evolve the cellular system on a lattice. In this method, the cells and the hydrogel media, in which cells are embedded, are coarse-grained to material's points on a three-dimensional (3D) lattice, where the cell-cell and cell-medium interactions are quantified by adhesion and cohesion energies. In a multicellular aggregate system with a fixed number of cells and fixed amount of hydrogel media, where the effect of cell differentiation, proliferation and death are tactically neglected, the interaction energy is primarily dictated by the interfacial energy between cell and cell as well as between cell and medium particles on the lattice, respectively, based on the differential adhesion hypothesis. By using the transition state theory to track the time evolution of the multicellular system while minimizing the interfacial energy, KMC is shown to be an efficient time-dependent simulation tool to study the evolution of the multicellular aggregate system. In this study, numerical experiments are presented to simulate fusion and cell sorting during the biofabrication process of vascular networks, in which the bio-constructs are fabricated via engineering designs. The results predict the feasibility of fabricating the vascular structures

  9. Analysis of 165Er excited state properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, V.A.; Budzynski, M.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown by the analysis of 165 Tm decay that the precision measurements of γ-ray and internal conversion electron intensities together with the measurements o.f angular correlation coefficients provide more data for the determination of γ-ray multipole composition and intensities of γ-transitions with small enerqy difference. The spin of the 589.868 ke tate is found to be I=1/2 - . Doublet transitions of different parity from the states 1103.495, 920.645 and 745.968 keV to the levels of the 590 keV region with energy difference ΔE=(108+-22) eV are identified

  10. Generalized fault tree analysis combined with state analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldarola, L.

    1980-02-01

    An analytical theory has been developed which allows one to calculate the occurrence probability of the top event of a fault tree with multistate (two or more than two states) components. It is shown that, in order to correctly describe a system with multistate components, a special type of boolean algebra is required. This is called 'boolean algebra with restrictions on variables' and its basic rules are the same as those of the traditional boolean algebra with some additional restrictions on the variables. These restrictions are extensively discussed in the paper. It is also shown that the boolean algebra with restrictions on variables facilitates the task of formally combining fault tree analysis with state analysis. The computer program MUSTAFA 1 based on the above theory has been developed. It can analyse fault trees of system containing statistically independent as well as dependent components with two or more than two states. MUSTAFA 1 can handle coherent as well as non coherent boolean functions. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MB [de

  11. Recovery of nickel and cobalt as MHP from limonitic ore leaching solution: Kinetics analysis and precipitate characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safitri, Nina; Mubarok, M. Zaki; Winarko, Ronny; Tanlega, Zela

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, precipitation of nickel and cobalt as mixed hydroxide precipitate (MHP) from pregnant leach solution of nickel limonite ore from Soroako after iron removal stage was carried out. A series of MHP precipitation experiments was conducted by using MgO slurry as neutralizing agent and the effects of pH, temperature, duration of precipitation and the addition of MHP seed on the precipitation behavior of nickel, cobalt, as well as iron and manganese was studied. Characterization of MHP product was performed by particle size analyzer (PSA) as well as X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analyses. Kinetics analysis was made by using differential-integral method for the rate of homogenous reaction. Precipitation at pH 7, temperature 50°C for 30 minute, without seed addition resulted in nickel and cobalt recoveries of 82.8% and 92%, respectively with co-precipitated iron and manganese of 70% and 24.2%, respectively. The seed addition increases nickel and cobalt precipitations significantly to 99.9% and 99.1%, respectively. However, the addition of seed into led to a significant increase of manganese co-precipitation from 24.2% without seed addition to 39.5% at the addition of 1 g seed per 200 mL of PLS. Kinetics analysis revealed that Ni precipitation to form MHP follows the second-order reaction kinetics with activation energy of 94.6 kJ/mol.

  12. Nano-desorption electrospray and kinetic method in chiral analysis of clinical samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ranc, V.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Bednář, P.; Lemr, Karel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 6 (2008), s. 411-417 ISSN 1469-0667 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA ČR GA203/07/0765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : nano-desorption electrospray * mass spectrometry * kinetic method Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.167, year: 2008

  13. Analysis of the kinetics of methanol oxidation in a porous Pt-Ru anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yan-Ping; Xing, Lei [Chemical Engineering Department, Taiyuan University of Technology, Shanxi 030024 (China); Scott, Keith [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Merz Court, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-01

    A kinetic model of a porous Pt-Ru anode for methanol oxidation is presented. It was based on the dual-site mechanism for methanol oxidation and used to predict anode performance and the influence of species adsorption on the overall oxidation (macro-) kinetics. The performance of the porous Pt-Ru anode depended on the parameters of the intrinsic chemical kinetics of methanol oxidation and physical parameters such as electrode thickness, surface area, effective diffusion and charge transfer coefficients and concentration of methanol and temperature. The model was solved by using the finite difference method with a subroutine for solving a set of nonlinear algebraic equations in each step. Surface coverage ratio distributions of adsorbed species, effectiveness of the porous electrode and macro-polarisation curves were obtained. The simulated polarisation curves were compared to experimental polarisation data for methanol oxidation on Pt-Ru porous anodes at different temperatures and methanol concentrations. The intrinsic kinetic parameters were regressed from the corresponding experimental data. The predicted polarisation curves calculated by the model, were consistent with experimental polarisation data at lower current densities. The departure of experimental data from the predicted polarisation curves at high concentration and high apparent current densities was believed to be due to two-phase flow in the electrode. (author)

  14. Non-isothermal kinetic analysis on the phase transformations of Fe–Co–V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasani, S.; Shamanian, M.; Shafyei, A.; Behjati, P.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated, occurrence of different phase transformations in a FeCo- 7.15%wt V alloy upon heating to 1200 °C. • We investigated, the determination of the activation energy for these phase transformations by using five isoconversional methods. • We investigated, the calculation of the empirical kinetic triplets by using the invariant kinetic parameters method and fitting model. - Abstract: In this study, occurrence of different phase transformations was investigated in a FeCo-7 wt% V alloy upon heating to 1200 °C by the dilatometry method at different heating rates (5, 10, and 15 °C min −1 ). It was found that four phase transformations (including B2-type atomic ordering in α phase, first stage of polymorphic transformation (α → α r + γ), ordering to disordering, and second stage of polymorphic transformation (α r → γ) occur in this alloy up to 1200 °C. Two isoconversional methods, as Starink and Friedman, were used to determine variation of the activation energy with temperature, E(T). Moreover, the empirical kinetic triplets (E, A, and g(α)) were calculated by the invariant kinetic parameters (IKP) method and fitting model

  15. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of ultra-high pressure and heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To undertake comparative kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with IgG pre-treated with ultra-high pressure (UHP) and moderate heat. Methods: BSA solutions were processed at 100 – 600 MPa and 25 – 40 °C. We applied an optical biosensor based on surface ...

  16. Thermolysis of (1R,2R)-1,2-dideuteriocyclobutane. An application of vibrational circular dichroism to kinetic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chickos, J.S.; Annamalai, A.; Keiderling, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The relative rates of geometric isomerization to racemization have been studied for the title compound by using a combination of infrared (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies, respectively. The results are interpreted with a kinetic and mechanistic scheme which parallels that used by Berson, Pedersen, and Carpenter on a similar study of chiral cyclopropane-d 2 thermolysis. Relative rates of isomerization to stereomutation of 1.5 +/- 0.4 were obtained which can be interpreted to be consistent with a mechanism best described by random methylene rotation in tetramethylene-d 2 . This is the first application of VCD to kinetic analysis, and the advantages of IR techniques over the more usually employed UV spectroscopies to this type of basic mechanistic problem are illustrated

  17. Determination of kinetic parameters in the pyrolysis operation and thermal behavior of Prosopis juliflora using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arunkumar; Ramachandran, Sethumadhavan; Subbiah, Senthilmurugan

    2017-06-01

    This paper deals with the pyrolysis of Prosopis juliflora fuelwood using thermogravimetric analysis to determine the kinetic parameters at six different heating rates of 2, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25°C/min. The activation energy of pyrolysis was calculated using different methods, namely Kissinger, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose, Ozawa-Flynn-Wall and Friedman model and corresponding calculated activation energy were found to be 164.6, 204, 203.2, and 219.3kJ/mol, respectively for each method. The three-pseudo component model was applied to calculate the following three kinetic parameters: activation energy, pre-exponential factor and order of reaction. The experimental results were validated with model prediction for all the six heating rates. The three-pseudo component model is able to predict experimental results much accurately while considering variable order reaction model (n≠1). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Microstructure and growth kinetics of nickel silicide ultra-thin films synthesized by solid-state reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coia, Cedrik

    substrate is not a necessary condition for θ-Ni2Si to form. Activated CMOS dopants and alloying impurities delay the growth of all Ni-rich compounds and eventually suppress the formation of θ-Ni2Si possibly because of a limited solubility. Impurities implanted without subsequent re-crystallization anneals stabilize the compound partly through the presence of an amorphous interface, at least at the beginning of the reaction. A quantitative investigation of the growth kinetics of θ-Ni 2Si on undoped Si(001) reveals two distinct stages which are well described by a model incorporating 2D nucleation-controlled growth at the silicide/Si interface and the non-planar diffusion-controlled penetration of θ-Ni 2Si in the overlying delta-Ni2Si grains. Despite the very good fit of the model to our data, we cannot rule out the possibility that the second stage consists of a 1D diffusion-controlled planar growth during which the composition of the non-stoichiometric θ-Ni2Si changes. In F-doped samples, the second stage corresponds to a 1D diffusion-controlled growth in the absence of delta-Ni2Si and Ni, suggesting a possible compositional change during growth. The results presented in this thesis show that thanks to the use of powerful in situ monitoring techniques we have observed the kinetic competition between different growing compounds in the early stages of their growth. This competition has been predicted by many growth models, yet to our knowledge it has not been observed so far. We also have shown that this competition can lead to the lateral co-existence of several compounds in the same layer whereas most solid-state reaction models assume or require a layer-by-layer co-existence scheme. Finally, we show that the combination of (i) strong interfacial concentration gradients, (ii) structural similarities between delta-Ni 2Si, NiSi and θ-Ni2Si, and (iii) the ability of the latter to sustain vacancies and to nucleate in concentration gradients lead to a very peculiar

  19. LIQUIDITY ANALYSIS OF STATE BANK OF INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Gandhi R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern customer has a high demand for quality of service than he/she had before. There is an urgent need for improving the customer service levels currently provided in the banking industry. Banks need to understand, foresee, the needs and expected levels of customer support which the customer expects when he/she steps into the branch and strive to stand up and excel in providing the service and making banking a truly delightful experience. The banker should change his/her agenda from Customer Satisfaction to Customer delight and then march towards Customer Ecstasy. This will be possible by maintaining the financial soundness of the firm. In this connection it has been given importance through this study. Since most of the Banking slightly deviate into the other areas like insurance, financial services and modern banking services such as Advisory services, Agent for receivables, custodian, instant loan provider, Forfeiter services and factoring services. A conscious attempt has been made to analysis the liquidity of state bank of India (SBI. The present study aimed to understand the financial soundness of the bank, the ratio analysis taken as tool. In this research work the secondary data mainly used, it has been collected in the form of the company manuals, Balance sheets and other documents. The data analyzed by some of the statistical tools such as ANOVA test and Multi variate test is used to analyze the interferences about the operating efficiency.

  20. Analysis on reduced chemical kinetic model of N-heptane for HCCI combustion. Paper no. IGEC-1-072

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, M.; Zheng, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Because of high complexity coupled with multidimensional fluid dynamics, it is difficult to apply detailed chemical kinetic model to simulate practical engines. A reduced model of n-heptane has been developed on the basic of detailed mechanism by sensitivity analysis and reaction path analysis of every stage of combustion. The new reduced mechanism consists of 35 species and 41 reactions, and it is effective in engine condition. The results show that it gives predictions similar to the detailed model in ignition timing, in-cylinder temperature and pressure. Furthermore, the reduced mechanism can be used to simulate boundary condition of partial combustion in good agreement with the detailed mechanism. (author)

  1. Kinetic analysis on photocatalytic degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide on nanosized porous TiO2 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iis Sopyan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the UV illumination-assisted degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde, hydrogen sulfide, and ammonia on highly active nanostructured-anatase and rutile films were investigated. It was found that the anatase film showed a higher photocatalytic activity than the counterpart did, however, the magnitude of difference in the photocatalytic activity of both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide. To elucidate the reasons for the observation, the adsorption characteristics and the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of the three reactants on both films were analyzed. The adsorption analysis examined using a simple Langmuir isotherm, showed that adsorbability on both films decreased in the order ammonia>acetaldehyde>hydrogen sulfide, which can be explained in terms of the decreasing electron-donor capacity. Acetaldehyde and ammonia adsorbed more strongly and with higher coverage on anatase film (1.2 and 5.6 molecules/nm2, respectively than on rutile (0.6 and 4.7 molecules/nm2, respectively. Conversely, hydrogen sulfide molecules adsorbed more strongly on rutile film (0.7 molecules/nm2 than on anatase (0.4 molecules/nm2. Exposure to UV light illumination brought about the photocatalytic oxidation of the three gases in contact with both TiO2 films, and the decrease in concentration were measured, and their kinetics are analyzed in terms of the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetic model. From the kinetic analysis, it was found that the anatase film showed the photocatalytic activities that were factors of ~8 and ~5 higher than the rutile film for the degradation of gaseous ammonia and acetaldehyde, respectively. However, the activity was only a factor of ~1.5 higher for the photodegradation of hydrogen sulfide. These observations are systematically explained by the charge separation efficiency and the adsorption characteristics of each catalyst as well as by the physical and electrochemical properties of each

  2. State Teacher Salary Schedules. Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the United States most teacher compensation issues are decided at the school district level. However, a group of states have chosen to play a role in teacher pay decisions by instituting statewide teacher salary schedules. Education Commission of the States has found that 17 states currently make use of teacher salary schedules. This education…

  3. Purification and kinetic analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial thioredoxin glutathione reductase extracted from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancarte, Agustin; Nava, Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Thioredoxin glutathione reductases (TGRs) (EC 1.8.1.9) were purified to homogeneity from the cytosolic (cTsTGR) and mitochondrial (mTsTGR) fractions of Taenia solium, the agent responsible for neurocysticercosis, one of the major central nervous system parasitic diseases in humans. TsTGRs had a relative molecular weight of 132,000, while the corresponding value per subunit obtained under denaturing conditions, was of 62,000. Specific activities for thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase substrates for both TGRs explored were in the range or lower than values obtained for other platyhelminths and mammalian TGRs. cTsTGR and mTsTGR also showed hydroperoxide reductase activity using hydroperoxide as substrate. Km(DTNB) and Kcat(DTNB) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (88 µM and 1.9 s(-1); 45 µM and 12.6 s(-1), respectively) and Km(GSSG) and Kcat(GSSG) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (6.3 µM and 0.96 s(-1); 4 µM and 1.62 s(-1), respectively) were similar to or lower than those reported for mammalian TGRs. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that 12 peptides from cTsTGR and seven from mTsTGR were a match for gi|29825896 thioredoxin glutathione reductase [Echinococcus granulosus], confirming that both enzymes are TGRs. Both T. solium TGRs were inhibited by the gold compound auranofin, a selective inhibitor of thiol-dependent flavoreductases (I₅₀ = 3.25, 2.29 nM for DTNB and GSSG substrates, respectively for cTsTGR; I₅₀ = 5.6, 25.4 nM for mTsTGR toward the same substrates in the described order). Glutathione reductase activity of cTsTGR and mTsTGR exhibited hysteretic behavior with moderate to high concentrations of GSSG; this result was not observed either with thioredoxin, DTNB or NADPH. However, the observed hysteretic kinetics was suppressed with increasing amounts of both parasitic TGRs. These data suggest the existence of an effective substitute which may account for the lack of the detoxification enzymes glutathione reductase

  4. Solution of non-steady-state substrate concentration in the action of biosensor response at mixed enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthamarai, R.; Jana Ranjani, R.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model of an amperometric biosensor at mixed enzyme kinetics and diffusion limitation in the case of substrate inhibition has been developed. The model is based on time dependent reaction diffusion equation containing a non -linear term related to non -Michaelis - Menten kinetics of the enzymatic reaction. Solution for the concentration of the substrate has been derived for all values of parameters using the homotopy perturbation method. All the approximate analytic expressions of substrate concentration are compared with simulation results using Scilab/Matlab program. Finally, we have given a satisfactory agreement between them.

  5. Determination of kinetic parameters of Fe sup 3+ reduction mediated by a polyaniline film using steady-state and impedance methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslouis, C. (LP15 du CNRS, Physique des Liquides et Electrochimie, Lab. de l' Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (FR)); Musiani, M.M.; Pagura, C.; Tribollet, C. (Inst. di Polarografia de Elettrochimica Preparativa del CNR, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, 35020 Camin, Padova (IT))

    1991-09-01

    This paper discusses the Fe{sup 3+} reduction reaction studied at Pt and polyaniline rotating disk electrodes by steady-state and impedance methods with the aim of testing the possibility of achieving the charge transfer resistance (R{sub ts}) of a redox reaction mediated by a conducting polymer film by ac impedance R{sub ts} was obtained as a function of electrode potential and rotation rate by nonlinear least squares fitting of a previously developed kinetic equation to the experimental data. These R{sub ts} values were combined with steady-state ones to calculate b{sub c} and k{sup 0}.

  6. CuInSe2 nano-crystallite reaction kinetics using solid state reaction from Cu2Se and In2Se3 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiang, Hsing-I; Lu, Li-Hsin; Chang, Yu-Lun; Ray, Dahtong; Yen, Fu-Su

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → CuInSe 2 phase increased gradually accompanied with a decrease in γ-In 2 Se 3 and no intermediate phase during calcination. → CuInSe 2 formation from Cu 2 Se and In 2 Se 3 powders follows a one-dimensional diffusion-controlled reaction with apparent activation energy of about 122.5 kJ/mol. → The solid reaction kinetics may be dominated by the diffusion of In 3+ ions. - Abstract: The reaction mechanism and CuInSe 2 formation kinetics using a solid state reaction from Cu 2 Se and In 2 Se 3 powders synthesized using a heating up process were investigated using X-ray diffractomy (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that the CuInSe 2 phase increased gradually, accompanied with a decrease in γ-In 2 Se 3 with no intermediate phase as the calcination temperature and soaking time were increased. The reaction kinetics was analyzed using the Avrami and polynomial kinetic model, suggesting that CuInSe 2 formation from Cu 2 Se and In 2 Se 3 powders follows a diffusion-controlled reaction with an apparent activation energy of about 122.5-182.3 kJ/mol. Cu 2 Se and In 2 Se 3 phases react and directly transform into CIS without the occurrence of any intermediate phase and the size of the newly formed CuInSe 2 crystallites was close to that of the Cu 2 Se reactant particle based on the TEM results, which indicated that the solid reaction kinetics may be dominated by the diffusion of In 3+ ions.

  7. Probing the transition state for nucleic acid hybridization using phi-value analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jandi; Shin, Jong-Shik

    2010-04-27

    Genetic regulation by noncoding RNA elements such as microRNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) involves hybridization of a short single-stranded RNA with a complementary segment in a target mRNA. The physical basis of the hybridization process between the structured nucleic acids is not well understood primarily because of the lack of information about the transition-state structure. Here we use transition-state theory, inspired by phi-value analysis in protein folding studies, to provide quantitative analysis of the relationship between changes in the secondary structure stability and the activation free energy. Time course monitoring of the hybridization reaction was performed under pseudo-steady-state conditions using a single fluorophore. The phi-value analysis indicates that the native secondary structure remains intact in the transition state. The nativelike transition state was confirmed via examination of the salt dependence of the hybridization kinetics, indicating that the number of sodium ions associated with the transition state was not substantially affected by changes in the native secondary structure. These results propose that hybridization between structured nucleic acids undergoes a transition state leading to formation of a nucleation complex and then is followed by sequential displacement of preexisting base pairings involving successive small energy barriers. The proposed mechanism might provide new insight into physical processes during small RNA-mediated gene silencing, which is essential to selection of a target mRNA segment for siRNA design.

  8. Kinetic Typography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Djonov, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images.......After discussing broad cultural drivers behind the development of kinetic typography, the chapter outlines an approach to analysing kinetic typography which is based on Halliday's theory of transitivity, as applied by Kress and Van Leeuwen to visual images....

  9. Investigating the state of physiologically based kinetic modelling practices and challenges associated with gaining regulatory acceptance of model applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physiologically based kinetic (PBK) models are used widely throughout a number of working sectors, including academia and industry, to provide insight into the dosimetry related to observed adverse health effects in humans and other species. Use of these models has increased over...

  10. Effects of thermal treatment on high solid anaerobic digestion of swine manure: Enhancement assessment and kinetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Hu, Yu-Ying; Wang, Shi-Feng; Cao, Zhi-Ping; Li, Huai-Zhi; Fu, Xin-Mei; Wang, Kai-Jun; Zuo, Jian-E

    2017-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD), which is a process for generating biogas, can be applied to the treatment of organic wastes. Owing to its smaller footprint, lower energy consumption, and less digestate, high solid anaerobic digestion (HSAD) has attracted increasing attention. However, its biogas production is poor. In order to improve biogas production and decrease energy consumption, an improved thermal treatment process was proposed. Raw swine manure (>20% solid content) without any dilution was thermally treated at 70±1°C for different retention times, and then its effect on HSAD was investigated via batch AD experiments at 8.9% solid content. Results showed that the main organic components of swine manure hydrolyzed significantly during the thermal treatment, and HSAD's methane production rate was improved by up to 39.5%. Analysis using two kinetic models confirmed that the treatment could increase biodegradable organics (especially the readily biodegradable organics) in swine manure rather than upgrading its hydrolysis rate. It is worth noting that the superimposed first-order kinetics model was firstly applied in AD, and was a good tool to reveal the AD kinetics mechanism of substrates with complex components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Modified Hematite by Methane (CH{sub 4}) for Chemical-Looping Combustion: A Global Kinetics Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monazam, Esmail R; Breault, Ronald W; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Miller, Duane D

    2013-10-01

    Iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) or in its natural form (hematite) is a potential material to capture CO{sub 2} through the chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process. It is known that magnesium (Mg) is an effective methyl cleaving catalyst and as such it has been combined with hematite to assess any possible enhancement to the kinetic rate for the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with methane. Therefore, in order to evaluate its effectiveness as a hematite additive, the behaviors of Mg-modified hematite samples (hematite –5% Mg(OH){sub 2}) have been analyzed with regard to assessing any enhancement to the kinetic rate process. The Mg-modified hematite was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis. The reactivity experiments were conducted in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) using continuous stream of CH{sub 4} (5, 10, and 20%) at temperatures ranging from 700 to 825 {degrees}C over ten reduction cycles. The mass spectroscopy analysis of product gas indicated the presence of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2} and CO in the gaseous product. The kinetic data at reduction step obtained by isothermal experiments could be well fitted by two parallel rate equations. The modified hematite samples showed higher reactivity as compared to unmodified hematite samples during reduction at all investigated temperatures.

  12. Comparative evaluation of thermal oxidative decomposition for oil-plant residues via thermogravimetric analysis: Thermal conversion characteristics, kinetics, and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbiao; Wang, Yanhong; Lang, Xuemei; Ren, Xiu'e; Fan, Shuanshi

    2017-11-01

    Thermal oxidative decomposition characteristics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of rape straw (RS), rapeseed meal (RM), camellia seed shell (CS), and camellia seed meal (CM) were evaluated via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TG-DTG-DSC curves demonstrated that the combustion of oil-plant residues proceeded in three stages, including dehydration, release and combustion of organic volatiles, and chars oxidation. As revealed by combustion characteristic parameters, the ignition, burnout, and comprehensive combustion performance of residues were quite distinct from each other, and were improved by increasing heating rate. The kinetic parameters were determined by Coats-Redfern approach. The results showed that the most possible combustion mechanisms were order reaction models. The existence of kinetic compensation effect was clearly observed. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔG, ΔS) at peak temperatures were calculated through the activated complex theory. With the combustion proceeding, the variation trends of ΔH, ΔG, and ΔS for RS (RM) similar to those for CS (CM). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis and simulation of phase transformation kinetics of zeolite A from amorphous phases

    CERN Document Server

    Marui, Y; Uchida, H; Takiyama, H

    2003-01-01

    Experiments on transformation rates of zeolite A from amorphous phases at different feed rates to alter the particle size of the amorphous phases were carried out to analyze the kinetics of the transformation, and were analyzed by performing simulation of the transformation. A clear dependence of the induction time for nucleation of zeolite A crystals on the surface area of the amorphous phase was recognized, indicating that the nucleation of zeolite A was heterogeneous and the nucleation rate was almost proportional to the size of the amorphous particles. From the simulation, the mechanism of the transformation was found to be heterogeneous nucleation of zeolite A crystals on the surface of amorphous particles followed by solution mediated phase transformation, and the transformation kinetics were well reproduced at different feed rates. (author)

  14. Kinetics of the Thermal Degradation of Granulated Scrap Tyres: a Model-free Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix A. LÓPEZ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is a technology with a promising future in the recycling of scrap tyres. This paper determines the thermal decomposition behaviour and kinetics of granulated scrap tyres (GST by examining the thermogravimetric/derivative thermogravimetric (TGA/DTG data obtained during their pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere at different heating rates. The model-free methods of Friedman, Flynn-Wall-Ozawa and Coats-Redfern were used to determine the reaction kinetics from the DTG data. The apparent activation energy and pre-exponential factor for the degradation of GST were calculated. A comparison with the results obtained by other authors was made.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.2947

  15. Model-free method for isothermal and non-isothermal decomposition kinetics analysis of PET sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, B.; Maiti, A.K.; Ghoshal, A.K.

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolysis, one possible alternative to recover valuable products from waste plastics, has recently been the subject of renewed interest. In the present study, the isoconversion methods, i.e., Vyazovkin model-free approach is applied to study non-isothermal decomposition kinetics of waste PET samples using various temperature integral approximations such as Coats and Redfern, Gorbachev, and Agrawal and Sivasubramanian approximation and direct integration (recursive adaptive Simpson quadrature scheme) to analyze the decomposition kinetics. The results show that activation energy (E α ) is a weak but increasing function of conversion (α) in case of non-isothermal decomposition and strong and decreasing function of conversion in case of isothermal decomposition. This indicates possible existence of nucleation, nuclei growth and gas diffusion mechanism during non-isothermal pyrolysis and nucleation and gas diffusion mechanism during isothermal pyrolysis. Optimum E α dependencies on α obtained for non-isothermal data showed similar nature for all the types of temperature integral approximations

  16. Kinetic analysis of dihydroxyacetone production from crude glycerol by immobilized cells of Gluconobacter oxydans MTCC 904.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Pritam Kumar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2016-09-01

    The present study has investigated kinetic features of bioconversion of biodiesel-derived crude glycerol to dihydroxyacetone with immobilized Gluconobacter oxydans cells using modified Haldane substrate-inhibition model. The results have been compared against free cells and pure glycerol. Relative variations in the kinetic parameters KS, KI, Vmax, n and X reveal that immobilized G. oxydans cells (on PU foam substrate) with crude glycerol as substrate give higher order of inhibition (n) and lower maximum reaction velocities (Vmax). These results are essentially implications of substrate transport restrictions across immobilization matrix, which causes retention of substrate in the matrix and reduction in fractional available substrate (X) for the cells. This causes reduction in both KS (substrate concentration at Vmax/2) and KI (inhibition constant) as compared to free cells. For immobilized cells, substrate concentration (Smax) corresponding to Vmax is practically same for both pure and crude glycerol as substrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Crystallization Kinetics within a Generic Modelling Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisler, Kresten Troelstrup; von Solms, Nicolas; Gernaey, Krist

    2013-01-01

    An existing generic modelling framework has been expanded with tools for kinetic model analysis. The analysis of kinetics is carried out within the framework where kinetic constitutive models are collected, analysed and utilized for the simulation of crystallization operations. A modelling...... procedure is proposed to gain the information of crystallization operation kinetic model analysis and utilize this for faster evaluation of crystallization operations....

  18. State of the Climate - Global Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The State of the Climate is a collection of periodic summaries recapping climate-related occurrences on both a global and national scale. The State of the Climate...

  19. Application of the reactor kinetics equations to the reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sdouz, G.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor kinetics equations which can be solved by the computer program AIREK-III are used to describe the behavior of fast reactivity transients. By supplementing this computer program it was possible to solve additional safety problems, e.g. the course of reactor excursions induced by any form of reactivity input, the control of reactivity input as a function of a threshold-energy and the computation of produced energy. (author)

  20. Kinetic analysis of polyoxometalate (POM) oxidation of non-phenolic lignin model compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoya Yokoyama; Hou-min Chang; Ira A. Weinstock; Richard S. Reiner; John F. Kadla

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic and reaction mechanism of non-phenolic lignin model compounds under anaerobic polyoxometalate (POM), Na5(+1.9)[SiV1(-0.1)MoW10(+0.1) 40], bleaching conditions were examined. Analyses using a syringyl type model, 1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)ethanol (1), a guaiacyl type, 1-(3,4- imethoxyphenyl)ethanol (2), and 1- (4-ethoxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)ethanol (3) suggest...

  1. Extracting the basal extracellular dopamine concentrations from the evoked responses: re-analysis of the dopamine kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin C; Budygin, Evgeny A

    2007-08-15

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in conjunction with carbon fiber microelectrode has been used to study dopamine (DA) release and uptake mechanisms in rat brains because of the smaller size of the electrode and the subsecond resolution. Current voltammetry data were analyzed by a DA kinetic model assuming a zero baseline, which is in conflict with existing microdialysis findings and a recent claim of the striatal extracellular DA concentration at micromolar levels. This work applied a new analysis approach based on a modified DA kinetic model to analyze the kinetics of electrically evoked DA overflow in the caudate-putamen of anesthetized rats. The DA uptake parameters were fitted from the electrical stimulation phase, and subsequently used to calculate theoretical DA uptake rates. Comparison of the theoretical uptake rates with experimental clearance rates allows for the study of the tonic DA release process following electrical stimulations. Analyses of DA voltammetry data suggest that the locally averaged basal level of extracellular DA in the rat striatum might be confined between 95 and 220 nM. The disparate time scales in the clearance kinetics of endogenous and exogenous DA were investigated. Long-distance diffusion could only partially explain the slow clearance time course of exogenous DA. Model simulations and parameter analyses on evoked DA responses indicate that suppression of the nonevoked DA release process immediately following electrical stimulation cannot completely account for the rapid clearance of the electrically evoked DA. Inconsistency in the measured uptake strengths in the literature studying endogenous and exogenous DA remains to be investigated in the future.

  2. The solution of the neutron point kinetics equation with stochastic extension: an analysis of two moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Milena Wollmann da; Vilhena, Marco Tullio M.B.; Bodmann, Bardo Ernst J.; Vasques, Richard, E-mail: milena.wollmann@ufrgs.br, E-mail: vilhena@mat.ufrgs.br, E-mail: bardobodmann@ufrgs.br, E-mail: richard.vasques@fulbrightmail.org [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica

    2015-07-01

    The neutron point kinetics equation, which models the time-dependent behavior of nuclear reactors, is often used to understand the dynamics of nuclear reactor operations. It consists of a system of coupled differential equations that models the interaction between (i) the neutron population; and (II) the concentration of the delayed neutron precursors, which are radioactive isotopes formed in the fission process that decay through neutron emission. These equations are deterministic in nature, and therefore can provide only average values of the modeled populations. However, the actual dynamical process is stochastic: the neutron density and the delayed neutron precursor concentrations vary randomly with time. To address this stochastic behavior, Hayes and Allen have generalized the standard deterministic point kinetics equation. They derived a system of stochastic differential equations that can accurately model the random behavior of the neutron density and the precursor concentrations in a point reactor. Due to the stiffness of these equations, this system was numerically implemented using a stochastic piecewise constant approximation method (Stochastic PCA). Here, we present a study of the influence of stochastic fluctuations on the results of the neutron point kinetics equation. We reproduce the stochastic formulation introduced by Hayes and Allen and compute Monte Carlo numerical results for examples with constant and time-dependent reactivity, comparing these results with stochastic and deterministic methods found in the literature. Moreover, we introduce a modified version of the stochastic method to obtain a non-stiff solution, analogue to a previously derived deterministic approach. (author)

  3. Kinetic analysis of Yersinia pestis DNA adenine methyltransferase activity using a hemimethylated molecular break light oligonucleotide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Wood

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: DNA adenine methylation plays an important role in several critical bacterial processes including mismatch repair, the timing of DNA replication and the transcriptional control of gene expression. The dependence of bacterial virulence on DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam has led to the proposal that selective Dam inhibitors might function as broad spectrum antibiotics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein we report the expression and purification of Yersinia pestis Dam and the development of a continuous fluorescence based assay for DNA adenine methyltransferase activity that is suitable for determining the kinetic parameters of the enzyme and for high throughput screening against potential Dam inhibitors. The assay utilised a hemimethylated break light oligonucleotide substrate containing a GATC methylation site. When this substrate was fully methylated by Dam, it became a substrate for the restriction enzyme DpnI, resulting in separation of fluorophore (fluorescein and quencher (dabcyl and therefore an increase in fluorescence. The assays were monitored in real time using a fluorescence microplate reader in 96 well format and were used for the kinetic characterisation of Yersinia pestis Dam, its substrates and the known Dam inhibitor, S-adenosylhomocysteine. The assay has been validated for high throughput screening, giving a Z-factor of 0.71+/-0.07 indicating that it is a sensitive assay for the identification of inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The assay is therefore suitable for high throughput screening for inhibitors of DNA adenine methyltransferases and the kinetic characterisation of the inhibition.

  4. Dual-Mode Measurement and Theoretical Analysis of Evaporation Kinetics of Binary Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hanyu; He, Chi-Ruei; Basdeo, Carl; Li, Ji-Qin; Ye, Dezhuang; Kalonia, Devendra; Li, Si-Yu; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    Theoretical and experimental investigations are presented for the precision measurement of evaporation kinetics of binary mixtures using a quartz crystal resonator. A thin layer of light alcohol mixture including a volatile (methanol) and a much less volatile (1-butanol) components is deployed on top of the resonator. The normal or acoustic mode is to detect the moving liquid-vapor interface due to evaporation with a great spatial precision on the order of microns, and simultaneously the shear mode is used for in-situ detection of point viscosity or concentration of the mixture near the resonator. A one-dimensional theoretical model is developed to describe the underlying mass transfer and interfacial transport phenomena. Along with the modeling results, the transient evaporation kinetics, moving interface, and the stratification of viscosity of the liquid mixture during evaporation are simultaneously measured by the impedance response of the shear and longitudinal waves emitted from the resonator. The system can be used to characterize complicated evaporation kinetics involving multi-component fuels. American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund, NSF CMMI-0952646.

  5. [CoCuMnOx Photocatalyzed Oxidation of Multi-component VOCs and Kinetic Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hai-long; Bo, Long-li; Liu, Jia-dong; Gao, Bo; Feng, Qi-qi; Tan, Na; Xie, Shuai

    2016-05-15

    Solar energy absorption coating CoCuMnOx was prepared by co-precipitation method and applied to photodegrade multi- component VOCs including toluene, ethyl acetate and acetone under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic oxidation performance of toluene, ethyl acetate and acetone was analyzed and reaction kinetics of VOCs were investigated synchronously. The research indicated that removal rates of single-component toluene, ethyl acetate and acetone were 57%, 62% and 58% respectively under conditions of 400 mg · m⁻³ initial concentration, 120 mm illumination distance, 1 g/350 cm² dosage of CoCuMnOx and 6 h of irradiation time by 100 W tungsten halogen lamp. Due to the competition among different VOCs, removal efficiencies in three-component mixture were reduced by 5%-26% as compared with single VOC. Degradation processes of single-component VOC and three-component VOCs both fitted pseudo first order reaction kinetics, and kinetic constants of toluene, ethyl acetate and acetone were 0.002, 0.002 8 and 0.002 33 min⁻¹ respectively under single-component condition. Reaction rates of VOCs in three-component mixture were 0.49-0.88 times of single components.

  6. The oxygen-conserving potential of the diving response: A kinetic-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costalat, Guillaume; Coquart, Jeremy; Castres, Ingrid; Joulia, Fabrice; Sirost, Olivier; Clua, Eric; Lemaître, Frédéric

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the oxygen-conserving potential of the human diving response by comparing trained breath-hold divers (BHDs) to non-divers (NDs) during simulated dynamic breath-holding (BH). Changes in haemodynamics [heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO)] and peripheral muscle oxygenation [oxyhaemoglobin ([HbO 2 ]), deoxyhaemoglobin ([HHb]), total haemoglobin ([tHb]), tissue saturation index (TSI)] and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) were continuously recorded during simulated dynamic BH. BHDs showed a breaking point in HR kinetics at mid-BH immediately preceding a more pronounced drop in HR (-0.86 bpm.% -1 ) while HR kinetics in NDs steadily decreased throughout BH (-0.47 bpm.% -1 ). By contrast, SV remained unchanged during BH in both groups (all P > 0.05). Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) results (mean ± SD) expressed as percentage changes from the initial values showed a lower [HHb] increase for BHDs than for NDs at the cessation of BH (+24.0 ± 10.1 vs. +39.2 ± 9.6%, respectively; P kinetic-based approach we used provides further credence to the concept of an "oxygen-conserving breaking point" in the human diving response.

  7. The solution of the neutron point kinetics equation with stochastic extension: an analysis of two moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Milena Wollmann da; Vilhena, Marco Tullio M.B.; Bodmann, Bardo Ernst J.; Vasques, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The neutron point kinetics equation, which models the time-dependent behavior of nuclear reactors, is often used to understand the dynamics of nuclear reactor operations. It consists of a system of coupled differential equations that models the interaction between (i) the neutron population; and (II) the concentration of the delayed neutron precursors, which are radioactive isotopes formed in the fission process that decay through neutron emission. These equations are deterministic in nature, and therefore can provide only average values of the modeled populations. However, the actual dynamical process is stochastic: the neutron density and the delayed neutron precursor concentrations vary randomly with time. To address this stochastic behavior, Hayes and Allen have generalized the standard deterministic point kinetics equation. They derived a system of stochastic differential equations that can accurately model the random behavior of the neutron density and the precursor concentrations in a point reactor. Due to the stiffness of these equations, this system was numerically implemented using a stochastic piecewise constant approximation method (Stochastic PCA). Here, we present a study of the influence of stochastic fluctuations on the results of the neutron point kinetics equation. We reproduce the stochastic formulation introduced by Hayes and Allen and compute Monte Carlo numerical results for examples with constant and time-dependent reactivity, comparing these results with stochastic and deterministic methods found in the literature. Moreover, we introduce a modified version of the stochastic method to obtain a non-stiff solution, analogue to a previously derived deterministic approach. (author)

  8. Analysis of equations of state for ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogando, F.; Velarde, P.

    1998-01-01

    In the field of inertial confinement fusion (ICF), numerical simulation plays a very important role reproducing real results with a good accuracy. Once considered the needed simplificative approximations, it is obtained and equation system that has to be solved in a more or less complex way. Anyway these simulation codes have to fit the behaviour of real materials with the help of some flexible parameters. In the case of fluid dynamics, the key to fit the equation system to the real material behaviour are the equations of state (EOS) involved in the problem. This is why there is an actual need of using accurate data in order to obtain results that match the real behaviour of materials. Nowadays there are several available sources of real EOS data. These sources are based either in theoretical models fixed with experimental results or in analytical approximations to those models. In this article a comparative analysis is made between two of the most used EOS data sources in simulations. The aim of this work is to check the quality of these data that is commonly used and on which the accuracy of the results depend. (Author) 3 refs

  9. Stochastic theory of interfacial enzyme kinetics: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Biswajit; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Stochastic theory of interfacial enzyme kinetics is formulated. Numerical results of macroscopic phenomenon of lag-burst kinetics is obtained by using a kinetic Monte Carlo approach to single enzyme activity. Highlights: ► An enzyme is attached with the fluid state phospholipid molecules on the Langmuir monolayer. ► Through the diffusion, the enzyme molecule reaches the gel–fluid interface. ► After hydrolysing a phospholipid molecule it predominantly leaves the surface in the lag phase. ► The enzyme is strictly attached to the surface with scooting mode of motion and the burst phase appears. - Abstract: In the spirit of Gillespie’s stochastic approach we have formulated a theory to explore the advancement of the interfacial enzyme kinetics at the single enzyme level which is ultimately utilized to obtain the ensemble average macroscopic feature, lag-burst kinetics. We have provided a theory of the transition from the lag phase to the burst phase kinetics by considering the gradual development of electrostatic interaction among the positively charged enzyme and negatively charged product molecules deposited on the phospholipid surface. It is shown that the different diffusion time scales of the enzyme over the fluid and product regions are responsible for the memory effect in the correlation of successive turnover events of the hopping mode in the single trajectory analysis which again is reflected on the non-Gaussian distribution of turnover times on the macroscopic kinetics in the lag phase unlike the burst phase kinetics.

  10. Recurrence quantification analysis of chimera states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, M.S.; Szezech, J.D.; Batista, A.M.; Caldas, I.L.; Viana, R.L.; Lopes, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Chimera states, characterised by coexistence of coherence and incoherence in coupled dynamical systems, have been found in various physical systems, such as mechanical oscillator networks and Josephson-junction arrays. We used recurrence plots to provide graphical representations of recurrent patterns and identify chimera states. Moreover, we show that recurrence plots can be used as a diagnostic of chimera states and also to identify the chimera collapse. - Highlights: • Chimera states have been found in various physical systems. • Recurrence plots is a graphical method useful to locate recurring patterns. • We used recurrence plots to identify the chimera states. • We show also the recurrence plots can identify the chimera collapse

  11. Recurrence quantification analysis of chimera states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, M.S. [Pós-Graduação em Ciências/Física, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Szezech, J.D., E-mail: jdanilo@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Batista, A.M., E-mail: antoniomarcosbatista@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05315-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Viana, R.L.; Lopes, S.R. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-10-02

    Chimera states, characterised by coexistence of coherence and incoherence in coupled dynamical systems, have been found in various physical systems, such as mechanical oscillator networks and Josephson-junction arrays. We used recurrence plots to provide graphical representations of recurrent patterns and identify chimera states. Moreover, we show that recurrence plots can be used as a diagnostic of chimera states and also to identify the chimera collapse. - Highlights: • Chimera states have been found in various physical systems. • Recurrence plots is a graphical method useful to locate recurring patterns. • We used recurrence plots to identify the chimera states. • We show also the recurrence plots can identify the chimera collapse.

  12. Kinetic analysis of enzyme systems with suicide substrate in the presence of a reversible competitive inhibitor, tested by simulated progress curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moruno-Dávila, M A; Garrido-del Solo, C; García-Moreno, M; Havsteen, B H; Garcia-Sevilla, F; Garcia-Cánovas, F; Varón, R

    2001-02-01

    The use of suicide substrates remains a very important and useful method in enzymology for studying enzyme mechanisms and designing potential drugs. Suicide substrates act as modified substrates for the target enzymes and bind to the active site. Therefore the presence of a competitive reversible inhibitor decreases the rate of substrate-induced inactivation and protects the enzyme from this inactivation. This lowering on the inactivation rate has evident physiological advantages, since it allows the easy acquisition of experimental data and facilitates kinetic data analysis by providing another variable (inhibitor concentration). However despite the importance of the simultaneous action of a suicide substrate and a competitive reversible inhibition, to date no corresponding kinetic analysis has been carried out. Therefore we present a general kinetic analysis of a Michaelis-Menten reaction mechanism with double inhibition caused by both, a suicide substrate and a competitive reversible inhibitor. We assume rapid equilibrium of the reversible reaction steps involved, while the time course equations for the reaction product have been derived with the assumption of a limiting enzyme. The goodness of the analytical solutions has been tested by comparison with the simulated curves obtained by numerical integration. A kinetic data analysis to determine the corresponding kinetic parameters from the time progress curve of the product is suggested. In conclusion, we present a complete kinetic analysis of an enzyme reaction mechanism as described above in an attempt to fill a gap in the theoretical treatment of this type of system.

  13. Adsorption of toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state by TiO2-MCM-41: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Kulamani; Mishra, Krushna Gopal; Dash, Suresh Kumar

    2012-11-30

    This paper deals with the immobilization of various weight percentage of TiO(2) on mesoporous MCM-41, characterization of the materials by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and evaluation of the adsorption capacity toward Cr(VI) removal. It is found that the MCM-41 structure retained after loading of TiO(2) but the surface area and pore diameter decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous state was investigated on TiO(2)-MCM-41 by changing various parameters such as pH, metal ion concentration, and the temperature. When TiO(2) loading was more than 20 wt.%, the adsorption activity (25)TiO(2)-MCM-41 reduced significantly due to considerable decrease in the surface area. It is also observed that TiO(2) and neat MCM-41 exhibits very less Cr(VI) adsorption compared to TiO(2)-MCM-41. The adsorption of Cr(VI) onto (20)TiO(2)-MCM-41 at pH~5.5 and temperature 323 K was 91% at 100mg/L Cr(VI) metal ion concentration in 80 min. The experimental data fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on TiO(2)-MCM-41 followed a second order kinetics with higher values of intra-particle diffusion rate. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption process is endothermic in nature and desorption studies indicated a chemisorption mode. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 15N Kinetic Analysis of N2O Production by Nitrosomonas europaea: an Examination of Nitrifier Denitrification

    OpenAIRE

    Poth, Mark; Focht, Dennis D.

    1985-01-01

    A series of 15N isotope tracer experiments showed that Nitrosomonas europaea produces nitrous oxide only under oxygen-limiting conditions and that the labeled N from nitrite, but not nitrate, is incorporated into nitrous oxide, indicating the presence of the “denitrifying enzyme” nitrite reductase. A kinetic analysis of the m/z 44, 45, and 46 nitrous oxide produced by washed cell suspensions of N. europaea when incubated with 4 mM ammonium (99% 14N) and 0.4 mM nitrite (99% 15N) was performed....

  15. Study on reaction mechanism by analysis of kinetic energy spectra of light particles and formation of final products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, G.; Mandaglio, G.; Nasirov, A. K.; Anastasi, A.; Curciarello, F.; Fazio, G.

    2018-05-01

    The sensitivity of reaction mechanism in the formation of compound nucleus (CN) by the analysis of kinetic energy spectra of light particles and of reaction products are shown. The dependence of the P CN fusion probability of reactants and W sur survival probability of CN against fission at its deexcitation on the mass and charge symmetries in the entrance channel of heavy-ion collisions, as well as on the neutron numbers is discussed. The possibility of conducting a complex program of investigations of the complete fusion by reliable ways depends on the detailed and refined methods of experimental and theoretical analyses.

  16. Neutron lifetimes behavior analysis considering the two-region kinetic model in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN-SP Travessa R-400, 05508-900, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    This is a complementary work about the behavior analysis of the neutron lifetimes that was developed in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor facility. The macroscopic neutron noise technique was experimentally employed using pulse mode detectors for two stages of control rods insertion, where a total of twenty levels of subcriticality have been carried out. It was also considered that the neutron reflector density was treated as an additional group of delayed neutrons, being a sophisticated approach in the two-region kinetic theoretical model.

  17. Neutron lifetimes behavior analysis considering the two-region kinetic model in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Diniz, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    This is a complementary work about the behavior analysis of the neutron lifetimes that was developed in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor facility. The macroscopic neutron noise technique was experimentally employed using pulse mode detectors for two stages of control rods insertion, where a total of twenty levels of subcriticality have been carried out. It was also considered that the neutron reflector density was treated as an additional group of delayed neutrons, being a sophisticated approach in the two-region kinetic theoretical model

  18. Correlated kinetic energy density functional of ground states of harmonically confined two-electron atoms for arbitrary interparticle interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amovilli, C; March, N H

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing the earlier work of Holas et al (2003 Phys. Lett. A 310 451) and the more recent contribution of Akbari et al (2009 Phys. Rev. A 80 032509), we construct an integral equation for the relative motion (RM) contribution t RM (r) to the correlated kinetic energy density for modelling two-electron atoms with harmonic confinement but arbitrary interparticle interaction. It is stressed that t RM = t RM [f(G)], where f(G) is the atomic scattering factor: the Fourier transform of the density ρ(r). As a simple illustrative example of this functional relation for the correlated kinetic energy density, the harmonic Moshinsky case is investigated, the scattering factor then having a Gaussian form. (paper)

  19. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF STEADY STATE DISPERSION FLOW MODEL FOR LACTOSE-LACTASE HYDROLYSIS WITH DIFFERENT KINETICS IN FIXED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLAOSEBIKAN ABIDOYE OLAFADEHAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A detailed computational procedure for evaluating lactose hydrolysis with immobilized enzyme in a packed bed tubular reactor under dispersion flow conditions is presented. The dispersion flow model for lactose hydrolysis using different kinetics, taking cognizance of external mass transfer resistances, was solved by the method of orthogonal collocation. The reliability of model simulations was tested using experimental data from a laboratory packed bed column, where the -galactosidase of Kluyveromyces fragilis was immobilized on spherical chitosan beads. Comparison of the simulated results with experimental exit conversion shows that the dispersion flow model and using Michaelis-Menten kinetics with competitive product (galactose inhibition are appropriate to interpret the experimental results and simulate the process of lactose hydrolysis in a fixed bed.

  20. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells – A Comparison between Hydrogen/Steam and Reformate Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen/steam and refor......Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen....../steam fuel split into two processes with opposing temperature behavior in the reformate fuels. An 87.5% reduction in active electrode area diminishes the gas conversion impedance in the hydrogen/steam fuel at high fuel flow rates. In both reformates, the second and third lowest frequency processes merged...

  1. Removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution with magnetite loaded multi-wall carbon nanotube: Kinetic, isotherm and mechanism analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ai, Lunhong; Zhang, Chunying; Liao, Fang; Wang, Yao; Li, Ming; Meng, Lanying; Jiang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► M-MWCNTs were synthesized by a facile one-pot solvothermal method and used as an efficient adsorbent for removing toxic dye from aqueous solution. ► The adsorption process was characterized by kinetics and isotherm analysis. ► FTIR analysis was employed to investigate the interactions between M-MWCNTs and dye. - Abstract: In this study, we have demonstrated the efficient removal of cationic dye, methylene blue (MB), from aqueous solution with the one-pot solvothermal synthesized magnetite-loaded multi-walled carbon nanotubes (M-MWCNTs). The as-prepared M-MWCNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of contact time, initial dye concentration, and solution pH on the adsorption of MB onto M-MWCNTs were systematically studied. It was shown that the MB adsorption was pH-dependent. Adsorption kinetics was best described by the pseudo-second-order model. Equilibrium data were well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model, yielding maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of 48.06 mg g −1 . FTIR analysis suggested that the adsorption mechanism was possibly attributed to the electrostatic attraction and π–π stacking interactions between MWCNTs and MB.

  2. Kinetic bed therapy to prevent nosocomial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Anthony; Gray, Hilary; Laupland, Kevin B; Zuege, Danny J

    2006-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is the most important infectious complication in patients admitted to intensive care units. Kinetic bed therapy may reduce the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients. The objective of this study was to investigate whether kinetic bed therapy reduces the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia and improves outcomes in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. We searched Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and AMED for studies, as well as reviewed abstracts of conference proceedings, bibliographies of included studies and review articles and contacted the manufacturers of medical beds. Studies included were randomized or pseudo-randomized clinical trials of kinetic bed therapy compared to standard manual turning in critically ill mechanically ventilated adult patients. Two reviewers independently applied the study selection criteria and extracted data regarding study validity, type of bed used, intensity of kinetic therapy, and population under investigation. Outcomes assessed included the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia, mortality, duration of ventilation, and intensive care unit and hospital length of stay. Fifteen prospective clinical trials were identified, which included a total of 1,169 participants. No trial met all the validity criteria. There was a significant reduction in the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia (pooled odds ratio (OR) 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28 to 0.53), but no reduction in mortality (pooled OR 0.96, 95%CI 0.66 to 1.14), duration of mechanical ventilation (pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.14 days, 95%CI, -0.29 to 0.02), duration of intensive care unit stay (pooled SMD -0.064 days, 95% CI, -0.21 to 0.086) or duration of hospital stay (pooled SMD 0.05 days, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.27). While kinetic bed therapy has been purported to reduce the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients, the overall body of evidence is insufficient to support this

  3. Preclinical dynamic 18F-FDG PET - tumor characterization and radiotherapy response assessment by kinetic compartment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roee, Kathrine; Aleksandersen, Thomas B.; Nilsen, Line B.; Hong Qu; Ree, Anne H.; Malinen, Eirik; Kristian, Alexandr; Seierstad, Therese; Olsen, Dag R.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Non-invasive visualization of tumor biological and molecular processes of importance to diagnosis and treatment response is likely to be critical in individualized cancer therapy. Since conventional static 18 F-FDG PET with calculation of the semi-quantitative parameter standardized uptake value (SUV) may be subject to many sources of variability, we here present an approach of quantifying the 18 F-FDG uptake by analytic two-tissue compartment modeling, extracting kinetic tumor parameters from dynamic 18 F-FDG PET. Further, we evaluate the potential of such parameters in radiotherapy response assessment. Material and methods. Male, athymic mice with prostate carcinoma xenografts were subjected to dynamic PET either untreated (n=8) or 24 h post-irradiation (7.5 Gy single dose, n=8). After 10 h of fasting, intravenous bolus injections of 10-15 MBq 18 F-FDG were administered and a 1 h dynamic PET scan was performed. 4D emission data were reconstructed using OSEM-MAP, before remote post-processing. Individual arterial input functions were extracted from the image series. Subsequently, tumor 18 F-FDG uptake was fitted voxel-by-voxel to a compartment model, producing kinetic parameter maps. Results. The kinetic model separated the 18 F-FDG uptake into free and bound tracer and quantified three parameters; forward tracer diffusion (k1), backward tracer diffusion (k2), and rate of 18 F-FDG phosphorylation, i.e. the glucose metabolism (k3). The fitted kinetic model gave a goodness of fit (r2) to the observed data ranging from 0.91 to 0.99, and produced parametrical images of all tumors included in the study. Untreated tumors showed homogeneous intra-group median values of all three parameters (k1, k2 and k3), whereas the parameters significantly increased in the tumors irradiated 24 h prior to 18 F-FDG PET. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a two-tissue compartment kinetic analysis of dynamic 18 F-FDG PET images. If validated, extracted

  4. Analysis of dechlorination kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by Fe(II) in cement slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Bahngmi [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435-0001 (United States)], E-mail: jung.bahngmi@gmail.com; Batchelor, Bill [Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3136 (United States)

    2008-03-21

    Degradative solidification/stabilization with ferrous iron (DS/S-Fe(II)) has been found to be effective in degrading a number of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons including 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA), 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (1,1,2,2-TeCA), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chloroform (CF). Previous studies have characterized degradation kinetics in DS/S-Fe(II) systems as affected by Fe(II) dose, pH and initial target organic concentration. The goal of this study is to investigate the importance of various chemical properties on degradation kinetics of DS/S-Fe(II). This was accomplished by first measuring rate constants for degradation of 1,1,1-TCA, 1,1,2,2-TeCA and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) in individual batch experiments. Rate constants developed in these experiments and those obtained from the literature were related to thermodynamic parameters including one-electron reduction potential, two-electron reduction potential, bond dissociation energy and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energies. Degradation kinetics by Fe(II) in cement slurries were generally represented by a pseudo-first-order rate law. The results showed that the rate constants for chlorinated methanes (e.g. CT, CF) and chlorinated ethanes (e.g. 1,1,1-TCA) were higher than those for chlorinated ethylenes (e.g. PCE, TCE, 1,1-DCE and VC) under similar experimental conditions. The log of the pseudo-first-order rate constant (k) was found to correlate better with lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energies (E{sub LUMO}) (R{sup 2} = 0.874) than with other thermodynamic parameter descriptors.

  5. Second Law Analysis for a Variable Viscosity Reactive Couette Flow under Arrhenius Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Kobo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the inherent irreversibility associated with the Couette flow of a reacting variable viscosity combustible material under Arrhenius kinetics. The nonlinear equations of momentum and energy governing the flow system are solved both analytically using a perturbation method and numerically using the standard Newton Raphson shooting method along with a fourth-order Runge Kutta integration algorithm to obtain the velocity and temperature distributions which essentially expedite to obtain expressions for volumetric entropy generation numbers, irreversibility distribution ratio, and the Bejan number in the flow field.

  6. Tracer kinetics: Modelling of tracer behaviour in nonlinear and nonsteady state systems exemplified by the evaluation of protein turnover in plant organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, E.

    1991-01-01

    If nonlinear biological processes are investigated by means of tracer experiments they can be modelled with linear kinetic equations (compartment equations) as long as the total system is in a stationary state. But if nonstationary behaviour is included considerations on the kinetics of the individual processes are necessary. Within the range of biological and agricultural investigations especially first order reactions (constant fraction processes), zero order reactions (constant amount process) and saturation reactions (Michaelis-Menten-kinetics) are to be taken into account. A rigorous treatment of data based on system theory can be preceeded by graphic-algebraic procedure which may be more or less uncertain in its results but which can easily be handled. An example is given of methodological considerations concerning the combination of evaluation procedures and the discrimination between different reaction mechanisms. It treats protein turnover in 2 different parts of growing wheat plants investigated by means of an 15 N-tracer experiment. Whereas in a stationary system (upper stalk section) linear tracer equations were sufficient irrespective of the true reaction mechanism, for protein synthesis in the upper leaf as a nonstationary system it was necessary to decide between the hypotheses of a zero order and a first order reaction. In accordance with statements in the literature the unambiguous result was a combination of protein synthesis as a zero order process and of protein degradation as a first order process. (orig.) [de

  7. Analysis of dried fish marketing in Kwara State, Nigeria. | Fadipe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of dried fish marketing in Kwara State, Nigeria. ... This study was carried out to examine marketing of dried fish in Kwara State, Nigeria. The study used a combination of information ... Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  8. Analysis of fresh maize marketing in Anambra state, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of fresh maize marketing in Anambra state, Nigeria. ... on marketing income in Anambra State, this study utilized descriptive statistic, Sherpherd-futrel model of determining marketing efficiency ... EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  9. Relation between nonlinear or 'not-linear' characteristics in nuclear kinetics and noise analysis of neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, H.

    1975-01-01

    The 'not-linear' or '2nd-class-nonlinear' characteristics in nuclear reactor kinetics with the feedback effect in the high-power operation and induce the increase in the amplitude of the neutron flux noise, specially in the very low frequency region. The fundamental behaviour of 'not-linear' characteristics and its effect for the reactor noise was investigated. Application of the reactor noise analysis technique to power reactors has not been successful because of unknown large disagreement between the result of the conventional theoretical analysis and the experimental facts. When the cause of this discrepancy is clear, reactor noise analysis techniques can be effectively applied to instrumentation, control, monitoring and diagnosis of power reactors. (author)

  10. State-Recovery Analysis of Spritz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankele, Ralph; Kölbl, Stefan; Rechberger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    evidence that they may exist, the situation for Spritz is however not clear, as resistance against such attacks was not a design goal. In this paper, we provide the first cryptanalytic results on Spritz and introduce three different state recovery algorithms. Our first algorithm recovers an internal state...

  11. Isotope partitioning for NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum confirms a steady-state random kinetic mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.Y.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Isotope partitioning studies beginning with E-[ 14 C]NAD, E-[ 14 C] malate, E-[ 14 C] NAD-Mg 2+ , and E-Mg-[ 14 C]malate suggest a steady-state random mechanism for the NAD-malic enzyme. Isotope trapping beginning with E-[ 14 C]NAD and with varying concentrations of Mg 2+ and malate in the chase solution indicates that Mg 2+ is added in rapid equilibrium and must be added prior to malate for productive ternary complex formation. Equal percentage trapping from E-[ 14 C]NAD-Mg and E-Mg-[ 14 C] malate indicates the mechanism is steady-state random with equal off-rates for NAD and malate from E-NAD-Mg-malate. The off-rates for both do not change significantly in the ternary E-Mg-malate and E-NAD-Mg complexes, nor does the off-rate change for NAD from E-NAD. No trapping of malate was obtained from E-[ 14 C] malate, suggesting that this complex is nonproductive. A quantitative analysis of the data allows an estimation of values for a number of the rate constants along the reaction pathway

  12. Kinetics of phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.O.; Aziz, M.J.; Stephenson, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the Materials Research Society symposium on Kinetics of Phase Transformations held in Boston, Massachusetts from November 26-29, 1990. The symposium provided a forum for research results in an exceptionally broad and interdisciplinary field. Presentations covered nearly every major class of transformations including solid-solid, liquid-solid, transport phenomena and kinetics modeling. Papers involving amorphous Si, a dominant topic at the symposium, are collected in the first section followed by sections on four major areas of transformation kinetics. The symposium opened with joint sessions on ion and electron beam induced transformations in conjunction with the Surface Chemistry and Beam-Solid Interactions: symposium. Subsequent sessions focused on the areas of ordering and nonlinear diffusion kinetics, solid state reactions and amorphization, kinetics and defects of amorphous silicon, and kinetics of melting and solidification. Seven internationally recognized invited speakers reviewed many of the important problems and recent results in these areas, including defects in amorphous Si, crystal to glass transformations, ordering kinetics, solid-state amorphization, computer modeling, and liquid/solid transformations

  13. Quasiclassical Theory of Spin Dynamics in Superfluid ^3He: Kinetic Equations in the Bulk and Spin Response of Surface Majorana States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaev, M. A.

    2018-06-01

    We develop a theory based on the formalism of quasiclassical Green's functions to study the spin dynamics in superfluid ^3He. First, we derive kinetic equations for the spin-dependent distribution function in the bulk superfluid reproducing the results obtained earlier without quasiclassical approximation. Then, we consider spin dynamics near the surface of fully gapped ^3He-B-phase taking into account spin relaxation due to the transitions in the spectrum of localized fermionic states. The lifetimes of longitudinal and transverse spin waves are calculated taking into account the Fermi-liquid corrections which lead to a crucial modification of fermionic spectrum and spin responses.

  14. Kinetic Analysis of Weakly ionized Plasmas in presence of collecting walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, J.; Donoso, J. M.

    2018-02-01

    Description of plasmas in contact with a wall able to collecting or emitting charged particles is a research topic of great importance. This situation arises in a great variety of phenomena such as the characterization of plasmas by means of electric probes, in the surface treatment of materials and in the service-life of coatings in electric thrusters. In particular, in this work we devote attention to the dynamics of an argon weakly ionized plasma in the presence of a collecting wall. It is proposed a kinetic model in a 1D1V planar phase-space geometry. The model accounts for the electric field coupled to the system by solving the associated Poisson’s equation. To solve numerically the resulting non-linear system of equations, the Propagator Integral Method is used in conjunction with a slabbing method. On each interrelating plasma slab the integral advancing scheme operates in velocity space, in such a way that the all the species dynamics dominating the system evolution are kinetically described.

  15. Kinetic analysis of temperature-induced transformation of zeolite 4A to low-carnegieite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosanovic, C.; Subotic, B.; Ristic, A.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetics of the isothermal amorphization of zeolite 4A and recrystallization of the formed amorphous phase to low-carnegieite at three different temperatures were investigated by powder X-ray diffraction method. Changes in the fractions f A of zeolite 4A, f a of amorphous aluminosilicate and f C of low-carnegieite during heating of zeolite 4A, show that amorphization and recrystallization take place simultaneously. Kinetic analyzes of single processes (amorphization, recrystallization) as well as solution of the population balance of the entire transformation process (simultaneous transformation of zeolite 4A into amorphous aluminosilicate and its recrystallization into low-carnegieite) have shown that: (A) the transformation of zeolite 4A takes place by a random, diffusion-limited agglomeration of the short-range-ordered aluminosilicate subunits formed by thermally induced breaking of Si-O-Si and Si-O-Al bonds between different building units of zeolite framework; and (B) the crystallization of low-carnegieite occurs by homogeneous nucleation of low-carnegieite inside the matrix of amorphous aluminosilicate and diffusion-controlled, one-dimensional growth of the nuclei, thus forming needle-shaped crystals of low-carnegieite

  16. Kinetic parameter estimation and fluctuation analysis of CO at SnO 2 single nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Tulzer, Gerhard; Baumgartner, Stefan; Brunet, Elise; Mutinati, Giorgio C; Steinhauer, Stephan; Kö ck, Anton; Barbano, Paolo E; Heitzinger, Clemens

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we present calculated numerical values for the kinetic parameters governing adsorption/desorption processes of carbon monoxide at tin dioxide single-nanowire gas sensors. The response of such sensors to pulses of 50 ppm carbon monoxide in nitrogen is investigated at different temperatures to extract the desired information. A rate-equation approach is used to model the reaction kinetics, which results in the problem of determining coefficients in a coupled system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The numerical values are computed by inverse-modeling techniques and are then used to simulate the sensor response. With our model, the dynamic response of the sensor due to the gas-surface interaction can be studied in order to find the optimal setup for detection, which is an important step towards selectivity of these devices. We additionally investigate the noise in the current through the nanowire and its changes due to the presence of carbon monoxide in the sensor environment. Here, we propose the use of a wavelet transform to decompose the signal and analyze the noise in the experimental data. This method indicates that some fluctuations are specific for the gas species investigated here. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Performance analysis and acceleration of explicit integration for large kinetic networks using batched GPU computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shyles, Daniel [University of Tennessee (UT); Dongarra, Jack J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Guidry, Mike W. [ORNL; Tomov, Stanimire Z. [ORNL; Billings, Jay Jay [ORNL; Brock, Benjamin A. [ORNL; Haidar Ahmad, Azzam A. [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    Abstract—We demonstrate the systematic implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms that solve efficiently N coupled ordinary differential equations (subject to initial conditions) on modern GPUs. We take representative test cases (Type Ia supernova explosions) and demonstrate two or more orders of magnitude increase in efficiency for solving such systems (of realistic thermonuclear networks coupled to fluid dynamics). This implies that important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical disciplines that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible. As examples of such applications we present the computational techniques developed for our ongoing deployment of these new methods on modern GPU accelerators. We show that similarly to many other scientific applications, ranging from national security to medical advances, the computation can be split into many independent computational tasks, each of relatively small-size. As the size of each individual task does not provide sufficient parallelism for the underlying hardware, especially for accelerators, these tasks must be computed concurrently as a single routine, that we call batched routine, in order to saturate the hardware with enough work.

  18. [Enzyme kinetic analysis of Oncomelania hupensis exposed to active ingredient of Buddleja lindleyana (AIBL)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang-Xing, Han; Jun, Chen

    2016-07-01

    To analyze the enzyme kinetics of active ingredient of Buddleja lindleyana (AIBL) against Oncomelania hupensis , the intermediate host of Schistosoma japonicum . O . hupensis snails were placed in 1 000 ml of 3.55 mg/L AIBL solution for 24, 48 h and 72 h, respectively, and the enzyme kinetics of alanine aminotransferase (GPT) was determined by Reitman-Frankel assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) by the chemical inhibition lactic acid substrate method, alkaline phosphatase (AKP) by the disodium phenyl phosphate colorimetric method, acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and malate dehydrogenas (MDH) by ELISA, and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) by the phenazine methyl sulfate reaction method (PMS) in the soft tissues of O. hupensis before and after AIBL treatment. Following exposure to 3.55 mg/L AIBL solution for 24 h, the GPT, LDH, and AKP activities significantly improved in the soft tissues of O. hupensis , while the SDH and MDH activities were significantly lowered in the head-foot and liver. However, AIBL treatment did not cause significant effect on AChE activity in O. hupensis . AIBL causes significant damages to O. hupensis liver and can efficiently act on anaerobic and aerobic respiration loci, which will hinder energy metabolism, and cause inadequate energy supply in cells used for normal secretion, eventually leading to O. hupensis death.

  19. Kinetic analysis of [11C]vorozole binding in the human brain with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jean; Kim, Sung Won; Pareto, Deborah; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S; Biegon, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Using positron emission tomography, we investigated the kinetics of [11C]vorozole ([11C]VOR), a radiotracer for the enzyme aromatase that catalyzes the last step in estrogen biosynthesis. Six subjects were scanned under baseline conditions followed by retest 2 weeks later. The retest was followed by a blocking study with 2.5 mg of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. The binding potential (BP(A)ND) was estimated from a Lassen plot using the total tissue distribution volume (VT) for baseline and blocked. for the thalamus was found to be 15 times higher than that for the cerebellum. From the letrozole studies, we found that [11C]VOR exhibits a slow binding compartment (small k4) that has a nonspecific and a blockable component. Because of the sensitivity of VT to variations in k4, a common value was used for the four highest binding regions. We also considered the tissue uptake to plasma ratio for 60 to 90 minutes as an outcome measure. Using the ratio method, the difference between the highest and lowest was 2.4 compared to 3.5 for the VT. The ratio method underestimates the high regions but is less variable and may be more suitable for patient studies. Because of its kinetics and distribution, this tracer is not a candidate for a bolus infusion or reference tissue methods.

  20. Effects of hypoxia on 13NH4+ fluxes in rice roots: kinetics and compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronzucker, H.J.; Kirk, G.J.D.; Siddiqi, M.Y.; Glass, A.D.M.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques of compartmental (efflux) and kinetic influx analyses with the radiotracer 13NH4+ were used to examine the adaptation to hypoxia (15, 35, and 50% O2 saturation) of root N uptake and metabolism in 3-week-old hydroponically grown rice (Oryza sativa L., cv IR72) seedlings. A time-dependence study of NH4+ influx into rice roots after onset of hypoxia (15% O2) revealed an initial increase in the first 1 to 2.5 h after treatment imposition, followed by a decline to less than 50% of influx in control plants by 4 d. Efflux analyses conducted 0, 1, 3, and 5 d after the treatment confirmed this adaptation pattern of NH4+ uptake. Half-lives for NH4+ exchange with subcellular compartments, cytoplasmic NH4+ concentrations, and efflux (as percentage of influx) were unaffected by hypoxia. However, significant differences were observed in the relative amounts of N allocated to NH4+ assimilation and the vacuole versus translocation to the shoot. Kinetic experiments conducted at 100, 50, 35, and 15% O2 saturation showed no significant change in the K(m) value for NH4+ uptake with varying O2 supply. However, V(max) was 42% higher than controls at 50% O2 saturation, unchanged at 35%, and 10% lower than controls at 15% O2. The significance of these flux adaptations is discussed

  1. Kinetic parameter estimation and fluctuation analysis of CO at SnO 2 single nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Tulzer, Gerhard

    2013-07-12

    In this work, we present calculated numerical values for the kinetic parameters governing adsorption/desorption processes of carbon monoxide at tin dioxide single-nanowire gas sensors. The response of such sensors to pulses of 50 ppm carbon monoxide in nitrogen is investigated at different temperatures to extract the desired information. A rate-equation approach is used to model the reaction kinetics, which results in the problem of determining coefficients in a coupled system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The numerical values are computed by inverse-modeling techniques and are then used to simulate the sensor response. With our model, the dynamic response of the sensor due to the gas-surface interaction can be studied in order to find the optimal setup for detection, which is an important step towards selectivity of these devices. We additionally investigate the noise in the current through the nanowire and its changes due to the presence of carbon monoxide in the sensor environment. Here, we propose the use of a wavelet transform to decompose the signal and analyze the noise in the experimental data. This method indicates that some fluctuations are specific for the gas species investigated here. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  2. The kinetic analysis of the pyrolysis of agricultural residue under non-isothermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Chao; Dong, Yuping; Zhang, Tonghui

    2013-01-01

    The study concerns the pyrolysis kinetics of agricultural wastes, corn straw (CS) and rice husk (RH). Thermogravimetric experiments were carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer under inert conditions, and operated at different heating rates ranging from 5 to 40K/min. As the increment of heating rates, the variations of characteristic parameters from the TG-DTG curves were determined. Iso-conversional Starink approach and Avrami theory were used to evaluate the kinetic parameters, including apparent activation energy and reaction order. For the range of conversion fraction investigated (20-80%), the apparent activation energy of CS initially increased from 98.715 to 148.062 kJ/mol and then decreased to 144.387 kJ/mol afterwards, whilst the apparent activation energy of RH increased gradually from 50.492 to 88.994 kJ/mol. With varied temperatures (517-697 K), the corresponding value of reaction order was increased from 0.288 and 0.359 to 0.441 and 0.692, along with a decrease to 0.306 and 0.445, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinematic, kinetic and EMG analysis of four front crawl flip turn techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Suzana Matheus; Ruschel, Caroline; Hubert, Marcel; Machado, Leandro; Roesler, Helio; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse the kinematic, kinetic and electromyographic characteristics of four front crawl flip turn technique variants. The variants distinguished from each other by differences in body position (i.e., dorsal, lateral, ventral) during rolling, wall support, pushing and gliding phases. Seventeen highly trained swimmers (17.9 ± 3.2 years old) participated in interventional sessions and performed three trials of each variant, being monitored with a 3-D video system, a force platform and an electromyography (EMG) system. Studied variables: rolling time and distance, wall support time, push-off time, peak force and horizontal impulse at wall support and push-off, centre of mass horizontal velocity at the end of the push-off, gliding time, centre of mass depth, distance, average and final velocity during gliding, total turn time and electrical activity of Gastrocnemius Medialis, Tibialis Anterior, Biceps Femoris and Vastus Lateralis muscles. Depending on the variant, total turn time ranged from 2.37 ± 0.32 to 2.43 ± 0.33 s, push-off force from 1.86 ± 0.33 to 1.92 ± 0.26 BW and centre of mass velocity during gliding from 1.78 ± 0.21 to 1.94 ± 0.22 m · s(-1). The variants were not distinguishable in terms of kinematical, kinetic and EMG parameters during the rolling, wall support, pushing and gliding phases.

  4. Determination of kinetic parameters of Phlomis bovei de Noé using thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiaoui, Meriem; Hadoun, Hocine; Toumert, Idir; Hassani, Aicha

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports the pyrolysis study of Phlomis bovei biomass by thermogravimetric experiments in order to determine the thermal degradation behavior and kinetic parameters. The weight losses were found to occur in three stages. In the DTG thermograms, an increase of the heating rate tended to delay thermal degradation processes towards higher temperatures. The average values of activation energy and pre-exponential factor calculated from Ozawa-Flynn-Wall, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose and Kissinger methods are 134.83, 134.06, 223.31kJ/mol and 4.1610(13), 1.1810(10), 2.8110(11)/s, respectively. The three-pseudo-component method shows that the activation energy increases with increasing the heating rate for hemicellulose and cellulose while the activation energy of the lignin decreased with an increase of the heating rate. Predicted results and experimental data exhibit similar tendencies and the three pseudo-components model with n different from unity 1 is recommended as the most suitable for prediction of kinetic behavior of Phlomis bovei de Noé. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of the reaction between biological catecholamines and chlorinated methylperoxy radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimić, Dušan S.; Milenković, Dejan A.; Marković, Jasmina M. Dimitrić; Marković, Zoran S.

    2018-05-01

    The antiradical potency of catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, L-DOPA), metabolites of dopamine (homovanillic acid, 3-methoxytyramine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) and catechol towards substituted methylperoxy radicals is investigated. The thermodynamic parameters, together with the kinetic approach, are used to determine the most probable mechanism of action. The natural bond orbital and quantum theory of atoms in molecules are utilised to explain the highest reactivity of trichloromethylperoxy radical. The preferred mechanism is dependent both on the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters . The number of chlorine atoms on radical, the presence of intra-molecular hydrogen bond and number of hydroxy groups attached to the aromatic ring significantly influence the mechanism. The results suggest that sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) is the most probable for reaction with methylperoxy and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) for reaction with trichloromethylperoxy radicals, with a gradual transition between SPLET and HAT for other two radicals. Due to the significant deprotonation of molecules containing the carboxyl group, the respective anions are also investigated. The HAT and SPLET mechanisms are highly competitive in reaction with MP radical, while the dominant mechanism towards chlorinated radicals is HAT. The reactions in methanol and benzene are also discussed.

  7. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-07

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  8. The comparative kinetic analysis of Acetocell and Lignoboost® lignin pyrolysis: the estimation of the distributed reactivity models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Bojan

    2011-10-01

    The non-isothermal pyrolysis kinetics of Acetocell (the organosolv) and Lignoboost® (kraft) lignins, in an inert atmosphere, have been studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Using isoconversional analysis, it was concluded that the apparent activation energy for all lignins strongly depends on conversion, showing that the pyrolysis of lignins is not a single chemical process. It was identified that the pyrolysis process of Acetocell and Lignoboost® lignin takes place over three reaction steps, which was confirmed by appearance of the corresponding isokinetic relationships (IKR). It was found that major pyrolysis stage of both lignins is characterized by stilbene pyrolysis reactions, which were subsequently followed by decomposition reactions of products derived from the stilbene pyrolytic process. It was concluded that non-isothermal pyrolysis of Acetocell and Lignoboost® lignins can be best described by n-th (n>1) reaction order kinetics, using the Weibull mixture model (as distributed reactivity model) with alternating shape parameters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Machine learning-based kinetic modeling: a robust and reproducible solution for quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leyun; Cheng, Caixia; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2017-05-01

    A variety of compartment models are used for the quantitative analysis of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data. Traditionally, these models use an iterative fitting (IF) method to find the least squares between the measured and calculated values over time, which may encounter some problems such as the overfitting of model parameters and a lack of reproducibility, especially when handling noisy data or error data. In this paper, a machine learning (ML) based kinetic modeling method is introduced, which can fully utilize a historical reference database to build a moderate kinetic model directly dealing with noisy data but not trying to smooth the noise in the image. Also, due to the database, the presented method is capable of automatically adjusting the models using a multi-thread grid parameter searching technique. Furthermore, a candidate competition concept is proposed to combine the advantages of the ML and IF modeling methods, which could find a balance between fitting to historical data and to the unseen target curve. The machine learning based method provides a robust and reproducible solution that is user-independent for VOI-based and pixel-wise quantitative analysis of dynamic PET data.

  10. Gas-Phase Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Labeling of Select Peptide Ion Conformer Types: a Per-Residue Kinetics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The per-residue, gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics for individual amino acid residues on selected ion conformer types of the model peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK have been examined using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and HDX-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. The [M + 4H](4+) ions exhibit two major conformer types with collision cross sections of 418 Å(2) and 446 Å(2); the [M + 3H](3+) ions also yield two different conformer types having collision cross sections of 340 Å(2) and 367 Å(2). Kinetics plots of HDX for individual amino acid residues reveal fast- and slow-exchanging hydrogens. The contributions of each amino acid residue to the overall conformer type rate constant have been estimated. For this peptide, N- and C-terminal K residues exhibit the greatest contributions for all ion conformer types. Interior D and I residues show decreased contributions. Several charge state trends are observed. On average, the D residues of the [M + 3H](3+) ions show faster HDX rate contributions compared with [M + 4H](4+) ions. In contrast the interior I8 and I9 residues show increased accessibility to exchange for the more elongated [M + 4H](4+) ion conformer type. The contribution of each residue to the overall uptake rate showed a good correlation with a residue hydrogen accessibility score model calculated using a distance from charge site and initial incorporation site for nominal structures obtained from molecular dynamic simulations (MDS).

  11. Analysis of United States' Broadband Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uzarski, Joel S

    2007-01-01

    .... With every month that passes, the United States fails to close the gap in the digital divide both inside its borders as well as among the other countries that lead the world in broadband penetration...

  12. Enzyme kinetics, inhibitors, mutagenesis and electron paramagnetic resonance analysis of dual-affinity nitrate reductase in unicellular N(2)-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tung-Hei; Chen, Yung-Han; Huang, Jine-Yung; Liu, Kang-Cheng; Ke, Shyue-Chu; Chu, Hsiu-An

    2011-11-01

    The assimilatory nitrate reductase (NarB) of N(2)-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 is a monomeric enzyme with dual affinity for substrate nitrate. We purified the recombinant NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 and further investigated it by enzyme kinetics analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, inhibitor kinetics analysis, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The NarB showed 2 kinetic regimes at pH 10.5 or 8 and electron-donor conditions methyl viologen or ferredoxin (Fd). Fd-dependent NR assay revealed NarB with very high affinity for nitrate (K(m)1, ∼1μM; K(m)2, ∼270μM). Metal analysis and EPR results showed that NarB contains a Mo cofactor and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. In addition, the R352A mutation on the proposed nitrate-binding site of NarB greatly altered both high- and low-affinity kinetic components. Furthermore, the effect of azide on the NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 was more complex than that on the NarB of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 with its single kinetic regime. With 1mM azide, the kinetics of the wild-type NarB was transformed from 2 kinetic regimes to hyperbolic kinetics, and its activity was enhanced significantly under medium nitrate concentrations. Moreover, EPR results also suggested a structural difference between the two NarBs. Taken together, our results show that the NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 contains only a single Mo-catalytic center, and we rule out that the enzyme has 2 independent, distinct catalytic sites. In addition, the NarB of Cyanothece sp. PCC 8801 may have a regulatory nitrate-binding site. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Microstructural Evolution of the Compound Layer; a Comparison of the States of Knowledge of Nitriding and Nitrocarburising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2000-01-01

    and atmospheric corrosion performance. The diffusion zone brings about an improvement of the endurance limit as compared to an untreated component. Hence, nitrocarburising is perhaps the most versatile surface treatment for ferritic steel and has a potential for wide application. From the literature...... conditions for tailoring a certain combination of properties. The present paper describes aspects of the thermodynamics, kinetics and microstructure evolution of the compound layer on pure iron during nitrocarburising, by comparing the current status of qualitative understanding with that for nitriding...

  14. Synthesis Of Magnesium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxides By Mechanochemical Method And Its Solid State Reaction Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Y.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A mechanochemical method is developed in preparing magnesium-aluminum-layered double hydroxides (MgAl-LDHs. This approach includes activation process and diffusion process. In order to verify the LDHs structure and study the reaction kinetics, X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, inductively coupled plasma(ICP and physical adsorption instrument were characterized. The results show that activation time can change the surface of particles and affect the reaction grade. During the diffusion process, reaction time is the most important factor. The reaction energy (ΔQ was calculated that is 6kJ/mol.

  15. Development and analysis of prognostic equations for mesoscale kinetic energy and mesoscale (subgrid scale) fluxes for large-scale atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avissar, Roni; Chen, Fei

    1993-01-01

    Generated by landscape discontinuities (e.g., sea breezes) mesoscale circulation processes are not represented in large-scale atmospheric models (e.g., general circulation models), which have an inappropiate grid-scale resolution. With the assumption that atmospheric variables can be separated into large scale, mesoscale, and turbulent scale, a set of prognostic equations applicable in large-scale atmospheric models for momentum, temperature, moisture, and any other gaseous or aerosol material, which includes both mesoscale and turbulent fluxes is developed. Prognostic equations are also developed for these mesoscale fluxes, which indicate a closure problem and, therefore, require a parameterization. For this purpose, the mean mesoscale kinetic energy (MKE) per unit of mass is used, defined as E-tilde = 0.5 (the mean value of u'(sub i exp 2), where u'(sub i) represents the three Cartesian components of a mesoscale circulation (the angle bracket symbol is the grid-scale, horizontal averaging operator in the large-scale model, and a tilde indicates a corresponding large-scale mean value). A prognostic equation is developed for E-tilde, and an analysis of the different terms of this equation indicates that the mesoscale vertical heat flux, the mesoscale pressure correlation, and the interaction between turbulence and mesoscale perturbations are the major terms that affect the time tendency of E-tilde. A-state-of-the-art mesoscale atmospheric model is used to investigate the relationship between MKE, landscape discontinuities (as characterized by the spatial distribution of heat fluxes at the earth's surface), and mesoscale sensible and latent heat fluxes in the atmosphere. MKE is compared with turbulence kinetic energy to illustrate the importance of mesoscale processes as compared to turbulent processes. This analysis emphasizes the potential use of MKE to bridge between landscape discontinuities and mesoscale fluxes and, therefore, to parameterize mesoscale fluxes

  16. Kinetic analysis of DAF-FM activation by NO: toward calibration of a NO-sensitive fluorescent dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namin, Shabnam M; Nofallah, Sara; Joshi, Mahesh S; Kavallieratos, Konstantinos; Tsoukias, Nikolaos M

    2013-01-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) research in biomedicine has been hampered by the absence of a method that will allow quantitative measurement of NO in biological tissues with high sensitivity and selectivity, and with adequate spatial and temporal resolution. 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM) is a NO sensitive fluorescence probe that has been used widely for qualitative assessment of cellular NO production. However, calibration of the fluorescent signal and quantification of NO concentration in cells and tissues using fluorescent probes, have provided significant challenge. In this study we utilize a combination of mathematical modeling and experimentation to elucidate the kinetics of NO/DAF-FM reaction in solution. Modeling and experiments suggest that the slope of fluorescent intensity (FI) can be related to NO concentration according to the equation: ddtFI=2αk(1)NO(2)O(2)DAF-FMkNO+DAF-FM where α is a proportionality coefficient that relates FI to unit concentration of activated DAF-FM, k(1) is the NO oxidation rate constant, and k was estimated to be 4.3±0.6. The FI slope exhibits saturation kinetics with DAF-FM concentration. Interestingly, the effective half-maximum constant (EC(50)) increases proportionally to NO concentration. This result is not in agreement with the proposition that N(2)O(3) is the NO oxidation byproduct that activates DAF-FM. Kinetic analysis suggests that the reactive intermediate should exhibit NO-dependent consumption and thus NO(2)() is a more likely candidate. The derived rate law can be used for the calibration of DAF-FM fluorescence and the quantification of NO concentration in biological tissues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fully integrated analysis of reactor kinetics, thermalhydraulics and the reactor control system in the MAPLE-X10 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, S.Y.; Carlson, P.A.; Baxter, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype research reactor, designated MAPLE-X10 (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental - X 10MW), is currently being built at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. The CATHENA (Canadian Algorithm for Thermalhydraulic Network Analysis) two-fluid code was used in the safety analysis of the reactor to determine the adequacy of core cooling during postulated reactivity and loss-of-forced-flow transients. The system responses to a postulated transient are predicted including the feedback between reactor kinetics, thermalhydrauilcs and the reactor control systems. This paper describes the MAPLE-X10 reactor and the modelling methodology used. Sample simulations of postulated loss-of-heat-sink and loss-of-regulation transients are presented. (author)

  18. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Ramaswamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  19. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-28

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF) of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  20. Kinetic and Reaction Pathway Analysis in the Application of Botulinum Toxin A for Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J. Lebeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A relatively new approach in the treatment of specific wounds in animal models and in patients with type A botulinum toxin is the focus of this paper. The indications or conditions include traumatic wounds (experimental and clinical, surgical (incision wounds, and wounds such as fissures and ulcers that are signs/symptoms of disease or other processes. An objective was to conduct systematic literature searches and take note of the reactions involved in the healing process and identify corresponding pharmacokinetic data. From several case reports, we developed a qualitative model of how botulinum toxin disrupts the vicious cycle of muscle spasm, pain, inflammation, decreased blood flow, and ischemia. We transformed this model into a minimal kinetic scheme for healing chronic wounds. The model helped us to estimate the rate of decline of this toxin's therapeutic effect by calculating the rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms after a wound-healing treatment with this neurotoxin.

  1. A pyranose dehydrogenase-based biosensor for kinetic analysis of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by cellulases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Badino, Silke Flindt; Tokin, Radina Naytchova

    2014-01-01

    A novel electrochemical enzyme biosensor was developed for real-time detection of cellulase activity when acting on their natural insoluble substrate, cellulose. The enzyme biosensor was constructed with pyranose dehydrongease (PDH) from Agaricus meleagris that was immobilized on the surface......-biosensor was shown to be anomer unspecific and it can therefore be used in kinetic studies over broad time-scales of both retaining- and inverting cellulases (in addition to enzyme cocktails). The biosensor was used for real-time measurements of the activity of the inverting cellobiohydrolase Cel6A from Hypocrea...... equation for processive cellulases, and it was found that the turnover for HjCel6A at saturating substrate concentration (i.e. maximal apparent specific activity) was similar (0.39–0.40 s−1) for the two substrates. Conversely, the substrate load at half-saturation was much lower for BMCC compared to Avicel...

  2. Source-jerk analysis using a semi-explicit inverse kinetic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, G.D.; Pederson, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the effective reproduction factor, k, in subcritical systems. The method uses the transient response of a subcritical system to the sudden removal of an extraneous neutron source (i.e., a source jerk). The response is analyzed using an inverse kinetic technique that least-squares fits the exact analytical solution corresponding to a source-jerk transient as derived from the point-reactor model. It has been found that the technique can provide an accurate means of measuring k in systems that are close to critical (i.e., 0.95 < k < 1.0). As a system becomes more subcritical (i.e., k << 1.0) spatial effects can introduce significant biases depending on the source and detector positions. However, methods are available that can correct for these biases and, hence, can allow measuring subcriticality in systems with k as low as 0.5. 12 refs., 3 figs

  3. Source-jerk analysis using a semi-explicit inverse kinetic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, G.D.; Pederson, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is proposed for measuring the effective reproduction factor, k, in subcritical systems. The method uses the transient responses of a subcritical system to the sudden removal of an extraneous neutron source (i.e., a source jerk). The response is analyzed using an inverse kinetic technique that least-squares fits the exact analytical solution corresponding to a source-jerk transient as derived from the point-reactor model. It has been found that the technique can provide an accurate means of measuring k in systems that are close to critical (i.e., 0.95 < k < 1.0). As a system becomes more subcritical (i.e., k << 1.0) spatial effects can introduce significant biases depending on the source and detector positions. However, methods are available that can correct for these biases and, hence, can allow measuring subcriticality in systems with k as low as 0.5

  4. Kinetics of cadmium hydroxide precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.W.; Marani, D.; Luo, B.; Swenson, P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents some preliminary results on the kinetics of Cd(OH)/sub 2/ precipitation, both in the absence and the presence of citric acid as an inhibiting agent. Batch and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) precipitation studies are performed by mixing equal volumes of NaOH and Cd(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ solutions, in order to avoid localized supersaturation conditions. The rate of metal removal from the soluble phase is calculated from the mass balance for the CSTR precipitation tests. In addition, precipitation kinetics are studied in terms of nucleation and crystal growth rates, by means of a particle counter that allows a population balance analysis for the precipitation reactor at steady state conditions

  5. Kinetics of diuron under aerobic condition and residue analysis in sugarcane under subtropical field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Shishir; Pant, Ravi

    2017-10-10

    The phenylureas group includes persistent herbicides which are major pollutants to soil and water. Dissipation kinetics of diuron in different soils under sugarcane field conditions was investigated. Diuron was extracted with acetone and florisil solid phase extraction clean-up and characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography-UV. Diuron persisted for more than 100 days and dissipation followed monophasic first-order kinetics. Persistence was more in sandy loam compared to silty clay loam soil. Half-life of diuron in silty clay loam soil was 22.57 and 32.37 days and in sandy loam was 28.35 and 43.93 days at 2 and 4 kg ha-1applications, respectively. Average recovery in soil, bagasse, leaf-straw and juice ranged from 75.95% to 84.20%, 80.15% to 89.35%, 77.46% to 86.19% and 81.88% to 92.68%, respectively. The quantitation limits for soil, bagasse, leaf-straw and juice were 0.01, 0.03, 0.04 μg g -1 and 0.008 μg mL -1 , respectively. Application of diuron inhibited growth of soil microbes initially but they recovered later. At harvest, diuron residues were below maximum residue limits in all samples. The study revealed that under subtropical conditions, diuron is safe for use in weed management and would not pose any residual/environmental problem and that sugarcane crop could be used safe for human/animal consumption.

  6. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  7. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Kinetic analysis of in vitro production of wild-type Spodoptera frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Farias de Almeida

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the kinetic behavior of Sf9 and Sf21 cells used in the production of a baculovirus biopesticide to control the pest of corn Spodoptera frugiperda was analyzed. Kinetic variables such as maximum specific growth rate, cell productivity, mean rate of infection, as well as the mean rate of occlusion body production were determined during the infection of these cell-lines with the extracellular virus of the S. frugiperda nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV. The Sf9 cell-line resulted in better viral production results (5.0 x 10(8 OB/mL than the Sf21 cell-line (2.5 x 10(8 OB/mL.Neste trabalho, analisou-se o comportamento cinético das células Sf9 e Sf21 utilizadas na produção de biopesticida para o controle de Spodoptera frugiperda. Variáveis cinéticas, como velocidade específica máxima de crescimento, produtividade em células, velocidade média de infecção e a velocidade média de produção de OB foram determinadas durante a infecção destas linhagens com o vírus extracelular do nucleopoliedrovirus de S. frugiperda. A linhagem Sf9 resultou em melhores resultados de produção do baculovírus (5 x 10(8 OB/mL, quando comparada à linhagem Sf21 (2,5 x 10(8 OB/mL e outras linhagens da literatura.

  9. Enrichment of tumor cells for cell kinetic analysis in human tumor biopsies using cytokeratin gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustermans, K.; Hofland, I.; Ramaekers, M.; Ivanyi, D.; Balm, A.J.M.; Geboes, K.; Lerut, T.; Schueren, E. van der; Begg, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using cytokeratin antibodies to distinguish normal and malignant cells in human tumors using flow cytometry. The goal was ultimately to increase the accuracy of cell kinetic measurements on human tumor biopsies. Material and methods: A panel of four antibodies was screened on a series of 48 tumors from two centres; 22 head and neck tumors (Amsterdam) and 26 esophagus carcinomas (Leuven). First, screening was carried out by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections to test intensity of staining and the fraction of cytokeratin-positive tumor cells. The antibody showing the most positive staining was then used for flow cytometry on the same tumor. Results: The two broadest spectrum antibodies (AE1/AE3, E3/C4) showed overall the best results with immunohistochemical staining, being positive in over 95% of tumors. Good cell suspensions for DNA flow cytometry could be made from frozen material by a mechanical method, whereas enzymatic methods with trypsin or collagenase were judged failures in almost all cases. >From fresh material, both collagenase and trypsin produced good suspensions for flow cytometry, although the fraction of tumor cells, judged by proportion aneuploid cells, was markedly higher for trypsin. Using the best cytokeratin antibody for each tumor, two parameter flow cytometry was done (cytokeratin versus DNA content). Enrichment of tumor cells was then tested by measuring the fraction of aneuploid cells (the presumed malignant population) of cytokeratin-positive cells versus all cells. An enrichment factor ranging between 0 (no enrichment) and 1 (perfect enrichment, tumor cells only) was then calculated. The average enrichment was 0.60 for head and neck tumors and 0.59 for esophagus tumors. Conclusions: We conclude that this method can substantially enrich the proportion of tumor cells in biopsies from carcinomas. Application of this method could significantly enhance accuracy of tumor cell kinetic measurements

  10. Dendrogeomorphology in landslide analysis: State of art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margottini, C [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia Ambiente e Salute; Fantucci, R

    1994-01-01

    This article summarizes the uses of dendrogeomorphological techniques in landslide analysis. It shows how to study different landslides events through the analysis of living trees. Living trees record any slope inclination variation as if they were natural inclinometers moreover they can be used to date landslide and their stabilization process with time.

  11. Analysis of residuals from enzyme kinetic and protein folding experiments in the presence of correlated experimental noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmic, Petr; Lorenz, Thorsten; Reinstein, Jochen

    2009-12-01

    Experimental data from continuous enzyme assays or protein folding experiments often contain hundreds, or even thousands, of densely spaced data points. When the sampling interval is extremely short, the experimental data points might not be statistically independent. The resulting neighborhood correlation invalidates important theoretical assumptions of nonlinear regression analysis. As a consequence, certain goodness-of-fit criteria, such as the runs-of-signs test and the autocorrelation function, might indicate a systematic lack of fit even if the experiment does agree very well with the underlying theoretical model. A solution to this problem is to analyze only a subset of the residuals of fit, such that any excessive neighborhood correlation is eliminated. Substrate kinetics of the HIV protease and the unfolding kinetics of UMP/CMP kinase, a globular protein from Dictyostelium discoideum, serve as two illustrative examples. A suitable data-reduction algorithm has been incorporated into software DYNAFIT [P. Kuzmic, Anal. Biochem. 237 (1996) 260-273], freely available to all academic researchers from http://www.biokin.com.

  12. Thermodynamic analysis and kinetic modelling of dioxin formation and emissions from power boilers firing salt-laden hog fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duo, Wenli; Leclerc, Denys

    2007-04-01

    Both organic chlorine (e.g. PVC) and inorganic chlorides (e.g. NaCl) can be significant chlorine sources for dioxin and furan (PCDD/F) formation in combustion processes. This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of high temperature salt chemistry. Its influence on PCDD/F formation in power boilers burning salt-laden wood waste is examined through the relationships between Cl2, HCl, NaCl(g) and NaCl(c). These analyses show that while HCl is a product of combustion of PVC-laden municipal solid waste, NaCl can be converted to HCl in hog fuel boilers by reactions with SO2 or alumino-silicate materials. Cl2 is a strong chlorinating agent for PCDD/F formation. HCl can be oxidized to Cl2 by O2, and Cl2 can be reduced back to HCl by SO2. The presence of sulphur at low concentrations thus enhances PCDD/F formation by increasing HCl concentrations. At high concentrations, sulphur inhibits de novo formation of PCDD/Fs through Cl2 reduction by excess SO2. The effect of NH3, CO and NOx on PCDD/F formation is also discussed. A semi-empirical kinetic model is proposed. This model considers both precursor and de novo formation mechanisms. A simplified version is used as a stack emission model. The kinetic model indicates that stack dioxin emissions will increase linearly with decreasing electrostatic precipitator (ESP) efficiency and exponentially with increasing ESP temperature.

  13. Computational analysis of interfacial attachment kinetics and transport phenomena during liquid phase epitaxy of mercury cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasin, Igal; Brandon, Simon [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Ben Dov, Anne; Grimberg, Ilana; Klin, Olga; Weiss, Eliezer [SCD-Semi-Conductor Devices, P.O. Box 2250/99, Haifa 31021 (Israel)

    2010-07-01

    Deposition of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) thin films, on lattice matched cadmium zinc telluride substrates, is often achieved via Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE). The yield and quality of these films, required for the production of infrared detector devices, is to a large extent limited by lack of knowledge regarding details of physical phenomena underlying the deposition process. Improving the understanding of these phenomena and their impact on the quality of the resultant films is therefore an important goal which can be achieved through relevant computational and/or experimental studies. We present a combined computational and experimental effort aimed at elucidating physical phenomena underlying the LPE of MCT via a slider growth process. The focus of the presentation will be results generated by a time-dependent three-dimensional model of mass transport, fluid flow, and interfacial attachment kinetics, which we have developed and applied in the analysis of this LPE process. These results, combined with experimental analyses, lead to an improved understanding of the role of different transport and kinetic phenomena underlying this growth process.

  14. Physical kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifschitz, E.M.; Pitajewski, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    The textbook covers the subject under the following headings: kinetic gas theory, diffusion approximation, collisionless plasma, collisions within the plasma, plasma in the magnetic field, theory of instabilities, dielectrics, quantum fluids, metals, diagram technique for nonequilibrium systems, superconductors, and kinetics of phase transformations

  15. Analysis of Some Clay Samples from Yauri (Kebbi State), Goronyo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of some clay samples presumed to be kaolin obtained from different deposits in Yauri (kebbi state), Goronyo, Munwadata, Atokonyo (Sokoto state), Nigeria was carried out. The samples were subjected to quantitative analysis to determine major and trace constituents using gravimetric, colorimetric, titrimetric and ...

  16. State Analysis: A Control Architecture View of Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Robert D.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the state analysis process is shown. The topics include: 1) Issues with growing complexity; 2) Limits of common practice; 3) Exploiting a control point of view; 4) A glimpse at the State Analysis process; 5) Synergy with model-based systems engineering; and 6) Bridging the systems to software gap.

  17. Heparin kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swart, C.A.M. de.

    1983-01-01

    The author has studied the kinetics of heparin and heparin fractions after intravenous administration in humans and in this thesis the results of this study are reported. Basic knowledge about the physico-chemical properties of heparin and its interactions with proteins resulting in anticoagulant and lipolytic effects are discussed in a review (chapter II), which also comprises some clinical aspects of heparin therapy. In chapter III the kinetics of the anticoagulant effect are described after intravenous administration of five commercial heparin preparations. A mathematical model is presented that fits best to these kinetics. The kinetics of the anticoagulant and lipolytic effects after intravenous injection of various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions and their relationship with the disappearance of the radiolabel are described in chapter IV. Chapter V gives a description of the kinetics of two radiolabels after injection of in vitro formed complexes consisting of purified, 125 I-radiolabelled antithrombin III and various 35 S-radiolabelled heparin fractions. (Auth.)

  18. Kinetics Parameters of VVER-1000 Core with 3 MOX Lead Test Assemblies To Be Used for Accident Analysis Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovitchev, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The present work is a part of Joint U.S./Russian Project with Weapons-Grade Plutonium Disposition in VVER Reactor and presents the neutronics calculations of kinetics parameters of VVER-1000 core with 3 introduced MOX LTAs. MOX LTA design has been studied in [1] for two options of MOX LTA: 100% plutonium and of ''island'' type. As a result, zoning i.e. fissile plutonium enrichments in different plutonium zones, has been defined. VVER-1000 core with 3 introduced MOX LTAs of chosen design has been calculated in [2]. In present work, the neutronics data for transient analysis codes (RELAP [3]) has been obtained using the codes chain of RRC ''Kurchatov Institute'' [5] that is to be used for exploitation neutronics calculations of VVER. Nowadays the 3D assembly-by-assembly code BIPR-7A and 2D pin-by-pin code PERMAK-A, both with the neutronics constants prepared by the cell code TVS-M, are the base elements of this chain. It should be reminded that in [6] TVS-M was used only for the constants calculations of MOX FAs. In current calculations the code TVS-M has been used both for UOX and MOX fuel constants. Besides, the volume of presented information has been increased and additional explications have been included. The results for the reference uranium core [4] are presented in Chapter 2. The results for the core with 3 MOX LTAs are presented in Chapter 3. The conservatism that is connected with neutronics parameters and that must be taken into account during transient analysis calculations, is discussed in Chapter 4. The conservative parameters values are considered to be used in 1-point core kinetics models of accident analysis codes

  19. ASAP: An Extensible Platform for State Space Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Michael; Evangelista, Sami; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    2009-01-01

    The ASCoVeCo State space Analysis Platform (ASAP) is a tool for performing explicit state space analysis of coloured Petri nets (CPNs) and other formalisms. ASAP supports a wide range of state space reduction techniques and is intended to be easy to extend and to use, making it a suitable tool fo...... for students, researchers, and industrial users that would like to analyze protocols and/or experiment with different algorithms. This paper presents ASAP from these two perspectives....

  20. Pathway analysis: State of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel eGarcía-Campos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathway analysis is a set of widely used tools for research in life sciences intended to give meaning to high-throughput biological data. The methodology of these tools settles in the gathering and usage of knowledge that comprise biomolecular functioning, coupled with statistical testing and other algorithms. Despite their wide employment, pathway analysis foundations and overall background may not be fully understood, leading to misinterpretation of analysis results. This review attempts to comprise the fundamental knowledge to take into consideration when using pathway analysis as a hypothesis generation tool. We discuss the key elements that are part of these methodologies, their capabilities and current deficiencies. We also present an overview of current and all-time popular methods, highlighting different classes across them. In doing so, we show the exploding diversity of methods that pathway analysis encompasses, point out commonly overlooked caveats, and direct attention to a potential new class of methods that attempt to zoom the analysis scope to the sample scale.