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Sample records for starch whey permeate

  1. Evaluation of whey, milk, and delactosed permeates as salt substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S T; Metzger, L; Drake, M A

    2016-11-01

    Whey and milk permeates are by-products of high-protein dairy powder manufacture. Previous work has shown that these permeates contribute to salty taste without contributing significantly to sodium content. The objective of this study was to explore the sensory characteristics and compositional analysis of permeates from different milk and whey streams and a low-sodium product application made from them. Skim milk, Cheddar, cottage, and Mozzarella cheese whey permeates were manufactured in triplicate, and delactosed whey permeate was obtained in triplicate. Composition (protein, fat, solids, minerals) was conducted on permeates. Organic acid composition was determined using HPLC. Volatile compounds were extracted from permeates by solid phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A trained sensory panel documented sensory attributes of permeates and cream of broccoli soups with and without salt or permeates followed by consumer acceptance testing (n=105) on the soups. Cottage cheese whey permeate contained a higher lactic acid content than other permeates, which has been shown to contribute to a higher salty taste. Cottage cheese whey permeate also contained potato or brothy and caramel flavors and sour and salty tastes, whereas delactosed whey permeate had high intensities of cardboard and beefy or brothy flavors and salty taste. Milk, Cheddar, and Mozzarella cheese whey permeates were characterized by sweet taste and cooked milky flavor. Permeates with higher cardboard flavor had higher levels of aldehydes. All permeates contributed to salty taste and to salty taste perception in soups; although the control soup with added salt was perceived as saltier and was preferred by consumers over permeate soups. Soup with permeate from cottage cheese was the least liked of all soups, likely due to its sour taste. All other permeate soups scored at parity for liking. These results demonstrate the potential for milk, whey, and delactosed permeates from

  2. Enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose of whey permeate

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    Karina Nascimento de Almeida

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The whey permeate is the residual of the concentration process of the whey proteins by ultrafiltration method. It contains important nutrients such as lactose, minerals and some proteins and lipids. It is without an ending industrial waste that causes serious damage to the environment. For its full use the lactose must be hydrolyzed to enable its consumption by intolerant people. The enzymatic hydrolysis by lactase (β-galactosidase of Kluyveromyces lactis yeast is a safe method that does not compromise the integrity of other nutrients, enabling further use of the permeate as a raw material. This study aimed to perform tests of enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose in whey permeate formulations in a concentration of 0.2%, 0.7% and 1% at 30, 60 and 90 minutes with pH 6.3 medium and 37 °C. The reactions were monitored by high performance liquid chromatography which showed that the enzyme concentration of 0.7% at time 30 minutes formulations became safe for consumption by lactose intolerant people, according to minimum levels established by law.

  3. Influência da adição da fécula de batata-doce (Ipomoea batatas L. sobre a viscosidade do permeado de soro de queijo Influence of sweet potato starch at permeate whey viscosity

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    Rafael Leite Pinto de Andrade

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A viscosidade é um parâmetro importante na aceitabilidade de bebidas lácteas. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo principal fornecer dados relativos ao comportamento da viscosidade uma base de permeado de soro de queijo adicionada de fécula de batata-doce, dados que poderão ser utilizados na elaboração de uma nova bebida láctea. A fécula de batata-doce utilizada apresentou um grau de gelatinização de 72,64%, umidade média de 7,88% e a seguinte composição centesimal média em base seca: 82,59% de amido, 9,33% de fibras dietéticas totais, 4,90% de proteínas, 2,08% de cinzas e 1,11% de lipídios. O permeado de soro foi adicionado a três diferentes concentrações de fécula e submetido a diferentes tratamentos térmicos. A viscosidade mais adequada, em função dos dados obtidos junto aos produtos comerciais, estaria no intervalo de 45mPa.s a 70mPa.s. Assim sendo, a porcentagem de 6% de fécula de batata-doce e um tratamento térmico de 90ºC por cerca de 5 minutos mostrou-se ser o mais adequado. O fluido obtido apresentou um comportamento pseudoplástico.Viscosity is an important parameter of milky drinks acceptability. This work supply data of the viscosity properties of permeate whey plus sweet potato starch basis; these data will may be used at development of a new milky beverage. The used sweet potato starch presented 72.64% of gelatinization, 7.88% of humidity and the following dry composition: 82.59% starch, 9.33% total dietary fibres, 4.90% proteins, 2.08% ashes and 1.10% lipids. The permeate whey had mixed at three different percentages of potato starch and had submitted at various thermal treatments. The most appropriate viscosity, in accord of commercial products, it would be in the interval of 45mPa.s to 70mPa.s. Therefore, the percentage of 6% of sweet potato starch and a thermal treatment of 90ºC for about 5 minutes it was shown to be the most appropriate. The fluid presented a pseudoplastic properties.

  4. Incorporation of whey permeate, a dairy effluent, in ethanol fermentation to provide a zero waste solution for the dairy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Archana; Jin, Yiqiong; Mason, Beth; Chae, Michael; Bressler, David C

    2016-03-01

    This study proposes a novel alternative for utilization of whey permeate, a by-product stream from the dairy industry, in wheat fermentation for ethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Whey permeates were hydrolyzed using enzymes to release fermentable sugars. Hydrolyzed whey permeates were integrated into wheat fermentation as a co-substrate or to partially replace process water. Cold starch hydrolysis-based simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was done as per the current industrial protocol for commercial wheat-to-ethanol production. Ethanol production was not affected; ethanol yield efficiency did not change when up to 10% of process water was replaced. Lactic acid bacteria in whey permeate did not negatively affect the co-fermentation or reduce ethanol yield. Whey permeate could be effectively stored for up to 4 wk at 4 °C with little change in lactose and lactic acid content. Considering the global abundance and nutrient value of whey permeate, the proposed strategy could improve economics of the dairy and biofuel sectors, and reduce environmental pollution. Furthermore, our research may be applied to fermentation strategies designed to produce value-added products other than ethanol. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fermentation of lactose to ethanol in cheese whey permeate and concentrated permeate by engineered Escherichia coli.

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    Pasotti, Lorenzo; Zucca, Susanna; Casanova, Michela; Micoli, Giuseppina; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Magni, Paolo

    2017-06-02

    Whey permeate is a lactose-rich effluent remaining after protein extraction from milk-resulting cheese whey, an abundant dairy waste. The lactose to ethanol fermentation can complete whey valorization chain by decreasing dairy waste polluting potential, due to its nutritional load, and producing a biofuel from renewable source at the same time. Wild type and engineered microorganisms have been proposed as fermentation biocatalysts. However, they present different drawbacks (e.g., nutritional supplements requirement, high transcriptional demand of recombinant genes, precise oxygen level, and substrate inhibition) which limit the industrial attractiveness of such conversion process. In this work, we aim to engineer a new bacterial biocatalyst, specific for dairy waste fermentation. We metabolically engineered eight Escherichia coli strains via a new expression plasmid with the pyruvate-to-ethanol conversion genes, and we carried out the selection of the best strain among the candidates, in terms of growth in permeate, lactose consumption and ethanol formation. We finally showed that the selected engineered microbe (W strain) is able to efficiently ferment permeate and concentrated permeate, without nutritional supplements, in pH-controlled bioreactor. In the conditions tested in this work, the selected biocatalyst could complete the fermentation of permeate and concentrated permeate in about 50 and 85 h on average, producing up to 17 and 40 g/l of ethanol, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing efficient ethanol production from the lactose contained in whey permeate with engineered E. coli. The selected strain is amenable to further metabolic optimization and represents an advance towards efficient biofuel production from industrial waste stream.

  6. In-vitro starch hydrolysis of chitosan incorporating whey protein and wheat starch composite gels

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    Natasha Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the influence of chitosan, incorporated into whey protein and wheat starch thermo gels, on the in-vitro hydrolysis of the polysaccharide. Gels were subjected to the following external conditions containing α-amylase at constant incubation temperature of 37 °C: In the first procedure, they were immersed in phosphate buffer (0.05 M and maintained at pH 6.9 throughout the entire digestion. In the second instance, they were introduced into a salt solution, with pH and total volume adjusted at times in sync with the human gastrointestinal tract. Results indicate that low and medium molecular weight chitosan, in combination with whey protein, were effective at enhancing the protective barrier against starch degradation. Less maltose was liberated from gels containing medium molecular weight chitosan, as opposed to the low molecular weight counterpart, and results compare favorably with the outcome of the in-vitro digestion of binary whey protein and wheat starch composites. Keywords: Food science

  7. Comprehensive peptidomic and glycomic evaluation reveals that sweet whey permeate from colostrum is a source of milk protein-derived peptides and oligosaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallas, D.C.; Weinborn, V.; Moura Bell, de J.M.L.N.; Wang, M.; Parker, E.A.; Guerrero, A.; Hettinga, K.A.; Lebrilla, C.B.; German, J.B.; Barile, D.

    2014-01-01

    Whey permeate is a co-product obtained when cheese whey is passed through an ultrafiltration membrane to concentrate whey proteins. Whey proteins are retained by the membrane, whereas the low-molecular weight compounds such as lactose, salts, oligosaccharides and peptides pass through the membrane

  8. d-Tagatose production by permeabilized and immobilized Lactobacillus plantarum using whey permeate.

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    Jayamuthunagai, J; Srisowmeya, G; Chakravarthy, M; Gautam, P

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the work is to produce d-Tagatose by direct addition of alginate immobilized Lactobacillus plantarum cells to lactose hydrolysed whey permeate. The cells were untreated and immobilized (UIC), permeabilized and immobilized (PIC) and the relative activities were compared with purified l-arabinose isomerase (l-AI) for d-galactose isomerization. Successive lactose hydrolysis by β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli and d-galactose isomerization using l-AI from Lactobacillus plantarum was performed to investigate the in vivo production of d-tagatose in whey permeate. In whey permeate, maximum conversion of 38% and 33% (w/w) d-galactose isomerization by PIC and UIC has been obtained. 162mg/g and 141mg/g of d-tagatose production was recorded in a 48h reaction time at 50°C, pH 7.0 with 5mM Mn 2+ ion concentration in the initial substrate mixture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Production of citric acid from whey permeate by fermentation using Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, M; Brooks, J D

    1983-08-01

    The use of lactic casein whey permeate as a substrate for citric acid production by fermentation has been investigated. Using a mutant strain of Aspergillus niger IMI 41874 in fermenter culture, a citric acid concentration of 8.3 g/l, representing a yield of 19% (w/w) based on lactose utilized, has been observed. Supplementation of the permeate with lactose (final concentration 140 g/l) increased the production to 14.8 g/l (yield 23%). The natural pH of the permeate (pH 4.5) was the most suitable initial pH for the process, and pH control during the fermentation was unnecessary. The addition of methanol (final concentration 3% v/v) to the fermentation increased the citric acid production to 25 g/l (yield 33%, based on lactose utilized). 13 references.

  10. Phase behaviour and in vitro hydrolysis of wheat starch in mixture with whey protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Natasha; Liu, Yingting; Ashton, John; Gorczyca, Elisabeth; Kasapis, Stefan

    2013-04-15

    Network formation of whey protein isolate (WPI) with increasing concentrations of native wheat starch (WS) has been examined. Small deformation dynamic oscillation in shear and modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry enabled analysis of binary mixtures at the macro- and micromolecular level. Following heat induced gelation, textural hardness was measured by undertaking compression tests. Environmental scanning electron microscopy provided tangible information on network morphology of polymeric constituents. Experiments involving in vitro starch digestion also allowed for indirect assessment of phase topology in the binary mixture. The biochemical component of this work constitutes an attempt to utilise whey protein as a retardant to the enzymatic hydrolysis of starch in a model system with α-amylase enzyme. During heating, rheological profiles of binary mixtures exhibited dramatic increases in G' at temperatures more closely related to those observed for single whey protein rather than pure starch. Results from this multidisciplinary approach of analysis, utilising rheology, calorimetry and microscopy, argue for the occurrence of phase separation phenomena in the gelled systems. There is also evidence of whey protein forming the continuous phase with wheat starch being the discontinuous filler, an outcome that is explored in the in vitro study of the enzymatic hydrolysis of starch. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Ethanol from hydrolyzed whey permeate using Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a membrane recycle bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehaia, M A [King Saud Univ., Buriedah (Saudi Arabia). Dairy Technology Lab.; Cheryan, M [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Agricultural Bioprocess Lab.

    1990-02-13

    A diauxic fermentation was observed during batch fermentation of enzyme-hydrolyzed whey permeate to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose was consumed before and much faster than galactose. In the continuous membrane recycle bioreactor (MRB), sugar utilization was a function of dilution rate and concentration of sugars. At a cell concentration of 160 kg/m{sup 3}, optimum productivity was 31 kg/(m{sup 3}.h) at ethanol concentration of 65 kg/m{sup 3}. Low levels of acetate (0.05-0.1 M) reduced cell growth during continuous fermentation, but also reduced galactose utilization. (orig.).

  12. Whey permeate fermented with kefir grains shows antifungal effect against Fusarium graminearum.

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    Gamba, Raúl Ricardo; De Antoni, Graciela; Peláez, Angela León

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the work reported here was to study the antifungal capability of cell-free supernatants obtained from whey permeates after fermentation by the kefir grains CIDCA AGK1 against Fusarium graminearum growth and zearalenone (ZEA) production. The assays were performed in order to study the conidial germination inhibition -in liquid media- and the effect on fungal growth rate and the Latency phase -in solid media. We observed that fermented supernatants of pH 3·5 produced the highest percentages of inhibition of conidial germination. The dilution and, particularly, alkalinisation of them led to the gradual loss of antifungal activity. In the fungal inhibition assays on plates we found that only the highest proportion of supernatant within solid medium had significant antifungal activity, which was determined as fungicidal. There was no ZEA biosynthesis in the medium with the highest proportion of supernatant, whereas at lower concentrations, the mycotoxin production was strain-dependent. From the results obtained we concluded that kefir supernatants had antifungal activity on the F. graminearum strains investigated and inhibited mycotoxin production as well, but in a strain-dependent fashion. The present work constitutes the first report of the effect of the products obtained from the kefir-grain fermentation of whey permeates - a readily available by-product of the dairy industry - on F. graminearum germination, growth, and toxin production.

  13. Textural behavior of gels formed by rice starch and whey protein isolate: Concentration and crosshead velocities

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    Thiago Novaes Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fabricated food gels involving the use of hydrocolloids are gaining polpularity as confectionery/convenience foods. Starch is commonly combined with a hydrocolloid (protein our polyssacharides, particularly in the food industry, since native starches generally do not have ideal properties for the preparation of food products. Therefore the texture studies of starch-protein mixtures could provide a new approach in producing starch-based food products, being thus acritical attribute that needs to be carefully adjusted to the consumer liking. This work investigated the texture and rheological properties of mixed gels of different concentrations of rice starch (15%, 17.5%, and 20% and whey protein isolate (0%, 3%, and 6% with different crosshead velocities (0.05, 5.0, and 10.0 mm/s using a Box-Behnken experimental design. The samples were submitted to uniaxial compression tests with 80% deformation in order to determinate the following rheological parameters: Young’s modulus, fracture stress, fracture deformation, recoverable energy, and apparent biaxial elongational viscosity. Gels with a higher rice starch concentration that were submitted to higher test velocities were more rigid and resistant, while the whey protein isolate concentration had little influence on these properties. The gels showed a higher recoverable energy when the crosshead velocity was higher, and the apparent biaxial elongational viscosity was also influenced by this factor. Therefore, mixed gels exhibit different properties depending on the rice starch concentration and crosshead velocity.

  14. Effect of maize, rumen-protected fat and whey permeate on energy utilisation and milk fat composition in lactating goats

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    Giovanna Battelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of utilisation of diets with different proportions of energy sources (starch, fat, lactose was studied with three pairs of lactating Saanen goats; the animals were fed, in a Latin square design, 3 silage-based diets containing (on DM basis the following energy sources: 32% maize meal (diet M; 4.7% rumen-protected fat (Megalac® and 23.5% maize meal (diet F; 9.8% milk whey permeate powder and 22.3% maize meal (diet W. During each of the three experimental periods, 8 days of total collection balance trials were conducted during which goats were allocated for 72 h (three 24 h cycles in open circuit respiration chambers to determine methane and heat production and, hence, the energy balance. Diet F, in comparison with diets M and W, significantly increased the milk fat content (4.13 vs 3.11 and 3.14%, P<0.001 and the 4%-FCM yield (3367 vs 2927 and 3055 g/d, P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively, while no relevant changes were observed for milk protein content and yield. Energy digestibility was equal in diets F and W. Megalac® did not decrease fibre digestibility. The partition of the gross energy intake (EI differed significantly between diets: diet M had lower DE (72.4 vs 74.3 and 74.3%; P<0.01 and ME (62.1 vs 64.7 and 63.5%; P<0.05 in comparison with diets F and W, respectively. Energy lost as methane was not significantly decreased by the inclusion of rumen- protected fat in the diet, although a trend for a reduction of methanogenesis was observed. Heat production deter- mined by treatment F was lower in comparison with the other treatments. This difference was almost significant (P=0.056 when expressed as a percentage of the ME. Milk energy output increased significantly (+12%, P<0.001 by including fat in the diet, as compared with treatments M and W: 21.4 vs 19.1 and 19.0% of the EI. The net ener- gy content of the protected fat was 27.94 MJ NEl/kg DM (+340% vs maize meal; its kl value resulted 0.77. The corresponding values for whey

  15. Butanol production from concentrated lactose/whey permeate: Use of pervaporation membrane to recover and concentrate product

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    In these studies butanol (acetone butanol ethanol, or ABE) was produced from concentrated lactose/whey permeate containing 211 gL-1 lactose. Fermentation of such a highly concentrated lactose solution was possible due to simultaneous product removal using a pervaporation membrane. In this system a p...

  16. Ozonation of nanofiltration permeate of whey before processing by reverse osmosis

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    Zmievskii Yurii G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During nanofiltration processing of whey a significant amount of permeate is generated. In some cases this permeate is treated by reverse osmosis to get purified water for technological needs. Dry substances are not used, because they contain practically the same amount of organic and inorganic components. Mineral substances can be used for the mineralization of drinking water purified by reverse osmosis. However, the presence of organic compounds complicates the process of separation, as well as reduces the specific productivity of reverse osmosis membranes at the concentration stage. Therefore, the search for methods of destruction and removal of organic components is grounded. In the presented work, experimental studies of ozonation and sorption of organic compounds by activated carbon were carried. It has been shown that ozonation improves the degree of sorption purification by six times. Sequential treatment with ozone and subsequent filtration through the layer of activated carbon improves the specific productivity of reverse osmosis membranes by 30% at the stage of treatment of the nanofiltration permeate, while their selectivity remains unchanged.

  17. Composition and functionality of whey protein phospholipid concentrate and delactosed permeate.

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    Levin, M A; Burrington, K J; Hartel, R W

    2016-09-01

    Whey protein phospholipid concentrate (WPPC) and delactosed permeate (DLP) are 2 coproducts of cheese whey processing that are currently underused. Past research has shown that WPPC and DLP can be used together as a functional dairy ingredient in foods such as ice cream, soup, and caramel. However, the scope of the research has been limited to 1 WPPC supplier. The objective of this research was to fully characterize a range of WPPC. Four WPPC samples and 1 DLP sample were analyzed for chemical composition and functionality. This analysis showed that WPPC composition was highly variable between suppliers and lots. In addition, the functionality of the WPPC varies depending on the supplier and testing pH, and cannot be correlated with fat or protein content because of differences in processing. The addition of DLP to WPPC affects functionality. In general, WPPC has a high water-holding capacity, is relatively heat stable, has low foamability, and does not aid in emulsion stability. The gel strength and texture are highly dependent on the amount of protein. To be able to use these 2 dairy products, the composition and functionality must be fully understood. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Whey protein phospholipid concentrate and delactosed permeate: Applications in caramel, ice cream, and cake.

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    Levin, M A; Burrington, K J; Hartel, R W

    2016-09-01

    Whey protein phospholipid concentrate (WPPC) and delactosed permeate (DLP) are 2 coproducts of cheese whey processing that are currently underutilized. Past research has shown that WPPC and DLP can be used together as a functional dairy ingredient in foods such as ice cream, soup, and caramel. However, the scope of the research has been limited to a single WPPC supplier. The variability of the composition and functionality of WPPC was previously studied. The objective of this research was to expand on the previous study and examine the potential applications of WPPC and DLP blends in foods. In ice cream, WPPC was added as a natural emulsifier to replace synthetic emulsifiers. The WPPC decreased the amount of partially coalesced fat and increased the drip-through rate. In caramel, DLP and WPPC replaced sweetened condensed skim milk and lecithin. Cold flow increased significantly, and hardness and stickiness decreased. In cake, DLP and WPPC were added as a total replacement of eggs, with no change in yield, color, or texture. Overall, WPPC and DLP can be utilized as functional dairy ingredients at a lower cost in ice cream and cake but not in chewy caramel. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of modified cassava starch on the rheological and quality properties of a dairy beverage prepared with sweet whey

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    Paola Catalina IMBACHÍ-NARVÁEZ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of sweet whey and octenyl succinic anhydride (OSA-modified cassava starch on the quality and rheological properties of fermented dairy beverages was evaluated. Sweet whey (45-65% and OSA-modified cassava starch (0.8-1.2% were added to determine an optimal fermented dairy beverage with the highest viscosity and the lowest syneresis possible. The optimal fermented dairy beverage corresponded to the addition of 40.9% sweet whey and 1.13% OSA-modified cassava starch with respect to the milk and sweet whey mixture. Moreover, the rheological and quality properties of the optimal fermented dairy beverage were compared to a commercial beverage (control during 22 days of storage. No significant differences were found in soluble solids, acidity, pH and consistency index during the time evaluated, while the syneresis of both products showed an increase during storage. OSA-modified cassava starch can be used as a stabiliser in sweet whey fermented dairy beverages because it helps improve its quality properties.

  20. Effects of carbohydrate/protein ratio on the microstructure and the barrier and sorption properties of wheat starch-whey protein blend edible films.

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    Basiak, Ewelina; Lenart, Andrzej; Debeaufort, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Starch and whey protein isolate and their mixtures were used for making edible films. Moisture sorption isotherms, water vapour permeability, sorption of aroma compounds, microstructure, water contact angle and surface properties were investigated. With increasing protein content, the microstructure changes became more homogeneous. The water vapour permeability increases with both the humidity gradient and the starch content. For all films, the hygroscopicity increases with starch content. Surface properties change according to the starch/whey protein ratio and are mainly related to the polar component of the surface tension. Films composed of 80% starch and 20% whey proteins have more hydrophobic surfaces than the other films due to specific interactions. The effect of carbohydrate/protein ratio significantly influences the microstructure, the surface wettability and the barrier properties of wheat starch-whey protein blend films. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Production of fermented probiotic beverages from milk permeate enriched with whey retentate and identification of present lactic acid bacteria

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    Jagoda Šušković

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research the application of bacterial strains Lactobacillus acidophilus M92, Lactobacillus plantarum L4 and Enterococcus faecium L3 in the production of fermented probiotic beverages from milk permeate enriched with 10 % (v/v whey retentate, was investigated. In the previous researches of probiotic concept, probiotic properties of these three strains of lactic acid bacteria have been defined. At the end of controlled fermentation, probiotic strains have produced 7.4 g/L lactic acid, pH was decreased to 4.7, and number of live cells was around 108 CFU/mL. Number of viable count of probiotic bacteria, which were identified with RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNAmethod, was maintained at around 107 CFU/mL during 28 days of the preservation at 4 °C. Furthermore, a spontaneous fermentation of milk permeate enriched with 10 % (v/v of whey retentate was carried out and lactic acid bacteria present in these substrates were isolated. All of these bacterial strains have rapidly acidified the growth media and have shown antibacterial activity against chosen test-microorganisms, what are important properties of potential starter cultures for the fermentation of dairy products. The results of biochemical API analysis have identified isolated strains as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus helveticus.

  2. Dynamics of yeast immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactors systems in ethanol fermentation from lactose-hydrolyzed whey and whey permeate.

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    Gabardo, Sabrina; Pereira, Gabriela Feix; Klein, Manuela P; Rech, Rosane; Hertz, Plinho F; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2016-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of ethanol production on lactose-hydrolyzed whey (LHW) and lactose-hydrolyzed whey permeate (LHWP) in batch fluidized-bed bioreactors using single and co-cultures of immobilized cells of industrial strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-industrial strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus. Although the co-culture of S. cerevisiae CAT-1 and K. marxianus CCT 4086 produced two- to fourfold the ethanol productivity of single cultures of S. cerevisiae, the single cultures of the K. marxianus CCT 4086 produced the best results in both media (Y EtOH/S = 0.47-0.49 g g(-1) and Q P = 1.39-1.68 g L(-1) h(-1), in LHW and LHWP, respectively). Ethanol production on concentrated LHWP (180 g L(-1)) reached 79.1 g L(-1), with yields of 0.46 g g(-1) for K. marxianus CCT 4086 cultures. Repeated batches of fluidized-bed bioreactor on concentrated LHWP led to increased ethanol productivity, reaching 2.8 g L(-1) h(-1).

  3. Including whey protein and whey permeate in ready-to-use supplementary food improves recovery rates in children with moderate acute malnutrition: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

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    Stobaugh, Heather C; Ryan, Kelsey N; Kennedy, Julie A; Grise, Jennifer B; Crocker, Audrey H; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Litkowski, Patricia E; Maleta, Kenneth M; Manary, Mark J; Trehan, Indi

    2016-03-01

    The utility of dairy ingredients in the supplementary foods used in the treatment of childhood moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) remains unsettled. We evaluated the effectiveness of a peanut-based ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF) with soy protein compared with a novel RUSF containing dairy ingredients in the form of whey permeate and whey protein concentrate in the treatment of children with MAM. We conducted a randomized, double-blind clinical effectiveness trial involving rural Malawian and Mozambican children 6-59 mo of age with MAM treated with either soy RUSF or a novel whey RUSF treatment of ~75 kcal · kg(-1) · d(-1) for up to 12 wk. The proportion of children that recovered from MAM was significantly higher in the group that received whey RUSF (960 of 1144; 83.9%) than in the group that received soy RUSF (874 of 1086; 80.5%; P whey RUSF also demonstrated better growth markers, with a higher mean midupper arm circumference (MUAC) at the time of discharge (P whey RUSF resulted in higher recovery rates and improved growth than did soy RUSF, although the whey RUSF supplement provided less total protein and energy than the soy RUSF. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01790048. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Alcohol production from whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reesen, L

    1978-01-01

    The continuous production of ethanol from whey permeate, by fermentation of its lactose with Kluyveromyces fragilis, is described. From whey containing 4.4% lactose, production costs were very competitive with those for alcohol from molasses.

  5. Whey pretreatments before ultrafiltration

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    Tuomo Tupasela

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available Whey is a by-product of cheesemaking. Whey dry matter contains mainly lactose, but also valuable whey proteins. The aim of this study was to develop improvements to whey protein membrane isolation processes. In our trials CaCl2 -added, pH-adjusted and heat-treated wheys were found to have MF (microfiltration permeate fluxes about 30% higher than in untreated MF whey. The total solids and protein content of the MF permeates decreased compared to the original wheys. UF (ultrafiltration trials were conducted using MF whey to compare it with centrifugally separated whey. The MF whey consistently maintained an UF flux about 1.5 to 2.5 times higher than that of the separated whey. Differently treated MF whey UF permeate fluxes also showed a difference. With CaCl2 addition, pH adjustment and heat treatment, the UF permeate fluxes were about 20 to 40% higher than when only MF was used. The total solids content decreased in each trial. The protein content of the UF concentrate also decreased compared to the MF permeate. The (β-lg (β-lactoglobulin and α-la (α-lactalbumin content was almost the same in UF concentrates as in MF permeates.

  6. Efficient mosquitocidal toxin production by Bacillus sphaericus using cheese whey permeate under both submerged and solid state fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bendary, Magda A; Moharam, Maysa E; Foda, M S

    2008-05-01

    Whey permeate (WP) was used efficiently for production of mosquitocidal toxin by Bacillus sphaericus 2362 (B. sphaericus 2362) and the Egyptian isolate, B. sphaericus 14N1 (B. sphaericus 14N1) under both submerged and solid state fermentation conditions. Under submerged fermentation, high mosquitocidal activity was produced by B. sphaericus 2362 and B. sphaericus 14N1 at 50-100% and 25-70% WP, respectively. Initial pH of WP was a critical factor for toxin production by both tested organisms. The highest toxicity was obtained at initial pH 7. Egyptian isolate, B. sphaericus 14N1 was tested for growth and toxin production under solid state fermentation conditions (SSF) by using WP as moistening agent instead of distilled water. The optimum conditions for production of B. sphaericus 14N1 on wheat bran-WP medium were 10 g wheat bran/250 ml flask moistened with 10-70% WP at 50% moisture content, inoculum size ranged between 17.2x10(7) and 34.4x10(7) and 6 days incubation under static conditions at 30 degrees C. Preliminary pilot-scale production of B. sphaericus 14N1 under SSF conditions in trays proved that wheat bran-WP medium was efficient and economic for industrial production of mosquitocidal toxin by B. sphaericus.

  7. High-throughput hydrolysis of starch during permeation across α-amylase-immobilized porous hollow-fiber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Suguru; Kubota, Noboru; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Saito, Kyoichi; Sugita, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kohei; Sugo, Takanobu

    2002-02-01

    Two kinds of supporting porous membranes, ethanolamine (EA) and phenol (Ph) fibers, for immobilization of α-amylase were prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of an epoxy-group-containing monomer, glycidyl methacrylate, onto a porous hollow-fiber membrane, and subsequent ring-opening with EA and Ph, respectively. An α-amylase solution was forced to permeate radially outward through the pores of the EA and Ph fibers. α-Amylase was captured at a density of 0.15 and 6.6 g/L of the membrane by the graft chain containing 2-hydroxyethylamino and phenyl groups, respectively. A permeation pressure of 0.10 MPa provided a space velocity of 780 and 1500 h -1 for the α-amylase-immobilized EA and Ph fibers, respectively. Quantitative hydrolysis of starch during permeation of a 20 g/L starch solution in the buffer across the α-amylase-immobilized Ph fiber was attained up to a space velocity of about 2000 h -1; this was achieved because of negligible diffusional mass-transfer resistance of the starch to the α-amylase due to convective flow, whereas an enzyme reaction-controlled system was observed for the α-amylase-immobilized EA fiber.

  8. High-throughput hydrolysis of starch during permeation across α-amylase-immobilized porous hollow-fiber membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Suguru; Kubota, Noboru; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Saito, Kyoichi; Sugita, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kohei; Sugo, Takanobu

    2002-01-01

    Two kinds of supporting porous membranes, ethanolamine (EA) and phenol (Ph) fibers, for immobilization of α-amylase were prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of an epoxy-group-containing monomer, glycidyl methacrylate, onto a porous hollow-fiber membrane, and subsequent ring-opening with EA and Ph, respectively. An α-amylase solution was forced to permeate radially outward through the pores of the EA and Ph fibers. α-Amylase was captured at a density of 0.15 and 6.6 g/L of the membrane by the graft chain containing 2-hydroxyethylamino and phenyl groups, respectively. A permeation pressure of 0.10 MPa provided a space velocity of 780 and 1500 h -1 for the α-amylase-immobilized EA and Ph fibers, respectively. Quantitative hydrolysis of starch during permeation of a 20 g/L starch solution in the buffer across the α-amylase-immobilized Ph fiber was attained up to a space velocity of about 2000 h -1 ; this was achieved because of negligible diffusional mass-transfer resistance of the starch to the α-amylase due to convective flow/ whereas an enzyme reaction-controlled system was observed for the α-amylase-immobilized EA fiber.

  9. High-throughput hydrolysis of starch during permeation across {alpha}-amylase-immobilized porous hollow-fiber membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Suguru; Kubota, Noboru; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Saito, Kyoichi E-mail: marukyo@xtal.tf.chiba-u.ac.jp; Sugita, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kohei; Sugo, Takanobu

    2002-02-01

    Two kinds of supporting porous membranes, ethanolamine (EA) and phenol (Ph) fibers, for immobilization of {alpha}-amylase were prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of an epoxy-group-containing monomer, glycidyl methacrylate, onto a porous hollow-fiber membrane, and subsequent ring-opening with EA and Ph, respectively. An {alpha}-amylase solution was forced to permeate radially outward through the pores of the EA and Ph fibers. {alpha}-Amylase was captured at a density of 0.15 and 6.6 g/L of the membrane by the graft chain containing 2-hydroxyethylamino and phenyl groups, respectively. A permeation pressure of 0.10 MPa provided a space velocity of 780 and 1500 h{sup -1} for the {alpha}-amylase-immobilized EA and Ph fibers, respectively. Quantitative hydrolysis of starch during permeation of a 20 g/L starch solution in the buffer across the {alpha}-amylase-immobilized Ph fiber was attained up to a space velocity of about 2000 h{sup -1}; this was achieved because of negligible diffusional mass-transfer resistance of the starch to the {alpha}-amylase due to convective flow/ whereas an enzyme reaction-controlled system was observed for the {alpha}-amylase-immobilized EA fiber.

  10. Modeling lactose hydrolysis for efficiency and selectivity: Toward the preservation of sialyloligosaccharides in bovine colostrum whey permeate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura Bell, Juliana M L N; Aquino, Leticia F M C; Liu, Yan; Cohen, Joshua L; Lee, Hyeyoung; de Melo Silva, Vitor L; Rodrigues, Maria I; Barile, Daniela

    2016-08-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose has been shown to improve the efficiency and selectivity of membrane-based separations toward the recovery of bioactive oligosaccharides. Achieving maximum lactose hydrolysis requires intrinsic process optimization for each specific substrate, but the effects of those processing conditions on the target oligosaccharides are not well understood. Response surface methodology was used to investigate the effects of pH (3.25-8.25), temperature (35-55°C), reaction time (6 to 58 min), and amount of enzyme (0.05-0.25%) on the efficiency of lactose hydrolysis by β-galactosidase and on the preservation of biologically important sialyloligosaccharides (3'-siallylactose, 6'-siallylactose, and 6'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine) naturally present in bovine colostrum whey permeate. A central composite rotatable design was used. In general, β-galactosidase activity was favored at pH values ranging from 3.25 to 5.75, with other operational parameters having a less pronounced effect. A pH of 4.5 allowed for the use of a shorter reaction time (19 min), lower temperature (40°C), and reduced amount of enzyme (0.1%), but complete hydrolysis at a higher pH (5.75) required greater values for these operational parameters. The total amount of sialyloligosaccharides was not significantly altered by the reaction parameters evaluated, suggesting specificity of β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae toward lactose as well as the stability of the oligosaccharides at pH, temperature, and reaction time evaluated. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Bioethanol production by inherent enzymes from rye and wheat with addition of organic farming cheese whey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kádár, Zsófia; Christensen, Anne Deen; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard

    2011-01-01

    . Throughout our studies, wheat and rye grain was used as raw material in bioethanol production with the purpose of producing in situ enzymes (during germination) for the hydrolysis of starch in the grains and compared with commercial amylase enzyme preparations. Whey permeate was incorporated into the grain...

  12. Gastrointestinal ecosystem and immunological responses in E.coli challenged pigs after weaning fed liquid diets containing whey permeate fermented with different lactic acid bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Lauridsen, Charlotte; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of feeding liquid feed containing whey permeate (WP) fermented with different lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on the microbiota and mucosal immune responses of Escherichia coli F4 inoculated piglets post weaning. The study consisted of 52 weaned...... diet tended (P = 0.069) to lower total coliform and enhanced (P = 0.050) LAB:coliform ratio in GIT digesta. The faecal LAB:coliform ratio was higher (P .... Intestinal immunoglobulin (Ig) A decreased (P liquid feed containing W. viridescens-fermented WP improved the intestinal health...

  13. Rapid Screening of Bovine Milk Oligosaccharides in a Whey Permeate Product and Domestic Animal Milks by Accurate Mass Database and Tandem Mass Spectral Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Otter, Don E.; Barile, Daniela

    2018-01-01

    A bovine milk oligosaccharide (BMO) library, prepared from cow colostrum, with 34 structures was generated and used to rapidly screen oligosaccharides in domestic animal milks and a whey permeate powder. The novel library was entered into a custom Personal Compound Database and Library (PCDL) and included accurate mass, retention time, and tandem mass spectra. Oligosaccharides in minute-sized samples were separated using nanoliquid chromatography (nanoLC) coupled to a high resolution and sensitive quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-ToF) MS system. Using the PCDL, 18 oligosaccharides were found in a BMO-enriched product obtained from whey permeate processing. The usefulness of the analytical system and BMO library was further validated using milks from domestic sheep and buffaloes. Through BMO PCDL searching, 15 and 13 oligosaccharides in the BMO library were assigned in sheep and buffalo milks, respectively, thus demonstrating significant overlap between oligosaccharides in bovine (cow and buffalo) and ovine (sheep) milks. This method was shown to be an efficient, reliable, and rapid tool to identify oligosaccharide structures using automated spectral matching. PMID:27428379

  14. Thermophysical properties of starch and whey protein composite prepared in presence of organic acid and esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously, we prepared starch and protein composite by reactive mixing in presence of various organic acids and found that use of these acid esters resulted in composites with good mechanical properties. In this study, concentration (% w/w) of acid citrates in the starch-protein composites were var...

  15. Whey: Characteristics, Applications and Health Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Sima Khezri; Mir Mehdi Seyedsaleh; Nina Emami; Parvin Dehghan

    2016-01-01

    Cheese whey utilization is one of major concerns nowadays. Its high organic matter content (BOD and COD concentrations), in combination with the high volumes produced and limited treatment options make cheese whey a serious environmental problem. To overcome this issue, various technological approaches have been employed to convert whey into value-added products. It is now transformed into products such as whey powder, whey protein, whey permeate, bioethanol, biopolymers, hydrogen, methane...

  16. Use of cheese whey for biomass production and spray drying of probiotic lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavari, Luisina; Páez, Roxana; Cuatrin, Alejandra; Reinheimer, Jorge; Vinderola, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    The double use of cheese whey (culture medium and thermoprotectant for spray drying of lactobacilli) was explored in this study for adding value to this wastewater. In-house formulated broth (similar to MRS) and dairy media (cheese and ricotta whey and whey permeate) were assessed for their capacity to produce biomass of Lactobacillus paracasei JP1, Lb. rhamnosus 64 and Lb. gasseri 37. Simultaneously, spray drying of cheese whey-starch solution (without lactobacilli cells) was optimised using surface response methodology. Cell suspensions of the lactobacilli, produced in in house-formulated broth, were spray-dried in cheese whey-starch solution and viability monitored throughout the storage of powders for 2 months. Lb. rhamnosus 64 was able to grow satisfactorily in at least two of the in-house formulated culture media and in the dairy media assessed. It also performed well in spray drying. The performance of the other strains was less satisfactory. The growth capacity, the resistance to spray drying in cheese whey-starch solution and the negligible lost in viability during the storage (2 months), makes Lb. rhamnosus 64 a promising candidate for further technological studies for developing a probiotic dehydrated culture for foods, utilising wastewaters of the dairy industry (as growth substrate and protectant) and spray drying (a low-cost widely-available technology).

  17. Study of the effects of spray drying in whey-starch on the probiotic capacity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 64 in the gut of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavari, L; Burns, P; Páez, R; Reinheimer, J; Vinderola, G

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of spray drying of Lactobacillus rhamnosus 64 on its capacity to modulate the gut immune response and on the attenuation of TNBS-induced colitis in mice. Lactobacillus rhamnosus 64 was spray dried in cheese whey-starch solution and administered to mice for 3, 6 or 10 consecutive days. Peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activity, secretory IgA levels in the small intestinal fluid and TNFα, IFNγ, IL-10, IL-6 and IL-2 levels in homogenates of the small and large intestine were determined. The effects of spray drying were also evaluated in an acute model of Trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. A shift in the regulation of immune parameters, particularly the cytokine profile, was observed for mice treated with the spray-dried culture, compared to the profile observed in animals that received the strain as fresh culture (FC). The spray-dried culture of L. rhamnosus 64 showed anti-inflammatory properties in murine model of TNBS-induced colitis. The spray-drying process of L. rhamnosus 64 in whey-starch modified its immunomodulating capacity in healthy animals and conferred enhanced protection in an in vivo model of inflammation. Probiotic capacity can be affected by spray drying in relation to the properties observed for the strain as an overnight FC. This fact should be taken into account when producing the culture for its application in the industry. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Bioconversion of Cheese Waste (Whey)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, G.W.

    1998-03-11

    The US dairy industry produces 67 billion pounds of cheese whey annually. A waste by-product of cheese production, whey consists of water, milk sugar (lactose), casein (protein), and salts amounting to about 7% total solids. Ultrafiltration is used to concentrate cheese whey into a protein-rich foodstuff; however, it too produces a waste stream, known as ''whey permeate,'' (rejected water, lactose, and salts from the membrane). Whey permeate contains about 4.5% lactose and requires treatment to reduce the high BOD (biological oxygen demand) before disposal. Ab Initio, a small business with strong chemistry and dairy processing background, desired help in developing methods for bioconversion of whey permeate lactose into lactic acid. Lactic acid is an organic acid primarily used as an acidulant in the food industry. More recently it has been used to produce polylactic acid, a biodegradable polymer and as a new method to treat meat carcasses to combat E. coli bacteria. Conversion of whey permeate to lactic acid is environmentally sound because it produces a valued product from an otherwise waste stream. FM&T has expertise in bioconversion processes and analytical techniques necessary to characterize biomass functions. The necessary engineering and analytical services for pilot biomass monitoring, process development, and purification of crude lactic acid were available at this facility.

  19. Bioconversion of Cheese Waste (Whey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnert, G.W.

    1998-01-01

    The US dairy industry produces 67 billion pounds of cheese whey annually. A waste by-product of cheese production, whey consists of water, milk sugar (lactose), casein (protein), and salts amounting to about 7% total solids. Ultrafiltration is used to concentrate cheese whey into a protein-rich foodstuff; however, it too produces a waste stream, known as ''whey permeate,'' (rejected water, lactose, and salts from the membrane). Whey permeate contains about 4.5% lactose and requires treatment to reduce the high BOD (biological oxygen demand) before disposal. Ab Initio, a small business with strong chemistry and dairy processing background, desired help in developing methods for bioconversion of whey permeate lactose into lactic acid. Lactic acid is an organic acid primarily used as an acidulant in the food industry. More recently it has been used to produce polylactic acid, a biodegradable polymer and as a new method to treat meat carcasses to combat E. coli bacteria. Conversion of whey permeate to lactic acid is environmentally sound because it produces a valued product from an otherwise waste stream. FM and T has expertise in bioconversion processes and analytical techniques necessary to characterize biomass functions. The necessary engineering and analytical services for pilot biomass monitoring, process development, and purification of crude lactic acid were available at this facility

  20. Fermented Whey Permeate for Piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manurung, Sarmauli

    ., 2007; Ding et al., 2011)The last part of the project dealt with evaluation of Chinese Herbal Medicine, in the form of Fructus mume and Ziziphi spinosa semen ethanolic extracts, in inhibiting PWD-relevant E. coli F4 and measuring how these extracts regulate innate immune responses in vitro...

  1. Characterization of edible coatings consisting of pea starch, whey protein isolate, and Carnauba wax and their effects on oil rancidity and sensory properties of walnuts and pine nuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehyar, Ghadeer F; Al-Ismail, Khalid; Han, Jung H; Chee, Grace W

    2012-02-01

    Edible coatings made of whey protein isolate (WPI), pea starch (PS), and their combinations with carnauba wax (CW) were prepared and characterized. WPI combined with CW formed stable emulsion while PS with CW formed unstable emulsion and both formulations produced non-homogeneous films. Addition of PS to WPI: CW combination at the ratio of 1:1:1, respectively, resulted in stable emulsion and homogenous films. The emulsion PS: WPI: CW (1:1:2) was stable and formed a continuous film but had less homogenous droplets size distribution when compared to 1:1:1 film. Combined films had a reduced tensile strength and elongation compared to single component films. WPI : CW (1:1) films had higher elastic modulus than the WPI films, but the modulus reduced by the addition of PS. All the coating formulations were effective in preventing oxidative and hydrolytic rancidity of walnuts and pine nuts stored at 25 °C throughout the storage (12 d) but were less effective at 50 °C. Increasing the concentration of CW from 1:1:1 to 1:1:2 in PS: WPI: CW formulation did not contribute in further prevention of oil rancidity at 25 °C. Using of PS: WPI: CW (1:1:1) coating on both nuts significantly (P carnauba wax reduced the oxidative and hydrolytic rancidity of the nuts and improved sensory characteristics. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Resistance to moist conditions of whey protein isolate and pea starch biodegradable films and low density polyethylene nondegradable films: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehyar, G. F.; Bawab, A. Al

    2015-10-01

    Biodegradable packaging materials are degraded under the natural environmental conditions. Therefore using them could alleviate the problem of plastics accumulation in nature. For effective replacement of plastics, with biodegradable materials, biodegradable packages should keep their properties under the high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Therefore the objectives of the study were to develop biodegradable packaging material based on whey protein isolate (WPI) and pea starch (PS). To study their mechanical, oxygen barrier and solubility properties under different RHs compared with those of low density polyethylene (LDPE), the most used plastic in packaging. Films of WPI and PS were prepared separately and conditioned at different RH (30-90%) then their properties were studied. At low RHs ( 40% RH. Oxygen permeability of WPI and LDPE did not adversely affected by increasing RH to 65%. Furthermore, WPI and LDPE films had lower degree of hydration at 50% and 90% RH and total soluble matter than PS films. These results suggest that WPI could be successfully replacing LDPE in packaging of moist products.

  3. Pasting and extrusion properties of mixed carbohydrates and whey protein isolate matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed systems of whey protein isolate (WPI) or texturized WPI (tWPI) and different starches may form weak or strong gel pastes or rigid matrices depending on interactions. The paste viscoelasticity of starches from amioca, barley, corn starch, Hylon VII, plantain, and pea starch, mixed with whey pro...

  4. Whey research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, E W

    1980-01-01

    A brief discussion of the composition of whey and its nutritional potential is followed by consideration of the less well- known areas of research in whey technology. These include the utilization of whole whey and problems of whey taint; use of lactose, by modification to lactitol, in breadmaking or as a binder for powders such as iron oxide fines in the steel industry; food uses of whey proteins e.g. in cheese, breadmaking and 'prudent diet' foods; pharmaceutical uses of whey protein concentrates as a source of lactoperoxidase; and technological research on membrane processes and ion-exchange fractionation of whey proteins.

  5. Improved Quantitation of Gluten in Wheat Starch for Celiac Disease Patients by Gel-Permeation High-Performance Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detection (GP-HPLC-FLD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherf, Katharina Anne; Wieser, Herbert; Koehler, Peter

    2016-10-12

    Purified wheat starch (WSt) is commonly used in gluten-free products for celiac disease (CD) patients. It is mostly well-tolerated, but doubts about its safety for CD patients persist. One reason may be that most ELISA kits primarily recognize the alcohol-soluble gliadin fraction of gluten, but insufficiently target the alcohol-insoluble glutenin fraction. To address this problem, a new sensitive method based on the sequential extraction of gliadins, glutenins, and gluten from WSt followed by gel-permeation high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (GP-HPLC-FLD) was developed. It revealed that considerable amounts of glutenins were present in most WSt. The gluten contents quantitated by GP-HPLC-FLD as sum of gliadins and glutenins were higher than those by R5 ELISA (gluten as gliadin content multiplied by a factor of 2) in 19 out of 26 WSt. Despite its limited selectivity, GP-HPLC-FLD may be applied as confirmatory method to ELISA to quantitate gluten in WSt.

  6. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reliable information about the safety of taking whey protein if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. Milk allergy: If you are allergic to cow's milk, avoid using whey protein.

  7. Making the most of whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, D L

    1979-01-01

    The products available from cheese whey processing are surveyed and the preparation of protein products is particularly emphasized, using ultrafiltration. The permeate from this process is used for the production of a variety of lactose syrup products with wide uses in the food industry.

  8. Estudo dos parâmetros da ultrafiltração de permeado de soro de queijo fermentado por Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Ultrafiltration conditions of whey permeate fermented by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane BRONSTEIN

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Permeado de soro doce, suplementado com extrato de levedura e peptona, foi utilizado como meio de crescimento para Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. No final da fase exponencial de crescimento, o meio de cultura fermentado foi submetido a uma ultrafiltração com o objetivo de concentrar o microrganismo. Foram realizados 6 processamentos diferentes, nos quais variou-se as condições iniciais da ultrafiltração, tendo sido avaliados os seguintes parâmetros: porosidade da membrana, pH e número de células viáveis no permeado e no retentado, a fim de ser estudado a influência de cada parâmetro na taxa de permeação da ultrafiltração. As membranas utilizadas foram eficazes como meio de barragem para o microrganismo Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, ficando o retentado com uma média celular de 10(8 ufc/ml e o permeado com uma média celular de 10² ufc/ml. Membranas de diferentes porosidades tiveram taxas de fluxo semelhantes. O aumento da concentração celular provocou a diminuição do fluxo. O pH também influenciou a taxa de permeação, havendo um aumento do fluxo quando foi utilizado um pH inicial mais alto.Cheese whey permeate supplemented with yeast extract and peptone was used as a growth medium for the bacteria Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. At the end of the exponential growth phase, the fermented growth medium was ultrafiltered to concentrate the microorganism and to evaluate the effect of the membrane porosity, inicial UF pH and cellular concentration in permeation rate during the ultrafiltration process. The membranes used were efficient as a mean of a barrage for the Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. On average, the cellular concentrations were 10(8 CFU/mL and 10² CFU/mL for retentate and permeate, respectively. Membranes of different porosities had very similar flux rates. Better flow rates were obtained with inicial UF pH 6,5 and with the minors micrrorganism concentration.

  9. Optimization PHAs production from dairy industry wastewater (cheese whey) by Azohydromonas lata DSMZ 1123

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sharifzadeh Baei; G.D. Najafpour; Z. Lasemi; F. Tabandeh; H. Younesi; H. Issazadeh; M. Khodabandeh

    2010-01-01

    In the present research, whey was used as useful substrate which retained from permeates of dairy industry. The obtained whey was hydrolyzed to cleave its main carbon source, lactose to glucose and galactose.The hydrolyzed products were chosen as carbon sources for the production of poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) by Azohydromonas lata DSMZ 1123. The biosynthesis of PHA copolyesters containing 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) units from hydrolyzed whey permeate and valerat...

  10. Utilization of whey with microbiological processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuber, M

    1981-08-01

    Besides biogas production, the following processes and technologies are available in practice for microbiological processing: 1) Lactic acid Using thermophilic lactic acid bacteria, such as Lactobacillus bulgaricus, the procedure is economically performed at 45-50/sup 0/C. Since the bacteria are sensitive to high lactate concentrations, buffering with CaCO/sub 3/ or lime-milk is necessary. 2) Ethanol Using lactose-fermenting yeasts, such as Kluyvermyces fragilis, alcohol production is easily performed at 25/sup 0/C and at pH-values between 4 and 6, the dry matter contents varying between 5 and 15% (concentrated whey or permeate). Addition of ammonium sulphate is necessary. 3) Single Cell Protein One-stage production of single cell protein (SCP) is possible using lactose-fermenting aerobic yeasts (K. fragilis, Candida utilis etc.). The yeast procuced and utilized in animal feeding (as Milke replacement in calf rearing) is currently offered in the Federal Republic of Germany at a price of approximately DM 1.40/kg. Two-stage fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae following lactic acid fermentation and addition of enzymatically hydrolyzed starch can be performed effluent-free.

  11. Cheese whey: A potential resource to transform into bioprotein, functional/nutritional proteins and bioactive peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Jay Shankar Singh; Yan, Song; Pilli, Sridhar; Kumar, Lalit; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2015-11-01

    The byproduct of cheese-producing industries, cheese whey, is considered as an environmental pollutant due to its high BOD and COD concentrations. The high organic load of whey arises from the presence of residual milk nutrients. As demand for milk-derived products is increasing, it leads to increased production of whey, which poses a serious management problem. To overcome this problem, various technological approaches have been employed to convert whey into value-added products. These technological advancements have enhanced whey utilization and about 50% of the total produced whey is now transformed into value-added products such as whey powder, whey protein, whey permeate, bioethanol, biopolymers, hydrogen, methane, electricity bioprotein (single cell protein) and probiotics. Among various value-added products, the transformation of whey into proteinaceous products is attractive and demanding. The main important factor which is attractive for transformation of whey into proteinaceous products is the generally recognized as safe (GRAS) regulatory status of whey. Whey and whey permeate are biotransformed into proteinaceous feed and food-grade bioprotein/single cell protein through fermentation. On the other hand, whey can be directly processed to obtain whey protein concentrate, whey protein isolate, and individual whey proteins. Further, whey proteins are also transformed into bioactive peptides via enzymatic or fermentation processes. The proteinaceous products have applications as functional, nutritional and therapeutic commodities. Whey characteristics, and its transformation processes for proteinaceous products such as bioproteins, functional/nutritional protein and bioactive peptides are covered in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrokinetic characterization of whey protein separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Kristian; Stougård, Anders; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    Cross flow filtration of whey protein has been performed on 3 different membranes. The rejections have been determined by HPLC analysis of the feed and permeate. The pure membranes as well as the fouled membranes have been characterized by measurements of the streaming potential along the membrane...

  13. Prospects for ethanol production from whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, K R

    1978-05-01

    Whey is a by-product of the manufacture of cheese and casein. Casein whey is not as fully utilized as cheese whey although in the last five years commercial processes have been developed to recover the whey proteins, either in denatured form as lactalbumin or in their soluble form as Solac. The removal of the whey proteins makes little difference to the polluting strength or volume of the whey and a crude lactose solution - serum or permeate - remains to be processed. Many processes have been evaluated for the use of this crude lactose solution; one is microbial transformation to produce products such as methane, ethanol, acetone and butanol and etc. The technologies for these processes are well known and it is the economic evaluation which ultimately determines the feasibility of the process being considered. For the purposes of this paper, the prospects for ethanol production have been evaluated. Unless there is a significant reduction in capital costs, it is concluded that ethanol production from whey is not a viable proposition as an energy source for New Zealand. Industrial ethanol (annual imports; 3.5 x 10/sup 6/ 1 CIF value 32 c/1) and potable ethanol production may be worth contemplating.

  14. Resistant starch and protein intake enhances fat oxidation and feelings of fullness in lean and overweight/obese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentile, Christopher L; Ward, Emery; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    and overweight/obese women. METHODS: Women of varying levels of adiposity consumed one of four pancake test meals in a single-blind, randomized crossover design: 1) waxy maize (control) starch (WMS); 2) waxy maize starch and whey protein (WMS+WP); 3) resistant starch (RS); or 4) RS and whey protein (RS...

  15. Cost effective disposal of whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zall, R R

    1980-01-01

    Means of reducing the problem of whey disposal are dealt with, covering inter alia the pre-treatment of cheese milk e.g., by ultrafiltration to lower the whey output, utilization of whey constituents, use of liquid whey for feeding, fermenting whey to produce methane and alcohol, and disposal of whey by irrigation of land or by purification in sewage treatment plants.

  16. Industrial alcohol production via whey and grain fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, B A; Cunningham, M L; Shahani, K M

    1982-01-01

    Six strains of a trained lactose fermenting Kluyveromyces yeast were examined for their ability to utilise lactose in sweet-whey permeate. All strains of K. fragilis tested reduced the concentration of the 5.1% lactose, initially present in whey permeate, to 0.1-0.2% within 48h. Periodic adjustment to maintain the pH during fermentation did not alter the lactose utilisation. The fermentation efficiency of K. fragilis was then compared with that of a mixture of K. fragilis and the classical alcohol fermenter Saccharomyces cerevisiae to verify that no unfavourable interactions occurred in the mixed culture. There were no differences in lactose utilisation or ethanol production between the two groups; both produced approximately 2% ethanol within 24h. This represented approximately 80% of the alcohol which theoretically could be produced from the 5.1% lactose present in the permeate. Whey permeate was also incorporated into the classical grain fermentation by substitution for one-half the water normally added to produce the mash. Fermentation was nearly complete by 36h and alcohol levels ranged from 9.7% for the mixed culture to 9.4% for the K. fragilis and 9.3% for the S. cerevisiae. Since the whey provided significant levels of fermentable sugars, studies were also conducted in which undiluted whey permeate was substituted for all of the water in the mash and the amount of grain was reduced by 20%. At the end of 36h K. fragilis produced 10.9% alcohol and at 60 h of fermentation the level had reached 12.2%. When whole sweet-whey was used, similar levels of alcohol were produced. (Refs. 20).

  17. Operation whey powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, E.

    1987-01-01

    The odyssey of the contaminated whey powder finally has come to an end, and the 5000 tonnes of whey now are designated for decontamination by means of an ion exchange technique. The article throws light upon the political and economic reasons that sent the whey powder off on a chaotic journey. It is worth mentioning in this context that the natural radioactivity of inorganic fertilizers is much higher than that of the whey powder in question. (HP) [de

  18. Cheese whey-induced high-cell-density production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of lactose-rich concentrates from dairy processes for the induction of recombinant gene's expression has not received much attention although they are interesting low cost substrates for production of recombinant enzymes. Applicability of dairy waste for induction of recombinant genes in Escherichia coli was studied. Clones expressing Lactobacillus phage muramidase and Lactobacillus alcohol dehydrogenase were used for the experiments. Results Shake flask cultivations in mineral salt medium showed that cheese whey or deproteinised whey induced gene expression as efficiently as IPTG (isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside or pure lactose. Addition of yeast extract or proteolytically degraded whey proteins did not improve the recombinant protein yield. In contrast, addition of yeast extract to the well-balanced mineral salt medium decreased the product yield. Feeding with glycerol provided sufficient amount of easily assimilable carbon source during the induction period without preventing lactose intake and induction by lactose. High-cell-density fed-batch cultivations showed that product yields comparable to IPTG-induction can be achieved by feeding bacteria with a mixture of glycerol and concentrated whey permeate during the induction. Conclusion Whey and concentrated whey permeate can be applied as an alternative inducer in recombinant high-cell-density fed-batch fermentations. The yield of the recombinant product was comparable to fermentations induced by IPTG. In low-cell-density shake flask experiments the yield was higher with whey or whey permeate than with IPTG.

  19. Production and characterisation of whey protein hydrolysate having antioxidant activity from cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athira, Syamala; Mann, Bimlesh; Saini, Prerna; Sharma, Rajan; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Ashish Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Cheese whey is a rich by-product in nutritional terms, possessing components with high biological value, excellent functional properties, and an inert flavour profile. In the present study, mozzarella cheese whey was ultra-filtrated to remove lactose and mineral. The retentate was hydrolysed with food-grade enzyme alcalase and the hydrolysis conditions (pH, temperature and time) were optimised for maximum antioxidant activity using response surface methodology. Whey protein hydrolysed for 8 h at pH 9 and 55 °C showed a maximum antioxidant activity of 1.18 ± 0.015 µmol Trolox mg(-1) protein. The antioxidant peptides were further enriched by ultra-filtration through a 3 kDa membrane. Seven peptides - β-Lg f(123-131), β-Lg f(122-131), β-Lg f(124-131), β-Lg f(123-134), β-Lg f(122-131), β-Lg f(96-100) and β-Lg f(94-100) - were identified by LC-MS/MS in the 3 kDa permeate of the hydrolysate. The incorporation of whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) in lemon whey drink (5-10 g L(-1)) increased the antioxidant activity from 76% to 90% as compared to control. Hydrolysis of ultra-filtrated retentate of whey can be an energy- and cost-effective method for the direct production of WPH from whey compared to the industrial production of WPH from whey protein concentrate. This study suggests that WPH with good nutritional and biological properties can be effectively used in health-promoting foods as a biofunctional ingredient. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Optimization of fermentation conditions for ethanol production from whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, F J; Izaguirre, M F; Michelena, V; Moreno, B

    1982-01-01

    Optimal conditions for ethanol production in 7% whey solutions by the yeast Candida pseudotropicalis ATCC 8619 included an initial pH of 4.57 and 30 degrees. Complete fermentation of the available lactose took place without supplementary nutrients; additions of N and P salts, yeast extract, or corn steep liquor resulted in increased yeast production and lower ethanol yields. A possible correlation was observed between increases in yeast inocula and lactose utilization and ethanol production rates; 8.35 g ethanol/L was obtained within 22 hours by using a yeast inoculum of 13.9 g/L. No differences in fermentation rates or ethanol yields were observed when whole or deproteinized whey solutions were used. Concentrated whey permeates, obtained after removal of the valuable proteins from whey, can be effectively fermented for ethanol production.

  1. Process of converting starch to glucose and glucose to lactic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, TenLin; Sanville, C.Y.; Coleman, R.D.; Schertz, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    This document describes a method for converting starch into lactic acid of sufficient purity for use as a substrate for biodegradable plastics. The process is designed to work on industrial food waste streams such as potato wastes or cheese whey permeate. For potato waste, {alpha}-amylase and calcium chloride are added to the starch containing waste and incubated at a pH of 4--7, a temperature of 90--130{degree}C, and a pressure above 15 psi for not less than 15 minutes. At this point, glucoamylase is added and the mixture is incubated at a temperature of 50--70{degree}C and a pH below 6.5 for 4 hours. This results in the conversion of more than 90% of the starch into glucose, which is substantially free of microbial contamination. The hydrolysate is filtered, and introduced with additional nutrients to a fermentor containing a lactose producing microorganism to form a fermentation broth. This results in the fermentation of glucose to lactose, which is filtered and subjected to electrodialysis for purification. Conversion of glucose to lactic acid or lactate occurs with an efficiency of over 95%. 1 fig. (MHB)

  2. Effect of whey fermented by Enterococcus faeciumin consortium with Veilonella parvulaon ruminal bacteria in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higor Fábio Carvalho Bezerra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of whey fermented by Enterococus faecium in consortium with Veilonella parvula in vitro on ruminal microorganisms in different substrates, with or without monensin. The first experiment was carried out in a completely randomized design, in a 6 × 3 factorial arrangement (six substrates × three whey levels with two replicates. In experiment two, a 2 × 3 × 4 factorial arrangement (with and without monensin, three foods and four levels of fermented whey was used, in a randomized design with four replicates, totaling 24 treatments. There was no interaction among the wheys and the substrates in the variable for pectin, starch, and carboxymethyl cellulose. There was a greater growth of amylolytic and pectinolytic microorganisms and a lower growth of proteolytic and cellulolytic microorganisms. A significant effect of optical density was found in the media without substrate and that containing trypticase and glucose due to the addition of fermented whey. There was interaction for the pH at 24 hours among whey, food and monensin. For ammonia at 24 hours there was effect for food, whey and monensin, and interaction among factors. For microbial protein at 24 hours, there was effect for food, whey, monensin and no interaction among sources of variation. The use of whey fermented by bacteria Enterococcus faeciumand Veilonella parvula improves microbial protein synthesis by ruminal bacteria in media containing different energy sources. The combination of fermented whey and monensin shows variable results in relation to microbial growth.

  3. Complete utilization of whey for alcohol and methane production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reesen, L; Strube, R

    1978-01-01

    The quality of the rectified alcohol obtained by 2-stage fermentation of whey permeate with Kluyveromyces fragilis followed by distillation was similar to that of rectified alcohol from molasses, though composition in terms of fusel oils, aldehydes, and diacetyls was varied. A contact process of anaerobic biological treatment reduced the COD of the effluent from 7000 to 350 and 1000 mg/L in laboratory and full-scale plant experiments respectively. The gas drawn off from this process contained 63% CH/sub 4/ and was almost odorless because of the low S content in the whey permeate; it had an energy value of 1.8 kg fuel oil/m/sup 3/ permeate and was able to replace 17 to 20% of the fuel oil used at the plant. The alcohol yield was 80% of the theoretical yield, and corresponded to the use of 42 L of whey permeate containing 4.4% lactose for production of 1 L of 100% alcohol and the total energy gain was 30%.

  4. Process for the manufacture of whey products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanie, P

    1980-01-01

    Whey is subjected to ultrafiltration to retain about 10% of the T5, whilst the permeate is demineralized to 7% or less ash in the final product and dried to 3% moisture. The product, containing (in DM) 75% or more lactose, 6% or less protein and 8% or less minerals, is hydrolysed, e.g. with beta-galactosidase. It may be used for replacing sucrose, in the manufacture of a range of foods. Applications include chewing gum, fondants, nougats, chocolate, bakery and confectionery products as well as cream and yoghurt.

  5. Utilization of whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Compositions of wheys from cheesemaking and ultrafiltration are tabulated and some indications of the pollution potential and the cost of disposal of whey are given. The following treatments are described: ion exchange and electrodialysis for demineralization and deacidification; concentration by reverse osmosis, evaporation, spray drying, ''Hatmaker'' (roller) drying, and a drying technique using small Teflon balls; separation of proteins by ''Centri-Whey'' (Alfa-Laval) and ''Bel-Industrie'' heat/acid coagulation, ultrafiltration and other methods; purification and enzymic hydrolysis of lactose, and use of lactose as a substrate for protein biosynthesis by ''Bel'' (lactic acid yeast), ''Devos'' (Saccharomyces yeast) and ''Caliqua-Sireb'' (using fungi) processes. The use of whey for producing ethanol, lactic acid, vinegar, vitamins, antibiotics, enzymes and fats; and development of industrial whey processing in France are reviewed.

  6. Utilization of whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Compositions of wheys from cheesemaking and ultrafiltration are tabulated and some indications of the pollution potential and the cost of disposal of whey are given. The following treatments are described: ion exchange and electrodialysis for demineralization and deacidification; concentration by reverse osmosis, evaporation, spray drying, ''Hatmaker'' (roller) drying, and a drying technique using small Teflon balls; separation of proteins by ''Centri-Whey'' (Alfa-Laval) and ''Bel-Industrie'' heat/acid coagulation, ultrafiltration and other methods; purification and enzymic hydrolysis of lactose, and use of lactose as a substrate for protein biosynthesis by ''Bel'' (lactic acid yeast), ''Devos'' (Saccharomyces yeast) and ''Caliqua-Sireb'' (using fungi) processes. The use of whey for producing ethanol, lactic acid, vinegar, vitamins, antibiotics, enzymes and fats; and development of industrial whey processing in France are reviewed.

  7. Cheese whey protein recovery by ultrafiltration through transglutaminase (TG) catalysis whey protein cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Qiong, Wang; Lan-Wei, Zhang; Xue, Han; Yi, Lu

    2017-01-15

    In whey ultrafiltration (UF) production, two main problems are whey protein recovery and membrane fouling. In this study, membrane coupling protein transglutaminase (TG) catalysis protein cross-linking was investigated under different conditions to find out the best treatment. We found that the optimal conditions for protein recovery involved catalyzing whey protein cross-linking with TG (40U/g whey proteins) at 40°C for 60min at pH 5.0. Under these conditions, the recovery rate was increased 15-20%, lactose rejection rate was decreased by 10%, and relative permeate flux was increase 30-40% compared to the sample without enzyme treatment (control). It was noticeable that the total resistance and cake resistance were decreased after enzyme catalysis. This was mainly due to the increased particle size and decreased zeta potential. Therefore, membrane coupling enzyme catalysis protein cross-linking is a potential means for further use. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Alcohol from whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    A process for ethanol production from whey is described. The lactose is fermented into alcohol via glucose and galactose of yeast. The whey must be pasteurized before fermentation in order to reduce the concentration of microorganisms in the protein fraction. The protein is separated by ultrafiltration. The whey, which is now rather free of bacteria, is introduced into the fermentation unit where yeast cultures are added to it. After fermentation, the yeast slurry is separated and processed into feeding yeast while the mash is passed on to the distillation unit. The alcohol thus produced is of very high quality and may be added to alcoholic beverages.

  9. Physicochemical Properties of Gamma-Irradiated Corn Starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.J.; Lim, S.T.; Kim, S.Y.; Han, S.M.; Kim, H.M.; Kang, I.J.

    2006-01-01

    Structural modification of corn starch by gamma irradiation was evaluated for under dry conditions at varied intensities from 0 to 40 kGy. Under scanning electron microscopy, the granule shape of corn starch was not significantly affected by the irradiation up to 40 kGy. In addition, X-ray diffraction and melting patterns of the irradiated starches were similar to those of the native starch, indicating that crystalline regions in the starch granules were not changed by irradiation. However, the pattern of gel permeation column chromatography showed a significant increase in partial hydrolysis of gamma irradiated starch samples

  10. On Diffusion and Permeation

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen S. L.

    2009-01-01

    concentrations they form a nearly rigid porous glass through which the fluid permeates. The theoretically determined pressure drop is nonlinear in the diffusion regime and linear in the permeation regime, in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements

  11. Starch bioengineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blennow, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Application of starch in industry frequently requires extensive modification. This is usually achieved by chemical and/or physical modification that is time-consuming and often expensive and polluting. To impart functionality as early as possible in the starch production chain, modification can...... be achieved directly as part of the developing starch storage roots, tubers, and seeds and grains of the crop. Starch has been a strong driver for human development and is now the most important energy provider in the diet forcing the development of novel and valuable starch qualities for specific...... applications. Among the most important structures that can be targeted include starch phosphorylation chain transfer/branching generating chemically substituted and chain length-modified starches such as resistant and health-promoting high-amylose starch. Starch bioengineering has been employed for more than...

  12. Review: elimination of bacteriophages in whey and whey products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep eAtamer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available As the cheese market faces strong international competition, the optimization of production processes becomes more important for the economic success of dairy companies. In dairy productions, whey from former cheese batches is frequently re-used to increase the yield, to improve the texture and to increase the nutrient value of the final product. Recycling of whey cream and particulated whey proteins is also routinely performed. Most bacteriophages, however, survive pasteurization and may re-enter the cheese manufacturing process. There is a risk that phages multiply to high numbers during the production. Contamination of whey samples with bacteriophages may cause problems in cheese factories because whey separation often leads to aerosol-borne phages and thus contamination of the factory environment. Furthermore, whey cream or whey proteins used for recycling into cheese matrices may contain thermo-resistant phages. Drained cheese whey can be contaminated with phages as high as 109 phages per mL. When whey batches are concentrated, phage titers can increase significantly by a factor of 10 hindering a complete elimination of phages. To eliminate the risk of fermentation failure during recycling of whey, whey treatments assuring an efficient reduction of phages are indispensable. This review focuses on inactivation of phages in whey by thermal treatment, ultraviolet (UV light irradiation and membrane filtration. Inactivation by heat is the most common procedure. However, application of heat for inactivation of thermo-resistant phages in whey is restricted due to negative effects on the functional properties of native whey proteins. Therefore an alternative strategy applying combined treatments should be favoured - rather than heating the dairy product at extreme temperature/time combinations. By using membrane filtration or UV treatment in combination with thermal treatment, phage numbers in whey can be reduced sufficiently to prevent subsequent

  13. Review: elimination of bacteriophages in whey and whey products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamer, Zeynep; Samtlebe, Meike; Neve, Horst; J. Heller, Knut; Hinrichs, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    As the cheese market faces strong international competition, the optimization of production processes becomes more important for the economic success of dairy companies. In dairy productions, whey from former cheese batches is frequently re-used to increase the yield, to improve the texture and to increase the nutrient value of the final product. Recycling of whey cream and particulated whey proteins is also routinely performed. Most bacteriophages, however, survive pasteurization and may re-enter the cheese manufacturing process. There is a risk that phages multiply to high numbers during the production. Contamination of whey samples with bacteriophages may cause problems in cheese factories because whey separation often leads to aerosol-borne phages and thus contamination of the factory environment. Furthermore, whey cream or whey proteins used for recycling into cheese matrices may contain thermo-resistant phages. Drained cheese whey can be contaminated with phages as high as 109 phages mL-1. When whey batches are concentrated, phage titers can increase significantly by a factor of 10 hindering a complete elimination of phages. To eliminate the risk of fermentation failure during recycling of whey, whey treatments assuring an efficient reduction of phages are indispensable. This review focuses on inactivation of phages in whey by thermal treatment, ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, and membrane filtration. Inactivation by heat is the most common procedure. However, application of heat for inactivation of thermo-resistant phages in whey is restricted due to negative effects on the functional properties of native whey proteins. Therefore an alternative strategy applying combined treatments should be favored – rather than heating the dairy product at extreme temperature/time combinations. By using membrane filtration or UV treatment in combination with thermal treatment, phage numbers in whey can be reduced sufficiently to prevent subsequent phage accumulations

  14. Lactose Hydrolysis in Milk and Dairy Whey Using Microbial β-Galactosidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Dutra Rosolen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at evaluating the influence of enzyme concentration, temperature, and reaction time in the lactose hydrolysis process in milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate, using two commercial β-galactosidases of microbial origins. We used Aspergillus oryzae (at temperatures of 10 and 55°C and Kluyveromyces lactis (at temperatures of 10 and 37°C β-galactosidases, both in 3, 6, and 9 U/mL concentrations. In the temperature of 10°C, the K. lactis β-galactosidase enzyme is more efficient in the milk, cheese whey, and whey permeate lactose hydrolysis when compared to A. oryzae. However, in the enzyme reaction time and concentration conditions evaluated, 100% lactose hydrolysis was not reached using the K. lactis β-galactosidase. The total lactose hydrolysis in whey and permeate was obtained with the A. oryzae enzyme, when using its optimum temperature (55°C, at the end of a 12 h reaction, regardless of the enzyme concentration used. For the lactose present in milk, this result occurred in the concentrations of 6 and 9 U/mL, with the same time and temperature conditions. The studied parameters in the lactose enzymatic hydrolysis are critical for enabling the application of β-galactosidases in the food industry.

  15. Influence of lactose hydrolysis and solids concentration on alcohol production by yeast in acid whey ultrafiltrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' leary, V S; Sutton, C; Bencivengo, M; Sullivan, B; Holsinger, V H

    1977-11-01

    Alcohol yields of 6.5 percent were obtained with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in lactase-hydrolyzed acid whey permeate containing 30 to 35 percent total solids. Maximum alcohol yields obtained with Kluyveromyces fragilis were 4.5 percent in lactase-hydrolyzed acid whey permeate at a solids concentration of 20 percent and 3.7 percent in normal permeate at a solids concentration of 10 percent. Saccharomyces cerevisiae efficiently converted the glucose present in lactase-hydrolyzed whey permeates containing 5 to 30 percent total solids (2 to 13 percent glucose) to alcohol. However, the galactose, which comprised about half the available carbohydrate in lactase-hydrolyzed whey, was not utilized by S. cerevisiae, so that even though alcohol yields were higher when this organism was used, the process was wasteful in that a substantial proportion of the substrate was not fermented. For the process to become commercially feasible, an efficient means of rapidly converting both the galactose and glucose to alcohol must be found.

  16. Obtention and characterization of dried gels prepared with whey proteins, honey and hydrocolloids mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ana C; Torrez Irigoyen, Martín R; Navarro, Alba S; Yamul, Diego K

    2017-11-01

    Large amounts of honey and liquid whey derived from the dairy industry are produced in Argentina. Honey is exported in bulk and whey is transformed into whey protein concentrates and isolates. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of pH, composition and storage time on the properties of dried gels with honey, whey proteins and hydrocolloids. Color properties varied according to pH and composition. The fracture stress of dried gels prepared with corn starch was higher than that of gels prepared with guar gum in all conditions assayed. Young's modulus was higher at pH 7 for both compositions and increased with storage time. Rubbery characteristics were found in dried gels with guar gum, while both corn starch and guar gum made the microstructure rougher. Multivariate analysis showed that samples could be grouped by pH. Panelists preferred pH 7 products over acidic ones, and no significant differences in sensory properties were found using either corn starch or guar gum in the formulation. The results demonstrated that it is possible to generate a new product, which may open new applications for honey and whey in food formulations. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1979 - Whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Whey. 184.1979 Section 184.1979 Food and Drugs FOOD... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1979 Whey. (a)(1) Whey. Whey is the liquid substance obtained by separating the coagulum from milk, cream, or skim milk in cheesemaking. Whey obtained from a procedure, in which...

  18. Alcoholic fermentation of whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, A S; Holland, J W

    1958-09-10

    The lactose of whey and other milk products is rapidly fermented to ethanol by means of Candida pseudotropicalis strain XI. The fermentation is complete in about 12 hours and yields about 45% ethanol based on the weight of lactose. Conditions favoring the fermentation and inhibiting lactic acid production include pH 4.5, 30/sup 0/, and continuous aeration.

  19. Permeation through graphene ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tao; He, Guangyu; Wu, Xu; Ren, Jindong; Guo, Hongxuan; Kong, Yuhan; Iwai, Hideo; Fujita, Daisuke; Gao, Hongjun; Guo, Haiming; Liu, Yingchun; Xu, Mingsheng

    2017-06-01

    Real graphene sheets show limited anti-permeation performance deviating from the ideally flat honeycomb carbon lattice that is impermeable to gases. Ripples in graphene are prevalent and they could significantly influence carrier transport. However, little attention has been paid to the role of ripples in the permeation properties of graphene. Here, we report that gases can permeate through graphene ripples at room temperature. The feasibility of gas permeation through graphene ripples is determined by detecting the initial oxidation sites of Cu surface covered with isolated graphene domain. Nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations demonstrate that the oxygen atom permeation occurs via the formation of C-O-C bond, in which process the energy barrier through the rippled graphene lattice is much smaller than that through a flat graphene lattice, rendering permeation through ripples more favorable. Combining with the recent advances in atoms intercalation between graphene and metal substrate for transfer-free and electrically insulated graphene, this discovery provides new perspectives regarding graphene’s limited anti-permeation performance and evokes for rational design of graphene-based encapsulation for barrier and selective gas separation applications through ripple engineering.

  20. Recovery of Whey Proteins and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Lactose Derived from Casein Whey Using a Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bipasha; Bhattacharjee, Sangita; Bhattacharjee, Chiranjib

    2013-09-01

    In this study, ultrafiltration (UF) of pretreated casein whey was carried out in a cross-flow module fitted with 5 kDa molecular weight cut-off polyethersulfone membrane to recover whey proteins in the retentate and lactose in the permeate. Effects of processing conditions, like transmembrane pressure and pH on permeate flux and rejection were investigated and reported. The polarised layer resistance was found to increase with time during UF even in this high shear device. The lactose concentration in the permeate was measured using dinitro salicylic acid method. Enzymatic kinetic study for lactose hydrolysis was carried out at three different temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 °C using β-galactosidase enzyme. The glucose formed during lactose hydrolysis was analyzed using glucose oxidase-peroxidase method. Kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis of lactose solution was found to follow Michaelis-Menten model and the model parameters were estimated by Lineweaver-Burk plot. The hydrolysis rate was found to be maximum (with Vmax = 5.5091 mmol/L/min) at 30 °C.

  1. 7 CFR 58.813 - Dry whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dry whey. 58.813 Section 58.813 Agriculture... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.813 Dry whey. The quality requirements for dry whey shall be in accordance with the U.S. Standards for Dry Whey. Supplemental Specifications for Plants...

  2. 7 CFR 58.808 - Whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Whey. 58.808 Section 58.808 Agriculture Regulations of....808 Whey. Whey for processing shall be fresh and originate from the processing of products made from... by the Food and Drug Administration may be added to the whey for processing, except when restricted...

  3. 7 CFR 58.717 - Whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Whey. 58.717 Section 58.717 Agriculture Regulations of....717 Whey. Whey used in cheese products should meet the requirements equivalent to USDA Extra Grade except that the moisture requirement for dry whey may be waived. ...

  4. Mechanochemical degradation of potato starch paste under ultrasonic irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-bin; LI Lin; LI Bing; CHEN Ling; GUI Lin

    2006-01-01

    In the paper, changes in the molecular weight, the intrinsic viscosity and the polydispersity (molecular mass distribution) of treated potato starch paste were studied under different ultrasonic conditions which include irradiation time, ultrasonic intensity, potato starch paste concentration, and distance from probe tip on the degradation of potato starch paste. Intrinsic viscosity of potato starch paste was determined following the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) standard practice for dilute solution viscosity of polymers. Molecular mass and polydispersity of potato starch paste were measured on GPC (Gel Permeation Chromatography). The results showed that the average molecular mass and the intrinsic viscosity of starch strongly depended on irradiation time. Degradation increased with prolonged ultrasonic irradiation time, and the increase of ultrasonic intensity could accelerate the degradation, resulting in a faster degradation rate, a lower limiting value and a higher degradation extent. Starch samples were degraded faster in dilute solutions than in concentrated solutions. The molecular mass and the intrinsic viscosity of starch increased with the increase of distance from probe tip. Our results also showed that the polydispersity decreased with ultrasonic irradiation under all ultrasonic conditions. Ultrasonic degradation of potato starch paste occured based on the mechanism of molecular relaxation of starch paste. In the initial stage, ultrasonic degradation of potato starch paste was a random process, and the molecular mass distribution was broad. After that, ultrasonic degradation of potato starch paste changed to a nonrandom process, and the molecular mass distribution became narrower. Finally, molecular mass distribution tended toward a saturation value.

  5. Tritium permeation through iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagi, Hideki; Hayashi, Yasunori

    1989-01-01

    An experimental method for measuring diffusion coefficients and permeation rates of tritium in metals around room temperature has been established, and their values in iron have been obtained by using the method. Permeation rates of tritium and hydrogen through iron were measured by the electrochemical method in which a tritiated aqueous solution was used as a cathodic electrolyte. Tritium and hydrogen were introduced from one side of a membrane specimen by cathodic polarization, while at the other side of the specimen the permeating tritium and hydrogen were extracted by potentiostatical ionization. The amount of permeated hydrogen was obtained by integrating the anodic current, and that of tritium was determined by measuring the radioactivity of the electrolyte sampled from the extraction side. Diffusion coefficients of tritium (D T ) and hydrogen (D H ) were determined from the time lag of tritium and hydrogen permeation. D T =9x10 -10 m 2 /s and D H =4x10 -9 m 2 /s at 286 K for annealed iron specimens. These values of D T and D H were compared with the previous data of the diffusion coefficients of hydrogen and deuterium, and the isotope effect in diffusion was discussed. (orig.)

  6. On Diffusion and Permeation

    KAUST Repository

    Peppin, Stephen S. L.

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion and permeation are discussed within the context of irreversible thermodynamics. A new expression for the generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is obtained which links the permeability to the diffusivity of a two-component solution and contains the poroelastic Biot-Willis coefficient. The theory is illustrated by predicting the concentration and pressure profiles during the filtration of a protein solution. At low concentrations the proteins diffuse independently while at higher concentrations they form a nearly rigid porous glass through which the fluid permeates. The theoretically determined pressure drop is nonlinear in the diffusion regime and linear in the permeation regime, in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. © 2009 Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, New York.

  7. Microfiltration of wheat starch suspensions using multichannel ceramic membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikonić Bojana B.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates influence of different process parameters such as transmembrane pressure, flow rate and concentration of wheat starch suspension on the average permeate flux and permeate flux decline. Used membrane in all experiments was 19 channels ceramic membrane with 0.2 μm pore size. Experimental results were analyzed using response surface methodology. It is observed that the significant average permeate flux enhancement of 200% was achieved by the increase of the transmembrane pressure, while the increase of flow rate and concentration affected the increase in average permeate flux in the range of 40-100%. Permeate flux decline was almost independent of the transmembrane pressure, but the increase of the flow rate, as well as the decrease of the concentration led to decrease of permeate flux decline in the range of 20-50%.

  8. Health issues of whey proteins: 3. Gut health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential of whey protein to promote gut health. The high digestibility and specific amino acid composition of whey protei, as present in whey powder, whey protein concentrate and whey protein isolate, explain why ingestion of whey protein will exert this beneficial effect.

  9. Health issues of whey proteins: 3. gut health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gertjan Schaafsma

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential of whey protein to promote gut health. The high digestibility and specific amino acid composition of whey protein, as present in whey powder, whey protein concentrate and whey protein isolate, explain why ingestion of whey protein will exert this beneficial effect.

  10. Physical Stability of Octenyl Succinate-Modified Polysaccharides and Whey Proteins for Potential Use as Bioactive Carriers in Food Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerta-Gomez, Alex F; Castell-Perez, M Elena

    2015-06-01

    The high cost and potential toxicity of biodegradable polymers like poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) has increased the interest in natural and modified biopolymers as bioactive carriers. This study characterized the physical stability (water sorption and state transition behavior) of selected starch and proteins: octenyl succinate-modified depolymerized waxy corn starch (DWxCn), waxy rice starch (DWxRc), phytoglycogen, whey protein concentrate (80%, WPC), whey protein isolate (WPI), and α-lactalbumin (α-L) to determine their potential as carriers of bioactive compounds under different environmental conditions. After enzyme modification and particle size characterization, glass transition temperature and moisture isotherms were used to characterize the systems. DWxCn and DWxRc had increased water sorption compared to native starch. The level of octenyl succinate anhydrate (OSA) modification (3% and 7%) did not reduce the water sorption of the DWxCn and phytoglycogen samples. The Guggenheim-Andersen-de Boer model indicated that native waxy corn had significantly (P whey proteins had higher glass transition temperature (Tg) values. On the other hand, depolymerized waxy starches at 7%-OSA modification had a "melted" appearance when exposed to environments with high relative humidity (above 70%) after 10 days at 23 °C. The use of depolymerized and OSA-modified polysaccharides blended with proteins created more stable blends of biopolymers. Hence, this biopolymer would be suitable for materials exposed to high humidity environments in food applications. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Simplified tritium permeation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    In this model I seek to provide a simplified approach to solving permeation problems addressed by TMAP4. I will assume that there are m one-dimensional segments with thickness L i , i = 1, 2, hor-ellipsis, m, joined in series with an implantation flux, J i , implanting at the single depth, δ, in the first segment. From material properties and heat transfer considerations, I calculate temperatures at each face of each segment, and from those temperatures I find local diffusivities and solubilities. I assume recombination coefficients K r1 and K r2 are known at the upstream and downstream faces, respectively, but the model will generate Baskes recombination coefficient values on demand. Here I first develop the steady-state concentration equations and then show how trapping considerations can lead to good estimates of permeation transient times

  12. 7 CFR 58.443 - Whey handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Whey handling. 58.443 Section 58.443 Agriculture... Procedures § 58.443 Whey handling. (a) Adequate sanitary facilities shall be provided for the handling of whey. If outside, necessary precautions shall be taken to minimize flies, insects and development of...

  13. Effect of various pre-treatments on the ultrafiltration of sweet cheese whey at about 55 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiddink, J; De Boer, R; Nooy, P F.C.

    1981-11-01

    The permeate flux at 55 degrees C during ultrafiltration of Gouda cheese whey (5.5% TS and 11% TS) can be readily manipulated by applying pre-treatments based on inactivation or removal of calcium. The following pre-treatments were carried out: clarification, decalcificication, desalting, pre-heating at 45, 55, and 60 degrees C for 30 minutes, pre-heating at 55 degrees C for 30 minutes combined with pH adjustment to pH 7.5, 4.5 and 3.0 and preheating at 55 degrees C for 30 minutes (coupled with addition of sodum hexametaphosphate. In particular decalification, clarification and pH adjustment to 7.5 or 3.0 gave high permeate fluxes, while pre- heating for 30 minutes resulted in a moderate flux. The pretreatment not only affects the permeate flux but also the composition and properties of the whey protein concentrate. A high ash content, which also reflects a high calcium and phosphorous content, was obtained with a pretreatment based on pH 7 5, while low ash contents were achieved by desalting and clarification. The solubility of the protein was reduced to some 60-70% if the pH of the pre-treated whey was brought to 3.0 or 7.5. Furthermore, it appeared that the influence of the type of membrane - a tubular and a plate-and-frame module were used - was of minor importance as far as the retention or the composition of the whey protein concentrate was concerned. However, the permeate flux of the two types of equipment was different. Under the applied process conditions the tubular system tended to give a higher permeate flux than did the plate-and-frame system, but the energy consumption of the former was considerably higher. (Refs. 25).

  14. Impact of Ovine Whey Protein Concentrates and Clarification By-Products on the Yield and Quality of Whey Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos D. Pereira; Olga Díaz; Angel Cobos

    2007-01-01

    The effects of the addition of whey protein concentrates and clarification by-products obtained from ovine cheese whey and deproteinized whey (Sorelho) on the yield and quality of the whey cheese (Requeijão) have been evaluated. Whey protein concentrates were obtained by ultrafiltration of skimmed whey and Sorelho. The clarification by-products were obtained after the treatment of the skimmed whey and Sorelho by thermocalcic precipitation and microfiltration with two membranes (0.20 and 0.65 ...

  15. Hyperphosphorylation of cereal starch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carciofi, Massimiliano; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Jensen, Susanne Langgård

    2011-01-01

    Plant starch is naturally phosphorylated at a fraction of the C6 and the C3 hydroxyl groups during its biosynthesis in plastids. Starch phosphate esters are important in starch metabolism and they also generate specific industrial functionality. Cereal grains starch contains little starch bound...... phosphate compared with potato tuber starch and in order to investigate the effect of increased endosperm starch phosphate, the potato starch phosphorylating enzyme glucan water dikinase (StGWD) was overexpressed specifically in the developing barley endosperm. StGWD overexpressors showed wild......-type phenotype. Transgenic cereal grains synthesized starch with higher starch bound phosphate content (7.5 (±0.67) nmol/mg) compared to control lines (0.8 (±0.05) nmol/mg) with starch granules showing altered morphology and lower melting enthalpy. Our data indicate specific action of GWD during starch...

  16. Aroma interactions with starch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anders Dysted

    Starches are used to enhance aroma perception in low-fat foods. Aroma compounds can bind physically to the starch in grooves on the surface or they can form complexes inside amylose helices. This study has been divided into two parts: one part regarding binding of aromas to starches and their aroma......-release, and another part regarding stimulation of a fungal secretome using different carbohydrates. In the first part, nine aromas and one aroma-mixture were mixed with nine different starches, including genetically modified starches. The objective of this sub-project was to bind aromas to the starches to 15 weight......-percent. Aroma binding was tested on both amorphous starches and on native starch granules. A series of aldehydes and alcohols were also tested for binding to the starches. The aromas with the highest volatility were positively retained by starch, whereas for aromas with a lower volatility the starch had...

  17. 40 CFR 405.110 - Applicability; description of the condensed whey subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... condensed whey subcategory. 405.110 Section 405.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Condensed Whey Subcategory § 405.110 Applicability; description of the condensed whey subcategory. The... whey and condensed acid whey. ...

  18. Novel Functional Whey-Based Drinks with Great Potential in the Dairy Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Henriques

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the production of liquid whey protein concentrates by ultrafiltration followed by thermal denaturation and homogenization of the ultrafiltrated concentrate, as well as on the production of ultrafiltrated permeates concentrated by reverse osmosis. Kefir grains (fresh and thawed and/or commercial probiotic bacteria were inoculated in both liquid whey protein concentrates and concentrated ultrafiltrated permeates and grown at 25 °C for 24 h for the manufacture of fermented drinks. The physicochemical characterization (pH, titratable acidity, viscosity, and content of total solids, ash, fat and proteins of the obtained drinks was then assessed and compared. Enumeration of viable microorganisms was carried out immediately aft er inoculation (at 0 h, during the fermentation period (at 12 and 24 h and during refrigerated storage (at 48, 168 and 336 h. The fermented drinks showed acceptable physicochemical and sensorial properties, and contained above 7 log CFU/mL of lactococci and lactobacilli and 6 log CFU/mL of yeasts after 14 days of refrigerated storage, which is in agreement with the standards required by international organizations like European Food Safety Authority (EFSA and Food and Drug Administration (FDA for products containing probiotics. In summary, the strategy developed in this work contributes to the expansion of the applications of products derived from whey fractionation for the design of novel functional foods.

  19. Novel Functional Whey-Based Drinks with Great Potential in the Dairy Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carlos; Gomes, David; Gomez-Zavaglia, Andrea; de Antoni, Graciela

    2015-01-01

    Summary This work focuses on the production of liquid whey protein concentrates by ultrafiltration followed by thermal denaturation and homogenization of the ultrafiltrated concentrate, as well as on the production of ultrafiltrated permeates concentrated by reverse osmosis. Kefir grains (fresh and thawed) and/or commercial probiotic bacteria were inoculated in both liquid whey protein concentrates and concentrated ultrafiltrated permeates and grown at 25 °C for 24 h for the manufacture of fermented drinks. The physicochemical characterization (pH, titratable acidity, viscosity, and content of total solids, ash, fat and proteins) of the obtained drinks was then assessed and compared. Enumeration of viable microorganisms was carried out immediately after inoculation (at 0 h), during the fermentation period (at 12 and 24 h) and during refrigerated storage (at 48, 168 and 336 h). The fermented drinks showed acceptable physicochemical and sensorial properties, and contained above 7 log CFU/mL of lactococci and lactobacilli and 6 log CFU/mL of yeasts after 14 days of refrigerated storage, which is in agreement with the standards required by international organizations like European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for products containing probiotics. In summary, the strategy developed in this work contributes to the expansion of the applications of products derived from whey fractionation for the design of novel functional foods. PMID:27904362

  20. Production of n-butanol from whey filtrate using Clostridium acetobutylicum NCIB 2951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, I S

    1980-01-01

    Production of the important solvent n-butanol by traditional fermentation of corn mash or molasses by Clostridium acetobutylicum produces a mixed end product in the ratio butanol:acetone:ethanol 6:3:1. Laboratory experiments have shown that H2SO4 casein whey after ultrafiltration to remove protein (DSA 40, 5658) is a possible substrate for butanol fermentation, which would also reduce a major waste disposal problem. The organism was maintained in the casein whey permeate; inocula were heat-shocked at 70 degrees Celcius for 90 s, followed by incubation at 30 degrees Celcius for 3 days to provide working cultures. Whey permeate supplemented with 0.5% (w/v) yeast extract was adjusted to pH 6.5 with 1 M NH4OH, inoculated with 5% culture and incubated at 30 degrees Celcius. Cell counts were recorded daily, together with residual lactose concentration and production of butyric acid, acetic acid, butanol, acetone and ethanol (determined by GLC). Initially butyric and acetic acids were produced, but after 2 days conversion to butanol and acetone began. Cell growth ceased after 3 days, but conversion continued to reach a maximum yield of butanol after 5 days, in the favourable ratio of butanol:acetone:ethanol of 10:1:1. Inhibition by end products prevented complete utilization of the lactose. Omission of the yeast supplement produced a slower but similar fermentation reaching a butanol yield of 1.3% after 7 days. The ultrafiltration may not be necessary. (Refs. 3).

  1. Tritium permeation and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, R.A.; Hamilton, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The paper is an appendix to a study of the reactor relevance of the NET design concept. The latter study examines whether the technologies and design principles proposed for NET can be directly extrapolated to a demonstration (DEMO) reactor. In this appendix, tritium transport in the DEMO breeding blanket is considered with emphasis on the permeation rate from the lithium-lead breeder into the coolant. A computational model used to calculate the tritium transport in the breeder blanket is described. Results are reported for the tritium transport in the NET/INTOR type blanket as well as the DEMO blanket in order to provide a comparison. In addition, results are presented for the helium coolant tritium extraction analysis. (U.K.)

  2. Spray dried microparticles of chia oil using emulsion stabilized by whey protein concentrate and pectin by electrostatic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noello, C; Carvalho, A G S; Silva, V M; Hubinger, M D

    2016-11-01

    Chia seed oil has a high content of α-linolenic acid (60%) and linoleic acid (20%). Use of this oil in different products is limited due to its liquid state, and the presence of insaturation is a trigger for oxidation. In this context, to facilitate the incorporation of chia oil in food products and increase its protection against oxidation, the aim of this work was to produce chia oil microparticles by spray drying using emulsions stabilized by whey protein concentrate (ζ-potential +13.4 at pH3.8) and pectin (ζ-potential -40.4 at pH3.8) through the electrostatic layer-by-layer deposition technique and emulsions prepared with only whey protein concentrate. Emulsions stabilized by whey protein concentrate and stabilized by whey protein concentrate-pectin were prepared using maltodextrin (10 DE) and modified starch (Hi-Cap® 100). They were characterized in relation to stability, droplet size, ζ-Potential and optical microscopy. The microparticles were characterized in relation to moisture content, water activity, particle size, microstructure and oxidative stability by the Rancimat method. Emulsions stabilized by whey protein concentrate-pectin with added maltodextrin 10 DE and emulsions stabilized by whey protein concentrate with added modified starch (Hi-Cap® 100) were stable after 24h. Emulsions stabilized by whey protein concentrate and by whey protein concentrate-pectin showed droplets with mean diameter ranging from 0.80 to 1.31μm, respectively and ζ-potential varying from -6.9 to -27.43mV, respectively. After spray drying, the microparticles showed an mean diameter ranging from 7.00 to 9.00μm. All samples presented high encapsulation efficiency values, above 99%. Microparticles produced with modified starch showed a smoother spherical surface than particles with maltodextrin 10 DE, which presented a wrinkled surface. All microparticles exhibited higher oxidative stability than chia oil in pure form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving Baking Quality of Weak Gluten Semolina Using Ovine Whey Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Secchi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the addition of ovine whey powder at 5%, 10%, and 15% on bread quality was studied. Two different types of semolina were used, one being a commercial blend with strong and tenacious gluten (48T and the other coming from one single cultivar, characterized for having weak and sticky gluten (4T. Two different types of typical Mediterranean bread were produced, pan bread and flat bread, and their quality characteristics were measured, together with their shelf life. The volume of 4T pan bread was improved by the addition of 5% ovine whey powder. In the case of 48T, the volume of bread was negatively affected by the addition of ovine whey powder. Moreover, flat bread made with 4T was more extensible after the addition of ovine whey powder and showed lower starch retrogradation over time than the same type of bread made with 48T. Among the different pan bread types, consumers preferred 4T with 5% of substitution, which also showed an improved cell size distribution in the crumb.

  4. Effects of partial replacement of dietary starch from barley or corn with lactose on ruminal function, short-chain fatty acid absorption, nitrogen utilization, and production performance of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibisa, G E; Gorka, P; Penner, G B; Berthiaume, R; Mutsvangwa, T

    2015-04-01

    In cows fed diets based on corn-alfalfa silage, replacing starch with sugar improves milk production. Although the rate of ruminal fermentation of sugar is more rapid than that of starch, evidence has been found that feeding sugar as a partial replacement for starch does not negatively affect ruminal pH despite increasing diet fermentability. The mechanism(s) for this desirable response are unknown. Our objective was to determine the effects of replacing barley or corn starch with lactose (as dried whey permeate; DWP) on ruminal function, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption, and nitrogen (N) utilization in dairy cows. Eight lactating cows were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 28-d periods and source of starch (barley vs. corn) and level of DWP (0 vs. 6%, DM basis) as treatment factors. Four cows in 1 Latin square were ruminally cannulated for the measurement of ruminal function, SCFA absorption, and N utilization. Dry matter intake and milk and milk component yields did not differ with diet. The dietary addition of DWP tended to increase ruminal butyrate concentration (13.6 vs. 12.2 mmol/L), and increased the Cl(-)-competitive absorption rates for acetate and propionate. There was no sugar effect on minimum ruminal pH, and the duration and area when ruminal pH was below 5.8. Minimum ruminal pH tended to be lower in cows fed barley compared with those fed corn (5.47 vs. 5.61). The duration when ruminal pH was below pH 5.8 tended to be shorter (186 vs. 235 min/d), whereas the area (pH × min/d) that pH was below 5.8 was smaller (47 vs. 111) on the corn than barley diets. Cows fed the high- compared with the low-sugar diet had lower ruminal NH3-N concentration. Feeding the high-sugar diet tended to increase apparent total-tract digestibility of dry matter and organic matters and increased apparent total-tract digestibility of fat. Apparent total-tract digestibility of N tended to be greater in cows fed barley compared with those fed corn

  5. Dairy workers develop whey to sweeten profits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-02-11

    Scientists at the Milk Marketing Board are reported to have developed an enzyme process that will convert whey into protein for animal feed and a liquid sweetener for the food industry. In the process whey wastes are forced under pressure through a column, about 0.5m wide, packed with ceramic beads which carry the enzyme Beta- galactosidase. The enzyme converts whey to a mixture of protein and liquid sweeteners, but is not itself consumed. At present, a pilot plant processes 10,000 liters of whey every day, but when working at full capacity the plant can double or treble that output.

  6. Nutritional and functional properties of whey proteins concentrate and isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Herceg

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein fractions represent 18 - 20 % of total milk nitrogen content. Nutritional value in addition to diverse physico - chemical and functional properties make whey proteins highly suitable for application in foodstuffs. In the most cases, whey proteins are used because of their functional properties. Whey proteins possess favourable functional characteristics such as gelling, water binding, emulsification and foaming ability. Due to application of new process techniques (membrane fractionation techniques, it is possible to produce various whey - protein based products. The most important products based on the whey proteins are whey protein concentrates (WPC and whey protein isolates (WPI. The aim of this paper was to give comprehensive review of nutritional and functional properties of the most common used whey proteins (whey protein concentrate - WPC and whey protein isolate - WPI in the food industry.

  7. Metabolomics investigation of whey intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanstrup, Jan

    syndrome are complex disorders and are not caused by a high-calorie diet and low exercise level alone. The specific nature of the nutrients, independent of their caloric value, also play a role. The question is which. In the quest to answer this question the qualitative intake of protein is of special...... and prevention of the metabolic syndrome related to obesity and diabetes. In this thesis the effects of whey intake on the human metabolome was investigated using a metabolomics approach. We demonstrated that intake of whey causes a decreased rate of gastric emptying compared to other protein sources....... Therefore this thesis will also present and discuss state-of-the-art tools for computer-assisted compound identification, including: annotation of adducts and fragments, determination of the molecular ion, in silico fragmentation, retention time mapping between analytical systems and de novo retention time...

  8. Cheese whey management: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prazeres, Ana R; Carvalho, Fátima; Rivas, Javier

    2012-11-15

    Cheese whey is simultaneously an effluent with nutritional value and a strong organic and saline content. Cheese whey management has been focused in the development of biological treatments without valorization; biological treatments with valorization; physicochemical treatments and direct land application. In the first case, aerobic digestion is reported. In the second case, six main processes are described in the literature: anaerobic digestion, lactose hydrolysis, fermentation to ethanol, hydrogen or lactic acid and direct production of electricity through microbial fuel cells. Thermal and isoelectric precipitation, thermocalcic precipitation, coagulation/flocculation, acid precipitation, electrochemical and membrane technologies have been considered as possible and attractive physicochemical processes to valorize or treat cheese whey. The direct land application is a common and longstanding practice, although some precautions are required. In this review, these different solutions are analyzed. The paper describes the main reactors used, the influence of the main operating variables, the microorganisms or reagents employed and the characterizations of the final effluent principally in terms of chemical oxygen demand. In addition, the experimental conditions and the main results reported in the literature are compiled. Finally, the comparison between the different treatment alternatives and the presentation of potential treatment lines are postulated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Whey powder sterilization by ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic, M.; Salatic, Z.; Markov, S.

    1988-01-01

    Whey powder was sterilized by gamma waves application. As a source of irridiation isotope 60Co was used in Institute of Nuclear sciences B oris Kidrich , Vincha-Belgrade (Yugoslavia). The applied doses were: a, b, c, d, and e Kgy. The dose d was radappertization. After whey powder irradiation no adverse changes of organoleptic properties were noticed

  10. Casein - whey protein interactions in heated milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasbinder, Astrid Jolanda

    2002-01-01

    Heating of milk is an essential step in the processing of various dairy products, like for example yoghurt. A major consequence of the heat treatment is the denaturation of whey proteins, which either associate with the casein micelle or form soluble whey protein aggregates. By combination of

  11. 21 CFR 184.1979a - Reduced lactose whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Reduced lactose whey. 184.1979a Section 184.1979a... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1979a Reduced lactose whey. (a) Reduced lactose whey is the substance obtained by the removal of lactose from whey. The lactose content of the finished...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1979b - Reduced minerals whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Reduced minerals whey. 184.1979b Section 184.1979b... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1979b Reduced minerals whey. (a) Reduced minerals whey is the substance obtained by the removal of a portion of the minerals from whey. The dry product...

  13. Starch degradation by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruzinec, J.; Hola, O.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of high energy irradiation on various starch samples was studied. The radiation dose varied between 43 and 200.9 kGy. The viscosity of starch samples were determined by Hoeppler's method. The percentual solubility of the matter in dry starch was evaluated. The viscosity and solubility values are presented. (author) 14 refs

  14. Thermomechanical treatment of starch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goot, van der A.J.; Einde, van den R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Starch is used as a major component in many food and nonfood applications and determines the overall product properties to a large extent. It is therefore important to understand the effect of processing on starch. Many starch-based products are produced using a thermal as well as a mechanical

  15. Impact of Ovine Whey Protein Concentrates and Clarification By-Products on the Yield and Quality of Whey Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos D. Pereira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the addition of whey protein concentrates and clarification by-products obtained from ovine cheese whey and deproteinized whey (Sorelho on the yield and quality of the whey cheese (Requeijão have been evaluated. Whey protein concentrates were obtained by ultrafiltration of skimmed whey and Sorelho. The clarification by-products were obtained after the treatment of the skimmed whey and Sorelho by thermocalcic precipitation and microfiltration with two membranes (0.20 and 0.65 μm pore size. Next, the liophilization of the corresponding retentates was carried out. Each powder was added in three different mass ratios: 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 %. The addition of the powders caused higher yields of the whey cheese – mainly the one with the additional whey powder – but it did not affect the strength of the products. The retention of water and other components of whey and milk in the whey cheese was influenced by the protein composition of the powders. In relation to colour parameters, the whey cheese manufactured with ultrafiltration and microfiltration retentate powders showed lower values of ligthness than the control whey cheese – mainly the whey cheese with 1.5 % of added powders. The microstructure constituted of small aggregates in the whey cheese manufactured with ultrafiltration and 0.20-μm microfiltration retentate powders and also by large, smooth structures in the other whey cheeses, especially in batches with added Sorelho powders.

  16. Use of Whey and Whey Preparations in the Food Industry – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Królczyk Jolanta B.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The interest in whey and whey preparations has considerably increased in recent years. Whey and whey preparations are the so-called “forgotten treasure” and, because of their unique properties, they have been “rediscovered” and have been increasingly frequently and successfully used by various production plants in the food industry. They have also been eagerly purchased by consumers who are aware of the role of whey preparations in adequate human nutrition. For many years, there has been a tendency in the food processing industry to use substitutes of ingredients in recipes of many products. This situation can be observed in the case of foods with reduced fat and sugar, or products for lacto-ovo-vegetarians. Whey - and more specifically, its preparations - can also be used as a substitute. According to many literature sources, its use can have a positive impact not only on the consumers’ health but also on the finances of many companies, by reducing the costs of raw materials, and thus production costs. This review paper presents selected uses of whey and whey preparations in the food industry. The uses of whey discussed include: meat and meat products, reduced-fat products, yoghurts and ice creams, cheeses, bakery products, confectionery and pastry products, infant formulas, and whey drinks.

  17. Whey based beverages - new generation of dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jeličić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Whey is a by product in the process of cheese production. Composition and characteristics of whey are depending on the production technology, the end product and the quality of used milk. Liquid whey consists of approximately 93% water and contains almost 50% of total solids present in the milk of which lactose is main constituent. Lactose is the main constituent of whey while proteins represent less than 1% of total solids. Minerals and vitamins are present in fewer amounts also. Production of whey based beverages started in 1970's and until today a wide range of different whey based beverages has been developed. They can be produced from native sweet or acid whey, from deproteinised whey, from native whey which was diluted with water, from whey powder or by whey fermentation. Non alcoholic whey beverages include wide range of products obtained by mixing native sweet, diluted or acid whey with different additives like tropical fruits (but also other fruits like apples, pears, strawberries or cranberries, crops and their products (mainly bran, isolates of vegetable proteins, CO2, chocolate, cocoa, vanilla extracts and other aromatizing agents. Special attention is being paid to production of fermented whey beverages with probiotic bacteria where the most important step is the choice of suitable culture of bacteria in order to produce functional beverage with high nutritional value and acceptable sensory characteristics. Non alcoholic whey beverages also include dietetic beverages, drinks with hydrolyzed lactose, milk like drinks and powder drinks. Whey is a very good raw material for production of alcoholic beverages due to the fact that the main constituent of the solid content is lactose (about 70%. Alcoholic whey beverages include drinks with small amount of alcohol (up to 1,5%, whey beer and whey wine. Whey beverages are suitable for wide range of consumers – from children to the elderly ones. They have very high nutritional value and good

  18. Whey cheese: membrane technology to increase yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Francisco; González, Pablo; Muro, Claudia

    2016-02-01

    Sweet cheese whey has been used to obtain whey cheese without the addition of milk. Pre-treated whey was concentrated by nanofiltration (NF) at different concentration ratios (2, 2.5 and 2.8) or by reverse osmosis (RO) (2-3 times). After the concentration, whey was acidified with lactic acid until a final pH of 4.6-4.8, and heated to temperatures between 85 and 90 °C. The coagulated fraction (supernatant) was collected and freely drained over 4 h. The cheese-whey yield and protein, fat, lactose and ash recoveries in the final product were calculated. The membrane pre-concentration step caused an increase in the whey-cheese yield. The final composition of products was compared with traditional cheese-whey manufacture products (without membrane concentration). Final cheese yields found were to be between 5 and 19.6%, which are higher than those achieved using the traditional 'Requesón' process.

  19. Fermented probiotic beverages based on acid whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skryplonek, Katarzyna; Jasińska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Production of fermented probiotic beverages can be a good method for acid whey usage. The obtained products combine a high nutritional value of whey with health benefits claimed for probiotic bacteria. The aim of the study was to define quality properties of beverages based on fresh acid whey and milk with addition of buttermilk powder or sweet whey powder. Samples were inoculated with two strains of commercial probiotic cultures: Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 or Bifidobacterium animalis Bb-12. After fermentation, samples were stored at refrigerated conditions. After 1, 4, 7, 14 and 21 days sensory characteristics, hardness, acetaldehyde content, titratable acidity, pH acidity and count of bacteria cells were evaluated. Throughout all storage period, the number of bacteria was higher than 8 log cfu/ml in the all samples. Beverages with La-5 strain had higher hardness and acidity, whilst samples with Bb-12 contained more acetaldehyde. Samples with buttermilk powder had better sensory properties than with sweet whey powder. Obtained products made of acid whey combined with milk and fortified with buttermilk powder or sweet whey powder, are good medium for growth and survival of examined probiotic bacteria strains. The level of bacteria was sufficient to provide health benefits to consumers.

  20. Sustainable alternative for the food industry: converting whey and orange juice into a micro-filtered beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fagnani

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Enhancing industrial sustainability by converting whey into alternative high value-added products is a scientific trend in food science and technology. However, without other ingredients, rennet, or sour, whey has an unappetizing flavor. This sensory challenge can be overcome by blending it with citrus flavor from orange juice. This study assessed a micro-filtered beverage from whey and orange juice without enzymatic treatment. Four formulations (27:10, 8.6:10, 2.4:10 and 1:10 v/v whey:juice ratio were processed through a 1.4 μm microfiltration system with four different transmembrane pressures (1, 2, 3, and 4.15 bar and then stored at 5 °C for 28 days. The micro-filtered beverage was analyzed for physicochemical, sensorial and microbial changes. It was possible overcome the technological challenges of orange juice microfiltration without enzymatic treatment with high transmembrane pressures. The whey:orange juice ratio was also decisive for permeation. A clear beverage with lower viscosity, turbidity, and protein levels was obtained, without altering mineral concentrations thus showing that the product has good capacity for hydration. The beverage presented good microbiological quality and remained stable for 28 days at 5 °C. Sensory evaluation data indicate that the beverage can be directed to young people and women, regardless of their physical activity. The combination of whey and orange juice can be explored industrially as a micro-filtered beverage, with satisfactory results of physicochemical, microbiological and sensory acceptance.

  1. Thermoplastic starch materials prepared from rice starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontes, Barbara R.B.; Curvelo, Antonio A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Rice starch is a source still little studied for the preparation of thermoplastic materials. However, its characteristics, such as the presence of proteins, fats and fibers may turn into thermoplastics with a better performance. The present study intends the evaluation of the viability of making starch thermoplastic from rice starch and glycerol as plasticizer. The results of X-ray diffraction and scanning electronic microscopy demonstrate the thermoplastic acquisition. The increase of plasticizer content brings on more hydrophilic thermoplastics with less resistance to tension and elongation at break. (author)

  2. Methane production from cheese whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, J Q; Liao, P H; Lo, K V

    1988-01-01

    Cheese whey was treated in a 17.5-litre laboratory-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor operated over a range of hydraulic retention times and organic loading rates. The reactor performance was determined in terms of methane production, volatile fatty acids conversion and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction. At a constant influent strength, the methane production rate decreased with decreasing hydraulic retention time. At constant hydraulic retention time the methane production rate increased as the influent strength was increased up to a concentration of 28.8 g COD litre/sup -1/. The methane production rate was similar for two influent concentrations studied at hydraulic retention times longer than 10 days. The effect of short hydraulic retention times on methane production rate was more pronounced for the higher influent concentration than for the lower influent concentration. The highest methane production rate of 9.57 litres CH/sub 4/ litre/sup -1/ feed day/sup -1/ was obtained at a loading rate of 5.96 g/sup -1/ COD litre/sup -1/ and an influent concentration of 28.8 g COD litre/sup -1/. A high treatment efficiency in terms of chemical oxygen demand reduction was obtained. In general, over 98% removal of chemical oxygen demand was achieved. The results indicated that anaerobic digestion of cheese whey using an upflow sludge blanket reactor could reduce pollution strength and produce energy for a cheese plant.

  3. Microbial ecophysiology of whey biomethanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartrain, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The biodegradation of lactose into methane was investigated in a chemostat ecosystem under steady state conditions in order to understand the intermediary metabolism and the responsible bacterial species; and, to model the anaerobic digestion of whey in a continuous contact process. Radioactive carbon tracer studies showed that lactose biomethanation occurred in three distinct but simultaneous metabolic steps with lactate, acetate and hydrogen/carbon dioxide as the major intermediary metabolites. Mixed culture studies on the ecosystem composition demonstrated that multiple species of well described anaerobic bacteria were participating in each of three trophic groups: hydrolytic, acetogenic, and methanogenic. Biomethanation performance studies analyzed the dynamics of bacterial species composition and competition in relation to dilution rate. These results demonstrated that the hydrolytic and acetogenic bacteria were coupled to the methanogenic bacteria by interspecies hydrogen transfer; that species competition and dominance for a given carbon metabolite or for hydrogen was related to specific substrate transformation kinetic properties; and that the data was useful for describing biomethanation with a mechanistic model. Starter cultures were developed by employing freeze drying techniques to preserve either a defined culture comprised of four prevalent digestor species or an adapted chemostat sludge. Both of these starter cultures were shown to effectively degrade lactose using either a defined medium or raw whey as biomethanation starting substrate

  4. Fouling behavior and performance of microfiltration membranes for whey treatment in steady and unsteady-state conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rezaei

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Whey pretreatment for protein purification is one of the main applications of cross-flow microfiltration before an ultrafiltration process. In this paper, the effects of the operating pressure and crossflow velocity on the membrane performance and the individual resistances in microfiltration of whey for both unsteady and steady-state conditions were investigated for two 0.45 µm mean pore size polymeric membranes, Polyethersulfone (PES and Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF. A laboratory-scale microfiltration setup with a flat rectangular module was used. The Reynolds number and operating pressure showed positive and negative effects on the amount of all resistances, respectively. The dominant effect of the concentration polarization and cake resistances was demonstrated by using a "Resistance-in-Series" model for unsteadystate investigations, which could vary during the filtration time. An empirical model revealed a linear relationship between the Reynolds number and permeate flux and a second-order polynomial relationship between the transmembrane pressure and the permeate flux. This empirical correlation, implemented for the limited range of MF operating parameters tested in this article for whey protein, was validated with experimental data and showed good agreement between calculated and experimental data.

  5. Effects of single and dual physical modifications on pinhão starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Vânia Zanella; Vanier, Nathan Levien; Deon, Vinicius Gonçalves; Moomand, Khalid; El Halal, Shanise Lisie Mello; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa; Lim, Loong-Tak; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra

    2015-11-15

    Pinhão starch was modified by annealing (ANN), heat-moisture (HMT) or sonication (SNT) treatments. The starch was also modified by a combination of these treatments (ANN-HMT, ANN-SNT, HMT-ANN, HMT-SNT, SNT-ANN, SNT-HMT). Whole starch and debranched starch fractions were analyzed by gel-permeation chromatography. Moreover, crystallinity, morphology, swelling power, solubility, pasting and gelatinization characteristics were evaluated. Native and single ANN and SNT-treated starches exhibited a CA-type crystalline structure while other modified starches showed an A-type structure. The relative crystallinity increased in ANN-treated starches and decreased in single HMT- and SNT-treated starches. The ANN, HMT and SNT did not provide visible cracks, notches or grooves to pinhão starch granule. SNT applied as second treatment was able to increase the peak viscosity of single ANN- and HMT-treated starches. HMT used alone or in dual modifications promoted the strongest effect on gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Process for teating whey by enzymic hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocquet, J L

    1980-01-01

    In the process lactose is converted into glucose and galactose, with demineralization to a level of at least 50%, before the hydrolysis. A bacteriologically stable hydrolysed whey is obtained and may be used in foods for human consumption.

  7. In-pile tritium permeation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Watts, K.D.; Kershner, C.J.; Rogers, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    The experiments in progress are examining various aspects of the permeation of hydrogen isotopes through fusion materials. Of particular importance will be the measurement of permeation due to ion implantation in the presence of a neutron radiation field. Theoretical and early experimental results for these experiments have suggested that sufficient tritium will permeate fusion reactor interior structures that development of a permeation barrier will be needed. (orig.)

  8. In-pile tritium permeation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Watts, K.D. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls (USA)); Kershner, C.J.; Rogers, M.L. (Monsanto Research Corp., Miamisburg, OH (USA). Mound Facility)

    The experiments in progress are examining various aspects of the permeation of hydrogen isotopes through fusion materials. Of particular importance will be the measurement of permeation due to ion implantation in the presence of a neutron radiation field. Theoretical and early experimental results for these experiments have suggested that sufficient tritium will permeate fusion reactor interior structures that development of a permeation barrier will be needed.

  9. Quality of fermented whey beverage with milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakin Marica B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most economical ways of whey processing is the production of beverages, that represents a single process that exploits all the potential of whey as a raw material. Functional and sensory characteristics of whey based beverages are a criterion that is crucial to the marketing of products and win over consumers. The aim of this study was to determine nutritional and functional characteristics of fermented whey beverage with milk and commercial ABY-6 culture. The results showed that the applied starter culture can be used for the production of fermented whey based beverage with satisfactory nutritional properties. Addition of milk was important not only in the nutritional quality of the resulting product, but also improved the taste, the homogeneity and stability. Analysis of the chemical composition of fermented whey based beverage and nutritional information about it indicates that the product is a good source of protein and calcium. Fermented beverage contained 8.07 log (CFU/mL, showed antioxidant activity of at least 38.1% and the titratable acidity of 28.2°SH corresponding to the acidity of the product in this category. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31017 i br. 451-03-00605/2012-16/85

  10. Protein-peptide interactions in mixtures of whey peptides and whey proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creusot, N.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of several conditions on the amounts and compositions of aggregates formed in mixtures of whey protein hydrolysate, made with Bacillus licheniformis protease, and whey protein isolate were investigated using response surface methodology. Next, the peptides present in the aggregates were

  11. Design and construction of a 7,500 liter immobilized cell reactor-separator for ethanol production from whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.

    1992-12-31

    A 7,500 liter reactor/separator has been constructed for the production of ethanol from concentrated whey permeate. This unit is sited in Hopkinton IA, across the street from a whey generating cheese plant A two phase construction project consisting of (1) building and testing a reactor/separator with a solvent absorber in a single unified housing, and (2) building and testing an extractive distillation/product stripper for the recovery of anhydrous ethanol is under way. The design capacity of this unit is 250,000 gal/yr of anhydrous product. Design and construction details of the reactor/absorber separator are given, and design parameters for the extractive distillation system are described.

  12. Accelerated fermentation of cheese whey. Developing the system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtle, R M; Claydon, T J

    1971-01-01

    A system for accelerated fermentation of cheese wheys requires a mixed yeast and lactose-fermenting bacterial culture. The air flow required (110 ml/min/1./1% of lactose) was proportional to the concentration of wheys in the media. Yeast cell-mass production by accelerated fermentation was equal to or greater than the whey concentration factor when compared with yeast production of single yeast strain production on unconcentrated wheys. Generally, on triple strength wheys, yeast production was approximately 1 lb/gallon of medium. Fermentation media formulas were developed with whey analysis, shake culture, and fermentor trials. The formula used with a specific whey must be adequate to supplement the mineral deficiencies in the whey and to provide trace elements and nutrients essential for maximum microbial growth. High-rate aeration was required for both respiration of the microbial culture and to purge the ferment of volatile metabolites, whose presence depressed microbial cell synthesis.

  13. Hydrogen permeation preventive structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kimichika; Nakahigashi, Shigeo; Imura, Masashi; Terasawa, Michitaka; Ebisawa, Katsuyuki.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To provide highly practical wall materials for use in thermonuclear reactors capable of effectively preventing the permeation of hydrogen isotopes such as tritium thereby preventing the contamination of coolants. Constitution: Helium gas is injected into or at the surface of base materials comprising stainless steel plates to form a helium gas region. Alternatively, boron, nitrogen or the compound thereof having a greater helium forming nuclear reaction cross section than that of the base materials is mixed or injected into the base material to form the helium gas region through (n,α) reaction under neutron irradiation. Since the helium gas region constitutes a diffusion barrier for the tritium as the hydrogen isotope, the permeation amount of tritium is significantly suppressed. Helium gas bubbles or lattice defects are formed in the helium gas region under the neutron irradiation, by which the hydrogen isotope capturing effect can also be effected. In this way, permeation of the hydrogen isotope, contamination of the coolants, etc. can be prevented to provide great practical effectives. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Deuterium permeation through Flibe facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukada, S.; Anderl, R.A.; Smolik, G.R.

    2004-01-01

    Experiment of deuterium permeation through Ni facing with purified Flibe is being carried out under the Japan-US joint research project (JUPITER-II). The experiment has been proceeding in the following phases; (i) fabrication and assembly of a dual-probe permeation apparatus, (ii) a single-probe Ni/D 2 , permeation experiment without Flibe, (iii) a dual-probe Ar/Ni/D 2 permeation experiment without Flibe, (iv) Flibe chemical purification by HF/H 2 gas bubbling, (v) physical purification by Flibe transport through a porous Ni filter, (vi) Ar/Ni/Flibe/Ni/D 2 permeation experiment using the dual Ni probe, and (vii) Ar/Ni/Flibe/Ni/HT permeation experiment. The present paper describe results until the Ar/Ni/Flibe/Ni/D 2 permeation experiment in detail. (author)

  15. Potato starch synthases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazarian-Firouzabadi, Farhad; Visser, Richard G.F.

    2017-01-01

    Starch, a very compact form of glucose units, is the most abundant form of storage polyglucan in nature. The starch synthesis pathway is among the central biochemical pathways, however, our understanding of this important pathway regarding genetic elements controlling this pathway, is still

  16. Operation whey powder. Anatomy of a German scandal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, E

    1987-04-03

    The odyssey of the contaminated whey powder finally has come to an end, and the 5000 tonnes of whey now are designated for decontamination by means of an ion exchange technique. The article throws light upon the political and economic reasons that sent the whey powder off on a chaotic journey. It is worth mentioning in this context that the natural radioactivity of inorganic fertilizers is much higher than that of the whey powder in question.

  17. Energy production by anaerobic treatment of cheese whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peano, L.; Ciciarelli, R.; Comino, E.; Gard, P. A.

    2009-07-01

    Anaerobic treatment and methane generation potential of cheese whey, diluted with mud, were determined in the digester of an existing wastewater treatment plant in Switzerland. Lactose, main sugar in cheese whey, can be a useful indicator to evaluate serum anaerobic treatment. Conventional parameters of anaerobic digestion (Volatile Matter, Dry Matter, Fatty Volatile Acids, total Alkali metric Title) were measured after the introduction of different whey/sludge ratio demonstrating that, despite an overcharge of whey digester, its stability is never compromised. (Author)

  18. Nutritional and functional properties of whey proteins concentrate and isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Zoran Herceg; Anet Režek

    2006-01-01

    Whey protein fractions represent 18 - 20 % of total milk nitrogen content. Nutritional value in addition to diverse physico - chemical and functional properties make whey proteins highly suitable for application in foodstuffs. In the most cases, whey proteins are used because of their functional properties. Whey proteins possess favourable functional characteristics such as gelling, water binding, emulsification and foaming ability. Due to application of new process techniques (membrane fract...

  19. Astringency reduction in red wine by whey proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Jauregi, Paula; Olatujoye, Jumoke B.; Cabezudo, Ignacio; Frazier, Richard A.; Gordon, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Whey is a by-product of cheese manufacturing and therefore investigating new applications of whey proteins will contribute towards the valorisation of whey and hence waste reduction. This study shows for the first time a detailed comparison of the effectiveness of gelatin and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) as fining agents. Gelatin was more reactive than whey proteins to tannic acid as shown by both the astringency method (with ovalbumin as a precipitant) and the tannins determination method (with me...

  20. Energy production by anaerobic treatment of cheese whey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peano, L.; Ciciarelli, R.; Comino, E.; Gard, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment and methane generation potential of cheese whey, diluted with mud, were determined in the digester of an existing wastewater treatment plant in Switzerland. Lactose, main sugar in cheese whey, can be a useful indicator to evaluate serum anaerobic treatment. Conventional parameters of anaerobic digestion (Volatile Matter, Dry Matter, Fatty Volatile Acids, total Alkali metric Title) were measured after the introduction of different whey/sludge ratio demonstrating that, despite an overcharge of whey digester, its stability is never compromised. (Author)

  1. Starch Bioengineering in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana

    , the effects of engineering high levels of phosphate and amylose content on starch physico-chemical properties were evaluated by various biochemical and morphological studies. As a result, a substantial increase of 10-fold phosphate content and ~99% amylose content with high-resistant starch was observed...... in storage reserve accumulation, metabolite accumulation in AO but no significant differences were observed in HP compared to WT. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy revealed the details in topography and internal structures of the starch granules in these lines. The results demonstrated......Starch represents the most important carbohydrate used for food and feed purposes. Increasingly, it is also used as a renewable raw material, as a source of biofuel, and for many different industrial applications. Progress in understanding starch biosynthesis, and investigations of the genes...

  2. Future cereal starch bioengineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blennow, Andreas; Jensen, Susanne Langgård; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana

    2013-01-01

    The importance of cereal starch production worldwide cannot be overrated. However, the qualities and resulting values of existing raw and processed starch do not fully meet future demands for environmentally friendly production of renewable, advanced biomaterials, functional foods, and biomedical...... additives. New approaches for starch bioengineering are needed. In this review, we discuss cereal starch from a combined universal bioresource point of view. The combination of new biotechniques and clean technology methods can be implemented to replace, for example, chemical modification. The recently...... released cereal genomes and the exploding advancement in whole genome sequencing now pave the road for identifying new genes to be exploited to generate a multitude of completely new starch functionalities directly in the cereal grain, converting cereal crops to production plants. Newly released genome...

  3. 21 CFR 573.450 - Fermented ammoniated condensed whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fermented ammoniated condensed whey. 573.450... ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.450 Fermented ammoniated condensed whey. (a) Identity. The product is produced by the Lactobacillus bulgaricus fermentation of whey with the addition of ammonia. (b...

  4. DIAFILTRATION OF ULTRAFILTRATION RETENTATE OF WHEY FROM WHITE BRINED CHEESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria DUSHKOVA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey diafiltration was carried out with a UF25-PAN polyacrylnitrilic membrane with 25 kDa molecular weight cut-off at volume reduction factors (VRF VRF=2, VRF=4, VRF=6, VRF=8, VRF=10. The values of the principal components dry matter, protein, lactose and mineral substances in the retentates and permeate obtained were established. The relative shares of protein, lactose and mineral substances in the dry matter, the concentration factor (CF values for dry matter, protein, lactose and mineral substances, and the protein retention factor (RF were determined. Linear models were created for the CF of each investigated component according to the VRF, and a logarithmic model was developed for the protein RF according to the VRF. The results obtained demonstrated the efficiency of diafiltration for deep treatment aimed at a further elimination of lactose and mineral substances and subsequent utilization of the diafiltration concentrates low in lactose and mineral substances as a liquid supplement in the manufacture of extruded cereal products.

  5. Functionality of extrusion--texturized whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwulata, C I; Konstance, R P; Cooke, P H; Farrell, H M

    2003-11-01

    Whey, a byproduct of the cheesemaking process, is concentrated by processors to make whey protein concentrates (WPC) and isolates (WPI). Only 50% of whey proteins are used in foods. In order to increase their usage, texturizing WPC, WPI, and whey albumin is proposed to create ingredients with new functionality. Extrusion processing texturizes globular proteins by shearing and stretching them into aligned or entangled fibrous bundles. In this study, WPC, WPI, and whey albumin were extruded in a twin screw extruder at approximately 38% moisture content (15.2 ml/min, feed rate 25 g/min) and, at different extrusion cook temperatures, at the same temperature for the last four zones before the die (35, 50, 75, and 100 degrees C, respectively). Protein solubility, gelation, foaming, and digestibility were determined in extrudates. Degree of extrusion-induced insolubility (denaturation) or texturization, determined by lack of solubility at pH 7 for WPI, increased from 30 to 60, 85, and 95% for the four temperature conditions 35, 50, 75, and 100 degrees C, respectively. Gel strength of extruded isolates increased initially 115% (35 degrees C) and 145% (50 degrees C), but gel strength was lost at 75 and 100 degrees C. Denaturation at these melt temperatures had minimal effect on foaming and digestibility. Varying extrusion cook temperature allowed a new controlled rate of denaturation, indicating that a texturized ingredient with a predetermined functionality based on degree of denaturation can be created.

  6. Permeation behavior of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; O' hira, Shigeru; Nishi, Masataka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-09-01

    Study on Implantation Driven Permeation (IDP) behavior of deuterium through pure beryllium was investigated as a part of the research to predict the tritium permeation through the first wall components ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The permeation experiments were carried out with two beryllium specimens, one was an unannealed specimen and the other was that annealed at 1173 K. The permeation flux was measured as a function of specimen temperature and incident ion flux. Surface analysis of specimen was also carried out after the permeation experiment. Permeation was observed only with the annealed specimen and no significant permeation was observed with unannealed specimen under the present experimental condition (maximum temperature: 685 K, detection limit: 1x10{sup 13} D atoms/m{sup 2}s). It could be attributed that the intrinsic lattice defects, which act as diffusion preventing site, decreased with the specimen annealing. Based on the result of steady and transient permeation behavior and surface analysis, it was estimated that the deuterium permeation implanted into annealed beryllium was controlled by surface recombination due to the oxide layer on the surface of the permeated side. (author)

  7. Permeation of iodide from iodine-enriched yeast through porcine intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryszka, Florian; Dolińska, Barbara; Zieliński, Michał; Chyra, Dagmara; Dobrzański, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a common phenomenon, threatening the whole global human population. Recommended daily intake of iodine is 150 μg for adults and 250 μg for pregnant and breastfeeding women. About 50% of human population can be at risk of moderate iodine deficiency. Due to this fact, increased iodine supplementation is recommended, through intake of iodized mineral water and salt iodization. The aim of this study was to investigate permeation and absorption of iodide from iodine bioplex (experimental group) in comparison with potassium iodide (controls). Permeation and absorption processes were investigated in vitro using a porcine intestine. The experimental model was based on a standard Franz diffusion cell (FD-Cell). The iodine bioplex was produced using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and whey powder: iodine content - 388 μg/g, total protein - 28.5%, total fat - 0.9%., glutamic acid - 41.2%, asparaginic acid - 29.4%, lysine - 24.8%; purchased from: F.Z.N.P. Biochefa, Sosnowiec, Poland. Potassium iodide was used as controls, at 388 μg iodine concentration, which was the same as in iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. A statistically significant increase in iodide permeation was observed for iodine-enriched yeast bioplex in comparison with controls - potassium iodide. After 5h the total amount of permeated iodide from iodine-enriched yeast bioplex was 85%, which is ~ 2-fold higher than controls - 37%. Iodide absorption was by contrast statistically significantly higher in controls - 7.3%, in comparison with 4.5% in experimental group with iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. Presented results show that iodide permeation process dominates over absorption in case of iodine-enriched yeast bioplex.

  8. Characterization of starch nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymońska, J.; Targosz-Korecka, M.; Krok, F.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomaterials already attract great interest because of their potential applications in technology, food science and medicine. Biomaterials are biodegradable and quite abundant in nature, so they are favoured over synthetic polymer based materials. Starch as a nontoxic, cheap and renewable raw material is particularly suitable for preparation of nanoparticles. In the paper, the structure and some physicochemical properties of potato and cassava starch particles of the size between 50 to 100 nm, obtained by mechanical treatment of native starch, were presented. We demonstrated, with the aim of the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the non-contact Atomic Force Microscopy (nc-AFM), that the shape and dimensions of the obtained nanoparticles both potato and cassava starch fit the blocklets - previously proposed as basic structural features of native starch granules. This observation was supported by aqueous solubility and swelling power of the particles as well as their iodine binding capacity similar to those for amylopectin-type short branched polysaccharide species. Obtained results indicated that glycosidic bonds of the branch linkage points in the granule amorphous lamellae might be broken during the applied mechanical treatment. Thus the released amylopectin clusters could escape out of the granules. The starch nanoparticles, for their properties qualitatively different from those of native starch granules, could be utilized in new applications.

  9. Acetate production from whey lactose using co-immobilized cells of homolactic and homoacetic bacteria in a fibrous-bed bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.; Yang, S.T. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-11-20

    Acetate was produced from whey lactose in batch and fed-batch fermentations using co-immobilized cells of Clostridium formicoaceticum and Lactococcus lactis. The cells were immobilized in a spirally wound fibrous sheet packed in a 0.45-L column reactor, with liquid circulated through a 5-L stirred-tank fermentor. Industrial-grade nitrogen sources, including corn steep liquor, casein hydrolysate, and yeast hydrolysate, were studied as inexpensive nutrient supplements to whey permeate and acid whey. Supplementation with either 2.5% (v/v) corn steep liquor or 1.5 g/L casein hydrolysate was adequate for the cocultured fermentation. The overall acetic acid yield from lactose was 0.9 g/g, and the productivity was 0.25 g/(L h). Both lactate and acetate at high concentrations inhibited the homoacetic fermentation. To overcome these inhibitions, fed-batch fermentations were used to keep lactate concentration low and to adapt cells to high-concentration acetate. The final acetate concentration obtained in the fed-batch fermentations were used to keep lactate concentration low and to adapt cells to high-concentration acetate. The final acetate concentration obtained in the fed-batch fermentation was 75 g/L, which was the highest acetate concentration ever produced by C. formicoaceticum. Even at this high acetate concentration, the overall productivity was 0.18 g/(L h) based on the total medium volume and 1.23 g/(L h) based on the fibrous-bed reactor volume. The cells isolated from the fibrous-bed bioreactor at the end of this study were more tolerant to acetic acid than the original culture used to seed the bioreactor, indicating that adaptation and natural selection of acetate-tolerant strains occurred. This cocultured fermentation process could be used to produce a low-cost acetate deicer from whey permeate and acid whey.

  10. The functional properties, modification and utilization of whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Venter

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein has an excellent nutritional value and exhibits a functional potential. In comparison with certain other food proteins, the whey protein content of essential amino acids is extremely favourable for human consumption. Depending on the heat-treatment history thereof, soluble whey proteins with utilizable functional properties, apart from high biological value, true digestibility, protein efficiency ratio and nett protein utilization, can be recovered. Various technological and chemical recovery processes have been designed. Chemically and enzymatically modified whey protein is manufactured to obtain technological and functional advantages. The important functional properties of whey proteins, namely hydration, gelation, emulsifying and foaming properties, are reviewed.

  11. Hydrogen permeation through metallic foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, M.I.B.; Rodrigues, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The process of electrolytic permeation of hydrogen through metallic foils is studied. A double electrolytic cell, in glass, in which the two compartments of reaction are separated by a metallic foil to be studied, was built. As direct result, the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the metal is obtained. The hydrogen diffusion coefficients in the palladium and, in austenitic stainless steels 304 and 304 L, used in the Angra-1 reactor, were obtained. Samples of stainless steels with and without welding, were used. (Author) [pt

  12. Tritium permeation in fusion reactors: INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskes, M.I.; Bauer, W.; Kerst, R.A.; Swansiger, W.A.; Wilson, K.L.

    1981-12-01

    Tritium permeation through the first wall of advanced fusion reactors is examined. A fraction of the D-T which bombards the first wall as charge exchange neutral particles will permeate through the first wall and enter the coolant. Calculations of the steady state permeation rate for the US INTOR Tokamak design result in values of less than or equal to 0.002 grams of tritium per day under the most favorable conditions. For unfavorable surface conditions the rate is greater than or equal to 0.1 g/day. The magnitude of these permeation rates is critically dependent on the temperatures and surface conditions of the wall. The introduction of permeation barriers at the wall-coolant interface can significantly reduce permeation rates and hence may be desirable for reactor applications

  13. Water permeation through anion exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoyan; Wright, Andrew; Weissbach, Thomas; Holdcroft, Steven

    2018-01-01

    An understanding of water permeation through solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membranes is crucial to offset the unbalanced water activity within SPE fuel cells. We examine water permeation through an emerging class of anion exchange membranes, hexamethyl-p-terphenyl poly (dimethylbenzimidazolium) (HMT-PMBI), and compare it against series of membrane thickness for a commercial anion exchange membrane (AEM), Fumapem® FAA-3, and a series of proton exchange membranes, Nafion®. The HMT-PMBI membrane is found to possess higher water permeabilities than Fumapem® FAA-3 and comparable permeability than Nafion (H+). By measuring water permeation through membranes of different thicknesses, we are able to decouple, for the first time, internal and interfacial water permeation resistances through anion exchange membranes. Permeation resistances on liquid/membrane interface is found to be negligible compared to that for vapor/membrane for both series of AEMs. Correspondingly, the resistance of liquid water permeation is found to be one order of magnitude smaller compared to that of vapor water permeation. HMT-PMBI possesses larger effective internal water permeation coefficient than both Fumapem® FAA-3 and Nafion® membranes (60 and 18% larger, respectively). In contrast, the effective interfacial permeation coefficient of HMT-PMBI is found to be similar to Fumapem® (±5%) but smaller than Nafion®(H+) (by 14%).

  14. Enzymatic modification of starch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Susanne Langgård

    In the food industry approaches for using bioengineering are investigated as alternatives to conventional chemical and physical starch modification techniques in development of starches with specific properties. Enzyme-assisted post-harvest modification is an interesting approach to this, since...... it is considered a clean and energy saving technology. This thesis aimed to investigate the effect of using reaction conditions, simulating an industrial process, for enzymatic treatment of starch with branching enzyme (BE) from Rhodothermus obamensis. Thus treatements were conducted at 70°C using very high...... substrate concentration (30-40% dry matter (DM)) and high enzyme activity (750-2250 BE units (BEU)/g sample). Starches from various botanical sources, representing a broad range of properties, were used as substrates. The effects of the used conditions on the BE-reaction were evaluated by characterization...

  15. Environmental impact assessment of six starch plastics focusing on wastewater-derived starch and additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeren, Martijn L.M.; Kuling, Lody; Worrell, Ernst; Shen, Li

    2017-01-01

    Starch plastics are developed for their biobased origin and potential biodegradability. To assist the development of sustainable starch plastics, this paper quantifies the environmental impacts of starch plastics produced from either virgin starch or starch reclaimed from wastewater. A

  16. Flavor and Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Isolates from Different Whey Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T J; Foegeding, E A; Drake, M A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated flavor and functional characteristics of whey protein isolates (WPIs) from Cheddar, Mozzarella, Cottage cheese, and rennet casein whey. WPIs were manufactured in triplicate. Powders were rehydrated and evaluated in duplicate by descriptive sensory analysis. Volatile compounds were extracted by solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Functional properties were evaluated by measurement of foam stability, heat stability, and protein solubility. WPI from Cheddar and Cottage cheese whey had the highest cardboard flavor, whereas sweet aromatic flavor was highest in Mozzarella WPI, and rennet casein WPI had the lowest overall flavor and aroma. Distinct sour taste and brothy/potato flavor were also noted in WPI from Cottage cheese whey. Consistent with sensory results, aldehyde concentrations were also highest in Cheddar and Cottage cheese WPI. Overrun, yield stress, and foam stability were not different (P > 0.05) among Cheddar, Mozzarella, and rennet casein WPI, but WPI foams from Cottage cheese whey had a lower overrun and air-phase fraction (P whey sources could be used in new applications due to distinct functional and flavor characteristics. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Advances in extrusion for texturized whey proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairy proteins like whey proteins play an important role in human nutrition because of their characteristic structure and associated numerous benefits such as ease of digestion, in- vivo assimilation, creating new or maintaining the muscle mass and the unique ability of boosting immune functions. W...

  18. Monitoring of whey quality with NIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucheryavskiy, Sergey; Lomborg, Carina

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for monitoring of liquid whey quality parameters during protein production process has been tested. The parameters included total solids, lactose, protein and fat content. The samples for the experiment were taken from real industrial...

  19. Fibril assembly in whey protein mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to study fibril assembly in mixtures of whey proteins. The effect of the composition of the protein mixture on the structures and the resulting phase behaviour was investigated. The current work has shown that beta-lactoglobulin is responsible for the fibril assembly

  20. Tribomechanical micronization and activation of whey protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tribomechanics is a part of physics that is concerned with the study of phenomena that appear during milling under dynamic conditions. Tribomechanical micronization and activation (TMA) of whey protein concentrates (WPC) and zeolites (type clinoptilolite) were carried out. Samples of powdered WPC and zeolite were ...

  1. In vitro digestibility of banana starch cookies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Pérez, Luis A; Sáyago-Ayerdi, Sonia G; Méndez-Montealvo, Guadalupe; Tovar, Juscelino

    2004-01-01

    Banana starch was isolated and used for preparation of two types of cookies. Chemical composition and digestibility tests were carried out on banana starch and the food products, and these results were compared with corn starch. Ash, protein, and fat levels in banana starch were higher than in corn starch. The high ash amount in banana starch could be due to the potassium content present in this fruit. Proximal analysis was similar between products prepared with banana starch and those based on corn starch. The available starch content of the banana starch preparation was 60% (dmb). The cookies had lower available starch than the starches while banana starch had lower susceptibility to the in vitro alpha-amylolysis reaction. Banana starch and its products had higher resistant starch levels than those made with corn starch.

  2. Implanted-tritium permeation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Holland, D.F.; Casper, L.A.; Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.; Watts, K.D.; Wilson, C.J.; Kershner, C.J.; Rogers, M.L.

    1982-04-01

    In fusion reactors, charge exchange neutral atoms of tritium coming from the plasma will be implanted into the first wall and other interior structures. EG and G Idaho is conducting two experiments to determine the magnitude of permeation into the coolant streams and the retention of tritium in those structures. One experiment uses an ion gun to implant deuterium. The ion gun will permit measurements to be made for a variety of implantation energies and fluxes. The second experiment utilizes a fission reactor to generate a tritium implantation flux by the 3 He(n,p) 3 H reaction. This experiment will simulate the fusion reactor radiation environment. We also plan to verify a supporting analytical code development program, in progress, by these experiments

  3. Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Whey Cheese with Pine Nuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anamaria Semeniuc

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop a value-added whey cheese through addition of pine nuts. Therefore, different concentrations of pine nuts [2, 4, 6 and 8% (w/w] were added to whey cheese. The study was designed to evaluate the influence of pine nuts on physicochemical and sensory properties of whey cheese. The addition of pine nuts resulted in an increase in fat content and total solids and a decrease in moisture content. However, no statistically significant difference was found in pH values. Sensory analysis was performed using the 9-point hedonic scale, with selected assessors. The whey cheese sample with 4% pine nuts was the most appreciated (7.6 points, followed by the classic whey cheese, whey cheese with 6 and 8% pine nuts (7.4 points, and whey cheese with 2% pine nuts (7.3 points. Nevertheless, the sensory characteristics of whey cheese were not significantly influenced by the addition of pine nuts. Whey cheese sensory profiling was successful in differential characterization of whey cheese samples.

  4. Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-16

    Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White Martin H. Moore Brian J. Melde Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Interfacial...ABSTRACT Permeation Tests on Polypropylene Fiber Materials Brandy J. White, Martin H. Moore, Brian J. Melde Center for Bio/Molecular Science

  5. Characteristics of separation of carnitine and metal ions in cheese whey model solution by loose reverse osmosis membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Echizen, H.; Xing, X.; Yamamoto, S.; Unno, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-04-20

    Aiming at recovering carnitine from cheese whey by using loose reverse osmosis membranes, rejection characteristics of several components in the whey were examined by using model solutions. An electroneutral membrane was found to be most effective for the separation. The rejection of carnitine was above 0.95 independent of the pH of solutions, while monovalent metal ions showed low rejections of 0.1-0.3. On the other hand, the rejections of divalent metal ions deceased with increase of the pH, and reached a minimum of about 0.5. As a result, mono-and divalent metal ions could be removed simultaneously by adjusting the pH of the feed solutions. To clarify the effect of pH on the rejection the permeate of MgCl2 aqueous solution was examined. The rejections of MgCl2 were greatly affected by the pH and showed the same tendency as the mixed station. The effect of the pH on permeation of electrolyte was considered to be caused mainly by the adsorption of ions on the membrane. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Nutritional Potential and Functionality of Whey Powder Influenced by Different Processing Temperature and Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Zarmina Gillani; Nuzhat Huma; Aysha Sameen; Mulazim Hussain Bukhari

    2017-01-01

    Whey is an excellent food ingredient owing to its high nutritive value and its functional properties. However, composition of whey varies depending on composition of milk, processing conditions, processing method, and its whey protein content. The aim of this study was to prepare a whey powder from raw whey and to determine the influence of different processing temperatures (160 and 180 °C) on the physicochemical, functional properties during storage of 180 days and on whey protein denaturati...

  7. Starch phosphorylation plays an important role in starch biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Xuan; Dees, Dianka; Dechesne, Annemarie; Huang, Xing Feng; Visser, Richard G.F.; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2017-01-01

    Starch phosphate esters are crucial in starch metabolism and render valuable functionality to starches for various industrial applications. A potato glucan, water dikinase (GWD1) was introduced in tubers of two different potato genetic backgrounds: an amylose-containing line Kardal and the

  8. Effect of skim milk treated with high hydrostatic pressure on permeate flux and fouling during ultrafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Mathilde; Marciniak, Alice; Chamberland, Julien; Pouliot, Yves; Bazinet, Laurent; Doyen, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) is largely used in the dairy industry to generate milk and whey protein concentrate for standardization of milk or production of dairy ingredients. Recently, it was demonstrated that high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) extended the shelf life of milk and improved rennet coagulation and cheese yield. Pressurization also modified casein micelle size distribution and promoted aggregation of whey proteins. These changes are likely to affect UF performance. Consequently, this study determined the effect of skim milk pressurization (300 and 600 MPa, 5 min) on UF performance in terms of permeate flux decline and fouling. The effect of HHP on milk proteins was first studied and UF was performed in total recycle mode at different transmembrane pressures to determine optimal UF operational parameters and to evaluate the effect of pressurization on critical and limiting fluxes. Ultrafiltration was also performed in concentration mode at a transmembrane pressure of 345 kPa for 130 or 140 min to evaluate the decline of permeate flux and to determine fouling resistances. It was observed that average casein micelle size decreased by 32 and 38%, whereas β-lactoglobulin denaturation reached 30 and 70% at 300 and 600 MPa, respectively. These results were directly related to UF performance because initial permeate fluxes in total recycle mode decreased by 25% at 300 and 600 MPa compared with nonpressurized milk, critical flux, and limiting flux, which were lower during UF of milk treated with HHP. During UF in concentration mode, initial permeate fluxes were 30% lower at 300 and 600 MPa compared with the control, but the total flux decline was higher for nonpressurized milk (62%) compared with pressure-treated milk (30%). Fouling resistances were similar, whatever the treatment, except at 600 MPa where irreversible fouling was higher. Characterization of the fouling layer showed that caseins and β-lactoglobulin were mainly involved in membrane fouling after UF of

  9. Application of a Pivot Profile Variant Using CATA Questions in the Development of a Whey-Based Fermented Beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Miraballes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available During the development of a food product, the application of rapid descriptive sensory methodologies is very useful to determine the influence of different variables on the sensory characteristics of the product under development. The Pivot profile (PP and a variant of the technique that includes check-all-that-apply questions (PP + CATA were used for the development of a milk drink fermented from demineralised sweet whey. Starting from a base formula of partially demineralised sweet whey and gelatin, nine samples were elaborated, to which various concentrations of commercial sucrose, modified cassava starch, and whole milk powder were added. Differences in sucrose content affected the sample texture and flavour and the modified starch was able to decrease the fluidity and increase the texture of creaminess and firmness, of the samples. The two applied sensory methodologies achieved good discrimination between the samples and very similar results, although the data analysis was clearly simplified in relation to the difficulty and time consumed in the PP + CATA variant.

  10. Radiation processing of starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaruddin Hashim

    2008-01-01

    Starch is a polysaccharide material and generally, it is non-toxic, biocompatible and biodegradable. It mainly use as foodstuff, food additives, production of sugar and flavouring. Sago palm with scientific name Genus Metroxylon belonging to family Palmae is an important resource in the production of sago starch in Malaysia. Nearly 90% of sago planting areas is found in Sarawak State of Malaysia. It can easily grow under the harsh swampy environment. The sago starch content 4% polyphenol, which is an active compound with antioxidant property that has potential benefit in health and skin care applications. Renewal resources and environmental friendly of natural polymer reason for the researcher to explore the potential of this material in order to improve our quality of live. (author)

  11. Structure of potato starch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertoft, Eric; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Potato starch granules consist primarily of two tightly packed polysaccharides, amylose and amylopectin. Amylose, which amount for 20-30%, is the principal linear component, but a fraction is in fact slightly branched. Amylopectin is typically the major component and is extensively branched...... chains extending from the clusters. A range of enzymes is involved in the biosynthesis of the cluster structures and linear segments. These are required for sugar activation, chain elongation, branching, and trimming of the final branching pattern. As an interesting feature, potato amylopectin...... is substituted with low amounts of phosphate groups monoesterified to the C-3 and the C-6 carbons of the glucose units. They seem to align well in the granular structure and have tremendous effects on starch degradation in the potato and functionality of the refined starch. A specific dikinase catalyzes...

  12. Permeation of hydrogen through metal membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wienhold, P.; Rota, E.; Waelbroeck, F.; Winter, J.; Banno, Tatsuya.

    1986-08-01

    Experiments show that the permeant flux of hydrogen through a metal membrane at low driving pressures ( r is introduced into the model as a new material constant and the rate equations are given. After the description of the wall pump effect, a variety of different limiting cases are discussed for a symmetrical permeation membrane. This is modified to the asymmetric case and to the influence of particle implantation. The permeation number W turns out to be a dimensionless quantity which characterizes the permeation range and predicts the permeant flux in steady state. (orig.)

  13. Preparation and characterization of dialdehyde starch by one-step acid hydrolysis and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yingfeng; Liu, Wenjie; Xiao, Junhua; Zhao, Xing; Zhu, Ying; Wu, Yiqiang

    2017-10-01

    Dialdehyde starch was prepared by one-step synthesis of acid hydrolysis and oxidation, using corn starch as the raw material, sodium periodate (NaIO 4 ) as the oxidant, and hydrochloric acid (HCl) as the acid solution. The prepared dialdehyde starch was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The results confirmed that oxidation occurred between the starch and NaIO 4 . The acid hydrolysis reaction reduced the molecular weight of starch and effectively improved the aldehyde group contents (92.7%). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis indicated that the average particle size decreased after acid hydrolysis and oxidation reaction. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA) analysis demonstrated that the crystallinity of the obtained dialdehyde starch showed a downward trend and a decelerated thermal decomposition rate. The starch after acid hydrolysis and oxidation exhibited lower hot paste viscosity and higher reactivity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Heterologous expression of two Arabidopsis starch dikinases in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Xuan; Dees, Dianka; Huang, Xing Feng; Visser, Richard G.F.; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2018-01-01

    Starch phosphate esters influence physiochemical properties of starch granules that are essential both for starch metabolism and industrial use of starches. To modify properties of potato starch and understand the effect of starch phosphorylation on starch metabolism in storage starch, the starch

  15. Intakes of whey protein hydrolysate and whole whey proteins are discriminated by LC-MS metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanstrup, Jan; Rasmussen, Jakob Ewald; Ritz, Christian

    2014-01-01

    of four different whey protein fractions and establishes new hypotheses for the observed effects. Obese, non-diabetic subjects were included in the randomized, blinded, cross-over meal study. Subjects ingested a high-fat meal containing whey isolate (WI), whey concentrate hydrolysate (WH), α...... of the meals. Highly elevated plasma levels of a number of cyclic dipeptides and other AA metabolites were found following intake of the WH meal and these metabolites are primary candidates to explain the superior insulinotropic effect of WH. The manufacturing process of WH caused oxidization of methionine...... to methionine sulfoxide which in turn caused in vivo generation of N-phenylacetyl-methionine and N-phenylacetyl-methionine sulfoxide. These two compounds have not previously been described in biological systems....

  16. INAA of RM IAEA-155 whey powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Lixin; Tian Weizhi

    1993-01-01

    An IAEA biological RM IAEA-155 whey powder was analysed for phosphorus, as well as other 24 elements by INAA. The Bremsstrahlung photons produced by 32 P is measured by a HpGe spectrometer. The interferences involved in P determination were comprehensively studied and this method was also applied to the determinations of P in several established biological NBS SRMs and proved to be reliable for a wide range of P contents in biological samples

  17. Permeation of deuterium implanted into vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Struttmann, D.A.

    1986-05-01

    Permeation of deuterium through the vanadium alloy, V-15Cr-5Ti, was investigated using 3-keV, D 3 + ion beams from a small accelerator. The experiments consisted of measurements of the deuterium reemission and permeation rates as a function of implantation fluence for 0.5-mm thick specimens heated to tempertures from 623 to 823 0 K. Implantation-side surface characterization was made by simultaneous measurements of sputtered ions with a secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS). Analyses of these measurements indicate that for the experimental conditions used, the steady-state deuterium permeation flux in V-15Cr-5Ti is approximately 18% of the implantation flux. This corresponds to approximately 1000 times that seen in the ferritic steel, HT-9, under comparable conditions. Measurement of deuterium diffusivity in V-15Cr-5Ti using permeation break-through times indicates D = 1.4 x 10 -8 exp(-.11 eV/kT) (m 2 /s)

  18. Dissolution and permeation characteristics of artemether tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    characterized by delayed drug release but enhanced permeation of the released drug. Keywords: ... and prosopis gum as binders and to consider the relationship between ..... higher tensile strength and higher brittle fracture index compared ...

  19. Hydroxyethyl starch for resuscitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Nicolai; Perner, Anders

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Resuscitation with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is controversial. In this review, we will present the current evidence for the use of HES solutions including data from recent high-quality randomized clinical trials. RECENT FINDINGS: Meta-analyses of HES vs. control fluids show clear...

  20. Resistant starch in cassava products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Letícia Buzati Pereira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Found in different foods, starch is the most important source of carbohydrates in the diet. Some factors present in starchy foods influence the rate at which the starch is hydrolyzed and absorbed in vivo. Due the importance of cassava products in Brazilian diet, the objective of this study was to analyze total starch, resistant starch, and digestible starch contents in commercial cassava products. Thirty three commercial cassava products from different brands, classifications, and origin were analyzed. The method used for determination of resistant starch consisted of an enzymatic process to calculate the final content of resistant starch considering the concentration of glucose released and analyzed. The results showed significant differences between the products. Among the flours and seasoned flours analyzed, the highest levels of resistant starch were observed in the flour from Bahia state (2.21% and the seasoned flour from Paraná state (1.93%. Starch, tapioca, and sago showed levels of resistant starch ranging from 0.56 to 1.1%. The cassava products analyzed can be considered good sources of resistant starch; which make them beneficial products to the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Aroma compounds in sweet whey powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, S S; Goddik, L; Qian, M C

    2004-12-01

    Aroma compounds in sweet whey powder were investigated in this study. Volatiles were isolated by solvent extraction followed by solvent-assisted flavor evaporation. Fractionation was used to separate acidic from nonacidic volatiles. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/olfactometry were used for the identification of aroma compounds. Osme methodology was applied to assess the relative importance of each aroma compound. The most aroma-intense free fatty acids detected were acetic, propanoic, butanoic, hexanoic, heptanoic, octanoic, decanoic, dodecanoic, and 9-decenoic acids. The most aroma-intense nonacidic compounds detected were hexanal, heptanal, nonanal, phenylacetaldehyde, 1-octen-3-one, methional, 2,6-dimethylpyrazine, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2,3-dimethylpyrazine, 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine, furfuryl alcohol, p-cresol, 2-acetylpyrrole, maltol, furaneol, and several lactones. This study suggested that the aroma of whey powder could comprise compounds originating from milk, compounds generated by the starter culture during cheese making, and compounds formed during the manufacturing process of whey powder.

  2. Proton permeation of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, D W

    1987-10-01

    Proton permeation of the lipid bilayer barrier has two unique features. First, permeability coefficients measured at neutral pH ranges are six to seven orders of magnitude greater than expected from knowledge of other monovalent cations. Second, proton conductance across planar lipid bilayers varies at most by a factor of 10 when pH is varied from near 1 to near 11. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for this anomalous behavior: proton conductance related to contaminants of lipid bilayers, and proton translocation along transient hydrogen-bonded chains (tHBC) of associated water molecules in the membrane. The weight of evidence suggests that trace contaminants may contribute to proton conductance across planar lipid membranes at certain pH ranges, but cannot account for the anomalous proton flux in liposome systems. Two new results will be reported here which were designed to test the tHBC model. These include measurements of relative proton/potassium permeability in the gramicidin channel, and plots of proton flux against the magnitude of pH gradients. (1) The relative permeabilities of protons and potassium through the gramicidin channel, which contains a single strand of hydrogen-bonded water molecules, were found to differ by at least four orders of magnitude when measured at neutral pH ranges. This result demonstrates that a hydrogen-bonded chain of water molecules can provide substantial discrimination between protons and other cations. It was also possible to calculate that if approximately 7% of bilayer water was present in a transient configuration similar to that of the gramicidin channel, it could account for the measured proton flux. (2) The plot of proton conductance against pH gradient across liposome membranes was superlinear, a result that is consistent with one of three alternative tHBC models for proton conductance described by Nagle elsewhere in this volume.

  3. Influence of the operating parameters on the flux during microfiltration of the steepwater in the starch industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šereš Zita I.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the work is the possibility of applying microfiltration through a ceramic tubular membrane with 100 nm pore sizes to the steepwater obtained in the production process of corn starch. The dry matter content should be reduced in the steepwater permeate. Thus the consumption of the process water would be reduced, the nutrients from the steepwater could be exploited as feed and the wastewater problem would consequently be solved. The objective of the work was to examine the influence of the operating parameters on the permeate flux during steepwater microfiltration. The parameters that vary in the course of microfiltration, were the transmembrane pressur and flow rate, while the permeate flux and dry matter content of the permeate and retentate were the dependent parameters, constantly monitored during the process. Another objective of this study was to investigate the influence of static turbulence promoter on the permeate flux during steepwater microfiltration. Static mixers enhance permeate flux, thus the microfiltration can be performed longer. As a result of the statistical analysis, the optimal conditions for steepwater microfiltration were determined. The maximum value of the permeate flux without mixer (25 lm-2h-1 was achieved at a pressure of 2 bars and a flow rate around 100 lh-1. With the use of static mixer the flux is 2,5 times higher compared to the one obtained without the mixer. The dry matter content of the permeat after 2.5 hours of mucrofiltration was lowered by 40%.

  4. Permeation of Ionic Liquids through the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Júlio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative forms of drug delivery such as delivery through the skin, have been developed to explore other routes. However, the incorporation of poorly soluble or partially insoluble drugs into these delivery systems represents a major problem. Ionic liquids (ILs may be incorporated in aqueous, oily or hydroalcoholic solutions and thus, may be used as excipients in drug delivery systems to increase/improve the topical and transdermal drug delivery. However, it is fundamental to consider the cytotoxicity of these salts and it is also crucial to evaluate if these compounds permeate through the skin. Herein, three imidazole-based ILs: [C2mim][Br], [C4mim][Br] and [C6mim][Br], were synthesized and each IL was incorporated within caffeine saturated solutions. Permeation studies of the active (caffeine in these solutions were performed to evaluate the amount of IL that permeated through the porcine ear skin in the presence of the active. To achieve this, gravimetric studies of the receptor compartment were performed. Results showed that the more lipophilic IL [C6mim][Br] presented the highest permeation through the skin. The permeation is dependent upon the size of the alkyl chain of the IL, and as more than 60% of the ILs permeate is it vital to consider the cytotoxicity of these salts when considering their incorporation in topical systems.

  5. Cheese from ultrafiltered milk : whey proteins and chymosin activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijsse, C.A.P.

    1999-01-01

    The manufacture of (semi-)hard cheese from ultrafiltered milk (UF-cheese) enables the partial incorporation of whey proteins in the cheese, thereby increasing its yield. The transfer of whey proteins in curd from (UF-)milk was studied in relation to the degree of ultrafiltration of the milk

  6. Two-stage anaerobic digestion of cheese whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, K V; Liao, P H

    1986-01-01

    A two-stage digestion of cheese whey was studied using two anaerobic rotating biological contact reactors. The second-stage reactor receiving partially treated effluent from the first-stage reactor could be operated at a hydraulic retention time of one day. The results indicated that two-stage digestion is a feasible alternative for treating whey. 6 references.

  7. Antibacterial activity of papain hydrolysed camel whey and its fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdel-Hamid, Mahmoud; Goda, Hanan A.; De Gobba, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Camel whey (ON) was hydrolysed with papain from Carica papaya and fractionated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The antibacterial activity of the CW, camel whey hydrolysate (CWH) and the obtained SEC-fractions was assessed using the disc-diffusion method. The CWH exhibited significantly...

  8. Behavior of whey protein concentrates under extreme storage conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overseas demand for whey protein concentrates (WPC) has increased steadily in recent years. Emergency aid foods often include WPC, but shelf-life studies of whey proteins under different shipment and storage conditions have not been conducted in the last 50 yr. Microbial quality, compound form...

  9. Effect of whey storage on physicochemical properties, microstructure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-11-23

    Nov 23, 2016 ... It is concluded that the production of ricotta with whey stored for up .... were allocated in a completely randomized design by Tukey test at 5% probability as ..... manufactured only with bovine whey and when milk is added, this ...

  10. Citric acid production from whey with sugars and additives by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citric acid (CA) production by Aspergillus niger ATCC9642 from whey with different concentrations of sucrose, glucose, fructose, galactose riboflavin, tricalcium phosphate and methanol in surface culture process was studied. It was found that whey with 15% (w/v) sucrose with or without 1% methanol was the most ...

  11. Membrane processes in production of functional whey components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutfiye Yilmaz-Ersan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, whey has been recognised as a major source of nutritional and functional ingredients for the food industry. Commercial whey products include various powders, whey protein concentrates and isolates, and fractionated proteins, such as a-lactalbumin and b-lactoglobulin. The increased interest in separation and fractionation of whey proteins arises from the differences in their functional, biological and nutritional properties. In response to concerns about environmental aspects, research has been focused on membrane filtration technology, which provides exciting new opportunities for large-scale protein and lactose fractionation. Membrane separation is such technique in which particles are separated according to their molecular size. The types of membrane processing techniques are ultrafiltration, microfiltration, reverse osmosis, pervaporation, electrodialysis and nanofiltration. A higher purification of whey proteins is possible by combining membrane separation with ion-exchange. This paper provides an overview of types and applications of membrane separation techniques

  12. Tritium permeation barriers for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perujo, A.; Forcey, K.

    1994-01-01

    An important issue concerning the safety, feasibility and fueling (i.e., tritium breeding ratio and recovery from the breeding blanket) of a fusion reactor is the possible tritium leakages through the structural materials and in particular through those operating at high temperatures. The control of tritium permeation could be a critical factor in determining the viability of a future fusion power reactor. The formation of tritium permeation barriers to prevent the loss of tritium to the coolant by diffusion though the structural material seems to be the most practical method to minimize such losses. Many authors have discussed the formation of permeation barriers to reduce the leakage of hydrogen isotopes through proposed first wall and structural materials. In general, there are two routes for the formation of such a barrier, namely: the growth of oxide layers (e.g., Cr 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , etc.) or the application of surface coatings. Non-metals are the most promising materials from the point of view of the formation of permeation barriers. Oxides such as Al 2 O 3 or Cr 2 O 3 or carbides such as SiC or TiC have been proposed. Amongst the metals only tungsten or gold are sufficiently less permeable than steel to warrant investigation as candidate materials for permeation barriers. It is of course possible to grow oxide layers on steel directly by heating in the atmosphere or under a variety of conditions (first route above). The direct oxidizing is normally done in an environment of open-quotes wet hydrogenclose quotes to promote the growth of chromia on, for example, nickel steels or ternary oxides on 316L to prevent corrosion. The application of surface layers (second route above), offers a greater range of materials for the formation of permeation barriers. In addition to reducing permeation, such layers should be adhesive, resistant to attack by corrosive breeder materials and should not crack during thermal cycling

  13. The enzymatic determination of starch in food, feed and raw materials of the starch industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunt, K.; Sanders, P.; Rozema, T.

    1998-01-01

    An enzymatic starch determination which can be used for the analysis of starch in a very broad range of different samples is evaluated, ranging from starch in plants, feed and food to industrial applications as starch in starch. The method is based on a complete enzymatic conversion of the starch

  14. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  15. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  16. Whey-derived valuable products obtained by microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescuma, Micaela; de Valdez, Graciela Font; Mozzi, Fernanda

    2015-08-01

    Whey, the main by-product of the cheese industry, is considered as an important pollutant due to its high chemical and biological oxygen demand. Whey, often considered as waste, has high nutritional value and can be used to obtain value-added products, although some of them need expensive enzymatic synthesis. An economical alternative to transform whey into valuable products is through bacterial or yeast fermentations and by accumulation during algae growth. Fermentative processes can be applied either to produce individual compounds or to formulate new foods and beverages. In the first case, a considerable amount of research has been directed to obtain biofuels able to replace those derived from petrol. In addition, the possibility of replacing petrol-derived plastics by biodegradable polymers synthesized during bacterial fermentation of whey has been sought. Further, the ability of different organisms to produce metabolites commonly used in the food and pharmaceutical industries (i.e., lactic acid, lactobionic acid, polysaccharides, etc.) using whey as growth substrate has been studied. On the other hand, new low-cost functional whey-based foods and beverages leveraging the high nutritional quality of whey have been formulated, highlighting the health-promoting effects of fermented whey-derived products. This review aims to gather the multiple uses of whey as sustainable raw material for the production of individual compounds, foods, and beverages by microbial fermentation. This is the first work to give an overview on the microbial transformation of whey as raw material into a large repertoire of industrially relevant foods and products.

  17. Hydroxyethyl starch in sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Nicolai Rosenkrantz Segelcke

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is a colloid that has been widely used for fluid resuscitation for decades. The newest generation of HES, tetrastarch, was believed to provide an efficient volume expansion without causing the side effects observed with former HES solutions. However, this bel......BACKGROUND: Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is a colloid that has been widely used for fluid resuscitation for decades. The newest generation of HES, tetrastarch, was believed to provide an efficient volume expansion without causing the side effects observed with former HES solutions. However...... types of patients is unclear, but so far no group of patients with an overall benefit of HES beyond surrogate markers has been identified. In line with this, the European Medicines Agency's Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee now recommends that the marketing authorisations of all HES solutions...

  18. Radiolysis of starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffi, J.; Saint-Lebe, L.; Berger, G.

    1978-01-01

    In the first part of the paper the results of work on the identification and determination of the gamma ( 60 Co) radiolysis products of maize starch are brought together and, wherever possible, a balance drawn up by chemical class. The second part of the paper deals with the main parameters governing radiolysis: dose, irradiation temperature and atmosphere, water content and the conditions under which the irradiated starch is stored. The third part, devoted to the mechanisms believed to be involved, contains the following conclusions: (a) the formation of radiation-induced products with a carbon skeleton probably results from a breaking of the -C-O-C- chains with rearrangement of the radicals and/or a reaction involving the water and the oxygen - the oxygen has an activating effect which does not fundamentally modify the mechanism, whereas the effect of the water is more complex and varies according to the product; (b) the formation of hydrogen peroxide probably implies the addition of atmospheric oxygen to the radiation-induced hydrogen atoms in the water or to the organic radicals obtained by abstraction of a hydrogen from the starch. Lastly, the different methods envisaged for confirming or improving the mechanistic hypotheses are discussed. (author)

  19. ESR study of the effects of water, methanol, and ethanol on gamma-irradiation of starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, A.M.; Rudin, A.

    1981-01-01

    This investigation deals with the nature and relative abundance of stable radicals formed by gamma-irradiation of wheat starch at room temperature. Additions of equal weights of water, methanol, and ethanol were equally effective in reducing the content of stable radicals in starch which contained about 12% water before the additions. When, however, the starting material was dried starch with 2.9% initial water content additional water and methanol were better radical scavengers than ethanol. This difference is attributed to the superior ability of water and methanol to permeate the starch structure. Superficially different ESR spectra were obtained in products made by irradiating starch and starch that contained added water or methanol. Computer simulation of these spectra showed that they could be matched by superposition of the spectra of the same four component radicals, with some adjustments of relative intensities and peak widths. The structure of these radicals have been deduced from the spectral assignments and relative effects of the three solvents used on the intensities of the respective ESR spectra

  20. Functional properties of irradiated starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laouini, Wissal

    2011-01-01

    Irradiation is an effective method capable of modifying the functional properties of starches. Its effect depends on the specific structural and molecular organization of starch granules from different botanical sources. In this study, we have studied the effect of gamma irradiation (3, 5, 10, 20, 35, 50 kGy) on the rheological properties of some varieties of starch (potato, cassava and wheat). First, we were interested in determining dry matter content; the results showed that the variation in dry matter compared to the control (native starch) is almost zero. So it does not depend on the dose of irradiation. Contrariwise, it differs from a botanical species to another. The viscometer has shown that these starches develop different behaviors during shearing. The native potato starch gave the highest viscosity followed by wheat and cassava which have almost similar viscosities. For all varieties, the viscosity of starch decreases dramatically with an increasing dose of irradiation. At high doses (35 and 50 kGy) the behavior of different starch is similar to that of a viscous pure liquid. The textural analysis via the back-extrusion test showed that increasing the dose of radiation causes a decrease in extrusion force and the energy spent of the different starch throughout the test. Indeed, the extrusion resistance decreases with increasing dose.

  1. Continuous lactic fermentation of deproteinized sweet whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trujillo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Whey is a major water contaminant due to its high biochemical oxygen demand (BOD, stemming mainly from its lactose (milk sugar content. The objetive of this research was to investigate the conversion of whey into useful, value-added products. Several methods have been developed already, the most important being dehydration, production of drinks, and conversion of the sugar component into organic acids. Lactic acid including its sodium, calcium, iron and antimony salts, is a valuable product in the alimentary industry and is also a raw material in the chemical industry. To maximize lactic acid production we determined the optimal dilution rate (D carrying out eight fermentations, with D = 0.102 h-1, until the acid production was nil (D= 3.0 h-1. Working conditions were 45 ± 0.1 °C, pH 5.6 ± 0.2, and a cell concentration of 30 ± 4.0 g/L, using Lactobacillus bulgaricus, and deproteinized sweet whey as a substrate. Production of lactic acid and sodium lactate was between 0.5 and 24.37 g/L. Stability of production was reached in average after two retention times. Highest productivity was at D= 0.2 h-1 (2.5 g/Lh , where only 30% of the lactose was consumed from the substrate . Highest lactose consumption was found at D= 0.102 h-1 (53.4%, where productivity was nearly maximal (2.49g/Lh, but acid concentration (26.6% was considerably higher than at the corresponding dilution rate D= 0.2 h-1, which was 14.75 g/L.

  2. Permeation barrier for lightweight liquid hydrogen tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultheiss, D.

    2007-04-16

    For the future usage of hydrogen as an automotive fuel, its on-board storage is crucial. One approach is the storage of liquid hydrogen (LH2, 20 K) in double-walled, vacuum insulated tanks. The introduction of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structural material enables a high potential of reducing the weight in comparison to the state-of-the-art stainless steel tanks. The generally high permeability of hydrogen through plastics, however, can lead to long-term degradation of the insulating vacuum. The derived objective of this dissertation was to find and apply an adequate permeation barrier (liner) on CFRP. The investigated liners were either foils adhered on CFRP specimens or coatings deposited on CFRP specimens. The coatings were produced by means of thermal spraying, metal plating or physical vapor deposition (PVD). The materials of the liners included Al, Au, Cu, Ni and Sn as well as stainless steel and diamond-like carbon. The produced liners were tested for their permeation behavior, thermal shock resistance and adherence to the CFRP substrate. Additionally, SEM micrographs were used to characterize and qualify the liners. The foils, although being a good permeation barrier, adhered weakly to the substrate. Furthermore, leak-free joining of foil segments is a challenge still to be solved. The metal plating liners exhibited the best properties. For instance, no permeation could be detected through a 50 {mu}m thick Cu coating within the accuracy of the measuring apparatus. This corresponds to a reduction of the permeation gas flow by more than factor 7400 compared to uncoated CFRP. In addition, the metal platings revealed a high adherence and thermal shock resistance. The coatings produced by means of thermal spraying and PVD did not show a sufficient permeation barrier effect. After having investigated the specimens, a 170 liter CFRP tank was fully coated with 50 {mu}m Cu by means of metal plating. (orig.)

  3. Feasibility assessment of whey-based ethanol facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, L P; Pellerin, R A; Rao, A M; Hang, Y D; Kalter, R J; Boisvert, R N; Gabler, E C

    1985-07-01

    In the U.S., corn has been the principal commodity considered for conversion to ethanol. One alternative to using corn and other food crops is to utilize organic wastes, such as food processing waste. Cheese whey is one such waste that holds potential for conversion to ethanol. To ascertain the feasibility of using whey as a feedstock a series of regional studies were conducted by the authors. Results from these studies indicate that the transport of condensed whey to a central processing plant for conversion to ethanol is economically feasible. The energy balance for the plants considered can yield a positive or negative balance depending on whether an energy penalty is assigned for condensing the whey. A net energy gain of 23833 to 26921 kJ/l of ethanol was obtained if energy for whey condensing was not included and a net energy loss ranging from -279 to -686 kJ/l was obtained if whey condensing was included in the energy balance. Plants utilizing continuous fermentation technology showed positive energy balance with or without a penalty for the condensing of the whey.

  4. Application of Acid Whey in Orange Drink Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Jaworska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare qualitative changes in orange and orange beverages containing whey during 12 months of storage. The beverages contained 12 % extract, half of which was orange concentrate, the rest was sugar or sugar and whey extract. Acid whey was used in the production of beverages, added at a rate of 50 % of the used water. Orange beverages with whey contained more protein, ash, glucose, lactose and vitamin B2 than the orange beverages, but less sucrose, fructose and vitamin C, and also showed lower antioxidant activity against the DPPH radical. No significant differences between the two types of beverages were found in the polyphenolic content or activity against the ABTS cation radical. The type of beverage had a significant effect on the colour parameter values under the CIELAB system, although no significant differences were found between the beverages in the sensory evaluation of colour desirability. The overall sensory evaluation of orange beverages with whey was 2–10 % lower than of other orange beverages. The intensity of orange, sweet and refreshing taste was greater in orange beverages, while that of sour and whey taste was greater in orange beverages containing whey. There were significant decreases in sucrose, lactose, all indicators of antioxidant activity and sensory quality during storage. Levels of glucose and fructose rose with the storage period, while the intensity of sour, orange and refreshing taste decreased.

  5. Permeation of Comite through protective gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Hanaa; Que Hee, Shane S

    2006-09-01

    The goal of the study was to assess how protective disposable (Safeskin) and chemical protective (Sol-Vex) nitrile gloves were against Comite emulsifiable concentrate formulation containing propargite (PROP) as active pesticidal ingredient, because there were no explicit recommendations for the gloves that should be worn for hand protection. The glove material was exposed in ASTM-type I-PTC-600 permeation cells at 30.0+/-0.5 degrees C, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry used for PROP analysis. Aqueous solutions of Comite at 40.4 mg/mL permeated both Safeskin and Sol-Vex nitrile by 8h. Safeskin showed a mean PROP mass permeated of 176+/-27 microg after 8h compared with a mean mass permeated for Sol-Vex of 3.17+/-4.08 microg. Thus, Sol-Vex was about 56 times more protective than Safeskin for an 8-h exposure. However, the kinetics of the permeation revealed that Safeskin can be worn for at least 200 min before disposal. When undiluted Comite challenged both types of nitrile, much faster permeation was observed. Safeskin gloves showed two steady state periods. The first had lag times (t(l)) values of about 1h, although normalized breakthrough times (t(b)) were gloves exposed continuously to undiluted Comite permeated above the normalized breakthrough threshold beyond 2.7h. A risk assessment revealed that the PROP skin permeation rate of 7.1 ng cm(-2)h(-1) was much slower than the first steady state Safeskin glove P(s) of 62,000 ng cm(-2)h(-1). Infrared analysis showed that the glove surfaces were not degraded by the Comite challenge. The chemically protective Sol-Vex gloves protected adequately against undiluted formulation for about 2.7h, whereas they provided protection for nearly 8h when the formulation was diluted with water to the highest concentration for field application. In contrast, the disposable Safeskin gloves did not protect at all for the undiluted formulation, but did for 200 min when the formulation was diluted with water to the highest

  6. In-site coatings to reduce H and Tr permeation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoever, D.; Buchkremer, H.P.; Hecker, R.; Jonas, H.; Schaefer, J.; Zink, U.; Forsyth, N.; Thiele, W.

    1982-01-01

    The main goal of this project is the development of protective coatings to reduce or prevent Tr and H permeation through the heat exchanger walls of HTR components. The tasks of the project are: Measurement of the permeation inhibition efficiency of oxidic coatings on the high-temperature- resistant heat exchanger walls; establishing the parameters influencing permeation by variation of the process gas and steam parameters, temperature and mechanical stress; characterisation of coatings and correlation of coating characteristics with permeation measurements; investigation of permeation and corrosion mechanisms; quantitative description of H and Tr permeation by means of mathematical/physical models. (orig./IHOE) [de

  7. Ethanol, biomass and enzyme production for whey waste abatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiorella, B L; Castillo, F J

    1984-08-01

    Methods of ethanol, biomass, and lactase production are evaluated for the treatment of whey waste. These processes can all reduce the whey BOD load of 35,000 ppm by at least 90%. Plant designs are evaluated at the scale of 25,000 l whey per day, corresponding to the output of a typical independent cheese factory. Ethanol production is the most practical of the alternatives evaluated and the waste treatment would add 7.3 US cents per kilogramme to the cost of cheese manufacture. 57 references.

  8. Beverages formulated with whey protein and added lutein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Cássia Gomes Rocha

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to develop and characterize beverages formulated with whey protein and added lutein. Beverages formulated with 0.5 (F1, 2.0 (F2, 4.0 (F3 and 6.0% w/v (F4 whey protein were physicochemically and microbiologically characterized, and sensory evaluated. The physicochemical analyses indicated that the protein content significantly changed (P0.05 with increased protein content. The F2 formulation showed the highest sensory acceptance. Beverages offer a promising alternative to whey use and enhance the value of the product by the addition of lutein.

  9. Starch Biosynthesis in Crop Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J. Tetlow

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Starch is a water-insoluble polyglucan synthesized inside the plastids of plant tissues to provide a store of carbohydrate. Starch harvested from plant storage organs has probably represented the major source of calories for the human diet since before the dawn of civilization. Following the advent of agriculture and the building of complex societies, humans have maintained their dependence on high-yielding domesticated starch-forming crops such as cereals to meet food demands, livestock production, and many non-food applications. The top three crops in terms of acreage are cereals, grown primarily for the harvestable storage starch in the endosperm, although many starchy tuberous crops also provide an important source of calories for various communities around the world. Despite conservation in the core structure of the starch granule, starches from different botanical sources show a high degree of variability, which is exploited in many food and non-food applications. Understanding the factors underpinning starch production and its final structure are of critical importance in guiding future crop improvement endeavours. This special issue contains reviews on these topics and is intended to be a useful resource for researchers involved in improvement of starch-storing crops.

  10. Physicochemical properties of maca starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Li, Guantian; Wang, Sunan; Yao, Weirong; Zhu, Fan

    2017-03-01

    Maca (Lepidium meyenii Walpers) is gaining research attention due to its unique bioactive properties. Starch is a major component of maca roots, thus representing a novel starch source. In this study, the properties of three maca starches (yellow, purple and black) were compared with commercially maize, cassava, and potato starches. The starch granule sizes ranged from 9.0 to 9.6μm, and the granules were irregularly oval. All the maca starches presented B-type X-ray diffraction patterns, with the relative degree of crystallinity ranging from 22.2 to 24.3%. The apparent amylose contents ranged from 21.0 to 21.3%. The onset gelatinization temperatures ranged from 47.1 to 47.5°C as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry. Significant differences were observed in the pasting properties and textural parameters among all of the studied starches. These characteristics suggest the utility of native maca starch in products subjected to low temperatures during food processing and other industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Development and optimization of a mixed beverage made of whey and water-soluble soybean extract flavored with chocolate using a simplex-centroid design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dóris Faria de OLIVEIRA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to combine the nutritional advantages of whey and soybean by developing a type of chocolate beverage with water-soluble soybean extract dissolved in whey. Different concentrations of thickeners (carrageenan, pectin and starch – maximum level of 500 mg.100 mL-1 were tested by a simplex-centroid design. Several physicochemical, rheological, and sensory properties of the beverages were measured and a multi-response optimization was conducted aiming to obtain a whey and soybean beverage with increased overall sensory impression and maximum purchase intention. Beverages presented mean protein levels higher than 3.1 g.100 mL-1, a low content of lipids (< 2 g.100 mL-1 and total soluble solids ≥20 g.100 mL-1. Response surface methodology was applied and the proposed for overall impression and purchase intention presented R2=0.891 and R2=0.966, respectively. The desirability index (d-value=0.92 showed that the best formulation should contain 46% carrageenan and 54% pectin in the formulation. The formulation manufactured with this combination of thickeners was tested and the overall impression was 7.11±1.09 (over a 9-point hedonic scale and the purchase intention was 4.0±1.3 (over a 5-point hedonic scale, thus showing that the proposed models were predictive.

  12. Starches, Sugars and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. J. G. Aller

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The rising prevalence of obesity, not only in adults but also in children and adolescents, is one of the most important public health problems in developed and developing countries. As one possible way to tackle obesity, a great interest has been stimulated in understanding the relationship between different types of dietary carbohydrate and appetite regulation, body weight and body composition. The present article reviews the conclusions from recent reviews and meta-analyses on the effects of different starches and sugars on body weight management and metabolic disturbances, and provides an update of the most recent studies on this topic. From the literature reviewed in this paper, potential beneficial effects of intake of starchy foods, especially those containing slowly-digestible and resistant starches, and potential detrimental effects of high intakes of fructose become apparent. This supports the intake of whole grains, legumes and vegetables, which contain more appropriate sources of carbohydrates associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases, rather than foods rich in sugars, especially in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages.

  13. Characteristics of whey proteinhydrolysates from cheese whey, favors onvarious food applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeewanthi Chaturika Renda Kankanamge

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate theproduction of whey protein hydrolysates,examiningthe physiochemical properties withfive enzyme types named Alcalase, Protease S,Protease M, Trypsin, and Pepsin. Whey protein concentratewas adjusted by ultrafiltration,increasing the whey content to 135% that of initial levels. The hydrolysates have been shown to improve the characteristics of a number of food products, and the type of enzyme has a considerable influence on the end result of hydrolysatesproduction. Bulk density, Solubility, NPN, foaming capacity, and the degree of hydrolysis were increased with hydrolysis time. Maximum Bulk density was shownby Protease S. Pepsinand Alcalase, whichgraduallyincreasedthe foaming capacity, resulting in acomparatively lower pH and a lower degree of hydrolysis. The highestdegree of hydrolysiswas shown by Protease M. The highest NPN value was provided by Pepsin, which was much greater than that of other enzymes. There wasno significant difference in NPN according to the enzyme typeapplied. Allhydrolysates in alkaline media were shown more than 50% solubility. HMFcontents were also shown anobviousdifference with the enzyme type.

  14. Analysis and Application of Whey Protein Depleted Skim Milk Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hanne

    homogenisation (UHPH). The microfiltration will result in a milk fraction more or less depleted from whey protein, and could probably in combination with UHPH treatment contribute to milk fractions and cheeses with novel micro and macrostructures. These novel fractions could be used as new ingredients to improve......-destructive methods for this purpose. A significant changed structure was observed in skim milk depleted or partly depleted for whey protein, acidified and UHPH treated. Some of the properties of the UHPH treated skim milk depleted from whey protein observed in this study support the idea, that UHPH treatment has...... this. LF-NMR relaxation were utilised to obtain information about the water mobility (relaxation time), in diluted skim milk systems depleted from whey protein. Obtained results indicate that measuring relaxation times with LF-NMR could be difficult to utilize, since no clear relationship between...

  15. Development of newly enriched bread with quinoa flour and whey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, D. M.; Naranjo, M.; Pérez, L. V.; Valencia, A. F.; Acurio, L. P.; Gallegos, L. M.; Alvarez, F. C.; Amancha, P. I.; Valencia, M. P.; Rodriguez, C. A.; Arancibia, M. Y.

    2017-07-01

    Ecuador, Bolivia, and Peru are countries with the highest amount of quinoa production in the world due to the proximity to the Andes. Further, Ecuador has a high production of dairy products, particularly fresh cheese of which production gives a high volume of whey, without further use, with the consequent loss of their nutritional value. The present study was performed to develop a new fortified bread through the incorporation of quinoa flour and whey at three different concentrations. The use of quinoa and whey improved the texture, shelf life and sensory characteristics of bread, compared to those prepared with wheat flour. This study shows the potential of quinoa flour and whey as ingredients in the development of baked products.

  16. Production of bioethanol from organic whey using Kluyveromyces marxianus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A.D.; Kádár, Zsófia; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol production by K. marxianus in whey from organic cheese production was examined in batch and continuous mode. The results showed that no pasteurization or freezing of the whey was necessary and that K. marxianus was able to compete with the lactic acid bacteria added during cheese production...... ethanol yield (~0.50 g ethanol/g lactose) at both 30°C and 40°C using low pH (4.5) or no pH control. Continuous fermentation of nonsterilized whey was performed using Ca-alginate-immobilized K. marxianus. High ethanol productivity (2.5-4.5 g/l/h) was achieved at dilution rate of 0.2/h......, and it was concluded that K. marxianus is very suitable for industrial ethanol production from whey. © 2010 Society for Industrial Microbiology....

  17. Whey protein stories - an experiment in writing a multidisciplinary biography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tenna; Bechschøft, Rasmus L.; Giacalone, Davide

    2016-01-01

    This is an experimental, dual-purpose article about whey protein and how to conduct interdisciplinary analyses and writings. On the one hand, this article is a multidisciplinary commodity biography, which consists of five descriptions of whey protein written by the five different research groups...... contributes to the field of food studies with a multidisciplinary biography of whey protein - including its sensory qualities and challenges, insights into its cultural history, its nutritional value and effects on the human body and an analysis of how it is perceived by people who consume it. The biography...... thereby expands upon existing understandings of whey protein while discussing the usefulness of employing the commodity biography format in interdisciplinary writing. Moreover, the article contributes to the field of interdisciplinary research by providing a practical example of a joint publication...

  18. The role of whey in functional dairy food production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Tratnik

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern life style also enhances a need for creation of better dairyproducts, in comparison with traditional ones, possessing functionalcharacteristics. Whey is consisted primarily of lactose, proteins of high nutritive value, important minerals and imunoactive compounds, as well as vitamins of B group. It can be used for fermented probiotic drinks and albumin cheese production. Using new methods of pressure membrane filtration and demineralisation the economic manufacture of whey, as a valuable source of nutrients, is enabled. The aim of this paper is to give an overview on the possibilities of sweet whey, especially whey protein concentrates, use in functional dairy products manufacture from cow’s and goat’s milk. The paper is based on the published scientific research performed in the Laboratory for Technology of Milk and Dairy Products of the Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology University of Zagreb.

  19. Substituent distribution within cross-linked and hydroxypropylated sweet potato starch and potato starch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.; Schols, H.A.; Chen Zenghong,; Jin Zhengyu,; Buwalda, P.L.; Gruppen, H.

    2012-01-01

    Revealing the substituents distribution within starch can help to understand the changes of starch properties after modification. The distribution of substituents over cross-linked and hydroxypropylated sweet potato starch was investigated and compared with modified potato starch. The starches were

  20. LIBRETTO-3: modelling tritium extraction/permeation and evaluation of permeation barriers under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedano, L.A.; Fuetterer, M.A.; Viola, R.; Dies, X.

    1996-01-01

    Permeation barriers are required in order to limit the size and cost of the detritiation plants for future fusion reactor blankets of the water-cooled Pb-17Li type. The LIBRETTO irradiations were performed to evaluate the efficiency of permeation barriers under high flux reactor (HFR) conditions. Tritium extraction and permeation characteristics from Pb-17Li under variable temperatures 553-723 K, H 2 doping (0-1 vol%) and purge gas flow rates 20-100 scc/min were tested in LIBRETTO-3. An external TiC coating, an internal (TiC+Al 2 O 3 ), both produced by chemical vapour deposition (CVD), and an internal Al 2 O 3 produced by pack cementation (PC) on AISI 316L steel were tested as permeation barriers. The release mechanisms, experimental uncertainties and method for permeation barriers qualification are presented. As a result permeation reduction factors (PRF) at 0.1 dpa of 17 and 34 were obtained for the CVD-Al 2 O 3 at 498 K and for the PC-Al 2 O 3 at 508 K, respectively. These values were confirmed by a residence time analysis and are higher than in a preliminary analysis. (orig.)

  1. Effect of multiple substrates in ethanol fermentations from cheese whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C J; Jayanata, Y; Bajpai, R K

    1987-01-01

    Ethanol fermentations from cheese whey by Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 397 were investigated. Cheese whey, which contains lactose as the major sugar, has been found to have small amounts of glucose and galactose, depending on the source and operating conditions. Fermentation performance was strongly influenced by the presence of glucose and galactose. However, lactose did not significantly affect the cell growth and product formation even at a high concentration. A logistical model was proposed to take into account the effect of lactose. (Refs. 6).

  2. Effect of Permeation Enhancers on the Release Behavior and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The aim of this research work was to formulate, characterize and evaluate the in vitro permeation behavior of tramadol lotion containing propylene glycol (PG) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as permeation enhancers. Methods: The permeation experiments were conducted in vitro using full thickness rabbit skin in ...

  3. Sensory quality evaluation of whey-based beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Legarová

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Whey as a by-product of the cheese industry is a source of biological and functional valuable proteins. The aim of this research was to evaluate the commercial potential of whey-based dairy beverages containing a definite amount of semi-skimmed milk addition. The purpose of this paper was to improve the whey flavour via its fermentation by commercial yogurt starter cultures, and via 25 % and 50 % of milk addition. The course of fermentation was monitored by pH and titratable acidity changes. The sensory profile of non-fermented and fermented drinks was assessed using unstructured graphical scales. No significant differences in acidity were found between the samples which were fermented for 3 or 4 hours, but a significant difference was found between samples of whey drinks without milk and samples with milk addition. Fermentation by yoghurt culture did not bring statistically significant improvement of the whey drink organoleptic properties, while the addition of milk was the most important factor influencing not only the total sensory quality of the whey drinks but also their flavour, appearance, colour, viscosity and homogeneity.

  4. Biogas yield from Sicilian kitchen waste and cheese whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Comparetti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the chemical composition of kitchen waste and cheese whey, as well as the biogas yield obtained from the Anaerobic Digestion (AD tests of these two raw materials. Since the separated waste collection is performed in the town of Marineo (Palermo, a sample of kitchen waste, different from food industry one and included in the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW, was collected from the mass stored at the households of this town. Moreover, a sample of cheese whey was collected in a Sicilian mini dairy plant, where sheep milk is processed. This investigation was carried out inside laboratory digesters of Aleksandras Stulginskis University (Lithuania. Total Solids (TS resulted 15.6% in kitchen waste and 6% in cheese whey, while both the raw materials showed a high content of organic matter, 91.1% and 79.1%, respectively. The biogas yield resulted 104.6 l kg–1 from kitchen waste and 30.6 l kg–1 from cheese whey. The biogas yield from TS resulted 672.6 l kg–1 using kitchen waste and 384.7 l kg–1 using cheese whey. The biogas yield from Volatile Solids (VS resulted 738.9 l kg–1 using kitchen waste and 410.3 l kg–1 using cheese whey.

  5. Minimising generation of acid whey during Greek yoghurt manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uduwerella, Gangani; Chandrapala, Jayani; Vasiljevic, Todor

    2017-08-01

    Greek yoghurt, a popular dairy product, generates large amounts of acid whey as a by-product during manufacturing. Post-processing treatment of this stream presents one of the main concerns for the industry. The objective of this study was to manipulate initial milk total solids content (15, 20 or 23 g/100 g) by addition of milk protein concentrate, thus reducing whey expulsion. Such an adjustment was investigated from the technological standpoint including starter culture performance, chemical and physical properties of manufactured Greek yoghurt and generated acid whey. A comparison was made to commercially available products. Increasing protein content in regular yoghurt reduced the amount of acid whey during whey draining. This protein fortification also enhanced the Lb. bulgaricus growth rate and proteolytic activity. Best structural properties including higher gel strength and lower syneresis were observed in the Greek yoghurt produced with 20 g/100 g initial milk total solid compared to manufactured or commercially available products, while acid whey generation was lowered due to lower drainage requirement.

  6. Powder and compaction characteristics of pregelatinized starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, J; Uribe, Y; Zuluaga, A

    2012-06-01

    Pregelatinized starch is widely used as a pharmaceutical aid, especially as a filler-binder. It is known that the tableting performance of excipients could be affected by their source. The aim of this study was to evaluate the powder and tableting properties of pregelatinized starches obtained from yucca, corn and rice and compare those properties with those of Starch 1500. This material had the lowest particle size, and porosity and largest density and best flow. However, yucca starch and corn starch showed an irregular granule morphology, better compactibility and compressibility than Starch 1500. Their onset of plastic deformation and their strain rate sensitivity was comparable to that of Starch 1500. These two materials showed compact disintegration slower that Starch 1500. Conversely, rice starch showed a high elasticity, and friability, low compactibility, which are undesirable for direct compression. This study demonstrated the potential use of pregelatinized starches, especially those obtained from yucca and corn as direct compression filler-binders.

  7. Sixth taste – starch taste?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Zdrojewicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientists from Oregon State University, USA, came up with the newest theory of the sixth taste – starch taste that might soon join the basic five tastes. This argument is supported by studies done on both animals and humans, the results of which seem to indicate the existence of separate receptors for starch taste, others than for sweet taste. Starch is a glucose homopolymer that forms an α-glucoside chain called glucosan or glucan. This polysaccharide constitutes the most important source of carbohydrates in food. It can be found in groats, potatoes, legumes, grains, manioc and corn. Apart from its presence in food, starch is also used in textile, pharmaceutical, cosmetic and stationery industries as well as in glue production. This polysaccharide is made of an unbranched helical structure – amylose (15–20%, and a structure that forms branched chains – amylopectin (80–85%. The starch structure, degree of its crystallisation or hydration as well as its availability determine the speed of food-contained starch hydrolysis by amylase. So far, starch has been considered tasteless, but the newest report shows that for people of different origins it is associated with various aliments specific for each culture. Apart from a number of scientific experiments using sweet taste inhibitors, the existence of the sixth taste is also confirmed by molecular studies. However, in order to officially include starch taste to the basic human tastes, it must fulfil certain criteria. The aim of the study is to present contemporary views on starch.

  8. Interactions between whey proteins and kaolinite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, S.; Villa-Garcia, M.A.; Rendueles, M.; Diaz, M.

    2008-01-01

    The nature of the interactions between whey proteins and kaolinite surfaces was investigated by adsorption-desorption experiments at room temperature, performed at the isoelectric point (IEP) of the proteins and at pH 7. It was found that kaolinite is a strong adsorbent for proteins, reaching the maximum adsorption capacity at the IEP of each protein. At pH 7.0, the retention capacity decreased considerably. The adsorption isotherms showed typical Langmuir characteristics. X-ray diffraction data for the protein-kaolinite complexes showed that protein molecules were not intercalated in the mineral structure, but immobilized at the external surfaces and the edges of the kaolinite. Fourier transform IR results indicate the absence of hydrogen bonding between kaolinite surfaces and the polypeptide chain. The adsorption patterns appear to be related to electrostatic interactions, although steric effects should be also considered

  9. Interactions between whey proteins and kaolinite surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barral, S. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Villa-Garcia, M.A. [Department of Organic and Inorganic Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: mavg@uniovi.es; Rendueles, M. [Project Management Area, University of Oviedo, Independencia 13, 33004 Oviedo (Spain); Diaz, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    The nature of the interactions between whey proteins and kaolinite surfaces was investigated by adsorption-desorption experiments at room temperature, performed at the isoelectric point (IEP) of the proteins and at pH 7. It was found that kaolinite is a strong adsorbent for proteins, reaching the maximum adsorption capacity at the IEP of each protein. At pH 7.0, the retention capacity decreased considerably. The adsorption isotherms showed typical Langmuir characteristics. X-ray diffraction data for the protein-kaolinite complexes showed that protein molecules were not intercalated in the mineral structure, but immobilized at the external surfaces and the edges of the kaolinite. Fourier transform IR results indicate the absence of hydrogen bonding between kaolinite surfaces and the polypeptide chain. The adsorption patterns appear to be related to electrostatic interactions, although steric effects should be also considered.

  10. Moisture sorption isotherms of dehydrated whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Rimac Brnčić

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Moisture sorption isotherms describe the relation between the moisture content of the dry material (food and relative humidity of the surrounding environment. The data obtained are important in modelling of drying process conditions, packaging and shelf-life stability of food that will provide maximum retaining of aroma, colour and texture as well as nutritive and biological value. The objective of this research was to establish the equilibrium moisture content and water activity, as well as monolayer value of two commercial powdered whey protein isolates before and after tribomechanical micronisation and enzymatic hydrolysis, respectively. At the same time it was necessary to evaluate the best moisture sorption isotherm equation to fit the experimental data. The equilibrium moisture contents in investigated samples were determined using standard gravimetric method at 20 °C. The range of water activities was 0.11 to 0.75. The monolayer moisture content was estimated from sorption data using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET and Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB models. The results have shown that tribomechanically treated whey protein isolates as well as protein hydrolizates had lower monolayer moisture content values as well as higher corresponding water activity. Therefore, in spite of the fact that they have lower moisture content, they can be storage at higher relative humidity compared to untreated samples. BET model gave better fit to experimental sorption data for a water activity range from 0.11-0.54, while GAB model gave the closest fit for a water activity to 0.75.

  11. Chemical and Biological Evaluation of Whey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, N.E.; Anwar, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This Study has been carried out to extract whey protein concentrate (WPC) from sweet whey and to study the chemical composition, amino acids composition, amino acid scores and to investigate the possible role of WPC in ameliorating some biochemical disorders induced in γ-irradiated rats. Animals were divided into 4 groups. Group 1, fed on normal diet during experimental period. Group 2, fed on diet containing 15% WPC instead of soybean protein. Group 3, rats exposed to whole body γ-radiation with single dose of 5 Gy and fed on the normal diet. Group 4, rats exposed to 5 Gy then fed on diet containing 15% WPC. The rats were decapitated 14 and 28 days post irradiation. Chemical analysis of WPC revealed that it contains high amounts of protein (44%), total amino acids (71%) and all essential amino acids (EAA), phenylalanine (37%), isoleucine cystine and threonine were the major EAA and high amounts of sulphur amino acids. Methionine gave rich chemical score (102.67%) also, isoleucine (119.95%) and phenylalanine+ tyrosine gave maximum chemical score (198.8%), respectively. Exposure to γ-irradiation caused significant elevation of serum cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein (LDL), lipid per oxidation end product (TBARS) and iron (Fe) with significant decrease in high density lipoprotein (HDL), glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) in serum. Also, irradiated rats had significant decrease in copper (Cu), magnesium (Mg) and zinc (Zn) in serum. The histological examination of cardiac tissue showed severe structural damage. Irradiated rats fed on WPC revealed significant improvement of some biochemical parameters. It could be concluded that WPC must be added to diet for reducing radiation injury via metabolic pathway

  12. Chemical Modifications of Starch: Microwave Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Lewicka, Kamila; Siemion, Przemysław; Kurcok, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents basic methods of starch chemical modification, the effect of microwave radiation on the modification process, and the physicochemical properties of starch. It has been shown that the modifications contribute to improvement of the material performance and likewise to significant improvement of its mechanical properties. As a result, more and more extensive use of starch is possible in various industries. In addition, methods of oxidized starch and starch esters preparation ...

  13. Improved permeation barriers for tritiated waste packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassallo, G.; Van Den Bergh, R.; Forcey, K.S.; Perujo, A.

    1994-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) is extensively used as flexible bagging or packaging for soft tritiated waste in the tritium community because of its low permeability to the more radiotoxic form of tritium, i.e., tritiated water (HTO). However, HDPE does not represent a perfect barrier to HTO nor does it effectively hinder the permeation of elemental tritium, i.e, HT. This latter drawback is particularly important considering that the elemental form may readily convert to HTO outside of the waste package. The possible use of a multilayer film as packing material for the conditioning of tritiated waste is assessed, and its capability to hinder the permeation of elemental tritium is measured and compared with that of bare HDPE. The material investigated is readily available from the food industry. 5 refs., 1 tab

  14. Modeling and experiments on tritium permeation in fusion reactor blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, D. F.; Longhurst, G. R.

    The determination of tritium loss from helium-cooled fusion breeding blankets are discussed. The issues are: (1) applicability of present models to permeation at low tritium pressures; (2) effectiveness of oxide layers in reducing permeation; (3) effectiveness of hydrogen addition as a means to lower tritium permeation; and (4) effectiveness of conversion to tritiated water and subsequent trapping to reduce permeation. Theoretical models applicable to these issues are discussed, and results of experiments in two areas are presented; permeation of mixtures of hydrogen isotopes and conversion to tritiated water.

  15. Modeling and experiments on tritium permeation in fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Issues are discussed that are critical in determining tritium loss from helium-cooled fusion breeding blankets. These issues are: (a) applicability of present models to permeation at low tritium pressures, (b) effectiveness of oxide layers in reducing permeation, (c) effectiveness of hydrogen addition as a means to lower tritium permeation, and (d) effectiveness of conversion to tritiated water and subsequent trapping as a means to reduce permeation. The paper discusses theoretical models applicable to these issues, and presents results of experiments in two areas: permeation of mixtures of hydrogen isotopes and conversion to tritiated water

  16. Flibe-D2 Permeation Experiment and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukada, S.; Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R.; Schuetz, S.T.; O'Brien, J.E.; Nishimura, H.; Hatano, Y.; Terai, T.; Petti, D.A.; Sze, D.-K.; Tanaka, S.

    2003-01-01

    Experiment of D 2 permeation through Ni facing with purified Flibe is being carried out under the Japan-US joint research project (JUPITER-II). The experiment is proceeding in the following phases; (i) fabrication and assembly of a dual-probe permeation apparatus, (ii) a single-probe Ni/D 2 permeation experiment without Flibe, (iii) a dual-probe Ni/D 2 permeation experiment without Flibe, (iv) Flibe chemical purification by HF/H 2 gas bubbling, (v) physical purification by Flibe transport through a porous Ni filter, (vi) Ni/Flibe/D 2 permeation experiment, and (vii) Ni/Flibe/HT permeation experiment. The present paper describes results of the single and dual Ni/D 2 permeation experiments in detail

  17. Rheological properties of reduced fat ice cream mix containing octenyl succinylated pearl millet starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Singh, Ashish K; Yadav, Deep N

    2017-05-01

    The octenyl succinyl anhydride (OSA) esterified pearl millet ( Pennisetum typhoides ) starch was evaluated as fat replacer in soft serve ice cream in comparison to other fat replacers viz. inulin, whey protein concentrate-70 and commercial starch. During temperature sweep test, the yield stress and flow behaviour index of un-pasteurized ice cream mixes increased as the temperature increased from 40 to 80 °C, while the consistency index decreased. Consistency index of aged ice cream mixes containing 2% fat replacer was higher as compared to mixes with 1% level. The aged ice cream mixes exhibited non-Newtonian behaviour as flow behaviour index values were less than one. Apparent viscosity (at 50 s -1 shear rate) of control as well as ice cream mix containing 1% OSA-esterified pearl millet starch samples was 417 and 415 mPas, respectively and did not differ significantly. The overrun of the ice cream (with 5 and 7.5% fat) containing 1 and 2% of above fat replacers ranged between 29.7 and 34.3% and was significantly lower than control (40.3%). The percent melted ice cream was also low for the ice creams containing 2% of above fat replacers at 5% fat content as compared to control. However, sensory acceptability and rheological characteristics of reduced fat ice creams containing 1.0 and 2.0% OSA-esterified pearl millet starch were at par with other fat replacers under the study. Thus, OSA-esterified pearl millet starch has potential to be used as fat replacer in reduced fat ice cream.

  18. Enzyme-induced aggregation of whey proteins with Bacillus licheniformis protease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creusot, N.P.

    2006-01-01

    Whey proteins are commonly used as ingredient in food. In relation with the gelation properties of whey proteins, this thesis deals with understanding the mechanism of peptide-induced aggregation of whey protein hydrolysates made with Bacillus licheniformis protease (BLP). The results show that BLP

  19. Production of ethanol and biomass starting to present lactose in the milk whey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeles-Ramirez, K.; Arana-cuenca, A.; Tellez-Jurado, A.

    2009-01-01

    Milk whey is a by-product of the milk industry, a highly polluting waste due to the quantity of COD and BOD that it contains. The contamination caused by milk whey is mostly due to its lactose content. The fermentation of milk whey to ethanol is a possible road to reduce the polluting effect. (Author)

  20. 40 CFR 405.120 - Applicability; description of the dry whey subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... whey subcategory. 405.120 Section 405.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dry Whey Subcategory § 405.120 Applicability; description of the dry whey subcategory. The provisions of this subpart...

  1. Exceptional heat stability of high protein content dispersions containing whey protein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.; Venema, P.; Vries, de R.J.; Linden, van der E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to aggregation and/or gelation during thermal treatment, the amount of whey proteins that can be used in the formulation of high protein foods e.g. protein drinks, is limited. The aim of this study was to replace whey proteins with whey protein particles to increase the total protein content and

  2. Selection of lactose-fermenting yeast for ethanol production from whey. [Candida pseudotropicalis ATCC 8619

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaguirre, M E; Castillo, F J

    1982-01-01

    Candida pseudotropicalis ATCC 8619 was selected from among 9 strains of lactose-fermenting yeasts on the basis of its ability to ferment concentrated whey. In 28% deproteinized whey solutions it produced an average of 12.4% EtOH. This yeast could be used in a process for whey treatment.

  3. Design starch: stochastic modeling of starch granule biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguin, Adélaïde; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2017-08-15

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in plants and the main source of carbohydrate in the human diet. Owing to its remarkable properties and commercial applications, starch is still of growing interest. Its unique granular structure made of intercalated layers of amylopectin and amylose has been unraveled thanks to recent progress in microscopic imaging, but the origin of such periodicity is still under debate. Both amylose and amylopectin are made of linear chains of α-1,4-bound glucose residues, with branch points formed by α-1,6 linkages. The net difference in the distribution of chain lengths and the branching pattern of amylose (mainly linear), compared with amylopectin (racemose structure), leads to different physico-chemical properties. Amylose is an amorphous and soluble polysaccharide, whereas amylopectin is insoluble and exhibits a highly organized structure of densely packed double helices formed between neighboring linear chains. Contrarily to starch degradation that has been investigated since the early 20th century, starch production is still poorly understood. Most enzymes involved in starch growth (elongation, branching, debranching, and partial hydrolysis) are now identified. However, their specific action, their interplay (cooperative or competitive), and their kinetic properties are still largely unknown. After reviewing recent results on starch structure and starch growth and degradation enzymatic activity, we discuss recent results and current challenges for growing polysaccharides on granular surface. Finally, we highlight the importance of novel stochastic models to support the analysis of recent and complex experimental results, and to address how macroscopic properties emerge from enzymatic activity and structural rearrangements. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Design starch: stochastic modeling of starch granule biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in plants and the main source of carbohydrate in the human diet. Owing to its remarkable properties and commercial applications, starch is still of growing interest. Its unique granular structure made of intercalated layers of amylopectin and amylose has been unraveled thanks to recent progress in microscopic imaging, but the origin of such periodicity is still under debate. Both amylose and amylopectin are made of linear chains of α-1,4-bound glucose residues, with branch points formed by α-1,6 linkages. The net difference in the distribution of chain lengths and the branching pattern of amylose (mainly linear), compared with amylopectin (racemose structure), leads to different physico-chemical properties. Amylose is an amorphous and soluble polysaccharide, whereas amylopectin is insoluble and exhibits a highly organized structure of densely packed double helices formed between neighboring linear chains. Contrarily to starch degradation that has been investigated since the early 20th century, starch production is still poorly understood. Most enzymes involved in starch growth (elongation, branching, debranching, and partial hydrolysis) are now identified. However, their specific action, their interplay (cooperative or competitive), and their kinetic properties are still largely unknown. After reviewing recent results on starch structure and starch growth and degradation enzymatic activity, we discuss recent results and current challenges for growing polysaccharides on granular surface. Finally, we highlight the importance of novel stochastic models to support the analysis of recent and complex experimental results, and to address how macroscopic properties emerge from enzymatic activity and structural rearrangements. PMID:28673938

  5. Chemical Modifications of Starch: Microwave Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Lewicka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents basic methods of starch chemical modification, the effect of microwave radiation on the modification process, and the physicochemical properties of starch. It has been shown that the modifications contribute to improvement of the material performance and likewise to significant improvement of its mechanical properties. As a result, more and more extensive use of starch is possible in various industries. In addition, methods of oxidized starch and starch esters preparation are discussed. Properties of microwave radiation and its impact on starch (with particular regard to modifications described in literature are characterized.

  6. Starch as a source, starch as a sink: the bifunctional role of starch in carbon allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeill, Gregory J; Mehrpouyan, Sahar; Minow, Mark A A; Patterson, Jenelle A; Tetlow, Ian J; Emes, Michael J

    2017-07-20

    Starch commands a central role in the carbon budget of the majority of plants on earth, and its biological role changes during development and in response to the environment. Throughout the life of a plant, starch plays a dual role in carbon allocation, acting as both a source, releasing carbon reserves in leaves for growth and development, and as a sink, either as a dedicated starch store in its own right (in seeds and tubers), or as a temporary reserve of carbon contributing to sink strength, in organs such as flowers, fruits, and developing non-starchy seeds. The presence of starch in tissues and organs thus has a profound impact on the physiology of the growing plant as its synthesis and degradation governs the availability of free sugars, which in turn control various growth and developmental processes. This review attempts to summarize the large body of information currently available on starch metabolism and its relationship to wider aspects of carbon metabolism and plant nutrition. It highlights gaps in our knowledge and points to research areas that show promise for bioengineering and manipulation of starch metabolism in order to achieve more desirable phenotypes such as increased yield or plant biomass. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Astringency reduction in red wine by whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregi, Paula; Olatujoye, Jumoke B; Cabezudo, Ignacio; Frazier, Richard A; Gordon, Michael H

    2016-05-15

    Whey is a by-product of cheese manufacturing and therefore investigating new applications of whey proteins will contribute towards the valorisation of whey and hence waste reduction. This study shows for the first time a detailed comparison of the effectiveness of gelatin and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) as fining agents. Gelatin was more reactive than whey proteins to tannic acid as shown by both the astringency method (with ovalbumin as a precipitant) and the tannins determination method (with methylcellulose as a precipitant). The two proteins showed similar selectivity for polyphenols but β-LG did not remove as much catechin. The fining agent was removed completely or to a trace level after centrifugation followed by filtration which minimises its potential allergenicity. In addition, improved understanding of protein-tannin interactions was obtained by fluorescence, size measurement and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Overall this study demonstrates that whey proteins have the potential of reducing astringency in red wine and can find a place in enology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microstructural Study on Oxygen Permeated Arc Beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Heng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We simulated short circuit of loaded copper wire at ambient atmosphere and successfully identified various phases of the arc bead. A cuprous oxide flake was formed on the surface of the arc bead in the rapid solidification process, and there were two microstructural constituents, namely, Cu-κ eutectic structure and solutal dendrites. Due to the arc bead formed at atmosphere during the local equilibrium solidification process, the phase of arc bead has segregated to the cuprous oxide flake, Cu-κ eutectic, and Cu phase solutal dendrites, which are the fingerprints of the arc bead permeated by oxygen.

  9. Hydrogen isotope permeation in elastomeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmeyer, R.H.; Braun, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The permeabilities of elastomeric and polymeric materials to hydrogen isotopes were measured at room temperature. The technique for measuring permeation rates is based on the following constant-volume method: a fixed pressure of gas is applied to one side of the specimen to be studied and the permeability constant is determined from the observed rate of pressure increase in an initially evacuated volume on the other side of the specimen. Permeability constants for hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium were measured for Mylar, Teflon, Kapton, Saran, Buna-N, and latex rubber. Results were compared with literature values for hydrogen and deuterium where available and showed excellent agreement

  10. Organic fluid permeation through fluoropolymer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemser, Stuart M.; Kosaraju, Praveen; Bowser, John

    2015-07-14

    Separation of the components of liquid mixtures is achieved by contacting a liquid mixture with a nonporous membrane having a fluoropolymer selectively permeable layer and imposing a pressure gradient across the membrane from feed side to permeate side. Unusually high transmembrane flux is obtained when the membrane is subjected to one or more process conditions prior to separation. These include (a) leaving some residual amount of membrane casting solvent in the membrane, and (b) contacting the membrane with a component of the mixture to be separated for a duration effective to saturate the membrane with the component.

  11. Preparation and characterization of dialdehyde starch urea (DASU ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dialdehyde starch urea (DASU) was prepared by the reaction of dialdehyde starch (DAS) from periodate oxidized cassava starch with urea, which was then used to adsorb Co(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions from aqueous solution. Starch modified starches and starch complexes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared ...

  12. Interactions between whey proteins and salivary proteins as related to astringency of whey protein beverages at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, A; Streicher, C; Singh, H

    2011-12-01

    Whey protein beverages have been shown to be astringent at low pH. In the present study, the interactions between model whey proteins (β-lactoglobulin and lactoferrin) and human saliva in the pH range from 7 to 2 were investigated using particle size, turbidity, and ζ-potential measurements and sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE. The correlation between the sensory results of astringency and the physicochemical data was discussed. Strong interactions between β-lactoglobulin and salivary proteins led to an increase in the particle size and turbidity of mixtures of both unheated and heated β-lactoglobulin and human saliva at pH ∼3.4. However, the large particle size and high turbidity that occurred at pH 2.0 were the result of aggregation of human salivary proteins. The intense astringency in whey protein beverages may result from these increases in particle size and turbidity at these pH values and from the aggregation and precipitation of human salivary proteins alone at pH salivary proteins in the interaction is a key factor in the perception of astringency in whey protein beverages. At any pH, the increases in particle size and turbidity were much smaller in mixtures of lactoferrin and saliva, which suggests that aggregation and precipitation may not be the only mechanism linked to the perception of astringency in whey protein. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Whey protein supplementation accelerates satellite cell proliferation during recovery from eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Knudsen, Inge Skovgaard

    2014-01-01

    well investigated. In a comparative human study, we investigated the effect of hydrolyzed whey protein supplementation following eccentric exercise on fiber type-specific SC accumulation. Twenty-four young healthy subjects received either hydrolyzed whey protein + carbohydrate (whey, n = 12) or iso...... creatine kinase (CK) were evaluated as indices of recovery from muscle damage. In type II fiber-associated SCs, the whey group increased SCs/fiber from 0.05 [0.02; 0.07] to 0.09 [0.06; 0.12] (p ... the placebo group (p whey group increased SCs/myonuclei from 4 % [2; 5] to 10 % [4; 16] (p 

  14. Tritium permeation losses in HYLIFE-II heat exchanger tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Dolan, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    Tritium permeation through the intermediate heat exchanger of the HYLIFE-II inertial fusion design concept is evaluated for routine operating conditions. The permeation process is modelled using the Lewis analogy combined with surface recombination. It is demonstrated that at very low driving potentials, permeation becomes proportional to the first power of the driving potential. The model predicts that under anticipated conditions the primary cooling loop will pass about 6% of the tritium entering it to the intermediate coolant. Possible approached to reducing tritium permeation are explored. Permeation is limited by turbulent diffusion transport through the molten salt. Hence, surface barriers with impendance factors typical of present technology can do very little to reduce permeation. Low Flibe viscosity is desirable. An efficient tritium removal system operating on the Flibe before it gets to the intermediate heat exchanger is required. Needs for further research are highlighted. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Functionalization of whey proteins by reactive supercritical fluid extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanitta Ruttarattanamongkol

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein, a by-product from cheese-making, is often used in a variety of food formulations due to its unsurpassednutritional quality and inherent functional properties. However, the possibilities for the improvement and upgrading of wheyprotein utilization still need to be explored. Reactive supercritical fluid extrusion (SCFX is a novel technique that has beenrecently reported to successfully functionalize commercially available whey proteins into a product with enhanced functionalproperties. The specific goal of this review is to provide fundamental understanding of the reinforcement mechanism andprocessing of protein functionalization by reactive SCFX process. The superimposed extrusion variables and their interactionmechanism affect the physico-chemical properties of whey proteins. By understanding the structure, functional properties andprocessing relationships of such materials, the rational design criteria for novel functionalized proteins could be developedand effectively utilized in food systems.

  16. Biodiversity of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages isolated from cheese whey starters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Miriam; Bonvini, Barbara; Rossetti, Lia; Meucci, Aurora; Giraffa, Giorgio; Carminati, Domenico

    2015-05-01

    Twenty-one Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages, 18 isolated from different cheese whey starters and three from CNRZ collection, were phenotypically and genetically characterised. A biodiversity between phages was evidenced both by host range and molecular (RAPD-PCR) typing. A more detailed characterisation of six phages showed similar structural protein profiles and a relevant genetic biodiversity, as shown by restriction enzyme analysis of total DNA. Latent period, burst time and burst size data evidenced that phages were active and virulent. Overall, data highlighted the biodiversity of Lb. helveticus phages isolated from cheese whey starters, which were confirmed to be one of the most common phage contamination source in dairy factories. More research is required to further unravel the ecological role of Lb. helveticus phages and to evaluate their impact on the dairy fermentation processes where whey starter cultures are used.

  17. Interaction of milk whey protein with common phenolic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Yu, Dandan; Sun, Jing; Guo, Huiyuan; Ding, Qingbo; Liu, Ruihai; Ren, Fazheng

    2014-01-01

    Phenolics-rich foods such as fruit juices and coffee are often consumed with milk. In this study, the interactions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin with the phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and coumalic acid) were examined. Fluorescence, CD, and FTIR spectroscopies were used to analyze the binding modes, binding constants, and the effects of complexation on the conformation of whey protein. The results showed that binding constants of each whey protein-phenolic acid interaction ranged from 4 × 105 to 7 × 106 M-n and the number of binding sites n ranged from 1.28 ± 0.13 to 1.54 ± 0.34. Because of these interactions, the conformation of whey protein was altered, with a significant reduction in the amount of α-helix and an increase in the amounts of β-sheet and turn structures.

  18. Physicochemical characterization of starches from seven improved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... Key words: Cassava, starch, functional properties, industrial utilization. ... in demand for starch (Davis et al., 2002). Potato, maize, wheat and cassava are the major ... ambient temperature and stored at 4 °C for 4 weeks.

  19. Rheological and microstructural properties of Irradiated starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atrous Turki, Hager

    2011-01-01

    Gamma irradiation ia s fast and efficient method to improve the functional properties of straches. Wheat and potato starches were submitted, in the present study, at 3,5,10 and 20 kGy radiation dose. The changes induced by irradiation on the rheological properties of these starches showed a decrease in the viscosity with increasing radiation dose. Chemicals bond's hydrolysis has been induced by free radicals that have been identified by EPR. Wheat starch presents five EPR signals after irradiation, whiles potato starch has a weak EPR signal. On the other hand, irradiation caused decrease in amylose content. This decrease is more pronounced in potato starch. Dry irradiated starch's MEB revealed no change in the shape, size and distribution of the granules. While, the observation of wheat starch allowed the complete disappearance of the granular structure and the dissolution of its macromolecules after irradiation which justifies the significant decrease in wheat starch's viscosity irradiated at 20 kGy.

  20. Development of a Contact Permeation Test Fixture and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Permeation and Analytical Solutions Team Quality System documentation and the guidance found in the ISO 17025 standard. All permeation and...annular ring (left) and no pressure (right). 2.2.4 Quality Controls Analytical permeation testing was conducted in accordance with ISO 17025 quality...internal standard. This mixture was vortexed for 20–30 s then centrifuged at 15,000 rpm for 5 min in a Micromax microcentrifuge (Thermo IEC ; Needham

  1. BIOACTIVE PEPTIDES OF THE COW MILK WHEY PROTEINS (Bos taurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Iukalo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Data on the biological functions of milk whey proteins, which are implemented at the level of their proteolytic degradation products — bioactive peptides have been reviewed. The main functions of these proteins is to provide the amino acid nutrition of mammals in the early stages of development, as well as the transport of fatty acids, retinol, involved in the synthesis of lactose, ions of calcium and iron, immune protection, antimicrobial action, etc. However, in recent years, it has been found that milk proteins like casein are precursors of biologically active peptides. Аngiotensin — converting enzyme, opioid peptides which are opiate receptor agonists, anti–microbial peptides, peptides with immunomodulatory and hypocholesterolemic action, and peptides affecting motility have been found among the products of proteolytic degradation of ?-lactoglobulin, ?-laktoalbumin, lactoferrin and milk whey albumin. Also data on the possible participation of peptides from milk whey proteins in the implementation of the biological functions of both the assimilation of calcium, antioxidant effect, the regulation of appetite, anticarcinogenic are provided. The authors assume that the phenomenon of bioactive peptides formation could be considered as an additional function of natural food proteins, which gives advantages to the mammals and has a positive effect on their development in the postnatal period. Ways of bioactive peptides formation, their resistance to action of proteolytic enzymes, the ability to cross into the bloodstream and have biological effects have been also discussed. Up to date, only a few products with bioactive peptides from milk whey proteins are obtained. Further studies of their structure, mechanism of action, ways of formation and methods of isolation are required for their wider use. Formation of functional products based on bioactive peptides from milk whey proteins will allow efficient use of milk whey, which is often a

  2. Processing of whey modulates proliferative and immune functions in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Sangild, Per Torp; Li, Yanqi

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is often subjected to heat treatment during industrial processing, resulting in protein denaturation and loss of protein bioactivity. We hypothesized that WPC samples subjected to different degrees of thermal processing are associated with different levels of bioact......Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is often subjected to heat treatment during industrial processing, resulting in protein denaturation and loss of protein bioactivity. We hypothesized that WPC samples subjected to different degrees of thermal processing are associated with different levels...... of whey, with the lowest level being found in WPC derived from acid whey. Following acid activation, WPC from acid whey enhanced IEC proliferation compared with WPC from sweet whey or nonactivated WPC. Low-heat-treated WPC from acid whey induced greater secretion of IL-8 in IEC than either standard WPC...... from acid whey or low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey. Following acid activation (to activate growth factors), low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey induced higher IL-8 levels in IEC compared with standard WPC from sweet whey. In conclusion, higher levels of bioactive proteins in low-heat-treated WPC...

  3. Processing of whey modulates proliferative and immune functions in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Sangild, Per T; Li, Yanqi; Bering, Stine B; Chatterton, Dereck E W

    2016-02-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) is often subjected to heat treatment during industrial processing, resulting in protein denaturation and loss of protein bioactivity. We hypothesized that WPC samples subjected to different degrees of thermal processing are associated with different levels of bioactive proteins and effects on proliferation and immune response in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). The results showed that low-heat-treated WPC had elevated levels of lactoferrin and transforming growth factor-β2 compared with that of standard WPC. The level of aggregates depended on the source of whey, with the lowest level being found in WPC derived from acid whey. Following acid activation, WPC from acid whey enhanced IEC proliferation compared with WPC from sweet whey or nonactivated WPC. Low-heat-treated WPC from acid whey induced greater secretion of IL-8 in IEC than either standard WPC from acid whey or low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey. Following acid activation (to activate growth factors), low-heat-treated WPC from sweet whey induced higher IL-8 levels in IEC compared with standard WPC from sweet whey. In conclusion, higher levels of bioactive proteins in low-heat-treated WPC, especially from acid whey, may enhance proliferation and cytokine responses of IEC. These considerations could be important to maintain optimal bioactivity of infant formulas, including their maturational and immunological effects on the developing intestine. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sweet whey as a raw material for the dietary supplements obtaining with immunomodulatory effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Didukh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of the study of literary sources to prove the viability of the idea of using sweet whey to deep its fractionation, and to obtain biologically active proteins with immunomodulatory effect. We demonstrated methods for fractionation of milk whey (membrane and chromatographic, as well as the technological scheme of concentration of sweet whey. We introduced the composition of sweet whey and protein content of immunomodulatory action. Modern methods of processing whey, which include, basically, only the process of dehydration and concentration of whey and its use in the complete component composition, which limits its use for food purposes are shown. The necessity of processing of secondary resources in a catastrophic ecological situation on the planet and full use of the composite processing of raw materials for food purposes, and also shows properties of proteins immunomodulating actions which are part of the whey are grounded.

  5. In situ measurement of tritium permeation through stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscher, Walter G.; Senor, David J.; Clayton, Kevin K.; Longhurst, Glen R.

    2013-06-01

    The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a 4He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T2) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292 °C and 330 °C. In situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He-Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. Results from in situ permeation measurements were compared with predictions based on an ex-reactor permeation correlation in the literature. In situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure over the ranges considered in this study. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of 3He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a 4He carrier gas mixed with 3He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330 °C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from 3He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  6. Separation of aromatics by vapor permeation through solvent swollen membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, A.; Adachi, K.; Feng, Y. [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan)

    1995-12-20

    A vapor permeation process for aromatics separation from a hydrocarbon mixture was studied by means of the simultaneous permeation of dimethylsulfoxide vapor as an agent for membrane swelling and preferential permeation of aromatics. The separation performance of the process was demonstrated by a polyvinylalcohol membrane for mixed vapors of benzene/cyclohexane, xylene/octane and a model gasoline. The aromatic vapors preferentially permeated from these mixed vapor feeds. The separation factor was over 10. The separation mechanism of the process mainly depends on the relative salability of the vapors between aromatics and other hydrocarbons in dimethylsulfoxide. 14 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Hydrogen permeation resistant layers for liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1980-03-01

    Reviewing the literature in the tritium diffusion field one can readily see a wide divergence in results for both the response of permeation rate to pressure, and the effect of oxide layers on total permeation rates. The basic mechanism of protective oxide layers is discussed. Two coatings which are less hydrogen permeable than the best naturally occurring oxide are described. The work described is part of an HEDL-ANL cooperative research program on Tritium Permeation in Liquid Metal Cooled Reactors. This includes permeation work on hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium with the hydrogen-deuterium research leading to the developments presented

  8. Effect of starch isolation method on properties of sweet potato starch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. SURENDRA BABU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Isolation method of starch with different agents influences starch properties, which provide attention for studying the most appropriate method for isolation of starch. In the present study sweet potato starch was isolated by Sodium metabisulphate (M1, Sodium chloride (M2, and Distilled water (M3 methods and these were assessed for functional, chemical, pasting and structural properties. M3 yielded the greatest recovery of starch (10.20%. Isolation methods significantly changed swelling power and pasting properties but starches exhibited similar chemical properties. Sweet potato starches possessed C-type diffraction pattern. Small size granules of 2.90 μm were noticed in SEM of M3 starch. A high degree positive correlation was found between ash, amylose, and total starch content. The study concluded that isolation methods brought changes in yield, pasting and structural properties of sweet potato starch.

  9. Microparticulated whey proteins for improving dairy product texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipsen, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Use of microparticulated whey protein (MWP) was patented in 1988; since then much research has been conducted on use of MWP. This review provides an overview of the use and functionality of MWP in dairy applications and discusses how MWP interacts with other components in dairy matrices. For ferm......Use of microparticulated whey protein (MWP) was patented in 1988; since then much research has been conducted on use of MWP. This review provides an overview of the use and functionality of MWP in dairy applications and discusses how MWP interacts with other components in dairy matrices...

  10. Synthesis, characterization, release kinetics and toxicity profile of drug-loaded starch nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Mehrez E; El-Rafie, M H; El-sheikh, M A; El-Feky, Gina S; Hebeish, A

    2015-11-01

    The current research work focuses on the medical application of the cost-effective cross-linked starch nanoparticles, for the transdermal delivery using Diclofenac sodium (DS) as a model drug. The prepared DS-cross-linked starch nanoparticles were synthesized using nanoprecipitation technique at different concentrations of sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) in the presence of Tween 80 as a surfactant. The resultant cross-linked starch nanoparticles loaded with DS were characterized using world-class facilities such as TEM, DLS, FT-IR, XRD, and DSc. The efficiency of DS loading was also evaluated via entrapment efficiency as well as in vitro release and histopathological study on rat skin. The optimum nanoparticles formulation selected by the JMP(®) software was the formula that composed of 5% maize starch, 57.7mg DS and 0.5% STPP and 0.4% Tween 80, with particle diameter of about 21.04nm, polydispersity index of 0.2 and zeta potential of -35.3mV. It is also worth noting that this selected formula shows an average entrapment efficiency of 95.01 and sustained DS release up to 6h. The histophathological studies using the best formula on rat skin advocate the use of designed transdermal DS loaded cross-linked starch nanoparticles as it is safe and non-irritant to rat skin. The overall results indicate that, the starch nanoparticles could be considered as a good carrier for DS drug regarding the enhancement in its controlled release and successful permeation, thus, offering a promising nanoparticulate system for the transdermal delivery non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. ( Phaseolus lunatus ) starch as a tablet disintegrant

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) was evaluated. The starch from the seeds was extracted and its disintegrant ability was compared with that of maize starch BP in paracetamol based tablets at concentrations of 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 %w/w. The following properties of the starch ...

  12. Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bednarska, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis – a summary

    K.A. Bednarska

    The dissertation entitled ‘Kinetic modelling of enzymatic starch hydrolysis’ describes the enzymatic hydrolysis and kinetic modelling of liquefaction and saccharification of wheat starch.

  13. Sugarcane starch: quantitative determination and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelise de Alencar Figueira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Starch is found in sugarcane as a storage polysaccharide. Starch concentrations vary widely depending on the country, variety, developmental stage, and growth conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the starch content in different varieties of sugarcane, between May and November 2007, and some characteristics of sugarcane starch such as structure and granules size; gelatinization temperature; starch solution filterability; and susceptibility to glucoamylase, pullulanase, and commercial bacterial and fungal α-amylase enzymes. Susceptibility to debranching amylolytic isoamylase enzyme from Flavobacterium sp. was also tested. Sugarcane starch had spherical shape with a diameter of 1-3 µm. Sugarcane starch formed complexes with iodine, which showed greater absorption in the range of 540 to 620 nm. Sugarcane starch showed higher susceptibility to glucoamylase compared to that of waxy maize, cassava, and potato starch. Sugarcane starch also showed susceptibility to debranching amylolytic pullulanases similar to that of waxy rice starch. It also showed susceptibility to α-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Aspergillus oryzae similar to that of the other tested starches producing glucose, maltose, maltotriose, maltotetraose, maltopentose and limit α- dextrin.

  14. Properties of retrograded and acetylated starch produced via starch extrusion or starch hydrolysis with pullulanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelko, M; Zięba, T; Gryszkin, A; Styczyńska, M; Wilczak, A

    2013-09-12

    The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of serial modifications of starch, including firstly starch extrusion or hydrolysis with pullulanase, followed by retrogradation (through freezing and defrosting of pastes) and acetylation (under industrial conditions), on its susceptibility to amylolysis. The method of production had a significant effect on properties of the resultant preparations, whilst the direction and extent of changes depended on the type of modification applied. In the produced starch esters, the degree of substitution, expressed by the per cent of acetylation, ranged from 3.1 to 4.4 g/100 g. The acetylation had a significant impact on contents of elements determined with the atomic emission spectrometry, as it contributed to an increased Na content and decreased contents of Ca and K. The DSC thermal characteristics enabled concluding that the modifications caused an increase in temperatures and a decrease in heat of transition (or its lack). The acetylation of retrograded starch preparations increased their solubility in water and water absorbability. The modifications were found to exert various effects on the rheological properties of pastes determined based on the Brabender's pasting characteristics and flow curves determined with the use of an oscillatory-rotating viscosimeter. All starch acetates produced were characterized by ca. 40% resistance to amylolysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Physicochemical properties of starches isolated from pumpkin compared with potato and corn starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przetaczek-Rożnowska, Izabela

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the study was to characterize the selected physicochemical, thermal and rheological properties of pumpkin starches and compared with the properties of potato and corn starches used as control samples. Pumpkin starches could be used in the food industry as a free gluten starch. Better thermal and rheological properties could contribute to reduce the costs of food production. The syneresis of pumpkin starches was similar to that of potato starch but much lower than that for corn starch. Pasting temperatures of pumpkin starches were lower by 17-21.7°C and their final viscosities were over 1000cP higher than corn paste, but were close to the values obtained for potato starch. The thermodynamic characteristic showed that the transformation temperatures of pumpkin starches were lower than those measured for control starches. A level of retrogradation was much lower in pumpkin starch pastes (32-48%) than was in the case of corn (59%) or potato (77%) starches. The pumpkin starches gels were characterized by a much greater hardness, cohesiveness and chewiness, than potato or corn starches gels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tailor-made starch-based conjugates containing well-defined poly(vinyl acetate and its derivative poly(vinyl alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization was adopted to synthesize starch-based conjugates that possessed controllable architecture and properties. Starch-based xanthate agent was prepared and applied as chain transfer agent to conduct the living/controlled polymerization (LCP of vinyl acetate, which generated tailor-made conjugates of starch and well-defined poly(vinyl acetate (SVAc. The relevant derivatives, conjugates of starch and chain length-controlled poly(vinyl alcohol (SVA, were obtained subsequently. Various characterizations such as Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA were performed to examine the structure of intermediates and the starch-based conjugates. Static contact angle measurements revealed that the hydrophilic character of starch-based conjugates was tunable. Well-defined SVAc was amphiphilic and it was able to self-assemble into size controllable micelles, which was verified by contact angles, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS tests. SVA exhibited much higher capability to form physically cross-linked hydrogel than starch did. Both the characteristic of SVAc and SVA were chain length-dependent.

  17. In situ measurement of tritium permeation through stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luscher, Walter G., E-mail: walter.luscher@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Senor, David J., E-mail: david.senor@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Clayton, Kevin K., E-mail: kevin.clayton@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Longhurst, Glen R., E-mail: glenlonghurst@suu.edu [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► In situ tritium permeation measurements collected over broad pressure range. ► Test conditions relevant to 316 SS in commercial light water reactors. ► Comparisons between in- and ex-reactor measurements provided. ► Correlation between tritium permeation, temperature, and pressure developed. -- Abstract: The TMIST-2 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory to evaluate tritium permeation through Type 316 stainless steel (316 SS). The interior of a 316 SS seamless tube specimen was exposed to a {sup 4}He carrier gas mixed with a specified quantity of tritium (T{sub 2}) to yield partial pressures of 0.1, 5, and 50 Pa at 292 °C and 330 °C. In situ tritium permeation measurements were made by passing a He–Ne sweep gas over the outer surface of the specimen to carry the permeated tritium to a bubbler column for liquid scintillation counting. Results from in situ permeation measurements were compared with predictions based on an ex-reactor permeation correlation in the literature. In situ permeation data were also used to derive an in-reactor permeation correlation as a function of temperature and pressure over the ranges considered in this study. In addition, the triton recoil contribution to tritium permeation, which results from the transmutation of {sup 3}He to T, was also evaluated by introducing a {sup 4}He carrier gas mixed with {sup 3}He at a partial pressure of 1013 Pa at 330 °C. Less than 3% of the tritium resulting from {sup 3}He transmutation contributed to tritium permeation.

  18. Morphology and Structural Properties of Novel Short Linear Glucan/Protein Hybrid Nanoparticles and Their Influence on the Rheological Properties of Starch Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojing; Ji, Na; Li, Man; Zhang, Shuangling; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2017-09-13

    Starch nanoparticles were potential texture modifiers. However, they have strong tendency to aggregate and poor water dispersibility, which limited their application. The interaction between glucan (prepared from starch by enzymatic modification) and protein could significantly improve the dispersity of starch nanoparticles and, thus, enhance the rheological properties of food gels. In this work, glucan/protein hybrid nanoparticles were successfully developed for the first time using short linear glucan (SLG) and edible proteins [soy protein isolate (SPI), rice protein (RP), and whey protein isolate (WPI)]. The results showed that the SLG/SPI hybrid nanoparticles exhibited hollow structures, of which the smallest size was approximately 10-20 nm when the SLG/SPI ratio was 10:5. In contrast, SLG/RP nanoparticles displayed flower-like superstructures, and SLG/WPI nanoparticles presented stacked lamellar nanostructures with a width of 5-10 nm and a length of 50-70 nm. In comparison to bare SLG nanoparticles, SLG/SPI and SLG/WPI hybrid nanoparticles had higher melting temperatures. The addition of all nanoparticles greatly increased the storage modulus of corn starch gels and decreased loss tangent values. Importantly, the G' value of starch gels increased by 567% with the addition of flower-like SLG/RP superstructures.

  19. Permeation of Light Gases through Hexagonal Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gales

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gas separation using porous solids have attracted great attention due to their energetic applications. There is an enormous economic and environmental interest in the development of improved technologies for relevant processes, such as H2 production, CO2 separation or O2 and N2 purification from air. New materials are needed for achieving major improvements. Crystalline materials, displaying unidirectional and single-sized pores, preferentially with low pore tortuosity and high pore density, are promising candidates for membrane synthesis. Herein, we study hexagonal ice crystals as an example of this class of materials. By slowly growing ice crystals inside capillary tubes we were able to measure the permeation of several gas species through ice crystals and investigate its relation with both the size of the guest molecules and temperature of the crystal.

  20. Electrical insulator assembly with oxygen permeation barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Beck, Roland R.; Bond, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-voltage electrical insulator (21) for electrically insulating a thermoelectric module (17) in a spacecraft from a niobium-1% zirconium alloy wall (11) of a heat exchanger (13) filled with liquid lithium (16) while providing good thermal conductivity between the heat exchanger and the thermoelectric module. The insulator (21) has a single crystal alumina layer (SxAl.sub.2 O.sub.3, sapphire) with a niobium foil layer (32) bonded thereto on the surface of the alumina crystal (26) facing the heat exchanger wall (11), and a molybdenum layer (31) bonded to the niobium layer (32) to act as an oxygen permeation barrier to preclude the oxygen depleting effects of the lithium from causing undesirable niobium-aluminum intermetallic layers near the alumina-niobium interface.

  1. Tritium permeation model for plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, G. R.

    1992-12-01

    This report documents the development of a simplified one-dimensional tritium permeation and retention model. The model makes use of the same physical mechanisms as more sophisticated, time-transient codes such as implantation, recombination, diffusion, trapping and thermal gradient effects. It takes advantage of a number of simplifications and approximations to solve the steady-state problem and then provides interpolating functions to make estimates of intermediate states based on the steady-state solution. The model is developed for solution using commercial spread-sheet software such as Lotus 123. Comparison calculations are provided with the verified and validated TMAP4 transient code with good agreement. Results of calculations for the ITER CDA diverter are also included.

  2. Tritium permeation model for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.

    1992-12-01

    This report documents the development of a simplified one-dimensional tritium permeation and retention model. The model makes use of the same physical mechanisms as more sophisticated, time-transient codes such as implantation, recombination, diffusion, trapping and thermal gradient effects. It takes advantage of a number of simplifications and approximations to solve the steady-state problem and then provides interpolating functions to make estimates of intermediate states based on the steady-state solution. The model is developed for solution using commercial spread-sheet software such as Lotus 123. Comparison calculations are provided with the verified and validated TMAP4 transient code with good agreement. Results of calculations for the ITER CDA diverter are also included

  3. Whey protein stories - An experiment in writing a multidisciplinary biography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Tenna; Bechshoeft, Rasmus L; Giacalone, Davide; Otto, Marie Haulund; Castro-Mejía, Josue; Bin Ahmad, Hajar Fauzan; Reitelseder, Søren; Jespersen, Astrid Pernille

    2016-12-01

    This is an experimental, dual-purpose article about whey protein and how to conduct interdisciplinary analyses and writings. On the one hand, this article is a multidisciplinary commodity biography, which consists of five descriptions of whey protein written by the five different research groups involved in the interdisciplinary research project CALM(Counteracting Age-related loss of Skeletal Muscle Mass). On the other hand, it is a meta-analysis, which aims to uncover and highlight examples of how the five descriptions contribute to each other with insights into the contextualisation of knowledge, contrasts between the descriptions and the new dimensions they bring to established fields of interest. The meta-analysis also contains a discussion of interdisciplinary study objects and the usefulness of the multidisciplinary commodity biography as a format for interdisciplinary publications. The article contributes to the field of food studies with a multidisciplinary biography of whey protein - including its sensory qualities and challenges, insights into its cultural history, its nutritional value and effects on the human body and an analysis of how it is perceived by people who consume it. The biography thereby expands upon existing understandings of whey protein while discussing the usefulness of employing the commodity biography format in interdisciplinary writing. Moreover, the article contributes to the field of interdisciplinary research by providing a practical example of a joint publication and reflections upon the existence, interaction and possibilities of monodisciplinary knowledge structures within interdisciplinary studies and publications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical Potential of Hyperbaric Pressure-Treated Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolomini, André F.; Kubow, Stan; Lands, Larry C.

    2015-01-01

    Whey protein (WP) from cow’s milk is a rich source of essential and branched chain amino acids. Whey protein isolates (WPI) has been demonstrated to support muscle accretion, antioxidant activity, and immune modulation. However, whey is not readily digestible due to its tight conformational structure. Treatment of WPI with hyperbaric pressure results in protein unfolding. This enhances protein digestion, and results in an altered spectrum of released peptides, and greater release of essential and branched chain amino acids. Pressurized whey protein isolates (pWPI), through a series of cell culture, animal models and clinical studies, have been demonstrated to enhance muscle accretion, reduce inflammation, improve immunity, and decrease fatigue. It is also conceivable that pWPI would be more accessible to digestive enzymes, which would allow for a more rapid proteolysis of the proteins and an increased or altered release of small bioactive peptides. The altered profile of peptides released from WP digestion could thus play a role in the modulation of the immune response and tissue glutathione (GSH) concentrations. The research to date presents potentially interesting applications for the development of new functional foods based on hyperbaric treatment of WPI to produce products with more potent nutritional and nutraceutical properties. PMID:27417773

  5. Improved Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Hydrolysates in Food Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeewanthi, Renda Kankanamge Chaturika; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the enhanced functional characteristics of enzymatic hydrolysates of whey proteins (WPHs) in food applications compared to intact whey proteins (WPs). WPs are applied in foods as whey protein concentrates (WPCs), whey protein isolates (WPIs), and WPHs. WPs are byproducts of cheese production, used in a wide range of food applications due to their nutritional validity, functional activities, and cost effectiveness. Enzymatic hydrolysis yields improved functional and nutritional benefits in contrast to heat denaturation or native applications. WPHs improve solubility over a wide range of pH, create viscosity through water binding, and promote cohesion, adhesion, and elasticity. WPHs form stronger but more flexible edible films than WPC or WPI. WPHs enhance emulsification, bind fat, and facilitate whipping, compared to intact WPs. Extensive hydrolyzed WPHs with proper heat applications are the best emulsifiers and addition of polysaccharides improves the emulsification ability of WPHs. Also, WPHs improve the sensorial properties like color, flavor, and texture but impart a bitter taste in case where extensive hydrolysis (degree of hydrolysis greater than 8%). It is important to consider the type of enzyme, hydrolysis conditions, and WPHs production method based on the nature of food application. PMID:26761849

  6. Use of immobilised biocatalysts in the processing of cheese whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosseva, Maria R; Panesar, Parmjit S; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kennedy, John F

    2009-12-01

    Food processing industry operations need to comply with increasingly more stringent environmental regulations related to the disposal or utilisation of by-products and wastes. These include growing restrictions on land spraying with agro-industrial wastes, and on disposal within landfill operations, and the requirements to produce end products that are stabilised and hygienic. Much of the material generated as wastes by the dairy processing industries contains components that could be utilised as substrates and nutrients in a variety of microbial/enzymatic processes, to give rise to added-value products. A good example of a waste that has received considerable attention as a source of added-value products is cheese whey. The carbohydrate reservoir of lactose (4-5%) in whey and the presence of other essential nutrients make it a good natural medium for the growth of microorganisms and a potential substrate for bioprocessing through microbial fermentation. Immobilised cell and enzyme technology has also been applied to whey bioconversion processes to improve the economics of such processes. This review focuses upon the elaboration of a range of immobilisation techniques that have been applied to produce valuable whey-based products. A comprehensive literature survey is also provided to illustrate numerous immobilisation procedures with particular emphasis upon lactose hydrolysis, and ethanol and lactic acid production using immobilised biocatalysts.

  7. Effects of whey, molasses and exogenous enzymes on the ensiling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to assess the effects of whey, molasses and exogenous enzymes on fermentation, aerobic stability and nutrient composition of ensiled maize cobs. Five treatments were ensiled in 1.5 L anaerobic glass jars over 32 days, namely i) control (maize cobs without additives (CON); ii) maize cobs with ...

  8. Citric acid production from whey by fermentation using Aspergillus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Julián Sánchez Toro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Whey has become the main dairy-industry waste product, despite continuous efforts aimed at finding a way to use it. The aim of this research was to investigate citric acid production by submerged fermentation using Aspergillus genus fungi, using whey as substrate to take economical advantage of it and to reduce the environmental impact caused by discharging this by-product into nearby streams. The following three strains were used: A. carbonarius NRRL 368, A. carbonarius NRRL 67 and A. niger NRRL 3. The best adaptation medium for inoculum propagation was selected. Proposed experimental design for evaluating citric acid biosynthesis from whey modified through different treatments showed that the two A. carbonarius strains did not present significant differences in acid production whereas A. niger NRRL 3 reached higher concentration when evaporated, deproteinised and p-galactosidase lactose-hydrolysed whey was used. However, A. carbonarius gave higher average citric acid titres than those found for A. niger. This suggests the need for carrying out further research on it as a potential producing strain. Cell growth, substrate consumption and acid production kinetics in a 3-L stirred-tank bioreactor with aeration were developed in the case of A. niger; kinetics were simulated through non-structured mathematical models. Key words: Aspergilluscarbonarius, Aspergillus niger, bioreactor, simulation, p-galactosidase.

  9. Consumer perception of astringency in clear acidic whey protein beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Jessica L; Drake, MaryAnne

    2010-01-01

    Acidic whey protein beverages are a growing component of the functional food and beverage market. These beverages are also astringent, but astringency is an expected and desirable attribute of many beverages (red wine, tea, coffee) and may not necessarily be a negative attribute of acidic whey protein beverages. The goal of this study was to define the consumer perception of astringency in clear acidic whey protein beverages. Six focus groups (n=49) were held to gain understanding of consumer knowledge of astringency. Consumers were presented with beverages and asked to map them based on astringent mouthfeel and liking. Orthonasal thresholds for whey protein isolate (WPI) in water and flavored model beverages were determined using a 7-series ascending forced choice method. Mouthfeel/basic taste thresholds were determined for WPI in water. Acceptance tests on model beverages were conducted using consumers (n=120) with and without wearing nose clips. Consumers in focus groups were able to identify astringency in beverages. Astringency intensity was not directly related to dislike. The orthonasal threshold for WPI in water was lower (P astringent mouthfeel and that both flavor and astringency should be the focus of ongoing studies to improve the palatability of these products. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Acceptability of prebiotic fiber-treated whey drink fermented with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work aimed to develop a fermented drink by diversifying the quantities of Lactobacillus acidophilus inoculum and prebiotic fiber in the form of inulin and using the total dry extract of whey and sucrose. After fermentation, the following measurements were made after 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of storage at 6°C: titratable ...

  11. Fermented whey as poultry feed additive to prevent fungal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, Alejandra; León Peláez, María A; Diosma, Gabriela; De Antoni, Graciela L; Abraham, Analía G; Garrote, Graciela L

    2014-12-01

    Fungal contamination of poultry feed causes economic losses to industry and represents a potential risk to animal health. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effectiveness of whey fermented with kefir grains as additive to reduce fungal incidence, thus improving feed safety. Whey fermented for 24 h at 20 °C with kefir grains (100 g L(-1) ) reduced conidial germination of Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium crustosum, Trichoderma longibrachiatum and Rhizopus sp. Poultry feed supplemented with fermented whey (1 L kg(-1) ) was two to four times more resistant to fungal contamination than control feed depending on the fungal species. Additionally, it contained kefir microorganisms at levels of 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) kg(-1) of lactic acid bacteria and 6 × 10(7) CFU kg(-1) of yeasts even after 30 days of storage. Fermented whey added to poultry feed acted as a biopreservative, improving its resistance to fungal contamination and increasing its shelf life. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Quality of whey powders stored under adverse conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whey protein concentrate powder (WPC) is exported by the U.S. and is included in emergency aid foods, but the bags sent overseas are usually stored without refrigeration and under elevated temperature and relative humidity (RH). The shelf life of WPC under adverse conditions must be known to preven...

  13. Dynamic modeling of ultrafiltration membranes for whey separation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saltik, M.B.; Ozkan, L.; Jacobs, M.; van der Padt, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a control relevant rigorous dynamic model for an ultrafiltration membrane unit in a whey separation process. The model consists of a set of differential algebraic equations and is developed for online model based applications such as model based control and process

  14. Whey protein concentrate storage at elevated temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairy processors are finding new export markets for whey protein concentrate (WPC), a byproduct of cheesemaking, but they need to know if full-sized bags of this powder will withstand high temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels during unrefrigerated storage under tropical conditions. To answ...

  15. Deposition of heated whey proteins on a chromium oxide surface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurnink, Th.; Verheul, M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Kruif, de C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Whey protein solutions were given different heat treatments after which their deposition on a chromium oxide surface (the outer layer of stainless steel) was measured by reflectometry. The deposition was studied under controlled flow conditions by using a stagnation point flow configuration. The

  16. optimizing soybean flour., whey powder. and colostrum ratios for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    l4 days. If preserved colostrum could be supplemented with reconstituted soybean flour and whey powder, the period of colostrum feeding could be extended to 4 weeks. Various researchers reported the successful inclusion of soybean flour and/or soybean protein concentrate in milk replacers (Schmutz, Cravens, Soldner ...

  17. Effect of Stirring and Seeding on Whey Protein Fibril Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of stirring and seeding on the formation of fibrils in whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied. More fibrils of a similar length are formed when WPI is stirred during heating at pH 2 and 80 C compared to samples that were heated at rest. Addition of seeds did not show an

  18. Permeation of Telone EC through protective gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Hanaa; Que Hee, Shane S

    2005-09-30

    Telone is a potent fumigant that is based on the chlorinated unsaturated hydrocarbon, 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-DCP). It is often applied without dilution and so poses severe inhalation and air pollution threats. Urinary metabolites of 1,3-DCP have been detected after Telone skin exposure, so that preventing dermal exposure is also important. The objective of the study was to assess if nitrile and multi-layer ("laminated") gloves provide adequate protection against Telone EC formulation. To accomplish this, disposable (Safeskin) and chemically resistant (Sol-Vex) nitrile and laminated (Barrier mark and Silver Shield) glove materials were challenged by Telone EC with hexane liquid collection in an ASTM-type I-PTC-600 permeation cell. Analyses of cis- and trans-1,3-DCP in the collection fluid at specified times were performed on a moderately polar capillary column by gas chromatography-electron capture detection. Telone EC caused microholes in both nitrile materials, though the chemically protective material was degraded slower than the disposable nitrile. The laminated gloves offered limited protection. Silver Shield protected best because 1.5-2.3 mg 1,3-DCP permeated by 8 h relative to 2.5-7.6 mg for Barrier, implying about 2.5 times more protection for 8 h. Even for Silver Shield, the extent of protection was inadequate as illustrated by a risk assessment of the skin exposure situation. The normalized breakthrough times for both types of laminated gloves varied between 27 and 60 min. It is recommended that Viton gloves still be worn for protection.

  19. A study on reverse osmosis permeating treatment for yarn dyeing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a fuzzy linear regression model for estimation of reverse osmosis permeating parameters conditions. The proposed model can effectively take on non-crisp, fuzzy and crisp data. This study model used for estimation of reverse osmosis permeating parameters data from Tirupur examines the variables that ...

  20. Effect of Nutrient Formulations on Permeation of Proteins and Lipids ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of nutrient formulations on the permeation of proteins and lipids through porcine intestine in vitro. Method: In vitro permeation studies of proteins and lipids of two peptide-based formulations, composed of various compounds and sources of hydrolyzed protein was carried out, and compared ...

  1. An unheated permeation device for calibrating atmospheric VOC measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of an unpowered permeation device for continuous calibration of in-situ instruments measuring atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs is described. Being lightweight and compact, and containing only negligible amounts of chemicals, the device is especially suited for field use such as on board aircraft. Its speciality is to maintain the permeation process in thermal equilibrium, so that the instantaneous permeation rate can be ascribed to a simple temperature measurement. This equilibrium state is maintained by a combination of three features: (i a thin PTFE membrane as permeation medium which guarantees short stabilization times, (ii a water bath as heat buffer, and (iii a vacuum-panel based insulation, in which features (ii and (iii minimize temperature drifts to ~30 mK h−1 per Kelvin temperature difference to the environment. The respective uncertainty of the permeation rate due to thermal non-equilibrium is kept below 1%. An extensive theory part details the major permeation processes of gases through porous polymers, being Fick's diffusion, Knudsen flow, and viscous flow. Both the measured stabilization time and the measured temperature dependence of the permeation rate independently indicate that the permeation can be described by a viscous flow model, where diffusion of the gas molecules in large pores (having a diameter of >0.05 μm dominates.

  2. Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi E-mail: nakamura@tpl.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Hayashi, Takumi; Nishi, Masataka; Arita, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji

    2001-09-01

    Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten has been investigated to estimate the amount of tritium permeation through its barrier in a thermo-nuclear fusion device. The permeation experiments were performed on pure tungsten foil of 25 {mu}m thickness under conditions of incident flux of 1.9x10{sup 18}-1.1x10{sup 19} D{sup +}/m{sup 2}s, incident ion energy of 200-2000 eV, and specimen temperature of 512-660 K. As a result of this steady-state permeation experiment, the rate-determining process of deuterium permeation was found to be controlled by diffusion at both implanted and permeated sides. On the other hand, transient permeation was strongly affected by trap effect in the specimen. Simulation analysis using TMAP code on transient permeation behavior indicates the existence of a trap site with a trap energy of nearly 1eV and with a trap density of over several ten's ppm in tungsten.

  3. Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Nishi, Masataka; Arita, Makoto; Okuno, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    Implantation driven permeation behavior of deuterium through pure tungsten has been investigated to estimate the amount of tritium permeation through its barrier in a thermo-nuclear fusion device. The permeation experiments were performed on pure tungsten foil of 25 μm thickness under conditions of incident flux of 1.9x10 18 -1.1x10 19 D + /m 2 s, incident ion energy of 200-2000 eV, and specimen temperature of 512-660 K. As a result of this steady-state permeation experiment, the rate-determining process of deuterium permeation was found to be controlled by diffusion at both implanted and permeated sides. On the other hand, transient permeation was strongly affected by trap effect in the specimen. Simulation analysis using TMAP code on transient permeation behavior indicates the existence of a trap site with a trap energy of nearly 1eV and with a trap density of over several ten's ppm in tungsten

  4. Maize starch biphasic pasting curves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nelles, EM

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available (150–500 rev/min). The second pasting peak is attributed to the formation of complexes between amylose and low levels of lipid present in maize starch. When lipid was partially removed by extraction with methanol-chloroform (1: 3 v/v), the second...

  5. Resistant starch: promise for improving human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birt, Diane F; Boylston, Terri; Hendrich, Suzanne; Jane, Jay-Lin; Hollis, James; Li, Li; McClelland, John; Moore, Samuel; Phillips, Gregory J; Rowling, Matthew; Schalinske, Kevin; Scott, M Paul; Whitley, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Ongoing research to develop digestion-resistant starch for human health promotion integrates the disciplines of starch chemistry, agronomy, analytical chemistry, food science, nutrition, pathology, and microbiology. The objectives of this research include identifying components of starch structure that confer digestion resistance, developing novel plants and starches, and modifying foods to incorporate these starches. Furthermore, recent and ongoing studies address the impact of digestion-resistant starches on the prevention and control of chronic human diseases, including diabetes, colon cancer, and obesity. This review provides a transdisciplinary overview of this field, including a description of types of resistant starches; factors in plants that affect digestion resistance; methods for starch analysis; challenges in developing food products with resistant starches; mammalian intestinal and gut bacterial metabolism; potential effects on gut microbiota; and impacts and mechanisms for the prevention and control of colon cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Although this has been an active area of research and considerable progress has been made, many questions regarding how to best use digestion-resistant starches in human diets for disease prevention must be answered before the full potential of resistant starches can be realized.

  6. Preparation, characterization and utilization of starch nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Young; Park, Sung Soo; Lim, Seung-Taik

    2015-02-01

    Starch is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature and is typically isolated from plants in the form of micro-scale granules. Recent studies reported that nano-scale starch particles could be readily prepared from starch granules, which have unique physical properties. Because starch is environmentally friendly, starch nanoparticles are suggested as one of the promising biomaterials for novel utilization in foods, cosmetics, medicines as well as various composites. An overview of the most up-to-date information regarding the starch nanoparticles including the preparation processes and physicochemical characterization will be presented in this review. Additionally, the prospects and outlooks for the industrial utilization of starch nanoparticles will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cassava starch in the Brazilian food industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Mottin Demiate

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cassava starch is a valued raw material for producing many kinds of modified starches for food applications. Its physicochemical properties, as well as its availability, have made it an interesting and challenging ingredient for the food industry. In the present work, food grade modified cassava starches were purchased from producers and analyzed for selected physicochemical characteristics. Samples of sour cassava starch were included, as well as one sample of native cassava starch. Results showed that almost all modified starches were resistant to syneresis, produced pastes more stable to stirred cooking, and some of them were difficult to cook. The sour cassava starches presented high acidity and resulted in clear and unstable pastes during stirred cooking, susceptible to syneresis.

  8. Mechanical, barrier and morphological properties of starch nanocrystals-reinforced pea starch films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojing; Qiu, Chao; Ji, Na; Sun, Cuixia; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2015-05-05

    To characterize the pea starch films reinforced with waxy maize starch nanocrystals, the mechanical, water vapor barrier and morphological properties of the composite films were investigated. The addition of starch nanocrystals increased the tensile strength of the composite films, and the value of tensile strength of the composite films was highest when starch nanocrystals content was 5% (w/w). The moisture content (%), water vapor permeability, and water-vapor transmission rate of the composite films significantly decreased as starch nanocrystals content increased. When their starch nanocrystals content was 1-5%, the starch nanocrystals dispersed homogeneously in the composite films, resulting in a relatively smooth and compact film surface and better thermal stability. However, when starch nanocrystals content was more than 7%, the starch nanocrystals began to aggregate, which resulted in the surface of the composite films developing a longitudinal fibrous structure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Physicochemical properties of starches and proteins in alkali-treated mungbean and cassava starch granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israkarn, Kamolwan; Na Nakornpanom, Nantarat; Hongsprabhas, Parichat

    2014-05-25

    This study explored the influences of envelope integrity of cooked starch granules on physicochemical and thermophysical properties of mungbean and cassava starches. Alkali treatment was used to selectively leach amylose from the amorphous region of both starches and partially fragmented starch molecules into lower-molecular-weight polymers. It was found that despite the loss of 40% of the original content of amylose, both mungbean and cassava starches retained similar crystallinities, gelatinization temperature ranges, and pasting profiles compared to the native starches. However, the loss of granule-bound starch synthases during alkali treatment and subsequent alkali cooking in excess water played significant roles in determining granular disintegration. The alterations in envelope integrity due to the negative charge repulsion among polymers within the envelope of swollen granules, and the fragmentation of starch molecules, were responsible for the alterations in thermophysical properties of mungbean and cassava starches cooked under alkaline conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Physicochemical and Amino Acid Profiling of Cheddar, Mozzarella and Paneer Whey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Sharif, M.K.; Butt, M.S.; Nawaz, H.

    2015-01-01

    The present study characterised locally available whey samples of cheddar, mozzarella and paneer for physicochemical and nutritional attributes. The results revealed that the cheddar whey exhibited pH (5.41 ± 0.16), crude protein (0.83 ± 0.03 percentage), fat (0.25 ± 0.01 percentage), lactose (4.95 ± 0.21 percentage) and total solids (6.55 ± 0.27 percentage), slightly higher than those of mozzarella and paneer whey. On the other hand, the paneer whey showed acidity (0.30 ± 0.01) and ash content (0.56 ± 0.02), slightly higher than those of cheddar and mozzarella whey. Furthermore, the mozzarella whey revealed the total plate count values (3.17 ± 0.09 x 104 cfu/mL), slightly higher than those of cheddar and paneer whey samples. The paneer whey contained the amount of calcium (25.02 ± 1.34), magnesium (4.88 ± 0.23), sodium (32.11 ± 1.37) and potassium (97.55 ± 3.54) slightly higher, when compared to those of cheddar and mozzarella whey. The cheddar whey possessed the highest amount of essential and non-essential amino acid contents, followed by mozzarella and paneer whey. Thus, cheddar whey exhibited the best physicochemical and nutritional profile among all the whey samples, so it can be used to prepare high quality novel and nutritious sports drink for sportsman. (author)

  11. Mechanical properties and solubility in water of corn starch-collagen composite films: Effect of starch type and concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Wang, Wenhang; Ye, Ran; Liu, Anjun; Xiao, Jingdong; Liu, Yaowei; Zhao, Yana

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the possibility of enhancing the properties of collagen with three different maize starches: waxy maize starch, normal starch, and high amylose starch. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that starch-collagen films had a rougher surface compared to pure collagen films which became smoother upon heating. Amylose starch and normal starch increased the tensile strength of unheated collagen films in both dry and wet states, while all starches increased tensile strength of collagen film by heating. Depending upon the amylose content and starch concentrations, film solubility in water decreased with the addition of starch. DSC thermograms demonstrated that addition of all starches improved the thermal stability of the collagen film. Moreover, X-ray diffraction results indicated that except for high amylose starch, the crystallinity of both starch and collagen was significantly decreased when subject to heating. FTIR spectra indicated that intermolecular interactions between starch and collagen were enhanced upon heating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Permeation of aromatic solvent mixtures through nitrile protective gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Keh-Ping; Hsu, Ya-Ping; Chen, Su-Yi

    2008-05-30

    The permeation of binary and ternary mixtures of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and p-xylene through nitrile gloves were investigated using the ASTM F739 test cell. The more slowly permeating component of a mixture was accelerated to have a shorter breakthrough time than its pure form. The larger differences in solubility parameter between a solvent mixture and glove resulted in a lower permeation rate. Solubility parameter theory provides a potential approach to interpret the changes of permeation properties for BTEX mixtures through nitrile gloves. Using a one-dimensional diffusion model based on Fick's law, the permeation concentrations of ASTM F739 experiments were appropriately simulated by the estimated diffusion coefficient and solubility. This study will be a fundamental work for the risk assessment of the potential dermal exposure of workers wearing protective gloves.

  13. ENZYME RESISTANCE OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED STARCH POTATOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sh. Mannapova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here in this article the justification of expediency of enzyme resistant starch use in therapeutic food products is presented . Enzyme resistant starch is capable to resist to enzymatic hydrolysis in a small intestine of a person, has a low glycemic index, leads to decrease of postprandial concentration of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides in blood and insulin reaction, to improvement of sensitivity of all organism to insulin, to increase in sense of fulness and to reduction of adjournment of fats. Resistant starch makes bifidogenшс impact on microflora of a intestine of the person, leads to increase of a quantity of lactobacillus and bifidobacterium and to increased production of butyric acid in a large intestine. In this regard the enzyme resistant starch is an important component in food for prevention and curing of human diseases such as diabetes, obesity, colitis, a cancer of large and direct intestine. One method is specified by authors for imitation of starch digestion in a human body. This method is based on the definition of an enzyme resistance of starch in vitro by its hydrolysis to glucose with application of a glucoamylase and digestive enzyme preparation Pancreatin. This method is used in researches of an enzyme resistance of starch, of genetically modified potato, high amylose corn starch Hi-Maize 1043 and HYLON VII (National Starch Food Innovation, USA, amylopectin and amylose. It is shown that the enzyme resistance of the starch emitted from genetically modified potatoes conforms to the enzyme resistance of the high amylose corn starch “Hi-Maize 1043 and HYLON VII starch”, (National Starch Food Innovation, the USA relating to the II type of enzyme resistant starch. It is established that amylopectin doesn't have the enzyme resistant properties. The results of researches are presented. They allow us to make the following conclusion: amylose in comparison with amylopectin possesses higher enzyme resistance and gives to

  14. Barley grain constituents, starch composition, and structure affect starch in vitro enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Eric K; Jaiswal, Sarita; Maley, Jason; Båga, Monica; Sammynaiken, Ramaswami; Rossnagel, Brian G; Chibbar, Ravindra N

    2011-05-11

    The relationship between starch physical properties and enzymatic hydrolysis was determined using ten different hulless barley genotypes with variable carbohydrate composition. The ten barley genotypes included one normal starch (CDC McGwire), three increased amylose starches (SH99250, SH99073, and SB94893), and six waxy starches (CDC Alamo, CDC Fibar, CDC Candle, Waxy Betzes, CDC Rattan, and SB94912). Total starch concentration positively influenced thousand grain weight (TGW) (r(2) = 0.70, p starch concentration (r(2) = -0.80, p hydrolysis of pure starch (r(2) = -0.67, p starch concentration (r(2) = 0.46, p starch (RS) in meal and pure starch samples. The rate of starch hydrolysis was high in pure starch samples as compared to meal samples. Enzymatic hydrolysis rate both in meal and pure starch samples followed the order waxy > normal > increased amylose. Rapidly digestible starch (RDS) increased with a decrease in amylose concentration. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis revealed a higher polydispersity index of amylose in CDC McGwire and increased amylose genotypes which could contribute to their reduced enzymatic hydrolysis, compared to waxy starch genotypes. Increased β-glucan and dietary fiber concentration also reduced the enzymatic hydrolysis of meal samples. An average linkage cluster analysis dendrogram revealed that variation in amylose concentration significantly (p starch concentration in meal and pure starch samples. RS is also associated with B-type granules (5-15 μm) and the amylopectin F-III (19-36 DP) fraction. In conclusion, the results suggest that barley genotype SH99250 with less decrease in grain weight in comparison to that of other increased amylose genotypes (SH99073 and SH94893) could be a promising genotype to develop cultivars with increased amylose grain starch without compromising grain weight and yield.

  15. Effects of Hydrolysed Whey Proteins on the Techno-Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein-Based Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Noller

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pure whey protein isolate (WPI-based cast films are very brittle due to its strong formation of protein cross-linking of disulphide bonding, hydrogen bonding as well as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. However, this strong cross-linking is the reason for its final barrier performance. To overcome film brittleness of whey protein layers, plasticisers like glycerol are used. It reduces intermolecular interactions, increases the mobility of polymer chains and thus film flexibility can be achieved. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of hydrolysed whey protein isolate (WPI in whey protein isolate-based cast films on their techno-functional properties. Due to the fact, that the addition of glycerol is necessary but at the same time increases the free volume in the film leading to higher oxygen and water vapour permeability, the glycerol concentration was kept constant. Cast films with different ratios of hydrolysed and not hydrolysed WPI were produced. They were characterised in order to determine the influence of the lower molecular weight caused by the addition of hydrolysed WPI on the techno-functional properties. This study showed that increasing hydrolysed WPI concentrations significantly change the mechanical properties while maintaining the oxygen and water vapour permeability. The tensile and elastic film properties decreased significantly by reducing the average molecular weight whereas the yellowish coloration and the surface tension considerably increased. This study provided new data which put researchers and material developers in a position to tailor the characteristics of whey protein based films according to their intended application and further processing.

  16. A REVIEW ON BIODEGRADABLE STARCH BASED FILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Molavi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, biodegradable edible films have become very important in research related to food, due to their compatibility with the environment and their use in the food packaging industry. Various sources can be used in the production of biopolymers as biodegradable films that include polysaccharides, proteins and lipids. Among the various polysaccharides, starch due to its low price and its abundance in nature is of significant importance. Several factors affect the properties of starch films; such as the source which starch is obtained from, as well as the ratio of constituents of the starch. Starch films have advantages such as low thickness, flexibility and transparency though; there are some downsides to mention, such as the poor mechanical properties and water vapor permeability. Thus, using starch alone to produce the film will led to restrictions on its use. To improve the mechanical properties of starch films and also increases resistance against humidity, several methods can be used; including the starch modifying techniques such as cross linking of starch and combining starch with other natural polymers. Other methods such as the use of lipid in formulations of films to increase the resistance to moisture are possible, but lipids are susceptible to oxidation. Therefore, new approaches are based on the integration of different biopolymers in food packaging.

  17. Whey protein reduces early life weight gain in mice fed a high-fat diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranberg, Britt; Hellgren, Lars; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that dairy products, including whey protein, alleviate several disorders of the metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigated the effects of whey protein isolate (whey) in mice fed a high-fat diet hypothesising that the metabolic effects of whey would...... be associated with changes in the gut microbiota composition. Five-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet ad libitum for 14 weeks with the protein source being either whey or casein. Faeces were collected at week 0, 7, and 13 and the fecal microbiota was analysed by denaturing gradient gel...... electrophoresis analyses of PCR-derived 16S rRNA gene (V3-region) amplicons. At the end of the study, plasma samples were collected and assayed for glucose, insulin and lipids. Whey significantly reduced body weight gain during the first four weeks of the study compared with casein (P

  18. Whey protein reduces early life weight gain in mice fed a high-fat diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tranberg, Britt; Hellgren, Lars; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that dairy products, including whey protein, alleviate several disorders of the metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigated the effects of whey protein isolate (whey) in mice fed a high-fat diet hypothesising that the metabolic effects of whey would...... be associated with changes in the gut microbiota composition. Five-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet ad libitum for 14 weeks with the protein source being either whey or casein. Faeces were collected at week 0, 7, and 13 and the fecal microbiota was analysed by denaturing gradient gel...... reduced weight gain in young C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet compared to casein. Although the effect on weight gain ceased, whey alleviated glucose intolerance, improved insulin sensitivity and reduced plasma cholesterol. These findings could not be explained by changes in food intake or gut microbiota...

  19. Microbial production of raw starch digesting enzymes | Sun | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raw starch digesting enzymes refer to enzymes that can act directly on raw starch granules below the gelatinization temperature of starch. With the view of energy-saving, a worldwide interest has been focused on raw starch digesting enzymes in recent years, especially since the oil crisis of 1973. Raw starch digesting ...

  20. The effect of water volume and mixing time on physical properties of bread made from modified cassava starch-wheat composite flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirejeki, S.; Manuhara, G. J.; Amanto, B. S.; Atmaka, W.; Laksono, P. W.

    2018-03-01

    Modification of cassava starch with soaking in the whey (by product on cheese production) resulted in changes of the flour characteristics. Adjustments of processing condition are important to be studied in the making of bread from modified cassava starch and wheat composite flour (30:70). This research aims to determine the effect of water volume and mixing time on the physical properties of the bread. The experimental design of this research was Completely Randomized Factorial Design (CRFD) with two factors which were water volume and mixing time. The variation of water volume significantly affected on bread height, dough volume, dough specific volume, and crust thickness. The variation of mixing time had a significant effect on the increase of dough volume and dough specific volume. The combination of water volume and mixing time had a significant effect on dough height, bread volume, bread specific volume, baking expansion, and weight loss.

  1. Development of tritium permeation barriers on Al base in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benamati, G.; Chabrol, C.; Perujo, A.; Rigal, E.; Glasbrenner, H.

    The development of the water cooled lithium lead (WCLL) DEMO fusion reactor requires the production of a material capable of acting as a tritium permeation barrier (TPB). In the DEMO blanket reactor permeation barriers on the structural material are required to reduce the tritium permeation from the Pb-17Li or the plasma into the cooling water to acceptable levels (HIP) technology and spray (this one developed also for repair) deposition techniques. The final goal is to select a reference technique to be used in the blanket of the DEMO reactor and in the ITER test module fabrication. The activities performed in four European laboratories are summarised here.

  2. Reemission and permeation of deuterium implanted into metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.; Furuyama, Y.; Imoto, S.

    1984-01-01

    Focusing on the marked depression of deuterium permeation rate during the deuteron bombardment, implantation experiments coupled with gaseous permeation experiments are performed on pure Ni and Ni with evaporated MnO. It is concluded that the reemission of implanted deuterium is initially depressed, but it soon becomes enhanced with increase of fluence leading to a rapid decrease of permeation rate at the intermediate temperatures 600-1000 K, which is attributed to the formation of short diffusion paths from the projected range to the front surface. (orig.)

  3. Permeation enhancer strategies in transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwah, Harneet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Today, ∼74% of drugs are taken orally and are not found to be as effective as desired. To improve such characteristics, transdermal drug delivery was brought to existence. This delivery system is capable of transporting the drug or macromolecules painlessly through skin into the blood circulation at fixed rate. Topical administration of therapeutic agents offers many advantages over conventional oral and invasive techniques of drug delivery. Several important advantages of transdermal drug delivery are prevention from hepatic first pass metabolism, enhancement of therapeutic efficiency and maintenance of steady plasma level of the drug. Human skin surface, as a site of drug application for both local and systemic effects, is the most eligible candidate available. New controlled transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) technologies (electrically-based, structure-based and velocity-based) have been developed and commercialized for the transdermal delivery of troublesome drugs. This review article covers most of the new active transport technologies involved in enhancing the transdermal permeation via effective drug delivery system.

  4. Permeation rates for RTF metal hydride vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    Contamination rates have been estimated for the RTF nitrogen heating and cooling system (NH and CS) due to tritium permeation through the walls of metal hydride vessels. Tritium contamination of the NH and CS will be seen shortly after start-up of the RTF with the majority of it coming from the TCAP units. Contamination rates of the NH and CS are estimated to exceed 400 Ci/year after three years of operation and will elevate tritium concentrations in the NH and CS above 6 x 10 -3 μCi/cc. To reduce tritium activity in the NH and CS, a stripper or ''getter'' bed may need to be installed in the NH and CS. Increasing the purge rate of nitrogen from the NH and CS is shown to be an impractical method for reducing tritium activity due to the high purge rates required. Stripping of the NH and CS nitrogen in the glove box stripper system will give a temporary lowering of tritium activity in the NH and CS, but tritium activity will return to its previous level in approximately two weeks

  5. Invited review: Whey proteins as antioxidants and promoters of cellular antioxidant pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrochano, Alberto R; Buckin, Vitaly; Kelly, Phil M; Giblin, Linda

    2018-03-28

    Oxidative stress contributes to cell injury and aggravates several chronic diseases. Dietary antioxidants help the body to fight against free radicals and, therefore, avoid or reduce oxidative stress. Recently, proteins from milk whey liquid have been described as antioxidants. This review summarizes the evidence that whey products exhibit radical scavenging activity and reducing power. It examines the processing and treatment attempts to increase the antioxidant bioactivity and identifies 1 enzyme, subtilisin, which consistently produces the most potent whey fractions. The review compares whey from different milk sources and puts whey proteins in the context of other known food antioxidants. However, for efficacy, the antioxidant activity of whey proteins must not only survive processing, but also upper gut transit and arrival in the bloodstream, if whey products are to promote antioxidant levels in target organs. Studies reveal that direct cell exposure to whey samples increases intracellular antioxidants such as glutathione. However, the physiological relevance of these in vitro assays is questionable, and evidence is conflicting from dietary intervention trials, with both rats and humans, that whey products can boost cellular antioxidant biomarkers. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Plant-crafted starches for bioplastics production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sagnelli, Domenico; Hebelstrup, Kim H.; Leroy, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Transgenically-produced amylose-only (AO) starch was used to manufacture bioplastic prototypes. Extruded starch samples were tested for crystal residues, elasticity, glass transition temperature, mechanical properties, molecular mass and microstructure. The AO starch granule crystallinity was both...... in the storage modulus (E') for AO samples compared to the control. The data support the use of pure starch-based bioplastics devoid of non-polysaccharide fillers....... of the B- and Vh-type, while the isogenic control starch was mainly A-type. The first of three endothermic transitions was attributed to gelatinization at about 60°C. The second and third peaks were identified as melting of the starch and amylose-lipid complexes, respectively. After extrusion, the AO...

  7. Application of radiation technology in starch modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huiyuan; Peng Zhigang; Ding Zhongmin; Lu Jiajiu

    2007-01-01

    In order to commercialize the radiation modification of starch, corn starch was irradiated with different dose of 60 Co gamma radiations. Some basic physical and chemical properties of the resulted modified starch paste were measured with emphasis on the viscosity stability and tensile strength. The results indicate that irradiation of corn starch with a dose of 4-10 kGy can decrease its viscosity to 5-14 mPa·s, and the tensile strength can meet the standard set up for textile paste. In comparison with chemical modification for starch, radiation modification is simpler in technology, more convenient in operation, more stable in modification quality, and easier to control. The mechanism of radiation modification of starch was also discussed. (authors)

  8. Potential of Starch Nanocomposites for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, N. H.; Muhammad, N.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, the development of biodegradable materials from renewable sources based on polymeric biomaterials have grown rapidly due to increase environmental concerns and the shortage of petroleum sources. In this regard, naturally renewable polymers such as starch has shown great potential as environmental friendly materials. Besides, the unique properties of starch such as biodegradable and non-toxic, biocompatible and solubility make them useful for a various biomedical applications. Regardless of their unique properties, starch materials are known to have limitations in term of poor processability, low mechanical properties, poor long term stability and high water sensitivity. In order to overcome these limitations, the incorporation of nano size fillers into starch materials (nanocomposites) has been introduced. This review aims to give an overview about structure and characteristics of starch, modification of starch by nanocomposites and their potential for biomedical applications.

  9. DISINTEGRATION EFFICIENCY OF SODIUM STARCH GLYCOLATES, PREPARED FROM DIFFERENT NATIVE STARCHES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOLHUIS, GK; ARENDSCHOLTE, AW; STUUT, GJ; DEVRIES, JA

    1994-01-01

    In a comparative evaluation, the disintegration efficiency of sodium starch glycolates prepared from seven different native starches (potato, maize, waxy maize, wheat, rice, sago and tapioca) were compared. All the sodium starch glycolates tested had a high swelling capacity, but the rate of water

  10. The influence of extruded starch molecular mass on the properties of extruded thermoplastic starch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van J.J.G.; Benes, K.; Wit, de D.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanical properties of a low and a high molecular mass thermoplastic starch (TPS) were monitored at water contents in the range of 5-30% (w/w). The granular starches were plasticized by extrusion processing with glycerol and water. The low molecular mass starch was prepared by partial acid

  11. The influence of starch molecular mass on the properties of extruded thermoplastic starch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Soest, J.J.G. van; Benes, K.; Wit, D. de

    1996-01-01

    The mechanical properties of a low and a high molecular mass thermoplastic starch (TPS) were monitored at water contents in the range of 5–30% (w/w). The granular starches were plasticized by extrusion processing with glycerol and water. The low molecular mass starch was prepared by partial acid

  12. Starch meets biotechnology : in planta modification of starch composition and functionalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Storage starch is an energy reservoir for plants and the major source of calories in the human diet. Starch is used in a broad range of industrial applications, as a cheap, abundant, renewable and biodegradable biopolymer. However, starch needs to be modified before it can fulfill the required

  13. Chemically Modified Starch; Allyl- and Epoxy-Starch Derivatives: Their Synthesis and Characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, M.C.R.; Boeriu, C.

    2014-01-01

    Both native and modified starches, such as starch that is pregelatinized, extruded, acid-converted, cross-linked, and substituted, are widely used in industry. This chapter describes a mild two-step process for the synthesis of novel, highly reactive granular epoxy-starch derivatives. Via this

  14. Inducing PLA/starch compatibility through butyl-etherification of waxy and high amylose starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokadala, Obiro Cuthbert; Emmambux, Naushad Mohammad; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2014-11-04

    In this study, waxy and high amylose starches were modified through butyl-etherification to facilitate compatibility with polylactide (PLA). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and wettability tests showed that hydrophobic butyl-etherified waxy and high amylose starches were obtained with degree of substitution values of 2.0 and 2.1, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry, tensile testing, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated improved PLA/starch compatibility for both waxy and high amylose starch after butyl-etherification. The PLA/butyl-etherified waxy and high amylose starch composite films had higher tensile strength and elongation at break compared to PLA/non-butyl-etherified composite films. The morphological study using SEM showed that PLA/butyl-etherified waxy starch composites had a more homogenous microstructure compared to PLA/butyl-etherified high amylose starch composites. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that PLA/starch composite thermal stability decreased with starch butyl-etherification for both waxy and high amylose starches. This study mainly demonstrates that PLA/starch compatibility can be improved through starch butyl-etherification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. COORDINATION OF CASSAVA STARCH TO METAL IONS AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    starch. On the other hand, the decomposition proceeded at a lower rate than the decomposition of ... Metal salts influenced the thermal decomposition of starches [4, 5]. Thus, properly ..... reactions of starch resulting in dextrins. After the ...

  16. Defining Starch Binding by Glucan Phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auger, Kyle; Raththagala, Madushi; Wilkens, Casper

    2015-01-01

    Starch is a vital energy molecule in plants that has a wide variety of uses in industry, such as feedstock for biomaterial processing and biofuel production. Plants employ a three enzyme cyclic process utilizing kinases, amylases, and phosphatases to degrade starch in a diurnal manner. Starch...... is comprised of the branched glucan amylopectin and the more linear glucan amylose. Our lab has determined the first structures of these glucan phosphatases and we have defined their enzymatic action. Despite this progress, we lacked a means to quickly and efficiently quantify starch binding to glucan...

  17. Atomic force microscopy of starch systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan

    2017-09-22

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) generates information on topography, adhesion, and elasticity of sample surface by touching with a tip. Under suitable experimental settings, AFM can image biopolymers of few nanometers. Starch is a major food and industrial component. AFM has been used to probe the morphology, properties, modifications, and interactions of starches from diverse botanical origins at both micro- and nano-structural levels. The structural information obtained by AFM supports the blocklet structure of the granules, and provides qualitative and quantitative basis for some physicochemical properties of diverse starch systems. It becomes evident that AFM can complement other microscopic techniques to provide novel structural insights for starch systems.

  18. Digestion of cheese whey with anaerobic rotating biological contact reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, K V; Liao, P H

    1986-01-01

    A laboratory-scale anaerobic rotating biological contact reactor receiving full strength cheese whey was studied over a range of hydraulic retention times from 11 to 5 days at 35 degrees C. Methane production rates ranging from 1.68 to 3.26 litres CH/sub 4//litre/day and a 76 to 93% reduction in chemical oxygen demand were achieved. At hydraulic retention times shorter than 5 days, steady-state operation could not be maintained for reactors receiving either full strength or diluted whey. A two-stage fermentation system was also studied; the results indicated that stable operation and treatment efficiency (89.5% COD removal) could be achieved.

  19. Efficient lactulose production from cheese whey using sodium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Park, Gwon Woo; Han, Jong-In

    2015-04-15

    An economical method of lactulose production from cheese whey was developed using sodium carbonate (Na2CO3). Three parameters such as temperature, reaction time, and Na2CO3 concentration were identified as experimental factors, and yield was selected as a response parameter. The experimental factors were optimised employing Response Surface Methodology (RSM). Maximum yield of 29.6% was obtained at reaction time of 20.41 min, Na2CO3 of 0.51% at 90 °C. To overcome this limited lactulose yield, due to the conversion of lactulose to galactose, fed batch system was applied using dried cheese whey as lactose source. By this system, limit was broken, and 15.8 g/L of lactulose is produced in hour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Batch cultivation of kluyveromyces fragilis in cheese whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beausejour, D; Leduy, A; Ramalho, R S

    1981-08-01

    Kluyveromyces fragilis was cultivated batchwise in an open pond rectangular bioreactor at 30 degrees Centigrade, 2vvm of aeration, under non-sterile conditions and uncontrolled pH. The culture medium contained 7% cheese whey powder, 0.25% KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/, 0.5% (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and was adjusted to an initial pH of 4.0 with phosphoric acid. The lactose was almost completely consumed after 16 hours and COD reduction attained 80% after 64 hours. The maximum suspended solids concentration obtained was 11.7 g/L. The cheese whey which had initially low protein and high lactose contents was converted by this system into a high protein and low lactose carbohydrate product. (Refs. 26).

  1. Batch cultivation of kluyveromyces fragilis in cheese whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beausejour, D; Leduy, A; Ramalho, R S

    1981-01-01

    Kluyveromyces fragilis was cultivated batchwise in an open pond rectangular bioreactor at 30 degrees Celcius with aeration, under non-sterile conditions and uncontrolled pH. The culture medium contained 7% cheese whey powder, 0.25% KH2PO4, and 0.5% (NH4)2SO4 and was adjusted to an initial pH of 4.0 with H3PO4. The lactose was almost completely consumed after 16 hours and COD reduction attained 80% after 64 hours. The maximum suspended solids concentration obtained was 11.7 g/L. The cheese whey which had initially low protein and high lactose contents was converted by this system into a high protein and low lactose carbohydrate product.

  2. Study of tritium permeation through Peach Bottom Steam Generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Baugh, W.A.; Baldwin, N.L.

    1977-06-01

    The report describes the equipment developed, samples tested, procedures used, and results obtained in the tritium permeation tests conducted on steam generator tubing samples which were removed from the Peach Bottom Unit No. 1 reactor

  3. Recent results on implantation and permeation into fusion reactor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, R. A.; Holland, D. F.; Longhurst, G. R.; Struttman, D. A.

    This paper reports on implantation-driven permeation experiments that have been made for primary candidate alloy (PCA) and the ferritic steel HT-9 using deuterium ion beams from an accelerator. The results include measurements of the implantation flux and fluence dependence of the deuterium reemission and permeation for specimens heated to approximately 430(0)C. Simultaneous measurements of the ions sputtered from the specimen front surface with a secondary ion mass spectrometer provided some characterization of the surface condition throughout an experiment. For both materials, the permeation rate was lowered by the implantation process. However, the steady state permeation rate for HT-9 was found to be at least a factor of 5 greater than that for PCA.

  4. Phase Change Permeation Technology for Environmental Control & Life Support Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is evaluating Dutyion™, a phase change permeation membrane technology developed by Design Technology and Irrigation (DTI), for use in future advanced life...

  5. Effect of residual stresses on hydrogen permeation in iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouanga, M.; Bercot, P.; Takadoum, J.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of residual stresses on electrochemical permeation in iron membrane was investigated. Four thermal and mechanical treatments were chosen to obtain different surface states in relation to the residual stresses. Residual stresses were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Macherauch and Mueller method. The results were completed by the microhardness measurements. For all iron membranes, compressive residual stresses were obtained. Electrochemical permeation experiments using a Devanathan and Stachurski cell were employed to determine the hydrogen permeation behaviour of the various iron membranes. The latter was charged with hydrogen by galvanostatic cathodic polarization in 0.1 M NaOH at 25 deg. C. The experimental results revealed that hydrogen permeation rate increases with increasing residual stresses introduced in iron membranes.

  6. The effects of carbon sources and micronutrients in whey and fermented whey on the kinetics of phenanthrene biodegradation in diesel contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Anders P.; Ostberg, Tomas L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · Whey and fermented whey significantly enhances phenanthrene biodegradation. · Mode of administration and amount of amendment is decisive. · Observed effects were increased linear growth, bioavailability and degradation. · The effects were attributed to lactate and vitamins. · Growth factors play a significant role in phenanthrene biodegradation. - Abstract: This paper demonstrates significant effects on phenanthrene degradation in diesel contaminated soil by the addition of organic amendments such as whey and fermented whey. Both amount of amendment added and mode of administration was shown to be decisive. There was a strong positive effect on the 14 C-mineralization of phenanthrene by multiple (bi-weekly) additions of fermented whey 210 mg dw kg -1 soil dw (FW multi) and also by single dose addition of 2100 mg dw sweet whey kg -1 soil dw (SW high). The most prominent effects on phenanthrene degradation kinetics were a five to fifteen fold increase in the linear growth term (k 2 ) and a 23-27% increase in bioavailability factor S 0 for SW high and FW multi respectively. Also, total mineralization at the end of the experiment increased from 46% in the control to 66 and 71% respectively and the lag time was reduced from 21 to 15 days by multiple addition of fermented whey. The most significant stimulating effects on phenanthrene degradation kinetics could be attributed to lactate and vitamins. This study demonstrates a more complex dependence of carbon sources and growth factors for an aromatic compound such as phenanthrene in comparison to hexadecane.

  7. Pemberian Whey-Dangke dalam Air Minum Menekan Kadar Kolesterol, Trigliserida dan Lipoprotein Darah Ayam Broiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulmiyati Sulmiyati

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian untuk mengetahui pengaruh penambahan whey dangke terhadap kadar kolesterol, trigliserida, LDL (low density lipoprotein, HDL (high density lipoprotein, VLDL (very low density lipoprotein darah ayam broiler dan mengukur konsentrasi pemberian whey dangke dalam air minum yang diberikan. Penelitian dilakukan dengan menggunakan Rancangan Acak Lengkap dengan enam perlakuan pemberian whey dangke dalam air minum dengan empat ulangan. Konsentrasi P0 adalah kelompok kontrol 0%; P1=pemberian whey dangke dengan konsentrasi 10%; P2 = pemberian whey dangke dengan konsentrasi 20%; P3 = pemberian whey dangke dengan konsentrasi 30%; P4 = pemberian whey dangke dengan konsentrasi 40%; dan P5 = pemberian whey dangke dengan konsentrasi 50%. Pemberian whey dangke pada ayam broiler strain cobb SR 707 dilakukan selama 15 hari (umur 20–35 hari. Parameter yang diamati adalah kadar kolesterol, trigliserida, LDL, HDL, dan VLDL darah ayam broiler. Data dianalisis dengan analisis sidik ragam, dan jika menunjukkan pengaruh nyata dilanjutkan dengan Uji Beda Nyata Terkecil (BNT. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pemberian whey dangke dalam air minum tidak memberikan pengaruh yang nyata (P>0,05 terhadap parameter kolesterol, trigliserida, dan lipoprotein. Namun, terlihat kecenderungan penurunan kadar kolesterol seiring dengan peningkatan konsentrasi pemberian whey dangke. Hasil penelitian dapat disimpulkan bahwa hasil uji in vivo menunjukkan pemberian whey dangke dalam air minum pada ayam broiler pada konsentrasi 50% memperlihatkan penurunan kadar kolesterol hingga 15%. Abstract The purposes of research is to determine the effect of whey dangke against cholesterol levels, triglycerides, LDL, HDL, and VLDL broiler blood and measuring the concentration of whey dangke in water provided. The research was conducted using a completely randomized design with six treatments and four replications. P0 is the control group 0%; P1 = whey dangke added with a concentration

  8. Proteomics in quality control: Whey protein-based supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Bruno Carius; Souza, Gustavo H M F; Lourenço, Daniela C; Fasciotti, Maíra

    2016-09-16

    The growing consumption of nutritional supplements might represent a problem, given the concern about the quality of these supplements. One of the most used supplements is whey protein (WP); because of its popularity, it has been a target of adulteration with substitute products, such as cheaper proteins with lower biological value. To investigate this type of adulteration, this study used shotgun proteomics analyses by MS(E) (multiplexed, low- and high-collision energy, data-independent acquisition) of WP-based supplements. Seventeen WP-based supplement samples were evaluated. Chicken, maize, rice, potato, soybean, and wheat proteins were considered as probable sources of bovine whey adulteration. Collectively, 523 proteins were identified across all 16 samples and replicates, with 94% of peptides inside a normal distribution within 10ppm of maximum error. In 10 of the 16 samples analyzed, only proteins from bovine whey could be detected, while in the other samples several other protein sources were detected in high concentrations, especially soybean, wheat, and rice. These results point out a probable adulteration and/or sample contamination during manufacturing that could only be detected using this proteomic approach. The present work shows how shotgun proteomics can be used to provide reliable answers in quality control matters, especially focusing on Whey Protein nutritional supplements which are a very popular subject in food and nutrition. In order to achieve an appropriate methodology, careful evaluation was performed applying extremely rigorous quality criteria, established for the proteomic analysis. These criteria and the methodological approach used in this work might serve as a guide for other authors seeking to use proteomics in quality control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Whey Based Bioactive Peptides Used in Animal Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Demet Karaman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive peptides come out as a result of the hydrolysis of milk proteins and contain nutritional, functional and biological activities. Nowadays, the utilization of whey proteins to provide various features in the animal products such as meat and milk products and animal production has been increasing. In this compilation, after being introduced some general information about their common characteristics, bioactive peptides will be mentioned about their particularly recent usage in animal products.

  10. Effects of whey on the colonization and sporulation of arbuscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to research the effect of 2 different doses of whey [50 ml kg-1(W50) and 100 ml kg-1(W100)], an important organic waste, on colonization and sporulation of arbuscular mycorhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices'(G.i.) inoculated to lentil plant and the effects of changing P ratio in the soil and plant as ...

  11. Characterization of Native and Modified Starches by Potentiometric Titration

    OpenAIRE

    Soto, Diana; Urdaneta, Jose; Pernia, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    The use of potentiometric titration for the analysis and characterization of native and modified starches is highlighted. The polyelectrolytic behavior of oxidized starches (thermal and thermal-chemical oxidation), a graft copolymer of itaconic acid (IA) onto starch, and starch esters (mono- and diester itaconate) was compared with the behavior of native starch, the homopolymer, and the acid employed as a graft monomer and substituent. Starch esters showed higher percentages of acidity, follo...

  12. Measurement of tritium permeation through resistant materials near room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maienschein, J.; DuVal, V.; McMurphy, F.; Uribe, F.; Musket, R.; Brown, D.

    1985-01-01

    To measure tritium permeation through low-permeability materials at 50 to 170 0 C, we use highly-sensitive liquid scintillation counting to detect the permeating tritium. To validate our method, we conducted extensive experiments with copper, for which much data exists for comparison. We report permeability of tritium through copper at 50, 100, and 170 0 C, and discuss details of the experimental technique. Further plans are outlined. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Quantification of whey proteins by reversed phase-HPLC and effectiveness of mid-infrared spectroscopy for their rapid prediction in sweet whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturaro, Alba; De Marchi, Massimo; Masi, Antonio; Cassandro, Martino

    2016-01-01

    In the dairy industry, membrane filtration is used to reduce the amount of whey waste and, simultaneously, to recover whey proteins (WP). The composition of WP can strongly affect the filtration treatment of whey, and rapid determination of WP fractions would be of interest for dairy producers to monitor WP recovery. This study aimed to develop mid-infrared spectroscopy (MIRS) prediction models for the rapid quantification of protein in sweet whey, using a validated rapid reversed phase (RP)-HPLC as a reference method. Quantified WP included α-lactalbumin (α-LA), β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) A and B, bovine serum albumin, caseinomacropeptides, and proteose peptone. Validation of RP-HPLC was performed by calculating the relative standard deviation (RSD) in repeatability and reproducibility tests for WP retention time and peak areas. Samples of liquid whey (n=187) were analyzed by RP-HPLC and scanned through MIRS to collect spectral information (900 to 4,000 cm(-1)); statistical analysis was carried out through partial least squares regression and random cross-validation procedure. Retention times in RP-HPLC method were stable (RSD between 0.03 and 0.80%), whereas the RSD of peak area (from 0.25 to 8.48%) was affected by WP relative abundance. Higher coefficients of determination in validation for MIRS model were obtained for protein fractions present in whey in large amounts, such as β-LG (0.58), total identified WP (0.58), and α-LA (0.56). Results of this study suggest that MIRS is an easy method for rapid quantification of detail protein in sweet whey, even if better resolution was achieved with the method based on RP-HPLC. The prediction of WP in sweet whey by MIRS might be used for screening and for classifying sweet whey according to its total and individual WP contents. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rheology and microstructure of kefiran and whey protein mixed gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazazi, Hosayn; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Rezaei, Karamatollah; Pishvaei, Malihe; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Moieni, Sohrab

    2017-04-01

    The effect of kefiran on cold-set gelation of whey protein isolate (WPI) at 25 °C was studied using rheological measurements and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The gelation of samples was induced by the addition of glucono-δ-lactone to the dispersions. WPI concentration was maintained at 8% (w/v) and the concentration of kefiran varied from 0 to 0.08% (w/v). According to rheological measurements, the addition of kefiran into WPI dispersions resulted in a significant increase in the gel strength, the yield stress, and the shear stress values at the flowing point. The gelling point and gelation pH of samples decreased significantly with an increase in kefiran concentration. ESEM micrographs showed that the presence of kefiran played an important role in the microstructure formation of gels. The microstructure of kefiran-WPI mixed gels was more compact and dense, compared to the WPI gel. Depletion interactions between kefiran and whey protein aggregates can be regarded as the chief factor which was responsible for these effects. The present work demonstrated that rheological and microstructural properties of acid-induced whey protein gels were improved by the addition of kefiran.

  15. Whey protein concentration by ultrafiltration and study of functional properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidiane Iltchenco

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This paper aim to evaluate the ultrafiltration (UF process for constituents recovery from whey. Sequences of factorial designs were performed by varying temperature (5 to 40°C and pressure (1 to 3 bar, to maximize the proteins concentration using membrane of 100kDa in dead end system. Based on the best result new experiments were performed with membrane of 50kDa and 10kDa. With the membrane of 50 the protein retention was about 3 times higher than the membrane of 100kDa. The concentrated obtained by UF membrane of 10kDa, 10°C and 2 bar in laboratory scale showed a mean protein retention of 80 %, greater protein solubility, emulsion stability and the identification of β-lactoglobulins (18.3 kDa and α-lactalbumin fractions (14.2kDa. Therefore, the use of membrane of 100 and 50kDa are became a industrially recommendable alternatives to concentration of whey proteins, and/or as a previous step to the fractionation of whey constituents using membrane ≤10kDa, aiming at future applications in different areas (food, pharmaceutical, chemical, etc..

  16. Effect of combined treatments on viscosity of whey dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camillo, A.; Sabato, S.F.

    2004-01-01

    Whey proteins, enriched protein fractions from milk, are of great interest as ingredients due to nutritional value associated with its functional properties. These proteins could have their structural properties improved when some treatments are applied, such as thermal and gamma irradiation or when some compounds are added. The current work aimed to study the viscometer behavior of whey dispersions submitted to two different combined treatments: (1) thermal plus irradiation and (2) thermal plus vacuum and N 2 plus irradiation. Dispersions of whey protein in water (5% and 8% protein (w/v) base) and containing proteins and glycerol at ratios 1:1 and 2:1 (protein:glycerol) were submitted to both combined treatments. The irradiation doses were 0, 5, 15 and 25 kGy. The viscosity of the two combined treatments and for four levels of absorbed doses is presented and the combined effects are discussed. The thermal treatment combined with gamma irradiation contributed to increase the viscosity as irradiation doses increases for both (5% and 8%) concentrations of proteins (p<0.05). For protein and glycerol solutions, the irradiation dose seemed to result in a slightly increase. The vacuum applied before the irradiation showed a small contribution

  17. Effect of combined treatments on viscosity of whey dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camillo, A.; Sabato, S.F. E-mail: sfsabato@ipen.br

    2004-10-01

    Whey proteins, enriched protein fractions from milk, are of great interest as ingredients due to nutritional value associated with its functional properties. These proteins could have their structural properties improved when some treatments are applied, such as thermal and gamma irradiation or when some compounds are added. The current work aimed to study the viscometer behavior of whey dispersions submitted to two different combined treatments: (1) thermal plus irradiation and (2) thermal plus vacuum and N{sub 2} plus irradiation. Dispersions of whey protein in water (5% and 8% protein (w/v) base) and containing proteins and glycerol at ratios 1:1 and 2:1 (protein:glycerol) were submitted to both combined treatments. The irradiation doses were 0, 5, 15 and 25 kGy. The viscosity of the two combined treatments and for four levels of absorbed doses is presented and the combined effects are discussed. The thermal treatment combined with gamma irradiation contributed to increase the viscosity as irradiation doses increases for both (5% and 8%) concentrations of proteins (p<0.05). For protein and glycerol solutions, the irradiation dose seemed to result in a slightly increase. The vacuum applied before the irradiation showed a small contribution.

  18. Modelling formulae of strawberry whey drinks of prophylactic application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tkachenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Expediency of the development of formulae and innovative technologies for production of prophylactic application drinks possessing antioxidant, probiotic and hepatoprotective properties with the use of the secondary dairy product – whey, as well as the domestic vegetable raw materials having a high content of bioactive substances has been substantiated.Formulation composition of the prophylactic drinks based on cheese whey, extract of Tagetes patula flowers and the berry filler “Strawberry” with the use of the response surface method has been developed. Bioactivity of the drinks and the complex quality indicator which accounts for the total influence of the bioactivity, organoleptic assessment and weight coefficients of the specified unit indicators were taken as the optimization criteria; as the independent factors that were varied in the course of the experiment, the mass fractions of the marigold flowers extract and the strawberries filler were selected. It is recommended that the mass fractions of the berry filler “Strawberry” and the extract of Tagetes patula flowers in the prophylactic drinks are set as 7 and 20 % of the finished product, accordingly. The practical mass fraction of the citric acid of 0.2 % was determined as it ensures high organoleptic characteristics of the finished drinks. Recommendations are given concerning development of innovative technologies of unfermented and fermented strawberry whey drinks of prophylactic application enriched with the extract of Tagetes patula flowers.

  19. Enrichment of extruded snack products with whey protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Brnčić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Highest share in products with whey proteins addition belongs to aromatised drinks, aromatised protein bars and various dietetic preparations. In the last few years, there is increased use of the extrusion process for production of food products. This process is, besides other things, used for obtaining directly expanded products, which are immediately packed and sent on market after mechanical and thermal treatment in extruder, or after drying for a short time. One of these food products is “snack” food. Snack food is made with twin corotating screw extruders, in which raw materials are submitted to high temperatures and short time, with intensive expansion and rapid pressure drop. For the production of this category of food products, basic ingredients like corn, wheat, rye and rice, with the maximum of 9 % of proteins, are used. With the development of extrusion technology, special attention is focused on the enrichment of extruded products with different types of proteins, including proteins. In this paper, review of the newest research and achievements in embedding various types of whey concentrates in snack food will be represented. This category of food products for direct consummation is constantly increasing, and addition of whey protein concentrate adds better nutritional value and increased functionality.

  20. Authentication of Whey Protein Powders by Portable Mid-Infrared Spectrometers Combined with Pattern Recognition Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Tan, Siow Ying; Mutilangi, William; Aykas, Didem P; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method to differentiate whey protein types (WPC, WPI, and WPH) used for beverage manufacturing by combining the spectral signature collected from portable mid-infrared spectrometers and pattern recognition analysis. Whey protein powders from different suppliers are produced using a large number of processing and compositional variables, resulting in variation in composition, concentration, protein structure, and thus functionality. Whey protein powders including whey protein isolates, whey protein concentrates and whey protein hydrolysates were obtained from different suppliers and their spectra collected using portable mid-infrared spectrometers (single and triple reflection) by pressing the powder onto an Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) diamond crystal with a pressure clamp. Spectra were analyzed by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) generating a classification model showing the ability to differentiate whey protein types by forming tight clusters with interclass distance values of >3, considered to be significantly different from each other. The major bands centered at 1640 and 1580 cm(-1) were responsible for separation and were associated with differences in amide I and amide II vibrations of proteins, respectively. Another important band in whey protein clustering was associated with carboxylate vibrations of acidic amino acids (∼1570 cm(-1)). The use of a portable mid-IR spectrometer combined with pattern recognition analysis showed potential for discriminating whey protein ingredients that can help to streamline the analytical procedure so that it is more applicable for field-based screening of ingredients. A rapid, simple and accurate method was developed to authenticate commercial whey protein products by using portable mid-infrared spectrometers combined with chemometrics, which could help ensure the functionality of whey protein ingredients in food applications. © 2015

  1. Structural and molecular basis of starch viscosity in hexaploid wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ral, J-P; Cavanagh, C R; Larroque, O; Regina, A; Morell, M K

    2008-06-11

    Wheat starch is considered to have a low paste viscosity relative to other starches. Consequently, wheat starch is not preferred for many applications as compared to other high paste viscosity starches. Increasing the viscosity of wheat starch is expected to increase the functionality of a range of wheat flour-based products in which the texture is an important aspect of consumer acceptance (e.g., pasta, and instant and yellow alkaline noodles). To understand the molecular basis of starch viscosity, we have undertaken a comprehensive structural and rheological analysis of starches from a genetically diverse set of wheat genotypes, which revealed significant variation in starch traits including starch granule protein content, starch-associated lipid content and composition, phosphate content, and the structures of the amylose and amylopectin fractions. Statistical analysis highlighted the association between amylopectin chains of 18-25 glucose residues and starch pasting properties. Principal component analysis also identified an association between monoesterified phosphate and starch pasting properties in wheat despite the low starch-phosphate level in wheat as compared to tuber starches. We also found a strong negative correlation between the phosphate ester content and the starch content in flour. Previously observed associations between internal starch granule fatty acids and the swelling peak time and pasting temperature have been confirmed. This study has highlighted a range of parameters associated with increased starch viscosity that could be used in prebreeding/breeding programs to modify wheat starch pasting properties.

  2. Fouling behavior of poly(ether)sulfone ultrafiltration membrane during concentration of whey proteins: Effect of hydrophilic modification using atmospheric pressure argon jet plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damar Huner, Irem; Gulec, Haci Ali

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of hydrophilic surface modification via atmospheric pressure jet plasma (ApJPls) on the fouling propensity of polyethersulfone (PES) ultrafiltration (UF) membranes during concentration of whey proteins. The distance from nozzle to substrate surface of 30mm and the exposure period of 5 times were determined as the most effective parameters enabling an increase in ΔG iwi value of the plain membrane from (-) 14.92±0.89mJ/m 2 to (+) 17.57±0.67mJ/m 2 . Maximum hydrophilicity and minimum surface roughness achieved by argon plasma action resulted in better antifouling behavior, while the hydraulic permeability and the initial permeate flux were decreased sharply due to the plasma-induced surface cross-linking. A quite steady state flux was obtained throughout the UF with the ApJPls modified PES membrane. The contribution of R frev to R t , which was 94% for the UF through the plain membrane, decreased to 43% after the plasma treatment. The overall results of this study highlighted the ApJPls modification decreased the fouling propensity of PES membrane without affecting the original protein rejection capability and improved the recovery of initial permeate flux after chemical cleaning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Improved ethanol production from cheese whey, whey powder, and sugar beet molasses by "Vitreoscilla hemoglobin expressing" Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Meltem Yesilcimen; Sar, Taner; Ozcelik, Busra

    2014-01-01

    This work investigated the improvement of ethanol production by engineered ethanologenic Escherichia coli to express the hemoglobin from the bacterium Vitreoscilla (VHb). Ethanologenic E. coli strain FBR5 and FBR5 transformed with the VHb gene in two constructs (strains TS3 and TS4) were grown in cheese whey (CW) medium at small and large scales, at both high and low aeration, or with whey powder (WP) or sugar beet molasses hydrolysate (SBMH) media at large scale and low aeration. Culture pH, cell growth, VHb levels, and ethanol production were evaluated after 48 h. VHb expression in TS3 and TS4 enhanced their ethanol production in CW (21-419%), in WP (17-362%), or in SBMH (48-118%) media. This work extends the findings that "VHb technology" may be useful for improving the production of ethanol from waste and byproducts of various sources.

  4. Copper-mediated homogeneous living radical polymerization of acrylamide with waxy potato starch-based macroinitiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifei; Cao, Huatang; van Mastrigt, Frank; Pei, Yutao; Picchioni, Francesco

    2018-07-15

    Cu 0 -mediated living radical polymerization (Cu 0 -mediated LRP) was employed in this research for the synthesis of starch-g-polyacrylamide (St-g-PAM). The use of a controlled radical grafting technique is necessary, as compared to the traditional free-radical polymerization methods, in order to obtain a well-defined structure of the final product. This is in turn essential for studying the relationship between such structure and the end-properties. Waxy potato starch-based water-soluble macroinitiator was first synthesized by esterification with 2-bromopropionyl bromide in the mixture of dimethylacetamide and lithium chloride. With the obtained macroinitiator, St-g-PAM was homogeneously synthesized by aqueous Cu 0 -mediated LRP using CuBr/hexamethylated tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (Me 6 Tren) as catalyst. The successful synthesis of the macroinitiator and St-g-PAM was proved by NMR, FT-IR, SEM, XRD and TGA analysis. The molecular weight and polydispersity of PAM chains were analyzed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) after hydrolyzing the starch backbone. Monomer conversion was monitored by gas chromatography (GC), on the basis of which the kinetics were determined. A preliminarily rheological study was performed on aqueous solutions of the prepared materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Combination of Poly(lactic) Acid and Starch for Biodegradable Food Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Justine; González-Martínez, Chelo; Chiralt, Amparo

    2017-08-15

    The massive use of synthetic plastics, in particular in the food packaging area, has a great environmental impact, and alternative more ecologic materials are being required. Poly(lactic) acid (PLA) and starch have been extensively studied as potential replacements for non-degradable petrochemical polymers on the basis of their availability, adequate food contact properties and competitive cost. Nevertheless, both polymers exhibit some drawbacks for packaging uses and need to be adapted to the food packaging requirements. Starch, in particular, is very water sensitive and its film properties are heavily dependent on the moisture content, exhibiting relatively low mechanical resistance. PLA films are very brittle and offer low resistance to oxygen permeation. Their combination as blend or multilayer films could provide properties that are more adequate for packaging purposes on the basis of their complementary characteristics. The main characteristics of PLA and starch in terms of not only the barrier and mechanical properties of their films but also of their combinations, by using blending or multilayer strategies, have been analyzed, identifying components or processes that favor the polymer compatibility and the good performance of the combined materials. The properties of some blends/combinations have been discussed in comparison with those of pure polymer films.

  6. Combination of Poly(lactic) Acid and Starch for Biodegradable Food Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Chelo; Chiralt, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    The massive use of synthetic plastics, in particular in the food packaging area, has a great environmental impact, and alternative more ecologic materials are being required. Poly(lactic) acid (PLA) and starch have been extensively studied as potential replacements for non-degradable petrochemical polymers on the basis of their availability, adequate food contact properties and competitive cost. Nevertheless, both polymers exhibit some drawbacks for packaging uses and need to be adapted to the food packaging requirements. Starch, in particular, is very water sensitive and its film properties are heavily dependent on the moisture content, exhibiting relatively low mechanical resistance. PLA films are very brittle and offer low resistance to oxygen permeation. Their combination as blend or multilayer films could provide properties that are more adequate for packaging purposes on the basis of their complementary characteristics. The main characteristics of PLA and starch in terms of not only the barrier and mechanical properties of their films but also of their combinations, by using blending or multilayer strategies, have been analyzed, identifying components or processes that favor the polymer compatibility and the good performance of the combined materials. The properties of some blends/combinations have been discussed in comparison with those of pure polymer films. PMID:28809808

  7. Internal structure of normal maize starch granules revealed by chemical surface gelatinization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, D D; Jane, J I

    2000-01-01

    Normal maize starch was fractionated into two sizes: large granules with diameters more than 5 microns and small granules with diameters less than 5 microns. The large granules were surface gelatinized by treating them with an aqueous LiCl solution (13 M) at 22-23 degrees C. Surface-gelatinized remaining granules were obtained by mechanical blending, and gelatinized surface starch was obtained by grinding with a mortar and a pestle. Starches of different granular sizes and radial locations, obtained after different degrees of surface gelatinization, were subjected to scanning electron microscopy, iodine potentiometric titration, gel-permeation chromatography, and amylopectin branch chain length analysis. Results showed that the remaining granules had a rough surface with a lamella structure. Amylose was more concentrated at the periphery than at the core of the granule. Amylopectin had longer long B-chains at the core than at the periphery of the granule. Greater proportions of the long B-chains were present at the core than at the periphery of the granule.

  8. Native whey protein with high levels of leucine results in similar post-exercise muscular anabolic responses as regular whey protein: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamarsland, Håvard; Nordengen, Anne Lene; Nyvik Aas, Sigve; Holte, Kristin; Garthe, Ina; Paulsen, Gøran; Cotter, Matthew; Børsheim, Elisabet; Benestad, Haakon B; Raastad, Truls

    2017-01-01

    Protein intake is essential to maximally stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and the amino acid leucine seems to possess a superior effect on muscle protein synthesis compared to other amino acids. Native whey has higher leucine content and thus a potentially greater anabolic effect on muscle than regular whey (WPC-80). This study compared the acute anabolic effects of ingesting 2 × 20 g of native whey protein, WPC-80 or milk protein after a resistance exercise session. A total of 24 young resistance trained men and women took part in this double blind, randomized, partial crossover, controlled study. Participants received either WPC-80 and native whey ( n  = 10), in a crossover design, or milk ( n  = 12). Supplements were ingested immediately (20 g) and two hours after (20 g) a bout of heavy-load lower body resistance exercise. Blood samples and muscle biopsies were collected to measure plasma concentrations of amino acids by gas-chromatography mass spectrometry, muscle phosphorylation of p70S6K, 4E-BP1 and eEF-2 by immunoblotting, and mixed muscle protein synthesis by use of [ 2 H 5 ]phenylalanine-infusion, gas-chromatography mass spectrometry and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Being the main comparison, differences between native whey and WPC-80 were analysed by a one-way ANOVA and comparisons between the whey supplements and milk were analysed by a two-way ANOVA. Native whey increased blood leucine concentrations more than WPC-80 and milk ( P  whey ingestion induced a greater phosphorylation of p70S6K than milk 180 min after exercise ( P  = 0.03). Muscle protein synthesis rates increased 1-3 h hours after exercise with WPC-80 (0.119%), and 1-5 h after exercise with native whey (0.112%). Muscle protein synthesis rates were higher 1-5 h after exercise with native whey than with milk (0.112% vs. 0.064, P  = 0.023). Despite higher-magnitude increases in blood leucine concentrations with native whey, it was not superior to WPC-80

  9. Distribution of Animal Drugs among Curd, Whey, and Milk Protein Fractions in Spiked Skim Milk and Whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappell, Nancy W; Shelver, Weilin L; Lupton, Sara J; Fanaselle, Wendy; Van Doren, Jane M; Hakk, Heldur

    2017-02-01

    It is important to understand the partitioning of drugs in processed milk and milk products, when drugs are present in raw milk, in order to estimate the potential consumer exposure. Radioisotopically labeled erythromycin, ivermectin, ketoprofen, oxytetracycline, penicillin G, sulfadimethoxine, and thiabendazole were used to evaluate the distribution of animal drugs among rennet curd, whey, and protein fractions from skim cow milk. Our previous work reported the distribution of these same drugs between skim and fat fractions of milk. Drug distribution between curd and whey was significantly correlated (R 2 = 0.70) to the drug's lipophilicity (log P), with improved correlation using log D (R 2 = 0.95). Distribution of drugs was concentration independent over the range tested (20-2000 nM). With the exception of thiabendazole and ivermectin, more drug was associated with whey protein than casein on a nmol/g protein basis (oxytetracycline experiment not performed). These results provide insights into the distribution of animal drug residues, if present in cow milk, among milk fractions, with possible extrapolation to milk products.

  10. Kinetics of anaerobic digestion of labaneh whey in a batch reactor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-04-16

    Apr 16, 2014 ... kinetic constants were determined for labaneh whey and for diluted whey .... reactor has a pH and temperature control system. ... Variable power electric heater was used to heat the reactor. ..... by gas chromatography, Annual book of ASTM Standard, Vol. ... Thesis, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan.

  11. Photoacoustic study of heated binary mixtures containing whey and skimmed-milk powders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doka, O.; Bicanic, D.; Frankhuizen, R.

    1999-01-01

    A novel methodology is proposed to determine the amount of whey powder in a binary mixture containing whey and skimmed-milk powders. This new approach is based on measurement of the amplitude of the photoacoustic (PA) signal obtained when the mixture is exposed to a controlled thermal treatment; the

  12. Effect of whey protein on the In Vivo Release of Aldehydes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, K.G.C.; Boelrijk, A.E.M.; Burger, J.J.; Claassen, N.E.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Retention of aldehydes by whey proteins in solutions buffered at a range of pH values was studied under static and dynamic headspace conditions and in vivo in exhaled air. Static headspace measurements showed a clear increase in retention in the presence of whey proteins for aldehydes with longer

  13. PRODUCTION OF FUNGAL MYCELIAL PROTEIN IN SUBMERGED CULTURE OF SOYBEAN WHEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FALANGHE, H; SMITH, A K; RACKIS, J J

    1964-07-01

    Various soybean whey media were tested as substrate for seven species of fungi in submerged culture. Very little mycelial growth was obtained with Morchella hybrida, Collybia velutipes, Cantharellus cibarius, and Xylaria polymorpha. Agaricus campestris failed to grow. Tricholoma nudum and Boletus indecisus showed the greatest rate of growth and production of mycelial protein and the best utilization of soybean whey solids, with much shorter incubation times compared with those of the other species. T. nudum developed as spheres having diameters of about 5 to 8 mm, instead of the usual slurry or yeastlike form, in the presence of added ammonium acetate. B. indecisus always developed as spheres. Mycelial yields and production of protein by T. nudum greatly decreased with the addition of more than 1% glucose to soybean whey, whereas with B. indecisus the yield of protein almost doubled when up to 3% glucose was added. The effect of minerals on mycelial growth was determined. With soybean whey concentrated to 50%, the rate of mycelial growth of T. nudum was nearly doubled, but protein content of mycelia was greatly reduced. Mycelial growth and yield of protein of B. indecisus grown in concentrated whey were increased greatly. About 4 to 6 g of mycelial protein per liter can be obtained from fermentation in soybean whey, depending upon the medium used. Utilization of soybean whey by fungal fermentation may have economic value in whey disposal and in the production of products of high protein content.

  14. Production of Fungal Mycelial Protein in Submerged Culture of Soybean Whey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falanghe, Helcio; Smith, A. K.; Rackis, J. J.

    1964-01-01

    Various soybean whey media were tested as substrate for seven species of fungi in submerged culture. Very little mycelial growth was obtained with Morchella hybrida, Collybia velutipes, Cantharellus cibarius, and Xylaria polymorpha. Agaricus campestris failed to grow. Tricholoma nudum and Boletus indecisus showed the greatest rate of growth and production of mycelial protein and the best utilization of soybean whey solids, with much shorter incubation times compared with those of the other species. T. nudum developed as spheres having diameters of about 5 to 8 mm, instead of the usual slurry or yeastlike form, in the presence of added ammonium acetate. B. indecisus always developed as spheres. Mycelial yields and production of protein by T. nudum greatly decreased with the addition of more than 1% glucose to soybean whey, whereas with B. indecisus the yield of protein almost doubled when up to 3% glucose was added. The effect of minerals on mycelial growth was determined. With soybean whey concentrated to 50%, the rate of mycelial growth of T. nudum was nearly doubled, but protein content of mycelia was greatly reduced. Mycelial growth and yield of protein of B. indecisus grown in concentrated whey were increased greatly. About 4 to 6 g of mycelial protein per liter can be obtained from fermentation in soybean whey, depending upon the medium used. Utilization of soybean whey by fungal fermentation may have economic value in whey disposal and in the production of products of high protein content. PMID:14199023

  15. Alcohol production by selected yeast strains in lactase-hydrolyzed acid whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, V S; Green, R; Sullivan, B C; Holsinger, V H

    1977-07-01

    Ethanol production by Kluyveromyces fragilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied using cottage cheese whey in which 80 to 90 percent of the lactose present had been prehydrolyzed to glucose and galactose. Complete fermentation of the sugar by K. fragilis required 120 hr at 30/sup 0/C in lactase-hydrolyzed whey compared to 72 hr in nonhydrolyzed whey. This effect was due to a diauxic fermentation pattern in lactase-hydrolyzed whey with glucose being fermented before galactose. Ethanol yields of about 2 percent were obtained in both types of whey when K. fragilis was the organism used for fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced alcohol from glucose more rapidly than K. fragilis, but galactose was fermented only when S. cerevisiae was pregrown on galactose. Slightly lower alcohol yields were obtained with S. cerevisiae, owing to the presence of some lactose in the whey which was not fermented by this organism. Although prehydrolysis of lactose in whey and whey fractions is advantageous in that microbial species unable to ferment lactose may be utilized, diauxic and galactose utilization problems must be considered.

  16. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxide – process modeling and cost estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) from a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) containing 55% ...

  17. Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC whey product as protein source for growing pigs 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Näsi

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available A digestibility and balance trial was performed with three growing pigs to evaluate the nutritive value and protein utilization of a carboxymethyl cellulose(CMC whey product used to replace 50 % or 100 % of the dried skim supplement in a barley-based diet. The effect of CMC whey on clinical chemical blood parameters was also investigated. The CMC whey protein contained 39.6 % crude protein and 36.0 % true protein in DM. The proportion of CMC in the product was 18.3% of DM. CMC whey had high contents of lysine, cystine, methionine and threonine: 10.3, 2.9, 2.1 and 5.6 g/16 g N, respectively. NFE digestibility was lower on the CMC whey diet than on the skim milk diet (P < 0.05. Faecal excretion of CMC averaged 59.0 %. Protein utilization was effective on the CMC whey diet: 69.9 % of absorbed N was retained. Judging from the blood analyses, the CMC whey product did not have any detrimental effect on the metabolism or health of the pigs. The CMC whey product is well suited as a protein supplement in pig feeding because of its high contents of essential amino acids.

  18. Heat-induced whey protein isolate fibrils: Conversion, hydrolysis, and disulphide bond formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Vasbinder, A.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    Fibril formation of individual pure whey proteins and whey protein isolate (WPI) was studied. The heat-induced conversion of WPI monomers into fibrils at pH 2 and low ionic strength increased with heating time and protein concentration. Previous studies, using a precipitation method, size-exclusion

  19. Comparison of the aggregation behavior of soy and bovine whey protein hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, B.J.H.; Alting, A.C.; Gruppen, H.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Soy-derived proteins (soy protein isolate, glycinin, and ß-conglycinin) and bovine whey-derived proteins (whey protein isolate, ¿-lactalbumin, ß-lactoglobulin) were hydrolyzed using subtilisin Carlsberg, chymotrypsin, trypsin, bromelain, and papain. The (in)solubility of the hydrolysates

  20. Effect of different media on production of lactic acid from whey by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whey containing 50 g.l -1 lactose was fermented to lactic acid in batch process by Lactobacillus bulgaricus. The impact of 5 different media with change in volume percent of whey and nutrient was investigated at 32 ± 0.5°C. Substrate consumption and lactic acid production were determined at 0, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 h.

  1. Effect of Whey Beverage Fortified with Vitamin E on Quality of Life in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zahra sohrabi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whey protein can improve quality of life and vitamin E can reduce oxidative stress. Due to the reduced quality of life in hemodialysis patients, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of whey beverage fortified with vitamin E on quality of life in hemodialysis patients. Methods: Ninety two 17 to 65 years old patients who were on hemodialysis were randomly assigned to four groups of (i 1 receiving whey beverage fortified with vitamin E, (ii 2 receiving whey beverage, (iii 3 receiving vitamin E, and (iv 4 as the control group receiving no intervention. SF- 12 questionnaire was used for assessing quality of life in the participants. Results: Bodily pain score improved significantly in group 3 while, a significant decline was seen for bodily pain in control group. An improvement was seen in groups 1 and 2. Physical health showed a significant improvement in group 1. Considering social functioning scores, improvement in whey beverage and vitamin E groups was seen. An improvement of quality of life in whey beverage fortified with vitamin E was noticed. Conclusion: Whey protein and vitamin E were shown to reduce oxidative stress and their effect on neurotransmitters in brain such as serotonin and dopamine leads to improvement in quality of life in hemodialysis patients. Doing longer studies with questionnaires such as SF-36, may help precise investigation of whey protein and vitamin E effects on quality of life of hemodialysis patients.

  2. Ca2+-Induced Cold Set Gelation of Whey Protein Isolate Fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Hendrickx, H.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe the rheological behaviour of Ca2+-induced cold-set gels of whey protein mixtures. Coldset gels are important applications for products with a low thermal stability. In previous work [1], we determined the state diagram for whey protein mixtures that were heated for 10 h at

  3. Development of starch-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habeych Narvaez, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Starch-based materials show potential as fully degradable plastics. However, the current
    applicability of these materials is limited due to their poor moisture tolerance and
    mechanical properties. Starch is therefore frequently blended with other polymers to make
    the material more

  4. Antimicrobial nanostructured starch based films for packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Ana S; Oliveira, M; de Sá, Arsénio; Rodrigues, Rui M; Cerqueira, Miguel A; Vicente, António A; Machado, A V

    2015-09-20

    Montmorillonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt C30B/starch nanocomposite (C30B/ST-NC), silver nanoparticles/starch nanocomposite (Ag-NPs/ST-NC) and both silver nanoparticles/C30B/starch nanocomposites (Ag-NPs/C30B/ST-NC) films were produced. The nanoclay (C30B) was dispersed in a starch solution using an ultrasonic probe. Different concentrations of Ag-NPs (0.3, 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0mM) were synthesized directly in starch and in clay/starch solutions via chemical reduction method. Dispersion of C30B silicate layers and Ag-NPs in ST films characterized by X-ray and scanning electron microscopy showed that the presence of Ag-NPs enhanced clay dispersion. Color and opacity measurements, barrier properties (water vapor and oxygen permeabilities), dynamic mechanical analysis and contact angle were evaluated and related with the incorporation of C30B and Ag-NPs. Films presented antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans without significant differences between Ag-NPs concentrations. The migration of components from the nanostructured starch films, assessed by food contact tests, was minor and under the legal limits. These results indicated that the starch films incorporated with C30B and Ag-NPs have potential to be used as packaging nanostructured material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Semicontinuous saccharification of starch in alcohol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilyak, N.I.; Kaminskil, R.S.; Shvedov, A.D.

    1959-05-21

    The saccharification is accomplished with an enzyme preparation of Aspergillus oryzae. In the first stage, the starch is treated at 57 to 59/sup 0/ with a fermenting solution containing 1% enzyme based on the starch content. The second step is carried out in the fermenting solution containing 2.5% enzyme.

  6. Starch and cellulose nanocrystals together into thermoplastic starch bionanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Kizkitza; Retegi, Aloña; González, Alba; Eceiza, Arantxa; Gabilondo, Nagore

    2015-03-06

    In the present work, thermoplastic maize starch based bionanocomposites were prepared as transparent films, plasticized with 35% of glycerol and reinforced with both waxy starch (WSNC) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), previously extracted by acidic hydrolysis. The influence of the nanofiller content was evaluated at 1 wt.%, 2.5 wt.% and 5 wt.% of WSNC. The effect of adding the two different nanoparticles at 1 wt.% was also investigated. As determined by tensile measurements, mechanical properties were improved at any composition of WSNC. Water vapour permeance values maintained constant, whereas barrier properties to oxygen reduced in a 70%, indicating the effectiveness of hydrogen bonding at the interphase. The use of CNC or CNC and WSNC upgraded mechanical results, but no significant differences in barrier properties were obtained. A homogeneous distribution of the nanofillers was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy, and a shift of the two relaxation peaks to higher temperatures was detected by dynamic mechanical analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acetylation and characterization of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Pérez, L A; Contreras-Ramos, S M; Jìmenez-Aparicio, A; Paredes-López, O

    2000-01-01

    Banana native starch was acetylated and some of its functional properties were evaluated and compared to corn starch. In general, acetylated banana starch presented higher values in ash, protein and fat than corn acetylated starch. The modified starches had minor tendency to retrogradation assessed as % transmittance of starch pastes. At high temperature acetylated starches presented a water retention capacity similar to their native counterpart. The acetylation considerably increased the solubility of starches, and a similar behavior was found for swelling power. When freeze-thaw stability was studied, acetyl banana starch drained approximately 60% of water in the first and second cycles, but in the third and fourth cycles the percentage of separated water was low. However, acetyl corn starch showed lower freeze-thaw stability than the untreated sample. The modification increased the viscosity of banana starch pastes.

  8. Electrochemical measurement of tritium and hydrogen permeation through iron membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagi, Hideki; Hayashi, Yasunori

    1987-01-01

    Permeation rates of tritium and hydrogen through iron were measured by the electro-chemical method in which an aqueous solution containing 3.7 x 10 12 Bq/m 3 tritium was used as a cathodic electrolyte. Tritium and hydrogen were introduced from one side of a specimen by cathodic polarization with a constant current density, while at the other side of the specimen the permeated tritium and hydrogen were extracted by potentiostatical ionization. Nearly all of the potentiostatic current on the extraction side is produced by the ionization of hydrogen, because the concentration of tritium in the cathodic electrolyte is very small. The amount of permeated hydrogen was obtained by integrating the potentiostatic current, and that of permeated tritium was determined by measuring the radioactivity of the electrolyte sampled from the anodic side. The separation factor for permeation obtained under steady state conditions (the ratio of permeation rates of hydrogen to tritium divided by the ratio of the concentration of hydrogen to tritium in the cathodic electrolyte) is 12 at 288 K. This value is independent of cathodic current density. Diffusion coefficients of tritium (D T ) and hydrogen (D H ) in iron were determined from the tritium and hydrogen permeation by using time lag technique. For annealed iron at 286 K, D T = 9 x 10 -10 m 2 /s and D H = 4 x 10 -9 m 2 /s, and for 9 % cold-worked iron at 284 K, D T = 3 x 10 -10 m 2 /s and D H = 4 x 10 -10 m 2 /s. (author)

  9. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farup, Jean; Rahbek, S K; Vendelbo, M H

    2014-01-01

    In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD) or a carbohy......In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD...... or contraction mode effects. In conclusion, high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate augments muscle and tendon hypertrophy following 12 weeks of resistance training – irrespective of contraction mode....

  10. The effect of natural whey proteins on mechanisms of blood pressure regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Car

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Whey is a rich natural source of peptides and amino acids. It has been reported in numerous studies that biological active peptides isolated from cow’s milk whey may affect blood pressure regulation. Studies on animals and humans have shown that α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin obtained from enzymatically hydrolysed whey inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, while lactorphins lower blood pressure by normalizing endothelial function or by opioid receptors dependent mechanism. Whey proteins or their bioactive fragments decrease total cholesterol, LDL fraction and triglycerides, thus reducing the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this review is to discuss the effects of whey proteins on the mechanisms of blood pressure regulation.

  11. The functional and biological properties of whey proteins: prospects for the development of functional foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. T. KORHONEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in processing technologies and the accumulation of scientific data on the functional and biological properties of whey components have contributed to the growing commercial valuation of cheese whey over the last decade. New membrane separation and chromatographic techniques have made it possible to fractionate and enrich various components of whey more efficiently than before. The specific properties of these components can now be examined in greater detail and new applications developed accordingly. The utilisation of cheese whey is evolving into a new industry producing a multitude of purified ingredients for numerous purposes. The most significant areas of R&D related to whey proteins include functional foods, the rheological properties of foodstuffs, and biopharmaceuticals.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Whey N-Glycoproteins in Human Colostrum and Mature Milk Using Quantitative Glycoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xueyan; Song, Dahe; Yang, Mei; Yang, Ning; Ye, Qing; Tao, Dongbing; Liu, Biao; Wu, Rina; Yue, Xiqing

    2017-11-29

    Glycosylation is a ubiquitous post-translational protein modification that plays a substantial role in various processes. However, whey glycoproteins in human milk have not been completely profiled. Herein, we used quantitative glycoproteomics to quantify whey N-glycosylation sites and their alteration in human milk during lactation; 110 N-glycosylation sites on 63 proteins and 91 N-glycosylation sites on 53 proteins were quantified in colostrum and mature milk whey, respectively. Among these, 68 glycosylation sites on 38 proteins were differentially expressed in human colostrum and mature milk whey. These differentially expressed N-glycoproteins were highly enriched in "localization", "extracellular region part", and "modified amino acid binding" according to gene ontology annotation and mainly involved in complement and coagulation cascades pathway. These results shed light on the glycosylation sites, composition and biological functions of whey N-glycoproteins in human colostrum and mature milk, and provide substantial insight into the role of protein glycosylation during infant development.

  13. Cheese whey: A cost-effective alternative for hyaluronic acid production by Streptococcus zooepidemicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Isabel R; Vázquez, José A; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Teixeira, José A

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the optimisation of cheese whey formulated media for the production of hyaluronic acid (HA) by Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Culture media containing whey (W; 2.1g/L) or whey hydrolysate (WH; 2.4 g/L) gave the highest HA productions. Both W and WH produced high yields on protein consumed, suggesting cheese whey is a good nitrogen source for S. zooepidemicus production of HA. Polysaccharide concentrations of 4.0 g/L and 3.2g/L were produced in W and WH in a further scale-up to 5L bioreactors, confirming the suitability of the low-cost nitrogen source. Cheese whey culture media provided high molecular weight (>3000 kDa) HA products. This study revealed replacing the commercial peptone by the low-cost alternative could reduce HA production costs by up to a 70% compared to synthetic media. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of gamma radiation effects on natural corn and potato starches and modified cassava starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Bruna S.; Garcia, Rafael H. L.; Takinami, Patricia Y. I.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of irradiation treatment on physicochemical properties of three natural polymers, i.e. native potato and corn starches and a typical Brazilian product, cassava starch modified through fermentation -sour cassava- and also to prepare composite hydrocolloid films based on them. Starches were irradiated in a 60Co irradiation chamber in doses up to 15 kGy, dose rate about 1 kGy/h. Differences were found in granule size distribution upon irradiation, mainly for corn and cassava starch but radiation did not cause significant changes in granule morphology. The viscosity of the potato, corn and cassava starches hydrogels decreased as a function of absorbed dose. Comparing non-irradiated and irradiated starches, changes in the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra in the 2000-1500 cm-1 region for potato and corn starches were observed but not for the cassava starch. Maximum rupture force of the starch-based films was affected differently for each starch type; color analysis showed that doses of 15 kGy promoted a slight rise in the parameter b* (yellow color) while the parameter L* (lightness) was not significantly affected; X-ray diffraction patterns remained almost unchanged by irradiation.

  15. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mößeler, Anne; Vagt, Sandra; Beyerbach, Martin; Kamphues, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n = 3) or without (n = 3) pancreatic duct ligation (PL) were used to estimate the rate of praecaecal disappearance (pcD) of starch. Different botanical sources of starch (rice, amaranth, potato, and pea) were fed either raw or cooked. In the controls (C), there was an almost complete pcD (>92%) except for potato starch (61.5%) which was significantly lower. In PL pcD of raw starch was significantly lower for all sources of starch except for amaranth (87.9%). Thermal processing increased pcD in PL, reaching values of C for starch from rice, potato, and pea. This study clearly underlines the need for precise specification of starch used for patients with specific dietetic needs like PEI. Data should be generated in suitable animal models or patients as tests in healthy individuals would not have given similar conclusions.

  16. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mößeler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI, enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n=3 or without (n=3 pancreatic duct ligation (PL were used to estimate the rate of praecaecal disappearance (pcD of starch. Different botanical sources of starch (rice, amaranth, potato, and pea were fed either raw or cooked. In the controls (C, there was an almost complete pcD (>92% except for potato starch (61.5% which was significantly lower. In PL pcD of raw starch was significantly lower for all sources of starch except for amaranth (87.9%. Thermal processing increased pcD in PL, reaching values of C for starch from rice, potato, and pea. This study clearly underlines the need for precise specification of starch used for patients with specific dietetic needs like PEI. Data should be generated in suitable animal models or patients as tests in healthy individuals would not have given similar conclusions.

  17. Hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Hankins, M.R.; Longhurst, G.R.; Neiser, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Tungsten has been proposed as a plasma-facing component material for advanced fusion facilities. This paper reports on laboratory-scale studies that were done to assess the hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten for such applications. The work entailed deuterium permeation measurements for plasma-sprayed (PS) tungsten coatings, sputter-deposited (SP) tungsten coatings, and steel substrate material using a mass-analyzed, 3 keV D + 3 ion beam with fluxes of similar 6.5x10 19 D/m 2 s. Extensive characterization analyses for the plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings were made using Auger spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Observed permeation rates through composite PS-tungsten/steel specimens were several orders of magnitude below the permeation levels observed for SP-tungsten/steel composite specimens and pure steel specimens. Characterization analyses indicated that the plasma-sprayed tungsten coating had a nonhomogeneous microstructure that consisted of splats with columnar solidification, partially-melted particles with grain boundaries, and void regions. Reduced permeation levels can be attributed to the complex microstructure and a substantial surface-connected porosity. ((orig.))

  18. Hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Pawelko, R.J. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Hankins, M.R. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Longhurst, G.R. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Neiser, R.A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States))

    1994-09-01

    Tungsten has been proposed as a plasma-facing component material for advanced fusion facilities. This paper reports on laboratory-scale studies that were done to assess the hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten for such applications. The work entailed deuterium permeation measurements for plasma-sprayed (PS) tungsten coatings, sputter-deposited (SP) tungsten coatings, and steel substrate material using a mass-analyzed, 3 keV D[sup +][sub 3] ion beam with fluxes of similar 6.5x10[sup 19] D/m[sup 2] s. Extensive characterization analyses for the plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings were made using Auger spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Observed permeation rates through composite PS-tungsten/steel specimens were several orders of magnitude below the permeation levels observed for SP-tungsten/steel composite specimens and pure steel specimens. Characterization analyses indicated that the plasma-sprayed tungsten coating had a nonhomogeneous microstructure that consisted of splats with columnar solidification, partially-melted particles with grain boundaries, and void regions. Reduced permeation levels can be attributed to the complex microstructure and a substantial surface-connected porosity. ((orig.))

  19. Hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, R. A.; Pawelko, R. J.; Hankins, M. R.; Longhurst, G. R.; Neiser, R. A.

    1994-09-01

    Tungsten has been proposed as a plasma-facing component material for advanced fusion facilities. This paper reports on laboratory-scale studies that were done to assess the hydrogen permeation properties of plasma-sprayed tungsten for such applications. The work entailed deuterium permeation measurements for plasma-sprayed (PS) tungsten coatings, sputter-deposited (SP) tungsten coatings, and steel substrate material using a mass-analyzed, 3 keV D 3+ ion beam with fluxes of ˜6.5 × 10 19 D/m 2 s. Extensive characterization analyses for the plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings were made using Auger spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Observed permeation rates through composite PS-tungsten/steel specimens were several orders of magnitude below the permeation levels observed for SP-tungsten/steel composite specimens and pure steel specimens. Characterization analyses indicated that the plasma-sprayed tungsten coating had a nonhomogeneous microstructure that consisted of splats with columnar solidification, partially-melted particles with grain boundaries, and void regions. Reduced permeation levels can be attributed to the complex microstructure and a substantial surface-connected porosity.

  20. Drug Release and Skin Permeation from Lipid Liquid Crystalline Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Balogh, F. O.; Sparr, E.; Sousa, J. J. S.; Pais, A. A. C. C.

    We have studied drug release and skin permeation from several different liquid crystalline lipid formulations that may be used to control the respective release rates. We have studied the release and permeation through human skin of a water-soluble and amphiphilic drug, propranolol hydrochloride, from several formulations prepared with monoolein and phytantriol as permeation enhancers and controlled release excipients. Diolein and cineol were added to selected formulations. We observed that viscosity decreases with drug load, wich is compatible with the occurrence of phase changes. Diolein stabilizes the bicontinuous cubic phases leading to an increase in viscosity and sustained release of the drug. The slowest release was found for the cubic phases with higher viscosity. Studies on skin permeation showed that these latter formulations also presented lower permeability than the less viscous monoolein lamellar phases. Formulations containing cineol originated higher permeability with higher enhancement ratios. Thus, the various formulations are adapted to different circumstances and delivery routes. While a slow release is usually desired for drug sustained delivery, the transdermal route may require a faster release. Lamellar phases, which are less viscous, are more adapted to transdermal applications. Thus, systems involving lamellar phases of monoolein and cineol are good candidates to be used as skin permeation enhancers for propranolol hydrochloride.

  1. Recent developments in skin mimic systems to predict transdermal permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Laura J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a drive to create experimental techniques that can facilitate the accurate and precise prediction of transdermal permeation without the use of in vivo studies. This review considers why permeation data is essential, provides a brief summary as to how skin acts as a natural barrier to permeation and discusses why in vivo studies are undesirable. This is followed by an in-depth discussion on the extensive range of alternative methods that have been developed in recent years. All of the major 'skin mimic systems' are considered including: in vitro models using synthetic membranes, mathematical models including quantitative structure-permeability relationships (QSPRs), human skin equivalents and chromatographic based methods. All of these model based systems are ideally trying to achieve the same end-point, namely a reliable in vitro-in vivo correlation, i.e. matching non-in vivo obtained data with that from human clinical trials. It is only by achieving this aim, that any new method of obtaining permeation data can be acknowledged as a potential replacement for animal studies, for the determination of transdermal permeation. In this review, the relevance and potential applicability of the various models systems will also be discussed.

  2. Permeation of cytotoxic formulations through swatches from selected medical gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael; Lambov, Nikolai; Samev, Nikola; Carstens, Gerhard

    2003-05-15

    The permeability of selected medical glove materials to various cytotoxic agents is described. Fifteen cytotoxic agents were prepared at the highest concentrations normally encountered by hospital personnel. Four single-layer and two double-layer glove systems made of two materials--latex and neoprene--were exposed to the drugs for 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 minutes. Circular sections of the glove material were cut from the cuff and evaluated without any pretreatment. Permeability tests were conducted in an apparatus consisting of a donor chamber containing the cytotoxic solution and a collection chamber filled with water (the acceptor medium). The two sections were separated by the glove material. Permeating portions, collected in water as the acceptor medium, were analyzed by either ultraviolet-visible light spectrophotometry or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Permeation rates were calculated on the basis of the concentration of the cytotoxic agent in the acceptor medium. Spectrophotometric measurements were taken every 30 minutes, and HPLC analysis was performed at the end of the three-hour period. Average permeation rates for 14 drugs were low (materials. All glove materials tested were impermeable to most of the cytotoxic agents over a period of three hours. Carmustine was the only agent that substantially permeated single-layer latex glove materials. Permeation of most tested cytotoxic formulations was low through swatches of material from various medical gloves.

  3. A comparative study of the physicochemical properties of starches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some properties of starches from cassava, potato and sweet potato were compared with cereal starches from maize, wheat, millet and sorghum. The aim was to determine the properties of tuber and root crop starches and compare them with cereal starches in addition to unravelling the potential of commonly grown ...

  4. Casein addition to a whey-based formula has limited effects on gut function in preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymann, T.; Støy, Ann Cathrine Findal; Bering, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Preterm infants are susceptible to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Using preterm pigs, we determined whether a whey–casein-based formula would be superior to a formula based on whey protein alone. Twenty cesarean-derived preterm pigs (92% gestation) were given total parenteral nutrition for 36 h...... followed by 30 h of enteral feeding with whey [protein fraction of milk formula based on whey (WHEY); n = 11] or casein and/or whey [protein fraction of milk formula based on a combination of casein and whey (CASEIN); n = 9]-based formulas. Sugar absorptive function was investigated at 6 and 30 h after...... studied in gut contents. Severity of NEC lesions was similar between diet groups but galactose absorption was markedly higher in CASEIN than in WHEY (P

  5. Whey protein reduces early life weight gain in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt Tranberg

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies indicate that dairy products, including whey protein, alleviate several disorders of the metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigated the effects of whey protein isolate (whey in mice fed a high-fat diet hypothesising that the metabolic effects of whey would be associated with changes in the gut microbiota composition. Five-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet ad libitum for 14 weeks with the protein source being either whey or casein. Faeces were collected at week 0, 7, and 13 and the fecal microbiota was analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses of PCR-derived 16S rRNA gene (V3-region amplicons. At the end of the study, plasma samples were collected and assayed for glucose, insulin and lipids. Whey significantly reduced body weight gain during the first four weeks of the study compared with casein (P<0.001-0.05. Hereafter weight gain was similar resulting in a 15% lower final body weight in the whey group relative to casein (34.0±1.0 g vs. 40.2±1.3 g, P<0.001. Food intake was unaffected by protein source throughout the study period. Fasting insulin was lower in the whey group (P<0.01 and glucose clearance was improved after an oral glucose challenge (P<0.05. Plasma cholesterol was lowered by whey compared to casein (P<0.001. The composition of the fecal microbiota differed between high- and low-fat groups at 13 weeks (P<0.05 whereas no difference was seen between whey and casein. In conclusion, whey initially reduced weight gain in young C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet compared to casein. Although the effect on weight gain ceased, whey alleviated glucose intolerance, improved insulin sensitivity and reduced plasma cholesterol. These findings could not be explained by changes in food intake or gut microbiota composition. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms behind the metabolic effects of whey.

  6. Plant-crafted starches for bioplastics production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnelli, Domenico; Hebelstrup, Kim H; Leroy, Eric; Rolland-Sabaté, Agnès; Guilois, Sophie; Kirkensgaard, Jacob J K; Mortensen, Kell; Lourdin, Denis; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-11-05

    Transgenically-produced amylose-only (AO) starch was used to manufacture bioplastic prototypes. Extruded starch samples were tested for crystal residues, elasticity, glass transition temperature, mechanical properties, molecular mass and microstructure. The AO starch granule crystallinity was both of the B- and Vh-type, while the isogenic control starch was mainly A-type. The first of three endothermic transitions was attributed to gelatinization at about 60°C. The second and third peaks were identified as melting of the starch and amylose-lipid complexes, respectively. After extrusion, the AO samples displayed Vh- and B-type crystalline structures, the B-type polymorph being the dominant one. The AO prototypes demonstrated a 6-fold higher mechanical stress at break and 2.5-fold higher strain at break compared to control starch. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed a significant increase in the storage modulus (E') for AO samples compared to the control. The data support the use of pure starch-based bioplastics devoid of non-polysaccharide fillers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Barrier, mechanical and optical properties of whey protein concentrate films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Machado Azevedo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Whey is recognized as a valuable source of high quality protein and, when processed as protein concentrate, may be used in the production of biodegradable films. The objective of the study was to develop films of whey protein concentrate 80% (WPC at concentrations of 6, 8, 10 and 12% and evaluate the influence of this factor in the barrier, mechanical and optical properties of the films. Treatments showed moisture content with a mean value of 22.10% ± 0.76and high solubility values between 56.67 to 62.42%. Thus, there is little or no influence of varying the concentration of WPC in these properties and high hydrophilicity of the films. With increasing concentration of WPC, increases the water vapor permeability of the films (7.42 x 10-13 to 3.49 x 10-12 g.m-1.s-1.Pa-1. The treatment at the concentration of 6% of WPC showed a higher modulus of elasticity (287.90 ± 41.79 MPa. Thegreater rigidity in films with higher concentrations is possibly due to the greater number of bonds between molecules of the polymeric matrix. The films have the same puncture resistance. The increased concentration of WPC promotes resistance to the action of a localized force. In general, films of whey protein concentrate in the tested concentrations exhibited slightly yellowish color and transparency, and can be used in food packaging that requiring intermediate permeability to water vapor, to keep moisture and texture desired.

  8. Whey utilization for single-cell protein production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barraquio, V; Silverio, L G; Revilleza, R P; Fernadez, W L

    1980-01-01

    The production of single-cell protein by yeast assimilation of lactose in soft cheese whey was studied using Candida pseudotropicalis as a test organism. Under shake-flask cultivation conditions with deproteinized whey as the medium, lactose (initially 4.20%) was completely assimilated in 48h; cell mass was 5.56 mg/mL after 72h; and average protein content of the dried mass was approximately 11.8%. Batch cultivation using undeproteinized whey resulted in a faster lactose utilization rate from an initial 3.93% to a residual 0.56% in 12 h; cell mass was 8.41 mg/mL in 10 h; and average protein was approximately 37.7%. In a semicontinuous culture with 10 to the power of 7 viable cells/mL as initial cell concentration, 15.69 mg/mL cell mass with a mean protein content of approximately 21.4% could be produced and lactose could be considerably consumed (from an initial 4.75% to a residual 0.42%) within 13-14 h. Supplementation with (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/S0/sub 4/ and KH/sub 2/P0/sub 4/ did not increase cell mass (12.47 mg/mL in 12 h) and hasten lactose assimulation (from initial 4.49% to residual 0.3% in 12 h). Average protein content was approximately 31%. Cell mass yield was established as 0.29 mg yeast cell/mg lactose consumed. Factors that might have affected protein content are also discussed.

  9. Double electrolyte sensor for monitoring hydrogen permeation rate in steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, Y.J. [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huaihua College, Huaihua 418008 (China); Yu, G., E-mail: yuganghnu@163.co [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Ou, A.L.; Hu, L.; Xu, W.J. [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} Designed an amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes. {yields} Explained the principle of determining hydrogen permeation rate. {yields} Verified good stability, reproducibility and correctness of the developed sensor. {yields} Field on-line monitoring the susceptivity of hydrogen induced cracks. - Abstract: An amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes composed of a gelatiniform electrolyte and KOH solution has been developed to determine the permeation rate of hydrogen atoms in steel equipment owing to hydrogen corrosion. The gelatiniform electrolyte was made of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS), carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) and 0.2 mol dm{sup -3} KOH solution. The results show that the gelatiniform electrolyte containing 50 wt.% polymers has suitable viscosity and high electrical conductivity. The consistent permeation curves were detected by the sensor of the double electrolyte and single liquid KOH electrolyte, respectively. The developed sensor has good stability and reproducibility at room temperature.

  10. Deuterium permeation and diffusion in high-purity beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, E.; Riehm, M.P.; Thompson, D.A.; Smeltzer, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    The permeation rate of deuterium through high-purity beryllium membranes was measured using the gas-driven permeation technique. The time-dependent and the steady-state deuterium flux data were analyzed and the effective diffusivities of the samples were determined. Using multilayer permeation theory the effects of surface oxide were eliminated and the diffusion coefficients of the bulk beryllium determined. The diffusion parameters obtained for the extra-grade beryllium samples (99.8%) are D 0 =6.7x10 -9 m 2 /s and E D =28.4 kJ/mol. For the high-grade beryllium samples (99%) the parameters are D 0 =8.0x10 -9 m 2 /s and E D =35.1 kJ/mol. (orig.)

  11. Deuterium permeation and diffusion in high purity beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, E.

    1990-05-01

    The permeation rate of deuterium through high-purity beryllium membranes was measured using the gas-driven permeation technique. The time-dependent and the steady-state deuterium flux data were analyzed and the effective diffusivities of the samples were determined. A multilayer permeation theory was used in order to eliminate the surface oxide effects and the diffusion coefficients of the bulk beryllium were determined. The diffusion parameters obtained for the extra-grade beryllium samples (99.8%) are D 0 = 6.7 x 10 -9 [m 2 /s] and E D = 28.4 [KJ/mol]; and for the high-grade beryllium samples (99%) the parameters are D 0 = 8.0 x 10 -9 [m 2 /s] and E D = 35.1 [KJ/mol

  12. Double electrolyte sensor for monitoring hydrogen permeation rate in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Y.J.; Yu, G.; Ou, A.L.; Hu, L.; Xu, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Designed an amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes. → Explained the principle of determining hydrogen permeation rate. → Verified good stability, reproducibility and correctness of the developed sensor. → Field on-line monitoring the susceptivity of hydrogen induced cracks. - Abstract: An amperometric hydrogen sensor with double electrolytes composed of a gelatiniform electrolyte and KOH solution has been developed to determine the permeation rate of hydrogen atoms in steel equipment owing to hydrogen corrosion. The gelatiniform electrolyte was made of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS), carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) and 0.2 mol dm -3 KOH solution. The results show that the gelatiniform electrolyte containing 50 wt.% polymers has suitable viscosity and high electrical conductivity. The consistent permeation curves were detected by the sensor of the double electrolyte and single liquid KOH electrolyte, respectively. The developed sensor has good stability and reproducibility at room temperature.

  13. Control of tritium permeation through fusion reactor strucural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to provide a brief synopsis of the status of understanding and technology pertaining to the dissolution and permeation of tritium in fusion reactor materials. The following sections of this paper attempt to develop a simple perspective for understanding the consequences of these phenomena and the nature of the technical methodology being contemplated to control their impact on fusion reactor operation. Considered in order are: (1) the occurrence of tritium in the fusion fuel cycle, (2) a set of tentative criteria to guide the analysis of tritium containment and control strategies, (3) the basic mechanisms by which tritium may be released from a fusion plant, and (4) the methods currently under development to control the permeation-related release mechanisms. To provide background and support for these considerations, existing solubility and permeation data for the hydrogen isotopes are compared and correlated under conditions to be expected in fusion reactor systems

  14. Permeation of "Hydromer" Film: An Elastomeric Hydrogen-Capturing Biopolymer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnesky, Richard A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Friddle, Raymond William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Whaley, Josh A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, Geoffrey [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This report analyzes the permeation resistance of a novel and proprietary polymer coating for hydrogen isotope resistance that was developed by New Mexico State University. Thermal gravimetric analysis and thermal desoprtion spectroscopy show the polymer is stable thermally to approximately 250 deg C. Deuterium gas-driven permeation experiments were conducted at Sandia to explore early evidence (obtained using Brunauer - Emmett - Teller) of the polymer's strong resistance to hydrogen. With a relatively small amount of the polymer in solution (0.15%), a decrease in diffusion by a factor of 2 is observed at 100 and 150 deg C. While there was very little reduction in permeability, the preliminary findings reported here are meant to demonstrate the sensitivity of Sandia's permeation measurements and are intended to motivate the future exploration of thicker barriers with greater polymer coverage.

  15. The formation of tritium permeation barriers by CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forcey, K.S.; Perujo, A.; Reiter, F.; Lolli-Ceroni, P.L.

    1993-01-01

    The effectiveness as permeation barriers of the following CVD coatings have been investigated: TiC (1 to 2 μm in thickness); a bi-layer of TiN on TiC (3 μm total thickness) and CVD Al 2 O 3 on a TiN/TiC bi-layer. The substrate materials were TZM (a Mo alloy) and 316L stainless steel in the form of discs of diameter 48 mm and thickness 0.1 or 1 mm. Permeation measurements were performed in the temperature range 515-742 K using deuterium at pressures in the range 1-50 kPa. CVD layers were shown to form reasonably effective permeation barriers. At a temperature of 673 K TiC is around 6000 times less permeable to deuterium than 316L stainless steel. (orig.)

  16. Ion-driven deuterium permeation through tungsten at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Yu. M.; Golubeva, A. V.; Mayer, M.; Pisarev, A. A.; Roth, J.

    2009-06-01

    The ion-driven permeation (IDP) through 50 μm thick pure tungsten foils was measured in the temperature range of 823-923 K during irradiation by 200 eV/D + ion beam with a flux of 10 17-10 18 D/m 2s. Gas driven permeation (GDP) from the deuterium background gas was observed as well. Calculations using both the analytical formula for the diffusion limited regime (DLR) and the TMAP 7 code gave good agreement with the experimental data. Defects with a detrapping energy of (2.05 ± 0.15) eV were found to limit the permeation lag time in our experimental conditions.

  17. Ion-driven deuterium permeation through tungsten at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparyan, Yu.M., E-mail: yury.gasparyan@ipp.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Golubeva, A.V. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Ac. Kurchatov sq., 1/1, Moscow RU-123182 (Russian Federation); Mayer, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pisarev, A.A. [Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Roth, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmanstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The ion-driven permeation (IDP) through 50 mum thick pure tungsten foils was measured in the temperature range of 823-923 K during irradiation by 200 eV/D{sup +} ion beam with a flux of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} D/m{sup 2}s. Gas driven permeation (GDP) from the deuterium background gas was observed as well. Calculations using both the analytical formula for the diffusion limited regime (DLR) and the TMAP 7 code gave good agreement with the experimental data. Defects with a detrapping energy of (2.05 +- 0.15) eV were found to limit the permeation lag time in our experimental conditions.

  18. Ion-driven deuterium permeation through tungsten at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparyan, Yu.M.; Golubeva, A.V.; Mayer, M.; Pisarev, A.A.; Roth, J.

    2009-01-01

    The ion-driven permeation (IDP) through 50 μm thick pure tungsten foils was measured in the temperature range of 823-923 K during irradiation by 200 eV/D + ion beam with a flux of 10 17 -10 18 D/m 2 s. Gas driven permeation (GDP) from the deuterium background gas was observed as well. Calculations using both the analytical formula for the diffusion limited regime (DLR) and the TMAP 7 code gave good agreement with the experimental data. Defects with a detrapping energy of (2.05 ± 0.15) eV were found to limit the permeation lag time in our experimental conditions.

  19. Reduced starch granule number per chloroplast in the dpe2/phs1 mutant is dependent on initiation of starch degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Irina; Fettke, Joerg

    2017-01-01

    An Arabidopsis double knock-out mutant lacking cytosolic disproportionating enzyme 2 (DPE2) and the plastidial phosphorylase (PHS1) revealed a dwarf-growth phenotype, reduced starch content, an uneven distribution of starch within the plant rosette, and a reduced number of starch granules per chloroplast under standard growth conditions. In contrast, the wild type contained 5-7 starch granules per chloroplast. Mature and old leaves of the double mutant were essentially starch free and showed plastidial disintegration. Several analyses revealed that the number of starch granules per chloroplast was affected by the dark phase. So far, it was unclear if it was the dark phase per se or starch degradation in the dark that was connected to the observed decrease in the number of starch granules per chloroplast. Therefore, in the background of the double mutant dpe2/phs1, a triple mutant was generated lacking the initial starch degrading enzyme glucan, water dikinase (GWD). The triple mutant showed improved plant growth, a starch-excess phenotype, and a homogeneous starch distribution. Furthermore, the number of starch granules per chloroplast was increased and was similar to wild type. However, starch granule morphology was only slightly affected by the lack of GWD as in the triple mutant and, like in dpe2/phs1, more spherical starch granules were observed. The characterized triple mutant was discussed in the context of the generation of starch granules and the formation of starch granule morphology.

  20. Process for the separation of proteins from acid whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabel, B

    1980-01-01

    Acid whey from cheese or casein manufacture (pH less than 4.6) and containing about 5.2 g protein/l is passed through a cation exchange resin (of silica coated with a copolymer of styrene/vinyltriethoxysilane carrying SO/sub 3/H functional groups). The proteins adsorbed on the resin (alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, serum albumin and immunoglobulins) are eluated with an 0.1 M ammonia solution, concentrated under vacuum and freeze-dried, obtaining a final product with 88% undenatured protein. The products are for use in the food and pharmaceutical industries and for dietetic and veterinary purposes.

  1. Production of yeast extract from whey using Kluyveromyces marxianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revillion Jean P. de Palma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556 was grown on whey to produce nucleotide-rich yeast extracts. Thermal treatments of cells at 35 or 50ºC for 15-30h resulted in yeast extracts containing about 20 g/L protein, with only the second treatment resulting in the presence of small amounts of RNA. In contrast, autolysis in buffered solution was the unique treatment that resulted in release of high amounts of intracellular RNA, being, therefore, the better procedure to produce 5'-nucletide rich extract with K. marxianus.

  2. Biomethanation of salty cheese whey using multichamber anaerobic bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Chirag; Madamwar, Datta [Sardar Patel Univ., Gujarat (India)

    1998-07-01

    To obtain enriched methane content and improve anaerobic digestion of salty cheese whey after diluting with total dairy waste water, a multichamber anaerobic bioreactor has been developed using different combination of bedding materials in different chambers. Best performance has been obtained at 37''oC under the combination of polystyrene chips, pumice stones and PVC beads as supporting materials, and operating at 2 day hydraulic retention time. Maximum gas production of 3.2 litre/litre of digester/day with methane content of 68% and 83% reduction in COD have been noticed. (Author)

  3. Features of the compost received by use of dairy whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Smolnikova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article features cjmposting of organic materials are considered at use of a traditional way and fermenting additives. Indicators of quality of the composts received with the use of dairy whey and a bacterial preparation as the fermenting additive are investigated. Comparison of the received samples of composts on such indicators of quality as is spent: humidity, acidity, the maintenance of organic substance in recalculation on dry weight, quantity of the general and fmmonium nitrogen.

  4. Electrochemical measurement of tritium and hydrogen permeation through iron membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagi, Hideki; Hayashi, Yasunori

    1988-01-01

    Permeation rates of tritium and hydrogen through iron were measured by the electrochemical method in which an aqueous solution containing 3.7 x 10 12 Bq/m 3 tritium was used as a cathodic electrolyte. Tritium and hydrogen were introduced from one side of a specimen by cathodic polarization with a constant current density, while at the other side of the specimen the permeated tritium and hydrogen were extracted by potentiostatical ionization. Nearly all of the potentiostatic current of the extraction side stands for the ionization of hydrogen, because the concentration of tritium in the cathodic electrolyte is very small. The amount of permeated hydrogen was obtained by integrating the anodic current, and that of tritium was determined by measuring the radioactivity of the electrolyte sampled from the extraction side. The separation factor for permeation obtained under steady state conditions (the ratio of permeation rates of hydrogen to tritium divided by the ratio of the concentration of hydrogen to tritium in the charging electrolyte) is 12 at 288 K. This value is independent of cathodic current density. Diffusion coefficients of tritium (D T ) and hydrogen (D H ) in iron were determined from the time lag of tritium and hydrogen permeation. For annealed specimens at 286 K, D T = 9 x 10 -10 m 2 /s and D H = 4 x 10 -9 m 2 /s, and for 9% cold-worked specimens at 284 K, D T = 3 x 10 -10 m 2 /s and D H = 4 x 10 -10 m 2 /s. (author)

  5. Tritium inventory and permeation in the ITER breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violante, V.; Tosti, S.; Sibilia, C.; Felli, F.; Casadio, S.; Alvani, C.

    2000-01-01

    A model has allowed us to perform the analysis of the tritium inventory and permeation in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) breeding blanket under the hypothesis of steady state conditions. Li 2 ZrO 3 (reference) and Li 2 TiO 3 (alternative) have been studied as breeding materials. The total breeder inventory assessed is 7.64 g for the Li 2 ZrO 3 at reference temperature. The model has also been used for a parametric analysis of the tritium permeation. At reference temperature and purge helium velocity of 0.01 m/s, the HT partial pressure is ranging from 10 to 30 Pa in the breeder and 1.5x10 -3 Pa in the beryllium. At 0.1 m/s of purge helium velocity, the HT partial pressure is reduced of one order by magnitude in the breeder and becomes 5x10 -5 Pa in the beryllium. The tritium permeation into the coolant for the whole blanket is ranging from 100 to 250 mCi per day for purge helium velocity of 0.01 m/s. The analysis of the tritium inventory and permeation for the alternative Li 2 TiO 3 breeding material has been carried out too. The tritium inventory in the breeder is in the range from 6 to 375 g larger than in Li 2 ZrO 3 by about a factor 5; the tritium permeation into coolant is comparable to the Li 2 ZrO 3 one. This analysis provides indications on the influence of the operating parameters on the tritium control in the ITER breeding blanket; particularly the control of the tritium inventory by the temperature and the tritium permeation by the purge gas velocity

  6. Implantation measurements to determine tritium permeation in first wall structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Causey, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A principal safety concern for a D-T burning fusion reactor is release of tritium during routine operation. Tritium implantation into first wall structures, and subsequent permeation into coolants, is potentially an important source of tritium loss. This paper reports on an experiment in which an ion accelerator was used to implant deuterium atoms in a stainless steel disk to simulate tritium implantation in first wall structures. The permeation rate was measured under various operating conditions. These results were used in the TMAP computer code to determine potential tritium loss rates for fusion reactors

  7. Permeation Barrier Coatings for the Helical Heat Exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korinko, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    A permeation barrier coating was specified for the Helical Heat Exchanger (HHE) to minimize contamination through emissions and/or permeation into the nitrogen system for ALARA reasons. Due to the geometry of the HHE, a special coating practice was needed since the conventional method of high temperature pack aluminization was intractable. A survey of many coating companies was undertaken; their coating capabilities and technologies were assessed and compared to WSRC needs. The processes and limitations to coating the HHE are described. Slurry coating appears to be the most technically sound approach for coating the HHE

  8. TECHNOLOGY OF THERMOPLASTIC STARCH PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Lukin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the manufacturing of bio-recyclable polymer products, which production and consumption has become an efficient way to protect environment from solid wastes in different countries of the world. The issue of environmental protection becomes global and the rapid growth of synthetic plastics application in many industries is a serious concern. There is a important task to improve the quality, safety and durability of products as well as their utilization after the expiration period. One of the most acceptable ways to solve these issues is to produce biodegradable materials based on natural materials, which are not harmful for environment and human health. A very common and effective method to give biological degradability to synthetic polymers is to insert starch into polymer composition in combination with other ingredients.

  9. Effect of Incubation Time and Sucrose Addition on the Characteristics of Cheese Whey Yoghurt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhartadi, E.; Utami, R.; Nursiwi, A.; Sari, A. M.; Widowati, E.; Sanjaya, A. P.; Esnadewi, E. A.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of incubation time and concentration of sucrose addition on the characteristics of cheese whey yogurt (lactic acid content, pH, total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, viscosity) and sensory characteristics (color, odor, flavor, consistency, and overalls) were investigated. The cheese whey yogurt fermentation process was carried out for 24h and 36h with the addition of sucrose 8, 10, and 12% (w/w) of total solid, respectively. The results showed that the lactic acid content, total lactic acid bacteria, antioxidant activity, and viscosity of cheese whey yogurt were affected by the incubation time and sucrose addition. The level of pH of yogurt which was incubated at 24h and 36h were relatively in the same levels, which were 4.51 up to 4.63. Due the sensory characteristic of cheese whey yogurt the panellists gave the high score for the cheese whey yogurt which was incubated at 24h and sucrose addition 12% (w/w) of total solid. The cheese whey yogurt has 0.41% lactic acid content; pH 4.51; 7.09 log total lactic acid bacteria cells / ml; 5.78% antioxidant activity; and 5.97 cP viscosity. The best sensory and physico-chemical characteristic of cheese whey yogurt was achieved by 24h incubation time and 12% concentration of sucrose addition.

  10. The use of acid whey for the production of yogurt-type fermented beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Skryplonek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid whey is a by-product of cheese-making industry, which, in comparison to rennet whey, has less favourable processing properties and thus it is more difficult to utilize. The aim of the study was to evaluate the quality of yogurt-type fermented beverages based on acid whey. In the beverages production yogurt bacteria cultures Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbruecki ssp. bulgaricus (YO-MIX, Danisco, Denmark were used. The production process included combining of pasteurized acid whey with UHT milk, unsweetened condensed milk or skimmed milk powder. Milk was incorporated to beverages in order to enrich casein content and obtain product with quality characteristics similar to fermented milk drinks. Moreover, the beverages were supplemented with oligofructose and whey protein concentrate WPC 35. The products were stored under refrigerated conditions (5±1°C for 21 days. During the storage, an assessment of physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics was carried out. In addition, the beverages were evaluated in consumer preference test. The study showed, that by combining of acid whey with milk it is possible to obtain a products similar to yogurt, although their characteristics were influenced by the composition and storage time. During storage period, the acidity increased and acetaldehyde content decreased. Moreover the deterioration of sensory properties was observed. Consumer preference test indicated, that the best sensory properties had beverages from whey and condensed milk.

  11. Quantitative proteomic analysis of whey proteins in the colostrum and mature milk of yak (Bos grunniens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongxin; Zhao, Xiaowei; Yu, Shumin; Cao, Suizhong

    2015-02-01

    Yak (Bos grunniens) is an important natural resource in mountainous regions. To date, few studies have addressed the differences in the protein profiles of yak colostrum and milk. We used quantitative proteomics to compare the protein profiles of whey from yak colostrum and milk. Milk samples were collected from 21 yaks after calving (1 and 28 d). Whey protein profiles were generated through isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-labelled proteomics. We identified 183 proteins in milk whey; of these, the expression levels of 86 proteins differed significantly between the whey from colostrum and milk. Haemoglobin expression showed the greatest change; its levels were significantly higher in the whey from colostrum than in mature milk whey. Functional analysis revealed that many of the differentially expressed proteins were associated with biological regulation and response to stimuli. Further, eight differentially expressed proteins involved in the complement and coagulation cascade pathway were enriched in milk whey. These findings add to the general understanding of the protein composition of yak milk, suggest potential functions of the differentially expressed proteins, and provide novel information on the role of colostral components in calf survival. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Whey as a raw material for the production of functional beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulatović Maja Lj.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the least utilized by-products of food industry, despite the great potential that is described, is the whey, which is obtained as a by-product of the technological process production of cheese and casein. The excess whey, which occurs in this process in very high yields, with failure to processing is becoming a very big polluter, what is completely at odds with the potential that such materials possess. On the other hand, the modern tempo and way of life, and increasingly polluted environmental also, impose the need to produce food products that would help the human body in the fight against harmful agents which are exposed to daily. One of the more effective solution is the production of fermented functional beverages based on whey, which achieved this intention in the most natural and most comfortable way. Considering the rather untapped potential of whey as a raw material and growing food shortages in the world market, the aim of this study was to analyze the possibilities of production of functional beverages based on whey, with satisfactory sensory characteristics, in order to demonstrate the attractiveness of whey as raw material in the food industry. This paper presents an overview of the wide possibilities for the use of whey with a special emphasis on its attractiveness and the necessity of its utilizing.

  13. Whey Protein Improves Marathon-Induced Injury and Exercise Performance in Elite Track Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Huang, Chi-Chang; Kan, Nai-Wen; Chen, Sheng-Shih

    2017-01-01

    Whey protein has been widely applied to athletes and the fitness field for muscle growth and performance improvement. Limited studies focused on the beneficial effects of whey on aerobic exercise according to biochemical assessments. In the current study, 12 elite male track runners were randomly assigned to whey and maltodextrin groups for 5 weeks' supplementation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of whey protein on physiological adaptions and exercise performance. During this period, three time points (pre-, post-, and end-test) were used to evaluate related biochemical parameters, body composition, and performance. The post-test was set 1 day after a marathon for injury status evaluation and the end-test was also assessed after 1-week recovery from endurance test. The results showed that the whey group exhibited significantly lower aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase indicators after the marathon (post-test), as well as at the end-test ( p <0.016). The endurance performance in twelve-minute walk/run was also significantly elevated ( p <0.012) possibly due to an increase in the muscle mass and amelioration of exercise injuries. In the current study, we demonstrated that whey protein can also be used for aerobic exercise for better physiological adaptation, in addition to resistance training. Whey protein could be also a potential nutrient supplement with a variety of benefits for amateur runners.

  14. Whey protein: The “whey” forward for treatment of type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignone, Linda E; Wu, Tongzhi; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K

    2015-01-01

    A cost-effective nutritional approach to improve postprandial glycaemia is attractive considering the rising burden of diabetes throughout the world. Whey protein, a by-product of the cheese-making process, can be used to manipulate gut function in order to slow gastric emptying and stimulate incretin hormone secretion, thereby attenuating postprandial glycaemic excursions. The function of the gastrointestinal tract plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis, particularly during the postprandial period, and this review will discuss the mechanisms by which whey protein slows gastric emptying and stimulates release of gut peptides, including the incretins. Whey protein is also a rich source of amino acids, and these can directly stimulate beta cells to secrete insulin, which contributes to the reduction in postprandial glycaemia. Appetite is suppressed with consumption of whey, due to its effects on the gut-brain axis and the hypothalamus. These properties of whey protein suggest its potential in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, the optimal dose and timing of whey protein ingestion are yet to be defined, and studies are required to examine the long-term benefits of whey consumption for overall glycaemic control. PMID:26516411

  15. Restructured low-fat cooked ham containing liquid whey fortified with lactulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristiane A; Massingue, Armando A; Moura, Ana Paula R; Fontes, Paulo Rogério; Ramos, Alcinéia Ls; Ramos, Eduardo M

    2018-01-01

    Current health concerns have driven consumers to request products with nutritional and physiological advantages, which can be achieved by using prebiotic ingredients. Lactulose is a prebiotic with excellent functional properties and can be easily incorporated into meat products through the addition of liquid whey. This study investigated the technological and sensorial quality of restructured cooked ham elaborated without liquid whey added (control) and with liquid whey containing different contents (0, 30, 60 and 100 g kg -1 ) of lactulose. Liquid whey did not change any technological or sensorial characteristics of the product, but the general acceptability decreased due to addition of lactulose. Samples with higher lactulose concentrations had lower moisture content, pH and refreezing loss and increased carbohydrate content. Control and whey added samples had higher lightness and lower intense color than samples with lactulose. Liquid whey additions with higher lactulose content increased hardness and chewiness of the samples. Restructured cooked hams formulated with liquid whey and 30 g kg -1 of lactulose had minimal effects on the technological properties and sensory characteristics and, due to the possible benefits conferred by the prebiotic, is a potential alternative to provide meat products with prebiotic activity. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Rheology and microstructure of binary mixed gel of rice bran protein-whey: effect of heating rate and whey addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafe, Ali; Vahedi, Elnaz; Hasan-Sarei, Azadeh Ghorbani

    2016-08-01

    Rice bran protein (RBP) is a valuable plant protein which has unique nutritional and hypoallergenic properties. Whey proteins have wide applications in the food industry, such as in dairy, meat and bakery products. Whey protein concentrate (WPC), RBP and their mixtures at different ratios (1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10 w/w) were heated from 20 to 90 °C at different heating rates (0.5, 1, 5 and 10 °C min(-1) ). The storage modulus (G') and gelling point (Tgel ) of WPC were higher than those of RBP, indicating the good ability of WPC to develop stiffer networks. By increasing the proportion of WPC in mixed systems, G' was increased and Tgel was reduced. Nevertheless, the elasticity of all binary mixtures was lower than that of WPC alone. Tgel and the final G' of RBP-WPC blends were increased by raising the heating rate. The RBP-WPC mixtures developed more elastic gels than RBP alone at different heating rates. RBP had a fibrillar and lentil-like structure whose fibril assembly had smaller structures than those of WPC. The gelling structure of the mixed gel of WPC-RBP was improved by adding WPC. Indeed, by adding WPC, gels tended to show syneresis and had lower water-holding capacity. Furthermore, the gel structure was produced by adding WPC to the non-gelling RBP, which is compatible with whey and can be applied as a functional food for infants and/or adults. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Process for the production of starch and alcohol from substances containing starch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, N B; McFate, H A; Eubanks, E M

    1969-01-01

    Almost complete extraction of starch from wheat, rice, maize, etc., is achieved more economically then by conventional processes. Starch-containing cereal is soaked, the magma is broken and the seed removed. The magma is then drained and separated into a liquid filtrate consisting of starch, gluten and fine fibers, and a solid residue made up of coarse fibers, husks and grit. The liquid filtrate is sieved to remove the fine fibers, and then centrifuged to obtain pure, gluten-free starch. The solid residue is treated with a mineral acid in a converter to give sugar, thus forming a material which is fermented and distilled to give alcohol.

  18. Starch Digestibility and Functional Properties of Rice Starch Subjected to Gamma Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Fernando Polesi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of gamma radiation on the digestibility and functional properties of rice starch. Rice cultivars IRGA417 and IAC202 were used for isolation of starch by the alkaline method. Starch samples were irradiated with 1, 2 and 5 kGy doses of 60Co at a rate of 0.4 kGy/h. A control sample, which was not irradiated, was used for comparison. Irradiated and control starches were characterized by in vitro starch digestibility, total dietary fiber, color, water absorption index, water solubility index, syneresis, swelling factor, amylose leaching, pasting properties and gel firmness. Irradiations changed starch digestibility differently in either cultivar. Increasing radiation doses promoted increase in the color parameter b* (yellow, elevation in the capacity to absorb water, and solubility in water as well as the amylose leached from granules for both cultivars. Pasting properties showed a decrease that was proportional to the dose applied, caused by the depolymerization of starch molecules. Gel firmness of the starch from IAC202 was inversely proportional to the radiation dose applied, whereas for IRGA417, there was a reduction at 5 kGy dose. Rice starches can be modified by irradiation to exhibit different functional characteristics and they can be used by the food industries in products such as soups, desserts, flans, puddings and others.

  19. Dilute solution properties of canary seed (Phalaris canariensis) starch in comparison to wheat starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Mahdi; Razavi, Seyed M A; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed M; Hucl, Pierre; Patterson, Carol Ann

    2016-06-01

    Dilute solution properties of an unknown starch are important to understand its performance and applications in food and non-food industries. In this paper, rheological and molecular properties (intrinsic viscosity, molecular weight, shape factor, voluminosity, conformation and coil overlap parameters) of the starches from two hairless canary seed varieties (CO5041 & CDC Maria) developed for food use were evaluated in the dilute regime (Starch dispersions in DMSO (0.5g/dl)) and compared with wheat starch (WS). The results showed that Higiro model is the best among five applied models for intrinsic viscosity determination of canary seed starch (CSS) and WS on the basis of coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE). WS sample showed higher intrinsic viscosity value (1.670dl/g) in comparison to CSS samples (1.325-1.397dl/g). Berry number and the slope of master curve demonstrated that CSS and WS samples were in dilute domain without entanglement occurrence. The shape factor suggested spherical and ellipsoidal structure for CO5041 starch and ellipsoidal for CDC Maria starch and WS. The molecular weight, coil radius and coil volume of CSSs were smaller than WS. The behavior and molecular characterization of canary seed starch showed its unique properties compared with wheat starch. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Ultrasound Treatment on Physiochemical Properties and Antimicrobial Activities of Whey Protein-Totarol Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuang; Shi, Ce; Wang, Cuina; Guo, Mingruo

    2017-10-01

    Totarol is a natural antimicrobial compound extracted from the heartwood of Podocarpus totara, a conifer native to New Zealand. The effects of whey protein-totarol nanoparticles treated with ultrasound on the physiochemical properties and the growth of Staphylococcus aureus were investigated. The particle size of whey protein-totarol nanoparticles was reduced by ultrasound treatment from 31.24 ± 5.31 to 24.20 ± 4.02 nm, and the size distribution was also narrowed by the treatment. Viscosity and modulus data indicated that the flow behaviors of whey protein-totarol nanoparticles seemed to be Newtonian and exerted a typical viscoelastic fluid at protein content of 15% (w/v). Rheological properties were more insensitive to ultrasonic time. Time-killing assays, agar diffusion tests, the cell membrane damage analysis, and microstructure were exploited to study the antibacterial properties of whey protein-totarol nanoparticles. The MIC of whey protein-totarol nanoparticles after ultrasound treatment decreased from 4 to 2 μg/mL compared with that without ultrasound treatment. Whey protein-totarol nanoparticles treated with ultrasound resulted in a significant (P whey protein-totarol nanoparticles were 12 and 36 mm for untreated and treated with ultrasound, respectively. The cell membrane damages and the microstructure changes also proved that whey protein-totarol nanoparticles treated with ultrasound had strong antibacterial activities against S. aureus and that the antibacterial effectiveness enhanced with the increasing of ultrasonic time. These findings suggested that whey protein-totarol nanoparticles treated with ultrasound were more effective against S. aureus than untreated nanoparticles.

  1. The Young's Modulus, Fracture Stress, and Fracture Strain of Gellan Hydrogels Filled with Whey Protein Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Cherry Wing Yu; Ikeda, Shinya

    2017-05-01

    Texture modifying abilities of whey protein microparticles are expected to be dependent on pH during heat-induced aggregation of whey protein in the microparticulation process. Therefore, whey protein microparticles were prepared at either pH 5.5 or 6.8 and their effects on small and large deformation properties of gellan gels containing whey protein microparticles as fillers were investigated. The majority of whey protein microparticles had diameters around 2 μm. Atomic force microscopy images showed that whey protein microparticles prepared at pH 6.8 partially collapsed and flatted by air-drying, while those prepared at pH 5.5 did not. The Young's modulus of filled gels adjusted to pH 5.5 decreased by the addition of whey protein microparticles, while those of filled gels adjusted to pH 6.8 increased with increasing volume fraction of filler particles. These results suggest that filler particles were weakly bonded to gel matrices at pH 5.5 but strongly at pH 6.8. Whey protein microparticles prepared at pH 5.5 showed more enhanced increases in the Young's modulus than those prepared at pH 6.8 at volume fractions between 0.2 and 0.4, indicating that microparticles prepared at pH 5.5 were mechanically stronger. The fracture stress of filled gels showed trends somewhat similar to those of the Young's modulus, while their fracture strains decreased by the addition of whey protein microparticles in all examined conditions, indicating that the primary effect of these filler particles was to enhance the brittleness of filled gels. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Application of infrared portable sensor technology for predicting perceived astringency of acidic whey protein beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Tan, Siow-Ying; Mutilangi, William; Plans, Marcal; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis

    2016-12-01

    Formulating whey protein beverages at acidic pH provides better clarity but the beverages typically develop an unpleasant and astringent flavor. Our aim was to evaluate the application of infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics in predicting astringency of acidic whey protein beverages. Whey protein isolate (WPI), whey protein concentrate (WPC), and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) from different manufacturers were used to formulate beverages at pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.9. Trained panelists using the spectrum method of descriptive analysis tested the beverages providing astringency scores. A portable Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy attenuated total reflectance spectrometer was used for spectra collection that was analyzed by multivariate regression analysis (partial least squares regression) to build calibration models with the sensory astringency scores. Beverage astringency scores fluctuated from 1.9 to 5.2 units and were explained by pH, protein type (WPC, WPI, or WPH), source (manufacturer), and their interactions, revealing the complexity of astringency development in acidic whey protein beverages. The WPC and WPH beverages showed an increase in astringency as the pH of the solution was lowered, but no relationship was found for WPI beverages. The partial least squares regression analysis showed strong relationship between the reference astringency scores and the infrared predicted values (correlation coefficient >0.94), giving standard error of cross-validation ranging from 0.08 to 0.12 units, depending on whey protein type. Major absorption bands explaining astringency scores were associated with carboxylic groups and amide regions of proteins. The portable infrared technique allowed rapid prediction of astringency of acidic whey protein beverages, providing the industry a novel tool for monitoring sensory characteristics of whey-containing beverages. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Whey Protein Reduces Early Life Weight Gain in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranberg, Britt; Hellgren, Lars I.; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Sejrsen, Kristen; Jeamet, Aymeric; Rune, Ida; Ellekilde, Merete; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that dairy products, including whey protein, alleviate several disorders of the metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigated the effects of whey protein isolate (whey) in mice fed a high-fat diet hypothesising that the metabolic effects of whey would be associated with changes in the gut microbiota composition. Five-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet ad libitum for 14 weeks with the protein source being either whey or casein. Faeces were collected at week 0, 7, and 13 and the fecal microbiota was analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses of PCR-derived 16S rRNA gene (V3-region) amplicons. At the end of the study, plasma samples were collected and assayed for glucose, insulin and lipids. Whey significantly reduced body weight gain during the first four weeks of the study compared with casein (Pwhey group relative to casein (34.0±1.0 g vs. 40.2±1.3 g, Pwhey group (Pwhey compared to casein (Pwhey and casein. In conclusion, whey initially reduced weight gain in young C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet compared to casein. Although the effect on weight gain ceased, whey alleviated glucose intolerance, improved insulin sensitivity and reduced plasma cholesterol. These findings could not be explained by changes in food intake or gut microbiota composition. Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms behind the metabolic effects of whey. PMID:23940754

  4. Effect of whey protein and a free amino acid mixture simulating whey protein on measures of satiety in normal-weight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chungchunlam, Sylvia M S; Henare, Sharon J; Ganesh, Siva; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-11-01

    Dietary protein is considered more satiating than carbohydrate, and whey protein is more satiating than other protein sources. The purported satiating effect of whey protein may be due to direct effects of the unique mixture of proteins in whey, due to the effects of peptides released upon digestion and/or its amino acid composition. The objective of the present study was to compare the satiating effects of intact whey protein isolate (WPI) or a free amino acid mixture (AAM) simulating the amino acid composition of the WPI. A single-blind completely randomised block design included twenty, healthy, adult women (age 24·2 (sem 0·8) years) of normal weight (BMI 22·7 (sem 0·4) kg/m2). Following consumption of isoenergetic (approximately 1800 kJ) preload meals enriched (52 g amino acid equivalent) with WPI or AAM, consumption of an ad libitum test meal 120 min later and subjective feelings of appetite using visual analogue scales (VAS) were determined. There were no significant differences (P=0·24) in the ad libitum test meal intakes between the WPI (268·5 (sem 27·3) g) and the AAM (238·4 (sem 22·7) g) preload meals. Subjective VAS ratings of appetite did not differ significantly between the WPI and the AAM preload meals (P>0·05). Intact whey protein and a free AAM simulating the whey protein showed similar effects on satiety. This suggests that the satiating effect of whey protein may be related to its specific amino acid composition.

  5. The effects of carbon sources and micronutrients in whey and fermented whey on the kinetics of phenanthrene biodegradation in diesel contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Anders P., E-mail: anders.jonsson@miun.se [Department of Engineering, and Sustainable Development, Mid Sweden University, SE-83125 Ostersund (Sweden); Ostberg, Tomas L. [Jegrelius Institute for Applied Green Chemistry, Studiegangen 3, SE-831 40 Ostersund (Sweden)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {center_dot} Whey and fermented whey significantly enhances phenanthrene biodegradation. {center_dot} Mode of administration and amount of amendment is decisive. {center_dot} Observed effects were increased linear growth, bioavailability and degradation. {center_dot} The effects were attributed to lactate and vitamins. {center_dot} Growth factors play a significant role in phenanthrene biodegradation. - Abstract: This paper demonstrates significant effects on phenanthrene degradation in diesel contaminated soil by the addition of organic amendments such as whey and fermented whey. Both amount of amendment added and mode of administration was shown to be decisive. There was a strong positive effect on the {sup 14}C-mineralization of phenanthrene by multiple (bi-weekly) additions of fermented whey 210 mg dw kg{sup -1} soil dw (FW multi) and also by single dose addition of 2100 mg dw sweet whey kg{sup -1} soil dw (SW high). The most prominent effects on phenanthrene degradation kinetics were a five to fifteen fold increase in the linear growth term (k{sub 2}) and a 23-27% increase in bioavailability factor S{sub 0} for SW high and FW multi respectively. Also, total mineralization at the end of the experiment increased from 46% in the control to 66 and 71% respectively and the lag time was reduced from 21 to 15 days by multiple addition of fermented whey. The most significant stimulating effects on phenanthrene degradation kinetics could be attributed to lactate and vitamins. This study demonstrates a more complex dependence of carbon sources and growth factors for an aromatic compound such as phenanthrene in comparison to hexadecane.

  6. Effects of hydrolysed casein, intact casein and intact whey protein on energy expenditure and appetite regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist; Lorenzen, Janne Kunchel; Gomes, Sisse

    2014-01-01

    Casein and whey differ in amino acid composition and in the rate of absorption; however, the absorption rate of casein can be increased to mimic that of whey by exogenous hydrolysis. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of hydrolysed casein (HC), intact casein (IC......) and intact whey (IW) on energy expenditure (EE) and appetite regulation, and thereby to investigate the influence of amino acid composition and the rate of absorption. In the present randomised cross-over study, twenty-four overweight and moderately obese young men and women consumed three isoenergetic...

  7. Degradation of whey in an anaerobic fixed bed (AnFB) reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Handajani, Marisa

    2004-01-01

    An Anaerobic Fixed Bed (AnFB) reactor was run as an upflow anaerobic reactor with an arrangement of supporting material for growth of a biofilm. The supporting material was made from Liapor-clay-polyethylene sinter lamellas (Herding Co., Amberg). The AnFB reactor was used for treating high concentrations of whey-containing wastewater. Optimal operating conditions for whey treatment at a concentration of COD in the influent of around 50 g whey·l-1 were found for a hydraulic retention ...

  8. Production of modified starches by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Il-Jun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Yook, Hong-Sun; Bae, Chun-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Soo; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Chung, Cha-Kwon

    1999-01-01

    As a new processing method for the production of modified starch, gamma irradiation and four kinds of inorganic peroxides were applied to commercial corn starch. The addition of inorganic peroxides without gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation without the addition of inorganic peroxides effectively decreased initial viscosity, but did not sufficiently keep viscosity stable. The combination of adding ammonium persulfate (APS) and gamma irradiation showed the lowest initial viscosity and the best stability out of the tested four kinds of inorganic peroxides. Among the tested mixing methods of APS, soaking was found to be more effective than dry blending or spraying. Therefore, the production of modified starch with low viscosity as well as with sufficient viscosity stability became feasible by the control of gamma irradiation dose levels and the amount of added APS to starch

  9. Utilisation of sago starch for wound dressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaruddin Hashim; Khairul Zaman Mohd Dahlan; Kamarudin Bahari

    2000-01-01

    Sago starch is utilized in Malaysia mainly for the purpose of food production. The purpose of the research is to diversify the use of sago starch for medical application particularly in development of hydrogel wound dressing. The sago starch is blending with water-soluble polymer such as polyvinyl pyrrolidone, polyvinyl alcohol and polyethylene oxide and irradiated with electron beam accelerator to form hydrogel. The parameters such gel strength, elasticity, swelling, gel fraction and tackiness have to be consider for this type of application. We also study the effect of adding additive such as carboxymethyl cellulose and polypropylene glycol into the system to enhance the property of sago starch hydrogel. Works on the use of chitosan in the blend have been performed, in order to prevent microbiological growth such as bacteria and fungi on the hydrogel. (author)

  10. Characterization of Digestion Resistance Sweet Potato Starch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To analyze the physicochemical properties and in vitro digestibility of sweet potato starchphosphodiester prepared using sodium trimetaphosphate. Methods: The physicochemical properties of sweet potato starch phosphodiester were analyzed by using infrared spectrometry (IR), differential scanning calorimetry ...

  11. Up-Scaling Production of Carboxymethyl Starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafiz Abdul Nasir; Zainon Othman; Kamaruddin Hashim; Siti Khadijah Abu Hadin; Nurul Nadia Shaaban

    2015-01-01

    Carboxymethyl starch (CMS) is a starch derivative formed by its reaction with sodium monochloroacetate which consist of OH-groups that are partially or completely replaced by ether substitution. Characteristic of CMSS defined by the degree of substitution (DS). DS is defined as the average number of substituents per anhydro glucose unit (AGU), the monomer unit of starch. The upgrading of CMSS production from 10L to 30L requires several experiments with different variable such as amount NaOH, amount of Sago Starch and reaction time. Each will give different DS. Quality control for the product cover moisture, viscosity and paste clarity. Therefore, SOP has been established to control the quality final product. (author)

  12. Energy from whey - comparison of the biogas and bioethanol processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruteau de Laclos, H.; Membrez, Y.

    2004-01-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a project which investigated how energy could be generated from the whey produced in the cheese-making process. The first part of the project aimed to validate a concept for on-site production and use of biogas at a medium-sized cheese factory. The results of the first step, an experimental study carried out using a down-flow fixed-film bio-reactor, are discussed. This allowed the determination of the optimal working parameters as well as providing an estimate of the performance of the process. The second part of the project aimed to compare the bio-ethanol and biogas production processes. It was carried out in collaboration with AlcoSuisse and the Energy Systems Laboratory at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne. The results of a life-cycle assessment (LCA) are discussed, which compared the two processes from an environmental point of view. Here, two impacts were considered: fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse effect. The replacement of fuel-oil with biogas for heat production and the replacement of conventional petrol with mixture including 5% bio-ethanol were examined. The results are presented that show that there was no significant difference between the two processes. According to the authors, the treatment of one cubic meter of cheese-whey allows savings of more than 20 litres of oil equivalent and 60 kg of CO 2 emissions

  13. Antioxidative features of whey and its application in liver protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radić Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress represents a condition in which there is an imbalance between the production of free radicals and their removal. Many risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants, radiation, infective agents can induce oxidative stress in the liver leading to the functional disturbance of the liver cells. In order to reduce oxidative stress, modern medicine goes back to the natural substances, which are becoming increasingly popular both in prevention and in treatment of many diseases. Numerous hepatoprotective substances such as silymarin, spirulina, pumpkin oil and whey are used in traditional diets by many people. Some experimental studies on animals and the monitoring of the effects on humans showed that whey can be estimated as an important antioxidant in the treatment of liver diseases. New information obtained on the basis of controlled experimental and clinical studies of its effects in terms of protection or treatment of already existing changes in the liver tissue, certainly contribute to defining the concrete possibilities of potential use in therapeutic methods, either as a supplement or extrication of specific medicinal ingredients.

  14. Whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Prestes Lessa Fernandes Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to prepare whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil at different concentrations, and evaluate their properties and antimicrobial activity. Films were more flexible with increasing the concentration of oregano oil and water vapor permeability was higher in the films with oregano oil. Increasing the concentration of essential oil decreased the water solubility. The solubility of control film and film with 1.5% oregano oil was 20.2 and 14.0%, respectively. The addition of 1% of oregano oil improved the resistance of the films. The tensile strength for the control film was 66.0 MPa, while for the film with 1% of oregano oil was 108.7 MPa. Films containing 1.5% oregano oil showed higher antimicrobial activity. The zone of inhibition ranged from 0 to 1.7 cm. The results showed that the whey protein-based films incorporated with oregano essential oil has potential application as active packaging.

  15. Amino acid composition of cottage cheese and whey with bifidobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Rodionova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Breaking condition intestinal flora, the simplest way to create sensitive parts of the body microbiocenosis caused by various factors. Reasons for people microecology imbalances – antibiotics, preservatives, stress. The result is an imbalance – the number of gastrointestinal disorders, immune deficiency disorders metabolic processes in the body. Therapeutic effect of probiotic microorganisms is the result of exogenous and endometabolitov synthesis the character of the protein. Acid activity information probiotic microorganisms and the distribution of amino acids between the products and intermediates in biopotential evaluation process foods produced with probiotic microflora by fermentation. Test results from the amino acid composition of whey and quark are obtained by fermenting raw milk probiotics bifidobacterias. It was found that during the fermentation of the quark consortium, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum Y enriched curd 4 of leucine and glutamine. Rate of transfer amino acids in serum to 2–6% of essential amino acids is irrelevant 3–7%. The highest value observed transient threonine, isoleucyl, lysine, valine, alanine, glycine, proline, serine. The mean value of the prototype amino acid protein curd and whey protein biological value was 71.89 and 74.58. Preservation of active forms of probiotic microorganisms after heating the bunch to 53–55 °C, lg concentration of not less than 7 (in 1 g in cottage cheese and serum. The received data are actual for formation of an information data bank, necessary for the development of prescription-component solutions of eubiotic products.

  16. Dynamic gastric digestion of a commercial whey protein concentrate†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Beatriz; Del Barrio, Roberto; Cueva, Carolina; Recio, Isidra; Amigo, Lourdes

    2018-03-01

    A dynamic gastrointestinal simulator, simgi ® , has been applied to assess the gastric digestion of a whey protein concentrate. Samples collected from the outlet of the stomach have been compared to those resulting from the static digestion protocol INFOGEST developed on the basis of physiologically inferred conditions. Progress of digestion was followed by SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. By SDS-PAGE, serum albumin and α-lactalbumin were no longer detectable at 30 and 60 min, respectively. On the contrary, β-lactoglobulin was visible up to 120 min, although in decreasing concentrations in the dynamic model due to the gastric emptying and the addition of gastric fluids. Moreover, β-lactoglobulin was partly hydrolysed by pepsin probably due to the presence of heat-denatured forms and the peptides released using both digestion models were similar. Under dynamic conditions, a stepwise increase in number of peptides over time was observed, while the static protocol generated a high number of peptides from the beginning of digestion. Whey protein digestion products using a dynamic stomach are consistent with those generated with the static protocol but the kinetic behaviour of the peptide profile emphasises the effect of the sequential pepsin addition, peristaltic shaking, and gastric emptying on protein digestibility. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Carbery milk products in Ireland produces alcohol from whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, R

    1980-01-01

    A brief illustrated description is given of alcohol production by Carbery Milk Products Ltd., introduced in 1976 as an alternative to whey drying. The initial investment into the new alcohol factory was 1.6 million. The process includes whey ultrafiltration at a rate of 125,000 gallons/day, fermentation of the premeate in 6 fermentation tanks (total capacity 42,000 gallons) in batch operation, each requiring on average 6 hours; efficiency of lactose conversion to alcohol is 86% of the theoretical yield. After separation of the yeasts, the liquor is pasteurized and heated to the correct temperature for distillation which is carried out in a plant consisting of six 32-metre high cylinders incorporating rectification towers. The finished alcohol is stored under customs supervision in 3 storage tanks, each with a capacity of 125000 gallons. The waste products from the fermentation and distillation stages necessitated the installation of a purification plant for treating daily about 200000 gallons effluent with 9000 lb BOD, in addition to another plant handling 400 000 gallons with also 9000 lb BOD of normal dairy waste water.

  18. Radiation sterilization of potato starch and Sedonik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.; Ismatov, N.B.; Saidov, R.P. et al.

    2016-01-01

    The raw material of pharmaceutical preparations potato starch and sedative means of Sedonik are sterilized at the electron's accelerator Electronics U-003. It is established that at 20.3 kGy absorbed dose and electron's energy 3 - 5 MeV the results of microbiological analysis showed sterility of potato starch and Sedonik and correspondence of their physical-optical properties to the requirements of normative documents. (authors)

  19. Resistant starch: an indigestible fraction of foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saura Calixto, F.

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available Resistant starch (RS, the dietary starch that scape digestion in the small intestine, can yields up to 20% of the starch in cereal and legume products. Several fractions contribute to the total RS of foods: retrograded amylose, starch inaccessible to digestive enzymes because of mechanical barriers, chemically modified starch fragments, undigested starch due to α-amylase inhibitors and starch complexed with other food components. RS is formed in products processed following heat treatments (baking, extrusion, autoclaving, etc.. RS produces significant fecal bulking and is partially fermentable by anaerobic bacteria of the colon. On the other hand, the relation of resistant starch with the glucose and insulin response in human subjects is an important nutritional effect. RS analytical methods are reported.

    El almidón resistente (RS, fracción de almidón de la dieta que no es digerido en el intestino delgado, puede alcanzar hasta un 20% del almidón en productos derivados de cereales y legumbres. Varias fracciones contribuyen al contenido total de almidón resistente: amilosa retrogradada, almidón inaccesible físicamente a los enzimas digestivos, almidón indigestible debido a inhibición de α-amilasas y almidón complejado con otros constituyentes de los alimentos. El almidón resistente se forma en productos que han sufrido tratamientos térmicos (panificación, extrusión, autoclave, etc. El RS aumenta el volumen de heces y es fermentado parcialmente en el colon por bacterias anaeróbicas. Igualmente, está relacionado con los niveles de glucosa en sangre y la respuesta de insulina en humanos. Se describen los métodos analíticos para su determinación.

  20. Biodegradable starch-based polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, Anna I.; Tyukova, Irina S.; Trufanova, Elena I.

    2000-05-01

    The effects of low-molecular-weight additives, temperature and mechanical action on the structure and properties of starch are discussed. Special attention is given to mixtures of starch with synthetic polymers, e.g., co-polymers of ethylene with vinyl acetate, vinyl alcohol, acrylic acid, cellulose derivatives and other natural polymers. These mixtures can be used in the development of novel environmentally safe materials (films, coatings, packaging materials) and various articles for short-term use. The bibliography includes 105 references.

  1. Study on the Effect of Levulinic Acid on Whey-Based Biosynthesis of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate by Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Koller

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Production of polyhydroxyalkanoate copolyesters consisting of 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyvalerate units was for the first time studied using the production strain Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava based on sustainable raw materials. This strategy provides for increased cost efficiency in PHA production and in enhanced material quality.Material and Methods: As a particularity, production of these poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3- hydroxyvalerate copolyesters was based on a novel substrate/co-substrate combination: whey permeate from dairy industry, on the one hand, acted as substrate for biomass and 3HB biosynthesis; on the other hand, levulinic acid, accessible from various renewable resources, was used as 3HV-related precursor compound. The experiments were carried out on shaking flask scale using defined nutrient media.Results and Conclusion: Applied during nutritionally balanced growth of H. pseudoflava, levulinicacid displays drastic growth inhibition at rather low concentrations of 0.2 g l-1 (growth inhibition constant Ki = 0.032, which suggests the careful supply of this compound in the first phase of cultivation. Under nitrogen-free cultivation conditions, inhibition of the strain´s metabolism by levulinic acid was less pronounced. Here, poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co- 3-hydroxyvalerate concentrations up to 4.2 g l-1 and volumetric poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3- hydroxyvalerate productivities up to 0.06 g l-1 h -1 were achieved in dependence on the precursor supply. Investigating poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate composition in setups supplied with differently composed whey/levulinic acid mixtures revealed 3- hydroxyvalerate fractions in the polymer between 0 and 0.6 mol mol-1 . This study successfully demonstrates the feasibility of combined utilization of different waste- and by-products from food industry and agriculture for generation of value-added 2nd generation biopolymers. Conflict of interest: The authors

  2. Feasibility, safety, and economic implications of whey-recovered water in cleaning-in-place systems: A case study on water conservation for the dairy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Yulie E; Flores, Rolando A

    2016-05-01

    Water scarcity is threatening food security and business growth in the United States. In the dairy sector, most of the water is used in cleaning applications; therefore, any attempt to support water conservation in these processes will have a considerable effect on the water footprint of dairy products. This study demonstrates the viability for recovering good quality water from whey, a highly pollutant cheese-making by-product, to be reused in cleaning-in-place systems. The results obtained in this study indicate that by using a combined ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis system, 47% of water can be recovered. This system generates protein and lactose concentrates, by-products that once spray-dried fulfill commercial standards for protein and lactose powders. The physicochemical and microbiological quality of the recovered permeate was also analyzed, suggesting suitable properties to be reused in the cleaning-in-place system without affecting the quality and safety of the product manufactured on the cleaned equipment. A cost analysis was conducted for 3 cheese manufacturing levels, considering an annual production of 1, 20, and 225 million liters of whey. Results indicate the feasibility of this intervention in the dairy industry, generating revenues of $0.18, $3.05, and $33.4 million per year, respectively. The findings provide scientific evidence to promote the safety of reuse of reconditioned water in food processing plants, contributing to building a culture of water conservation and sustainable production throughout the food supply chain. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of modified starch/polybutadiene as novel transdermal drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboktakin, Mohammad Reza; Akhyari, Shahab; Nasirov, Fizuli A

    2014-08-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems are topically administered medicaments in the form of patches that deliver drugs for systemic effects at a predetermined and controlled rate. It works very simply in which drug is applied inside the patch and it is worn on skin for long period of time. Polymer matrix, drug, permeation enhancers are the main components of transdermal drug delivery systems. The objective of the present study was to develop the modified starch and 1,4-cis polybutadiene nanoparticles as novel polymer matrix system. We have been studied the properties of a novel transdermal drug delivery system with clonidine as drug model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The foaming properties of camel and bovine whey: The impact of pH and heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajnaf, Roua; Picart-Palmade, Laetitia; Cases, Eliane; Attia, Hamadi; Marchesseau, Sylvie; Ayadi, M A

    2018-02-01

    The effect of heat treatment (70°C or 90°C for 30min) on the foaming and interfacial properties of acid and sweet whey obtained from bovine and camel fresh milk was examined. The maximum foamability and foam stability were observed for acid whey when compared to sweet whey for both milks, with higher values for the camel whey. This behavior for acid whey was explained by the proximity of the pI of whey protein (4.9-5.2), where proteins were found to carry the lowest negative charge as confirmed by the zeta potential measurements. Interfacial properties of acid camel whey and acid bovine whey were preserved at air water interface even after a heat treatment at 90°C. These results confirmed the pronounced foaming and interfacial properties of acid camel whey, even if acid and sweet bovine whey exhibited the highest viscoelastic modulus after heating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Permeation of deuterium implanted into V-15Cr-5Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Struttmann, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Permeation and reemission of deuterium for the vanadium alloy, V-15Cr-5Ti, was investigated using 3 keV, D 3 + ion beams from a small accelerator. The experiments consisted of measurement of the deuterium reemission and permeation rates as a function of implantation fluence for 0.5 mm thick specimens heated to temperatures from 623 K to 823 K. Implantation-side surface characterization was made by simultaneous measurements of sputtered ions with a secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS). For the experimental conditions used, the steady-state deuterium permeation flux in V-15Cr-5Ti is approximately 18% of the implantation flux. This is approximately 1000 times that seen in the austenitic stainless steel, PCA, and 200 times that seen in the ferritic steel, HT-9, under comparable conditions. Measurement of deuterium diffusivity in V-15Cr-5Ti using permeation break-through times indicates that D = 1.4x10 -8 exp(-0.11 eV/kT)(m 2 /s), over the temperature range 723 K to 823 K. (orig.)

  6. Hydrogen ion-driven permeation in carbonaceous films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.; Holland, D.F.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into the permeation properties of amorphous carbonaceous, a-C:H, films produced by plasmachemical deposition techniques. Carbonaceous films on iron substrates with thickness ranging from 60 nm to 110 nm were subjected to high fluence implantations with mass analyzed D 3 + ions with energies ranging from 600 eV to 3000 eV and fluxes ranging from 5x10 14 D/cm 2 s to 5x10 15 D/cm 2 s, respectively. Deuterium re-emission upstream, deuterium permeation downstream and secondary ions sputtered from the implantation surface were measured as a function of implantation fluence for specimens at 420 K. The present studies indicate that the a-C:H film permeability is directly related to the time, hence the fluence, required to achieve isotopic replacement and saturation of the deuterium ion beam atoms stopped in the implant region. Once the deuterium saturation level is achieved in the layer, a significant fraction of the implanting ions can result in permeation. For the present experiment, this permeation factor was much higher than that for uncoated iron specimens subjected to similar beam conditions. Carbon sputter yields of 0.008-0.01 C/D were determined in this work for 1000-eV to 400-eV deuterium ions incident on a-C:H films. (orig.)

  7. Permeation of deuterium implanted into V-15Cr-5Ti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, R. A.; Longhurst, G. R.; Struttmann, D. A.

    1987-02-01

    Permeation and reemission of deuterium for the vanadium alloy, V-15Cr-5Ti, was investigated using 3 keV, D 3+ ion beams from a small accelerator. The experiments consisted of measurement of the deuterium reemission and permeation rates as a function of implantation fluence for 0.5 mm thick specimens heated to temperatures from 623 K to 823 K. Implantation-side surface characterization was made by simultaneous measurements of sputtered ions with a secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS). For the experimental conditions used, the steady-state deuterium permeation flux in V-15Cr-5Ti is approximately 18% of the implantation flux. This is approximately 1000 times that seen in the austenitic stainless steel, PCA, and 200 times that seen in the ferritic steel, HT-9, under comparable conditions. Measurement of deuterium diffusivity in V-15Cr-5Ti using permeation break-through times indicates that D = 1.4 × 10 -8 exp( -0.11 eV/ kT) (m 2/s), over the temperature range 723 K to 823 K.

  8. Hydrogen ion-driven permeation in carbonaceous films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; Holland, D.F.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1989-04-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into the permeation properties of amorphous carbonaceous, a-C:H, films produced by plasmachemical deposition techniques. Carbonaceous films on iron substrates with thickness ranging from 60 nm to 110 nm were subjected to high fluence implantations with mass analyzed D/sub 3//sup +/ ions with energies ranging from 600 eV to 3000 eV and fluxes ranging from 5x10/sup 14/ D/cm/sup 2/ s to 5x10/sup 15/ D/cm/sup 2/ s, respectively. Deuterium re-emission upstream, deuterium permeation downstream and secondary ions sputtered from the implantation surface were measured as a function of implantation fluence for specimens at 420 K. The present studies indicate that the a-C:H film permeability is directly related to the time, hence the fluence, required to achieve isotopic replacement and saturation of the deuterium ion beam atoms stopped in the implant region. Once the deuterium saturation level is achieved in the layer, a significant fraction of the implanting ions can result in permeation. For the present experiment, this permeation factor was much higher than that for uncoated iron specimens subjected to similar beam conditions. Carbon sputter yields of 0.008-0.01 C/D were determined in this work for 1000-eV to 400-eV deuterium ions incident on a-C:H films. (orig.).

  9. Hydrogen ion-driven permeation in carbonaceous films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderl, R. A.; Holland, D. F.; Longhurst, G. R.

    1989-04-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into the permeation properties of amorphous carbonaceous, a-C: H, films produced by plasmachemical deposition techniques. Carbonaceous films on iron substrates with thickness ranging from 60 nm to 110 nm were subjected to high fluence implantations with mass analyzed D +3 ions with energies ranging from 600 eV to 3000 eV and fluxes ranging from 5 × 10 14D/ cm2 s to 5 × 10 15D/ cm2 s, respectively. Deuterium re-emission upstream, deuterium permeation downstream and secondary ions sputtered from the implantation surface were measured as a function of implantation fluence for specimens at 420 K. The present studies indicate that the a-C : H film permeability is directly related to the time, hence the fluence, required to achieve isotopic replacement and saturation of the deuterium ion beam atoms stopped in the implant region. Once the deuterium saturation level is achieved in the layer, a significant fraction of the implanting ions can result in permeation. For the present experiment, this permeation factor was much higher than that for uncoated iron specimens subjected to similar beam conditions. Carbon sputter yields of 0.008-0.01 C/D were determined in this work for 1000-eV to 400-eV deuterium ions incident on a-C : H films.

  10. Permeation of deuterium implanted into V-15Cr-5Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Struttmann, D.A.

    1987-02-01

    Permeation and reemission of deuterium for the vanadium alloy, V-15Cr-5Ti, was investigated using 3 keV, D/sub 3//sup +/ ion beams from a small accelerator. The experiments consisted of measurement of the deuterium reemission and permeation rates as a function of implantation fluence for 0.5 mm thick specimens heated to temperatures from 623 K to 823 K. Implantation-side surface characterization was made by simultaneous measurements of sputtered ions with a secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS). For the experimental conditions used, the steady-state deuterium permeation flux in V-15Cr-5Ti is approximately 18% of the implantation flux. This is approximately 1000 times that seen in the austenitic stainless steel, PCA, and 200 times that seen in the ferritic steel, HT-9, under comparable conditions. Measurement of deuterium diffusivity in V-15Cr-5Ti using permeation break-through times indicates that D = 1.4x10/sup -8/ exp(-0.11 eVkT)(m/sup 2/s), over the temperature range 723 K to 823 K.

  11. In vitro-in vivo correlation in skin permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, D; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2014-02-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been used extensively in the development and optimisation of delivery of actives in vivo. However, there are few reported correlations of such in vitro studies with in vivo data. The aim of this study was to investigate the skin permeation of a model active, niacinamide, both in vitro and in vivo. Conventional diffusion cell studies were conducted in human skin to determine niacinamide permeation from a range of vehicles which included dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML), N-methyl 2-pyrrolidone (NMP), Miglyol 812N® (MG), and mineral oil (MO). Single, binary or ternary systems were examined. The same vehicles were subsequently examined to investigate niacinamide delivery in vivo. For this proof-of-concept study one donor was used for the in vitro studies and one volunteer for the in vivo investigations to minimise biovariability. Analysis of in vitro samples was conducted using HPLC and in vivo uptake of niacinamide was evaluated using Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS). The amount of niacinamide permeated through skin in vitro was linearly proportional to the intensity of the niacinamide signal determined in the stratum corneum in vivo. A good correlation was observed between the signal intensities of selected vehicles and niacinamide signal intensity. The findings provide further support for the use of CRS to monitor drug delivery into and across the skin. In addition, the results highlight the critical role of the vehicle and its disposition in skin for effective dermal delivery.

  12. Mechanisms of oxygen permeation through plastic films and barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilski, Stefan; Wipperfürth, Jens; Jaritz, Montgomery; Kirchheim, Dennis; Mitschker, Felix; Awakowicz, Peter; Dahlmann, Rainer; Hopmann, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Oxygen and water vapour permeation through plastic films in food packaging or other applications with high demands on permeation are prevented by inorganic barrier films. Most of the permeation occurs through small defects (visualized by etching with reactive oxygen in a capacitively coupled plasma and subsequent SEM imaging. In this work, defects in SiO x -coatings deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) are investigated and the mass transport through the polymer is simulated in a 3D approach. Calculations of single defects showed that there is no linear correlation between the defect area and the resulting permeability. The influence of adjacent defects in different distances was observed and led to flow reduction functions depending on the defect spacing and defect area. A critical defect spacing where no interaction between defects occurs was found and compared to other findings. According to the superposition principle, the permeability of single defects was added up and compared to experimentally determined oxygen permeation. The results showed the same trend of decreasing permeability with decreasing defect densities.

  13. The formation of hydrogen permeation barriers on steels by aluminising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcey, K. S.; Ross, D. K.; Wu, C. H.

    1991-06-01

    An extensive investigation has been carried out into the effectiveness of aluminised layers as permeation barriers on AISI 316L stainless and DIN 1.4914 martensitic steels. The study involved measurement of the hydrogen permeation rate through commercially aluminised steel discs of thicknesses in the range 1-1.6 mm, at temperatures between 250 and 600 °C and for an upstream hydrogen pressure of 10 5 Pa. The composition and structure of the aluminide layers were investigated by a number of techniques such as SEM, electron beam microprobe and X-ray diffraction. Accelerator based techniques such as RBS and NRA were employed to study the top micron or so of the surfaces of the samples. By these techniques it was found that the effectiveness of the permeation barrier depended on the formation of a thin surface oxide layer consisting of Al 2O 3. It was found that the permeation rate through the aluminised steels could be reduced by 3-4 orders of magnitude by forming a surface oxide layer up to a micron or so in thickness.

  14. Hydrogen permeation behavior through F82H at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, S.; Katayama, K.; Shimozori, M.; Fukada, S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Ushida, H. [Energy Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Kyushu (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, UTM, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-03-15

    F82H is a primary candidate of structural material and coolant pipe material in a blanket of a fusion reactor. Understanding tritium permeation behavior through F82H is important. In a normal operation of a fusion reactor, the temperature of F82H will be controlled below 550 C. degrees because it is considered that F82H can be used up to 30,000 hours at 550 C. degrees. However, it is necessary to assume the situation where F82H is heated over 550 C. degrees in a severe accident. In this study, hydrogen permeation behavior through F82H was investigated in the temperature range from 500 to 800 C. degrees. In some cases, water vapor was added in a sample gas to investigate an effect of water vapor on hydrogen permeation. The permeability of hydrogen in the temperature range from 500 to 700 C. degrees agreed well with the permeability reported by E. Serra et al. The degradation of the permeability by water vapor was not observed. After the hydrogen permeation reached in a steady state at 700 C. degrees, the F82H sample was heated to 800 C. degrees. The permeability of hydrogen through F82H sample which was once heated up to 800 C. degrees was lower than that of the original one. (authors)

  15. GAS PERMEATION PROPERTIES OF POLY(LACTIC ACID). (R826733)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractThe need for the development of polymeric materials based on renewable resources has led to the development of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) which is being produced from a feedstock of corn rather than petroleum. The present study examines the permeation of nitrogen...

  16. Phase Change Permeation Technology For Environmental Control Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of a phase change permeation membrane (Dutyion [Trademark]) to passively and selectively mobilize water in microgravity to enable improved water recovery from urine/brine for Environment Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and water delivery to plans for potential use in microgravity.

  17. In vitro permeation of platinum through African and Caucasian skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, A; Eloff, F C; du Plessis, J; Badenhorst, C J; Du Plessis, J L

    2015-02-03

    The majority of the South African workforce are Africans, therefore potential racial differences should be considered in risk and exposure assessments in the workplace. Literature suggests African skin to be a superior barrier against permeation and irritants. Previous in vitro studies on metals only included skin from Caucasian donors, whereas this study compared the permeation of platinum through African and Caucasian skin. A donor solution of 0.3 mg/ml of potassium tetrachloroplatinate (K₂PtCl₄) dissolved in synthetic sweat was applied to the vertical Franz diffusion cells with full thickness abdominal skin. Skin from three female African and three female Caucasian donors were included (n=21). The receptor solution was removed at various intervals during the 24 h experiment, and analysed with high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Skin was digested and analysed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Significantly higher permeation of platinum through intact African skin (p=0.044), as well as a significantly higher mass of platinum retention in African skin in comparison with Caucasian skin (p=0.002) occurred. Significant inter-donor variation was found in both racial groups (pskin and further investigation is necessary to explain the higher permeation through African skin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Permeation of supercritical carbon dioxide through polymeric hollow fiber membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, V.E.; Broeke, van den L.J.P.; Vercauteren, F.F.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2006-01-01

    Permeation of carbon dioxide was measured for two types of composite polymeric hollow fiber membranes for feed pressures up to 18 MPa at a temp. of 313 K. support membrane. The membranes consist of a polyamide copolymer (IPC) layer or a poly(vinyl alc.) (PVA) layer on top of a polyethersulfone

  19. Mechanisms of oxygen permeation through plastic films and barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilski, Stefan; Wipperfürth, Jens; Jaritz, Montgomery; Kirchheim, Dennis; Dahlmann, Rainer; Hopmann, Christian; Mitschker, Felix; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen and water vapour permeation through plastic films in food packaging or other applications with high demands on permeation are prevented by inorganic barrier films. Most of the permeation occurs through small defects (<3 µ m) in the barrier coating. The defects were visualized by etching with reactive oxygen in a capacitively coupled plasma and subsequent SEM imaging. In this work, defects in SiO x -coatings deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) are investigated and the mass transport through the polymer is simulated in a 3D approach. Calculations of single defects showed that there is no linear correlation between the defect area and the resulting permeability. The influence of adjacent defects in different distances was observed and led to flow reduction functions depending on the defect spacing and defect area. A critical defect spacing where no interaction between defects occurs was found and compared to other findings. According to the superposition principle, the permeability of single defects was added up and compared to experimentally determined oxygen permeation. The results showed the same trend of decreasing permeability with decreasing defect densities. (paper)

  20. Preventing method and device for underground permeation of hazardous material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funabashi, Kiyomi; Kurokawa, Hideaki; Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Yamazaki, Tadashi.

    1996-01-01

    In a method of preventing hazardous materials from permeating into ground by burying adsorbing materials underground, a plurality of adsorbing layers are laminated being spaced apart from each other, the concentration of the hazardous materials between each of the adsorbent layers is measured. When the concentration reaches a predetermined value, the adsorbent layers are regenerated. A suppression means for preventing hazardous materials from permeating into the ground are formed by an upper adsorbent layer and a lower adsorbent layer, and a means for measuring the concentration of hazardous materials passing through the upper adsorbent layer and a means for charging and discharging regenerated liquid are disposed. When it is detected that the poisonous materials can not be eliminated, the poisonous materials are already permeated to the adsorbent layer, and they start to inflow into underground water. In order to prevent it, an adsorbent layer is additionally disposed at the lower side of the place of detection to eliminate the poisonous materials completely thereby enabling to prevent poisonous materials from permeating into underground for a long period of time. (T.M.)

  1. Permeation of Mixed Penetrants through Glassy Polymer Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-15

    and LOPE. Also, ESCA was used in conjunction with plasma etching to determine the effects of the gas phase fluorine concentration and fluorination...at 35 3C. ARD-AISS5 65 PERMEATION OF MIXED PENETRANTS THROUGH GLASSY POLYMER 213 MENBRANES (U) NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV AT RALEIGH R T CHERN ET AL. 15

  2. Comparing pervaporation and vapor permeation hybrid distillation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontalvo, J.; Cuellar, P.; Timmer, J.M.K.; Vorstman, M.A.G.; Wijers, J.G.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that hybrid distillation processes using either pervaporation or vapor permeation can be very attractive for the separation of mixtures. In this paper, a comparison between these two hybrid processes has been made. A tool has been presented that can assist designers and

  3. Permeated defect detecting test method and device in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshishige.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device capable of performing a test for entire inner surfaces of the reactor upon periodical inspection of a BWR type reactor while sufficiently taking countermeasures for radiation rays into consideration. Namely, the present invention comprises following steps. (1) A provisional step for taking a shroud head of a reactor core shroud and incore structural components above and below the shroud out of the reactor, discharging reactor water and water tightly closing openings such as reactor wall perforation holes, (2) a pretreatment step for washing exposed inner surfaces of the reactor and peeling deteriorated materials, (3) a first drying step for drying portions washed and peeled in the step (2), (4) a permeation step for applying a permeation liquid of a defect detecting medium on the exposed inner surfaces of the reactor, (5) a permeation liquid removing step for removing the an excess permeation liquid in the step (4), (6) a second drying step for drying corresponding portions after performing the step (5), and (7) a flaw detecting step for optically observing the corresponding portions after performing the step (6) and detecting flaws. (I.S.)

  4. In vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through Caucasian skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, A; Eloff, F C; Du Plessis, J; Badenhorst, C J; Jordaan, A; Du Plessis, J L

    2014-12-01

    During platinum group metals (PGMs) refining the possibility exists for dermal exposure to PGM salts. The dermal route has been questioned as an alternative route of exposure that could contribute to employee sensitisation, even though literature has been focused on respiratory exposure. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through intact Caucasian skin. A donor solution of 0.3mg/ml of metal, K2PtCl4 and RhCl3 respectively, was applied to the vertical Franz diffusion cells with full thickness abdominal skin. The receptor solution was removed at various intervals during the 24h experiment, and analysed with high resolution ICP-MS. Skin was digested and analysed by ICP-OES. Results indicated cumulative permeation with prolonged exposure, with a significantly higher mass of platinum permeating after 24h when compared to rhodium. The mass of platinum retained inside the skin and the flux of platinum across the skin was significantly higher than that of rhodium. Permeated and skin retained platinum and rhodium may therefore contribute to sensitisation and indicates a health risk associated with dermal exposure in the workplace. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of piperidones on hydrogen permeation and corrosion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    corrosion inhibition. 3.5 Hydrogen permeation measurements. Hydrogen can enter into the metal during various industrial operations like melting, heat treatment, or pickling and electrochemical processes such as cathodic cleaning and electrolytic machining. Of the various sources of entry of hydrogen into the metal,.

  6. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  7. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate based edible films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinma, C E; Ariahu, C C; Alakali, J S

    2015-04-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate (SPC) based edible films containing 20 % glycerol level were studied. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of edible films increased with increase in temperature and decreased with increase in relative humidity, while elongation at break decreased. Water vapour permeability of the films increased (2.6-4.3 g.mm/m(2).day.kPa) with increase in temperature and relative humidity. The temperature dependence of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate films followed Arrhenius relationship. Activation energy (Ea) of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate edible films ranged from 1.9 to 5.3 kJ/mol (R (2)  ≥ 0.93) and increased with increase in SPC addition. The Ea values were lower for the bio-films than for polyvinylidene chloride, polypropylene and polyethylene which are an indication of low water vapour permeability of the developed biofilms compared to those synthetic films.

  8. Influence of phosphate esters on the annealing properties of starch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wischmann, Bente; Muhrbeck, Per

    1998-01-01

    The effects of annealing on native potato, waxy maize, and phosphorylated waxy maize starches were compared. Phosphorylated waxy maize starch responded to annealing in a manner between that of the naturally phosphorylated potato starch and that of the native waxy maize starch. The gelatinisation...... end-point temperature was increased, whereas in the native waxy maize it was decreased. On the other hand, the onset temperature change was much larger in potato starch than in the two waxy maize starches. Steeping also yielded intermediate effects on the phosphorylated waxy maize starch....... It was concluded that the phosphate groups have similar effects as they do in the native, naturally phosphorylated potato starch, although the substitution pattern is not entirely the same in the artificially phosphorylated starch....

  9. Engineering Potato Starch with a Higher Phosphate Content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Xu

    Full Text Available Phosphate esters are responsible for valuable and unique functionalities of starch for industrial applications. Also in the cell phosphate esters play a role in starch metabolism, which so far has not been well characterized in storage starch. Laforin, a human enzyme composed of a carbohydrate-binding module and a dual-specificity phosphatase domain, is involved in the dephosphorylation of glycogen. To modify phosphate content and better understand starch (dephosphorylation in storage starch, laforin was engineered and introduced into potato (cultivar Kardal. Interestingly, expression of an (engineered laforin in potato resulted in significantly higher phosphate content of starch, and this result was confirmed in amylose-free potato genetic background (amf. Modified starches exhibited altered granule morphology and size compared to the control. About 20-30% of the transgenic lines of each series showed red-staining granules upon incubation with iodine, and contained higher phosphate content than the blue-stained starch granules. Moreover, low amylose content and altered gelatinization properties were observed in these red-stained starches. Principle component and correlation analysis disclosed a complex correlation between starch composition and starch physico-chemical properties. Ultimately, the expression level of endogenous genes involved in starch metabolism was analysed, revealing a compensatory response to the decrease of phosphate content in potato starch. This study provides a new perspective for engineering starch phosphate content in planta by making use of the compensatory mechanism in the plant itself.

  10. Development of a plasma driven permeation experiment for TPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, Dean, E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Kolasinski, Robert [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Shimada, Masa [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Donovan, David [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States); Youchison, Dennis [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Merrill, Brad [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We have designed and fabricated a novel tritium permeation membrane holder for use in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE). • The membrane temperature is controlled by varying the cooling flow rate and proximity of a spiral cooling channel. • Sealing tests have demonstrated adequate helium leak rates up to temperatures of 1000 °C. • Flow modeling indicates a minimal helium pressure drop across the membrane holder (<700 Pa). • Thermal modeling shows good heat removal and minimal membrane temperature variation (±2%) even up to peak TPE ion fluxes. - Abstract: Experiments on retention of hydrogen isotopes (including tritium) at temperatures less than 800 °C have been carried out in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory [1,2]. To provide a direct measurement of plasma driven permeation in plasma facing materials at temperatures reaching 1000 °C, a new TPE membrane holder has been built to hold test specimens (≤1 mm in thickness) at high temperature while measuring tritium permeating through the membrane from the plasma facing side. This measurement is accomplished by employing a carrier gas that transports the permeating tritium from the backside of the membrane to ion chambers giving a direct measurement of the plasma driven tritium permeation rate. Isolation of the membrane cooling and sweep gases from TPE's vacuum chamber has been demonstrated by sealing tests performed up to 1000 °C of a membrane holder design that provides easy change out of membrane specimens between tests. Simulations of the helium carrier gas which transports tritium to the ion chamber indicate a very small pressure drop (∼700 Pa) with good flow uniformity (at 1000 sccm). Thermal transport simulations indicate that temperatures up to 1000 °C are expected at the highest TPE fluxes.

  11. In Vitro Skin Permeation Enhancement of Sumatriptan by Microneedle Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Buchi N; Anusha, Sai Sri V; Bramhini, Sri R; Amulya, J; Sultana, Ashraf S K; Teja, Chandra U; Das, Diganta B

    2015-01-01

    Different dimensions of commercially available microneedle devices, namely, Admin- Patch(®) microneedle arrays (MN) (0.6, 0.9, 1.2 and 1.5 mm lengths) and Dermaroller(®) microneedle rollers (DR) (0.5 and 1mm lengths) were evaluated for their relative efficiency in enhancement of transdermal permeation of Sumatriptan (SMT). Solubility assessment of SMT was carried out using propylene glycol (PG), polyethylene glycol (PEG) in combination with saline (S) at different ratios and the order of solubility was found to be 70:30 > 80:20 > 90:10 %v/v in both PG:S and PEG:S. In vitro skin permeation studies were performed using PG:S (70:30 %v/v) as donor vehicle. A significant increase in cumulative amount of SMT permeated, steady state flux, permeability coefficient and diffusion coefficient values were observed after microneedle treatment, and the values were in the order of 1.5mm MN >1.2mm MN >0.9mm MN >1mm DR >0.6mm MN >0.5mm DR > passive permeation. Lag times were significantly shorter after longer microneedle application (0.24h for 1.5mm MN). Arrays were found to be superior to rollers with similar microneedle lengths in enhancing SMT permeation and may be attributed to higher density of microneedles and force of application onto skin. The in vitro flux values revealed that 2.5cm(2) area patch is sufficient for effective therapy after treatment of skin with 1.5mm MN. It may be inferred that microneedle application significantly enhances the transdermal penetration of SMT and that it may be feasible to deliver clinically relevant therapeutic levels of SMT using microneedle assisted transdermal delivery systems.

  12. Development of a plasma driven permeation experiment for TPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchenauer, Dean; Kolasinski, Robert; Shimada, Masa; Donovan, David; Youchison, Dennis; Merrill, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We have designed and fabricated a novel tritium permeation membrane holder for use in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE). • The membrane temperature is controlled by varying the cooling flow rate and proximity of a spiral cooling channel. • Sealing tests have demonstrated adequate helium leak rates up to temperatures of 1000 °C. • Flow modeling indicates a minimal helium pressure drop across the membrane holder (<700 Pa). • Thermal modeling shows good heat removal and minimal membrane temperature variation (±2%) even up to peak TPE ion fluxes. - Abstract: Experiments on retention of hydrogen isotopes (including tritium) at temperatures less than 800 °C have been carried out in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory [1,2]. To provide a direct measurement of plasma driven permeation in plasma facing materials at temperatures reaching 1000 °C, a new TPE membrane holder has been built to hold test specimens (≤1 mm in thickness) at high temperature while measuring tritium permeating through the membrane from the plasma facing side. This measurement is accomplished by employing a carrier gas that transports the permeating tritium from the backside of the membrane to ion chambers giving a direct measurement of the plasma driven tritium permeation rate. Isolation of the membrane cooling and sweep gases from TPE's vacuum chamber has been demonstrated by sealing tests performed up to 1000 °C of a membrane holder design that provides easy change out of membrane specimens between tests. Simulations of the helium carrier gas which transports tritium to the ion chamber indicate a very small pressure drop (∼700 Pa) with good flow uniformity (at 1000 sccm). Thermal transport simulations indicate that temperatures up to 1000 °C are expected at the highest TPE fluxes

  13. Towards a unified model of passive drug permeation I: origins of the unstirred water layer with applications to ionic permeation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Avijit; Scott, Dennis O; Maurer, Tristan S

    2014-02-14

    In this work, we provide a unified theoretical framework describing how drug molecules can permeate across membranes in neutral and ionized forms for unstirred in vitro systems. The analysis provides a self-consistent basis for the origin of the unstirred water layer (UWL) within the Nernst-Planck framework in the fully unstirred limit and further provides an accounting mechanism based simply on the bulk aqueous solvent diffusion constant of the drug molecule. Our framework makes no new assumptions about the underlying physics of molecular permeation. We hold simply that Nernst-Planck is a reasonable approximation at low concentrations and all physical systems must conserve mass. The applicability of the derived framework has been examined both with respect to the effect of stirring and externally applied voltages to measured permeability. The analysis contains data for 9 compounds extracted from the literature representing a range of permeabilities and aqueous diffusion coefficients. Applicability with respect to ionized permeation is examined using literature data for the permanently charged cation, crystal violet, providing a basis for the underlying mechanism for ionized drug permeation for this molecule as being due to mobile counter-current flow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Starch Spherulites Prepared by a Combination of Enzymatic and Acid Hydrolysis of Normal Corn Starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yaqian; Chao, Chen; Yu, Jinglin; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Shujun

    2018-06-13

    This paper describes a new method to prepare spherulites from normal corn starch by a combination of enzymatic (mixtures of α-amylase and amyloglucosidase) and acid hydrolysis followed by recrystallization of the hydrolyzed products. The resulting spherulites contained a higher proportion of chains with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 6-12 and a lower proportion of chains with DP of 25-36, compared to those of native starch. The spherulites had an even particle size of about 2 μm and a typical B-type crystallinity. The amounts of long- and short-range molecular order of double helices in starch spherulites were larger, but the quality of starch crystallites was poorer, compared to that of native starch. This study showed an efficient method for preparing starch spherulites with uniform granule morphology and small particle size from normal corn starch. The ratios of α-amylase and amyloglucosidase in enzymatic hydrolysis had little effect on the structure of the starch spherulites.

  15. Concerted suppression of all starch branching enzyme genes in barley produces amylose-only starch granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carciofi, Massimiliano; Blennow, Andreas; Jensen, Susanne L

    2012-01-01

    to glucose and rapidly absorbed in the small intestine. But a portion of dietary starch, termed "resistant starch" (RS) escapes digestion and reaches the large intestine, where it is fermented by colonic bacteria producing short chain fatty acids (SCFA) which are linked to several health benefits. The RS...

  16. In vitro starch digestion correlates well with rate and extent of starch digestion in broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weurding, R.E.; Veldman, R.; Veen, W.A.G.; Aar, van der P.J.; Verstegen, M.W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Current feed evaluation systems for poultry are based on digested components (fat, protein and nitrogen-free extracts). Digestible starch is the most important energy source in broiler chicken feeds and is part of the nitrogen-free extract fraction. Digestible starch may be predicted using an in

  17. Green starch conversions : Studies on starch acetylation in densified CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muljana, Henky; Picchioni, Francesco; Heeres, Hero J.; Janssen, Leon P. B. M.

    2010-01-01

    The acetylation of potato starch with acetic anhydride (AAH) and sodium acetate (NaOAc) as catalyst in densified CO2 was explored in a batch reactor setup. The effects of process variables such as pressure (6-9.8 MPa), temperature (40-90 degrees C), AAH to starch ratio (2-5 mol/mol AGU), NaOAc to

  18. Characterization of starch films containing starch nanoparticles: part 1: physical and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ai-Min; Wang, Li-Jun; Li, Dong; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-07-25

    We report, for the first time, the preparation method and characteristics of starch films incorporating spray dried and vacuum freeze dried starch nanoparticles. Physical properties of these films such as morphology, crystallinity, water vapor permeability (WVP), opacity, and glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties (strain versus temperature, strain versus stress, Young's modulus and toughness) were measured. Addition of both starch nanoparticles in starch films increased roughness of surface, lowered degree of crystallinity by 23.5%, WVP by 44% and Tg by 4.3°C, respectively compared to those of starch-only films. Drying method used in preparation of starch nanoparticles only affected opacity of films. The incorporation of nanoparticles in starch films resulted into denser films due to which the extent of variation of strain with temperature was much lower. The toughness and Young's modulus of films containing both types of starch nanoparticles were lower than those of control films especially at <100°C. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of gamma irradiation on thermophysical properties of plasticized starch and starch surfactant films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, Krystyna; Watzeels, Nick; Rahier, Hubert

    2014-06-01

    In this work the influence of gamma irradiation on the thermomechanical properties of the films formed in potato starch-glycerol and potato starch-glycerol-surfactant systems were examined by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis, DMA, and Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC, and the results were correlated to the amount of the volatile fraction in the films.

  20. Computational investigation of the effects of barrier layers on the permeation of hydrogen through metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.G.

    1975-01-01

    Results of a computational investigation of the permeation behavior of oxide-coated metal membranes are presented. A steady-state permeation model was developed which promises to be useful in evaluation of oxide layers on metals as hydrogen permeation barriers. The pressure and thickness dependence of steady state permeation through oxide-coated metal membranes is described using plots of logarithmic functions. (U.S.)