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Sample records for stannate titanate ceramics

  1. Preparation, structure and dielectric property of barium stannate titanate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Xiaoyong [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong Univesity, Xi' an 710049 (China)]. E-mail: wdy@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Yao Xi [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong Univesity, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2007-02-25

    The processing route of barium stannate titanate ceramics were optimized to prepare full composition range solid solution sample. The phase structure, microscopic morphology and dielectric properties of barium stannate titanate ceramics were studied. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that the samples are of single perovskite structure. Linear empirical relationship between crystal lattice and tin content was proposed. This relationship is valid covering the full composition range, which suggests that this solid solution system is ultimate mutual soluble. The phase transition behavior was studied and a phase diagram was obtained based on the dielectric measurements.

  2. High energy storage density performance of Ba, Sr-modified lead lanthanum zirconate titanate stannate antiferroelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinfei; Yang, Tongqing; Chen, Shengchen; Li, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Polarization hysteresis (P–E) loops of the (Pb 0.85 Ba 0.08 Sr 0.03 La 0.03 ) (Zr 0.74 Sn 0.22 Ti 0.04 ) samples: (a) measured at different applied electric-field and (b) measured at different temperatures is shown. It is typical antiferroelectrics whose remnant polarization is zero. As the remnant polarization of AFE is small and the ceramics are accompanied by the formation of the anti-parallel domain structure, energy stored in PLZST can be effectively released. Thus we calculated the energy density from the P–E loop and obtained the power density was up to 1.2 J/cm 3 at 55 °C, and at 45 °C the energy density was ∼1.24 J/cm 3 . As usual, for bulk ceramics, the switching between the AFE and FE states occurs at lower field. This value is much higher than that reported previously for the PLZT bulk ceramic (0.4 J/cm 3 ). - Highlights: • Ba 2+ , Sr 2+ co-doping caused the T c of PLZST moved to the lower temperature (T c ≈ 40 °C). • The ΔE was so smaller, E AF ≈ 90 kV/cm and E FA ≈ 85 kV/cm. • Ba, Sr co-doped PLZST ceramic exhibited slanted P–E loops with a large breakdown field (100 kV/cm). • A high energy density was up to 1.2 J/cm 3 . - Abstract: (Pb 0.85 Ba 0.08 Sr 0.03 La 0.03 )(Zr 0.74 Sn 0.22 Ti 0.04 ) (Ba, Sr co-doped PLZST) co-doping antiferroelectric (AFE) ceramics with orthorhombic perovskite structure were prepared by the traditional solid state reaction process. It was observed that the doping of barium and strontium caused the Curie temperature of PLZST move to the lower temperature (T c ≈ 40 °C). Ba, Sr co-doped PLZST AFE ceramics exhibited excellent electrical properties, the AFE to ferroelectric (FE) transition occurred at field E AF ≈ 90 kV/cm, and the transition from FE to AFE occurred at E FA ≈ 85 kV/cm. The maximum relative permittivity was about 4800, occurring at a field near the AFE to FE transition point, with a dielectric loss of 0.006. The samples exhibited small ΔE and slanted hysteresis

  3. Synthesis and characterisation of Stannate ceramics for application as high performance material; Synthese und Charakterisierung von Stannat-Keramiken fuer die Verwendung als Hochleistungswerkstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, A.

    2003-07-01

    New optimised wet-chemical routes (precipitation, polymerisation and sol-gel) for the production of pure, homogenic and nanocrystalline perovskitic earth alkali stannate powders (Ba- and SrSnO{sub 3}) were investigated. One of the routes was used to synthesise substituted partly new stannate ceramics (Ba{sub 2}YSnO{sub 5.5}, Ba{sub 2}NdSnO{sub 5.5} and nonstoichiometric compositions). The characterisation includes thermal analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and quantitative phase analysis. Further, results of impedance spectroscopy on the substituted powders are discussed. Thermal analysis data provide information about the precursor i. e. phase transition, ordering onset and mass changes. FTIR spectroscopy is both used to identify functional groups in the precursor and to compare with starting reagents as well as to investigate the surface behaviour of the calcined powders, i. e. adsorption of CO{sub 2} or water. X-ray diffraction data are used to compare the products in terms of phase purity and identification of additional phases as well as determination of crystallite size and distribution, structural parameters and quantitative phase analysis (target product and additional phases). The synthesis routes are compared and evaluated. The polymerisation and sol-gel-routes provide the best products in terms of material specific parameters. Different impedance spectra of Ba{sub 2}YSnO{sub 5.5}, Ba{sub 2}NdSnO{sub 5.5} and ''nonstoichiometric'' ceramics measured between RT and ca. 600 C are presented and calculated values for the specific conductance are shown. Ba{sub 2}YSnO{sub 5.5} can be applied as good conductive compound, Ba{sub 2}NdSnO{sub 5.5} and nonstoichiometric compositions as possible candidates for a membrane in a SOFC or as sensor material. (orig.)

  4. Electronic properties of lithium titanate ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla-Campos, Luis; Buljan, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Research on tritium breeder material is fundamental to the development of deuterium-tritium type fusion reactors for producing clean, non contaminating, electrical energy, since only energy and helium, a harmless gas, are produced from the fusion reaction. Lithium titanate ceramic is one of the possible candidates for the tritium breeder material. This last material is thought to form part of the first wall of the nucleus of the reactor which will provide the necessary tritium for the fusion and will also serve as a shield. Lithium titanate has advantageous characteristics compared to other materials. Some of these are low activation under the irradiation of neutrons, good thermal stability, high density of lithium atoms and relatively fast tritium release at low temperatures. However, there are still several physical and chemical properties with respect to the tritium release mechanism and mechanical properties that have not been studied at all. This work presents a theoretical study of the electronic properties of lithium titanate ceramic and the corresponding tritiated material. Band calculations using the Extended H kel Tight-Binding approach were carried out. Results show that after substituting lithium for tritium atoms, the electronic states for the latter appear in the middle of prohibited band gap which it is an indication that the tritiated material should behave as a semiconductor, contrary to Li 2 TiO 3 which is a dielectric isolator. A study was also carried out to determine the energetically most favorable sites for the substitution of lithium for tritium atoms. Additionally, we analyzed possible pathways for the diffusion of a tritium atom within the crystalline structure of the Li 2 TiO 3

  5. Extrusion and properties of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, S.; Millar, C.E.; Pedersen, L.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a procedure for fabricating electroceramic actuators with good piezoelectric properties. The preparation of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic rods and tubes by extrusion processing is described. The microstructure of extrudates was investi......The purpose of this work was to develop a procedure for fabricating electroceramic actuators with good piezoelectric properties. The preparation of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic rods and tubes by extrusion processing is described. The microstructure of extrudates...

  6. Electrical and thermal properties of lead titanate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, J.; Deshpande, V.K.

    2011-01-01

    Glass samples with composition of (50-X)PbO-(25+X)TiO 2 -25B 2 O 3 (where X=0, 5, 10 and 12.5 mol%) were prepared using conventional quenching technique. The glass transition temperature, T g and crystallization temperature T c were determined from the DTA. These glass samples were converted to glass ceramics by following two stage heat treatment schedule. The glass ceramic samples were characterized by XRD, SEM and dielectric constant measurements. The XRD results revealed the formation of ferroelectric lead titanate (PT) as a major crystalline phase in the glass ceramics. The density increases and the CTE decreases for all glass ceramics with increase in X (mol%). This may be attributed to increase in PT phase. The SEM results which show rounded crystallites of lead titanate, also supports other results. Hysteresis loops observed at room temperature confirms the ferroelectric nature of glass ceramics. The optimized glass ceramic sample exhibits high dielectric constant which is of technical importance. -- Research Highlights: →Lead titanate glass ceramics prepared by conventional quenching technique. →Lead titanate is a major crystalline phase in the glass ceramics. →The ferroelectric nature of glass ceramics is confirmed by the hysteresis study. →The high value of ε observed at room temperature is quite promising in the study.

  7. New developments in aluminium titanate ceramics and refractories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alecu, I.D.; Cilia, R.A.; Dean, G.A.; Reuben, R.; Stead, R.J.; Wing, R.F. [Rojan Advanced Ceramics Pty Ltd., Spearwood, WA (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    During the recent years there has been a world-wide resurgence in the interest for aluminium titanate ceramics. Aluminium titanate (AT) possesses a unique collection of outstanding properties that make it a favourite candidate for applications where thermal shock resistance, thermal and / or phonic insulation, or compatibility with molten metals are key requirements. Particularly promising are the applications of aluminium titanate in the non-ferrous metallurgical industry, primarily in aluminium smelters and foundries. Aluminium titanate is best suitable for manufacturing ceramic components for gravity and low-pressure die casting of non-ferrous metals and alloys. Examples of such components are casting nozzles and spouts, sprue bushes, connecting tubes, riser tubes, etc. As aluminium titanate (AT) is generally known as a ceramic material with a modest mechanical strength, most applications have been so far as components that either are small enough, or are subjected to small enough mechanical loads, so that the risk of failure is acceptably low. Currently there is an increasing demand for larger and / or stronger components, which obviously require significantly stronger aluminium titanate ceramic materials, as well as adequate forming technologies. (orig.)

  8. Extrusion and properties of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, S.; Millar, C.E.; Pedersen, L.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a procedure for fabricating electroceramic actuators with good piezoelectric properties. The preparation of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic rods and tubes by extrusion processing is described. The microstructure of extrudates...... was investigated in comparision with different processing conditions. Finally, the measuremental results of density, dielectric and piezoelectric properties are reported and analyzed....

  9. Radioluminescence and photoluminescence characterization of Eu and Tb doped barium stannate phosphor ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayvacıklı, M. [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 45010 Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Canimoglu, A., E-mail: canimoglu@hotmail.com [Niğde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Niğde (Turkey); Karabulut, Y. [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 45010 Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Kotan, Z. [Ege University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 35100 Bornova, İzmir (Turkey); Herval, L.K.S.; Godoy, M.P.F. de; Galvão Gobato, Y. [Departmento de Física, UniversidadeFederal de São Carlos, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Henini, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham Nanotechnology and Nanoscience Center, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Can, N., E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, 45010 Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey)

    2014-03-25

    In this paper, we report on structural and optical properties of terbium and europium doped barium stannate phosphors (BaSnO{sub 3}) synthesised by conventional solid state reaction method. We have studied those materials by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), radioluminescence (RL) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. XRD patterns confirm that the BaSnO{sub 3} sintered at 1400 °C exhibit orthorhombic structure and that the Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} substitution of Ba{sup 2+} does not change the structure of the BaSnO{sub 3} host. The optical emission spectrum is characterized a broad band centered at 897 nm (1.38 eV), with a high-energy tail approximately 750 nm from the host lattice. Other emission signals that are characteristic of the 3 + oxidation state of rare earth elements were generated by Eu and Tb doping. Luminescence measurements show that the series of emission states {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 6}, {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 5}, {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 4} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 3} corresponding to the typical 4f → 4f infra-configuration forbidden transitions of Tb{sup 3+} are appeared and the major emission peak at 540 nm is due to {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 5} transitions of Tb{sup 3+}. On the other hand, the emission spectrum of Eu doped BaSnO{sub 3} phosphor exhibits a series of emission bands, which are attributed to the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub j} (j = 0–4) transitions of Eu{sup 3+} ions. The dominant emission of Eu{sup 3+} corresponding to the electric dipole transition {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 2} is located at 613 nm. The sharp emission properties exhibited demonstrate that the BaSnO{sub 3} is a suitable host for rare-earth ion doped phosphor material. This work clearly confirms the unusual near infrared (NIR) PL discovered by H. Mizoguchi et al. in BaSnO{sub 3} at room temperature.

  10. Synthesis of Barium Titanate Piezoelectric Ceramics for Multilayer Actuators (MLAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biglar Mojtaba

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the characteristics of BaTiO3 ceramics synthesized by solid state method is presented. In order to receive the monophase ceramics the double activation and calcination were applied. A spray drier was used to granulate the powder of BaTiO3. Isostatic and uniaxial pressing were applied to manufacture the barium titanate pellets. The properties of fabricated BaTiO3 ceramics were determined at different stages of production. After the sintering phase, the hardness, the bending strength, the fracture toughness, and the coefficient of thermal expansion of barium titanate sinter were estimated. The BaTiO3 powder is characterized by spherical grains and the average size of 0.5 μm. The small value of the specific surface area of granulate ensured good properties of material mouldability and finally allowed to receive sinters of high density.

  11. Impurities in barium titanate posistor ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korniyenko, S. M.; Bykov, I. P.; Glinchuk, M. J.; Laguta, V. V.; Belous, A. G.; Jastrabík, Lubomír

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 239, - (2000), s. 1209-1218 ISSN 0015-0193 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : barium titanate phase transition * ESR * positive temperature coefficient of resistivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.547, year: 2000

  12. Compact pulse forming line using barium titanate ceramic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Sharma, Surender; Deb, P; Shukla, R; Prabaharan, T; Shyam, A

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic material has very high relative permittivity, so compact pulse forming line can be made using these materials. Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) has a relative permittivity of 1200 so it is used for making compact pulse forming line (PFL). Barium titanate also has piezoelectric effects so it cracks during high voltages discharges due to stresses developed in it. Barium titanate is mixed with rubber which absorbs the piezoelectric stresses when the PFL is charged and regain its original shape after the discharge. A composite mixture of barium titanate with the neoprene rubber is prepared. The relative permittivity of the composite mixture is measured to be 85. A coaxial pulse forming line of inner diameter 120 mm, outer diameter 240 mm, and length 350 mm is made and the composite mixture of barium titanate and neoprene rubber is filled between the inner and outer cylinders. The PFL is charged up to 120 kV and discharged into 5 Ω load. The voltage pulse of 70 kV, 21 ns is measured across the load. The conventional PFL is made up of oil or plastics dielectrics with the relative permittivity of 2-10 [D. R. Linde, CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 90th ed. (CRC, 2009); Xia et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 086113 (2008); Yang et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 43303 (2010)], which increases the length of PFL. We have reported the compactness in length achieved due to increase in relative permittivity of composite mixture by adding barium titanate in neoprene rubber. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  13. Assessment of full ceramic solid oxide fuel cells based on modified strontium titanates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtappels, Peter; Ramos, Tania; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy

    2014-01-01

    stimulated the development for full ceramic anodes based on strontium titanates. Furthermore, the Ni-cermet is primarily a hydrogen oxidation electrode and efficiency losses might occur when operating on carbon containing fuels. In the European project SCOTAS-SOFC full ceramic cells comprising CGO...

  14. Degradation in lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric ceramics by high power resonant driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.P.; Chong, C.P.; Chan, H.L.W.; Liu, P.C.K.

    2003-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramics were driven in a resonant mode at various power levels. The stability of the PZT piezoelectric ceramics is found to depend greatly on the driving power level. At low driving power, the ceramics are very stable and the properties remain unchanged after continuous vibration for long periods of time. When the driving power is relatively high, however, an obvious temperature rise is observed in the ceramics during vibration and serious degradation occurs to the properties of the ceramics after some periods of continuous vibration. As the properties of the degraded ceramics are restored after an ageing process, it is proposed that high power resonant driving causes a de-ageing effect on PZT piezoelectric ceramics, which leads to degradation. The heat generated in PZT ceramics by driving with relatively high power is proved to play a vital role in the de-ageing effect

  15. Contribution of the irreversible displacement of domain walls to the piezoelectric effect in barium titanate and lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovic, D

    1997-01-01

    The contribution from the irreversible displacement of non-180 deg domain walls to the direct longitudinal piezoelectric d sub 3 sub 3 coefficient of BaTiO sub 3 and Pb(Zr, Ti)O sub 3 ceramics was determined quantitatively by using the Rayleigh law. Effects of the crystal structure and microstructure of the ceramics as well as the external d.c. pressure on the domain wall contribution to d sub 3 sub 3 were examined. In barium titanate, this domain wall contribution is large (up to 35% of the total d sub 3 sub 3 , under the experimental conditions used) and dependent on the external d.c. pressure in coarse grained ceramics, and much smaller and independent of the external d.c. pressure in fine-grained samples. The presence of internal stresses in fine-grained ceramics could account for the observed behaviour. The analysis shows that the domain-wall contribution to the d sub 3 sub 3 in lead zirconate titanate ceramics is large in compositions close to the morphotropic phase boundary that contain a mixture of te...

  16. Fabrication of crystal-oriented barium-bismuth titanate ceramics in high magnetic field and subsequent reaction sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Tomita, Yusuke; Furushima, Ryoichi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Doshida, Yutaka; Uematsu, Keizo

    2009-02-01

    High magnetic field was applied to fabricate novel lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with a textured structure. A compact of crystallographically oriented grains was prepared by dry forming in a high magnetic field from a mixed slurry of bismuth titanate and barium titanate powders. Bismuth titanate particles with a size of about 1 μ m were used as the host material. In the forming process, the slurry was poured into a mold and set in a magnetic field of 10 T until completely dried. Bismuth titanate particles were highly oriented in the slurry under the magnetic field. The dried powder compact consisted of highly oriented bismuth titanate particles and randomly oriented barium titanate particles. Barium bismuth titanate ceramics with a - and b -axis orientations were successfully produced from the dried compact by sintering at temperatures above 1100 ° C.

  17. Review - Fabrication of crystal-oriented barium-bismuth titanate ceramics in high magnetic field and subsequent reaction sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Tanaka, Yusuke Tomita, Ryoichi Furushima, Hiroyuki Shimizu, Yutaka Doshida and Keizo Uematsu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High magnetic field was applied to fabricate novel lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with a textured structure. A compact of crystallographically oriented grains was prepared by dry forming in a high magnetic field from a mixed slurry of bismuth titanate and barium titanate powders. Bismuth titanate particles with a size of about 1 μ m were used as the host material. In the forming process, the slurry was poured into a mold and set in a magnetic field of 10 T until completely dried. Bismuth titanate particles were highly oriented in the slurry under the magnetic field. The dried powder compact consisted of highly oriented bismuth titanate particles and randomly oriented barium titanate particles. Barium bismuth titanate ceramics with a- and b-axis orientations were successfully produced from the dried compact by sintering at temperatures above 1100 ° C.

  18. Experimental studies on 3D printing of barium titanate ceramics for medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schult Mark

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the 3D printing of porous barium titanate ceramics. Barium titanate is a biocompatible material with piezoelectric properties. Due to insufficient flowability of the starting material for 3D printing, the barium titanate raw material has been modified in three different ways. Firstly, barium titanate powder has been calcined. Secondly, flow additives have been added to the powder. And thirdly, flow additives have been added to the calcined powder. Finally, a polymer has been added to the three materials and specimens have been printed from these three material mixtures. The 3D printed parts were then sintered at 1320°C. The sintering leads to shrinkage which differs between 29.51–71.53% for the tested material mixtures. The porosity of the parts is beneficial for cell growth which is relevant for future medical applications. The results reported in this study demonstrate the possibility to fabricate porous piezoelectric barium titanate parts with a 3D printer that can be used for medical applications. 3D printed porous barium titanate ceramics can especially be used as scaffold for bone tissue engineering, where the bone formation can be promoted by electrical stimulation.

  19. Full Ceramic Fuel Cells Based on Strontium Titanate Anodes, An Approach Towards More Robust SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtappels, Peter; Irvine, J.T.S.; Iwanschitz, B.

    2013-01-01

    The persistent problems with Ni-YSZ cermet based SOFCs, with respect to redox stability and tolerance towards sulfur has stimulated the development of a full ceramic cell based on strontium titanate(ST)- based anodes and anode support materials, within the EU FCH JU project SCOTAS-SOFC. Three...

  20. Scandium doped Strontium Titanate Ceramics: Structure, Microstructure, and Dielectric Properties

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    Tkach, Alexander

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Sc-doped strontium titanate (ST ceramics were synthesised by solid state reaction, according to the composition Sr1-1.5xScxTiO3 with x = 0-0.01. Structural properties and microstructure development was examined by XRD and SEM. The dielectric properties were evaluated as a function of the temperature and frequency in the radio frequency range. Lattice parameter, density and grain size, were found to decrease slightly with increasing Sc content. The dielectric permittivity and losses decrease also. Sc-doping has only a weak effect on the quantum paraelectric behaviour of ST and no dielectric anomaly was observed, what is probably related to the limited solubility of Sc on the Sr site of the perovskite lattice of ST.

    Se sintetizaron materiales cerámicos de titanato de estroncio dopado con escandio mediante reacción en estado sólido De acuerdo a la composición Sr1-1.5xScxTiO3 con x= 0-0.1. Las propiedades estructurales y el desarrollo microestructural se estudiaron mediante XRD y SEM. La propiedades dieléctricas se estudiaron como función de la temperatura y de la frecuencia en el rango de la frecuencias de radio. Se observó que los parámetros de red, la densidad y el tamaño del grano disminuyen ligeramente con el contenido en Sc. La permitividad dieléctrica y las perdidas también disminuyen. El dopado con Sc tiene un efecto muy ligero sobre el comportamiento paraeléctrico cuántico del titanato de estroncio y no se observó anomalías dioeléctricas , lo que está probablemente relacionado con la baja solubilidad del Sc en posiciones del Sr en la estructura tipo perovskita del titanato de estroncio.

  1. An approach to analyzing synthesis, structure and properties of bismuth titanate ceramics

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    Lazarević Z.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The family of bismuth titanate, Bi4Ti3O12 (BIT layered-structured ferroelectrics materials is attractive from the viewpoint of their application as electronic materials such as dielectrics, piezoelectrics and pyroelectrics, because they are characterized by good stability of piezoelectric properties, a high Curie temperature and a good resistance vs temperature. Bismuth titanate (Bi4Ti3O12 powders can be prepared using different methods, depending if the creation will be film coating or ceramics. The structure and properties of bismuth titanate materials show a significance dependence on the applied synthesis method. In this review paper, we made an attempt to give an approach to analyzing the structure, synthesis methods and properties of bismuth titanate ferroelectrics materials. .

  2. Electrical characterization of strontium titanate borosilicate glass ceramics system with bismuth oxide addition using impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, O.P.; Kumar, Devendra; Parkash, Om; Pandey, Lakshman

    2003-01-01

    The ac electrical data, measured in the frequency range 0.1 kHz-1 MHz, were used to study the electrical response of strontium titanate borosilicate glass ceramic system with bismuth oxide addition. Complex plane plots from these electrical data for various glass ceramic samples reveal contributions from simultaneously operating polarization mechanisms to overall dielectric behavior. The complex modulus (M * ) representation of electrical data for various glass ceramic samples were found to be more informative. Equivalent circuit models, which represent the electrical behavior of glass ceramic samples, were determined using complex non-linear least square (CNLS) fitting. An attempt has been made to understand the dielectric behavior of various glass ceramics in terms of contributions arising from different polarization processes occurring at glassy matrix, crystalline phases, glass to crystal interface region and blocking electrodes. Glass ceramics containing SrTiO 3 and TiO 2 (rutile) phases show thermally stable dielectric behavior

  3. Lanthanide stannate pyrochlores (Ln2Sn2O7; Ln = Nd, Gd, Er) at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katlyn M; Tracy, Cameron L; Mao, Wendy L; Ewing, Rodney C

    2017-11-09

    Lanthanide stannate pyrochlores (Ln2Sn2O7; Ln=Nd, Gd, and Er) were investigated in situ to 50 GPa in order to determine their structural response to compression and compare it to that of lanthanide titanate, zirconate, and hafnate pyrochlores. The cation radius ratio of A3+/B4+ in pyrochlore oxides (A2B2O7) is thought to be the dominant property that influences their compression response. The ionic radius of Sn4+ is intermediate to that of Ti4+, Zr4+, and Hf4+, but the bond in stannate pyrochlore is more covalent than the bonds in titanates, zirconate, and hafnates. In stannates, the pyrochlore cation and anion sublattices begin to disorder at 0.3 GPa. The extent of sublattice disorder vs. pressure is greater in stannates with a smaller Ln3+ cation. Stannate pyrochlores (Fd-3m) begin a sluggish transformation to a cotunnite-like structure (Pnma) at ~28 GPa; similar transitions have been observed in titanate, zirconate, and hafnate pyrochlore at varying pressures with cation radius ratio. The extent of the phase transition vs. pressure varies directly with the size of the Ln3+ cation. Post-decompression from ~50 GPa, Er2Sn2O7 and Gd2Sn2O7 adopt a pyrochlore structure, rather than the multiscale defect-fluorite + weberite structure adopted by Nd2Sn2O7 that is characteristic of titanate, zirconate, and hafnate pyrochlore treated to similar conditions. Like pyrochlore titanates, zirconates, and hafnates, the bulk modulus, B0, of stannates varies linearly and inversely with cation radius ratio. The trends of bulk moduli in stannates in this study are in excellent agreement with previous experimental studies on stannates, and suggest that the size of the Ln3+ cation is a primary determining factor of B0. Additionally, when normalized to rA/rB, the bulk moduli of stannates are comparable to those of zirconates and hafnates, which vary from titanates. Our results suggest that the cation radius ratio strongly influences the bulk moduli of stannates as well as

  4. EXAFS and XANES analysis of plutonium and cerium edges from titanate ceramics for fissile materials disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortner, J. A.; Kropf, A. J.; Bakel, A. J.; Hash, M. C.; Aase, S. B.; Buck, E. C.; Chamerlain, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    We report x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra from the plutonium L III edge and XANES from the cerium L II edge in prototype titanate ceramic hosts. The titanate ceramics studied are based upon the hafnium-pyrochlore and zirconolite mineral structures and will serve as an immobilization host for surplus fissile materials, containing as much as 10 weight % fissile plutonium and 20 weight % (natural or depleted) uranium. Three ceramic formulations were studied: one employed cerium as a ''surrogate'' element, replacing both plutonium and uranium in the ceramic matrix, another formulation contained plutonium in a ''baseline'' ceramic formulation, and a third contained plutonium in a formulation representing a high-impurity plutonium stream. The cerium XANES from the surrogate ceramic clearly indicates a mixed III-IV oxidation state for the cerium. In contrast, XANES analysis of the two plutonium-bearing ceramics shows that the plutonium is present almost entirely as Pu(IV) and occupies the calcium site in the zirconolite and pyrochlore phases. The plutonium EXAFS real-space structure shows a strong second-shell peak, clearly distinct from that of PuO 2 , with remarkably little difference in the plutonium crystal chemistry indicated between the baseline and high-impurity formulations

  5. Microwave assisted synthesis and characterization of barium titanate nanoparticles for multi layered ceramic capacitor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumalai, Sundararajan; Shanmugavel, Balasivanandha Prabu

    2011-01-01

    Barium titanate is a common ferroelectric electro-ceramic material having high dielectric constant, with photorefractive effect and piezoelectric properties. In this research work, nano-scale barium titanate powders were synthesized by microwave assisted mechano-chemical route. Suitable precursors were ball milled for 20 hours. TGA studies were performed to study the thermal stability of the powders. The powders were characterized by XRD, SEM and EDX Analysis. Microwave and Conventional heating were performed at 1000 degrees C. The overall heating schedule was reduced by 8 hours in microwave heating thereby reducing the energy and time requirement. The nano-scale, impurity-free and defect-free microstructure was clearly evident from the SEM micrograph and EDX patterns. LCR meter was used to measure the dielectric constant and dielectric loss values at various frequencies. Microwave heated powders showed superior dielectric constant value with low dielectric loss which is highly essential for the fabrication of Multi Layered Ceramic Capacitors.

  6. Microstructure Control of Barium Titanate Grain-oriented Ceramics and Their Piezoelectric Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Rintaro; Nakashima, Koichi; Fujii, Ichiro; Wada, Satoshi; Hayashi, Hiroshi; Nagamori, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Yuichi

    2011-01-01

    The Barium titanate (BaTiO 3 , BT) [110] grain-oriented ceramics along [110] direction were prepared by a templated grain growth (TGG) method. The [110] oriented BT platelike particles (t-BT) were used as template particles. The relationship between poling treatment program and piezoelectric constant was investigated. The change in the poling conditions did not greatly influence domain size and the piezoelectric constant. The relationship between piezoelectric properties and domain size in BT grain-oriented ceramics was investigated. The smaller domain size was required to increase the piezoelectric constant.

  7. Evolution of transverse piezoelectric response of lead zirconate titanate ceramics under hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fei; Xu Zhuo; Wei Xiaoyong; Gao Junjie; Zhang, Chonghui; Yao Xi; Jin Li

    2009-01-01

    The piezoelectric properties of 31-mode resonators of lead zirconate titanate ceramics under hydrostatic pressure from 0.1 to 325 MPa were evaluated by a fitting method, in which mechanical loss was taken into account. Our results based on the fitting method showed a hydrostatic pressure independent tendency of the piezoelectric coefficient and the electromechanical coupling factor because the adopted PZT ceramic can be considered as a linear system in our experiment, while two misleading tendencies of piezoelectric coefficient were obtained based on the resonance method when ignoring the contribution of the mechanical loss. (fast track communication)

  8. Direct laser processing of bulk lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Sheldon A.; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bose, Susmita [W.M. Keck Biomedical Materials Research Laboratory, School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Bandyopadhyay, Amit, E-mail: amitband@wsu.edu [W.M. Keck Biomedical Materials Research Laboratory, School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS{sup TM}) has been used to fabricate dense, net shape melt-cast structures of lead zirconate titanate (PZT), in a single step, directly on a metallic substrate by complete melting and resolidification of PZT powders. From our results, it appears that reasonable dielectric properties can be obtained in LENS{sup TM} processed PZT structures without post-fabrication heat treatments. Our results also demonstrate potential application of LENS{sup TM} towards direct fabrication of PZT based embedded sensors and transducers on structural components.

  9. An in vitro study of electrically active hydroxyapatite-barium titanate ceramics using Saos-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Frances R; Turner, Irene G; Bowen, Christopher R; Gittings, Jonathan P; Chaudhuri, Julian B

    2009-08-01

    Electrically active ceramics are of interest as bone graft substitute materials. This study investigated the ferroelectric properties of hydroxyapatite-barium titanate (HABT) composites and the behaviour of osteoblast-like cells seeded on their surfaces. A piezoelectric coefficient (d(33)) of 57.8 pCN(-1) was observed in HABT discs prepared for cell culture. The attachment, proliferation, viability, morphology and metabolic activity of cells cultured on unpoled HABT were comparable to those observed on commercially available hydroxyapatite at all time points. No indication of the cytotoxicity of HABT was detected. At one day after seeding, cell attachment was modified on both the positive and negative surfaces of poled HABT. After longer incubations, all parameters observed were comparable on poled and unpoled ceramics. The results indicate that HABT ceramics are biocompatible in the short term in vitro and that further investigation of cell responses to these materials under mechanical load and at longer incubation times is warranted.

  10. Lanthanide stannate pyrochlores (Ln2Sn2O7; Ln  =  Nd, Gd, Er) at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Katlyn M.; Tracy, Cameron L.; Mao, Wendy L.; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2017-12-01

    Lanthanide stannate pyrochlores (Ln2Sn2O7; Ln  =  Nd, Gd, and Er) were investigated in situ to 50 GPa in order to determine their structural response to compression and compare their response to that of lanthanide titanate, zirconate, and hafnate pyrochlores. The cation radius ratio of A3+/B4+ in pyrochlore oxides (A2B2O7) is thought to be the dominant feature that influences their response on compression. The ionic radius of Sn4+ is intermediate to that of Ti4+, Zr4+, and Hf4+, but the 〈Sn-O〉 bond in stannate pyrochlore is more covalent than the 〈B-O〉 bonds in titanates, zirconate, and hafnates. In stannates, based on in situ Raman spectroscopy, pyrochlore cation and anion sublattices begin to disorder with the onset of compression, first measured at 0.3 GPa. The extent of sublattice disorder versus pressure is greater in stannates with a smaller Ln3+ cation. Stannate pyrochlores (Fd-3m) begin a sluggish transformation to an orthorhombic, cotunnite-like structure at ~28 GPa similar transitions have been observed in titanate, zirconate, and hafnate pyrochlores at varying pressures (18-40 GPa) with cation radius ratio. The extent of the phase transition versus pressure varies directly with the size of the Ln3+ cation. Post-decompression from ~50 GPa, Er2Sn2O7 and Gd2Sn2O7 adopt a pyrochlore structure, rather than the multi-scale defect-fluorite  +  weberite-type structure adopted by Nd2Sn2O7 that is characteristic of titanate, zirconate, and hafnate pyrochlores under similar conditions. Like pyrochlore titanates, zirconates, and hafnates, the bulk modulus, B 0, of stannates varies linearly and inversely with cation radius ratio from 1 1 1 GPa (Nd2Sn2O7) to 251 GPa (Er2Sn2O7). The trends of bulk moduli in stannates in this study are in excellent agreement with previous experimental studies on stannates and suggest that the size of the Ln3+ cation is the primary determining factor of B 0. Additionally, when normalized to r A

  11. Influence of porosity on the mechanical properties of lead zirconate--titanate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, D.R.

    1976-09-01

    Niobium doped lead zirconate-titanate (PNZT) was used to investigate the effect of porosity on the mechanical properties of a polycrystalline ceramic. Spherical and acicular pores (25 to 150 ..mu..m) were introduced by using organic materials and the grain size (2 to 5 ..mu..m) was constant throughout the study. The very fine pores (2 to 3 ..mu..m) were formed by varying the sintering conditions and the grain size was comparable to the pore size. The fracture strength of the ceramic was measured by simple 4-point bending. A sonic resonance technique was used to measure the elastic modulus and the double torsion method was used to measure the fracture toughness of the ceramic. The effect of porosity on the fracture strength was predicted quite well by Weibull's probabilistic approach. The elastic modulus showed a linear relationship with increase in porosity (110 to 150 ..mu..m) and showed a higher value for PNZT-fine pore (2 to 3 ..mu..m) ceramics at same volume percent porosity. A decrease in fracture toughness with increase in porosity (110 to 150 ..mu..m) was also observed. It has been found that the fine pores in PNZT polycrystalline ceramic gave higher strength, elastic modulus and fracture toughness compared to the PNZT-large pore ceramics at equivalent porosities. Fracture surface analysis by scanning electron microscopy showed that the fracture origin was at the tensile surface, at the edges of the specimen and just underneath the tensile surface.

  12. Impedance spectroscopy and dielectric studies of nanocrystalline iron doped barium strontium titanate ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reenu Jacob

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Barium titanate compounds have great research attention due to their good electric and in some case interesting magnetic properties. The synthesis and characterization of iron doped barium strontium titanate (BSFTO make an attempt to understand its structure and investigate electric/dielectric properties. The formation of a perovskite compound with tetragonal phase was confirmed through X-ray structural studies. Dielectric and electrical impedance properties of the sintered BSFTO ceramics were measured in the frequency range from 42 Hz to 2 MHz and at different temperatures (up to 600 °C. It was shown that the properties of this material are highly dependent on temperature and frequency. The nature of frequency dependence of AC conductivity confirms the Jonscher’s power law. The temperature dependence of DC conductivity obeys the Arrhenius behaviour.

  13. Molten salt synthesis of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Zongying; Xing Xianran; Li Lu; Xu Yeming

    2008-01-01

    Lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (Pb 0.95 La 0.03 )(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 (PLZT) was synthesized by one step molten salt method with the starting materials of PbC 2 O 4 , La 2 O 3 , ZrO(NO 3 ) 2 .2H 2 O and TiO 2 in the NaCl-KCl eutectic mixtures in the temperature range of 700-1000 deg. C. The single phase of (Pb 0.95 La 0.03 )(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 powders was prepared at a temperature as low as 850 deg. C for 5 h. The effects of process parameters, such as soaking temperature and time, salt species, and the amount of flux with respect to the starting materials were investigated. The growth process of the PLZT particles in the molten salt undergoes a transition from a diffusion controlled mechanism to an interfacial reaction controlled mechanism at 900 deg. C

  14. Unfolding grain size effects in barium titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Chunlei; Koval, Vladimir; Shi, Baogui; Ye, Haitao; McKinnon, Ruth; Viola, Giuseppe; Yan, Haixue

    2015-01-01

    Grain size effects on the physical properties of polycrystalline ferroelectrics have been extensively studied for decades; however there are still major controversies regarding the dependence of the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties on the grain size. Dense BaTiO3 ceramics with different grain sizes were fabricated by either conventional sintering or spark plasma sintering using micro- and nano-sized powders. The results show that the grain size effect on the dielectric permittivity is nearly independent of the sintering method and starting powder used. A peak in the permittivity is observed in all the ceramics with a grain size near 1 μm and can be attributed to a maximum domain wall density and mobility. The piezoelectric coefficient d33 and remnant polarization Pr show diverse grain size effects depending on the particle size of the starting powder and sintering temperature. This suggests that besides domain wall density, other factors such as back fields and point defects, which influence the domain wall mobility, could be responsible for the different grain size dependence observed in the dielectric and piezoelectric/ferroelectric properties. In cases where point defects are not the dominant contributor, the piezoelectric constant d33 and the remnant polarization Pr increase with increasing grain size. PMID:25951408

  15. Unfolding grain size effects in barium titanate ferroelectric ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Yanqing; Wang, Chunlei; Koval, Vladimir; Shi, Baogui; Ye, Haitao; McKinnon, Ruth; Viola, Giuseppe; Yan, Haixue

    2015-05-07

    Grain size effects on the physical properties of polycrystalline ferroelectrics have been extensively studied for decades; however there are still major controversies regarding the dependence of the piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties on the grain size. Dense BaTiO3 ceramics with different grain sizes were fabricated by either conventional sintering or spark plasma sintering using micro- and nano-sized powders. The results show that the grain size effect on the dielectric permittivity is nearly independent of the sintering method and starting powder used. A peak in the permittivity is observed in all the ceramics with a grain size near 1 μm and can be attributed to a maximum domain wall density and mobility. The piezoelectric coefficient d33 and remnant polarization Pr show diverse grain size effects depending on the particle size of the starting powder and sintering temperature. This suggests that besides domain wall density, other factors such as back fields and point defects, which influence the domain wall mobility, could be responsible for the different grain size dependence observed in the dielectric and piezoelectric/ferroelectric properties. In cases where point defects are not the dominant contributor, the piezoelectric constant d33 and the remnant polarization Pr increase with increasing grain size.

  16. Effect of Semiconductor Element Substitution on the Electric Properties of Barium Titanate Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbarz-Glos B.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigated ceramics were prepared by a solid-state reaction from simple oxides and carbonates with the use of a mixed oxide method (MOM. The morphology of BaTi0.96Si0.04O3 (BTSi04 ceramics was characterised by means of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was found that Si+4 ion substitution supported the grain growth process in BT-based ceramics. The EDS results confirmed the high purity and expected quantitative composition of the synthesized material. The dielectric properties of the ceramics were also determined within the temperature range (ΔT=130-500K. It was found that the substitution of Si+4 ions had a significant influence on temperature behavior of the real (ε’ and imaginary (ε” parts of electric permittivity as well as the temperature dependence of a.c. conductivity. Temperature regions of PTCR effect (positive temperature coefficient of resistivity were determined for BTSi04 ceramics in the vicinity of structural phase transitions typical for barium titanate. No distinct maximum indicating a low-temperature structural transition to a rhombohedral phase in BTSi04 was found. The activation energy of conductivity was determined from the Arrhenius plots. It was found that substitution of Si ions in amount of 4wt.% caused almost 50% decrease in an activation energy value.

  17. Study of the structure of ferroelectric domain walls in barium titanate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normand, L.; Thorel, A. [Centre des Materiaux, Evry cedex (France) ; Kilaas, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Montardi, Y. [Rhone-Poulenc, CRA, Aubervilliers (France)

    1995-02-01

    Structure of 90{degree} ferroelectric domain boundaries in barium titanate ceramics has been studied by means of Transmission Electron Microscopy and High Resolution TEM. Tilts of specific fringes across domain walls are measured on HREM images and Selected Area Diffraction Patterns. They are in a good agreement with the twin model admitted for these domain boundaries. A computerized method has been developed to give access to quantitative information about atomic displacements across these ferroelectric domain walls. The so calculated displacement field is then compared with Landau-Ginzburg based theoretical predictions.

  18. Interdependence of phase chemistry, microstructure and oxygen fugacity in titanate nuclear waste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukyx, W.J.; Levins, D.M.; Smith, K.L.; Stevens, G.T.; Watson, K.G.; Smart, R.St.C.; Weedon, D.; White, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Titanate ceramic waste forms were prepared using several combinations of calcination atmosphere (N 2 , N 2 -3.5% H 2 , H 2 ) and metallic buffer (Ni, Fe, Ti, Al) to examine the dependence of microstructure and durability upon oxygen activity. It was found that the microstructures and phase assemblages were mostly insensitive to the fabrication method, although in detail some systematic changes were recognized. The correlation between aqueous durability and oxygen fugacity was not straightforward due to density variations in the hot-pressed ceramics. These fluctuations in density dominated the dissolution characteristics of the waste forms and sometimes obscured the more subtle changes associated with redox potential. It is concluded that although the best durability is achieved at lower fugacities (i.e. Ti metal buffer and H 2 calcination atmosphere), a satisfactory product can be produced using any of the preparative routes examined providing the material is near theoretical density. 25 refs., 15 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Structure and properties of sodium bismuth titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksel, Elena

    Piezoelectric materials are commonly used in sensor and actuator technologies due to their unique ability to couple electrical and mechanical displacements. Applications of piezoelectric materials range from diesel engine fuel injectors, sonar, ultrasound, and nanopositioners in scanning microscopes. Changing environmental regulations and policies have led to a recent surge in the research of lead-free piezoelectric materials. One such system currently under investigation is sodium bismuth titanate (Na0.5Bi0.5 TiO3) or NBT. It has recently been investigated with the addition of chemical modifiers as well as part of various solid solutions with other compounds. However, research into the structure and properties of NBT is still in its infancy. The aim of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive understanding of the crystal structure and property relationships in NBT. First, the formation of the NBT phase during solid state processing was examined using in situ X-ray diffraction. It was determined that NBT forms through a particle conversion mechanism of the Bi2O 3 particle. The average and local room temperature structure of calcined and sintered NBT were examined using both high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction techniques. It was determined that the room temperature average structure of this material is best modeled using the monoclinic Cc space group rather than the previously accepted rhombohedral R3c space group. A combined high resolution XRD and neutron diffraction Rietveld refinement provided refined lattice parameters, atomic positions, and displacement parameters. The departure of the local structure of NBT from the average structure was examined through the Pair Distribution Function analysis. It was determined that Na+ and Bi3+, which share the A-site, have differing bonding environments with their surrounding O2- ions. In order to understand the origin of the piezoelectric depolarization behavior of NBT, crystal

  20. Size effect of barium titanate and computer-aided design of multilayered ceramic capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumi, Takaaki; Hoshina, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Youichi; Chazono, Hirokazu

    2009-08-01

    The size effect of BaTiO3 (BTO) is the most important issue to design multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) with high capacitance. In the size effect of BTO particles, the size dependence of dielectric permittivity related with the complex structure in BTO nano-particles. The grain size dependence of dielectric permittivity in BTO ceramics was due to the domain wall contribution. The core-shell structure played an important role in the size effect of dielectric layers in X7R-MLCCs. Computer simulation technique was developed to predict the limit of capacitance density of MLCCs produced by the current technology. Dielectric properties of MLCCs with different particle size of BTO were measured, and the data were analyzed using B-SPLINE fitting to predict dielectric permittivity at arbitrary temperatures and AC-fields. The dielectric properties of barium titanate grains smaller than 100 nm were predicted using least squares fitting of the B-SPLINE coefficients. It was found from the simulation that the use of barium titanate grains smaller than 80 nm did not give an advantage to increase the capacitance density as well as temperature stability of the MLCCs. The maximum capacitance was predicted for the 1608 (mm) chip size.

  1. Investigation of the additive induced doping effects in gelcast soft lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Dong; Cai Kai; Li Longtu; Gui Zhilun

    2009-01-01

    Due to the high sensitivity of the electrical properties of electronic ceramics to various factors, knowledge about the possible influence of the processing procedure on their electrical performance is critical for applying a new technique to the fabrication of the materials. In this study, various electrical parameters, complex impedance spectra, ferroelectric hysteresis loops, and microstructures of soft lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics formed by the gelcasting technique from suspensions with various dispersants were investigated in comparison with those of the conventional dry pressed ones. We found that the sodium ion, which is the main cation in many commercial surfactants, exhibited obvious hard doping effects; thus causing deteriorated performance of the gelcast PZT ceramics. While a certain impurity ion introduced by a dispersant was also found to induce soft doping characteristics and improve the electrical performance of the materials. The results suggest that the doping effects of the metal ions or impurities introduced by the dispersants, or other additives, should be generally considered for applying a wet processing technique to forming multicomponent electronic ceramics.

  2. Defect properties of cobalt-doped hexagonal barium titanate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhammer, H T; Böttcher, R; Müller, T; Walther, T; Ebbinghaus, S G

    2015-07-29

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) powder spectra (9 and 34 GHz) and the magnetic susceptibility of BaTiO3 + 0.04 BaO + x/2 Co2O3 (0.001 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.02) ceramics were studied to investigate the incorporation of Co ions in the BaTiO3 lattice and their valence states as well as the development of the hexagonal phase (6H modification) in dependence on doping level x and sintering temperature Ts. At Ts = 1400 °C the 6H modification begins to occur at a nominal Co concentration x of about 0.001 and for x > 0.005 the samples are completely hexagonal at room temperature. Two different EPR spectra were observed in the 6H modification of BaTiO3, which were both assigned to paramagnetic Co(2+) ions located at the two crystallographically non-equivalent Ti sites in 6H-BaTiO3. The EPR g tensor values as well as the molar paramagnetic susceptibility, measured in the temperature range 5 K-300 K at a magnetic field of 9 T, were analyzed in the framework of the ligand field theory using the program CONCORD. The combination of EPR and magnetic measurements reveals that in air-sintered 6H BaTiO3, the incorporated Co occurs as a mixture of paramagnetic Co(2+) and diamagnetic Co(3+) ions, whereas in samples annealed in reducing atmosphere the majority of Co is in the divalent state. The occurrence of Co(4+) can be excluded for all investigated samples. The sample color caused by Co(2+) and Co(3+) ions is beige/light yellow and dark grey/black, respectively. The majority of the Co(2+) ions substitutes Ti in the exclusively corner-sharing oxygen octahedra possessing nearly cubic symmetry. The corresponding ligand field parameter [Formula: see text] amounts to about -28 000 cm(-1) (Wybourne notation, 10Dq ≈ 20 000 cm(-1)). In the reduced samples nearly 5% of the detected Co(2+) ions occupy the Ti site in the face-sharing oxygen octahedra, which are significantly trigonally distorted. The negative sign of the obtained

  3. Determination of temperature dependence of piezoelectric coefficients matrix of lead zirconate titanate ceramics by quasi-static and resonance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fei; Xu Zhuo; Wei Xiaoyong; Yao Xi

    2009-01-01

    The piezoelectric coefficients (d 33 , -d 31 , d 15 , g 33 , -g 31 , g 15 ) of soft and hard lead zirconate titanate ceramics were measured by the quasi-static and resonance methods, at temperatures from 20 to 300 0 C. The results showed that the piezoelectric coefficients d 33 , -d 31 and d 15 obtained by these two methods increased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics, while the piezoelectric coefficients g 33 , -g 31 and g 15 decreased with increasing temperature for both hard and soft PZT ceramics. In this paper, the observed results were also discussed in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to piezoelectric response.

  4. Elution of lead from lead zirconate titanate ceramics to acid rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumi, Takaaki; Takezawa, Shuhei; Hoshina, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroaki

    2017-10-01

    The amount of lead that eluted from lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics to artificial acid rain was evaluated. Four kinds of PZT ceramics, namely, pure PZT at MPB composition, CuO-added PZT, PZT with 10 mol % substitution of Ba for Pb, and CuO-added PZT with 10 mol % substitution of Ba for Pb, were used as samples of the elution test. These PZT ceramics of 8 mm2 and 1.1-1.2 mm thickness were suspended in 300 ml of H2SO4 solution of pH 4.0. The concentration of lead eluted from PZT was in the range from 0.2 to 0.8 ppm. It was found that both liquid phase formation by the addition of CuO and the substitution of Ba for Pb were effective to reduce the amount of lead that eluted. By fitting the leaching out curve with a classical equation, a master curve assuming no sampling effect was obtained. The lead concentration evaluated from the amount of lead that eluted from a commercial PZT plate to H2SO4 solution of pH 5.3 was almost the same as the limit in city water. It is concluded that PZT is not harmful to health and the environment and the amount of lead that eluted from PZT can be controlled by modifying PZT composition.

  5. Study of grain boundary tunneling in barium-titanate ceramic films

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H; Poon, M C

    1999-01-01

    The temperature and the electric-field dependences of the current-voltage characteristics and the low-frequency noise of barium-titanate ceramic films are studied. An abnormal field dependence is observed in the resistivity of BaTiO sub 3 materials with a small average grain size. In addition, experiments show that the low-frequency noise behaviors are governed by grain-boundary tunneling at room temperature and by trapping-detrapping of grain-boundary states at temperatures above the Curie point. Physical models for the new observations are developed. Results suggest that grain-boundary tunneling of carriers is as important as the double Schottky barrier in the current conduction in BaTiO sub 3 materials with small grain sizes.

  6. High Gain and High Directive of Antenna Arrays Utilizing Dielectric Layer on Bismuth Titanate Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. H. Wee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high gain and high directive microstrip patch array antenna formed from dielectric layer stacked on bismuth titanate (BiT ceramics have been investigated, fabricated, and measured. The antennas are designed and constructed with a combination of two-, four-, and six-BiT elements in an array form application on microwave substrate. For gain and directivity enhancement, a layer of dielectric was stacked on the BiT antenna array. We measured the gain and directivity of BiT array antennas with and without the dielectric layer and found that the gain of BiT array antenna with the dielectric layer was enhanced by about 1.4 dBi of directivity and 1.3 dB of gain over the one without the dielectric layer at 2.3 GHz. The impedance bandwidth of the BiT array antenna both with and without the dielectric layer is about 500 MHz and 350 MHz, respectively, which is suitable for the application of the WiMAX 2.3 GHz system. The utilization of BiT ceramics that covers about 90% of antenna led to high radiation efficiency, and small-size antennas were produced. In order to validate the proposed design, theoretical and measured results are provided and discussed.

  7. Microstructure evolution and electrical characterization of Lanthanum doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billah, Masum; Ahmed, A.; Rahman, Md. Miftaur; Mahbub, Rubbayat; Gafur, M. A.; Bashar, M. Shahriar

    2016-01-01

    In the current work, we investigated the structural and dielectric properties of Lanthanum oxide (La 2 O 3 ) doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO 3 ) ceramics and established a correlation between them. Solid state sintering method was used to dope BaTiO 3 with 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 mole% La 2 O 3 under different sintering parameters. The raw materials used were La 2 O 3 nano powder of ~80 nm grain size and 99.995% purity and BaTiO 3 nano powder of 100 nm grain size and 99.99% purity. Grain size distribution and morphology of fracture surface of sintered pellets were examined by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope and X-Ray Diffraction analysis was conducted to confirm the formation of desired crystal structure. The research result reveal that grain size and electrical properties of BaTiO 3 ceramic significantly enhanced for small amount of doping (up to 0.5 mole% La 2 O 3 ) and then decreased with increasing doping concentration. Desired grain growth (0.80-1.3 µm) and high densification (<90% theoretical density) were found by proper combination of temperature, sintering parameters and doping concentration. We found the resultant stable value of dielectric constant was 10000-12000 at 100-300 Hz in the temperature range of 30°-50° C for 0.5 mole% La 2 O 3 with corresponding shift of curie temperature around 30° C. So overall this research showed that proper La 3+ concentration can control the grain size, increase density, lower curie temperature and hence significantly improve the electrical properties of BaTiO 3 ceramics.

  8. Onset of multiferroicity in nickel and lithium co-substituted barium titanate ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkathy, Mahmoud S.; James Raju, K. C.

    2018-04-01

    The structural, magnetic and ferroelectric properties of nickel and lithium co-substituted barium titanate were investigated in this work. Ba(1-x)LixNix/2TiO3 (x = 0, 0.02, 0.04 and 0.08) ceramics were synthesized via solid-state reaction with the assistance of microwave heating of the starting materials. The tetragonal structure has been observed in all samples, and it is confirmed by the Rietveld refinement study. The morphological study has been carried out by FE-SEM. Electron spin resonance (ESR) has been used to study the electron interaction and to verify the magnetism behavior of present samples. No resonance signal was observed in pure BaTiO3 samples. However, the resonance signal has appeared in the co-substituted samples. The result shows that the electron interactions are strongly affected by Ni2+ and Li+ concentrations. M-H loop was traced using VSM at room temperature. The results confirm that the sample with x = 0 shows an anti-ferromagnetic response. However, a ferromagnetic hysteresis loop arises with co-substitution. The emergence of M-H loops confirms the appearance of magnetic properties in Ni2+ and Li+ co-substituted BaTiO3 ceramics. The origin of magnetic behavior could be due to the carrier-mediated exchange interactions. Room temperature P-E hysteresis loop has been investigated at an applied electric field of 35 kV/cm and 33 Hz frequency. Measurements of room temperature ferroelectric and magnetic hysteresis loops indicate that the Ni2+ and Li+ co-substituted BaTiO3 ceramics show ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism simultaneously.

  9. LOWERING THE SINTERING TEMPERATURE OF BARIUM STRONTIUM TITANATE BULK CERAMICS BY BARIUM STRONTIUM TITANATE-GEL AND BaCu(B₂O₅

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Gleissner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of barium strontium titanate (BST xerogel as a sinter additive and BaCu(B₂O₅(BCB as a liquid phase sintering aid on the sintering behavior of BST bulk ceramics is investigated. BST as well as BCB powders were synthesized via a mixed oxide route and BST gel via a sol-gel process. Compared to pure BST bulk ceramics, BST gel reduces the sintering start (onset temperature by up to 174°C and increases the density for a sintering temperature of 1200°C. By adding BCB to the BST powder the sintering was completed much faster and the onset temperatures were reduced by 281°C and 312°C for 1 mol% and 2.5 mol%, respectively. With 2.5 mol% BCB, the highest density of 96 % (5.41 g/cm³ was achieved at 950°C.

  10. Damping behavior and acoustic performance of polyurethane/lead zirconate titanate ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C.H.; Hu, Z.; Gao, G.; Zhao, S.; Huang, Y.D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► 0–3 Type PU-based PZT composites are chosen as sound absorption media. ► The damping loss peaks of PU/PZT composites move towards higher temperature. ► The damping temperature ranges of PU/PZT composites become broaden. ► Sound absorption coefficients of composites are greatly increased at low frequencies. - Abstract: 0–3 Type PU-based lead zirconate titanate ceramic (PZT) composites are prepared by in situ polymerization method, this PU/PZT composite material has excellent sound absorption property at low frequencies because of damping property and piezoelectric property. The dispersion of PZT particles in PU matrix, dielectric loss tangent (tan δ), dynamic storage modulus (E′), dynamic loss modulus (E″), and the acoustic absorption coefficient (α) of PU/PZT composites are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and two-microphone impedance tube, respectively. The results indicate that the modified PZT particles dispersed well in PU matrix with the content of 30 wt%; the tan δ, E′ and E″ are 0.62, 3.75 GPa and 6.05 GPa, respectively, when the composite with 30 wt% of polarizing PZT; the acoustic absorption coefficient is found to increase with an increase of PZT content, and the average acoustic absorption coefficient is 0.32 at low frequencies from 125 to 500 Hz

  11. Characterization of dense lead lanthanum titanate ceramics prepared from powders synthesized by the oxidant peroxo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Alexandre H.; Souza, Flavio L.; Chiquito, Adenilson J.; Longo, Elson; Leite, Edson R.; Camargo, Emerson R.

    2010-01-01

    Nanosized powders of lead lanthanum titanate (Pb 1-x La x TiO 3 ) were synthesized by means of the oxidant-peroxo method (OPM). Lanthanum was added from 5 to 30% in mol through the dissolution of lanthanum oxide in nitric acid, followed by the addition of lead nitrate to prepare a solution of lead and lanthanum nitrates, which was dripped into an aqueous solution of titanium peroxo complexes, forming a reactive amorphous precipitate that could be crystallized by heat treatment. Crystallized powders were characterized by FT-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, showing that tetragonal perovskite structure is obtained for samples up to 25% of lanthanum and cubic perovskite for samples with 30% of lanthanum. Powders containing 25 and 30% in mol of lanthanum were calcined at 700 deg. C for 2 h, and in order to determine the relative dielectric permittivity and the phase transition behaviour from ferroelectric-to-paraelectric, ceramic pellets were prepared and sintered at 1100 or 1150 deg. C for 2 h and subjected to electrical characterization. It was possible to observe that sample containing 25% in mol of La presented a normal behaviour for the phase transition, whereas the sample containing 30% in mol of La presented a diffuse phase transition and relaxor behaviour.

  12. Cavity resonator for dielectric measurements of high-ε, low loss materials, demonstrated with barium strontium zirconium titanate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marksteiner, Quinn R; Treiman, Michael B; Chen, Ching-Fong; Haynes, William B; Reiten, M T; Dalmas, Dale; Pulliam, Elias

    2017-06-01

    A resonant cavity method is presented which can measure loss tangents and dielectric constants for materials with dielectric constant from 150 to 10 000 and above. This practical and accurate technique is demonstrated by measuring barium strontium zirconium titanate bulk ferroelectric ceramic blocks. Above the Curie temperature, in the paraelectric state, barium strontium zirconium titanate has a sufficiently low loss that a series of resonant modes are supported in the cavity. At each mode frequency, the dielectric constant and loss tangent are obtained. The results are consistent with low frequency measurements and computer simulations. A quick method of analyzing the raw data using the 2D static electromagnetic modeling code SuperFish and an estimate of uncertainties are presented.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Low Loss Dielectric Ceramics Prepared from Composite of Titanate Nanosheets with Barium Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Wypych-Puszkarz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a strategy for preparing barium titanate precursor, being the composite of titanate nanosheets (TN with barium ions (Ba-TN, which subjected to step sintering allows obtaining TiO2 rich barium titanate ceramics of stoichiometry BaTi4O9 or Ba2Ti9O20. These compounds are important in modern electronics due to their required dielectric properties and grains’ size that can be preserved in nanometric range. The morphology studies, structural characterization, and dielectric investigations were performed simultaneously in each step of Ba-TN calcinations in order to properly characterize type of obtained ceramic, its grains’ morphology, and dielectric properties. The Ba-TN precursor can be sintered at given temperatures, so that its dielectric permittivity can be tuned between 25 and 42 with controlled temperature coefficients that change from negative 32 ppm/°C for Ba-TN sintered at 900°C up to positive 37 ppm/°C after calcination at 1300°C. XRD analysis and Raman investigations performed for the Ba-TN in the temperature range of 900÷1250°C showed that below 1100°C we obtained as a main phase BaTi4O9, whereas the higher calcinations temperature transformed Ba-TN into Ba2Ti9O20. Taking into account trend of device miniaturization and nanoscopic size requirements, temperatures of 900°C and 1100°C seem to be an optimal condition for Ba-TN precursor calcinations that guarantee the satisfactory value of dielectric permittivity (ε=26 and 32 and ceramic grains with a mean size of ~180 nm and ~550 nm, respectively.

  14. Luminescence properties of barium--gadolinium-titanate ceramics doped with rare-earth ions (Eu3+ and Tb3+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemasundara Raju, S; Muni Sudhakar, B; Sudhakar Reddy, B; Dhoble, S J; Thyagarajan, K; Nageswara Raju, C

    2014-11-01

    Barium-gadolinium-titanate (BaGd2 Ti4 O12) powder ceramics doped with rare-earth ions (Eu(3+) and Tb(3+)) were synthesized by a solid-state reaction method. From the X-ray diffraction spectrum, it was observed that Eu(3+) and Tb(3+):BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics are crystallized in the form of an orthorhombic structure. Scanning electron microscopy image shows that the particles are agglomerated and the particle size is about 200 nm. Eu(3+) - and Tb(3+) -doped BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics were examined by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence (TL) spectra. Emission spectra of Eu(3+)-doped BaGd2 Ti4 O12 powder ceramics showed bright red emission at 613 nm ((5)D0 →(7)F2) with an excitation wavelength λ(exci)  = 408 nm ((7)F0 → (5)D3) and Tb(3+):BaGd2 Ti4 O12 ceramic powder has shown green emission at 534 nm ((5)D4 → (7)F5) with an excitation wavelength λ(exci)  = 331 nm (((7)F6 → (5)D1). TL spectra show that Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions affect TL sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Indentation Behavior and Mechanical Properties of Tungsten/Chromium co-Doped Bismuth Titanate Ceramics Sintered at Different Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shaoxiong; Xu, Jiageng; Chen, Yu; Tan, Zhi; Nie, Rui; Wang, Qingyuan; Zhu, Jianguo

    2018-03-27

    A sort of tungsten/chromium(W/Cr) co-doped bismuth titanate (BIT) ceramics (Bi₄Ti 2.95 W 0.05 O 12.05 + 0.2 wt % Cr₂O₃, abbreviate to BTWC) are ordinarily sintered between 1050 and 1150 °C, and the indentation behavior and mechanical properties of ceramics sintered at different temperatures have been investigated by both nanoindentation and microindentation technology. Firstly, more or less Bi₂Ti₂O₇ grains as the second phase were found in BTWC ceramics, and the grain size of ceramics increased with increase of sintering temperatures. A nanoindentation test for BTWC ceramics reveals that the testing hardness of ceramics decreased with increase of sintering temperatures, which could be explained by the Hall-Petch equation, and the true hardness could be calculated according to the pressure-state-response (PSR) model considering the indentation size effect, where the value of hardness depends on the magnitude of load. While, under the application of microsized Vickers, the sample sintered at a lower temperature (1050 °C) gained four linearly propagating cracks, however, they were observed to shorten in the sample sintered at a higher temperature (1125 °C). Moreover, both the crack deflection and the crack branching existed in the latter. The hardness and the fracture toughness of BTWC ceramics presented a contrary variational tendency with increase of sintering temperatures. A high sintering tends to get a lower hardness and a higher fracture toughness, which could be attributed to the easier plastic deformation and the stronger crack inhibition of coarse grains, respectively, as well as the toughening effect coming from the second phase.

  16. Effect of millimeter-wave irradiation on cation interdiffusion in the calcium titanate/strontium titanate ceramic couple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Akira; Kamakura, Yukari; Teranishi, Takashi; Hayashi, Hidetaka

    2013-01-01

    Interdiffusion between the perovskite CaTiO 3 and SrTiO 3 diffusion couple was investigated in an annealing method using 24-GHz MMW irradiation as the heating source. Interdiffusion was enhanced by MMW irradiation, and the apparent activation energy for interdiffusion decreased 54%, compared with conventional furnace heating. The intrinsic diffusions for both Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ were also enhanced, although their relative degrees of enhancement differed, partly as a result of differences in MMW absorptivity between the two ceramics. The observed isothermal diffusion enhancement could be ascribed to a nonthermal effect, apart from the differential degree of enhancement between the transport species. - Highlights: ► Interdiffusion was enhanced by MMW (millimeter-wave) irradiation. ► At the same time the apparent activation energy decreased. ► The enhancement degrees were different between the transport species. ► The observed diffusion enhancement can be ascribed to a nonthermal effect. ► MMW irradiation could be an effective means of preparing novel complex oxides

  17. In situ neutron diffraction studies of a commercial, soft lead zirconate titanate ceramic: Response to electric fields and mechanical stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanick, Abhijit [University of Florida; Prewitt, Anderson [University of Florida; Cottrell, Michelle [University of Florida; Lee, Wayne [ITT Corporation Acoustic Sensors; Studer, Andrew J. [Bragg Institute, ANSTO; An, Ke [ORNL; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Jones, Jacob [University of Florida

    2010-01-01

    Structural changes in commercial lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics (EC-65) under the application of electric fields and mechanical stress were measured using neutron diffraction instruments at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The structural changes during electric-field application were measured on the WOMBAT beamline at ANSTO and include non-180{sup o} domain switching, lattice strains and field-induced phase transformations. Using time-resolved data acquisition capabilities, lattice strains were measured under cyclic electric fields at times as short as 30 {mu}s. Structural changes including the (002) and (200) lattice strains and non-180{sup o} domain switching were measured during uniaxial mechanical compression on the NRSF2 instrument at ORNL. Contraction of the crystallographic polarization axis, (002), and reorientation of non-180{sup o} domains occur at lowest stresses, followed by (200) elastic strains at higher stresses.

  18. Dielectric properties of bismuth titanate ceramics containing SiO2 and Nd2O3 as additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav S. Slavov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth-titanate ceramics containing SiO2 and Nd2O3 as additives are synthesized by melt quenching method in the system Bi2O3-TiO2-Nd2O3-SiO2 in the temperature range of 1250–1500 °C. The phase composition of the obtained materials is determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Using scanning electron microscopy different microstructures are observed in the samples depending on the composition. Different values of conductivity, dielectric losses and relative permittivity are obtained depending on the composition. It is established that all investigated samples are dielectric materials with conductivity between 10^-9 and 10^-13 (Ω·cm^-1 at room temperature, dielectric permittivity from 1000 to 3000 and dielectric losses tgδ between 0.0002 and 0.1.

  19. Effect of donor and acceptor dopants on crystallization, microstructural and dielectric behaviors of barium strontium titanate glass ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Avadhesh Kumar, E-mail: yadav.av11@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Dr. Bheem Rao Ambedkar Government Degree College, Anaugi, Kannauj (India); Gautam, C.R. [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226007 (India); Singh, Prabhakar [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2016-07-05

    Bulk transparent barium strontium titanate borosilicate glasses in glass system (65-x)[(Ba{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}).TiO{sub 3}]-30[2SiO{sub 2}.B{sub 2}O{sub 3}]-5[K{sub 2}O]-x[A{sub 2}O{sub 3}], A = La, Fe (x = 2, 5 and 10) were prepared by rapid melt-quench technique and subsequently, converted into glass ceramics by regulated heat treatment process. The phase identification was carried out by X-ray powder diffraction and their surface morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The dielectric properties were studied by impedance spectroscopic technique. Investigated glass samples were crystallized into major and secondary phases of Ba{sub 1.91}Sr{sub 0.09}TiO{sub 4} and Ba{sub 2}TiSi{sub 2}O{sub 8}, respectively. A very high dielectric constant having value upto 68000 was found in glass ceramic sample BST5K10F. This high value of dielectric constant was attributed to interfacial polarization, which arose due to conductivity difference among semiconducting crystalline phases, conducting grains and insulating grain boundaries. Donor dopant La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and acceptor dopant Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} play an important role for enhancing crystallization, dielectric constant and retardation of dielectric loss in the samples. Moreover, higher value of dielectric constant and lower value of dielectric loss was found in Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped samples in comparison to La{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped samples. - Highlights: • Bulk transparent barium strontium titanate glasses are successfully prepared. • A very high dielectric constant upto 68000 was found in glass ceramics. • La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} play role for enhancing value of dielectric constant. • Higher dielectric constant with low dielectric loss was found in Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped sample. • Such glass ceramics may be used in making capacitors for high energy storage.

  20. Enhanced electrocaloric analysis and energy-storage performance of lanthanum modified lead titanate ceramics for potential solid-state refrigeration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Fu; Huang, Xian-Xiong; Tang, Xin-Gui; Jiang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Qiu-Xiang; Lu, Biao; Lu, Sheng-Guo

    2018-01-10

    The unique properties and great variety of relaxer ferroelectrics make them highly attractive in energy-storage and solid-state refrigeration technologies. In this work, lanthanum modified lead titanate ceramics are prepared and studied. The giant electrocaloric effect in lanthanum modified lead titanate ceramics is revealed for the first time. Large refrigeration efficiency (27.4) and high adiabatic temperature change (1.67 K) are achieved by indirect analysis. Direct measurements of electrocaloric effect show that reversible adiabatic temperature change is also about 1.67 K, which exceeds many electrocaloric effect values in current direct measured electrocaloric studies. Both theoretical calculated and direct measured electrocaloric effects are in good agreements in high temperatures. Temperature and electric field related energy storage properties are also analyzed, maximum energy-storage density and energy-storage efficiency are about 0.31 J/cm 3 and 91.2%, respectively.

  1. Microstructure evolution and electrical characterization of Lanthanum doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billah, Masum, E-mail: masum.buet09@gmail.com; Ahmed, A., E-mail: jhinukbuetmme@gmail.com; Rahman, Md. Miftaur, E-mail: miftaurrahman@mme.buet.ac.bd [Department of Materials & Metallurgical Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Mahbub, Rubbayat, E-mail: rubayyatm@gce.buet.ac.bd [Department of Glass and Ceramic Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Gafur, M. A., E-mail: d-r-magafur@bcsir.gov.bd [Bangladesh Council of Scientific & Industrial Research (BCSIR), Dhaka-1205 (Bangladesh); Bashar, M. Shahriar, E-mail: bashar@agni.com [Institute of Fuel Research & Development, Bangladesh Council of Scientific & Industrial Research (BCSIR), Dhaka-1205 (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    In the current work, we investigated the structural and dielectric properties of Lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) doped Barium Titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) ceramics and established a correlation between them. Solid state sintering method was used to dope BaTiO{sub 3} with 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 mole% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} under different sintering parameters. The raw materials used were La{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano powder of ~80 nm grain size and 99.995% purity and BaTiO{sub 3} nano powder of 100 nm grain size and 99.99% purity. Grain size distribution and morphology of fracture surface of sintered pellets were examined by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope and X-Ray Diffraction analysis was conducted to confirm the formation of desired crystal structure. The research result reveal that grain size and electrical properties of BaTiO{sub 3} ceramic significantly enhanced for small amount of doping (up to 0.5 mole% La{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and then decreased with increasing doping concentration. Desired grain growth (0.80-1.3 µm) and high densification (<90% theoretical density) were found by proper combination of temperature, sintering parameters and doping concentration. We found the resultant stable value of dielectric constant was 10000-12000 at 100-300 Hz in the temperature range of 30°-50° C for 0.5 mole% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} with corresponding shift of curie temperature around 30° C. So overall this research showed that proper La{sup 3+} concentration can control the grain size, increase density, lower curie temperature and hence significantly improve the electrical properties of BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics.

  2. High temperature impedance spectroscopy of barium stannate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High temperature impedance spectroscopy of barium stannate, BaSnO3. SHAIL UPADHYAY. Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India. MS received 29 May 2012; revised 14 July 2012. Abstract. Polycrystalline powder of BaSnO3 was prepared at 1300 ◦C using a ...

  3. Barium titanate nanometric polycrystalline ceramics fired by spark plasma sintering.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Sedláček, J.; Ryukhtin, Vasyl; Cinert, Jakub; Lukáč, František

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 14 (2016), s. 15989-15993 ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : BaTiO3 * Spark plasma sintering * Electrical properties Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass; JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass (UJF-V) Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272884216311695

  4. Electric field induced strain, switching and energy storage behaviour of lead free Barium Zirconium Titanate ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badapanda, T.; Chaterjee, S.; Mishra, Anupam; Ranjan, Rajeev; Anwar, S.

    2017-09-01

    There is a huge demand of lead-free high performance ceramics with large strain, low hysteresis loss and high-energy storage ability at room temperature. In this context, we investigated the large electric field induced strain, switching behaviour and energy storage properties of BaZr0.05Ti0.95O3 ceramic (BZT) prepared by high energy ball milling technique, reportedly exhibiting a triple point transition near the room temperature. The X-ray diffraction of the BZT ceramic confirms orthorhombic symmetry with space group Amm2 at room temperature. The room temperature dielectric study reveals that there is a negligible variation of dielectric constant and dielectric loss with frequency. The polarization behaviour at various applied electric fields was studied and the energy storage densities were obtained from the integral area of P-E loops. Electric field induced strain behaviour has been studied with due emphasis on the electrostrictive response at room temperature. The ferroelectric and electromechanical properties derived from the P-E and S-E loops suggest that the present ceramic encompass the properties of actuation and energy storage simultaneously.

  5. Combinatorial bulk ceramic magnetoelectric composite libraries of strontium hexaferrite and barium titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullar, Robert C

    2012-07-09

    Bulk ceramic combinatorial libraries were produced via a novel, high-throughput (HT) process, in the form of polycrystalline strips with a gradient composition along the length of the library. Step gradient ceramic composite libraries with 10 mol % steps of SrFe12O19-BaTiO3 (SrM-BT) were made and characterized using HT methods, as a proof of principle of the combinatorial bulk ceramic process, and sintered via HT thermal processing. It was found that the SrM-BT libraries sintered at 1175 °C had the optimum morphology and density. The compositional, electrical and magnetic properties of this library were analyzed, and it was found that the SrM and BT phases did not react and remained discrete. The combinatorial synthesis method produced a relatively linear variation in composition. The magnetization of the library followed the measured compositions very well, as did the low frequency permittivity values of most compositions in the library. However, with high SrM content of ≥80 mol %, the samples became increasingly conductive, and no reliable dielectric measurements could be made. Such conductivity would also greatly inhibit any ferroelectricity and magnetoelectric coupling with these composites with high levels of the SrM hexagonal ferrite.

  6. EQUILIBRIUM AND KINETIC STUDIES OF THE STANNATE(IV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Equilibrium and kinetic studies of the stannate(IV)-polyol reaction. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2010, 24(3). 451 where k is a negative proportionality constant. A striking feature of the Sn(IV)-polyol reaction, however, was its unusually slow rate (Figure 1). This, viewed in the light of the alkaline natural. pH of stannate solutions ...

  7. Pressure slip casting and cold isostatic pressing of aluminum titanate green ceramics: A comparative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Papitha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum titanate (Al2TiO5 green bodies were prepared from mixture of titania and alumina powders with different particle sizes by conventional slip casting (CSC, pressure slip casting (PSC and cold isostatic pressing (CIP. Precursor-powder mixtures were evaluated with respect to the powder properties, flow behaviours and shaping parameters. Green densities were measured and correlated with the fractographs. A substantial increase in green densities up to 60 %TD (theoretical density of 4.02 g/cm3, calculated based on rule of mixtures is observed with the application of 2–3 MPa pressure with PSC. While particle size distribution and solid loading are the most influential parameters in the case of CSC, with PSC pressure also plays a key role in achieving the higher green densities. Being a dry process, high pressure of > 100 MPa for CIP is essential to achieve densities in the range of 60–65 %TD. Slip pressurization under PSC conditions facilitate the rearrangement of particles through rolling, twisting and interlocking unlike CIP processing where pressure is needed to overcome the inter-particle friction.

  8. Structural and ferroelectrical properties of bismuth titanate ceramic powders prepared by mechanically assisted synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Z.Ž.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanosized bismuth titanate, Bi4Ti3O12, was prepared via a high-energy ball milling process through mechanically assisted synthesis directly from the oxide mixture of Bi2O3 and TiO2. The Bi4Ti3O12 phase started to form after 1 h of milling. With increasing the milling time from 3 to 12 h, the particle size of formed Bi4Ti3O12 did not reduce significantly. The grain size was less than 16 nm and showed a strong tendency to agglomeration. The nucleation and phase formation of Bi4Ti3O12, crystal structure, microstructure, powder grain size and specific surface area were followed by XRD, Rietveld refinement analysis, SEM and the BET specific surface area measurements. Raman spectroscopy was used to explain the structural properties of Bi4Ti3O12 powder, prepared by mechanically assisted synthesis. Reduction in grain size with the increase of milling time was also noted (change in the position and relative intensity, which indicated changes in the structure, caused by nanodimension grains. The sample milled for 12 h and subsequently sintered at 1000°C for 24 h exhibited a hysteresis loop, confirming that the synthesized material possesses ferroelectric properties. .

  9. Biocompatible evaluation of barium titanate foamed ceramic structures for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Jordan P; Mound, Brittnee A; Nino, Juan C; Allen, Josephine B

    2014-07-01

    The potential of barium titanate (BT) to be electrically active makes it a material of interest in regenerative medicine. To enhance the understanding of this material for orthopedic applications, the in vitro biocompatibility of porous BT fabricated using a direct foaming technique was investigated. Characterization of the resultant foams yielded an overall porosity between 50 and 70% with average pore size in excess of 30 µm in diameter. A mouse osteoblast (7F2) cell line was cultured with the BT to determine the extent of the foams' toxicity using a LDH assay. After 72 h, BT foams showed a comparable cytotoxicity of 6.4 ± 0.8% to the 8.4 ± 1.5% of porous 45S5 Bioglass®. The in vitro inflammatory response elicited from porous BT was measured as a function of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) secreted from a human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1). Results indicate that the BT foams do not cause a significant inflammatory response, eliciting a 9.4 ± 1.3 pg of TNF-α per mL of media compared with 20.2 ± 2.3 pg/mL from untreated cells. These results indicate that porous BT does not exhibit short term cytotoxicity and has potential for orthopedic tissue engineering applications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Dielectric properties of composite based on ferroelectric copolymer of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene and ferroelectric ceramics of barium lead zirconate titanate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Solnyshkin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of dielectric properties of composite films on the base of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene copolymer P(VDF-TrFE and ferroelectric ceramics of barium lead zirconate titanate (BPZT solid solution is presented in this work. The composite films containing up to 50 vol.% of BPZT grains with size ∼1μm were prepared by the solvent cast method. Frequency dependences of real and imaginary components of the complex permittivity were determined. The concentration dependence of the dielectric constant was discussed.

  11. Dielectric relaxation and conductivity behavior in modified lead titanate ferroelectric ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaiz-Barranco, A; Gonzalez Abreu, Y [Facultad de Fisica-Instituto de Ciencia y TecnologIa de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana. San Lazaro y L, Vedado. La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Lopez-Noda, R [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica, ICIMAF, CITMA 15 no. 551, Vedado. La Habana 10400 (Cuba)], E-mail: pelaiz@fisica.uh.cu

    2008-12-17

    The frequency and temperature dielectric response and the electrical conductivity behavior around the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition temperature are studied in the ferroelectric ceramic system (Pb{sub 0.88}Sm{sub 0.08})(Ti{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x})O{sub 3}, with x = 0,1,3 at.%. The contribution of the conductive processes to the dielectric relaxation for the studied frequency range is discussed considering the oxygen vacancies as the most mobile ionic defects in perovskites, whose concentration seems to increase with the manganese content. The relaxation processes below the transition temperature are associated with the decay of the polarization in the oxygen-defect-related dipoles due to their hopping conduction. Above the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition temperature, the electrical conduction is governed by the thermal excitation of carriers from oxygen vacancies; the relaxation processes are associated with ionic dipoles distorted by the oxygen vacancies.

  12. Processing effects on core-shell grain formation in zirconium dioxide-modified barium titanate ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei

    2001-07-01

    Formation of core-shell grains in BaTiO3 based dielectric ceramics is essential to achieve stable dielectric temperature characteristic. This grain core-shell structure consists of a grain core, which is high purity BaTiO3, ferroelectric, and a paraelectric grain shell, where there is a concentration gradient of dopant. Most commonly core-shell additives are ZrO2, CeO2, Nb2O5+CO 2O3. As a result, internal stress is generated due to this dopant inhomogeneity within the grain and the normally sharp phase transition at Curie point becomes diffused. Up to now understanding and control of core-shell grains in BaTiO3 ceramics is still far from satisfying, which is the basis of this thesis work. In this work, processing influences on core-shell grain formation were investigated in the terms of powder size, stoichiometry, particle surface modification by slurry pH and leached Ba2+, pressing pressure and additive effects such as ZrO2, Nd2O3, BaO and flux CuO, BaCuO2, followed by multiple regression analysis to identify significant variables so as to form core-shell grains in a controller manner. It is found that ZrO2 amount; powder size, stoichiometry and temperature/time are most significant in control of core-shell characteristic (low Deltaepsilon% slurry pH; with adequate eutectic liquid phase, uniformly distributed fine grain morphology was achieved with high sintered densities. A dielectric formulation of 0.8˜1.3 wt% ZrO2, and 3 m/o BaCuO2 and 0.1˜0.3 m/o Nd2 O3 was successfully developed to be sintered at 1055˜1085°C/45˜90 min with Deltaepsilon% < 25%. This formulation has the potential to be co-fired with base metal electrodes.

  13. Microstructure evolution and phase transition in La/Mn doped barium titanate ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Paunović

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La/Mn codoped BaTiO3 with different La2O3 content, ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 at% La, was investigated regarding their microstructural and dielectric characteristics. The content of 0.05 at% Mn was constant in all investigated samples. The samples were sintered at 1320°C and 1350°C for two hours. Microstructural studies were done using SEM and EDS analysis. The fine-grained microstructure was obtained even for low content of La. The appearance of secondary abnormal grains with serrated features along grain boundaries was observed in 1.0 at% La-BaTiO3 sintered at 1350°C. Nearly flat permittivity-temperature response was obtained in specimens with 2.0 and 5.0 at% La. Using the modified Curie-Weiss law a critical exponent γ and C’were calculated. The obtained values of γ pointed out the diffuse phase transformation in heavily doped BaTiO3 and great departure from the Curie-Weiss law for low doped ceramics.

  14. Sound velocity variation as function of polarization state in Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essolaani, W; Farhat, N

    2012-01-01

    There are several ultrasonic techniques to measure the sound velocity, for example, the pulse-echo method. In such method, the size of transducer used to measure the sound velocity must be in the same order of the sample size. If not, the incompatibility of sizes becomes an error source of the sound velocity measurement. In this work, the Laser Induced Pressure Pulse (LIPP) method is used as ultrasonic method. This method has been very useful for studying the spatial distribution of charges and polarization in dielectrics. We take advantage of the fact that the method allows the sound velocity measurement, to study its variation as function of polarization state in (PZT) ceramics. In a sample with a known thickness e, the sound velocity ν is deduced from the measurement of the transit time T. The sound velocity depends on the elastic constants which in turn they depend on poling conditions. Thus, the variation of the sound velocity is related to the direction and the amplitude of the polarization.

  15. Alkaline earth stannates: The next silicon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Ismail-Beigi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor materials are being used in an increasingly diverse array of applications, with new device concepts being proposed each year for solar cells, flat-panel displays, sensors, memory, and spin transport. This rapid progress of invention outpaces the development of new semiconductor materials with the required properties and performance. In many applications, high carrier mobility at room temperature is required in addition to specific functional properties critical to the device concept. We review recent developments on high mobility stannate perovskite oxide materials and devices.

  16. Structural and Dynamical Properties of Barium Stannate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, D.; Krogstad, M. J.; Lopez-Bezanilla, A.; Parshall, D.; Gim, Y.; Cooper, S. L.; Zheng, H.

    Barium stannate based perovskites have recently drawn attention due to their potential as transparent conducting oxides and reports of high carrier mobility in La-doped single crystals. Published DFT calculations and experimental results have suggested phonon instabilities at high symmetry zone boundary positions and local octahedral rotations, respectively, for BaSnO3. Here, we discuss recent structural measurements of BaSnO3, in which we have searched for such distortions by employing a combination of single crystal neutron diffraction and total scattering analysis of powder neutron diffraction. Moreover, we discuss lattice dynamical measurements, comparing phonon dispersion measurements to DFT calculations.

  17. Structural and microstructural study of gamma ray-irradiated co-doped barium titanate (Ba0.88Ca0.12Ti0.975Sn0.025O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umaru Ahmadu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Barium calcium stannate titanate (Ba0.88Ca0.12Ti0.975Sn0.025O3 ceramics, synthesized by solid state reaction method and sintered at 1100 °C/3 h, were exposed to gamma radiation dose of up to 1 kGy using a Cs-137 irradiation source at a dose rate of 100.46 Gv/h. Structural analysis of the ceramics indicated a tetragonal perovskite crystalline structure for both pristine and irradiated ceramics with a minor secondary phase. However, slight changes of the lattice parameters and average crystallite size were observed for the irradiated samples. The lattice aspect ratio of the tetragonal phase (c/a for the pristine ceramics was 1.0022 which decreased by 0.22% at maximum irradiation dose. Irradiation also causes some microstructural changes and slight decrease in grain size. Energy dispersive spectroscopic investigation of the Ba0.88Ca0.12Ti0.975Sn0.025O3 showed small variation in its chemical composition as gamma radiation dose is increased.

  18. Effects of surrounding powder in sintering process on the properties of Sb and Mn- doped barium-strontium titanate PTCR ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornsuda Bomlai

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of surrounding powder used during sintering of Sb and Mn doped bariumstrontium titanate (BST ceramics were studied. The ceramic samples were prepared by a conventional mixed-oxide method and placed on different powders during sintering. Phase formation, microstructure and PTCR behavior of the samples were then observed. Microstructures and PTCR behavior varied with the type of surrounding powder, whereas the crystal structure did not change. The surrounding powder has more effects on the shape of the grain than on the size. The grain size of samples was in the range of 5-20 μm. The most uniform grain size and the highest increase of the ratio of ρmax/ρRT were found to be about 106 for samples which had been sintered on Sb-doped BST powder. This value was an order of magnitude greater than for samples sintered on a powder of the equivalent composition to that of the sample pellet.

  19. Composite reinforced alumina ceramics with titan and lantana for use in coating storage tanks and transport of crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, C.E.; Rego, S.A.B.C.; Oliveira, J.C.S.; Ferreira, R.A. Sanguinetti; Yadava, Y.P.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to use ceramics to improve the performance of the tanks that store and transport crude oil and which use metallic materials for their manufacture. These tanks in contact with crude oil undergo a process of degradation on their surfaces, since crude oil is a highly corrosive substance. And in turn ceramic materials have good stability in hostile environments. However, they are inherently fragile for display little plastic deformation. Therefore, the choice of a ceramic composite alumina-titania-lantana has high mechanical strength and high toughness which were produced by thermo-mechanical processing. These composites were sintered at 1350 ° C for 36 hours, and it was held Vickers hardness testing and microstructural characterization to assess their surfaces before and after the attack by crude to use such material as ceramic coating. These results will be presented at the congress. (author)

  20. Barium titanate coated with magnesium titanate via fused salt method and its dielectric property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Renzheng; Cui Aili; Wang Xiaohui; Li Longtu

    2003-01-01

    Barium titanate fine particles were coated homogeneously with magnesium titanate via the fused salt method. The thickness of the magnesium titanate film is 20 nm, as verified by TEM and XRD. The mechanism of the coating is that: when magnesium chloride is liquated in 800 deg. C, magnesium will replace barium in barium titanate, and form magnesium titanate film on the surface of barium titanate particles. Ceramics sintered from the coated particles show improved high frequency ability. The dielectric constant is about 130 at the frequency from 1 to 800 MHz

  1. INFLUENCE OF REOXIDATION ON SILICA-CONTAINING BARIUM TITANATE CERAMICS FOR PTCR THERMISTORS PREPARED BY TAPE CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiao Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Silica-containing barium-rich BaTiO₃ ceramics for thermistors with a positive temperature coefficient of resistance are prepared by a tape-casting technique. The ceramics are sintered in a reducing atmosphere at low temperatures of 1175-1225°C. The influences of reoxidation are investigated after the reduced ceramics are reoxidized in air at 700-900°C. An anomalous correlation is illustrated between room temperature resistivity and reoxidation temperature. The anomaly results from the ferroelectricity rebuilding mechanism, which includes the spontaneous polarization theory and the ferroelectricity degradation caused by oxygen vacancies. The acceptor-state densities are estimated from the temperature-dependent resistivity. A critical temperature of 750-800°C is concluded for the grain boundary reoxidation.

  2. Specific Features of the Structure and the Dielectric Properties of Sodium-Bismuth Titanate-Based Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politova, E. D.; Golubko, N. V.; Kaleva, G. M.; Mosunov, A. V.; Sadovskaya, N. V.; Bel'kova, D. A.; Stefanovich, S. Yu.

    2018-03-01

    The phase formation, specific features, and the dielectric properties of the ceramics of compositions from the region of morphotropic interface in the (Na0.5Bi0.5)TiO3-BaTiO3 system modified by Bi(Mg0.5Ti0.5)O3 and also low-melting additions KCl, NaCl-LiF, CuO, and MnO2 that favor the control of the stoichiometry and the properties of the ceramics have been studied. The ceramics are characterized by ferroelectric phase transitions that are observed as jumps at temperatures near 400 K and maxima at T m 600 K in the temperature dependences of the dielectric permittivity. The phase transitions at 400 K demonstrate the relaxor behavior indicating the existence of polar domains in the nonpolar matrix. An increase in the content of Bi(Mg0.5Ti0.5)O3 favor a decrease in the electrical conductivity and dielectric losses of the samples, and the relative dielectric permittivity at room temperature ɛrt is retained quite high, achieving the highest values ɛrt = 1080-1350 in the ceramics modified with KCl.

  3. Synthesis, microstructural and electrical characterization of ceramic compounds based on strontium and calcium titanates and iron-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, Joao Roberto do

    2011-01-01

    Ca x Sr 1-x Ti 1-y Fe y O 3- δ, X = 0, 0.5 and 1.0, y = 0 and 0.35, ceramic compounds were synthesized by reactive solid state synthesis of CaCO 3 , SrCO 3 , TiO 2 and Fe 2 O 3 , and by the polymeric precursor technique. The ceramic powders were evaluated by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Sintered ceramic pellets were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy and impedance spectroscopy. The electromotive force resulting from the exposing the pellets to partial pressure de oxygen in the ∼50 ppm in the 600-1100 ℃ range was monitored using an experimental setup consisting of an oxygen electrochemical pump with yttria-stabilized zirconia transducer and sensor. Rietveld analysis of the X-ray data allowed for determining the crystalline structures: cubic perovskite (y = 0) and orthorhombic perovskite (y ≠ 0). The electrical conductivity was determined by the two probe impedance spectroscopy measurements in the 5 Hz-13 MHz frequency range from room temperature to approximately 200 ℃. The deconvolution of the [-Z ( ω) x Z'(ω)] impedance diagrams in the 300 < T(K) < 500 range shows two semicircles due to intragranular (bulk) and intergranular (grain boundary) contributions to the electrical resistivity. Sintered pellets using powders prepared by the ceramic route present higher inter- and intragranular resistivity values than pellets prepared with chemically synthesized powders. The emf signal under exposure oxygen shows that these compounds may be used in oxygen sensing devices in the 600 - 1100 ℃ range. Scanning probe microscopy topographic analysis of the polished and thermally etched surfaces of the pellets gave details of grain morphology, showing that pellets prepared with powders synthesized by the chemical route are less porous than the ones obtained by the ceramic route. These results are in agreement with the impedance spectroscopy

  4. High energy storage density over a broad temperature range in sodium bismuth titanate-based lead-free ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haibo; Yan, Fei; Lin, Ying; Wang, Tong; Wang, Fen

    2017-08-18

    A series of (1-x)Bi 0.48 La 0.02 Na 0.48 Li 0.02 Ti 0.98 Zr 0.02 O 3 -xNa 0.73 Bi 0.09 NbO 3 ((1-x)LLBNTZ-xNBN) (x = 0-0.14) ceramics were designed and fabricated using the conventional solid-state sintering method. The phase structure, microstructure, dielectric, ferroelectric and energy storage properties of the ceramics were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Na 0.73 Bi 0.09 NbO 3 (NBN) could decrease the remnant polarization (P r ) and improve the temperature stability of dielectric constant obviously. The working temperature range satisfying TCC 150  °C  ≤±15% of this work spans over 400 °C with the compositions of x ≥ 0.06. The maximum energy storage density can be obtained for the sample with x = 0.10 at room temperature, with an energy storage density of 2.04 J/cm 3 at 178 kV/cm. In addition, the (1-x)LLBNTZ-xNBN ceramics exhibit excellent energy storage properties over a wide temperature range from room temperature to 90 °C. The values of energy storage density and energy storage efficiency is 0.91 J/cm 3 and 79.51%, respectively, for the 0.90LLBNTZ-0.10NBN ceramic at the condition of 100 kV/cm and 90 °C. It can be concluded that the (1-x)LLBNTZ-xNBN ceramics are promising lead-free candidate materials for energy storage devices over a broad temperature range.

  5. High temperature dielectric relaxation anomaly of Y³⁺ and Mn²⁺ doped barium strontium titanate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Shiguang; Mao, Chaoliang, E-mail: maochaoliang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn; Wang, Genshui; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Dong, Xianlin, E-mail: maochaoliang@mail.sic.ac.cn, E-mail: xldong@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-10-14

    Relaxation like dielectric anomaly is observed in Y³⁺ and Mn²⁺ doped barium strontium titanate ceramics when the temperature is over 450 K. Apart from the conventional dielectric relaxation analysis method with Debye or modified Debye equations, which is hard to give exact temperature dependence of the relaxation process, dielectric response in the form of complex impedance, assisted with Cole-Cole impedance model corrected equivalent circuits, is adopted to solve this problem and chase the polarization mechanism in this paper. Through this method, an excellent description to temperature dependence of the dielectric relaxation anomaly and its dominated factors are achieved. Further analysis reveals that the exponential decay of the Cole distribution parameter n with temperature is confirmed to be induced by the microscopic lattice distortion due to ions doping and the interaction between the defects. At last, a clear sight to polarization mechanism containing both the intrinsic dipolar polarization and extrinsic distributed oxygen vacancies hopping response under different temperature is obtained.

  6. The fabrication and characterization of barium titanate/akermanite nano-bio-ceramic with a suitable piezoelectric coefficient for bone defect recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokrollahi, H; Salimi, F; Doostmohammadi, A

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, due to the controllable mechanical properties and degradation rate, calcium silicates such as akermanite (Ca 2 MgSi 2 O 7 ) with Ca-Mg and Si- containing bio-ceramics have received much more attention. In addition, the piezoelectric effect plays an important role in bone growth, remodeling and defect healing. To achieve our objective, the porous bioactive nano-composite with a suitable piezoelectric coefficient was fabricated by the freeze-casting technique from the barium titanate and nano-akermanite (BT/nAK) suspension. The highest d 33 of 4pC/N was obtained for BT90/nAK10. The compressive strength and porosity were for BT75/nAK25 and BT60/nAK40 at the highest level, respectively. The average pore channel diameter was 41 for BT75/nAK25. Interestingly enough, the inter-connected pore channel was observed in the SEM images. There was no detectable transformation phase in the XRD pattern for the BT/nAK composites. The manipulation flexibility of this method indicated the potential for the customized needs in the application of bone substitutes. An ((3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide)) MTT assay indicated that the obtained scaffolds have no cytotoxic effects on the human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Description of tritium release from lithium titanate at constant temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, L.; Lagos, S.; Jimenez, J.; Saravia, E. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    1998-03-01

    Lithium Titanate Ceramics have been prepared by the solid-state route, pebbles and pellets were fabricated by extrusion and their microstructure was characterized in our laboratories. The ceramic material was irradiated in the La Reina Reactor, RECH-1. A study of post-irradiation annealing test, was performed measuring Tritium release from the Lithium Titanate at constant temperature. The Bertone`s method modified by R. Verrall is used to determine the parameters of Tritium release from Lithium Titanate. (author)

  8. Incipient ferroelectric to a possible ferroelectric transition in Te4+ doped calcium copper titanate (CaCu3Ti4O12 ceramics at low temperature as evidenced by Raman and dielectric spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabadyuti Barman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Partial replacement of Ti4+ by Te4+ ions in calcium copper titanate lattice improved its dielectric behaviour mostly due to cubic-to-tetragonal structural transformation and associated distortion in TiO6 octahedra. The relative permittivity values (23–30 x 103 of Te4+ doped ceramics is more than thrice that of un-doped ceramics (8 x 103 at 1 kHz. A decreasing trend in relative permittivity with increasing temperature (50–300 K is observed for all the samples. Barrett’s formula, as a signature of incipient ferroelectricity, is invoked to rationalize the relative permittivity variation as a function of temperature. A systematic investigation supported by temperature dependent Raman studies reveal a possible ferroelectric transition in Te4+ doped ceramic samples below 120 K. The possible ferroelectric transition is attributed to the interactions between quasi-local vibrations associated with the micro-clusters comprising TiO6 and TeO6 structural units and indirect dipole-dipole interactions of off-center B–cations (Ti4+ and Te4+ in double perovskite lattice.

  9. Characterization and microstructure of porous lead zirconate titanate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Porous lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics are widely used because of their low acoustic im- pedance, high figure of merit and high ... made by combining a PZT ceramic with a passive polymer or air phase. These materials greatly ... study of optimization of processing parameters and novel porous ceramics structures ...

  10. Origins of n -type doping difficulties in perovskite stannates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, L.; Bjaalie, L.; Krishnaswamy, K.; Van de Walle, C. G.

    2018-02-01

    The perovskite stannates (A SnO3 ; A = Ba, Sr, Ca) are promising for oxide electronics, but control of n -type doping has proved challenging. Using first-principles hybrid density functional calculations, we investigate La dopants and explore the formation of compensating acceptor defects. We find that La on the A site always behaves as a shallow donor, but incorporation of La on the Sn site can lead to self-compensation. At low La concentrations and in O-poor conditions, oxygen vacancies form in BaSnO3. A -site cation vacancies are found to be dominant among the native compensating centers. Compared to BaSnO3, charge compensation is a larger problem for the wider-band-gap stannates, SrSnO3 and CaSnO3, a trend we can explain based on conduction-band alignments. The formation of compensating acceptor defects can be inhibited by choosing oxygen-poor (cation-rich) growth or annealing conditions, thus providing a pathway for improved n -type doping.

  11. Nootropic effects of bis(citrato)germanates (stannates) with different metals (Mg, Co) in their structure

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Godovan; M. V. Matyushkina; R. S. Vastyanov

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Nootropic effects of bis(citrato)germanates (stannates) with different metals (Mg, Co) have been investigated in this article. With this aim the peculiarities of conditioned reflex formation as well as short- and long-term memory manifestations under the influence of the investigated coordinative compounds have been studied for 256 rats with the help of pathophysiological and pharmacological methods. Methods and results. It has been shown that stannates influence on the development o...

  12. Ceria and strontium titanate based electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A ceramic anode structure obtainable by a process comprising the steps of: (a) providing a slurry by dispersing a powder of an electronically conductive phase and by adding a binder to the dispersion, in which said powder is selected from the group consisting of niobium-doped strontium titanate......, vanadium-doped strontium titanate, tantalum-doped strontium titanate, and mixtures thereof, (b) sintering the slurry of step (a), (c) providing a precursor solution of ceria, said solution containing a solvent and a surfactant, (d) impregnating the resulting sintered structure of step (b...

  13. The Overview of The Electrical Properties of Barium Titanate

    OpenAIRE

    Burcu Ertuğ

    2013-01-01

    The perovskite family includes many titanates used in various electroceramic applications, for example, electronic, electro-optical, and electromechanical applications of ceramics. Barium titanate, perovskite structure, is a common ferroelectric material with a high dielectric constant, widely utilized to manufacture electronic components such as mutilayer capacitors (MLCs), PTC thermistors, piezoelectric transducers, and a variety of electro-optic devices. Pure barium titanate is an insulato...

  14. Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Alumina and Barium Strontium Titanate Wafers Produced by Tape Casting Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    DATES COVERED (From – To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MEASUREMENT OF ELASTIC MODULUS OF ALUMINA AND BARIUM STRONTIUM TITANATE WAFERS PRODUCED BY...configuration testing method. Samples of barium strontium titanate (BST) were made using a regular powder pressing, sintering, pelletizing, and...fabricated using thin wafers of barium strontium titanate (BST) and aluminum oxide (alumina) ceramic during launch of a system. Sandia National

  15. History and challenges of barium titanate: Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijatović M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium titanate is the first ferroelectric ceramics and a good candidate for a variety of applications due to its excellent dielectric, ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties. Barium titanate is a member of a large family of compounds with the general formula ABO3 which is called perovskite. Barium titanate can be prepared using different methods. The synthesis method depends on the desired characteristics for the end application and the method used has a significant influence on the structure and properties of barium titanate materials. In this review paper, in Part II the properties of obtained materials and their application are presented.

  16. History and challenges of barium titanate: Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijatović M.M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium titanate is the first ferroelectric ceramics and a good candidate for a variety of applications due to its excellent dielectric, ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties. Barium titanate is a member of a large family of compounds with the general formula ABO3 called perovskites. Barium titanate can be prepared using different methods. The synthesis method depends on the desired characteristics for the end application. The used method has a significant influence on the structure and properties of barium titanate materials. In this review paper, Part I contains a study of the BaTiO3 structure and frequently used synthesis methods.

  17. Characterization and microstructure of porous lead zirconate titanate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Porous lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics are widely used because of their low acoustic impedance, high figure of merit and high hydrostatic sensitivity. In the present work, porous PZT ceramics were fabricated by incorporating polyethylene oxide (PEO) as pore-forming agent. Both PZT powder and PEO were mixed ...

  18. Synthesis and characterization of La-doped barium stannate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Shail; Ansaree, Javed

    2014-01-01

    A few samples in the system Ba 1-x La x SnO 3 (x=0.001, 0.05 and 0.10) have been synthesized by combustion method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the samples confirms the formation of single phase solid solution formation. It was found that single phase compositions have cubic crystal structure similar to undoped barium stannate. Synthesized powders have also been characterized using SEM, EDXA, DTA, TGA and FTIR techniques. The electrical properties of these samples were studied using the ac impedance spectroscopy technique over a wide range of temperature (50-650℃) in the frequency range of 10 Hz - 1 MHz. Complex impedance plots recorded at different temperatures show that at high temperatures (≥ 300℃) total impedance is due to the contributions of grains and grain boundaries. Resistance of these contributions has been determined. Variation of these resistances with temperature shows the presence of two different regions with different slopes. Similarity in the nature of variation of both the resistances in both the temperature regions confirms that conducting species (phases) responsible for grain, grain boundaries and electrode are the same. Based on the value of activation energy, it is proposed that conduction in the low temperature region (300 - 450℃) is taking place via hopping of doubly ionized oxygen vacancies (V 0 ·· ) whereas, in the high temperature region (450 - 650℃) via hopping of proton i.e. OH · ions. (author)

  19. High-k 3D-barium titanate foam/phenolphthalein poly(ether sulfone)/cyanate ester composites with frequency-stable dielectric properties and extremely low dielectric loss under reduced concentration of ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Longhui; Yuan, Li; Guan, Qingbao; Liang, Guozheng; Gu, Aijuan

    2018-01-01

    Higher dielectric constant, lower dielectric loss and better frequency stability have been the developing trends for high dielectric constant (high-k) materials. Herein, new composites have been developed through building unique structure by using hyperbranched polysiloxane modified 3D-barium titanate foam (BTF) (BTF@HSi) as the functional fillers and phenolphthalein poly(ether sulfone) (cPES)/cyanate ester (CE) blend as the resin matrix. For BTF@HSi/cPES/CE composite with 34.1 vol% BTF, its dielectric constant at 100 Hz is as high as 162 and dielectric loss is only 0.007; moreover, the dielectric properties of BTF@HSi/cPES/CE composites exhibit excellent frequency stability. To reveal the mechanism behind these attractive performances of BTF@HSi/cPES/CE composites, three kinds of composites (BTF/CE, BTF/cPES/CE, BTF@HSi/CE) were prepared, their structure and integrated performances were intensively investigated and compared with those of BTF@HSi/cPES/CE composites. Results show that the surface modification of BTF is good for preparing composites with improved thermal stability; while introducing flexible cPES to CE is beneficial to fabricate composites with good quality through effectively blocking cracks caused by the stress concentration, and then endowing the composites with good dielectric properties at reduced concentration of ceramics.

  20. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of the stannate(IV)-polyol reaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stability constants of 1:1 stannate(IV)-polyol complexes in aqueous media have been determined using a conductimetric technique. The constants are fairly large, and lie in the range 5.3-123.0 for the ten ligands investigated. These values were subsequently used in conjunction with kinetic data to postulate a ...

  1. Pyroelectric response mechanism of barium strontium titanate ceramics in dielectric bolometer mode: The underlying essence of the enhancing effect of direct current bias field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Chaoliang; Cao, Sheng; Yan, Shiguang; Yao, Chunhua; Cao, Fei; Wang, Genshui; Dong, Xianlin [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Functional Materials and Devices, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Changning, Shanghai 200050 (China); Hu, Xu; Yang, Chunli [Kunming Institute of Physics, Kunming 650223 (China)

    2013-06-17

    Pyroelectric response mechanism of Ba{sub 0.70}Sr{sub 0.30}TiO{sub 3} ceramics under dielectric bolometer (DB) mode was investigated by dielectric and pyroelectric properties measurement. The variations of total, intrinsic, and induced pyroelectric coefficients (p{sub tot}, p{sub int}, p{sub ind}) with temperatures and bias fields were analyzed. p{sub int} plays the dominant role to p{sub tot} through most of the temperature range and p{sub ind} will be slightly higher than p{sub int} above T{sub 0}. The essence of the enhancing effect of DC bias field on pyroelectric coefficient can be attributed to the high value of p{sub int}. This mechanism is useful for the pyroelectric materials (DB mode) applications.

  2. The pressure-induced structural response of rare earth hafnate and stannate pyrochlore from 0.1-50 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. M.; Rittman, D.; Heymach, R.; Turner, M.; Tracy, C.; Mao, W. L.; Ewing, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Complex oxides with the pyrochlore (A2B2O7) and defect-fluorite ((A,B)4O7) structure-types undergo structural transformations under high-pressure. These compounds are under consideration for applications including as a proposed waste-form for actinides generated in the nuclear fuel cycle. High-pressure transformations in rare earth hafnates (A2Hf2O7, A=Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Y, Yb) and stannates (A2Sn2O7, A=Nd, Gd, Er) were investigated to 50 GPa by in situ Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD). Rare-earth hafnates form the pyrochlore structure for A=La-Tb and the defect-fluorite structure for A=Dy-Lu. Lanthanide stannates form the pyrochlore structure. Raman spectra revealed that at ambient pressure all compositions have pyrochlore-type short-range order. Stannate compositions show a larger degree of pyrochlore-type short-range ordering relative to hafnates. In situ high-pressure synchrotron XRD showed that rare earth hafnates and stannates underwent a pressure-induced phase transition to a cotunnite-like (Pnma) structure that begins between 18-25 GPa in hafnates and between 30-33 GPa in stannates. The phase transition is not complete at 50 GPa, and upon decompression, XRD indicates that all compositions transform to defect-fluorite with an amorphous component. In situ Raman spectroscopy showed that disordering in stannates and hafnates occurs gradually upon compression. Pyrochlore-structured hafnates retain short-range order to a higher pressure (30 GPa vs. <10 GPa) than defect-fluorite-structured hafnates. Hafnates and stannates decompressed from 50 GPa show Raman spectra consistent with weberite-type structures, also reported in irradiated stannates. The second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state fit gives a bulk modulus of 250 GPa for hafnate compositions with the pyrochlore structure, and 400 GPa for hafnate compositions with the defect-fluorite structure. Stannates have a lower bulk modulus relative to hafnates (between 80-150 GPa

  3. Effect of dielectrophoretic structuring on piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of lead titanate-epoxy composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanbareh, H.; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    Functional granular composites of lead titanate particles in an epoxy matrix prepared by dielectrophoresis show enhanced dielectric, piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties compared to 0-3 composites for different ceramic volume content from 10% to 50%. Two structuring parameters, the

  4. Titan Aerial Daughtercraft

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Saturn's giant moon Titan has become one of the most fascinating bodies in the Solar System. Titan is the richest laboratory in the solar system for studying...

  5. Titan Aerial Daughtercraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Saturn's giant moon Titan has become one of the most fascinating bodies in the Solar System. Titan is the richest laboratory in the solar system for studying...

  6. Equilibrium and kinetic studies of the stannate(IV-polyol reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolocam Mbabazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The stability constants of 1:1 stannate(IV-polyol complexes in aqueous media have been determined using a conductimetric technique. The constants are fairly large, and lie in the range 5.3-123.0 for the ten ligands investigated. These values were subsequently used in conjunction with kinetic data to postulate a mechanism involving the species Sn(OH5- as intermediate in the formation of the chelates. The stannate(IV-polyol reaction, though taking place at higher pH values, is acid-catalysed and follows first-order kinetics in the oxyanion, but at large ligand-oxyanion mole ratios the reaction exhibits zero-order rate dependence on the polyol. These features taken together are consistent with a unimolecular nucleophilic substitution on the oxyanion.

  7. Photovoltaic devices comprising zinc stannate buffer layer and method for making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuanzhi; Sheldon, Peter; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    A photovoltaic device has a buffer layer zinc stannate Zn.sub.2 SnO.sub.4 disposed between the semiconductor junction structure and the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer to prevent formation of localized junctions with the TCO through a thin window semiconductor layer, to prevent shunting through etched grain boundaries of semiconductors, and to relieve stresses and improve adhesion between these layers.

  8. The influence of cation ordering, oxygen vacancy distribution and proton siting on observed properties in ceramic electrolytes: the case of scandium substituted barium titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torino, Nico; Henry, Paul F; Knee, Christopher S; Bjørheim, Tor Svendsen; Rahman, Seikh M H; Suard, Emma; Giacobbe, Carlotta; Eriksson, Sten G

    2017-07-04

    The origin of the 2-order of magnitude difference in the proton conductivity of the hydrated forms of hexagonal and cubic oxygen deficient BaSc x Ti 1-x O 3-δ (x = 0.2 and x = 0.7) was probed using a combination of neutron diffraction and density functional theory techniques to support published X-ray diffraction, conductivity, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry studies. Cation ordering is found in the 6H structure type (space group P6 3 /mmc) adopted by BaSc 0.2 Ti 0.8 O 3-δ with scandium preferentially substituting in the vertex sharing octahedra (2a crystallographic site) and avoiding the face-sharing octahedra (4f site). This is coupled with oxygen vacancy ordering in the central plane of the face-sharing octahedra (O1 site). In BaSc 0.7 Ti 0.3 O 3-δ a simple cubic perovskite (space group Pm3[combining macron]m) best represents the average structure from Rietveld analysis with no evidence of either cation ordering or oxygen vacancy ordering. Significant diffuse scattering is observed, indicative of local order. Hydration in both cases leads to complete filling of the available oxygen vacancies and permits definition of the proton sites. We suggest that the more localised nature of the proton sites in the 6H structure is responsible for the significantly lower proton conduction observed in the literature. Within the 6H structure type final model, proton diffusion requires a 3-step process via higher energy proton sites that are unoccupied at room temperature and is also likely to be anisotropic whereas the highly disordered cubic perovskite proton position allows 3-dimensional diffusion by well-described modes. Finally, we propose how this knowledge can be used to further materials design for ceramic electrolytes for proton conducting fuel cells.

  9. Nootropic effects of bis(citratogermanates (stannates with different metals (Mg, Co in their structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Godovan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Nootropic effects of bis(citratogermanates (stannates with different metals (Mg, Co have been investigated in this article. With this aim the peculiarities of conditioned reflex formation as well as short- and long-term memory manifestations under the influence of the investigated coordinative compounds have been studied for 256 rats with the help of pathophysiological and pharmacological methods. Methods and results. It has been shown that stannates influence on the development of active avoidance conditioned reflex as well as on the manifestations of mnestic functions. It has been found that germacit and gercocit induce positive nootropic effects that occur in case of low dose drugs administration and are characterized by relief of conditioned reflex formation and by short- and long-term memory improvement at the same time. Conclusion. Stanmacit and stancocit also have nootropic effects that dependent on dose and are characterized by nootropic effect during administration in low doses and by amnestic effect at doses starting from 1/40 LD50. This indicates that stannates show nootropic activity

  10. Ceramic piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic piezoelectric materials conert reversibility electric energy into mechanical energy. In the presence of electric field piezoelectric materials exhibit deformations up to 0.15% (for single crystals up to 1.7%). The deformation energy is in the range of 10 2 - 10 3 J/m 3 and working frequency can reach 10 5 Hz. Ceramic piezoelectric materials find applications in many modern disciplines such as: automatics, micromanipulation, measuring techniques, medical diagnostics and many others. Among the variety of ceramic piezoelectric materials the most important appear to be ferroelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate so called PZT ceramics. Ceramic piezoelectric materials can be processed by methods widely applied for standard ceramics, i.e. starting from simple precursors e.g. oxides. Application of sol-gel method has also been reported. Substantial drawback for many applications of piezoelectric ceramics is their brittleness, thus much effort is currently being put in the development of piezoelectric composite materials. Other important research directions in the field of ceramic piezoelectric materials composite development of lead free materials, which can exhibit properties similar to the PZT ceramics. Among other directions one has to state processing of single crystals and materials having texture or gradient structure. (author)

  11. Process for making a ceramic composition for immobilization of actinides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B.; Van Konynenburg, Richard A.; Vance, Eric R.; Stewart, Martin W.; Walls, Philip A.; Brummond, William Allen; Armantrout, Guy A.; Herman, Connie Cicero; Hobson, Beverly F.; Herman, David Thomas; Curtis, Paul G.; Farmer, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for making a ceramic composition for the immobilization of actinides, particularly uranium and plutonium. The ceramic is a titanate material comprising pyrochlore, brannerite and rutile. The process comprises oxidizing the actinides, milling the oxides to a powder, blending them with ceramic precursors, cold pressing the blend and sintering the pressed material.

  12. Anion and cation diffusion in barium titanate and strontium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, Markus Franz

    2012-01-01

    Perovskite oxides show various interesting properties providing several technical applications. In many cases the defect chemistry is the key to understand and influence the material's properties. In this work the defect chemistry of barium titanate and strontium titanate is analysed by anion and cation diffusion experiments and subsequent time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The reoxidation equation for barium titanate used in multi-layer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) is found out by a combination of different isotope exchange experiments and the analysis of the resulting tracer diffusion profiles. It is shown that the incorporation of oxygen from water vapour is faster by orders of magnitude than from molecular oxygen. Chemical analysis shows the samples contain various dopants leading to a complex defect chemistry. Dysprosium is the most important dopant, acting partially as a donor and partially as an acceptor in this effectively acceptor-doped material. TEM and EELS analysis show the inhomogeneous distribution of Dy in a core-shell microstructure. The oxygen partial pressure and temperature dependence of the oxygen tracer diffusion coefficients is analysed and explained by the complex defect chemistry of Dy-doped barium titanate. Additional fast diffusion profiles are attributed to fast diffusion along grain boundaries. In addition to the barium titanate ceramics from an important technical application, oxygen diffusion in cubic, nominally undoped BaTiO 3 single crystals has been studied by means of 18 O 2 / 16 O 2 isotope exchange annealing and subsequent determination of the isotope profiles in the solid by ToF-SIMS. It is shown that a correct description of the diffusion profiles requires the analysis of the diffusion through the surface space-charge into the material's bulk. Surface exchange coefficients, space-charge potentials and bulk diffusion coefficients are analysed as a function of oxygen partial pressure and temperature. The

  13. Electron microscopy of X7R and Y5V type barium titanate multilayer ceramic capacitors with noble and base metal electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qiquan

    Two types of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs), Y5V with Ni electrodes and X7R with Ag/Pd electrodes, were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and showed quite different microstructures which determined their dielectric behaviors. In X7R-type MLCCs, core-shell structures were observed. The flat dielectric constant-temperature curves obtained from these materials can be interpreted in terms of the internal stress states in individual grains. The stress states were observed using weak beam dark field (WBDF) microscopy. The strain contours observed were formed by distorted crystal planes and were dependent on the stress state of the crystal instead of crystal symmetry. The stress distribution in individual grains was determined by both the thickness ratio of shell and core and the geometrical relationship of the core and the shell. (111) lamella twins and dislocation loops in the paraelectric phases of BaTiO3 doped with Bi2O3 were analyzed by TEM under two-beam conditions. Y5V-type MLCCs based on re-oxidized Ba(Ti 0.88,Zr0.12)O3 (BTZ) materials exhibited frequency relaxation effects. Multi-domain structures coexisting in one grain were observed at dynamical diffraction conditions. Uneven distribution of internal stress and coexistence of multi-phases and multi-domains in individual grains were considered to be responsible for the frequency relaxor behavior observed in these materials. The compatibility of electrodes and dielectrics in cofired MLCCs with both Ni and Ag/Pd electrodes was characterized by TEM using tripod polished samples. NiO lamellae and P-rich intermediate layers were found in highly accelerated life tested (HALT) MLCCs with Ni electrodes. It is believed that Mn ions were reduced by the Ni electrodes, as P-rich and Mn-rich segregated layers were observed in the virginal non-life tested MLCCs. No silver diffusion was found in either the BaTiO3 based perovskite lattices or the flux phases in air-fired X7R type MLCCs.

  14. Piezoelectric Ceramics Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jordan, T

    2001-01-01

    ... the behavior of a piezoelectric material. We have attempted to cover the most common measurement methods as well as introduce parameters of interest. Excellent sources for more in-depth coverage of specific topics can be found in the bibliography. In most cases, we refer to lead zirconate titanate (PZT) to illustrate some of the concepts since it is the most widely used and studied piezoelectric ceramic to date.

  15. IR study of Pb–Sr titanate borosilicate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    IR study of Pb–Sr titanate borosilicate glasses. C R GAUTAM*, DEVENDRA KUMAR. † and OM PARKASH. †. Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow 226 007, India. †. Department of Ceramic Engineering, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India. MS received 3 January ...

  16. Hydrogen diffusion in lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvine, K. J.; Vijayakumar, M.; Bowden, M. E.; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L.; Pitman, S. G.

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogen is a potential clean-burning, next-generation fuel for vehicle and stationary power. Unfortunately, hydrogen is also well known to have serious materials compatibility issues in metals, polymers, and ceramics. Piezoelectric actuator materials proposed for low-cost, high efficiency high-pressure hydrogen internal combustion engines (HICE) are known to degrade rapidly in hydrogen. This limits their potential use and poses challenges for HICE. Hydrogen-induced degradation of piezoelectrics is also an issue for low-pressure hydrogen passivation in ferroelectric random access memory. Currently, there is a lack of data in the literature on hydrogen species diffusion in piezoelectrics in the temperature range appropriate for the HICE as charged via a gaseous route. We present 1HNMR quantification of the local hydrogen species diffusion within lead zirconate titanate and barium titanate on samples charged by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen ˜32 MPa. Results are discussed in context of theoretically predicted interstitial hydrogen lattice sites and aqueous charging experiments from existing literature.

  17. Dielectric properties and vacancy-like defects in plasma-sprayed barium titanate.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Čížek, J.; Sedláček, J.; Lukáč, František

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 7 (2017), s. 2972-2983 ISSN 0002-7820 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : barium titanate * plasma spraying * vacancies Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.841, year: 2016

  18. Nanostructured tetragonal barium titanate produced by the polyol and spark plasma sintering (SPS) route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Salas, Ulises; Breitwieser, Romain; Gaudisson, Thomas; Nowak, Sophie; Ammar, Souad; Valenzuela, Raúl

    2017-10-01

    There is a great interest to synthesize ferroelectric ceramics both with fine grain size and significant electric properties. Here, we report the preparation of nanostructured tetragonal barium titanate by combining forced hydrolysis of metallic salts in polyol, soft annealing and 650 °C spark plasma sintering under uniaxial pressure of 120 MPa for 5 min. The stabilization of highly dense (density of 90%), nanostructured (grains about 50 nm) tetragonal barium titanate ceramic was achieved. The produced ceramic exhibited ferroelectric behavior and a dielectric permittivity of 3600 at 1 kHz and room temperature.

  19. Synthesis of barium-zinc-titanate ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović N.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixtures of BaCO3, ZnO and TiO2 powders, with molar ratio of 1:2:4, were mechanically activated for 20, 40 and minutes in a planetary ball mill. The resulting powders were compacted into pellets and isothermally sintered at 1250°C for 2h with a heating rate of 10°C/min. X-ray diffraction analysis of obtained powders and sintered samples was performed in order to investigate changes of the phase composition. The microstructure of sintered samples was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The photoacoustic phase and amplitude spectra of sintered samples were measured as a function of the laser beam modulating frequency using a transmission detection configuration. Fitting of experimental data enabled determination of photoacoustic properties including thermal diffusivity. Based on the results obtained correlation between thermal diffusivity and experimental conditions, as well the samples microstructure characteristics, was discussed.

  20. Behavior of lanthanum containing barium stannate nanoparticles synthesized by cetyltriammonium bromide assisted wet chemistry route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Astakala Anil; Kumar, Ashok; Quamara, J. K.

    2018-02-01

    In present study, we report dielectric, ferroelectric and pyroelectric behavior of pristine and La3+ containing barium stannate nanoparticles synthesized via wet chemical route involving cetyltriammonium bromide assisted thermal decomposition of binary precursors. The X-ray diffraction patterns of pristine and La3+ (2, 4 and 6 at%) doped BaSnO3 nanoparticles showed the formation of cubic perovskite phase. On substitution of Ba2+ lattice sites by La3+ at the La content of 6 at%, the sample exhibited fourfold increase in conductivity in comparison to pristine BaSnO3. Polarization hysteresis (P-E) curves of La containing barium stannate nanoparticles showed anti-ferroelectric behavior. The pyroelectric coefficient of pristine and La (2, 4 and 6 at%) containing BaSnO3 nanoparticles at 473 K were found to be 7.8, 11.6, 14.1 and 17.2 μCm‑2K‑1, respectively. Further, the responsivity and detectivity values were higher in comparison to the materials, such as AlN, GaN, CdS and ZnO.

  1. Titan's organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Voyager discovered nine simple organic molecules in the atmosphere of Titan. Complex organic solids, called tholins, produced by irradiation of the simulated Titanian atmosphere, are consistent with measured properties of Titan from ultraviolet to microwave frequencies and are the likely main constituents of the observed red aerosols. The tholins contain many of the organic building blocks central to life on earth. At least 100-m, and possibly kms thicknesses of complex organics have been produced on Titan during the age of the solar system, and may exist today as submarine deposits beneath an extensive ocean of simple hydrocarbons.

  2. Microwave processing for ceramic materials in microsystem technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, S.

    2002-11-01

    In this study, the applicability of microwaves for sintering of monolithic ceramics and ceramic microcomponents was investigated. Experiments with 2.45 GHz and 30 GHz microwaves were conducted and contrasted to conventional thermal processing. The advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing were then assessed. Nanoscale zirconia and sub-micron lead-zirconate-titanate electroceramics were selected for the evaluation. (orig.)

  3. Titan's Lower Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Caitlin Ann

    2007-09-01

    Saturn's largest moon, Titan, sports an atmosphere 10 times thicker than Earth's. Like Earth, the moon's atmosphere is N2 based and possesses a rich organic chemistry. In addition, similar to the terrestrial hydrological cycle, Titan has a methane cycle, with methane clouds, rain and seas. Presently, there is a revolution in our understanding of the moon, as data flows in and is analyzed from the NASA and ESA Cassini-Huygens mission. For example, seas were detected only this year. Here I will discuss the evolution of our understanding of Titan's atmosphere, its composition, chemistry, dynamics and origin. Current open questions will also be presented. Studies of Titan's atmosphere began and evolved to the present state in less time than that of a single scientist's career. This short interlude of activity demonstrates the rigors of the scientific method, and raises enticing questions about the workings and evolution of an atmosphere.

  4. Clash of the Titans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2010-01-01

    WebQuests and the 5E learning cycle are titans of the science classroom. These popular inquiry-based strategies are most often used as separate entities, but the author has discovered that using a combined WebQuest and 5E learning cycle format taps into the inherent power and potential of both strategies. In the lesson, "Clash of the Titans,"…

  5. Titan's Ammonia Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M.; Choukroun, M.

    2011-01-01

    NH3 has long been considered an important component in the formation and evolution of the outer planet satellites. NH3 is particularly important for Titan, since it may serve as the reservoir for atmospheric nitrogen. A brightening seen on Titan starting in 2004 may arise from a transient low-lying fog or surface coating of ammonia. The spectral shape suggests the ammonia is anhydrous, a molecule that hydrates quickly in the presence of water.

  6. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures

  7. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures.

  8. Centrifugal Jet Spinning for Highly Efficient and Large-scale Fabrication of Barium Titanate Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liyun; Kotha, Shiva P

    2014-02-15

    The centrifugal jet spinning (CJS) method has been developed to enable large-scale synthesis of barium titanate nanofibers. Barium titanate nanofibers with fiber diameters down to 50 nm and grain sizes around 25 nm were prepared with CJS by spinning a sol-gel solution of barium titanate and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) with subsequent heat treatment at 850 °C. XRD and FTIR analysis demonstrated high purity and tetragonal perovskite structured barium titanate nanofibers. SEM and TEM images confirm the continuous high aspect ratio structure of barium titanate nanofibers after heat treatment. It is demonstrated that the CJS technique offers a highly efficient method for large-scale fabrication of ceramic nanofibers at production rates of up to 0.3 gram/minute.

  9. The review of various synthesis methods of barium titanate with the enhanced dielectric properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, S. P.; Topare, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Barium Titanate is a very well known dielectric ceramic belongs to perovskite structure. It has very wide applications in the field of electronic, electro ceramic, electromechanical and electro-optical applications. Barium Titanate has very high dielectric constant as well as low dielectric loss. Substituted dielectrics are one of the most important technological compounds in modern electro ceramics. Its electrical properties can be tuned flexibly by a simple substitution technique. This has encouraged researchers to select a typical cation to be substituted at cationic sites. In the present paper, the review of various synthesis methods of Barium Titanate compound with the effect of different dopants, the grain size on the dielectric properties at various temperatures is discussed.

  10. Experimental and first-principles study of ferromagnetism in Mn-doped zinc stannate nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Rui

    2013-07-17

    Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in Mn-doped zinc stannate (ZTO:Mn) nanowires, which were prepared by chemical vapor transport. Structural and magnetic properties and Mn chemical states of ZTO:Mn nanowires were investigated by X-ray diffraction, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Manganese predominantly existed as Mn2+ and substituted for Zn (Mn Zn) in ZTO:Mn. This conclusion was supported by first-principles calculations. MnZn in ZTO:Mn had a lower formation energy than that of Mn substituted for Sn (MnSn). The nearest neighbor MnZn in ZTO stabilized ferromagnetic coupling. This observation supported the experimental results. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  11. Bismuth Sodium Titanate Based Materials for Piezoelectric Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Klaus; Feteira, Antonio; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The ban of lead in many electronic products and the expectation that, sooner or later, this ban will include the currently exempt piezoelectric ceramics based on Lead-Zirconate-Titanate has motivated many research groups to look for lead-free substitutes. After a short overview on different classes of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with large strain, this review will focus on Bismuth-Sodium-Titanate and its solid solutions. These compounds exhibit extraordinarily high strain, due to a field induced phase transition, which makes them attractive for actuator applications. The structural features of these materials and the origin of the field-induced strain will be revised. Technologies for texturing, which increases the useable strain, will be introduced. Finally, the features that are relevant for the application of these materials in a multilayer design will be summarized. PMID:28793724

  12. Bismuth Sodium Titanate Based Materials for Piezoelectric Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Reichmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ban of lead in many electronic products and the expectation that, sooner or later, this ban will include the currently exempt piezoelectric ceramics based on Lead-Zirconate-Titanate has motivated many research groups to look for lead-free substitutes. After a short overview on different classes of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with large strain, this review will focus on Bismuth-Sodium-Titanate and its solid solutions. These compounds exhibit extraordinarily high strain, due to a field induced phase transition, which makes them attractive for actuator applications. The structural features of these materials and the origin of the field-induced strain will be revised. Technologies for texturing, which increases the useable strain, will be introduced. Finally, the features that are relevant for the application of these materials in a multilayer design will be summarized.

  13. Bismuth Sodium Titanate Based Materials for Piezoelectric Actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Klaus; Feteira, Antonio; Li, Ming

    2015-12-04

    The ban of lead in many electronic products and the expectation that, sooner or later, this ban will include the currently exempt piezoelectric ceramics based on Lead-Zirconate-Titanate has motivated many research groups to look for lead-free substitutes. After a short overview on different classes of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with large strain, this review will focus on Bismuth-Sodium-Titanate and its solid solutions. These compounds exhibit extraordinarily high strain, due to a field induced phase transition, which makes them attractive for actuator applications. The structural features of these materials and the origin of the field-induced strain will be revised. Technologies for texturing, which increases the useable strain, will be introduced. Finally, the features that are relevant for the application of these materials in a multilayer design will be summarized.

  14. Application of Eh-pH diagram for room temperature precipitation of zinc stannate microcubes in an aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hinai, Ashraf T.; Al-Hinai, Muna H.; Dutta, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • One pot aqueous synthesis of zinc stannate (ZnSnO 3 ) particles at low temperature. • Synthesis designed with the assistance of potential-pH diagram. • ZnSnO 3 estimated to be stable between pH 8 and 12 was used for synthesis of the particles. • ZnSnO 3 ·3H 2 O were formed during the precipitation of zinc stannate. - Abstract: Potential-pH diagram assisted-design for controlled precipitation is an attractive method to obtain engineered binary and ternary oxide particles. Aqueous synthesis conditions of zinc stannate (ZnSnO 3 ) particles at low temperature were formulated with the assistance of potential-pH diagram. The pH of a solution containing stoichiometric amounts of Zn 2+ and Sn 4+ was controlled for the precipitation in a one pot synthesis step at room temperature (25 °C). The effect of the concentration of the reactants on the particle size was studied by varying the concentration of the precursor (Zn 2+ + Sn 4+ ) solution. Scanning electron micrographs show that the particles are monodispersed micron sized cubes formed by the self-organization of nano-sized crystallites. The obtained microcubes characterized by X-ray Diffraction and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) show that the particles are in ZnSnO 3 ·3H 2 O form

  15. Early History of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Rogez, J. C.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Atreya, S.; Lunine, J. I.

    2007-05-01

    We revisit models for the early history of Titan. Our models start a few My after the production of calcium- aluminum inclusions (CAIs), consistent with the dates required by our thermophysical-dynamical modeling of Saturn's medium-sized satellites. Depending on the time of formation with respect to CAIs, the accretion time scale, and the available accretional energy, models of Titan's interior after accretion are partially to fully differentiated. At one extreme of the models, Titan accretes incorporating a minimal amount of heat. This results in a relatively cold core that, over the long term, heats up and overturns, consistent with previous models of Titan. At the other extreme, accretional heat and heat fom the decay of short-lived radiogenic isotopes results in quick and complete differentiation. In this model there is no core overturn, and conditions soon develop for silicate serpentinization, and hydrothermal activity starts. We identify the periods during which conditions are suitable for hydrothermal geochemistry leading to the production of molecular nitrogen from ammonia decomposition and methane from the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Key questions include the availability of suitable metal catalysts and/or clay minerals, storage of the reactants and products in the interior of Titan, and mechanisms by which they are released to the atmosphere. Acknowledgements: This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA.

  16. Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler Jr., E. C.; Acuna, M.; Burchell, M. J.; Coates, A.; Farrell, W.; Flasar, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Gorevan, S.; Hartle, R. E.; Johnson, W. T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a combined Titan orbiter and Titan Aerorover mission with an emphasis on both in situ and remote sensing measurements of Titan's surface, atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetospheric interaction. The biological aspect of the Titan environment will be emphasized by the mission (i.e., search for organic materials which may include simple organics to 'amono' analogues of amino acids and possibly more complex, lightening detection and infrared, ultraviolet, and charged particle interactions with Titan's surface and atmosphere). An international mission is assumed to control costs. NASA will provide the orbiter, launch vehicle, DSN coverage and operations, while international partners will provide the Aerorover and up to 30% of the cost for the scientific instruments through collaborative efforts. To further reduce costs we propose a single PI for orbiter science instruments and a single PI for Aerorover science instruments. This approach will provide single command/data and power interface between spacecraft and orbiter instruments that will have redundant central DPU and power converter for their instruments. A similar approach could be used for the Aerorover. The mission profile will be constructed to minimize conflicts between Aerorover science, orbiter radar science, orbiter radio science, orbiter imaging science, and orbiter fields and particles (FP) science. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Titan Polar Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    With the ongoing Cassini-era observations and studies of Titan it is clear that the intensity and distribution of surface processes (particularly fluvial erosion by methane and Aeolian transport) has changed through time. Currently however, alternate hypotheses substantially differ among specific scenarios with respect to the effects of atmospheric evolution, seasonal changes, and endogenic processes. We have studied the evolution of Titan's polar region through a combination of analysis of imaging, elevation data, and geomorphic mapping, spatially explicit simulations of landform evolution, and quantitative comparison of the simulated landscapes with corresponding Titan morphology. We have quantitatively evaluated alternate scenarios for the landform evolution of Titan's polar terrain. The investigations have been guided by recent geomorphic mapping and topographic characterization of the polar regions that are used to frame hypotheses of process interactions, which have been evaluated using simulation modeling. Topographic information about Titan's polar region is be based on SAR-Topography and altimetry archived on PDS, SAR-based stereo radar-grammetry, radar-sounding lake depth measurements, and superposition relationships between geomorphologic map units, which we will use to create a generalized topographic map.

  18. Hybrid n-Alkylamine Intercalated Layered Titanates for Solid Lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Rodriguez, Pablo; Yuan, Huiyu; van den Nieuwenhuizen, Karin J H; Lette, Walter; Schipper, Dik J; Ten Elshof, Johan E

    2016-10-26

    The intercalation of different primary n-alkylamines in the structure of a layered titanate of the lepidocrocite type (H 1.07 Ti 1.73 O 4 ) for application in high-temperature solid lubrication is reported. The intercalation process of the amines was explored by means of in situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), with variations in alkyl chain length (3-12 carbon atoms) and the amine/titanate ratio. The intercalation process was found to be completed within 5 min after mixing of the precursors in water at 80 °C. The topotactic transformation of the layered titanate is driven by an acid-base reaction. The thermal degradation of the modified titanates was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and the chemical changes were investigated by temperature-dependent infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The coefficient of friction of the lubricants was assessed by means of high-temperature pin-on-disc experiments up to 580 °C. The intercalation of amine rendered a deformable layered ceramic upon heating. It was found that the hydrocarbon chain length exerts an influence on the mechanical properties of the titanates, resulting in lower friction forces for lubricants with longer intercalated amine molecules. Films of solid lubricants with longer amine chain lengths showed coefficients of friction as low as 0.01, lower than that of the state-of-the-art material graphite.

  19. Study on electrical properties of Ni-doped SrTiO3 ceramics using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Ni doped SrTiO3; impedance spectroscopy; grain; grain boundary; acceptor. 1. Introduction. In commercial multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCs), perovskite structure titanate are frequently used as high permittivity dielectrics. Alkaline earth titanates like BaTiO3,. SrTiO3 etc are widely used in microelectronic devices.

  20. Understanding Microstructural Properties of Perovskite Ceramics through Their Wet-Chemical Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stawski, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    This thesis comprises of seven full research chapters on the morphology, properties and processing of sol-gel precursor systems of barium titanate and lead zirconate titanate thin films and powders. In all the considered problems, the synthesis leading to nano-sized perovskite ceramics constitutes

  1. The tides of Titan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, Luciano; Jacobson, Robert A; Ducci, Marco; Stevenson, David J; Lunine, Jonathan I; Armstrong, John W; Asmar, Sami W; Racioppa, Paolo; Rappaport, Nicole J; Tortora, Paolo

    2012-07-27

    We have detected in Cassini spacecraft data the signature of the periodic tidal stresses within Titan, driven by the eccentricity (e = 0.028) of its 16-day orbit around Saturn. Precise measurements of the acceleration of Cassini during six close flybys between 2006 and 2011 have revealed that Titan responds to the variable tidal field exerted by Saturn with periodic changes of its quadrupole gravity, at about 4% of the static value. Two independent determinations of the corresponding degree-2 Love number yield k(2) = 0.589 ± 0.150 and k(2) = 0.637 ± 0.224 (2σ). Such a large response to the tidal field requires that Titan's interior be deformable over time scales of the orbital period, in a way that is consistent with a global ocean at depth.

  2. Impact craters on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles A.; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randy; Lopes, Rosaly; Mitchell, Karl; Stofan, Ellen; ,

    2010-01-01

    Five certain impact craters and 44 additional nearly certain and probable ones have been identified on the 22% of Titan's surface imaged by Cassini's high-resolution radar through December 2007. The certain craters have morphologies similar to impact craters on rocky planets, as well as two with radar bright, jagged rims. The less certain craters often appear to be eroded versions of the certain ones. Titan's craters are modified by a variety of processes including fluvial erosion, mass wasting, burial by dunes and submergence in seas, but there is no compelling evidence of isostatic adjustments as on other icy moons, nor draping by thick atmospheric deposits. The paucity of craters implies that Titan's surface is quite young, but the modeled age depends on which published crater production rate is assumed. Using the model of Artemieva and Lunine (2005) suggests that craters with diameters smaller than about 35 km are younger than 200 million years old, and larger craters are older. Craters are not distributed uniformly; Xanadu has a crater density 2-9 times greater than the rest of Titan, and the density on equatorial dune areas is much lower than average. There is a small excess of craters on the leading hemisphere, and craters are deficient in the north polar region compared to the rest of the world. The youthful age of Titan overall, and the various erosional states of its likely impact craters, demonstrate that dynamic processes have destroyed most of the early history of the moon, and that multiple processes continue to strongly modify its surface. The existence of 24 possible impact craters with diameters less than 20 km appears consistent with the Ivanov, Basilevsky and Neukum (1997) model of the effectiveness of Titan's atmosphere in destroying most but not all small projectiles.

  3. Diurnal variations of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1,000 and 1,400 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from 8 close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Though there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ~700 cm-3 below ~1,300 km. Such a plateau is associated with the combination of distinct diurnal variations of light and heavy ions. Light ions (e.g. CH5+, HCNH+, C2H5+) show strong diurnal variation, with clear bite-outs in their nightside distributions. In contrast, heavy ions (e.g. c-C3H3+, C2H3CNH+, C6H7+) present modest diurnal variation, with significant densities observed on the nightside. We propose that the distinctions between light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through "fast" ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through "slow" electron dissociative recombination. The INMS data suggest day-to-night transport as an important source of ions on Titan's nightside, to be distinguished from the conventional scenario of auroral ionization by magnetospheric particles as the only ionizing source on the nightside. This is supported by the strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effects of day-to-night transport on the ionospheric structures of Titan. The predicted diurnal variation has similar general characteristics to those observed, with some apparent discrepancies which could be reconciled by imposing fast horizontal thermal winds in Titan's upper atmosphere.

  4. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  5. Synthesis and characterization of nickel oxide doped barium strontium titanate ceramics Síntese e caracterização de cerâmicas de titanato de estrôncio e bário dopado com óxido de níquel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Banerjee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Barium strontium titanate (BST ceramics (Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 were synthesized by solid state sintering using barium carbonate, strontium carbonate and rutile as the precursor materials. The samples were doped with nickel oxide in different proportions. Different phases present in the sintered samples were determined from X-ray diffraction investigation and the distribution of different phases in the microstructure was assessed from scanning electron microscopy study. It was observed that the dielectric properties of BST were modified significantly with nickel oxide doping. These ceramics held promise for applications in tuned circuits.Cerâmicas de titanato de bário e estrôncio (TBS (Ba0,6Sr0,4TiO3 foram sintetizadas por sinterização do estado sólido usando carbonato de bário, carbonato de estrôncio e rutilo como materiais precursores. As amostras foram dopadas com diferentes proporções de óxido de níquel. Diferentes fases presentes nas amostras sinterizadas foram determinadas por difração de raios X e a distribuição de diferentes fases na microestrutura foi avaliada por microscopia eletrônica de varredura. Foi observado que as propriedades dielétricas do TBS foram modificadas significativamente com a dopagem do óxido de níquel. Essas cerâmicas são promissoras para aplicação em dispositivos.

  6. Titan's icy scar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, C. A.; Penteado, P. F.; Turner, J. D.; Neish, C. D.; Mitri, G.; Montiel, M. J.; Schoenfeld, A.; Lopes, R. M. C.

    2017-09-01

    We conduct a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of Cassini/VIMS [1] infrared spectral windows to identify and quantify weak surface features, with no assumptions on the haze and surface characteris- tics. This study maps the organic sediments, supplied by past atmospheres, as well as ice-rich regions that constitute Titan's bedrock.

  7. Weather on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, C. A.; Hall, J. L.; Geballe, T. R.

    2000-10-01

    Titan's atmosphere potentially sports a cycle similar to the hydrologic one on Earth with clouds, rain and seas, but with methane playing the terrestrial role of water. Over the past ten years many independent efforts indicated no strong evidence for cloudiness until some unique spectra were analyzed in 1998 (Griffith et al.). These surprising observations displayed enhanced fluxes of 14-200% on two nights at precisely the wavelengths (windows) that sense Titan's lower altitude where clouds might reside. The morphology of these enhancements in all 4 windows observed indicate that clouds covered ~6-9% of Titan's surface and existed at ~15 km altitude. Here I discuss new observations recorded in 1999 aimed to further characterize Titan's clouds. While we find no evidence for a massive cloud system similar to the one observed previously, 1%-4% fluctuations in flux occur daily. These modulations, similar in wavelength and morphology to the more pronounced ones observed earlier, suggest the presence of clouds covering evolutions. Their short lives point to the presence of rain. C. A. Griffith and J. L. Hall are supported by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program NAG5-6790.

  8. Doped barium titanate nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    electric random access memories (FRAM) etc (Mathews et al 1997; Scott 1998; Park et al 1999). With the minia- turization of electronic devices, it is both scientifically interesting and technologically challenging to synthesize and characterize an ultrafine, preferably nanosized, bar- ium titanate powders. Bulk BaTiO3 has the ...

  9. Microcracking in ceramics and acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbarao, E.C.

    1991-01-01

    One of the limitations in the use of ceramics in critical applications is due to the presence of microcracks, which may arise from differential thermal expansion and phase changes, among others. Acoustic emission signals occur when there are abrupt microdeformations in a material and thus offer a convenient means of non-destructive detection of microcracking. Examples of a study of acoustic emission from microcracking due to anisotropic thermal expansion in low thermal expansion single phase ceramics such as niobia and sodium zirconium phosphate ceramics and due to phase changes in zirconia and superconducting YBa 2 Cu 3 Osub(7-x) ceramics are presented, together with the case of lead titanate ceramics, which exhibits both a phase change (paraelectric to ferroelectric) and an anisotropic thermal expansion. The role of grain size on the extent of microcracking is illustrated in the case of niobia ceramics. Some indirect evidence of healing of microcracks on heating niobia and lead titanate ceramics is presented from the acoustic emission results. (author). 69 refs., 9 figs

  10. Non-stoichiometry, Compensation and Disorder in Hybrid MBE-grown Alkaline Earth Stannate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianqi; Prakash, Abhinav; Nunn, William; Haugstad, Greg; Jalan, Bharat

    Alkaline earth stannate has recently been of significant interest for transparent conducting oxide and power electronic applications owing to its wide band gap and high conductivity. In this talk, we will present a novel hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach utilizing elemental solid source for Ba and Sr, a chemical precursor source for Sn and a rf plasma source for oxygen, for the growth of BaSnO3 and SrSnO3 films on (001) SrTiO3 and (110) GdScO3 substrates. High-resolution x-ray diffraction and reflection high-energy electron diffraction revealed single phase, epitaxial films and a layer-by-layer growth mode, respectively. Films' cation stoichiometry was determined using high energy Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Using temperature dependent electronic transport measurements of films with varying cation stoichiometry, we will discuss how cation stoichiometry, charge compensation and structural disorder influence the metal-to-insulator transition, electron density, and mobility in La-doped BaSnO3 and SrSnO3 films. worked supported by NSF.

  11. Band gap tuning and room temperature ferromagnetism in Co doped Zinc stannate nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumithra, S., E-mail: ssmithra@gmail.com; Victor Jaya, N.

    2016-07-15

    The effect of Co doping on structural, optical and magnetic behavior of pure and Co doped Zinc stannate (ZTO) nanostructures was investigated. Pure and Co (1%, 3% & 5%) doped Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} compounds were prepared through simple precipitation route. Formation of cubic inverse spinel structure and metal oxide vibrations of the samples were investigated using XRD and FTIR. Co doping influences the crystallite size producing micro strain in ZTO lattice. Poly dispersed rod like shape of the particles was examined by FESEM. Elemental composition of prepared samples was identified by EDAX analysis. Optical Absorption spectra shows significant red shift on increasing the dopant concentration which indicates the reduction in optical band gap. Visible luminescence observed from photoluminescence studies confirms the presence of oxygen vacancies and trap sites in the lattice. Magnetization analysis reveals the enhanced ferromagnetic behavior in all Co doped ZTO samples. The amplified ferromagnetic ordering in Co doped ZTO compounds has been explained in terms of defects serving as free spin polarized prophetic carriers.

  12. Studies on luminescence from a cerium-doped strontium stannate phosphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Yüksel; Ayvacikli, Mehmet; Canimoglu, Adil; Garcia Guinea, Javier; Can, Nurdogan

    2015-06-01

    The crystal structure and morphology of Ce(3+) -doped SrSnO3 materials prepared using the solid-state reaction method were extensively characterized using experimental techniques. X-Ray diffraction results show that the cerium substitution of strontium does not change the structure of the strontium stannate. Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the microstructures and lattice vibrations. Environmental scanning electron microscopy images showed that phosphors aggregate and their particles form irregular shapes. SrSnO3 exhibits an intense green emission with a broad band originating from the 5d(1)  → 4f(1) transition of cerium. It was observed that, after exposure to beta-irradiation, the glow curve of this material has two broad thermoluminescence peaks, one centered at ~ 127°C and the other at ~ 245°C for a heating rate of 5 K/s. The kinetic parameters, which include the frequency factor and the activation energy of the material, were calculated using Chen's method, after beta-irradiation. The fading and reusability of the phosphor were also studied and it was found that the phosphor is suitable for radiation dosimetry. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Structural and functional characterization of barium zirconium titanate / epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto González Garcia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric behavior of composite materials (barium zirconium titanate / epoxy system was analyzed as a function of ceramic concentration. Structure and morphologic behavior of the composites was investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analyses. Composites were prepared by mixing the components and pouring them into suitable moulds. It was demonstrated that the amount of inorganic phase affects the morphology of the presented composites. XRD revealed the presence of a single phase while Raman scattering confirmed structural transitions as a function of ceramic concentration. Changes in the ceramic concentration affected Raman modes and the distribution of particles along into in epoxy matrix. Dielectric permittivity and dielectric losses were influenced by filler concentration.

  14. Organic chemistry on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.; Scattergood, T.; Aronowitz, S.; Flores, J.

    1979-01-01

    Features taken from various models of Titan's atmosphere are combined in a working composite model that provides environmental constraints within which different pathways for organic chemical synthesis are determined. Experimental results and theoretical modeling suggest that the organic chemistry of the satellite is dominated by two processes: photochemistry and energetic particle bombardment. Photochemical reactions of CH4 in the upper atmosphere can account for the presence of C2 hydrocarbons. Reactions initiated at various levels of the atmosphere by cosmic rays, Saturn 'wind', and solar wind particle bombardment of a CH4-N2 atmospheric mixture can account for the UV-visible absorbing stratospheric haze, the reddish appearance of the satellite, and some of the C2 hydrocarbons. In the lower atmosphere photochemical processes will be important if surface temperatures are sufficiently high for gaseous NH3 to exist. It is concluded that the surface of Titan may contain ancient or recent organic matter (or both) produced in the atmosphere.

  15. Changes on Titan's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonidou, A.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Coustenis, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Sotin, C.; Rodriguez, S.; Janssen, M. A.; Drossart, P.; Lawrence, K. J.; Matsoukas, C. K.; Hirtzig, M.; Le Mouelic, S.; Jaumann, R.; Brown, R. H.; Bratsolis, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and the Titan Radar Mapper have investigated Titan's surface since 2004, unveiling a complex, dynamic and Earth-like surface. Understanding the distribution and interplay of geologic processes is important for constraining models of its interior, surface-atmospheric interactions, and climate evolution. We focus on understanding the origin of the major geomorphological units identified by Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) [1,2], Malaska et al. (2015) [3] and regions we studied in Solomonidou et al. (2014; 2015) [4,5]. Here, we investigate the nature of: Undifferentiated Plains, Hummocky/Mountainous terrains, candidate cryovolcanic sites, Labyrinth, and Dunes in terms of surface albedo behavior and spectral evolution with time to identify possible changes. Using a radiative transfer code, we find that temporal variations of surface albedo occur for some areas. Tui Regio and Sotra Patera, both candidate cryovolcanic regions, change with time, becoming darker and brighter respectively in surface albedo. In contrast, we find that the Undifferentiated Plains and the suggested evaporitic areas [6] in the equatorial regions do not present any significant changes. We are able to report the differences and similarities among the various regions and provide constraints on their chemical composition and specific processes of origin. Our results support the hypothesis that both endogenic and exogenic processes have played important roles in shaping Titan's geologic evolution. Such a variety of geologic processes and their relationship to the methane cycle make Titan important for astrobiology and habitability studies and particularly significant in solar system studies. [1] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, 205, 540-588, 2010; [2] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: JGR, 118, 416-435, 2013; [3] Malaska, M., et al : Icarus, submitted, 2015;[4] Solomonidou et al.: JGR, 119, 1729-1747, 2014; [5] Solomonidou, A., et al.: In press, 2015; [6] Barnes

  16. Study of barium bismuth titanate prepared by mechanochemical synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Z.Ž.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium-bismuth titanate, BaBi4Ti4O15 (BBT, a member of Aurivillius bismuth-based layer-structure perovskites, was prepared from stoichiometric amounts of barium titanate and bismuth titanate obtained via mechanochemical synthesis. Mechanochemical synthesis was performed in air atmosphere in a planetary ball mill. The reaction mechanism of BaBi4Ti4O15 and the preparation and characteristics of BBT ceramic powders were studied using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, particle analysis and SEM. The Bi-layered perovskite structure of BaBi4Ti4O15 ceramic forms at 1100 °C for 4 h without a pre-calcination step. The microstructure of BaBi4Ti4O15 exhibits plate-like grains typical for the Bi-layered structured material and spherical and polygonal grains. The Ba2+ addition leads to changes in the microstructure development, particularly in the change of the average grain size.

  17. Sensitization of Perovskite Strontium Stannate SrSnO3 towards Visible-Light Absorption by Doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hungru Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perovskite strontium stannate SrSnO3 is a promising photocatalyst. However, its band gap is too large for efficient solar energy conversion. In order to sensitize SrSnO3 toward visible-light activities, the effects of doping with various selected cations and anions are investigated by using hybrid density functional calculations. Results show that doping can result in dopant level to conduction band transitions which lie lower in energy compared to the original band gap transition. Therefore, it is expected that doping SrSnO3 can induce visible-light absorption.

  18. Landscape Evolution of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Titan may have acquired its massive atmosphere relatively recently in solar system history. The warming sun may have been key to generating Titan's atmosphere over time, starting from a thin atmosphere with condensed surface volatiles like Triton, with increased luminosity releasing methane, and then large amounts of nitrogen (perhaps suddenly), into the atmosphere. This thick atmosphere, initially with much more methane than at present, resulted in global fluvial erosion that has over time retreated towards the poles with the removal of methane from the atmosphere. Basement rock, as manifested by bright, rough, ridges, scarps, crenulated blocks, or aligned massifs, mostly appears within 30 degrees of the equator. This landscape was intensely eroded by fluvial processes as evidenced by numerous valley systems, fan-like depositional features and regularly-spaced ridges (crenulated terrain). Much of this bedrock landscape, however, is mantled by dunes, suggesting that fluvial erosion no longer dominates in equatorial regions. High midlatitude regions on Titan exhibit dissected sedimentary plains at a number of localities, suggesting deposition (perhaps by sediment eroded from equatorial regions) followed by erosion. The polar regions are mainly dominated by deposits of fluvial and lacustrine sediment. Fluvial processes are active in polar areas as evidenced by alkane lakes and occasional cloud cover.

  19. Cerium-modified Aurivillius-type sodium lanthanum bismuth titanate with enhanced piezoactivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunming; Zhao Liang; Wang Jinfeng; Zheng Limei; Du Juan; Zhao Minglei; Wang Chunlei

    2009-01-01

    The electrical, piezoelectric and dielectric properties of cerium-modified Aurivillius-type sodium lanthanum bismuth titanate (Na 0.5 La 0.5 Bi 4 Ti 4 O 15 , NLBT) ceramics were investigated. It was found the piezoelectric activities of NLBT ceramics were significantly improved by cerium modification. The piezoelectric coefficient d 33 and Curie temperature T c for the 0.50 wt.% cerium-modified NLBT were found to be 29 pC/N and 573 deg. C, respectively. The reasons for piezoelectric activities improvement by cerium modification were given. A small dielectric abnormity was observed in NLBT ceramics, which can be suppressed by cerium modification.

  20. Titan after Cassini Huygens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, P. M.; Lunine, J.; Lebreton, J.; Coustenis, A.; Matson, D.; Reh, K.; Erd, C.

    2008-12-01

    In 2005, the Huygens Probe gave us a snapshot of a world tantalizingly like our own, yet frozen in its evolution on the threshold of life. The descent under parachute, like that of Huygens in 2005, is happening again, but this time in the Saturn-cast twilight of winter in Titan's northern reaches. With a pop, the parachute is released, and then a muffled splash signals the beginning of the first floating exploration of an extraterrestrial sea-this one not of water but of liquid hydrocarbons. Meanwhile, thousands of miles away, a hot air balloon, a "montgolfiere," cruises 6 miles above sunnier terrain, imaging vistas of dunes, river channels, mountains and valleys carved in water ice, and probing the subsurface for vast quantities of "missing" methane and ethane that might be hidden within a porous icy crust. Balloon and floater return their data to a Titan Orbiter equipped to strip away Titan's mysteries with imaging, radar profiling, and atmospheric sampling, much more powerful and more complete than Cassini was capable of. This spacecraft, preparing to enter a circular orbit around Saturn's cloud-shrouded giant moon, has just completed a series of flybys of Enceladus, a tiny but active world with plumes that blow water and organics from the interior into space. Specialized instruments on the orbiter were able to analyze these plumes directly during the flybys. Titan and Enceladus could hardly seem more different, and yet they are linked by their origin in the Saturn system, by a magnetosphere that sweeps up mass and delivers energy, and by the possibility that one or both worlds harbor life. It is the goal of the NASA/ESA Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) to explore and investigate these exotic and inviting worlds, to understand their natures and assess the possibilities of habitability in this system so distant from our home world. Orbiting, landing, and ballooning at Titan represent a new and exciting approach to planetary exploration. The TSSM mission

  1. Materials and Concepts for Full Ceramic SOFCs with Focus on Carbon Containing Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtappels, Peter; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Veltzé, Sune

    stimulated the development for full ceramic anodes based on strontium titanates. Furthermore, the Ni-cermet is primarily a hydrogen oxidation electrode and efficiency losses might occur when operating on carbon containing fuels. In a recent European project full ceramic cells comprising CGO/Ni infiltrated Nb...

  2. Effects of neonatal exposure to the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol-A, aluminum diethylphosphinate or zinc stannate on long-term potentiation and synaptic protein levels in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Hester; Koolen, Lucas; Dingemans, Milou; Viberg, Henrik; Lee, Iwa; Leonards, P.E.G.; Ramakers, G.M.J.; Westerink, Remco

    2014-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants such as tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) may exert (developmental) neurotoxic effects. However, data on (neuro)toxicity of halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs) are scarce. Recent in vitro studies indicated a high neurotoxic potential for some HFFRs, e.g., zinc stannate

  3. Effects of neonatal exposure to the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol-A, aluminum diethylphosphinate or zinc stannate on long-term potentiation and synaptic protein levels in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Hester S.; Koolen, Lucas A. E.; Dingemans, Milou M. L.; Viberg, Henrik; Lee, Iwa; Leonards, Pim E. G.; Ramakers, Geert M. J.; Westerink, Remco H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants such as tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) may exert (developmental) neurotoxic effects. However, data on (neuro)toxicity of halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs) are scarce. Recent in vitro studies indicated a high neurotoxic potential for some HFFRs, e.g., zinc stannate

  4. Preparation and characterization of nanofibers barium strontium titanate using electrospinning route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraco, B.S.; Engel, A.B.; Alves, A.K.; Bergmann, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    The barium strontium titanate (BST) is a ferroelectric material well known for exhibiting a ferroelectric transition temperature that can be adjusted by varying the Ba /Sr ratio. The reduction of the Curie point can be achieved by the substitution of strontium for barium. Due to the combination of interesting properties, such as high crystallographic orientation of grains and high thermal stability, ferroelectric fibers have attracted considerable interest for their potential use as functional ceramic fibers in the reinforcement of ceramics and metals. The electrospinning process is an effective method for the preparation of nano ceramic fibers with uniform diameter and having different composition. The objective of this work was to product and to characterize the structure and morphology of barium strontium titanate nanofibers made using the electrospinning method. (author)

  5. Barium titanate nanoparticles: promising multitasking vectors in nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giada Graziana; Marino, Attilio; Rocca, Antonella; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2016-06-10

    Ceramic materials based on perovskite-like oxides have traditionally been the object of intense interest for their applicability in electrical and electronic devices. Due to its high dielectric constant and piezoelectric features, barium titanate (BaTiO3) is probably one of the most studied compounds of this family. Recently, an increasing number of studies have been focused on the exploitation of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) in the biomedical field, owing to the high biocompatibility of BTNPs and their peculiar non-linear optical properties that have encouraged their use as nanocarriers for drug delivery and as label-free imaging probes. In this review, we summarize all the recent findings about these 'smart' nanoparticles, including the latest, most promising potential as nanotransducers for cell stimulation.

  6. Piezoelectric Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Yeop

    1987-03-01

    This book tells of piezoelectric ceramics on BaTiO 3 Pb(Zr, Ti)O 3 , properties of piezoelectric ceramics, measurement method of piezoelectric ceramics, manufacturing method of piezoelectric ceramics, property of PbZrO 3 -PbTiO 3 , transparent ceramics like electro-optics effect, electro-optics ceramics, application of a producer of high voltage, application of ultrasonic generator, ZnO piezoelectric film and its application such as property of ZnO, piezoelectric of ZnO film, manufacturing method of ZnO.

  7. Acetylene on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep; McCord, Thomas B.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Cornet, Thomas; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Clark, Roger Nelson; Maltagliati, Luca; Chevrier, Vincent

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's moon Titan possesses a thick atmosphere that is mainly composed of N2 (98%), CH4 (2 % overall, but 4.9% close to the surface) and less than 1% of minor species, mostly hydrocarbons [1]. A dissociation of N2 and CH4 forms complex hydrocarbons in the atmsophere and acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) are produced most abundently. Since years, C2H2 has been speculated to exist on the surface of Titan based on its high production rate in the stratosphere predicted by photochemical models [2,3] and from its detection as trace gas sublimated/evaporated from the surface after the landing of the Huygens probe by the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) [1]. Here we show evidence of acetylene (C2H2) on the surface of Titan by detecting absorption bands at 1.55 µm and 4.93 µm using Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) [4] at equatorial areas of eastern Shangri-La, and Fensal-Aztlan/Quivira.An anti-correlation of absorption band strength with albedo indicates greater concentrations of C2H2 in the dark terrains, such as sand dunes and near the Huygens landing site. The specific location of the C2H2 detections suggests that C2H2 is mobilized by surface processes, such as surface weathering by liquids through dissolution/evaporation processes.References:[1]Niemann et al., Nature 438, 779-784 (2005).[2]Lavvas et al., Planetary and Space Science 56, 67 - 99 (2008).[3]Lavvas et al., Planetary and Space Science 56, 27 - 66 (2008).[4] Brown et al., The Cassini-Huygens Mission 111-168 (Springer, 2004).

  8. The Tides of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, L.; Jacobson, R.; Ducci, M.; Stevenson, D. J.; Lunine, J. I.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S.; Racioppa, P.; Rappaport, N. J.; Tortora, P.

    2012-12-01

    Titan has long been thought to host a subsurface water ocean. A liquid water or water-ammonia layer underneath the outer icy shell was invoked to explain the Voyager and Cassini observations of abundant methane (an easily dissociated species) in the atmosphere of the satellite. Given the paucity of surface hydrocarbon reservoirs, the atmospheric methane must be supplied by the interior, and an ocean can both provide a large storage volume and facilitate the outgassing from the deeper layers of the satellite to the surface. Huygens probe observations of a Schumann-like resonance point to the presence of an electrically conductive layer at a depth of 50-100 km, which has been interpreted to be the top of an ammonia-doped ocean [1]. Cassini gravity observations provide stronger evidence of the existence of such subsurface ocean. By combining precise measurements of the spacecraft range rate during six flybys, suitably distributed along Titan's orbit (three near pericenter, two near apocenter one near quadrature), we have been able to determine the k2 Love number to be k2 = 0.589±0.150 and k2 = 0.637±0.224 in two independent so-lutions (quoted uncertainties are 2-sigma) [2]. Such a large value indicates that Titan is highly deformable over time scales of days, as one would expect if a global ocean were hidden beneath the outer icy shell. The inclusion of time-variable gravity in the solution provided also a more reliable estimate of the static field, including an updated long-wavelength geoid. We discuss the methods adopted in our solutions and some implications of our results for the interior structure of Titan, and outline the expected improvements from the additional gravity flybys before the end of mission in 2017. [1] C. Beghin, C. Sotin, M. Hamelin, Comptes Rendue Geoscience, 342, 425 (2010). [2] L. Iess, R.A. Jacobson, M. Ducci, D.J. Stevenson, J.I. Lunine, J.W. Armstrong, S.W. Asmar, P. Racioppa, N.J. Rappaport, P. Tortora, Science, 337, 457 (2012).

  9. Titan Airship Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzhanovich, V.; Yavrouian, A.; Cutts, J.; Colozza, A.; Fairbrother, D.

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's moon Titan is considered to be one of the prime candidates for studying prebiotic materials - the substances that precede the formation of life but have disappeared from the Earth as a result of the evolution of life. A unique combination of a dense, predominantly nitrogen, atmosphere (more than four times that of the Earth), low gravity (six times less than on the Earth) and small temperature variations makes Titan the almost ideal planet for studies with lighter-than-air aerial platforms (aerobots). Moreover, since methane clouds and photochemical haze obscure the surface, low-altitude aerial platforms are the only practical means that can provide global mapping of the Titan surface at visible and infrared wavelengths. One major challenge in Titan exploration is the extremely cold atmosphere (approx. 90 K). However, current material technology the capability to operate aerobots at these very low temperatures. A second challenge is the remoteness from the Sun (10 AU) that makes the nuclear (radioisotopic) energy the only practical source of power. A third challenge is remoteness from the Earth (approx. 10 AU, two-way light-time approx. 160 min) which imposes restrictions on data rates and makes impractical any meaningful real-time control. A small-size airship (approx. 25 cu m) can carry a payload approximately 100 kg. A Stirling engine coupled to a radioisotope heat source would be the prime choice for producing both mechanical and electrical power for sensing, control, and communications. The cold atmospheric temperature makes Stirling machines especially effective. With the radioisotope power source the airship may fly with speed approximately 5 m/s for a year or more providing an excellent platform for in situ atmosphere measurements and a high-resolution remote sensing with unlimited access on a global scale. In a station-keeping mode the airship can be used for in situ studies on the surface by winching down an instrument package. Floating above the

  10. On Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  11. Co-Extrusion of Piezoelectric Ceramic Fibres

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Michen, Marina

    2010-01-01

    The present work successfully developed a methodology for fabricating lead zirconate titanate [PZT] thin solid- and hollow-fibres by the thermoplastic co-extrusion process. The whole process chain, that includes: a) compounding, involving the mixing of ceramic powder with a thermoplastic binder, b) rheological characterizations, c) preform composite fabrication followed by co-extrusion, d) debinding and, finally, e) sintering of the body to near ...

  12. Scaling up aqueous processing of A-site deficient strontium titanate for SOFC anode supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Sudireddy, Bhaskar Reddy; Vasechko, Viacheslav

    2017-01-01

    All ceramic anode supported half cells of technically relevant scale were fabricated in this study, using a novel strontium titanate anode material. The use of this material would be highly advantageous in solid oxide fuel cells due to its redox tolerance and resistance to coking and sulphur......, electrical and mechanical properties of anode supports and half cells will be discussed. The use of two different commercial titanate powders with nominal identical, but in reality different stoichiometries, strongly affect electrical and mechanical properties. Careful consideration of such variations...

  13. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  14. Titan's Emergence from Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. Michael; Achterberg, Richard; Jennings, Donald; Schinder, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We summarize the changes in Titans thermal structure derived from Cassini CIRS and radio-occultation data during the transition from winter to early spring. Titan's surface, and middle atmosphere show noticeable seasonal change, whereas that in most of the troposphere is mated. This can be understood in terms of the relatively small radiative relaxation time in the middle atmosphere and much larger time scale in the troposphere. The surface exhibits seasonal change because the heat capacity in an annual skin depth is much smaller than that in the lowest scale height of the troposphere. Surface temperatures rise 1 K at raid and high latitudes in the winter northern hemisphere and cool in the southern hemisphere. Changes in in the middle atmosphere are more complicated. Temperatures in the middle stratosphere (approximately 1 mbar) increase by a few kelvin at mid northern latitudes, but those at high latitudes first increase as that region moves out of winter shadow, and then decrease. This probably results from the combined effect of increased solar heating as the suit moves higher in the sky and the decreased adiabatic warming as the sinking motions associated with the cross-equatorial meridional cell weaken. Consistent with this interpretation, the warm temperatures observed higher up at the winter polar stratopause cool significantly.

  15. Titan's Gravitational Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, G.; Anderson, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Titan's gravitational field is inferred from an analysis of archived radio Doppler data for six Cassini flybys. The analysis considers each flyby separately in contrast to the approach of lumping all the data together in a massive inversion. In this way it is possible to gain an improved understanding of the character of each flyby and its usefulness in constraining the gravitational coefficient C22 . Though our analysis is not yet complete and our final determination of C22 could differ from the result we report here by 1 or 2 sigma, we find a best-fit value of C22 equal to (13.21 × 0.17) × 10-6, significantly larger than the value of 10.0 × 10-6 obtained from an inversion of the lumped Cassini data. We also find no determination of the tidal Love number k2. The larger value of C22 implies a moment of inertia factor equal to 0.3819 × 0.0020 and a less differentiated Titan than is suggested by the smaller value. The larger value of C22 is consistent with an undifferentiated model of the satellite. While it is not possible to rule out either value of C22 , we prefer the larger value because its derivation results from a more hands on analysis of the data that extracts the weak hydrostatic signal while revealing the effects of gravity anomalies and unmodeled spacecraft accelerations on each of the six flybys.

  16. The Geology of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, Ralf

    Titan, the largest and most complex satellite in the solar system exhibits an organic dominated surface chemistry and shares surface features with other large icy satellites as well as the terrestrial planets. It is subject to tidal stresses, and its surface appears to have been modified tectonically. Cassini's global observations at infrared and radar wavelengths as well as local investigations by the instruments on the Huygens probe has revealed that Titan has the largest known abundance of organic material in the solar system apart from Earth, and that its active hydrological cycle is analogous to that of Earth, but with methane replacing water. The surface of Titan exhibits morphological features of different sizes and origins created by geological processes that span the entire dynamic range of aeolian, fluvial and tectonic activities, with likely evidence that cryovolcanism might exists where liquid water, perhaps in concert with ammonia, methane and carbon dioxide, makes its way to the surface from the interior [e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18]. Extended dune fields, lakes, mountainous terrain, dendritic erosion patterns and erosional remnants indicate dynamic surface processes. Valleys, small-scale gullies and rounded cobbles require erosion by extended energetic flow of liquids. There is strong evidence that liquid hydrocarbons are ponded on the surface in lakes, predominantly, but not exclusively, at high northern latitudes. A variety of features including extensive flows and caldera-like constructs are interpreted to be cryovolcanic in origin. Chains and isolated blocks of rugged terrain rising from smoother areas are best described as mountains and might be related to tectonic processes. Impact craters form on all solid bodies in the solar system, and have been detected on Titan. But very few have been observed so they must be rapidly destroyed or buried by other geologic processes The morphologies of the impact

  17. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, Lauren M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d 33 piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m −1 . It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response

  18. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten, Lauren M., E-mail: lmg309@psu.edu; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2015-03-07

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d{sub 33} piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m{sup −1}. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  19. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garten, Lauren M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d33 piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m-1. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  20. Thermal expansion studies on dysprosium and gadolinium titanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneerselvam, G.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Lanthanides and their oxides are considered potential candidates for the use in nuclear reactors as control rod. Dysprosium (Dy) and gadolinium (Gd) have very high absorption cross-section for neutrons. Dysprosium and gadolinium titanates were prepared by ceramic route as well as wet chemical route. The compounds were characterized chemically by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICPMS) technique and by x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Thermal expansion coefficient was measured in the temperature range 573 to 1573 K by using high temperature x-ray diffraction technique. (author)

  1. The effect of temperature and addition of reducing agent on sodium stannate preparation from cassiterite by the alkaline roasting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalasari, Latifa Hanum; Andriyah, Lia; Arini, Tri; Firdiyono, F.

    2018-04-01

    Sodium stannate is an intermediate compound with the formula Na2SnO3. This compound is easily dissolved in water and has many applications in the electroplating industry, tin alloy production, and catalysts for organic synthesis. In this occasion was investigated the effect of temperature and the addition of reducing agent on making of sodium stannate phase from cassiterite by an alkaline roasting process using sodium carbonate (Na2CO3). Firstly, cassiterite was roasted at 700 °C for 3 hours and continued leaching process using 10% HCl solution at 110 °C for 2 hours. The cassiterite residue than was dried at 110 °C and mixed homogenously with a Na2CO3 decomposer at a mass ratio Na2CO3/cassiterite as 5:3 for the decomposition process. It was done by variation temperatures (300 °C, 700 °C, 800 °C, 870 °C, 900 °C) for 3 hours, variation times (3, 4, 5 hours) at a roasting temperature of 700 °C and addition of reducing agent such as sub-bituminous coal. The result of the experiment shows that cassiterite prepared by roasting and acid leaching process has the chemical composition as follows: 59.98% Sn, 22.58% O, 3.20% Ce, 3.15% La, 2.57% Nd, 1.67% Ti, 1.56% Fe, 1.24% P, 0.62% Ca and others. The Na2SnO3 phase begins to form at a roasting temperature of 870 °C for 3 hours. Although the roasting times was extended from 3 hours to 5 hours at 700 °C, the Na2SnO3 phase also has not yet formed. In other conditions, the addition of coal reducing agent to the roasting process would cause formations of Sn metal besides Na2SnO3 phase at 870 °C. At temperatures lower than 870 °C, the addition of coal only forms Sn metal, whereas the sodium stannate phase is not formed.

  2. Titan's greenhouse and antigreenhouse effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Courtin, Regis

    1992-01-01

    Thermal mechanisms active in Titan's atmosphere are discussed in a brief review of data obtained during the Voyager I flyby in 1980. Particular attention is given to the greenhouse effect (GHE) produced by atmospheric H2, N2, and CH4; this GHE is stronger than that on earth, with CH4 and H2 playing roles similar to those of H2O and CO2 on earth. Also active on Titan is an antigreenhouse effect, in which dark-brown and orange organic aerosols block incoming solar light while allowing IR radiation from the Titan surface to escape. The combination of GHE and anti-GHE leads to a surface temperature about 12 C higher than it would be if Titan had no atmosphere.

  3. Seasonal Changes in Titan's Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, E. P.; DelGenio, A. D.; Barbara, J. M.; Perry, J. E.; Schaller, E. L.; McEwen, A. S.; West, R. A.; Ray, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem has observed Titan for 1/4 Titan year, and we report here the first evidence of seasonal shifts in preferred locations of tropospheric methane clouds. South \\polar convective cloud activity, common in late southern summer, has become rare. North \\polar and northern mid \\latitude clouds appeared during the approach to the northern spring equinox in August 2009. Recent observations have shown extensive cloud systems at low latitudes. In contrast, southern mid \\latitude and subtropical clouds have appeared sporadically throughout the mission, exhibiting little seasonality to date. These differences in behavior suggest that Titan s clouds, and thus its general circulation, are influenced by both the rapid temperature response of a low \\thermal \\inertia surface and the much longer radiative timescale of Titan s cold thick troposphere. North \\polar clouds are often seen near lakes and seas, suggesting that local increases in methane concentration and/or lifting generated by surface roughness gradients may promote cloud formation. Citation

  4. Barium titanate nanocomposite capacitor FY09 year end report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Tyler E.; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Yang, Pin; Chavez, Tom P.; Winter, Michael R.; Monson, Todd C.; Roesler, Alexander William; Fellows, Benjamin D.

    2009-11-01

    This late start RTBF project started the development of barium titanate (BTO)/glass nanocomposite capacitors for future and emerging energy storage applications. The long term goal of this work is to decrease the size, weight, and cost of ceramic capacitors while increasing their reliability. Ceramic-based nanocomposites have the potential to yield materials with enhanced permittivity, breakdown strength (BDS), and reduced strain, which can increase the energy density of capacitors and increase their shot life. Composites of BTO in glass will limit grain growth during device fabrication (preserving nanoparticle grain size and enhanced properties), resulting in devices with improved density, permittivity, BDS, and shot life. BTO will eliminate the issues associated with Pb toxicity and volatility as well as the variation in energy storage vs. temperature of PZT based devices. During the last six months of FY09 this work focused on developing syntheses for BTO nanoparticles and firing profiles for sintering BTO/glass composite capacitors.

  5. Analysis of the state of poling of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) particles in a Zn-ionomer composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, N.K.; Comyn, T.; Hall, D.; Daniel, L.; Kleppe, A.; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, W.A.

    2016-01-01

    The poling behaviour of tetragonal lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic particles in a weakly conductive ionomer polymer matrix is investigated using high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis. The poling efficiency, crystallographic texture and lattice strain of the PZT

  6. Life on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potashko, Oleksandr

    Volcanoes engender life on heavenly bodies; they are pacemakers of life. All planets during their period of formation pass through volcanism hence - all planets and their satellites pass through the life. Tracks of life If we want to find tracks of life - most promising places are places with volcanic activity, current or past. In the case of just-in-time volcanic activity we have 100% probability to find a life. Therefore the most perspective “search for life” are Enceladus, Io and comets, further would be Venus, Jupiter’s satellites, Saturn’s satellites and first of all - Titan. Titan has atmosphere. It might be result of high volcanic activity - from one side, from other side atmosphere is a necessary condition development life from procaryota to eucaryota. Existence of a planet means that all its elements after hydrogen formed just there inside a planet. The forming of the elements leads to the formation of mineral and organic substances and further to the organic life. Development of the life depends upon many factors, e.g. the distance from star/s. The intensity of the processes of the element formation is inversely to the distance from the star. Therefore we may suppose that the intensity of the life in Mercury was very high. Hence we may detect tracks of life in Mercury, particularly near volcanoes. The distance from the star is only one parameter and now Titan looks very active - mainly due to interior reason. Its atmosphere compounds are analogous to comet tail compounds. Their collation may lead to interesting result as progress occurs at one of them. Volcanic activity is as a source of life origin as well a reason for a death of life. It depends upon the thickness of planet crust. In the case of small thickness of a crust the probability is high that volcanoes may destroy a life on a planet - like Noachian deluge. Destroying of the life under volcano influences doesn’t lead to full dead. As result we would have periodic Noachian deluge or

  7. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures.

  8. Spark Plasma Sintering of Dielectric Ceramics Zr0.8Sn0.2TiO4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, P.; Kubatík, Tomáš František; Sedláček, J.; Kotlan, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2016), s. 435-439 ISSN 1392-1320 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : titanates * dielectric ceramics * spark plasma sintering Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.393, year: 2016 http://www.matsc.ktu.lt/index.php/MatSc/article/view/8767

  9. Tris(cyclohexylammonium cis-dichloridobis(oxalato-κ2O1,O2stannate(IV chloride monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modou Sarr

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, (C6H14N3[Sn(C2O42Cl2]Cl·H2O, contains three cyclohexylammonium cations, one stannate(IV dianion, one isolated chloride anion and one lattice water molecule. The cyclohexylammonium cations adopt chair conformations. In the complex anion, two bidentate oxalate ligands and two chloride anions in cis positions coordinate octahedrally to the central SnIV atom. The cohesion of the molecular entities is ensured by the formation of N—H...O, O—H...O, O—H...Cl and N—H...Cl interactions involving cations, anions and the lattice water molecule, giving rise to a layer-like arrangement parallel to (010.

  10. 2DEGs at perovskite interfaces between KTaO3 or KNbO3 and stannates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Weitao; Chen, Xin; Singh, David J

    2014-01-01

    We report density functional studies of electron rich interfaces between KTaO3 or KNbO3 and CaSnO3 or ZnSnO3 and in particular the nature of the interfacial electron gasses that can be formed. We find that depending on the details these may occur on either the transition metal or stannate sides of the interface and in the later case can be shifted away from the interface by ferroelectricity. We also present calculations for bulk KNbO3, KTaO3, CaSnO3, BaSnO3 and ZnSnO3, showing the different transport and optical properties that may be expected on the two sides of such interfaces. The results suggest that these interfaces may display a wide range of behaviors depending on conditions, and in particular the interplay with ferroelectricity suggests that electrical control of these properties may be possible.

  11. Synthesis of Barium Titanate Using Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, Rebecca; Foeller, Philip Y; Sinclair, Derek C; Reaney, Ian M

    2017-01-03

    Novel synthetic routes to prepare functional oxides at lower temperatures are an increasingly important area of research. Many of these synthetic routes, however, use water as the solvent and rely on dissolution of the precursors, precluding their use with, for example, titanates. Here we present a low-cost solvent system as a means to rapidly create phase-pure ferroelectric barium titanate using a choline chloride-malonic acid deep eutectic solvent. This solvent is compatible with alkoxide precursors and allows for the rapid synthesis of nanoscale barium titanate powders at 950 °C. The phase and morphology were determined, along with investigation of the synthetic pathway, with the reaction proceeding via BaCl 2 and TiO 2 intermediates. The powders were also used to create sintered ceramics, which exhibit a permittivity maximum corresponding to a tetragonal-cubic transition at 112 °C, as opposed to the more conventional temperature of ∼120 °C. The lower-than-expected value for the ferro- to para-electric phase transition is likely due to undetectable levels of contaminants.

  12. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  13. Mapping of Titan: Results from the first Titan radar passes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofan, E.R.; Lunine, J.I.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Lorenz, R.D.; Wood, C.A.; Kirk, R.; Wall, S.; Elachi, C.; Soderblom, L.A.; Ostro, S.; Janssen, M.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Zebker, H.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Stiles, B.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2006-01-01

    The first two swaths collected by Cassini's Titan Radar Mapper were obtained in October of 2004 (Ta) and February of 2005 (T3). The Ta swath provides evidence for cryovolcanic processes, the possible occurrence of fluvial channels and lakes, and some tectonic activity. The T3 swath has extensive areas of dunes and two large impact craters. We interpret the brightness variations in much of the swaths to result from roughness variations caused by fracturing and erosion of Titan's icy surface, with additional contributions from a combination of volume scattering and compositional variations. Despite the small amount of Titan mapped to date, the significant differences between the terrains of the two swaths suggest that Titan is geologically complex. The overall scarcity of impact craters provides evidence that the surface imaged to date is relatively young, with resurfacing by cryovolcanism, fluvial erosion, aeolian erosion, and likely atmospheric deposition of materials. Future radar swaths will help to further define the nature of and extent to which internal and external processes have shaped Titan's surface. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Titan Montgolfiere Terrestrial Test Bed, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With the Titan Saturn System Mission, NASA is proposing to send a Montgolfiere balloon to probe the atmosphere of Titan. To better plan this mission and create a...

  15. Titan Montgolfiere Terrestrial Test Bed, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With the Titan Saturn System Mission, NASA is proposing to send a Montgolfiere balloon to probe the atmosphere of Titan. In order to better plan this mission and...

  16. Mapping of strain mechanisms in barium titanate by three-dimensional X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkut, Marta

    This thesis presents an in-situ three-dimensional study of the grain-scale response of a prototypical piezoelectric ceramic, barium titanate (BT), to an exernally applied electric field. Piezoceramics take advantage of the coupling of electrical and mechanical energies for use in sensors and actu......This thesis presents an in-situ three-dimensional study of the grain-scale response of a prototypical piezoelectric ceramic, barium titanate (BT), to an exernally applied electric field. Piezoceramics take advantage of the coupling of electrical and mechanical energies for use in sensors...... to study the material at the grain scale. First, we use the intensity ratios of split diffraction peaks to extract grain-scale domain volume fractions for 139 grains. We find that even in the as-processed state there exist unequal volume fractions of each domain type, which we attribute to a heterogeneous...

  17. Specific features of the ferroelectric state in two-layer barium strontium titanate-based heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryukov, D. V.; Mukhortov, V. M.; Golovko, Yu. I.; Biryukov, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The structural properties of one- and two-layer heterostructures based on the barium-strontium titanate of various compositions deposited by the Frank-Van der Merve on a magnesium oxide substrate have been studied. The heterostructures have been prepared by the rf sputtering of the stoichiometric ceramic targets in a Plazma 50 SE deposition system. The principal difference of this method of deposition from known analogs is that the growth of single-crystal films occurs from a disperse oxide phase formed in the plasma of a high-current rf discharge during the ceramic target sputtering at the cluster level. The peculiarities of the manifestation of the ferroelectric state in the two-layer heterostructures when changing the sequence order of the films with various compositions of barium-strontium titanate.

  18. Zirconium titanate: stability and thermal expansion; Titanato de circonio: estabilidad termodinamica y expansion termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Lopez, E.; Moreno, R.; Baudin, C.

    2011-07-01

    Zirconium titanate is a well known compound in the field of electro ceramics, although it has also been used in catalyst and sensors applications. The crystallographic thermal expansion anisotropy of this compound makes it a potential candidate as constituent of structural components. In general, to assure the structural integrity and microstructural homogeneity of a ceramic piece, relatively low cooling rates from the fabrication temperature are required. This requirement is essential for zirconium titanate because thermal expansion as well as phase distribution is affected by small variations in the composition and cooling rate. This work reviews the available data on the phase equilibrium relationships in the systems ZrO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The main discrepancies as well as the possible origins of them are discussed. Additionally, the crystallographic thermal expansion data in the current literature are reviewed. (Author) 56 refs.

  19. Effects of pH and temperature on the deposition properties of stannate chemical conversion coatings formed by the potentiostatic technique on AZ91 D magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsentriecy, Hassan H.; Azumi, Kazuhisa; Konno, Hidetaka

    2008-01-01

    The effects of pH and temperature of a stannate bath on the quality of stannate chemical conversion coatings formed on AZ91 D magnesium alloy by using the potentiostatic polarization technique at E = -1.1 V were investigated in order to improve uniformity and corrosion protection performance of the coating films. It was found that the uniformity and corrosion resistance of coating films deposited by potentiostatic polarization were closely associated with pH and temperature of the coating bath. The pH and temperature to obtain the best coating film were investigated as a function of corrosion protection performance evaluated by curves of potentiodynamic anodic polarization conducted in borate buffer solution. Scanning electron microscope observation and electrochemical corrosion tests of the stannate-coated samples confirmed significant improvement in uniformity and corrosion resistivity of coating films deposited by the potentiostatic technique by modifying the pH and temperature of the coating bath. It was also found that uniformity and corrosion resistivity of the coating films deposited by the potentiostatic technique were considerably improved compared to those of coatings deposited by the simple immersion method at the best conditions of pH and temperature of the coating bath

  20. Organic chemistry on Titan: Surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of Titan's organic sediments with the surface (solubility in nonpolar fluids) is discussed. How Titan's sediments can be exposed to an aqueous medium for short, but perhaps significant, periods of time is also discussed. Interactions with hydrocarbons and with volcanic magmas are considered. The alteration of Titan's organic sediments over geologic time by the impacts of meteorites and comets is discussed.

  1. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  2. Enhancement of the piezoelectric properties of sodium lanthanum bismuth titanate (Na0.5La0.5Bi4Ti4O15) through modification with cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunming; Wang Jinfeng; Zheng Limei; Zhao Minglei; Wang Chunlei

    2010-01-01

    The dielectric, piezoelectric, and electromechanical properties of B-site cobalt-modified sodium lanthanum bismuth titanate (Na 0.5 La 0.5 Bi 4 Ti 4 O 15 , NLBT) piezoelectric ceramics were investigated. The piezoelectric properties of NLBT ceramics can be enhanced by cobalt modifications. The NLBT ceramics modified with 0.2 wt.% cobalt trioxide (NLBT-C4) possess good piezoelectric properties, with piezoelectric coefficient d 33 of 27 pC/N, electromechanical coupling factors (k p and k t ) of 6.5% and 28.5%, and mechanical quality factor Q m (k p mode) of 3400. The Curie temperature T c of cobalt-modified NLBT ceramics was found to slightly higher than that of pure NLBT ceramics. A large dielectric abnormity in dielectric loss tan δ was observed in NLBT ceramics, which can be significantly suppressed by cobalt modification. Thermal annealing studies presented the cobalt-modified NLBT ceramics possess stable piezoelectric properties.

  3. Diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J.; Galand, M.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Lavvas, P. P.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Cravens, T. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Waite, J. H.

    2009-06-01

    We present our analysis of the diurnal variations of Titan's ionosphere (between 1000 and 1300 km) based on a sample of Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) measurements in the Open Source Ion (OSI) mode obtained from eight close encounters of the Cassini spacecraft with Titan. Although there is an overall ion depletion well beyond the terminator, the ion content on Titan's nightside is still appreciable, with a density plateau of ˜700 cm-3 below ˜1300 km. Such a plateau is a combined result of significant depletion of light ions and modest depletion of heavy ones on Titan's nightside. We propose that the distinctions between the diurnal variations of light and heavy ions are associated with their different chemical loss pathways, with the former primarily through “fast” ion-neutral chemistry and the latter through “slow” electron dissociative recombination. The strong correlation between the observed night-to-day ion density ratios and the associated ion lifetimes suggests a scenario in which the ions created on Titan's dayside may survive well to the nightside. The observed asymmetry between the dawn and dusk ion density profiles also supports such an interpretation. We construct a time-dependent ion chemistry model to investigate the effect of ion survival associated with solid body rotation alone as well as superrotating horizontal winds. For long-lived ions, the predicted diurnal variations have similar general characteristics to those observed. However, for short-lived ions, the model densities on the nightside are significantly lower than the observed values. This implies that electron precipitation from Saturn's magnetosphere may be an additional and important contributor to the densities of the short-lived ions observed on Titan's nightside.

  4. [Ceramic brackets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølsted, K

    1992-01-01

    Because of the many drawbacks of the hard and brittle material, ceramic brackets should not be used uncritically for orthodontic treatments. If ceramic brackets are used, the following guidelines should be observed: 1. If large and complicated tooth movements are involved, conventional bracket systems should be considered. 2. Occlusion on ceramic brackets is to be avoided. 3. Sharp instruments should be used with extreme care to avoid scratching the ceramic surface. Metal ligatures must not be used. 4. The length of the treatment is extended, probably because of the increased friction. 5. The problems connected with removing the brackets have not yet been solved. Be particularly careful of weakened teeth. 6. Esthetically, ceramic brackets function satisfactorily, but transparent elastic ligatures do not. They rapidly become discoloured and need frequent replacement. Nor are there as yet any "invisible arch wires", apart from some few, extremely flexible "white" arch wires. The ceramic bracket has no doubt come to stay, but there have been many difficulties in the "running-in" period, and the problems are far from solved yet. New ceramic brackets are coming onto the market all the time, and only future clinical studies can show whether they will become a genuine alternative to the conventional bracket.

  5. Oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  6. Anion and cation diffusion in barium titanate and strontium titanate; Anionen- und Kationendiffusion in Barium- und Strontiumtitanat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, Markus Franz

    2012-12-19

    Perovskite oxides show various interesting properties providing several technical applications. In many cases the defect chemistry is the key to understand and influence the material's properties. In this work the defect chemistry of barium titanate and strontium titanate is analysed by anion and cation diffusion experiments and subsequent time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The reoxidation equation for barium titanate used in multi-layer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) is found out by a combination of different isotope exchange experiments and the analysis of the resulting tracer diffusion profiles. It is shown that the incorporation of oxygen from water vapour is faster by orders of magnitude than from molecular oxygen. Chemical analysis shows the samples contain various dopants leading to a complex defect chemistry. Dysprosium is the most important dopant, acting partially as a donor and partially as an acceptor in this effectively acceptor-doped material. TEM and EELS analysis show the inhomogeneous distribution of Dy in a core-shell microstructure. The oxygen partial pressure and temperature dependence of the oxygen tracer diffusion coefficients is analysed and explained by the complex defect chemistry of Dy-doped barium titanate. Additional fast diffusion profiles are attributed to fast diffusion along grain boundaries. In addition to the barium titanate ceramics from an important technical application, oxygen diffusion in cubic, nominally undoped BaTiO{sub 3} single crystals has been studied by means of {sup 18}O{sub 2}/{sup 16}O{sub 2} isotope exchange annealing and subsequent determination of the isotope profiles in the solid by ToF-SIMS. It is shown that a correct description of the diffusion profiles requires the analysis of the diffusion through the surface space-charge into the material's bulk. Surface exchange coefficients, space-charge potentials and bulk diffusion coefficients are analysed as a function of oxygen partial

  7. Organic chemistry in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattergood, T.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory photochemical simulations and other types of chemical simulations are discussed. The chemistry of methane, which is the major known constituent of Titan's atmosphere was examined with stress on what can be learned from photochemistry and particle irradiation. The composition of dust that comprises the haze layer was determined. Isotope fractionation in planetary atmospheres is also discussed.

  8. High-frequency dielectric properties of nanocomposite and ceramic titanates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rinkevich, A.B.; Kuznetsov, E. A.; Perov, D.V.; Bovtun, Viktor; Kempa, Martin; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Savinov, Maxim; Samoilovich, M.I.; Klescheva, S.M.; Ryabkov, Y.I.; Tsvetkova, E.V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 3 (2015), s. 585-592 ISSN 1536-125X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0232 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electromagnetic waveguide * opal matrix * transmission and reflection coefficients * microwave conductivity * dielectric spectra Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 1.702, year: 2015

  9. Tailored ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    In polyphase tailored ceramic forms two distinct modes of radionuclide immobilization occur. At high waste loadings the radionuclides are distributed through most of the ceramic phases in dilute solid solution, as indicated schematically in this paper. However, in the case of low waste loadings, or a high loading of a waste with low radionuclide content, the ceramic can be designed with only selected phases containing the radionuclides. The remaining material forms nonradioactive phases which provide a degree of physical microstructural isolation. The research and development work with polyphase ceramic nuclear waste forms over the past ten years is discussed. It has demonstrated the critical attributes which suggest them as a waste form for future HLW disposal. From a safety standpoint, the crystalline phases in the ceramic waste forms offer the potential for demonstrable chemical durability in immobilizing the long-lived radionuclides in a geologic environment. With continued experimental research on pure phases, analysis of mineral analogue behavior in geochemical environments, and the study of radiation effects, realistic predictive models for waste form behavior over geologic time scales are feasible. The ceramic forms extend the degree of freedom for the economic optimization of the waste disposal system

  10. Kiln furniture for sintering electronic ceramics. Ceramics shosei jigu (doguzai) ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fushimi, T.; Shibata, S. (Toshiba Ceramics Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-05-01

    This paper summarizes refractory jigs used in manufacturing electronic ceramics. Jigs used vary with types of sintering kilns. Sintering kilns include pusher kiln, trolley kiln, roller hearth kiln, batch kiln, and HIP. The paper describes jigs by electronic ceramics materials. Ferrites are sintered in a pusher kiln, where such jigs are used as a base plate, stanchions, shelf plates, saggers, and a setter. Jigs that contact with ferrite are demanded not to give such adverse effects to materials to be sintered as crystal growth. Soft ferrites of Mn/Zn and Ni/Zn systems use jigs of pure alumina and zirconia nature, while large-size soft ferrites use setters with rough surface. A barium titanate system as a ceramic dielectric uses a zirconia jig, and materials containing Pb and Bi such as for varistors use magnesia and spinel jigs. Alumina porcelain substrates use mullite or high-alumina pusher kilns and alumina jigs. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  11. 2DEGs at perovskite interfaces between KTaO3 or KNbO3 and stannates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Fan

    Full Text Available We report density functional studies of electron rich interfaces between KTaO3 or KNbO3 and CaSnO3 or ZnSnO3 and in particular the nature of the interfacial electron gasses that can be formed. We find that depending on the details these may occur on either the transition metal or stannate sides of the interface and in the later case can be shifted away from the interface by ferroelectricity. We also present calculations for bulk KNbO3, KTaO3, CaSnO3, BaSnO3 and ZnSnO3, showing the different transport and optical properties that may be expected on the two sides of such interfaces. The results suggest that these interfaces may display a wide range of behaviors depending on conditions, and in particular the interplay with ferroelectricity suggests that electrical control of these properties may be possible.

  12. The determination of major and some minor constituents in lead zirconate-titanate compositions by x-ray fluorescence and atomic absorption spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Willigen, J.H.H.G.; Kruidhof, H.; Dahmen, E.A.M.F.

    1972-01-01

    An accurate X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method is described for the determination of lead, zirconium and titanium in lead zirconate-titanate ceramics. Careful matching of samples and standards by a borax fusion method resulted in a relative standard deviation of about 0.2% for the major

  13. Structural Ceramics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  14. Obtaining and electrical characterization of silicone/barium titanate composite for variable capacitor applications; Obtencao e caracterizacao eletrica de composito silicone/titanato de bario para aplicacoes em capacitor variavel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, D.A.; Souza, P.S.S.; Souza, C.P., E-mail: debora.vieira@cear.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Centro de Energias Alternativas e Renovaveis. Departamento de Engenharia Eletrica; Menezes, P.C.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2014-07-01

    Silicone/barium titanate composites are excellent candidates for applications in the production of electronics components. In this work, silicone/barium titanate composite was obtained for the production of capacitors with variable dielectric distance. The mixture of composite (20% of barium titanate) was performed in a mixer with stem type propellers, at room temperature for 20 minutes. The cure was held in vacuum kiln. After obtaining the composite, was mounted a parallel plate capacitor, using composite as dielectric. The composite obtained was subjected to x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and capacitive electrical test. The DRX confirms the presence of ceramic charge in composite with the presence of broad peaks of barium titanate and micrographs show the barium titanate particles dispersed in polymer matrix. The capacitance of the sample was approximately 28,7pF. (author)

  15. Amino acidis derived from Titan tholins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Sagan, Carl; Ogino, Hiroshi; Nagy, Bartholomew; Er, Cevat

    1986-01-01

    The production of amino acids by acid treatment of Titan tholin is experimentally investigated. The synthesis of Titan tholin and the derivatization of amino acids to N-trifluoroacetyl isopropyl esters are described. The gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy analysis of the Titan tholins reveals the presence of glycine, alpha and beta alainine, and aspartic acid, and the total yield of amino acids is about 0.01.

  16. Evaluation of ceramic materials to immobilize ICPP calcines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Cole, H.S.; Mittl, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Various ceramic materials as well as Formula 127 glass have been developed to immobilize Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) zirconia calcine. Tailored, titanate and matrix encapsulated ceramics were prepared by cold pressing and sintering reactants, while glass-ceramics were prepared by melting in a manner similar to that of preparing the glass. X-ray diffraction techniques were used to determine the presence of radionuclide and calcine matrix element host phases in each ceramic material. The aqueous leachability, practical loading capacity and the incorporation of waste elements into host phases was investigated and compared to those of Formula 127 glass through application of the Soxhlet and MCC-1 static leach tests. Potential process requirements for each material were evaluated based on the number of steps needed for laboratory-scale preparation. 5 figures, 4 tables

  17. Titan Montgolfiere Buoyancy Modulation System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Titan is ideally suited for balloon exploration due to its low gravity and dense atmosphere. Current NASA mission architectures baseline Montgolfiere balloon...

  18. Study on a flexoelectric microphone using barium strontium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S R; Huang, W B; Yuan, F G; Jiang, X N; Zhang, S J

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a flexoelectric microphone was, for the first time, designed and fabricated in a bridge structure using barium strontium titanate (Ba 0.65 Sr 0.35 TiO 3 ) ceramic and tested afterwards. The prototyped flexoelectric microphone consists of a 1.5 mm  ×  768 μm  ×  50 μm BST bridge structure and a silicon substrate with a cavity. The sensitivity and resonance frequency were designed to be 0.92 pC/Pa and 98.67 kHz, respectively. The signal to noise ratio was measured to be 74 dB. The results demonstrate that the flexoelectric microphone possesses high sensitivity and a wide working frequency range simultaneously, suggesting that flexoelectricity could be an excellent alternative sensing mechanism for microphone applications. (paper)

  19. Study on a flexoelectric microphone using barium strontium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, S. R.; Huang, W. B.; Zhang, S. J.; Yuan, F. G.; Jiang, X. N.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a flexoelectric microphone was, for the first time, designed and fabricated in a bridge structure using barium strontium titanate (Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3) ceramic and tested afterwards. The prototyped flexoelectric microphone consists of a 1.5 mm  ×  768 μm  ×  50 μm BST bridge structure and a silicon substrate with a cavity. The sensitivity and resonance frequency were designed to be 0.92 pC/Pa and 98.67 kHz, respectively. The signal to noise ratio was measured to be 74 dB. The results demonstrate that the flexoelectric microphone possesses high sensitivity and a wide working frequency range simultaneously, suggesting that flexoelectricity could be an excellent alternative sensing mechanism for microphone applications.

  20. Process for Assembly of Multimode Hydrophone Ceramic Stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    driver may be magnetostrictive material that can provide a selected vibratory frequency through the excitation provided by oscillatory magnetic...transfer underwater pressure waves to electrical energy. As a result, an output charge can be monitored from piezoelectric material with the...hydrophone 10 includes tangentially-poled ceramic (lead- zirconate titanate) rings 12, a Delrin washers 14, a LC-800 washers 16, 26 AWG insulated wire

  1. Titan's geoid and hydrology: implications for Titan's geological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotin, Christophe; Seignovert, Benoit; Lawrence, Kenneth; MacKenzie, Shannon; Barnes, Jason; Brown, Robert

    2014-05-01

    A 1x1 degree altitude map of Titan is constructed from the degree 4 gravity potential [1] and Titan's shape [2] determined by the Radio Science measurements and RADAR observations of the Cassini mission. The amplitude of the latitudinal altitude variations is equal to 300 m compared to 600 m for the amplitude of the latitudinal shape variations. The two polar caps form marked depressions with an abrupt change in topography at exactly 60 degrees at both caps. Three models are envisaged to explain the low altitude of the polar caps: (i) thinner ice crust due to higher heat flux at the poles, (ii) fossil shape acquired if Titan had higher spin rate in the past, and (iii) subsidence of the crust following the formation of a denser layer of clathrates as ethane rain reacts with the H2O ice crust [3]. The later model is favored because of the strong correlation between the location of the cloud system during the winter season and the latitude of the abrupt change in altitude. Low altitude polar caps would be the place where liquids would run to and eventually form large seas. Indeed, the large seas of Titan are found at the deepest locations at the North Pole. However, the lakes and terrains considered to be evaporite candidates due to their spectral characteristics in the infrared [4,5] seem to be perched. Lakes may have been filled during Titan's winter and then slowly evaporated leaving material on the surface. Interestingly, the largest evaporite deposits are located at the equator in a deep depression 150 m below the altitude of the northern seas. This observation seems to rule out the presence of a global subsurface hydrocarbon reservoir unless the evaporation rate at the equator is faster than the transport of fluids from the North Pole to the equator. This work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. [1] Iess L. et al. (2012) Science, doi 10.1126/science.1219631. [2] Lorenz R.D. (2013

  2. Titan from Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Robert H; Waite, J. Hunter

    2010-01-01

    This book reviews our current knowledge of Saturn's largest moon Titan featuring the latest results obtained by the Cassini-Huygens mission. A global author team addresses Titan’s origin and evolution, internal structure, surface geology, the atmosphere and ionosphere as well as magnetospheric interactions. The book closes with an outlook beyond the Cassini-Huygens mission. Colorfully illustrated, this book will serve as a reference to researchers as well as an introduction for students.

  3. Potassium Sodium Niobate-Based Lead-Free Piezoelectric Multilayer Ceramics Co-Fired with Nickel Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Kawada

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although lead-free piezoelectric ceramics have been extensively studied, many problems must still be overcome before they are suitable for practical use. One of the main problems is fabricating a multilayer structure, and one solution attracting growing interest is the use of lead-free multilayer piezoelectric ceramics. The paper reviews work that has been done by the authors on lead-free alkali niobate-based multilayer piezoelectric ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. Nickel inner electrodes have many advantages, such as high electromigration resistance, high interfacial strength with ceramics, and greater cost effectiveness than silver palladium inner electrodes. However, widely used lead zirconate titanate-based ceramics cannot be co-fired with nickel inner electrodes, and silver palladium inner electrodes are usually used for lead zirconate titanate-based piezoelectric ceramics. A possible alternative is lead-free ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. We have thus been developing lead-free alkali niobate-based multilayer ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. The normalized electric-field-induced thickness strain (Smax/Emax of a representative alkali niobate-based multilayer ceramic structure with nickel inner electrodes was 360 pm/V, where Smax denotes the maximum strain and Emax denotes the maximum electric field. This value is about half that for the lead zirconate titanate-based ceramics that are widely used. However, a comparable value can be obtained by stacking more ceramic layers with smaller thicknesses. In the paper, the compositional design and process used to co-fire lead-free ceramics with nickel inner electrodes are introduced, and their piezoelectric properties and reliabilities are shown. Recent advances are introduced, and future development is discussed.

  4. Potassium Sodium Niobate-Based Lead-Free Piezoelectric Multilayer Ceramics Co-Fired with Nickel Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Shinichiro; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hideki; Kimura, Masahiko; Ando, Akira; Omiya, Suetake; Kubodera, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Although lead-free piezoelectric ceramics have been extensively studied, many problems must still be overcome before they are suitable for practical use. One of the main problems is fabricating a multilayer structure, and one solution attracting growing interest is the use of lead-free multilayer piezoelectric ceramics. The paper reviews work that has been done by the authors on lead-free alkali niobate-based multilayer piezoelectric ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. Nickel inner electrodes have many advantages, such as high electromigration resistance, high interfacial strength with ceramics, and greater cost effectiveness than silver palladium inner electrodes. However, widely used lead zirconate titanate-based ceramics cannot be co-fired with nickel inner electrodes, and silver palladium inner electrodes are usually used for lead zirconate titanate-based piezoelectric ceramics. A possible alternative is lead-free ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. We have thus been developing lead-free alkali niobate-based multilayer ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. The normalized electric-field-induced thickness strain (Smax/Emax) of a representative alkali niobate-based multilayer ceramic structure with nickel inner electrodes was 360 pm/V, where Smax denotes the maximum strain and Emax denotes the maximum electric field. This value is about half that for the lead zirconate titanate-based ceramics that are widely used. However, a comparable value can be obtained by stacking more ceramic layers with smaller thicknesses. In the paper, the compositional design and process used to co-fire lead-free ceramics with nickel inner electrodes are introduced, and their piezoelectric properties and reliabilities are shown. Recent advances are introduced, and future development is discussed. PMID:28793646

  5. Photoexcited-carrier transport in barium strontium titanate/strontium titanate heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, H.; Wang, J. Y.; Zhang, Z. T.; Yang, B.; Chen, C. L.; Jin, K. X.

    2017-09-01

    Photoexcited-carrier transport properties at the surface and the interface of barium strontium titanate/strontium titanate heterostructures are reported. Under a 365 nm light irradiation, the surfaces of barium strontium titanate films exhibit a metal-to-insulator transition, while the interfaces favor the metallic conduction with increasing temperatures. By analyzing, we consider that these results might be attributed to the intrinsic features of strontium titanate and the polarization state of barium strontium titanate films under the irradiation. Our results would contribute to further understanding of the photocarrier effect at the interface and demonstrate great potential applications in optoelectronic devices of all-oxide heterostructures.

  6. Preparation and properties of porous PMN-PZT ceramics doped with strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Tao; Dong Xianlin; Mao Chaoliang; Chen Shutao; Chen Heng

    2006-01-01

    The piezoelectric and dielectric properties of lead magnesium niobate-lead zirconate titanate (PMN-PZT) ceramics were investigated as a function of density for transducer applications. A decrease in density increased elastic compliance and improved acoustic impedance matching between PMN-PZT ceramics and ambient media. The reduced dielectric constant (ε 33 ) and enhanced hydrostatic figure of merit (d h g h ) of PMN-PZT were observed with decreased density. The results showed the d h g h of PMN-PZT ceramic with density of about 5.4 g/cm 3 reached 4000 x 10 -15 m 2 /N, and the ε 33 was very close to 2000, which demonstrates that porous PMN-PZT ceramic is a promising material for transducer applications. Moreover, the low density PMN-PZT ceramics exhibited lower dielectric loss than high density PMN-PZT ceramics during the temperature from 250 deg. C to 500 deg. C

  7. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  8. Microstructure of doped barium titanate prepared from polymeric precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanovic, B. D.

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Barium titanate is used extensively as a dielectric in ceramic capacitors, particularly due to its high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss characteristics. It can be made semiconducting by addition of certain dopants and by proper modification of grains and grain boundary properties obtaining very interesting characteristics for various applications. The synthesis method and sintering regime have a strong influence on properties of obtained barium titanate ceramics. Doped barium titanate was prepared with Nb+5 and Y+3 ions as donor dopants, and with Mn+2 ions as acceptor dopant by polymeric precursors method. By this procedure nanosized powders were obtained after calcination. Sintering was performed in the temperature range of 1290ºC to 1380ºC. The microstructure of doped BaTiO3 was performed using scanning electron microscopy. The influence of dopants and sintering temperature on grain size was analysed.

    El titanato de bario se usa extensamente como dieléctrico en condensadores cerámicos, debido principalmente a su elevada constante dieléctrica y a sus bajas pérdidas dieléctricas. Puede hacerse semiconductor mediante la adición de ciertos dopantes y a través de modificaciones adecuadas de las propiedades de los granos y los bordes de grano se obtienen características muy interesantes para muchas aplicaciones. El método de síntesis y el régimen de sinterización tienen una fuerte influencia sobre las propiedades del titanato de bario cerámico. El titanato de bario dopado con Nb5+ y Y3+ como dopantes donores y con Mn2+ como dopante aceptor se preparó mediante el método de precursores poliméricos. Mediante este procedimiento se obtuvieron polvos nanométricos después de la etapa de calcinación. La sinterización se realizó en el intervalo de temperaturas entre 1290ºC y 1380ºC. La microestructura del BaTiO3 dopado se estudió usando microscopía electrónica de barrido. Se analizó la influencia de los

  9. Reply to the 'Comment on "Proton transport in barium stannate: classical, semi-classical and quantum regime"'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneste, Grégory; Hermet, Jessica; Dezanneau, Guilhem

    2017-08-09

    We respond to the erroneous criticisms about our modeling of proton transport in barium stannate [G. Geneste et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 19104]. In this previous work, we described, on the basis of density-functional calculations, proton transport in the classical and semi-classical regimes, and provided arguments in favor of an adiabatic picture for proton transfer at low temperature. We re-explain here our article (with more detail and precision), the content of which has been distorted in the Comment, and reiterate our arguments in this reply. We refute all criticisms. They are completely wrong in the context of our article. Even though a few of them are based on considerations probably true in some metals, they make no sense here since they do not correspond to the content of our work. It has not been understood in the Comment that two competitive configurations, associated with radically different transfer mechanisms, have been studied in our work. It has also not been understood in the Comment that the adiabatic regime described for transfer occurs in the protonic ground state, in a very-low barrier configuration with the protonic ground state energy larger than the barrier. Serious confusion has been made in the Comment with the case of H in metals like Nb or Ta, leading to the introduction of the notion of (protonic) "excited-state proton transfer", relevant for H in some metals, but (i) that does not correspond to the (ground state) adiabatic transfers here described, and (ii) that does not correspond to what is commonly described as the "adiabatic limit for proton transfer" in the scientific literature. We emphasize, accordingly, the large differences between proton transfer in the present oxide and hydrogen jumps in metals like Nb or Ta, and the similarities between proton transfer in the present oxide and in acid-base solutions. We finally describe a scenario for proton transfer in the present oxide regardless of the temperature regime.

  10. Analysis of isothermal sintering of zinc-titanate doped with MgO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović N.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was analysis of isothermal sintering of zinc titanate ceramics doped with MgO obtained by mechanical activation. Mixtures of ZnO, TiO2 and MgO (0, 1.25 and 2.5% were mechanically activated 15 minutes in a planetary ball mill. The powders obtained were pressed under different pressures and the results were fitted with a phenomenological compacting equation. Isothermal sintering was performed in air for 120 minutes at four different temperatures. Structural characterization of ZnO-TiO2-MgO system after milling was performed at room temperature using XRPD measurements. DTA measurements showed different activation energies for pure and doped ZnO-TiO2 systems. Thus addition of MgO stabilizes the crystal structure of zinc titanate.

  11. Preparation of stable dispersion of barium titanate nanoparticles: Potential applications in biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofani, G; Danti, S; Moscato, S; Albertazzi, L; D'Alessandro, D; Dinucci, D; Chiellini, F; Petrini, M; Menciassi, A

    2010-04-01

    Nanoscale structures and materials have been explored in many biological applications because of their extraordinary novel properties. Here we propose a study of cellular interactions with barium titanate nanoparticles, an interesting ceramic material that has received a lot of interest in the nanotechnology research, but without any attention about its biological potential. We introduced for the first time an efficient method for the preparation of stable aqueous dispersions of barium titanate nanoparticles, characterized with FIB, TEM and AFM imaging, light scattering, Z-potential and UV/vis analysis. Finally, we presented a systematic study of short-term cytotoxicity of the prepared dispersion based both on quantitative (metabolism, proliferation) and qualitative (apoptosis, viability, differentiation) assays. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Preparation of Parium Titanates With Different Particle Size Distribution Using Modified Pechini Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Jaafer Abed AL-Jabar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Barium titanates is one of the most important ceramics that are widely used in the electronic industry because of its high dielectric constant, its ferroelectricity, and its piezoelectric properties. In the current study, five different batches of barium titanate powders were prepared by modifiedpechini method using the barium chloride and the titanium chloride as a starting materials in order to obtain different particle size distributions.SEM, TGA, DTA, XRD, FTIR, and other techniques have been used to characterize the prepared samples.XRD results suggested that the synthesized BaTiO3has a tetragonal phase.SEM images of the prepared samples reveala polyhedron shapes, on average, also it show that there are markedinfluence of the reactant concentration on the average size of the grains,where the samples prepared from higher solution concentration tend to possess larger grain size compared to that prepared from low concentration.

  13. Size and shape of Saturn's moon Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Stiles, Bryan; Hensley, Scott; Lorenz, Ralph; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lunine, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Cassini observations show that Saturn's moon Titan is slightly oblate. A fourth-order spherical harmonic expansion yields north polar, south polar, and mean equatorial radii of 2574.32 ± 0.05 kilometers (km), 2574.36 ± 0.03 km, and 2574.91 ± 0.11 km, respectively; its mean radius is 2574.73 ± 0.09 km. Titan's shape approximates a hydrostatic, synchronously rotating triaxial ellipsoid but is best fit by such a body orbiting closer to Saturn than Titan presently does. Titan's lack of high relief implies that most—but not all—of the surface features observed with the Cassini imaging subsystem and synthetic aperture radar are uncorrelated with topography and elevation. Titan's depressed polar radii suggest that a constant geopotential hydrocarbon table could explain the confinement of the hydrocarbon lakes to high latitudes.

  14. Anhydrous Ammonia Frost on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W. D.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonia has been suggested as a probable source for sustaining Titan's thick nitrogen-dominated atmosphere. Ammonia is believed to be important to maintaining nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere. Ammonia is seen in clouds in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, but has yet to be detected on any of the satellites. This may be because all forms of NH3 are unstable in the ambient conditions of the satellites surfaces or that its spectral features are altered by other components of the surface, and have not been identified. It has recently been demonstrated[1] that brightening occurs in Titan’s atmosphere that is transient on the time-scale of months. The spectral shape of the brightening is more consistent with that of the transient apparition of a pure ammonia frost than of an ammonia monohydrate or ammonia dihydrate frost. However, the phase behavior of the ammonia water system has peritectics at compositions of 1:1 and 1:2. These hydrate forms would be expected to dominate if the frost, or the reservoir from which the frost was derived had any water present. Physical mechanisms for producing measurable quanitities of anhydrous ammonia can include chemical dehydration or dehydration of the vapor phase - but it is challenging to store significant quantities of the anhydrous material because of the phase behavior in the solid state. [1] Nelson, R.M., et al. Saturn’s Titan: Surface Change, Ammonia, and Implications for Atmospheric and Tectonic Activity., Icarus, 199, pp. 429-441, 2009 This work was performed at JPL under contract to NASA

  15. Synthesis of barium titanate crystalline nanoparticles using hydrothermal microwave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.E.; Silva, R.A.; Teixeira, S.R.; Moreira, M.L.; Volanti, D.P.; Longo, E.

    2009-01-01

    The hydrothermal microwave method (HTMW) was used in the synthesis of barium titanate (BaTiO 3 ) nanoparticles. The solution was prepared in deionized water by using titanium (IV) isopropoxide (C 12 H 28 O 4 Ti), barium chloride (BaCl 2 .2H 2 O) and potassium hydroxide (KOH). Afterwards it was heated in an adapted conventional microwave oven. The system is composed of a temperature controller with thermocouple, a hermetic camera of reaction made of teflon, a manometer and a safety valve. The solution was heated to 140 deg C, at a 140 deg C/min heating rate, and maintained at this temperature for 40 minutes. The obtained ceramic powder was characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The XRD data confirms the formation of a high crystalline ceramic material with perovskite structure. The FE-SEM images reveal morphologies with dimensions varying from 27 to 54 nm. (author)

  16. Persistent photoconductivity in strontium titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Marianne C; Selim, Farida A; McCluskey, Matthew D

    2013-11-01

    Persistent photoconductivity was observed in strontium titanate (SrTiO(3)) single crystals. When exposed to sub-bandgap light (2.9 eV or higher) at room temperature, the free-electron concentration increases by over 2 orders of magnitude. After the light is turned off, the enhanced conductivity persists for several days, with negligible decay. From positron lifetime measurements, the persistent photoconductivity is attributed to the excitation of an electron from a titanium vacancy defect into the conduction band, with a very low recapture rate.

  17. Solid Carbon Produced in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch with a Titan Like Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vacher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid carbon is deposited on the surfaces of an inductively coupled plasma torch operating with a Titan like atmosphere plasma gas. The frame of the initial research is the study of the radiative properties of plasma encountered around a spacecraft during its hypersonic entry in upper layers of planetary atmosphere. Deposition of carbon is observed not only on the quartz tube outside the inductor but also on the ceramic protection of the torch injector. Carbon exhibits two types of morphology more or less dense and it is analyzed by various analytic devices as MEB, SEM, TEM, EDS and Raman spectroscopy. The gathered carbon powder shows the presence of nanostructured particles.

  18. Titan the earth-like moon

    CERN Document Server

    Coustenis, Athena

    1999-01-01

    This is the first book to deal with Titan, one of the most mysterious bodies in the solar system. The largest satellite of the giant planet Saturn, Titan is itself larger than the planet Mercury, and is unique in being the only known moon with a thick atmosphere. In addition, its atmosphere bears a startling resemblance to the Earth's, but is much colder.The American and European space agencies, NASA and ESA, have recently combined efforts to send a huge robot spacecraft to orbit Saturn and land on Titan. This book provides the background to this, the greatest deep space venture of our time, a

  19. Titan's organic chemistry: Results of simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Thompson, W. Reid; Khare, Bishun N.

    1992-01-01

    Recent low pressure continuous low plasma discharge simulations of the auroral electron driven organic chemistry in Titan's mesosphere are reviewed. These simulations yielded results in good accord with Voyager observations of gas phase organic species. Optical constants of the brownish solid tholins produced in similar experiments are in good accord with Voyager observations of the Titan haze. Titan tholins are rich in prebiotic organic constituents; the Huygens entry probe may shed light on some of the processes that led to the origin of life on Earth.

  20. The greenhouse and antigreenhouse effects on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Courtin, Regis

    1991-01-01

    The parallels between the atmospheric thermal structure of the Saturnian satellite Titan and the hypothesized terrestrial greenhouse effect can serve as bases for the evaluation of competing greenhouse theories. Attention is presently drawn to the similarity between the roles of H2 and CH4 on Titan and CO2 and H2O on earth. Titan also has an antigreenhouse effect due to a high-altitude haze layer which absorbs at solar wavelengths, while remaining transparent in the thermal IR; if this haze layer were removed, the antigreenhouse effect would be greatly reduced, exacerbating the greenhouse effect and raising surface temperature by over 20 K.

  1. A study on (K, Na) NbO3 based multilayer piezoelectric ceramics micro speaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Renlong; Chu, Xiangcheng; Huan, Yu; Sun, Yiming; Liu, Jiayi; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Longtu

    2014-10-01

    A flat panel micro speaker was fabricated from (K, Na) NbO3 (KNN)-based multilayer piezoelectric ceramics by a tape casting and cofiring process using Ag-Pd alloys as an inner electrode. The interface between ceramic and electrode was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The acoustic response was characterized by a standard audio test system. We found that the micro speaker with dimensions of 23 × 27 × 0.6 mm3, using three layers of 30 μm thickness KNN-based ceramic, has a high average sound pressure level (SPL) of 87 dB, between 100 Hz-20 kHz under five voltage. This result was even better than that of lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based ceramics under the same conditions. The experimental results show that the KNN-based multilayer ceramics could be used as lead free piezoelectric micro speakers.

  2. Titan's Atmospheric Dynamics and Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flasar, F. M.; Baines, K. H.; Bird, M. K.; Tokano, T.; West, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Titan, after Venus, is the second example of an atmosphere with a global cyclostrophic circulation in the solar system, but a circulation that has a strong seasonal modulation in the middle atmosphere. Direct measurement of Titan's winds, particularly observations tracking the Huygens probe at 10degS, indicate that the zonal winds are generally in the sense of the satellites rotation. They become cyclostrophic approx. 35 km above the surface and generally increase with altitude, with the exception of a sharp minimum centered near 75 km, where the wind velocity decreases to nearly zero. Zonal winds derived from the temperature field retrieved from Cassini measurements, using the thermal wind equation, indicate a strong winter circumpolar vortex, with maximum winds at mid northern latitudes of 190 ms-' near 300 km. Above this level, the vortex decays. Curiously, the zonal winds and temperatures are symmetric about a pole that is offset from the surface pole by approx.4 degrees. The cause of this is not well understood, but it may reflect the response of a cyclostrophic circulation to the offset between the equator, where the distance to the rotation axis is greatest, and the solar equator. The mean meridional circulation can be inferred from the temperature field and the meridional distribution of organic molecules and condensates and hazes. Both the warm temperatures in the north polar region near 400 km and the enhanced concentration of several organic molecules suggests subsidence there during winter and early spring. Stratospheric condensates are localized at high northern latitudes, with a sharp cut-off near 50degN. Titan's winter polar vortex appears to share many of the same characteristics of winter vortices on Earth-the ozone holes. Global mapping of temperatures, winds, and composition in he troposphere, by contrast, is incomplete. The few suitable discrete clouds that have bee found for tracking indicate smaller velocities than aloft, consistent with the

  3. Monolithic ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbell, Thomas P.; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    A development history and current development status evaluation are presented for SiC and Si3N4 monolithic ceramics. In the absence of widely sought improvements in these materials' toughness, and associated reliability in structural applications, uses will remain restricted to components in noncritical, nonman-rated aerospace applications such as cruise missile and drone gas turbine engine components. In such high temperature engine-section components, projected costs lie below those associated with superalloy-based short-life/expendable engines. Advancements are required in processing technology for the sake of fewer and smaller microstructural flaws.

  4. Thermal properties and dynamic mechanical properties of ceramic fillers filled epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidina, D. S.; Mariatti, M.; Juliewatty, J.

    2015-07-01

    This present study is aimed to enhance the thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of ceramic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate, CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) and Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) filled epoxy thin film composites. As can be seen from the results, 20 vol% BaTiO3/epoxy thin film composite showed the lowest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value, the highest decomposition temperature (T5 and Tonset) and weight of residue among the composites as the filler has low CTE value, distributed homogeneously throughout the composite and less voids can be seen between epoxy resin and BaTiO3 filler.

  5. Titan Submarine: Exploring the Depths of Kraken

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Titan is unique in the outer solar system in that it is the only one of the bodies outside the Earth with liquid lakes and seas on its surface. The Titanian seas,...

  6. Aluminum titanate crucible for molten uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbury, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    An improved crucible for molten uranium is described. The crucible or crucible liner is formed of aluminum titanate which essentially eliminates contamination of uranium and uranium alloys during molten states thereof. (U.S.)

  7. Titan Buoyant Atmospheric Glider, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Your mission is to explore the atmosphere and surface of Saturn's moon, Titan, a cold, harsh environment that poses many technical challenges for any potential...

  8. Piezoelectric properties and thermal stabilities of cobalt-modified potassium bismuth titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Zhen-Lei; Wang, Chun-Ming; Zhao, Tian-Long; Yu, Si-Long; Cao, Zhao-Peng

    2013-01-01

    The cobalt-modified potassium bismuth titanate (K 0.5 Bi 4.5 Ti 4 O 15 , KBT) piezoelectric ceramics have been prepared using conventional solid–state reaction. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the cobalt-modified KBT ceramics have a pure four-layer (m = 4) Aurivillius-type structure. The dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties of cobalt-modified KBT ceramics were investigated in detail. The piezoelectric activities of KBT ceramics were significantly improved by the cobalt modification. The reasons for piezoelectric activities enhancement with cobalt modification were given. The piezoelectric coefficient d 33 and Curie temperature T c for the 5 mol% cobalt-modified KBT ceramics (KBT-Co5) were found to be 28 pC/N and 575 °C, respectively. The DC resistivity, frequency constants (N p and N t ), and electromechanical properties at elevated temperature were investigated, indicating the cobalt-modified KBT piezoelectric ceramics possess stable piezoelectric properties up to 500 °C. The results show the cobalt-modified KBT ceramics are potential materials for high temperature piezoelectric applications. - Highlights: • We examine the piezoelectric properties of the cobalt-modified K 0.5 Bi 4.5 Ti 4 O 15 . • A high level of piezoelectric activities (d 33 = 28 pC/N) are obtained. • High Curie temperature (T c = 575 °C) is acquired for the optimal composition. • The Co-modified K 0.5 Bi 4.5 Ti 4 O 15 is promising as high temperature materials

  9. Crystalline Structure, Defect Chemistry and Room Temperature Colossal Permittivity of Nd-doped Barium Titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiaomei; Gu, Qilin; Zhu, Kongjun; Jin, Rongying; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Jing; Qiu, Jinhao

    2017-02-13

    Dielectric materials with high permittivity are strongly demanded for various technological applications. While polarization inherently exists in ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO 3 ), its high permittivity can only be achieved by chemical and/or structural modification. Here, we report the room-temperature colossal permittivity (~760,000) obtained in xNd: BaTiO 3 (x = 0.5 mol%) ceramics derived from the counterpart nanoparticles followed by conventional pressureless sintering process. Through the systematic analysis of chemical composition, crystalline structure and defect chemistry, the substitution mechanism involving the occupation of Nd 3+ in Ba 2+ -site associated with the generation of Ba vacancies and oxygen vacancies for charge compensation has been firstly demonstrated. The present study serves as a precedent and fundamental step toward further improvement of the permittivity of BaTiO 3 -based ceramics.

  10. Barium Titanate Nanoparticles: Highly Cytocompatible Dispersions in Glycol-chitosan and Doxorubicin Complexes for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danti Serena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the latest years, innovative nanomaterials have attracted a dramatic and exponentially increasing interest, in particular for their potential applications in the biomedical field. In this paper, we reported our findings on the cytocompatibility of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs, an extremely interesting ceramic material. A rational and systematic study of BTNP cytocompatibility was performed, using a dispersion method based on a non-covalent binding to glycol-chitosan, which demonstrated the optimal cytocompatibility of this nanomaterial even at high concentration (100 μg/ml. Moreover, we showed that the efficiency of doxorubicin, a widely used chemotherapy drug, is highly enhanced following the complexation with BTNPs. Our results suggest that innovative ceramic nanomaterials such as BTNPs can be realistically exploited as alternative cellular nanovectors.

  11. Barium Titanate Nanoparticles: Highly Cytocompatible Dispersions in Glycol-chitosan and Doxorubicin Complexes for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Danti, Serena; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Moscato, Stefania; Petrini, Mario; Menciassi, Arianna

    2010-05-09

    In the latest years, innovative nanomaterials have attracted a dramatic and exponentially increasing interest, in particular for their potential applications in the biomedical field. In this paper, we reported our findings on the cytocompatibility of barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs), an extremely interesting ceramic material. A rational and systematic study of BTNP cytocompatibility was performed, using a dispersion method based on a non-covalent binding to glycol-chitosan, which demonstrated the optimal cytocompatibility of this nanomaterial even at high concentration (100 μg/ml). Moreover, we showed that the efficiency of doxorubicin, a widely used chemotherapy drug, is highly enhanced following the complexation with BTNPs. Our results suggest that innovative ceramic nanomaterials such as BTNPs can be realistically exploited as alternative cellular nanovectors.

  12. Spectral Trends of Titan's Tropical Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Penteado, Paulo F.; Turner, Jake; Montiel, Nicholas; Schoenfeld, Ashley; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Neish, Catherine; Radebaugh, Jani

    2016-10-01

    Titan's surface can be observed most clearly at 8 spectral regions that lie in between the strong methane bands in Titan's spectrum. Within these "windows", between 0.9 to 5 microns, the surface is nonetheless obscured by methane and haze, the latter of which is optically thick at lower wavelengths. Thus studies of Titan's surface must eliminate the effects of atmospheric extinction and extract the subtle spectral features that underlie the dominant spectral trends.To determine the subtle spectral features of Titan's tropical surface (30S--30N) we conducted a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the I/F at the 1.1, 1.3, 1.6 and 2.0 um wavelength windows, recorded by Cassini/VIMS. The PCA analysis identifies the spectral trend that defines the highest variance in the data (the principal component), as well as successively weaker orthogonal trends, without a priori assumptions about the surface composition, e.g. as needed in radiative transfer analyses.Our analysis derives the spectral features at the four wavelengths that describe Titan's tropical surface. We detect a large almost contiguous region that extends roughly 160 degrees in longitude and which exhibits absorption features at 1.6 and 2.0, as well as 2.8 um (characteristic of water ice). This vast and perhaps tectonic feature is, in part, associated with terrain that is hypothesized to be some of the oldest surfaces on Titan. In addition, the PCA analysis indicates at least 2 separate organic spectra signatures, potentially due to the separation of liquid and refractory sediments or to their chemically alteration over time. Here we discuss the PCA analysis and compare our derived compositional maps of Titan's surface with Radar maps of the topography and morphology, to entertain questions regarding the geology of Titan's surface the age of its atmosphere.

  13. Atomic hydrogen distribution. [in Titan atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarie, N.

    1974-01-01

    Several possible H2 vertical distributions in Titan's atmosphere are considered with the constraint of 5 km-A a total quantity. Approximative calculations show that hydrogen distribution is quite sensitive to two other parameters of Titan's atmosphere: the temperature and the presence of other constituents. The escape fluxes of H and H2 are also estimated as well as the consequent distributions trapped in the Saturnian system.

  14. Rogue wave in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Labany, S. K.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Bedwehy, N. A.; Sabry, R.; Abd El-Razek, H. N.

    2012-03-01

    Rogue wave in a collisionless, unmagnetized electronegative plasma is investigated. For this purpose, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. However, when the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency then the KdV equation is also used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable modified ion-acoustic wavepackets through the derivation of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. In order to show that the characteristics of the rogue wave is influenced by the plasma parameters, the relevant numerical analysis of the NLS equation is presented. The relevance of our investigation to the Titan's atmosphere is discussed.

  15. Crystal structure of 2-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium aquatrichlorido(oxalato-κ2O,O′stannate(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhamadou Birame Diop

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The tin(IV atom in the complex anion of the title salt, (C4H7N2[Sn(C2O4Cl3(H2O], is in a distorted octahedral coordination environment defined by three chlorido ligands, an oxygen atom from a water molecule and two oxygen atoms from a chelating oxalate anion. The organic cation is linked through a bifurcated N—H...O hydrogen bond to the free oxygen atoms of the oxalate ligand of the complex [Sn(H2OCl3(C2O4]− anion. Neighbouring stannate(IV anions are linked through O—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the water molecule and the two non-coordinating oxalate oxygen atoms. In combination with additional N—H...Cl hydrogen bonds between cations and anions, a three-dimensional network is spanned.

  16. Luminescence studies of perovskite structured titanates: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag Bhargavi, G.; Khare, Ayush

    2015-06-01

    Apart from widely known dielectric and ferroelectric properties, the perovskite type materials also constitute a class of materials, which are recently investigated for their optical properties. These materials are being used for fabrication of various microelectronics and optoelectronic devices. Photoluminescence (PL), mechanoluminescence (ML) and thermoluminescence (TL) are such phenomena offering numerous applications in different fields like electro-optics, flat panel displays, LED technology, sensors, dynamic visualization etc. This paper briefly reviews the status and new progress in luminescence studies of ferroelectric materials like barium titanate (BT), barium zirconate titanate (BZT), calcium titanate (CT), calcium zirconate titanate (CZT), lead titanate (PT), lead zirconate titanate (PZT), etc., prepared through various methods.

  17. Selections from 2017: Discoveries in Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2017, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume in January.Carbon Chain Anions and the Growth of Complex Organic Molecules in Titans IonospherePublished July2017Main takeaway:Graphic depicting some of the chemical reactions taking place in Titans atmosphere, leading to the generation of organic haze particles. [ESA]In a recently published study led by Ravi Desai (University College London), scientists used data from the Cassini mission to identify negatively charged molecules known as carbon chain anions in the atmosphere of Saturns largest moon, Titan.Why its interesting:Carbon chain anions are the building blocks ofmore complex molecules, and Titans thick nitrogen and methane atmosphere mightmimic the atmosphere of earlyEarth. This first unambiguous detection of carbon chain anions in a planet-like atmosphere might therefore teach us about the conditions and chemical reactions that eventually led to the development of life on Earth. And ifwe can use Titan to learn about how complex molecules grow from these anion chains, we may be able to identify auniversal pathway towards the ingredients for life.What weve learned so far:Cassini measured fewer and fewer lower-mass anions the deeper in Titans ionosphere that it looked and at the same time,an increase in the number of precursors to larger aerosol molecules further down. This tradeoff strongly suggests that the anions are indeed involved in building up the more complex molecules, seeding their eventual growth into the complex organic haze of Titans lower atmosphere.CitationR. T. Desai et al 2017 ApJL 844 L18. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa7851

  18. Development of Advanced Materials for Electro-Ceramic Application Final Report CRADA No. TC-1331-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplan, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Olstad, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); McMillan, L. [Symetrix International, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Tulupov, A. [Soliton-NTT, Moscow (Russia)

    2017-10-19

    The goal of this project was to further develop and characterize the electrochemical methods originating in Russia for producing ultra high purity organometallic compounds utilized as precursors in the production of high quality electro-ceramic materials. Symetrix planned to use electro-ceramic materials with high dielectric constant for microelectronic memory circuit applications. General Atomics planned to use the barium titanate type ceramics with low loss tangent for producing a high power ferroelectric tuner used to match radio frequency power into their Dill-D fusion machine. Phase I of the project was scheduled to have a large number of organometallic (alkoxides) chemical samples produced using various methods. These would be analyzed by LLNL, Soliton and Symetrix independently to determine the level of chemical impurities thus verifying each other's analysis. The goal was to demonstrate a cost-effective production method, which could be implemented in a large commercial facility to produce high purity organometallic compounds. In addition, various compositions of barium-strontium-titanate ceramics were to be produced and analyzed in order to develop an electroceramic capacitor material having the desired characteristics with respect to dielectric constant, loss tangent, temperature characteristics and non-linear behavior under applied voltage. Upon optimizing the barium titanate material, 50 capacitor preforms would be produced from this material demonstrating the ability to produce, in quantity, the pills ultimately required for the ferroelectric tuner (approx 2000-3000 ceramic pills).

  19. Real time observation of the hydrothermal crystallization of barium titanate using in situ neutron powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, R I; Millange, F; Smith, R I; Hansen, T C; O'Hare, D

    2001-12-19

    The hydrothermal crystallization of barium titanate, BaTiO3, has been studied in situ by time-resolved powder neutron diffraction methods using the recently developed Oxford/ISIS hydrothermal cell. This technique has allowed the formation of the ferroelectric ceramic to be followed in a noninvasive manner in real time and under genuine reaction conditions. In a first set of experiments, Ba(OD)2-8D2O was reacted with two different titanium sources, either crystalline TiO2 (anatase) or amorphous TiO2-H2O in D2O, at 100-140 degrees C and the reaction studied using the POLARIS time-of-flight neutron powder diffractometer, at the ISIS Facility. In a second series of experiments, the reaction between barium chloride and crystalline TiO2 (anatase) in NaOD/D2O was studied at temperatures between 100 and 200 degrees C and at different deuterioxide concentrations using the constant-wavelength D20 neutron powder diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin. Quantitative growth and decay curves were determined from analysis of the integrated intensities of Bragg reflections of starting materials and product phases. In both sets of experiments the rapid dissolution of the barium source was observed, followed by dissolution of the titanium source before the onset of crystallization of barium titanate. Using a nucleation-growth model we are able to simulate the growth curve of barium titanate at three temperatures. Our results indicate the predominance of a homogeneous dissolution-precipitation mechanism for the hydrothermal formation of barium titanate, rather than other possible mechanisms that have been discussed in the literature. Analysis of the line widths of the Bragg reflections in the neutron diffraction data indicates that the particle size of the BaTiO3 product phase prepared from the amorphous TiO2-H2O is smaller than that prepared from crystalline TiO2 (anatase).

  20. Enhanced piezoelectric properties and excellent thermal stabilities of cobalt-modified Aurivillius-type calcium bismuth titanate (CaBi4Ti4O15)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Tian-Long; Wang, Chun-Ming; Wang, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-Ming; Dong, Shuxiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cobalt oxide modified CBT-based ceramics were prepared and investigated in detail. • XRPD analysis revealed Co ions enter into B-site of CBT-based ceramics. • CBT-Co4 ceramics show the enhanced d 33 of 14 pC/N and T c of 782 °C. • CBT-Co4 ceramics present the improved high-temperature resistivity. • Thermal depoling behavior indicates CBT-Co4 ceramics exhibit good thermal stability. - Abstract: Bismuth layer-structured ferroelectric (BLSF) calcium bismuth titanate (CaBi 4 Ti 4 O 15 , CBT) piezoelectric ceramics with 0.0–1.0 wt.% cobalt oxide (Co 2 O 3 ) have been prepared via a conventional solid-state reaction method. Microstructural morphology and electrical properties of cobalt oxide-modified CBT ceramics were investigated in detail. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis revealed that the cobalt oxide-modified CBT ceramics have a pure four-layer Aurivillius-type structure. The piezoelectric properties of CBT ceramics were significantly enhanced by cobalt oxide modifications. The piezoelectric coefficient d 33 and Curie temperature T c of 0.2 wt.% cobalt oxide-modified CBT ceramics (CBT-Co4) are 14 pC/N and 782 °C, respectively. The DC resistivity and thermal depoling behavior at elevated temperature indicated that the CBT-Co4 ceramics exhibit good thermal stability, demonstrating that the CBT-Co4 ceramics are potential materials for high temperature piezoelectric applications.

  1. Synthesis of nanosized barium titanate/epoxy resin composites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Barium titanate/epoxy resin composites have been synthesized and tested for microwave absorption/ transmission. Nanocrystalline barium titanate (BaTiO3 or BT) ... Anechoic chamber; barium titanate; electromagnetic interference and compatibility; epoxy resin ..... electromagnetic waves, the two port calibrations have been.

  2. Synthesis, microstructural and electrical characterization of ceramic compounds based on strontium and calcium titanates and iron-oxide; Sintese, caracterizacao microestrutural e eletrica de compostos ceramicos a base de solucoes solidas de titanato de estroncio, titanato de calcio e oxido de ferro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Joao Roberto do

    2011-07-01

    Ca{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Ti{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 3-}{delta}, X = 0, 0.5 and 1.0, y = 0 and 0.35, ceramic compounds were synthesized by reactive solid state synthesis of CaCO{sub 3}, SrCO{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and by the polymeric precursor technique. The ceramic powders were evaluated by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Sintered ceramic pellets were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy and impedance spectroscopy. The electromotive force resulting from the exposing the pellets to partial pressure de oxygen in the {approx}50 ppm in the 600-1100 Degree-Celsius range was monitored using an experimental setup consisting of an oxygen electrochemical pump with yttria-stabilized zirconia transducer and sensor. Rietveld analysis of the X-ray data allowed for determining the crystalline structures: cubic perovskite (y = 0) and orthorhombic perovskite (y {ne} 0). The electrical conductivity was determined by the two probe impedance spectroscopy measurements in the 5 Hz-13 MHz frequency range from room temperature to approximately 200 Degree-Celsius . The deconvolution of the [-Z{sup (}{omega}) x Z'({omega})] impedance diagrams in the 300 < T(K) < 500 range shows two semicircles due to intragranular (bulk) and intergranular (grain boundary) contributions to the electrical resistivity. Sintered pellets using powders prepared by the ceramic route present higher inter- and intragranular resistivity values than pellets prepared with chemically synthesized powders. The emf signal under exposure oxygen shows that these compounds may be used in oxygen sensing devices in the 600 - 1100 Degree-Celsius range. Scanning probe microscopy topographic analysis of the polished and thermally etched surfaces of the pellets gave details of grain morphology, showing that pellets prepared with powders synthesized by the chemical route are less porous than

  3. Osseointegration of short titan implants: A pilot study in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botzenhart, Ute; Kunert-Keil, Christiane; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Gredes, Tomasz; Seiler, Juliane; Berniczei-Roykó, Ádám; Gedrange, Tomasz

    2015-05-01

    Reduced vertical bone level in the implantation area is often considered one of the limiting factors before implant insertion. Inserting implants of reduced length might be useful in order to avoid vertical bone augmentation prior to implantation. To the present day, no official guidelines exist as to the optimal length for these implants. It is nevertheless well known that the stability of an implant depends primarily on its osseointegration, which could otherwise be influenced by modifying implant surface texture. The aim of our study was to evaluate osseointegration in correlation with implant length and surface texture. Three different variations of titan implants (n=5) were compared: two types, each with an acid-etched and ceramic blasted surface, were inserted in the upper jaw of adult female minipigs at different lengths (tioLogic ST Shorty, 5mm length; tioLogic ST, 9mm length) and were compared to a control group (tioLogic ST, 9mm length, ceramic blasted surface). Eight weeks after unloaded healing, bone tissue specimens containing the implants were processed, stained with Masson-Goldner-trichrome and analyzed histologically. Regardless of implant length and surface texture, new bone formation with no signs of inflammation could be detected in the area of the threads. Implants with a modified surface showed no statistically significant difference in bone-implant-contact (BIC) (tioLogic ST Shorty, 56.5%; tioLogic(©)ST; 77.2%), but a statistically significant difference could be found, when the 9mm implants were compared to the control group (BIC 48.9%). Surface modification could positively influence osseointegration as well as contribute to overcoming the adverse effects of length reduction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Nano-structured Ceramic Powders Synthesized by Emulsion Combustion Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatori, Kazumasa; Tani, Takao; Watanabe, Naoyoshi; Kamiya, Nobuo

    1999-01-01

    The emulsion combustion method (ECM), a novel powder production process, was originally developed to synthesize nano-structured metal-oxide powders. Metal ions in the aqueous droplets were rapidly oxidized by the combustion of the surrounding flammable liquid. The ECM achieved a small reaction field and a short reaction period to fabricate the submicron-sized hollow ceramic particles with extremely thin wall and chemically homogeneous ceramic powder. Alumina, zirconia, zirconia-ceria solid solutions and barium titanate were synthesized by the ECM process. Alumina and zirconia powders were characterized to be metastable in crystalline phase and hollow structure. The wall thickness of alumina was about 10 nm. The zirconia-ceria powders were found to be single-phase solid solutions for a wide composition range. These powders were characterized as equiaxed-shape, submicron-sized chemically homogeneous materials. The powder formation mechanism was investigated through the synthesis of barium titanate powder with different metal sources

  5. Flexoelectric sensing using a multilayered barium strontium titanate structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S R; Huang, W B; Yuan, F G; Jiang, X N; Zhang, S J

    2013-01-01

    The flexoelectric effect has been recently explored for its promise in electromechanical sensing. However, the relatively low flexoelectric coefficients of ferroelectrics inhibit the potential to develop flexoelectric sensing devices. In this paper, a multilayered structure using flexoelectric barium strontium titanate (Ba 0.65 Sr 0.35 TiO 3 or BST) ceramic was fabricated in an attempt to enhance the effective flexoelectric coefficients using its inherent scale effect, and hence to improve the flexoelectric sensitivity. The performances of piezoelectric and flexoelectric cantilevers with the same dimensions and under the same conditions were compared. Owing to the flexoelectric scaling effect, under the same force input, the BST flexoelectric structure generated a higher charge output than its piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) and PMN-30PT counterparts when its thickness was less than 73.1 μm and 1.43 μm, respectively. Also, amplification of the charge output using the multilayered structure was then experimentally verified. The prototyped structure consisted of three layers of 350 μm-thick BST plates with a parallel electric connection. The charge output was approximately 287% of that obtained using a single-layer structure with the same total thickness of the multilayered structure under the same end deflection input, which suggests high sensitivity sensing can be achieved using multilayer flexoelectric structures. (paper)

  6. Verification of ceramic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behar-Lafenetre, S.; Cornillon, L.; Rancurel, M.; Graaf, D. de; Hartmann, P.; Coe, G.; Laine, B.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the "Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures" contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and

  7. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  8. TITAN'S TRANSPORT-DRIVEN METHANE CYCLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the occurrence of large cloud outbursts and precipitation on Titan have been disputed. A global- and annual-mean estimate of surface fluxes indicated only 1% of the insolation, or ∼0.04 W m –2 , is exchanged as sensible and/or latent fluxes. Since these fluxes are responsible for driving atmospheric convection, it has been argued that moist convection should be quite rare and precipitation even rarer, even if evaporation globally dominates the surface-atmosphere energy exchange. In contrast, climate simulations indicate substantial cloud formation and/or precipitation. We argue that the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative imbalance is diagnostic of horizontal heat transport by Titan's atmosphere, and thus constrains the strength of the methane cycle. Simple calculations show the TOA radiative imbalance is ∼0.5-1 W m –2 in Titan's equatorial region, which implies 2-3 MW of latitudinal heat transport by the atmosphere. Our simulation of Titan's climate suggests this transport may occur primarily as latent heat, with net evaporation at the equator and net accumulation at higher latitudes. Thus, the methane cycle could be 10-20 times previous estimates. Opposing seasonal transport at solstices, compensation by sensible heat transport, and focusing of precipitation by large-scale dynamics could further enhance the local, instantaneous strength of Titan's methane cycle by a factor of several. A limited supply of surface liquids in regions of large surface radiative imbalance may throttle the methane cycle, and if so, we predict more frequent large storms over the lakes district during Titan's northern summer.

  9. Volatile products controlling Titan's tholins production

    KAUST Repository

    Carrasco, Nathalie

    2012-05-01

    A quantitative agreement between nitrile relative abundances and Titan\\'s atmospheric composition was recently shown with a reactor simulating the global chemistry occurring in Titan\\'s atmosphere (Gautier et al. [2011]. Icarus, 213, 625-635). Here we present a complementary study on the same reactor using an in situ diagnostic of the gas phase composition. Various initial N 2/CH 4 gas mixtures (methane varying from 1% to 10%) are studied, with a monitoring of the methane consumption and of the stable gas neutrals by in situ mass spectrometry. Atomic hydrogen is also measured by optical emission spectroscopy. A positive correlation is found between atomic hydrogen abundance and the inhibition function for aerosol production. This confirms the suspected role of hydrogen as an inhibitor of heterogeneous organic growth processes, as found in Sciamma-O\\'Brien et al. (Sciamma-O\\'Brien et al. [2010]. Icarus, 209, 704-714). The study of the gas phase organic products is focussed on its evolution with the initial methane amount [CH 4] 0 and its comparison with the aerosol production efficiency. We identify a change in the stationary gas phase composition for intermediate methane amounts: below [CH 4] 0=5%, the gas phase composition is mainly dominated by nitrogen-containing species, whereas hydrocarbons are massively produced for [CH 4] 0>5%. This predominance of N-containing species at lower initial methane amount, compared with the maximum gas-to solid conversion observed in Sciamma-O\\'Brien et al. (2010) for identical methane amounts confirms the central role played by N-containing gas-phase compounds to produce tholins. Moreover, two protonated imines (methanimine CH 2NH and ethanamine CH 3CHNH) are detected in the ion composition in agreement with Titan\\'s INMS measurements, and reinforcing the suspected role of these chemical species on aerosol production. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  10. Experimental simulations of ethylene evaporites on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaplinski, E.; Farnsworth, K.; Singh, S.; Chevrier, V.

    2017-12-01

    Titan has an abundance of lakes and seas, as identified by the Cassini spacecraft. Major components of these liquid bodies include methane (CH4) and ethane (C2H6), however minor constituents are also thought to exist (e.g. ethylene (C2H4)). As the lakes and seas evaporate, 5-μm-bright deposits, resembling evaporite deposits on Earth, are left behind in a "bathtub ring" fashion. Previous studies include models of evaporites, and observations of the 5-μm-bright regions, but the community is still lacking a complete suite of experimental evaporite studies. In this study, we experimentally investigate evaporites in order to determine their composition and how they affect infrared spectra during the evaporation process. The University of Arkansas owns a specialized chamber that simulates the surface conditions of Titan ( 90 K and 1.5 bar). Gaseous hydrocarbons are condensed within the chamber and analyzed with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and band depth calculations. In this study, three types of experiments were performed: ethane/ethylene, methane/ethylene, and methane/ethane/ethylene. For these experiments, methane was the only species that readily evaporated at Titan conditions (due to its high volatility), while ethane, being the more stable solvent, did not readily evaporate. Therefore, we will present spectral results of ethylene evaporite formation within these mixtures. Our results imply that evaporite formation is strongly dependent on the composition of the solvent. The north polar lakes of Titan are predicted to be methane-rich, indicating that they may be more likely to form evaporites. Alternatively, Ontario Lacus, a south polar lake, is predominately composed of ethane, which may make it more difficult to form evaporites. As we continue to study Titan's mysterious lakes and seas, we hope to draw insights on their exact composition, conditions for evaporite formation, habitability potential, and comparing Titan to prebiotic Earth.

  11. Ceramic electrolyte coating methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2004-10-12

    Processes for preparing aqueous suspensions of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material such as yttrium-stabilized zirconia. The invention also includes a process for preparing an aqueous coating slurry of a nanoscale ceramic electrolyte material. The invention further includes a process for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material on pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  12. Titan: Vom exklusiven Material zum Massenwerkstoff?

    OpenAIRE

    Hausmann, Joachim; Friedrich, Bernd; Möller, Claudia; Gussone, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Moderne Verkehrsflugzeuge wie der Airbus A380 oder die Boeing 787 („Dreamliner“) weisen bereits einen deutlich höheren Anteil an Titan auf als die Vorgängermodelle. Bei der Boeing 787 und dem künftigen Airbus A350 sind dies bereits deutlich mehr als 20 Tonnen pro Flugzeug. Neben den Eigenschaften des Titans, wie hohe Festigkeit und Steifigkeit sind vor allem seine gute chemische und mechanische Kompatibilität zum kohlenstofffaserverstärktem Kunststoff (CFK), welcher im Flugzeugbau immer häufi...

  13. Cryovolcanism on Titan and Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotin, C.

    2008-12-01

    of CO or CO2 [Matson et al., Icarus, 2007]. On Titan, the SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) and the VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) images suggest that several morphological features could be formed by cryovolcanic activity [Sotin et al., Nature, 2005; Barnes et al., GRL, 2006; Lopes et al., Icarus, 2007]. Such volcanism would explain the recent release of methane and its presence in the atmosphere where its lifetime is a few tens of millions of years. In order to link thermal evolution models and cryovolcanic models, it is necessary to have laboratory data that describe the melting temperature of different kinds of ices including clathrate hydrates containing ammonia, methane, nitrogen and other volatiles. Since the melting temperature of ammonia is small compared to that of water ice, it is a good candidate for explaining flow features seen on Titan's surface. However, the presence of an ocean at depth makes unlikely the presence of ammonia in the icy crust. More sophisticated models must be found with species such as methane and CO2. This work has been carried out at the JPL, Caltech, under contract with NASA.

  14. Cryovolcanic features on Titan's surface as revealed by the Cassini Titan Radar Mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Mitchell, K.L.; Stofan, E.R.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.; Paganelli, F.; Kirk, R.L.; Wood, C.A.; Wall, S.D.; Robshaw, L.E.; Fortes, A.D.; Neish, Catherine D.; Radebaugh, J.; Reffet, E.; Ostro, S.J.; Elachi, C.; Allison, M.D.; Anderson, Y.; Boehmer, R.; Boubin, G.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Janssen, M.A.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.O.; Ori, G.; Orosei, R.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.E.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Soderblom, L.A.; Stiles, B.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.D.; Wye, L.; Zebker, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini Titan Radar Mapper obtained Synthetic Aperture Radar images of Titan's surface during four fly-bys during the mission's first year. These images show that Titan's surface is very complex geologically, showing evidence of major planetary geologic processes, including cryovolcanism. This paper discusses the variety of cryovolcanic features identified from SAR images, their possible origin, and their geologic context. The features which we identify as cryovolcanic in origin include a large (180 km diameter) volcanic construct (dome or shield), several extensive flows, and three calderas which appear to be the source of flows. The composition of the cryomagma on Titan is still unknown, but constraints on rheological properties can be estimated using flow thickness. Rheological properties of one flow were estimated and appear inconsistent with ammonia-water slurries, and possibly more consistent with ammonia-water-methanol slurries. The extent of cryovolcanism on Titan is still not known, as only a small fraction of the surface has been imaged at sufficient resolution. Energetic considerations suggest that cryovolcanism may have been a dominant process in the resurfacing of Titan. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  16. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  17. Microstructure evolution during pressureless sintering of bulk oxide ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Maca

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The author’s experience concerning the infl uence of the choice of different pressureless heating schedules on the fi nal microstructure of oxide ceramic materials is summarized in the paper. Alumina, ceria, strontium titanate, as well as tetragonal (3 mol% Y2O3 and cubic (8 mol% Y2O3 zirconia were cold isostatically pressed or injection moulded and pressureless sintered with different heating schedules – namely with Constant-Rate of Heating with different dwell temperatures (CRH, with Rate-Controlled Sintering (RCS and with Two-Step Sintering (TSS. It was examined whether some of these three sintering schedules, with the same fi nal density achieved, can lead to a decrease of the grain size of sintered ceramics. The results showed that only TSS (and only for selected materials brought significant decrease of the grain size.

  18. TandEM: Titan and Enceladus mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, A.; Atreya, S.K.; Balint, T.; Brown, R.H.; Dougherty, M.K.; Ferri, F.; Fulchignoni, M.; Gautier, D.; Gowen, R.A.; Griffith, C.A.; Gurvits, L.I.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Leese, M.R.; Lunine, J.I.; McKay, C.P.; Moussas, X.; Muller-Wodarg, I.; Neubauer, F.; Owen, T.C.; Raulin, F.; Sittler, E.C.; Sohl, F.; Sotin, Christophe; Tobie, G.; Tokano, T.; Turtle, E.P.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Waite, J.H.; Baines, K.H.; Blamont, J.; Coates, A.J.; Dandouras, I.; Krimigis, T.; Lellouch, E.; Lorenz, R.D.; Morse, A.; Porco, C.C.; Hirtzig, M.; Saur, J.; Spilker, T.; Zarnecki, J.C.; Choi, E.; Achilleos, N.; Amils, R.; Annan, P.; Atkinson, D.H.; Benilan, Y.; Bertucci, C.; Bezard, B.; Bjoraker, G.L.; Blanc, M.; Boireau, L.; Bouman, J.; Cabane, M.; Capria, M.T.; Chassefiere, E.; Coll, P.; Combes, M.; Cooper, J.F.; Coradini, A.; Crary, F.; Cravens, T.; Daglis, I.A.; de Angelis, E.; De Bergh, C.; de Pater, I.; Dunford, C.; Durry, G.; Dutuit, O.; Fairbrother, D.; Flasar, F.M.; Fortes, A.D.; Frampton, R.; Fujimoto, M.; Galand, M.; Grasset, O.; Grott, M.; Haltigin, T.; Herique, A.; Hersant, F.; Hussmann, H.; Ip, W.; Johnson, R.; Kallio, E.; Kempf, S.; Knapmeyer, M.; Kofman, W.; Koop, R.; Kostiuk, T.; Krupp, N.; Kuppers, M.; Lammer, H.; Lara, L.-M.; Lavvas, P.; Le, Mouelic S.; Lebonnois, S.; Ledvina, S.; Li, Ji; Livengood, T.A.; Lopes, R.M.; Lopez-Moreno, J. -J.; Luz, D.; Mahaffy, P.R.; Mall, U.; Martinez-Frias, J.; Marty, B.; McCord, T.; Salvan, C.M.; Milillo, A.; Mitchell, D.G.; Modolo, R.; Mousis, O.; Nakamura, M.; Neish, Catherine D.; Nixon, C.A.; Mvondo, D.N.; Orton, G.; Paetzold, M.; Pitman, J.; Pogrebenko, S.; Pollard, W.; Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Rannou, P.; Reh, K.; Richter, L.; Robb, F.T.; Rodrigo, R.; Rodriguez, S.; Romani, P.; Bermejo, M.R.; Sarris, E.T.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitz, N.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Selig, A.; Sicardy, B.; Soderblom, L.; Spilker, L.J.; Stam, D.; Steele, A.; Stephan, K.; Strobel, D.F.; Szego, K.; Szopa,

    2009-01-01

    TandEM was proposed as an L-class (large) mission in response to ESA’s Cosmic Vision 2015–2025 Call, and accepted for further studies, with the goal of exploring Titan and Enceladus. The mission concept is to perform in situ investigations of two worlds tied together by location and properties, whose remarkable natures have been partly revealed by the ongoing Cassini–Huygens mission. These bodies still hold mysteries requiring a complete exploration using a variety of vehicles and instruments. TandEM is an ambitious mission because its targets are two of the most exciting and challenging bodies in the Solar System. It is designed to build on but exceed the scientific and technological accomplishments of the Cassini–Huygens mission, exploring Titan and Enceladus in ways that are not currently possible (full close-up and in situ coverage over long periods of time). In the current mission architecture, TandEM proposes to deliver two medium-sized spacecraft to the Saturnian system. One spacecraft would be an orbiter with a large host of instruments which would perform several Enceladus flybys and deliver penetrators to its surface before going into a dedicated orbit around Titan alone, while the other spacecraft would carry the Titan in situ investigation components, i.e. a hot-air balloon (Montgolfière) and possibly several landing probes to be delivered through the atmosphere.

  19. The seasonal cycle of Titan's detached haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert A.; Seignovert, Benoît; Rannou, Pascal; Dumont, Philip; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Perry, Jason; Roy, Mou; Ovanessian, Aida

    2018-04-01

    Titan's `detached' haze, seen in Voyager images in 1980 and 1981 and monitored by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) during the period 2004-2017, provides a measure of seasonal activity in Titan's mesosphere with observations over almost half of Saturn's seasonal cycle. Here we report on retrieved haze extinction profiles that reveal a depleted layer (having a diminished aerosol content), visually manifested as a gap between the main haze and a thin, detached upper layer. Our measurements show the disappearance of the feature in 2012 and its reappearance in 2016, as well as details after the reappearance. These observations highlight the dynamical nature of the detached haze. The reappearance seems congruent with earlier descriptions by climate models but more complex than previously described. It occurs in two steps, first as haze reappearing at 450 ± 20 km and one year later at 510 ± 20 km. These observations provide additional tight and valuable constraints about the underlying mechanisms, especially for Titan's mesosphere, that control Titan's haze cycle.

  20. The Titan Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Jinschek, Jörg R.

    2009-01-01

    University of Denmark (DTU) provides a unique combination of techniques for studying materials of interest to the catalytic as well as the electronics and other communities [5]. DTU’s ETEM is based on the FEI Titan platform providing ultrahigh microscope stability pushing the imaging resolution into the sub...

  1. Electrical characterization of zirconium substituted barium titanate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nyquist (Cole–Cole) plots show both inter and intra grain boundary ... Ferroelectrics; barium zirconate titanate; complex impedance spectroscopy. ... The impedance plots in the complex plane appear in the form of succe- ssion of semicircles representing electrical phenomena due to the bulk material, grain boundary effect ...

  2. Ceramic powder prepared by a wet method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheorghies, G.; Gheorghies, L.

    2000-01-01

    In the present paper we present the preparation of zirconium titanate powder via hydroxoperoxoprecursors. The effects of progressive thermal treatment on this precursor have been investigated by series of techniques. Zirconium titanate is a very well known material for a wide field of applications. It constitutes one of the most important families of ferroelectric material. Their longstanding use in ceramic capacitors has been joined more recently by their applications as resonator components in filters and frequency-stable oscillators in the GHz range. The binary system TiO 2 -ZrO 2 has been shown to be a potential material capable of being used as catalytic or photocatalytic material. The electrolyte used was a mixture of ZrOCl 2 -8H 2 O and TiCl 4 dissolved in water. All the chemicals were reagent grade. The water was deionized. The bath temperatures were controlled within a range of 20-30 deg. C. The anode and the cathode were two winding concentric wires. They were placed vertically in the center of the beaker. The non-isothermal thermal gravimetric (TG) trace was recorded using a heating rate of 4 deg. C min -1 . Differential thermal gravimetric analysis (DTA) was obtained at a heating rate of 10 deg. C with a thermal analyzer. The DTA analysis showed a great endothermic effect at ∼100 deg. C which was assigned principally to water elimination. The sharp exothermal effect at 640 deg. C suggests the crystallization of a new phase. The TG diagram is consistent with some of the above suggestions. Thus, the main weight loss can be associated with the endothermic effect observed by DTA and attributed to water elimination. The x-ray diffraction patterns were obtained at room temperature with a DRON - 3 using Cu K α radiation and nickel filter. The obtained powder were found to be amorphous. The weak diffraction peaks observed after heating at 500 deg. C reflect the beginning of a structural ordering and nucleation. These peaks correspond to zirconium titanate

  3. Tailored ceramics. Chapter 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haker, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    In the light of the broad variation in US high-level waste (HLW) types and the uncertainties in future waste production, research on the Rockwell International Science Center has focussed on developing a generic technology for the consolidation of high-level wastes into polyphase ceramics. The basic approach has been to 'tailor' wste compositions with chemical additives so that upon consolidation a dense ceramic assemblage is formed that chemically binds the waste species into known phases. This chapter deals with tailored ceramics for current and future high-level waste compositions. Section 2 gives a historical review of the development of tailored ceramics. Section 3 deals with tailored ceramics designed for specific HLW compositions and with microstructure and phase development. Section 4 discusses chemical and physical properties of tailored ceramic waste forms. In section 5 the various processing steps involved in converting HLW to polycrystalline ceramic forms are described. (author). 159 refs.; 20 figs.; 14 tabs

  4. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets

  5. Cassini/Huygens Investigations of Titan's Methane Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, C. A.; Penteado, P.

    2008-12-01

    In Titan's atmosphere, the second most abundant constituent, methane, exists as a gas, liquid and solid, and cycles between the atmosphere and surface. Similar to Earth's hydrological cycle, Titan sports clouds, rain, and lakes. Yet, Titan's cycle differs dramatically from its terrestrial counterpart, and reveals the workings of weather in an atmosphere that is ten times thicker than Earth's atmosphere, that is two orders of magnitude less illuminated, and that involves a different condensable. Measurements of Titan's troposphere, where the methane cycle plays out, are limited largely to spectral images of Titan's clouds, several temperature profiles by Voyager, Huygens and Cassini, recent Keck spectra of the surface methane humidity, and one vertical profile of Titan's methane abundance, measured on a summer afternoon in Titan's tropical atmosphere by the Huygens probe. The salient features of Titan's methane cycle are distinctly alien: clouds have predominated the northern and southern polar atmospheres; the one humidity profile precisely matches the profile (of cartoonish simplicity) used in pre-Cassini models, and surface features correlate with latitude. Data of Titan's troposphere are analyzed with thermodynamic and radiative transfer calculations, and synthesized with other studies of Titan's stratosphere and surface, to investigate the workings of Titan's methane cycle. At the end of Cassini's nominal mission, we find that Titan's weather, climate and surface-to-atmosphere exchange of volatiles vastly differs from the manifestation of these processes on Earth, largely as a result of different basic characteristics of these planetary bodies. The talk ends with a comparison between Titan and Earth's tropospheres, their fundamental properties, the energetics of their condensible cycles, their weather and climates. References: Griffith C.A. et al. Titan's Tropical Storms in an Evolving Atmosphere. Ap.J. In Press (2008). Griffith C.A. Storms, Polar Deposits, and

  6. Titan: a laboratory for prebiological organic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    When we examine the atmospheres of the Jovian planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune), the satellites in the outer solar system, comets, and even--through microwave and infrared spectroscopy--the cold dilute gas and grains between the stars, we find a rich organic chemistry, presumably abiological, not only in most of the solar system but throughout the Milky Way galaxy. In part because the composition and surface pressure of the Earth's atmosphere 4 x 10(9) years ago are unknown, laboratory experiments on prebiological organic chemistry are at best suggestive; but we can test our understanding by looking more closely at the observed extraterrestrial organic chemistry. The present Account is restricted to atmospheric organic chemistry, primarily on the large moon of Saturn. Titan is a test of our understanding of the organic chemistry of planetary atmospheres. Its atmospheric bulk composition (N2/CH4) is intermediate between the highly reducing (H2/He/CH4/NH3/H2O) atmospheres of the Jovian planets and the more oxidized (N2/CO2/H2O) atmospheres of the terrestrial planets Mars and Venus. It has long been recognized that Titan's organic chemistry may have some relevance to the events that led to the origin of life on Earth. But with Titan surface temperatures approximately equal to 94 K and pressures approximately equal to 1.6 bar, the oceans of the early Earth have no ready analogue on Titan. Nevertheless, tectonic events in the water ice-rich interior or impact melting and slow re-freezing may lead to an episodic availability of liquid water. Indeed, the latter process is the equivalent of a approximately 10(3)-year-duration shallow aqueous sea over the entire surface of Titan.

  7. Piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of lead titanate-polyethylene oxide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanbareh, H.; van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W. A.

    2014-11-01

    Polymer-ceramic composites with pyroelectric sensitivity are presented as promising candidates for infrared detection. Selection of the appropriate ceramic filler and the polymer matrix is one of the key parameters in the development of optimized materials for specific applications. In this work lead-titanate (PT) ceramic is incorporated into a flexible polymer matrix, polyethylene oxide (PEO) with relatively high electrical conductivity to develop sensitive and at the same time flexible composites. PT particles are dispersed in PEO at varying volume fractions, and composite materials cast in the form of films for the measurements. The dielectric, piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties are measured. From these data the piezoelectric voltage coefficients as well as pyroelctric figures of merit of the composite films have been determined and values were compared with that of PT-epoxy composites in order to determine the effect of electrical conductivity of the polymer matrix on the poling efficiency and the final properties. It is found that, in general, both the piezoelectric and the pyroelectric figures of merit increase with concentration of PT; however, it is at the expense of mechanical flexibility of the material. Moreover PT-PEO composites show superior pyroelectric sensitivity compared to PT-Epoxy composites. Improving the electrical conductivity of the polymer phase enhances the poling process significantly.

  8. Piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of conductive polyethylene oxide-lead titanate composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanbareh, H.; van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W. A.

    2015-04-01

    Polymer-ceramic composites with pyroelectric sensitivity are presented as promising candidates for sensing applications. Selection of the appropriate ceramic filler and the polymer matrix is one of the key parameters in the development of optimized materials for specific applications. In this work lead-titanate (PT) ceramic particulate is incorporated into a polymer matrix, polyethylene oxide (PEO) with a relatively high electrical conductivity to develop sensitive and at the same time flexible composites. PT particles are dispersed in PEO at varying volume fractions, and composite materials are cast in the form of films to measure their dielectric, piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties. From these data the piezoelectric voltage coefficients as well as pyroelctric figures of merit of the composite films have been determined. In order to determine the effect of electrical conductivity of the polymer matrix on the poling efficiency and the final properties, a poling study has been performed. Improving the electrical conductivity of the polymer phase enhances the poling process significantly. It is found that both the piezoelectric and the pyroelectric figures of merit increase with concentration of PT. PT-PEO composites show superior pyroelectric sensitivity compared to other composites with less conductive polymer matrices.

  9. Lead titanate nanotubes synthesized via ion-exchange method: Characteristics and formation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Liang; Cao Lixin; Li Jingyu; Liu Wei; Zhang Fen; Zhu Lin; Su Ge

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Lead titanate nanotubes PbTi 3 O 7 were firstly synthesized by ion-exchange method. → Sodium titanate nanotubes have ion exchangeability. → Lead titanate nanotubes show a distinct red shift on absorption edge. - Abstract: A two-step method is presented for the synthesis of one dimensional lead titanate (PbTi 3 O 7 ) nanotubes. Firstly, titanate nanotubes were prepared by an alkaline hydrothermal process with TiO 2 nanopowder as precursor, and then lead titanate nanotubes were formed through an ion-exchange reaction. We found that sodium titanate nanotubes have ion exchangeability with lead ions, while protonated titanate nanotubes have not. For the first time, we distinguished the difference between sodium titanate nanotubes and protonated titanate nanotubes in the ion-exchange process, which reveals a layer space effect of nanotubes in the ion-exchange reaction. In comparison with sodium titanate, the synthesized lead titanate nanotubes show a narrowed bandgap.

  10. A green synthesis of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate; lower temperature solid-state reaction and improved materials performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Makoto; Morita, Masashi; Igarashi, Shota; Sato, Soh

    2013-01-01

    A layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, with the size range from 0.1 to 30 µm was prepared to show the effects of the particle size on the materials performance. The potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction as reported previously, where the reaction temperature was varied. The reported temperature for the titanate preparation was higher than 800 °C, though 600 °C is good enough to obtain single-phase potassium lithium titanate. The lower temperature synthesis is cost effective and the product exhibit better performance as photocatalysts due to surface reactivity. - Graphical abstract: Finite particle of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, was prepared by solid-state reaction at lower temperature to show modified materials performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction. • Lower temperature reaction resulted in smaller sized particles of titanate. • 600 °C was good enough to obtain single phased potassium lithium titanate. • The product exhibited better performance as photocatalyst

  11. Mechanical and dielectric characterization of lead zirconate titanate(PZT)/polyurethane(PU) thin film composite for energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubakr, S.; Rguiti, M.; Hajjaji, A.; Eddiai, A.; Courtois, C.; d'Astorg, S.

    2014-04-01

    The Lead Zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic is known by its piezoelectric feature, but also by its stiffness, the use of a composite based on a polyurethane (PU) matrix charged by a piezoelectric material, enable to generate a large deformation of the material, therefore harvesting more energy. This new material will provide a competitive alternative and low cost manufacturing technology of autonomous systems (smart clothes, car seat, boat sail, flag ...). A thin film of the PZT/PU composite was prepared using up to 80 vol. % of ceramic. Due to the dielectric nature of the PZT, inclusions of this one in a PU matrix raises the permittivity of the composite, on other hand this latter seems to decline at high frequencies.

  12. A review and discussion of candidate ceramics for immobilization of high-level fuel reprocessing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, P.J.

    1982-08-01

    This review discusses and attempts to evaluate 11 of the leading ceramic processes for hosting the high-level and high-level plus medium-level wastes which would arise from the reprocessing of used UO 2 , (Th,Pu)O 2 and (Th,U)O 2 fuels. The wasteform materials considered include glass ceramics, supercalcine ceramics, SYNROC ceramics, 'stuffed glass', titanate ceramics, cermets, clay ceramics, cement-based materials and multibarrier wasteforms. Although no attempt has been made to rank these candidates in order of superiority, the conclusion is drawn that, of the materials proposed so far, a glass ceramic appears to be best suited to the Canadian program, taking into account durability in the potential environment of a flooded vault, ability to withstand radiation and transmutation damage without serious loss of durability, ability to accommodate variable waste compositions, and ease of processing and quality control. This conclusion does not necessarily apply to other national waste management programs. However, many of the points raised might be included in any critical assessment of alternative wasteform materials

  13. The effects of sintering behavior on piezoelectric properties of porous PZT ceramics for hydrophone application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Tao; Dong Xianlin; Chen Heng; Wang Yonglin

    2006-01-01

    Porous lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics were fabricated by adding polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the effects of sintering behavior on their microstructure and piezoelectric properties were investigated. The porosity of PZT ceramics decreased with an increase in the sintering temperature at a fixed PMMA addition. The dielectric constant (ε), longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient (d 33 ) and hydrostatic figures of merit (d h g h ) of 34% porous PZT ceramics increased with an increase in sintering temperature from 1050 to 1300 deg. C. When sintered at 1300 deg. C, longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient of 34% porous PZT ceramic was very close to that of 95% dense PZT ceramics, while the hydrostatic figures of merit of 34% porous PZT ceramics is about fifteen times more than that of 95% dense PZT ceramics. Compared with PZT-polymer composites, the dielectric constant of 34% porous PZT sintered at 1300 deg. C is much higher, which can be more efficient to resist the interference in receiving sensitivities caused by loading effect of the cable

  14. Dielectric behaviour of (Ba0.77Ca0.23(Ti0.98Dy0.02O3 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Moquim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, BaTiO3 is modified with Ca2+ and in addition doped with Dy3+ at the B site lattice. The main idea is to search for new lead-free ferroelectric material and improve their properties. For this purpose, the barium calcium titanate (BCT as a host and the rare earth element Dy3+ as an activator were used to fabricate a multifunctional material. The obtained ceramics was found to be homogeneous, dense and a single phase material with no evidence of secondary phases. The dielectric study showed that TC increases with the addition of dopants and the obtained ceramics behaves like a relaxor ferroelectric. Some important structural parameters and dielectric properties of dysprosium modified barium (calcium titanate ceramics are presented.

  15. Antibacterial ceramic for sandbox. Sunabayo kokin ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, K. (Ishizuka Glass Co. Ltd. Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-10-01

    Sands in sandboxes in parks have been called into question of being contaminated by colon bacilli and spawns from ascarides. This paper introduces an antibacterial ceramic for sandbox developed as a new material effective to help reduce the contamination. The ceramic uses natural sand as the main raw material, which is added with borax and silver to contain silver ions that have bacteria and fungus resistance and deodorizing effect. The ceramic has an average grain size ranging from 0.5 mm to 0.7 mm, and is so devised as to match specific gravity, grain size and shape of the sand, hence no separation and segregation can occur. The result of weatherability and antibacterial strength tests on sand for a sandbox mixed with the ceramic at 1% suggests that its efficacy lasts for about three years. Its actual use is under observation. Its efficacy has been verified in a test that measures a survival factor of spawns from dog ascardides contacted with aqueous solution containing the ceramic at 1%. Safety and sanitation tests have proved the ceramic a highly safe product that conforms to the food sanitation law. 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabloff, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  17. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  18. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Advanced Ceramics: Structural Ceramics and Glasses. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 4-11 ...

  19. [Ceramic inlays and onlays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, A W; de Kloet, H J; van der Kuy, P

    1996-11-01

    Large direct composite restorations can induce shrinkage related postoperative sensitivity. Indirect resin-bonded (tooth colored) restorations may perhaps prevent these complaints. Indirect bonded ceramics are especially attractive because of their biocompatibility and esthetic performance. Several procedures and techniques are currently available for the fabrication of ceramic restorations: firing, casting, heat-pressing and milling. In this article the different systems are described. Advantages, disadvantages and clinical performance of ceramic inlays are compared and discussed.

  20. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  1. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  2. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  3. Electrooptic modulation in thin film barium titanate plasmonic interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicken, Matthew J; Sweatlock, Luke A; Pacifici, Domenico; Lezec, Henri J; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Atwater, Harry A

    2008-11-01

    We demonstrate control of the surface plasmon polariton wavevector in an active metal-dielectric plasmonic interferometer by utilizing electrooptic barium titanate as the dielectric layer. Arrays of subwavelength interferometers were fabricated from pairs of parallel slits milled in silver on barium titanate thin films. Plasmon-mediated transmission of incident light through the subwavelength slits is modulated by an external voltage applied across the barium titanate thin film. Transmitted light modulation is ascribed to two effects, electrically induced domain switching and electrooptic modulation of the barium titanate index.

  4. Verification of the flexoelectricity in barium strontium titanate through d33 meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longlong Shu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Flexoelectricity is a newly arising electromechanical property that couples strain gradient to polarization. This physical property widely exists in most of the solid dielectrics but has quite weak response that often overlooked. Recently, barium strontium titanate (BST, a well-known ferroelectrics, has been reported to be a promising flexoelectric material, and thus triggered the associated studies on flexoelectricity to a new height. However, part of the researchers argued the observed flexoelectricity in BST is either by residual piezoelectricity or centric symmetry breaking during the densification process. In this paper, we would verify the flexoelectricity in BST ceramics by many comparison experiments. Our experimental result suggested the observed polarization in BST material is likely to be induced by strain gradient through flexoelectricity.

  5. Verification of the flexoelectricity in barium strontium titanate through d33 meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Longlong; Wang, Tong; Jiang, Xiaoning; Huang, Wenbin

    2016-12-01

    Flexoelectricity is a newly arising electromechanical property that couples strain gradient to polarization. This physical property widely exists in most of the solid dielectrics but has quite weak response that often overlooked. Recently, barium strontium titanate (BST), a well-known ferroelectrics, has been reported to be a promising flexoelectric material, and thus triggered the associated studies on flexoelectricity to a new height. However, part of the researchers argued the observed flexoelectricity in BST is either by residual piezoelectricity or centric symmetry breaking during the densification process. In this paper, we would verify the flexoelectricity in BST ceramics by many comparison experiments. Our experimental result suggested the observed polarization in BST material is likely to be induced by strain gradient through flexoelectricity.

  6. Comparison of chemical solution deposition systems for the fabrication of lead zirconate titanate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecarpentier, F.; Daglish, M.; Kemmitt, T.

    2001-01-01

    Ferroelectric thin films of lead zirconate titanate Pb(Zr x Ti 1-x )O 3 (PZT) were prepared from five chemical solution deposition (CSD) systems, namely methoxyethanol, citrate, diol, acetic acid and triethanolamine. Physical characteristics of the solutions, processing parameters and physical and electrical properties of the films were used to assess the relative advantages and disadvantages of the different chemical systems. All the CSD systems decomposed to produce single phase perovskite PZT at temperatures above 650 deg C. Thin film deposition was influenced by the specific characteristics of each system such as wetting on the substrate and viscosity. Distinct precursor effects on the thin film crystallinity and electrical performance were revealed. The diol route yielded films with the highest crystallite size, highest permittivity and lowest loss tangent. The relative permittivity exhibited by films made by the other routes were 25% to 35% lower at equivalent thicknesses. Copyright (2001) The Australian Ceramic Society

  7. Remember the Titans: A Theoretical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameca Leary

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a pivotal time in American history, when a 1971 Supreme Court mandate required southern school districts to end segregation (Daugherity, 2011. In Alexandria, Virginia, the merger of three rival high schools yielded a racially diverse football team and coaching staff. Beforehand, blacks and whites had their own schools. Many wondered how the new T.C. Williams Titans football team would fare. This paper takes an in-depth look at the film, Remember the Titans, which is based on this story. It analyzes the film using Gordon Allport’s (1954 Intergroup Contact Theory to assess how people from different backgrounds interact within group settings. It explores how communication barriers and the absence of knowledge can lead to ignorance. A 21st century legacy is also discussed, including ideas for further research.

  8. Benzene formation in Titan's lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, J. M. C.; Douglas, K.; Blitz, M. A.; Heard, D. E.; Seakins, P. W.; Feng, W.; Willacy, K.

    2017-09-01

    The most distinctive feature of Saturn's moon Titan is that it is covered in a thick haze. The haze consists of organic particles called tholins, of which benzene is thought to be an important precursor. Here we examine two pathways to form benzene. The first involves reactions on cosmic dust particles, which mostly do not ablate when entering Titan's atmosphere and accumulate in the lower atmosphere. We have shown in the laboratory that acetylene molecules stick on synthetic cosmic dust at low temperatures, and react efficiently to make benzene. The second pathway is through gas phase reactions involving radical species formed through methane photochemistry. A new lab study shows that the rates of critical reactions involving these radicals vary unexpectedly at low temperatures, leading to significant changes in important benzene precursors.

  9. Remember the Titans: A Theoretical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameca Leary

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a pivotal time in American history, when a 1971 Supreme Court mandate required southern school districts to end segregation (Daugherity, 2011. In Alexandria, Virginia, the merger of three rival high schools yielded a racially diverse football team and coaching staff. Beforehand, blacks and whites had their own schools. Many wondered how the new T.C. Williams Titans football team would fare. This paper takes an in-depth look at the film, Remember the Titans, which is based on this story. It analyzes the film using Gordon Allport’s (1954 Intergroup Contact Theory to assess how people from different backgrounds interact within group settings. It explores how communication barriers and the absence of knowledge can lead to ignorance. A 21st century legacy is also discussed, including ideas for further research. 

  10. A Ceramic Armor Material Database

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holmquist, T

    1999-01-01

    .... The data include nine different ceramic materials. The ceramics are Silicon Carbide, Boron Carbide, Titanium Diboride, Aluminum Nitride, Silicon Nitride, Aluminum Oxide (85% pure), Aluminum Oxide (high purity...

  11. Big Impacts and Transient Oceans on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Korycansky, D. G.; Nixon, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the thermal consequences of very big impacts on Titan [1]. Titan's thick atmosphere and volatile-rich surface cause it to respond to big impacts in a somewhat Earth-like manner. Here we construct a simple globally-averaged model that tracks the flow of energy through the environment in the weeks, years, and millenia after a big comet strikes Titan. The model Titan is endowed with 1.4 bars of N2 and 0.07 bars of CH4, methane lakes, a water ice crust, and enough methane underground to saturate the regolith to the surface. We assume that half of the impact energy is immediately available to the atmosphere and surface while the other half is buried at the site of the crater and is unavailable on time scales of interest. The atmosphere and surface are treated as isothermal. We make the simplifying assumptions that the crust is everywhere as methane saturated as it was at the Huygens landing site, that the concentration of methane in the regolith is the same as it is at the surface, and that the crust is made of water ice. Heat flow into and out of the crust is approximated by step-functions. If the impact is great enough, ice melts. The meltwater oceans cool to the atmosphere conductively through an ice lid while at the base melting their way into the interior, driven down in part through Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities between the dense water and the warm ice. Topography, CO2, and hydrocarbons other than methane are ignored. Methane and ethane clathrate hydrates are discussed quantitatively but not fully incorporated into the model.

  12. Deflocculants for Tape Casting Barium Titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    are discussed in detail by Mitchell and Smith (2). The measurement of free and bound water was performed by titration to an electrometric end point by...the dead- stop ( biamperometric ) technique using a Fisher Model 391 aquametry apparatus. The fundamental theory behind this technique is reviewed p in... Titrations were performed at 25 ± 10C. "i 9 For insoluble materials, such as the barium titanate powder, the solid was added to the pyridine solvent

  13. Modified titanate perovskites in photocatalytic water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wlodarczak, M.; Ludwiczak, M.; Laniecki, M. [A. Mickiewicz Univ. (Poland)

    2010-07-01

    Received materials have structure of perovskite, what was shown by XRD diffraction patterns. Perovskite structure is present in all samples with strontium, barium and one sample with calcium. Moreover, received barium and strontium titanate are very similar to pattern materials. XRD results show, that temperature 500 C is too low to create perovskite structure in CaTiO{sub 3}. However, it is high enough in case of SrTiO{sub 3} and BaTiO{sub 3}. One regularity is obvious, surface area increases for samples calcined in lower temperature. There is a connection between surface area and dispersion of platinum. Both of them reach the greatest value to the calcium titanate. Catalytic activity was shown by all of received samples. Measurable values were received to samples calcined in 700 C. Calcium titanate had the best catalytic activity, both an amount of hydrogen and a ratio of hydrogen to platinum. There is one regularity to all samples, the ration of hydrogen to platinum increase when amount of platinum decrease. (orig.)

  14. The key to Mars, Titan and beyond?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubrin, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear rockets using indigenous Mars propellants for future missions to Mars and Titan, which would drastically reduce the mass and cost of the mission while increasing its capability. Special attention is given to the CO2-powered nuclear rocket using indigenous Martian fuel (NIMF) vehicle for hopping around on Mars. If water is available on Mars, it could make a NIMF propellant yielding an exhaust velocity of 3.4 km/sec, good enough to allow a piloted NIMF spacecraft to ascent from the surface of Mars and propel itself directly to LEO; if water is available on Phobos, a NIMF spacecraft could travel to earth orbit and then back to Phobos or Mars without any additional propellant from earth. One of the many exciting missions beyond Mars that will be made possible by NIMF technology is the exploration of Saturn's moon Titan. A small automated NIMF Titan explorer, with foldout wings and a NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications) engine, is proposed

  15. Investigations of the Structure of Titanate Nanoscrolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, D.A.; Buckley, C.E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Nanosized materials have attracted much research lately due to their unique properties and their potential application in nanoelectronic and optoelectronic devices. Nanostructured materials have also sparked interest as possible hydrogen storage candidates. Research at Curtin University has shown titanate nanoscrolls to absorb modest amounts of hydrogen at low temperatures. Whether or not this capacity can be improved will be dependent on a thorough understanding of the structure and the way it interacts with hydrogen. Titanate nanoscrolls are made via a soft chemical process that involves ageing TiO 2 powder in a concentrated NaOH solution. The resultant nanoscrolls, once filtered and washed, are typically 8-10 nm in diameter and hundreds of nanometers long. The walls consist of 3-5 layers and the diameter of the hollow centre is typically 5 nm. A number of different structures have been assigned to nanoscrolls produced via the soft chemical process. These include anatase, H 2 Ti 3 O 7 , lepidocrocite-type structure and H 2 Ti 4 O 9 .H 2 O. Many of these structures are similar, consisting of titanate type layers, and qualitatively reproduce the X-ray diffraction data. However, preliminary data suggests that these structures are inconsistent with neutron diffraction data. Here we attempt a more quantitative analysis of the structure than those published previously using neutron and X-ray diffraction. (authors)

  16. Is Titan responsible for Iapetus' orbit ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycarpe, William

    2017-06-01

    Latest astrometrical results on Saturnian moons show evidence for high migration rates (Lainey et al. 2012; 2016). The tidal dissipation in the planet is responsible for those large orbital expansions and should therefore be much stronger than usually expected. The idea of significant tidal dissipation in the massive core (Remus et al. 2012) and the convective envelope (Le Guenel et al. 2015; Fuller et al. 2016) of the planet has been brought forward as a likely explanation.Nevertheless, high changes in semi-major axes of the moons shuffle up the ideas we had on the past evolution of the system of Saturn. In particular, depending on tidal mechanisms at play, several Mean Motion Resonances could have been crossed just a few million years ago.In the frame of high tidal migration, we investigate the consequences of the past 5:1 mean motion resonance between Titan and Iapetus, which could have happened between 5 and 500 million years ago. Numerical simulations show that the most common outcome for Iapetus is to be ejected, as Titan migrates through the resonance. However, if Titan has a very high recession (Q <2000), Iapetus may survive the resonance and come out of it with an eccentricity consistent with today's value. The effect on Iapetus' inclination is still under investigation.

  17. Impact-Induced Climate Change on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Korycansky, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Titan's thick atmosphere and volatile surface cause it to respond to big impacts like the one that produced the prominent Menrva impact basin in a somewhat Earth-like manner. Menrva was big enough to raise the surface temperature by 100 K. If methane in the regolith is generally as abundant as it was at the Huygens landing site, Menrva would have been big enough to double the amount of methane in the atmosphere. The extra methane would have drizzled out of the atmosphere over hundreds of years. Conditions may have been favorable for clathrating volatiles such as ethane. Impacts can also create local crater lakes set in warm ice but these quickly sink below the warm ice; whether the cryptic waters quickly freeze by mixing with the ice crust or whether they long endure under the ice remains a open question. Bigger impacts can create shallow liquid water oceans at the surface. If Titan's crust is made of water ice, the putative Hotei impact (a possible 800-1200 km diameter basin, Soderblom et al 2009) would have raised the average surface temperature to 350-400 K. Water rain would have fallen and global meltwaters would have averaged 50 m to as much as 500 m deep. The meltwaters may not have lasted more than a few decades or centuries at most, but are interesting to consider given Titan's organic wealth.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of ceramic pigments based on oxides of chromium and iron, on TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.M. da; Galvao, S.B.; Paskocimas, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    This work used oxides of chromium and iron, as precursors of the synthesis of ceramic pigments. The synthesis is based on the dissolution of citric acid as a complexing agent, addition of metal oxides, such as ion chromophores; polymerization with ethylene glycol and doping with titanium oxide. Passing through pre-calcination, breakdown, calcination at different temperatures (900 and 1100 ° C), resulting in pigments: green for pigment chrome deposited on TiO 2 and orange for iron on TiO 2 . Noticing an increase in the opacity with increasing temperature. The thermal analysis (TG and DTA), evaluated their thermal behavior, the XRD revealed the formation of crystalline phases as Iron Titanate and Chrome Titanate; SEM showed the formation of hexagonal particles for both oxides. Thus, the synthesized oxides were within the requirements for application as ceramic pigments. (author)

  19. Titan AVIATR - Aerial Vehicle for In Situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Barnes, J. W.; McKay, C. P.; Lemke, L.; Beyer, R. A.; Radebaugh, J.; Adamkovics, M.; Atkinson, D. H.; Burr, D. M.; Colaprete, T.; Foch, R.; Le Mouélic, S.; Merrison, J.; Mitchell, J.; Rodriguez, S.; Schaller, E.

    2010-10-01

    Titan AVIATR - Aerial Vehicle for In Situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance - is a small (120 kg), nuclear-powered Titan airplane in the Discovery/New Frontiers class based on the concept of Lemke (2008 IPPW). The scientific goals of the mission are designed around the unique flexibility offered by an airborne platform: to explore Titan's diversity of surface landforms, processes, and compositions, as well as to study and measure the atmospheric circulation, aerosols, and humidity. AVIATR would address and surpass many of the science goals of hot-air balloons in Titan flagship studies. The strawman instrument payload is narrowly focused on the stated scientific objectives. The optical remote sensing suite comprises three instruments - an off-nadir high-resolution 2-micron camera, a horizon-looking 5-micron imager, and a 1-6 micron pushbroom near-infrared spectrometer. The in situ instruments include atmospheric structure, a methane humidity sensor, and a raindrop detector. An airplane has operational advantages over a balloon. Its piloted nature allows a go-to capability to image locations of interest in real time, thereby allowing for directed exploration of many features of primary geologic interest: Titan's sand dunes, mountains, craters, channels, and lakes. Subsequent imaging can capture changes in these features during the primary mission. AVIATR can fly predesigned routes, building up large context mosaics of areas of interest before swooping down to low altitude to acquire high-resolution images at 30-cm spatial sampling, similar to that of HiRISE at Mars. The elevation flexibility of the airplane allows us to acquire atmospheric profiles as a function of altitude at any desired location. Although limited by the direct-to-Earth downlink bandwidth, the total scientific data return from AVIATR will be >40 times that returned from Huygens. To maximize the science per bit, novel data storage and downlink techniques will be employed, including lossy compression

  20. Titan through Time: Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and its Hydrocarbon Cycle on the Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Ashley E.

    The Introduction and Appendix i-A outline briefly the history of Titan exploration since its discovery by Christiaan Huygens in 1675 through the recent International Mission of Cassini-Huygens.. Chapter 1: This chapter discusses two possible pathways of loss of the two main gases from Titan's post-accretional atmosphere, methane (CH 4) and ammonia (NH3), by the mechanisms of thermal escape and emission from the interior coupled with thermal escape. Chapter 2: In this chapter, a simple photolysis model is created, where the second most abundant component of the present-day Titan atmosphere, methane (CH4), can either escape the atmosphere or undergo photolytic conversion to ethane (C2H6). Chapter 3: This chapter examines different fluvial features on Titan, identified by the Cassini spacecraft, and evaluates the possibilities of channel formation by two mechanisms: dissolution of ice by a concentrated solution of ammonium sulfate, and by mechanical erosion by flow of liquid ammonia and liquid ethane. Chapter 4: This chapter presents: (1) new explicit mathematical solutions of mixed 1st and 2nd order chemical reactions, represented by ordinary differential first-degree and Riccati equations; (2) the computed present-day concentrations of the three gases in Titan's scale atmosphere, treated as at near-steady state; and (3) an analysis of the reported and computed atmospheric concentrations of CH4, CH 3, and C2H6 on Titan, based on the reaction rate parameters of the species, the rate parameters taken as constants representative of their mean values. Chapter 5: This chapter examines the possible reactions of methane formation in terms of the thermodynamic relationships of the reactions that include pure carbon as graphite, the gases H2, CO2, H2 O, and serpentinization and magnetite formation from olivine fayalite. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  1. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  2. AVIATR - Aerial Vehicle for In-situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance A Titan Airplane Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Lemke, Lawrence; Foch, Rick; McKay, Christopher P.; Beyer, Ross A.; Radebaugh, Jani; Atkinson, David H.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; LeMouelic, Stephane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; hide

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mission concept for a stand-alone Titan airplane mission: Aerial Vehicle for In-situ and Airborne Titan Reconnaissance (AVIATR). With independent delivery and direct-to-Earth communications, AVIATR could contribute to Titan science either alone or as part of a sustained Titan Exploration Program. As a focused mission, AVIATR as we have envisioned it would concentrate on the science that an airplane can do best: exploration of Titan's global diversity. We focus on surface geology/hydrology and lower-atmospheric structure and dynamics. With a carefully chosen set of seven instruments-2 near-IR cameras, 1 near-IR spectrometer, a RADAR altimeter, an atmospheric structure suite, a haze sensor, and a raindrop detector-AVIATR could accomplish a significant subset of the scientific objectives of the aerial element of flagship studies. The AVIATR spacecraft stack is composed of a Space Vehicle (SV) for cruise, an Entry Vehicle (EV) for entry and descent, and the Air Vehicle (AV) to fly in Titan's atmosphere. Using an Earth-Jupiter gravity assist trajectory delivers the spacecraft to Titan in 7.5 years, after which the AVIATR AV would operate for a 1-Earth-year nominal mission. We propose a novel 'gravity battery' climb-then-glide strategy to store energy for optimal use during telecommunications sessions. We would optimize our science by using the flexibility of the airplane platform, generating context data and stereo pairs by flying and banking the AV instead of using gimbaled cameras. AVIATR would climb up to 14 km altitude and descend down to 3.5 km altitude once per Earth day, allowing for repeated atmospheric structure and wind measurements all over the globe. An initial Team-X run at JPL priced the AVIATR mission at FY10 $715M based on the rules stipulated in the recent Discovery announcement of opportunity. Hence we find that a standalone Titan airplane mission can achieve important science building on Cassini's discoveries and can likely do so within

  3. Influence of nanogold additives on phase formation, microstructure and dielectric properties of perovskite BaTiO3 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonkumwong, Jeeranan; Ananta, Supon; Srisombat, Laongnuan

    2015-06-01

    The formation of perovskite phase, microstructure and dielectric properties of nanogold-modified barium titanate (BaTiO3) ceramics was examined as a function of gold nanoparticle contents by employing a combination of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, Archimedes principle and dielectric measurement techniques. These ceramics were fabricated from a simple mixed-oxide method. The amount of gold nanoparticles was found to be one of the key factors controlling densification, grain growth and dielectric response in BaTiO3 ceramics. It was found that under suitable amount of nanogold addition (4 mol%), highly dense perovskite BaTiO3 ceramics with homogeneous microstructures of refined grains (~0.5-3.1 μm) and excellence dielectric properties can be produced.

  4. Maximising electro-mechanical response by minimising grain-scale strain heterogeneity in phase-change actuator ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Hossain, Mohammad Jahangir; Daniels, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change actuator ceramics directly couple electrical and mechanical energies through an electric-field-induced phase transformation. These materials are promising for the replacement of the most common electro-mechanical ceramic, lead zirconate titanate, which has environmental concerns. Here......, we show that by compositional modification, we reduce the grain-scale heterogeneity of the electro-mechanical response by 40%. In the materials investigated, this leads to an increase in the achievable electric-field-induced strain of the bulk ceramic of 45%. Compositions of (100-x)Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-(x...... heterogeneity can be achieved by precise control of the lattice distortions and orientation distributions of the induced phases. The current results can be used to guide the design of next generation high-strain electro-mechanical ceramic actuator materials....

  5. Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in existing facilities at the Savannah River site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiSabatino, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources, and through a ceramic immobilization process converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans

  6. Aromatic Structure in Simulates Titan Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Melissa G.; Loeffler, M. J.; Anderson, C. M.; Hudson, R. L.; Samuelson, R. E.; Moore, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of Titan by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) between 560 and 20 per centimeter (approximately 18 to 500 micrometers) have been used to infer the vertical variations of Titan's ice abundances, as well as those of the aerosol from the surface to an altitude of 300 km [1]. The aerosol has a broad emission feature centered approximately at 140 per centimeter (71 micrometers). As seen in Figure 1, this feature cannot be reproduced using currently available optical constants from laboratory-generated Titan aerosol analogs [2]. The far-IR is uniquely qualified for investigating low-energy vibrational motions within the lattice structures of COITIDlex aerosol. The feature observed by CIRS is broad, and does not likely arise from individual molecules, but rather is representative of the skeletal movements of macromolecules. Since Cassini's arrival at Titan, benzene (C6H6) has been detected in the atmosphere at ppm levels as well as ions that may be polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [3]. We speculate that the feature may be a blended composite that can be identified with low-energy vibrations of two-dimensional lattice structures of large molecules, such as PAHs or nitrogenated aromatics. Such structures do not dominate the composition of analog materials generated from CH4 and N2 irradiation. We are performing studies forming aerosol analog via UV irradiation of aromatic precursors - specifically C6H6 - to understand how the unique chemical architecture of the products will influence the observable aerosol characteristics. The optical and chemical properties of the aromatic analog will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures, with a focus on the as-yet unidentified far-IR absorbance feature. Preliminary results indicate that the photochemically-formed aromatic aerosol has distinct chemical composition, and may incorporate nitrogen either into the ring structure or adjoined chemical groups. These compositional differences are

  7. Processing of phase pure and dense bulk EuTiO.sub.3./sub. ceramics and their infrared reflectivity spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kachlik, M.; Máca, K.; Goian, Veronica; Kamba, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 74, MAY (2012), s. 16-18 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD202/09/H041; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0682 Grant - others:GAUK(CZ) SVV-2011-263303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : functional ceramics, * europium titanate * sintering * infrared reflectivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.224, year: 2012

  8. Room temperature surface piezoelectricity in SrTiO.sub.3./sub. ceramics via piezoresponse force microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kholkin, A.; Bdikin, I.; Ostapchuk, Tetyana; Petzelt, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 22 (2008), 222905/1-222905/3 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP202/06/P219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : strontium titanate ceramics * piezoresponse force microscopy * flexoelectric effect * polar grain boundaries Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.726, year: 2008

  9. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-02-01

    This is the fifth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. Results of wetting experiments on commercially available Nickel based brazing alloys on perovskite surfaces are described. Additionally, experimental and numerical investigations on the strength of concentric ceramic/metal joints are presented.

  10. Effects of neonatal exposure to the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol-A, aluminum diethylphosphinate or zinc stannate on long-term potentiation and synaptic protein levels in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Hester S; Koolen, Lucas A E; Dingemans, Milou M L; Viberg, Henrik; Lee, Iwa; Leonards, Pim E G; Ramakers, Geert M J; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-12-01

    Brominated flame retardants such as tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) may exert (developmental) neurotoxic effects. However, data on (neuro)toxicity of halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs) are scarce. Recent in vitro studies indicated a high neurotoxic potential for some HFFRs, e.g., zinc stannate (ZS), whereas the neurotoxic potential of other HFFRs, such as aluminum diethylphosphinate (Alpi), appears low. However, the in vivo (neuro)toxicity of these compounds is largely unknown. We therefore investigated effects of neonatal exposure to TBBPA, Alpi or ZS on synaptic plasticity in mouse hippocampus. Male C57bl/6 mice received a single oral dose of 211 µmol/kg bw TBBPA, Alpi or ZS on postnatal day (PND) 10. On PND 17-19, effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity were investigated using ex vivo extracellular field recordings. Additionally, we measured levels of postsynaptic proteins involved in long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as flame retardant concentrations in brain, muscle and liver tissues. All three flame retardants induced minor, but insignificant, effects on LTP. Additionally, TBBPA induced a minor decrease in post-tetanic potentiation. Despite these minor effects, expression of selected synaptic proteins involved in LTP was not affected. The flame retardants could not be measured in significant amounts in the brains, suggesting low bioavailability and/or rapid elimination/metabolism. We therefore conclude that a single neonatal exposure on PND 10 to TBBPA, Alpi or ZS does affect neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity only to a small extent in mice. Additional data, in particular on persistence, bioaccumulation and (in vivo) toxicity, following prolonged (developmental) exposure are required for further (human) risk assessment.

  11. Enhanced piezoelectric properties and excellent thermal stabilities of cobalt-modified Aurivillius-type calcium bismuth titanate (CaBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Tian-Long [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Chun-Ming, E-mail: wangcm@sdu.edu.cn [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-Ming [School of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Dong, Shuxiang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Cobalt oxide modified CBT-based ceramics were prepared and investigated in detail. • XRPD analysis revealed Co ions enter into B-site of CBT-based ceramics. • CBT-Co4 ceramics show the enhanced d{sub 33} of 14 pC/N and T{sub c} of 782 °C. • CBT-Co4 ceramics present the improved high-temperature resistivity. • Thermal depoling behavior indicates CBT-Co4 ceramics exhibit good thermal stability. - Abstract: Bismuth layer-structured ferroelectric (BLSF) calcium bismuth titanate (CaBi{sub 4}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 15}, CBT) piezoelectric ceramics with 0.0–1.0 wt.% cobalt oxide (Co{sub 2}O{sub 3}) have been prepared via a conventional solid-state reaction method. Microstructural morphology and electrical properties of cobalt oxide-modified CBT ceramics were investigated in detail. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analysis revealed that the cobalt oxide-modified CBT ceramics have a pure four-layer Aurivillius-type structure. The piezoelectric properties of CBT ceramics were significantly enhanced by cobalt oxide modifications. The piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 33} and Curie temperature T{sub c} of 0.2 wt.% cobalt oxide-modified CBT ceramics (CBT-Co4) are 14 pC/N and 782 °C, respectively. The DC resistivity and thermal depoling behavior at elevated temperature indicated that the CBT-Co4 ceramics exhibit good thermal stability, demonstrating that the CBT-Co4 ceramics are potential materials for high temperature piezoelectric applications.

  12. Direct probing of semiconductor barium titanate via electrostatic force microscopy Sondagem direta de titanato de bário semicondutorpor meio de microscopia de força eletrostática

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Gheno; H. L. Hasegawa; P. I. Paulin Filho

    2007-01-01

    Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) was used to directly probe surface potential in doped barium titanate semiconducting ceramics. EFM measurements were performed using noncontact scans at a constant tip-sample separation of 75 nm with varied bias voltages applied to the sample. The applied voltage was mapped up to 10 V and the distribution of potential across the sample showed changes in regions that matched the grain boundaries, displaying a constant barrier width of 145.2 nm.A microscopia...

  13. A Raman Study of Titanate Nanotubes | Liu | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the addition of NaOH or KOH on commercial Degussa Titania P25 was investigated using TEM, Raman and in situ Raman spectroscopy. Treatment of titania with conc. NaOH generated a tubular material corresponding to a sodium titanate. An in situ Raman study on the sodium titanate nanotubes as a function ...

  14. Reduced-graphene-oxide-and-strontium-titanate-based double

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave-absorbing materials based on reduced graphene oxide (r-GO)/ strontium titanate were prepared by embedding in epoxy matrix. R-GO and strontium titanate were synthesized and characterized before composite fabrication. Microstructures of the constituent elements were studied by scanning electron ...

  15. Reduced-graphene-oxide-and-strontium-titanate-based double ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave-absorbing materials based on reduced graphene oxide (r-GO)/ strontium titanate were prepared by embedding in epoxy matrix. R-GO and strontium titanate were synthesized and characterized before composite fabrication. Microstructures of the constituent elements were studied by scanning electron ...

  16. Thermal conductivity reduction in oxygen-deficient strontium titanates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Choongho; Scullin, Matthew L.; Huijben, Mark; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-01-01

    We report significant thermal conductivity reduction in oxygen-deficient lanthanum-doped strontium titanate (Sr1−xLaxTiO3−δ) films as compared to unreduced strontium titanates. Our experimental results suggest that the oxygen vacancies could have played an important role in the reduction. This could

  17. Lead removal from aqueous solutions by potassium titanate doped with silica; Remocion de plomo de soluciones acuosas por titanato de potasio dopado con silice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar G, M. A.; Aguilar E, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, 31109 Chihuahua (Mexico); Gorokhovsky, A. V.; Escalante G, J. I. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Saltillo, Carretera Saltillo-Mty Km. 13, Apdo. Postal 663, Saltillo 25000, Coahuila (Mexico)], e-mail: mgzlz@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    This paper is related to elimination of Pb{sup 2+} ions from aqueous solutions by adsorption in potassium tetra titanate doped with silica. The adsorbent was prepared in the form of granules with pastes of potassium poly titanate (45 %), powdered Pyrex glass (5 %) and potato starch (50 %), which were extruded and thermally treated at 1100 C. The structural characteristic of the granulated adsorbent allows reducing the Pb concentration, from the solutions eluted through an adsorption column, to levels below the requirement of national standards. The effects of the time of saturation of the adsorbent and the ph of the solution were also investigated on the effectiveness of the adsorption of Pb. The mechanism of lead adsorption, by the developed adsorbent, is considered as a combination of adsorption, ion-exchange and co-precipitation processes. It is also shown that the lead-saturated adsorbent could be utilized to produce high-strength non-dangerous ceramic materials. (Author)

  18. Ceramics As Materials Of Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, A; Eteiba, M. B.; Abdelmonem, N.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to review the limitations for using the important ceramics in contact with corrosive media. Different types of ceramics are included. Corrosion properties of ceramics and their electrical properties are mentioned. Recommendations are suggested for using ceramics in different media.

  19. Thermal stability of titanate nanorods and titania nanowires formed from titanate nanotubes by heating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brunátová, T.; Matěj, Z.; Oleynikov, P.; Vesely, J.; Danis, S.; Popelková, Daniela; Kuzel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 98, December (2014), s. 26-36 ISSN 1044-5803 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : titania nanowires * titanate nanorods * X-ray diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.845, year: 2014

  20. Magnetospheric ion deposition on Titan's ionosphere in hybrid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpaa, I.; Johnson, R. E.; Crary, F. J.; Young, D. T.; Kallio, E. J.; Jarvinen, R.

    2010-12-01

    Hybrid modelling allows tracking ion particle in self-consist electromagnetic fields. Titan is a specific case where ion gyromotion plays a significant role in the interaction with the ambient plasma flow. We present hybrid simulation results from a medium-strength magnetospheric flow case. The water-group ions are shown to dominate the energy deposition by particles into Titan's ionosphere, while incident protons and pickup ions deposit about a total of a third of the water-group energy. Neutral collisions for the incident ions were taken into account via stopping cross sections. We show that Titan's neutral exosphere reduces the flux and energy deposit of especially lighter flow ions into Titan's atmosphere. Distribution of impacts and energy deposit by incident watergroup ions onto Titan's exobase.

  1. Atmospheric drag model for Cassini orbit determination during low altitude Titan flybys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, F. J.; Antreasian, P. G.; Bordi, J. J.; Criddle, K. E.; Ionasescu, R.; Jacobson, R. A.; Mackenzie, R. A.; Parcher, D. W.; Stauch, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    On April 16, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft performed its lowest altitude flyby of Titan to date, the Titan-5 flyby, flying 1027 km above the surface of Titan. This document discusses the development of a Titan atmospheric drag model for the purpose of the orbit determination of Cassini. Results will be presented for the Titan A flyby, the Titan-5 flyby as well as the most recent low altitude Titan flyby, Titan-7. Different solutions will be compared against OD performance in terms of the flyby B-plane parameters, spacecraft thrusting activity and drag estimates. These low altitude Titan flybys were an excellent opportunity to observe the effect of Titan's atmospheric drag on the orbit determination solution and results show that the drag was successfully modeled to provide accurate flyby solutions.

  2. Methane, Ethane, and Nitrogen Stability on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, J.; Grundy, W. M.; Thompson, G.; Dustrud, S.; Pearce, L.; Lindberg, G.; Roe, H. G.; Tegler, S.

    2017-12-01

    Many outer solar system bodies are likely to have a combination of methane, ethane and nitrogen. In particular the lakes of Titan are known to consist of these species. Understanding the past and current stability of these lakes requires characterizing the interactions of methane and ethane, along with nitrogen, as both liquids and ices. Our cryogenic laboratory setup allows us to explore ices down to 30 K through imaging, and transmission and Raman spectroscopy. Our recent work has shown that although methane and ethane have similar freezing points, when mixed they can remain liquid down to 72 K. Concurrently with the freezing point measurements we acquire transmission or Raman spectra of these mixtures to understand how the structural features change with concentration and temperature. Any mixing of these two species together will depress the freezing point of the lake below Titan's surface temperature, preventing them from freezing. We will present new results utilizing our recently acquired Raman spectrometer that allow us to explore both the liquid and solid phases of the ternary system of methane, ethane and nitrogen. In particular we will explore the effect of nitrogen on the eutectic of the methane-ethane system. At high pressure we find that the ternary creates two separate liquid phases. Through spectroscopy we determined the bottom layer to be nitrogen rich, and the top layer to be ethane rich. Identifying the eutectic, as well as understanding the liquidus and solidus points of combinations of these species, has implications for not only the lakes on the surface of Titan, but also for the evaporation/condensation/cloud cycle in the atmosphere, as well as the stability of these species on other outer solar system bodies. These results will help interpretation of future observational data, and guide current theoretical models.

  3. Composition And Geometry Of Titan'S Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Alice; Janssen, M. A.; Wye, L. C.; Lorenz, R. D.; Radebaugh, J.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2009-09-01

    Fields of linear dunes cover a large portion of Titan's equatorial regions. As the Cassini mission continues, more of them are unveiled and examined by the microwave Titan RADAR Mapper both in the active and passive modes of operation of the instrument and with an increasing variety of observational geometries. In this presentation, we will show that the joint analysis of the SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) and radiometry observations of the dunes at closest approach supports the idea of different composition between the dunes and the interdunes. It suggests that the icy bedrock of Titan may be exposed, or partially exposed, in the interdunes. We also see regional differences among dune fields. Dunes are highly directional features; their visibility is controlled by the look direction and the incidence angle. We have developed a backscatter and emissivity model that takes into account the topography of the dunes relative to the geometry of observation as well as the composition of the dunes and interdunes. Compared to observations and, in particular, to multiple observations of areas at the overlap of several swaths, we argue the need for a diffuse scattering mechanism. The presence of ripples in the dunes and/or interdunes might account for the recorded backscatter. In this presentation we will also report the results of the T61 experiment. The T61 HiSAR sequence (on August 25, 2009) was designed to examine a small region of the Shangri-La dune field with a substantial sampling of incidence angles around the direction perpendicular to the dunes long axis. The spot in question was already observed during the T55 SAR swath and the T61 experiment should allow us to determine the slope of the dunes.

  4. Synthesis and In vitro Evaluation of Electrodeposited Barium Titanate Coating on Ti6Al4V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, Shahram; Basiriani, Mohammad Basir; Rafienia, Mohammad; Yaghini, Jaber; Raeisi, Keyvan

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegration has been the concern of implantology for many years. Researchers have used various ceramic coatings for this purpose; however, piezoelectric ceramics (e.g., barium titanate [BTO]) are a novel field of interest. In this regard, BTO (BaTiO3) coating was fabricated by electrophoretic deposition on Ti6Al4V medical alloy, using sol-gel-synthesized nanometer BTO powder. Structure and morphologies were studied using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Bioactivity response of coated samples was evaluated by SEM and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). Cell compatibility was also studied via MTT assay and SEM imaging. Results showed homogenous coating with cubic structure and crystallite size of about 41 nm. SEM images indicated apatite formation on the coating after 7 days of SBF immersion, and ICP analysis approved ions concentration decrement in SBF. Cells showed flattened morphology in intimate contact with coating after 7 days of culture. Altogether, coated samples demonstrated appropriate bioactivity and biocompatibility.

  5. Ferroelectric mesocrystals of bismuth sodium titanate: formation mechanism, nanostructure, and application to piezoelectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dengwei; Kong, Xingang; Mori, Kotaro; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Shinagawa, Kazunari; Feng, Qi

    2013-09-16

    Ferroelectric mesocrystals of Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3 (BNT) with [100]-crystal-axis orientation were successfully prepared using a topotactic structural transformation process from a layered titanate H1.07Ti1.73O4·nH2O (HTO). The formation reactions of BNT mesocrystals in HTO-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 and HTO-TiO2-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 reaction systems and their nanostructures were studied by XRD, FE-SEM, TEM, SAED, and EDS, and the reaction mechanisms were given. The BNT mesocrystals are formed by a topotactic structural transformation mechanism in the HTO-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 reaction system and by a combination mechanism of the topotactic structural transformation and epitaxial crystal growth in the HTO-TiO2-Bi2O3-Na2CO3 reaction system, respectively. The BNT mesocrystals prepared by these methods are constructed from [100]-oriented BNT nanocrystals. Furthermore, these reaction systems were successfully applied to the fabrication of [100]-oriented BNT ferroelectric ceramic materials. A BNT ceramic material with a high degree of orientation, high relative density, and small grain size was achieved.

  6. FEI Titan 80-300 STEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Heggen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The FEI Titan 80-300 STEM is a scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a field emission electron gun, a three-condenser lens system, a monochromator unit, and a Cs probe corrector (CEOS, a post-column energy filter system (Gatan Tridiem 865 ER as well as a Gatan 2k slow scan CCD system. Characterised by a STEM resolution of 80 pm at 300 kV, the instrument was one of the first of a small number of sub-ångström resolution scanning transmission electron microscopes in the world when commissioned in 2006.

  7. Phase 1 Final Report: Titan Submarine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Steven R.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Paul, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual design of a submarine for Saturn's moon Titan was a funded NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase 1 for 2014. The proposal stated the desire to investigate what science a submarine for Titan's liquid hydrocarbon seas might accomplish and what that submarine might look like. Focusing on a flagship class science system (100 kg), it was found that a submersible platform can accomplish extensive science both above and below the surface of the Kraken Mare. Submerged science includes mapping using side-looking sonar, imaging and spectroscopy of the lake, as well as sampling of the lake's bottom and shallow shoreline. While surfaced, the submarine will not only sense weather conditions (including the interaction between the liquid and atmosphere) but also image the shoreline, as much as 2 km inland. This imaging requirement pushed the landing date to Titan's next summer period (2047) to allow for lighted conditions, as well as direct-to-Earth communication, avoiding the need for a separate relay orbiter spacecraft. Submerged and surfaced investigation are key to understanding both the hydrological cycle of Titan as well as gather hints to how life may have begun on Earth using liquid, sediment, and chemical interactions. An estimated 25 Mb of data per day would be generated by the various science packages. Most of the science packages (electronics at least) can be safely kept inside the submarine pressure vessel and warmed by the isotope power system.The baseline 90-day mission would be to sail submerged and surfaced around and through Kraken Mare investigating the shoreline and inlets to evaluate the sedimentary interaction both on the surface and then below. Depths of Kraken have yet to be sensed (Ligeia to the north is thought to be 200 m (656 ft) deep), but a maximum depth of 1,000 m (3,281 ft) for Kraken Mare was assumed for the design). The sub would spend 20 d at the interface between Kraken Mare and Ligeia Mare for clues to the drainage of

  8. Dielectric properties of barium titanate supramolecular nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keun Hyung; Kao, Joseph; Parizi, Saman Salemizadeh; Caruntu, Gabriel; Xu, Ting

    2014-04-07

    Nanostructured dielectric composites can be obtained by dispersing high permittivity fillers, barium titanate (BTO) nanocubes, within a supramolecular framework. Thin films of BTO supramolecular nanocomposites exhibit a dielectric permittivity (εr) as high as 15 and a relatively low dielectric loss of ∼0.1 at 1 kHz. These results demonstrate a new route to control the dispersion of high permittivity fillers toward high permittivity dielectric nanocomposites with low loss. Furthermore, the present study shows that the size distribution of nanofillers plays a key role in their spatial distribution and local ordering and alignment within supramolecular nanostructures.

  9. Life on Titan: Theorem of existance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potashko, O.

    Volcanoes engender life on heavenly bodies; they are pacemakers of life[1]. All planets during their period of formation pass through volcanism hence - all planets and their satellites pass through life. Tracks of life If we want to find tracks of life -- most promising places are places with volcanic activity, current or past. In the case of just-in-time volcanic activity we have 100% probability to find a life. Therefore the most perspective ``search for life'' are Io and comets, further would be Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, their satellites and first of all -- Titan. Titan has atmosphere. It might be result of high volcanic activity -- from one side, from other side atmosphere is a necessary condition development life from procaryota to eucaryota. Existence of a planet means that all its elements after hydrogen formed just there inside a planet. The forming of the elements leads to the formation of mineral and organic substances and further to the organic life. Development of the life depends upon many factors, e.g. the distance from star/s. The intensity of the processes of the element formation is inversely to the distance from the star. Therefore we may suppose that the intensity of the life in Mercury was very high. Hence we may detect tracks of life in Mercury, particularly near volcanoes. The distance from the star is only one parameter and now Titan looks very active -- mainly due to interior reason. Its atmosphere compounds are analogous to comet tail compounds. Their collation may lead to interesting result as progress occurs at one of them. Volcanic activity is as a source of life origin as well a reason for a death of life. It depends upon the thickness of planet crust. In the case of small thickness of a crust the probability is high that volcanoes may destroy a life on a planet -- like Noachian deluge. Destroying of the life under volcano influences doesn't lead to full dead. As result we would have periodic Noachian deluge or nuclear winter. These

  10. Corrosion of a Pu-doped zirconolite-rich ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakel, A.J.; Buck, E.C.; Wolf, S.F.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Bates, J.K.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a large Pu disposition program, a zirconolite-rich titanate ceramic is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as a possible immobilization material. This same material is being tested at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The goal of this study is to describe the corrosion behavior of this ceramic, particularly the release of Pu and Gd, using results from several static corrosion tests (MCC-1, PCT-A, and PCT-B). The release of relatively large amounts of Al, Ba, and Ca in short-term tests (3 day MCC-1 and 7 day PCT-A) indicates that these elements are released from grain boundaries or from highly soluble phases. Results from long-term (28, 98, and 182 day) PCT-B show that the releases of Al, Ba, and Ca decrease with time, the releases of U and Zr increase with time, and that the releases of Cs, Gd, Mo, and Pu remain fairly constant. Formation of alteration phases may lead to the decrease of Ba and Ca in leachate solutions. Due to the heterogeneous nature of the material, the formation of alteration phases, and the inherently low solubility of several elements, no element(s) could be recommended as good markers for the overall corrosion of this ceramic. Data show that, due to the complex nature of this material, the release of each element should be considered separately

  11. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  12. Ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Anionic Conducting Oxide Ceramics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dunn, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    This program has emphasized the interrelationships among synthesis, microstructure and properties for oxygen ion conducting ceramics based on copper-substituted bismuth vanadate (Bi V Cu O ), known as BICUVOX...

  14. PEROXOTITANATE- AND MONOSODIUM METAL-TITANATE COMPOUNDS AS INHIBITORS OF BACTERIAL GROWTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.

    2011-01-19

    Sodium titanates are ion-exchange materials that effectively bind a variety of metal ions over a wide pH range. Sodium titanates alone have no known adverse biological effects but metal-exchanged titanates (or metal titanates) can deliver metal ions to mammalian cells to alter cell processes in vitro. In this work, we test a hypothesis that metal-titanate compounds inhibit bacterial growth; demonstration of this principle is one prerequisite to developing metal-based, titanate-delivered antibacterial agents. Focusing initially on oral diseases, we exposed five species of oral bacteria to titanates for 24 h, with or without loading of Au(III), Pd(II), Pt(II), and Pt(IV), and measuring bacterial growth in planktonic assays through increases in optical density. In each experiment, bacterial growth was compared with control cultures of titanates or bacteria alone. We observed no suppression of bacterial growth by the sodium titanates alone, but significant (p < 0.05, two-sided t-tests) suppression was observed with metal-titanate compounds, particularly Au(III)-titanates, but with other metal titanates as well. Growth inhibition ranged from 15 to 100% depending on the metal ion and bacterial species involved. Furthermore, in specific cases, the titanates inhibited bacterial growth 5- to 375-fold versus metal ions alone, suggesting that titanates enhanced metal-bacteria interactions. This work supports further development of metal titanates as a novel class of antibacterials.

  15. ICES ON TITAN: LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS THAT COMPLEMENT THE HUYGENS PROBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. ROBINSON; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The composition of the cold bodies in the outer solar system may hold some of the key molecular clues concerning the composition of the prestellax molecular cloud that gave rise to the solar system. We studied the physical chemistry and heterogeneous (gas/surface) reactivity of extraterrestrial ice analogs of the surfaces of Saturn's moon Titan. This program coupled our surface spectroscopic techniques with physical adsorption measurements. We addressed several of the pressing questions regarding Titan such as: Is storage of hydrocarbons in Titan's water ice crust feasible? Do heterogeneous processes influence the atmospheric chemical composition of Titan? Are phase transitions to be expected? These data can be incorporated into photochemical models with the goal of improved modeling of the chemical composition and meteorology of Titan's atmosphere. Titan will be probed by the Cassini-Huygens Mission. Our results on Titan ice analogs can be used to help interpret the mission data.

  16. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-07-01

    This is the fourth quarterly report on a new study to develop a ceramic membrane/metal joint. The first experiments using the La-Sr-Fe-O ceramic are reported. Some of the analysis performed on the samples obtained are commented upon. A set of experiments to characterize the mechanical strength and thermal fatigue properties of the joints has been designed and begun. Finite element models of joints used to model residual stresses are described.

  17. Titan LEAF: A Sky Rover Granting Targeted Access to Titan's Lakes and Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Floyd; Lee, Greg; Sokol, Daniel; Goldman, Benjamin; Bolisay, Linden

    2016-10-01

    Northrop Grumman, in collaboration with L'Garde Inc. and Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC), has been developing the Titan Lifting Entry Atmospheric Flight (T-LEAF) sky rover to roam the atmosphere and observe at close quarters the lakes and plains of Titan. T-LEAF also supports surface exploration and science by providing precision delivery of in situ instruments to the surface.T-LEAF is a maneuverable, buoyant air vehicle. Its aerodynamic shape provides its maneuverability, and its internal helium envelope reduces propulsion power requirements and also the risk of crashing. Because of these features, T-LEAF is not restricted to following prevailing wind patterns. This freedom of mobility allows it be commanded to follow the shorelines of Titan's methane lakes, for example, or to target very specific surface locations.T-LEAF utilizes a variable power propulsion system, from high power at ~200W to low power at ~50W. High power mode uses the propellers and control surfaces for additional mobility and maneuverability. It also allows the vehicle to hover over specific locations for long duration surface observations. Low power mode utilizes GAC's Titan Winged Aerobot (TWA) concept, currently being developed with NASA funding, which achieves guided flight without the use of propellers or control surfaces. Although slower than high powered flight, this mode grants increased power to science instruments while still maintaining control over direction of travel.Additionally, T-LEAF is its own entry vehicle, with its leading edges protected by flexible thermal protection system (f-TPS) materials already being tested by NASA's Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) group. This f-TPS technology allows T-LEAF to inflate in space, like HIAD, and then enter the atmosphere fully deployed. This approach accommodates entry velocities from as low as ~1.8 km/s if entering from Titan orbit, up to ~6 km/s if entering directly from Saturn orbit, like the Huygens probe

  18. Synthesis and characterization of nanosize sodium titanates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvington, M. C.; Tosten, M.; Taylor-Pashow, K. M. L.; Hobbs, D. T., E-mail: david.hobbs@srnl.doe.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-11-15

    This paper describes the synthesis and peroxide-modification of nanosize monosodium titanate (nMST). The synthesis method was derived from a sol-gel process used to produce micron-sized monosodium titanate (MST). Key modifications to this process include altering reagent concentrations, omitting a particle seed step, and introducing a non-ionic surfactant to facilitate control of particle formation and growth. The nMST material exhibits spherical-shaped particle morphology with a monodisperse distribution of particle diameters in the range from 100 to 150 nm. The BET surface area and isoelectric point of the nMST measured 285 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and 3.34 pH units, respectively, which is more than an order of magnitude higher in surface area and a pH unit lower than that measured for the microsize MST. The nMST material serves as an effective ion exchanger under both weakly acidic and strongly alkaline conditions and was converted to a peroxotitanate form by reaction with hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Nanosized lithium titanates produced by plasma technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabis, J; Orlovs, A; Rasmane, Dz

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of nanosized lithium titanates is studied by evaporation of coarse grained commercially available titanium and lithium carbonate particles in radio-frequency plasma flow with subsequent controlling formation and growth conditions of product particles. In accordance with the XRD analysis the phase composition of the obtained powders is determined by feeding rate of precursors and strongly by ratio of lithium and titanium. The Li 2 TiO 3 and Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 particles containing small amounts of extra phases were obtained at ratio of Li/Ti = 2 and Li/Ti = 0.8 respectively, feeding rate of precursors being in the range of 0.6-0.9 kg/h. Specific surface area of powders is in the range of 20-40 m2/g depending on concentration of vapours in gas flow and cooling rate of the products. Additional calcination of nanosize particles at 800-900 deg. C improves phase composition of lithium titanates

  20. Progress at the TITAN-EBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klawitter, R. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 2A3 Canada and Max Planck Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Alanssari, M.; Frekers, D. [Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, 48149 Münster (Germany); Chowdhury, U.; Gwinner, G. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, R3T 2N2, Winnipeg (Canada); Chaudhuri, A.; Grossheim, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Leach, K.; Schultz, B. E.; Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); López-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo [Max Planck Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ettenauer, S. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Gallant, A. T.; Macdonald, T. D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 2A3 Canada and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Lennarz, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 2A3 Canada and Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, 48149 Münster (Germany); Simon, M. C. [Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Seeraji, S.; Andreoiu, C. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2015-01-09

    Precision mass measurements of short-lived isotopes provide insight into a wide array of physics, including nuclear structure, nucleosynthesis, and tests of the Standard Model. The precision of Penning trap mass spectrometry (PTMS) measurements is limited by the lifetime of the isotopes of interest, but scales proportionally with their charge state q, making highly charged ions attractive for mass measurements of nuclides far from stability. TITAN, TRIUMF's Ion Trap(s) for Atomic and Nuclear science, is currently the only setup in the world coupling an EBIT to a rare isotope facility for the purpose of PTMS. Charge breeding ions for Penning trap mass spectrometry, however, entails specific set of challenges. To make use of its potential, efficiencies have to be high, breeding times have to be short and the ion energy spread has to be small. An overview of the TITAN facility and charge-breeding program is given, current and future developments are highlighted and some selected results are presented.

  1. Titan Coupled Surface/Atmosphere Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. A.; Pitman, K. M.

    2009-05-01

    Titan's thick haze obscures its surface at visible wavelengths and hinders surface photometric studies in the near-infrared. The large vertical extent of the haze produces two effects which require radiative transfer analysis beyond the capability of plane-parallel multi-scatter models. Haze aerosols extend to altitudes above 500 km and require a spherical-shell RT algorithm close to the limb or terminator. Even near nadir viewing, horizontal scattering at spatial scales less than a few hundred km requires a code capable of simulating the adjacency effect. The adjacency effect will reduce contrast more for small spatial scales than for large spatial scales, and the amount of contrast reduction depends on many factors (haze optical thickness, vertical distribution, single scattering albedo, scattering geometry, spatial scale). Titan's haze is strongly forward scattering even near 1-µm wavelength and many RT codes do a poor job. Fortunately the problem is more tractable at longer wavelengths. We show how data from the Cassini VIMS and ISS instruments can be used to understand surface contrast and atmospheric haze properties.

  2. DIELECTRIC AND PYROELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF THE COMPOSITES OF FERROELECTRIC CERAMIC AND POLY(VINYL CHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Olszowy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric and pyroelectric properties of lead zirconate titanate/poly(vinyl chloride [PZT/PVC] and barium titanate/poly(vinyl chloride [BaTiO3/ PVC] composites were studied. Flexible composites were fabricated in the thin films form (200-400 μm by hot-pressed method. Powders of PZT or BaTiO3 in the shape of ≤ 75 μm ceramics particles were dispersed in a PVC matrix, providing composites with 0-3} connectivity. Distribution of the ceramic particles in the polymer phase was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The analysis of the thermally stimulated currents (TSC have also been done. The changes of dielectric and pyroelectric data on composites with different contents of ceramics up to 40% volume were investigated. The dielectric constants were measured in the frequency range from 600 Hz to 6 MHz at room temperature. The pyroelectric coefficient for BaTiO3/PVC composite at 343 K is about 35 μC/m2K which is higher than that of β-PVDF (10 μC/m2 K.

  3. Studies of phase transition and impedance behavior of Ba(Zr, TiO3 ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sateesh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic samples of Barium Zirconium Titanate (BaZrxTi1-xO3 (BZT were synthesized by conventional solid-state reaction method with different concentrations of x(= 0.05 (BZT1, 0.10 (BZT2, 0.15 (BZT3, 0.20 (BZT4, 0.25 (BZT5, 0.30 (BZT6. Phase confirmation of the samples was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD technique. All the compositions are in cubic structure. XRD pattern was recorded for samples sintered at different sintering temperatures. Lattice parameters increased with addition of Zr+4. Doping with Zr+4 into Barium titanate resulted in interesting changes of electrical properties (dielectric, impedance and ferroelectiricity. The strong influence of Zr doping on the phase transition characteristics of the BZT ceramics was studied from the dielectric response of the samples. Diffusivity of phase transition of the BZT ceramic samples increase with Zr+4 concentration, indicating changes from normal to diffuse transition to relaxor phase transition behavior. Impedance spectroscopy reveals the presence of temperature-dependent grain, grain boundary effects. Polarization–Electricfield (PE loop measurements are also done on the samples.

  4. Progressive Climate Change on Titan: Implications for Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. M.; A. D. Howard

    2014-01-01

    Titan's landscape is profoundly shaped by its atmosphere and comparable in magnitude perhaps with only the Earth and Mars amongst the worlds of the Solar System. Like the Earth, climate dictates the intensity and relative roles of fluvial and aeolian activity from place to place and over geologic time. Thus Titan's landscape is the record of climate change. We have investigated three broad classes of Titan climate evolution hypotheses (Steady State, Progressive, and Cyclic), regulated by the role, sources, and availability of methane. We favor the Progressive hypotheses, which we will outline here, then discuss their implication for habitability.

  5. Exfoliation and thermal transformations of Nb-substituted layered titanates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Sjåstad, Anja O.; Fjellvåg, Helmer

    2011-01-01

    Single-layer Nb-substituted titanate nanosheets of ca. 1 nm thickness were obtained by exfoliating tetrabutylammonium (TBA)-intercalated Nb-substituted titanates in water. AFM images and turbidity measurements reveal that the exfoliated nanosheets crack and corrugate when sonicated. Upon heating...... factors for increasing the transformation temperatures for conversion of the nanosheets to anatase and finally into rutile. It is further tempting to link the delay in crystallization to morphology limitations originating from the nanosheets. The present work shows that layered Nb-titanates...

  6. The Exploration of Titan and the Saturnian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coustenis, Athena

    The exploration of the outer solar system and in particular of the giant planets and their environments is an on-going process with the Cassini spacecraft currently around Saturn, the Juno mission to Jupiter preparing to depart and two large future space missions planned to launch in the 2020-2025 time frame for the Jupiter system and its satellites (Europa and Ganymede) on the one hand, and the Saturnian system and Titan on the other hand [1,2]. Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, is the only other object in our Solar system to possess an extensive nitrogen atmosphere, host to an active organic chemistry, based on the interaction of N2 with methane (CH4). Following the Voyager flyby in 1980, Titan has been intensely studied from the ground-based large telescopes (such as the Keck or the VLT) and by artificial satellites (such as the Infrared Space Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope) for the past three decades. Prior to Cassini-Huygens, Titan's atmospheric composition was thus known to us from the Voyager missions and also through the explorations by the ISO. Our perception of Titan had thus greatly been enhanced accordingly, but many questions remained as to the nature of the haze surrounding the satellite and the composition of the surface. The recent revelations by the Cassini-Huygens mission have managed to surprise us with many discoveries [3-8] and have yet to reveal more of the interesting aspects of the satellite. The Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturnian system has been an extraordinary success for the planetary community since the Saturn-Orbit-Insertion (SOI) in July 2004 and again the very successful probe descent and landing of Huygens on January 14, 2005. One of its main targets was Titan. Titan was revealed to be a complex world more like the Earth than any other: it has a dense mostly nitrogen atmosphere and active climate and meteorological cycles where the working fluid, methane, behaves under Titan conditions the way that water does on

  7. Poster 14: Explorer of Enceladus and Titan (E2T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Giuseppe; Tobie, Gabriel; Postberg, Frank; Soderblom, Jason M.; Wurz, Peter; Barnes, Jason W.; Berga, Marco; Coustenis, Athena; D'Ottavio, Andrea Hayes, Alexander G.; Hayne, Paul O.; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Martelli, Andrea; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.; Yen, Chen-wan L.; Reh, Kim R.; Sotin, Christophe; Srama, Ralf; Tortora, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    The NASA-ESA Cassini-Huygens mission has revealed Titan and Enceladus to be two of the most enigmatic worlds in the Solar System. Titan, with its organically rich and dynamic atmosphere and geology, and Enceladus, with its active plume, both harboring subsurface oceans, are prime environments in which to investigate the conditions for the emergence of life and the habitability of Ocean Worlds. Explorer of Enceladus and Titan (E2T) is dedicated to investigating the evolution and habitability of these Saturnian satellites and will be proposed as a medium-class mission led by ESA in collaboration with NASA in response to ESA's M5 Call. E2T has a focused payload that will provide in-situ sampling and high-resolution imaging during multiple flybys of Enceladus and Titan using a solar-electric powered spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. The E2T mission will provide high-resolution mass spectroscopy of the plume emanating from Enceladus' south polar terrain (SPT) and of Titan's upper atmosphere as well as high-resolution IR imaging of the plume and the source fractures on Enceladus' SPT, and it will detail Titan's geomorphology at 50-100 m resolution. The E2T mission has three scientific goals: 1) Investigate the origin and evolution of volatile-rich icy worlds by examining both Enceladus and Titan, 2) Investigate the habitability and potential for life in ocean worlds on both Enceladus and Titan and 3) Investigate Titan as an Earth-like world with an evolving climate and landscape. These investigations will be accomplished by measuring the nature, abundance and isotopic properties of solid- and vapor-phase species in Enceladus' plume and Titan's upper atmosphere. E2T's high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometers will enable us to untangle the ambiguities left by Cassini regarding the identification of low-mass organic species, identify high-mass organic species for the first time, further constrain trace species such as the noble gases, and clarify the evolution of

  8. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  9. Effect of Nb doping on sintering and dielectric properties of PZT ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mirzaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of piezoelectric ceramics such as lead zirconate titanate (PZT in different applications became possible with the development of donor or acceptor dopants. Therefore, studies on the effect of dopants on the properties of PZT ceramics are highly demanded. In this study undoped and 2.4 mol% Nb-doped PZT (PZTN powders were successfully obtained by a solid-state reaction and calcination at 850 °C for 2 h. Crystallinity and phase formation of the prepared powders were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD. In order to study morphology of powders, scanning electron microscopy (SEM was performed. The crystalline PZT and Nb-doped PZT powders were pelleted into discs and sintered at 1100, 1150 and 1200 °C, with a heating rate of 10 °C/min, and holding time of 1–6 h to find the optimum combination of temperature and time to produce high density ceramics. Microstructural characterization was conducted on the fractured ceramic surfaces using SEM. Density measurements showed that maximal density of 95% of the theoretical density was achieved after sintering of PZT and PZTN ceramics at 1200 °C for 2 h and 4 h, respectively. However, the results of dielectric measurements showed that PZTN ceramics have higher relative permittivity (εr ∼17960 with lower Curie temperature (∼358 °C relative to PZT (εr = 16000 at ∼363 °C as a result of fine PZTN structure as well as presence of vacancies. In addition, dielectric loss (at 1 kHz of PZT and PZTN ceramics with 95% theoretical density was 0.0087 and 0.02, respectively. The higher dielectric loss in PZTN was due to easier domain wall motions in PZTN ceramics.

  10. Laser technologies of ceramics treatment (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, E.M.; Voronezhtsev, Yu.I.; Gol'dade, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Publications on the laser technologies of ceramic coating production, ceramics treatment and ceramics manufacture are analyzed for the past 5 years. Features of production processes utilizing the interaction of laser radiation with ceramics and other substances which form the ceramics as a result of such interaction are considered. Possible ways of improving laser technologies of ceramics treatment are outlined

  11. Permeability analysis for thermal binder removal from green ceramic bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeong Woo

    2007-12-01

    The permeability of unlaminated and laminated green tapes was determined as a function of binder content for binder removed by air oxidation. The tapes are comprised of barium titanate as the dielectric, and polyvinyl butyral and dioctyl phthalate as the main compoents of the binder mixture. The flow in porous media through the tapes was analyzed in terms of models for describing Knudsen, slip, and Poiseuille flow mechanisms. The characteristic pore size was determined to be 0.5-2 mum and thus Poiseuille flow was the dominant transport mechanism contributing to the flux. The permeability was then determined from Darcy's law for flow in porous media. The permeability was also determined from micro-structural attributes in terms of the specific surface, the pore fraction, and terms to account for tortuosity and constrictions. The permeability and adhesion strength of laminated green ceramic tapes were determined as a function of lamination conditions of time, temperature, and pressure.

  12. A Report of Clouds on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlies, Paul; Hayes, Alexander; Adamkovics, Mate; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Kelland, John; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Mitchell, Jonathan; Lora, Juan M.; Rojo, Patricio; Lunine, Jonathan I.

    2017-10-01

    We present in this work a detailed analysis of many of the clouds in the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) dataset in order to understand their global and seasonal properties. Clouds are one of the few direct observables in Titan’s atmosphere (Griffith et al 2009, Rodriguez et al 2009, Adamkovics et al 2010), and so determining their characteristics allows for a better understanding of surface atmosphere interactions, winds, transport of volatile material, and general circulation. We find the clouds on Titan generally reside in at 5-15km altitude, which agrees with previous modelling efforts (Rafkin et al. 2015), as well as a power law distribution for cloud optical depth. We assume an average cloud droplet size of 100um. No seasonal dependence is observed with either cloud altitude or optical depth, suggesting there is no preferred seasonal formation mechanisms. Combining these characteristics with cloud size (Kelland et al 2017) can trace the transport of volatiles in Titan’s atmosphere, which can be compared against general circulation models (GCMs) (Lora et al 2015). We also present some specific analysis of interesting cloud systems including hypothesized surface fogs (Brown et al 2009) and orographic cloud formation (Barth et al 2010, Corlies et al 2017). In this analysis we use a correlation between Cassini VIMS and RADAR observations as well as an updated topographic map of Titan’s southern hemisphere to better understand the role that topography plays in influencing and driving atmospheric phenomena.Finally, with the end of the Cassini mission, ground based observing now acts as the only means with which to observe clouds on Titan. We present an update of an ongoing cloud campaign to search for clouds on Titan and to understand their seasonal evolution.References:Adamkovics et al. 2010, Icarus 208:868Barth et al. 2010, Planet. Space Sci. 58:1740Corlies et al. 2017, 48th LPSC, 2870CGriffith et al. 2009, ApJ 702:L105Kelland et al

  13. Reduction of anti-ferroelectric temperature region in NBT-BT ceramics using 100 MeV O{sup 7+} ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmuga Sundari, S. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India); Murugan, Ramaswamy [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry 605014 (India); Asokan, K. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Dhanasekaran, R., E-mail: rdcgc@yahoo.com [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India)

    2014-01-01

    NBT-BT (sodium bismuth titanate-barium titanate) lead-free ceramics were prepared via the conventional solid-state reaction method in the Morphotropic Phase Boundary (MPB) composition. The prepared ceramics were irradiated with 100 MeV O{sup 7+} ions using four different fluences of 5 × 10{sup 11}, 1 × 10{sup 12}, 5 × 10{sup 12} and 1 × 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The dielectric constants of the pristine and irradiated samples were determined from 300 to 623 K for a broad range of frequencies from 20 Hz to 2 MHz. Irradiation with oxygen ions decreased the anti-ferroelectric temperature region present in the samples. The structural stability of the samples against the irradiation was investigated via XRD and Raman spectroscopy before and after the irradiation.

  14. Localized temperature stability in Low Temperature Cofired Ceramics (LTCC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steven Xunhu; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa.

    2012-04-01

    The base dielectrics of commercial low temperature cofired ceramics (LTCC) systems have a temperature coefficient of resonant frequency ({tau}{sub f}) in the range -50 {approx} -80 ppm/C. In this research we explored a method to realize zero or near zero {tau}{sub f} resonators by incorporating {tau}{sub f} compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC structure. To select composition for {tau}{sub f} adjustment, {tau}{sub f} compensating materials with different amount of titanates were formulated, synthesized, and characterized. Chemical interactions and physical compatibility between the {tau}{sub f} modifiers and the host LTCC dielectrics were investigated. Studies on stripline (SL) resonator panels with multiple compensating dielectrics revealed that: 1) compositions using SrTiO{sub 3} provide the largest {tau}{sub f} adjustment among titanates, 2) the {tau}{sub f} compensation is proportional to the amount of SrTiO{sub 3} in compensating materials, as well as the thickness of the compensating layer, and 3) the most effective {tau}{sub f} compensation is achieved when the compensating dielectric is integrated next to the SL. Using the effective dielectric constant of a heterogeneous layered dielectric structure, results from Method of Momentum (MoM) electromagnetic simulations are consistent with the experimental observations.

  15. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  16. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  17. Titan Submarine: Exploring the Depths of Kraken Mare (Phase II)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase II of the Titan Submarine: Exploring the Kraken Mare effort will focus on advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the concept by (1) retiring risks...

  18. The Titanic Origin of Humans: The Melian Nymphs and Zagreus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velvet Yates

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Hesiod's creation myth implies that the human race derived from the "ash tree nymphs" (meliai; the Neoplatonists, with their etymological arguments, seem to have this in mind in tracing human origins to the Titans' "limbs" (melea.

  19. Niobium-doped strontium titanates as SOFC anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blennow Tullmar, Peter; Kammer Hansen, Kent; Wallenberg, L. Reine

    2008-01-01

    been synthesized with a recently developed modified glycine-nitrate process. The synthesized powders have been calcined and sintered in air or in 9% H(2) / N(2) between 800 - 1400 degrees C. After calcination the samples were single phase Nb-doped strontium titanate with grain sizes of less than 100 nm...... in diameter on average. The phase purity, defect structure, and microstructure of the materials have been analyzed with SEM, XRD, and TGA. The electrical conductivity of the Nb-doped titanate decreased with increasing temperature and showed a phonon scattering conduction mechanism with sigma > 120 S...... ability of the Nb-doped titanates to be used as a part of a SOFC anode. However, the catalytic activity of the materials was not sufficient and it needs to be improved if titanate based materials are to be realized as constituents in SOFC anodes....

  20. Modified strontium titanates: From defect chemistry to SOFC anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbraeken, M.C.; Ramos, Tania; Agersted, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Modified strontium titanates have received much attention recently for their potential as anode material in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Their inherent redox stability and superior tolerance to sulphur poisoning and coking as compared to Ni based cermet anodes could improve durability of SOFC...... systems dramatically. Various substitution strategies can be deployed to optimise materials properties in these strontium titanates, such as electronic conductivity, electrocatalytic activity, chemical stability and sinterability, and thus mechanical strength. Substitution strategies not only cover choice...... of modified strontium titanates, this paper reviews three different A-site deficient donor (La, Y, Nb) substituted strontium titanates for their electrical behaviour and fuel cell performance. Promising performances in both electrolyte as well as anode supported cell designs have been obtained, when using...

  1. Amphibious Quadcopter Swarm for the Exploration of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajguru, A.; Faler, A. C.; Franz, B.

    2014-06-01

    This is a proposal for a low mass and cost effective mission architecture consisting of an amphibious quadcopter swarm flight vehicle system for the exploration of Titan's liquid methane lake, Ligeia Mare. The paper focuses on the EDL and operations.

  2. Low Permeation Envelope Material Development for Titan Aerobot, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerobot vehicles for missions on Titan require envelope materials that are strong, light and durable. Unlike terrestrial balloon materials, these must be able to...

  3. Low Permeation Envelope Material Development for Titan Aerobot, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerobot vehicles for missions on Titan require envelope materials that are strong, light and durable. In particular they must be able to withstand flexing at liquid...

  4. Study of the photovoltaic effect in thin film barium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grannemann, W. W.; Dharmadhikari, V. S.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of making non-volatile digital memory devices of barium titanate, BaTiO3, that are integrated onto a silicon substrate with the required ferroelectric film produced by processing, compatible with silicon technology was examined.

  5. The influence of Titan on Saturn kilometric radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the occurrence probability of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR appears to be influenced by the local time of Titan. Using a more extensive set of data than the original study, we confirm the correlation of higher occurrence probability of SKR when Titan is located near local midnight. In addition, the direction finding capability of the Cassini Radio Plasma Wave instrument (RPWS is used to determine if this radio emission emanates from particular source regions. We find that most source regions of SKR are located in the mid-morning sector of local time even when Titan is located near midnight. However, some emission does appear to have a source in the Saturnian nightside, consistent with electron precipitation from field lines that have recently mapped to near Titan.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of PbTiO3 based glass ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, J.; Rani, G. Neeraja; Mamatha, B.; Deshpande, V. K.

    2017-05-01

    Glass samples with composition (50 - X) PbO - XCaO - 25 TiO2 - 25 B2O3 (where = 0, .5, 10 and 15 mol %) were prepared using conventional quenching technique. It was observed that with the addition of alkaline earth oxides to lead borate glass containing TiO2 alters the network (conversion of BO3 to BO4) increasing the rigidity of the glass which enhances the Tg. These glass samples were converted to glass ceramics by following two stage heat treatment schedule. The density values of glass ceramic samples are higher than those of corresponding glass samples. It was observed that there was good correlation between the density and CTE results of the glass-ceramics. The XRD results in the glass ceramics revealed the formation of tetragonal lead titanate as a major crystalline phase and Ca3Ti2O7 as minor crystalline phase. The ferroelectric nature of all the glass ceramic samples is confirmed by P - E hysteresis measurements.

  7. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 8. Microstructure, methods, design, and fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.H.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents information on the following topics: fracture mechanics and microstructures; non-lubricated sliding wear of Al 2 O 3 , PSZ and SiC; mixed-mode fracture of ceramics; some fracture properties of alumina-containing electrical porcelains; transformation toughening in the Al 2 O 3 -Cr 2 O 3 /ZrO 2 -HfO 2 system; strength toughness relationships for transformation toughened ceramics; tensile strength and notch sensitivity of Mg-PSZ; fracture mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate ceramics; loading-unloading techniques for determining fracture parameters of brittle materials utilizing four-point bend, chevron-notched specimens; application of the potential drop technique to the fracture mechanics of ceramics; ceramics-to-metal bonding from a fracture mechanics perspective; observed changes in fracture strength following laser irradiation and ion beam mixing of Ni overlayers on sintered alpha-SiC; crack growth in single-crystal silicon; a fracture mechanics and non-destructive evaluation investigation of the subcritical-fracture process in rock; slow crack growth in sintered silicon nitride; uniaxial tensile fatigue testing of sintered silicon carbide under cyclic temperature change; and effect of surface corrosion on glass fracture

  8. Chemical reactivity and ion beam irradiation behaviour of perovskite- and zirconolite-nuclear ceramics type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larguem, H. [Laboratoire des Geomateriaux, Universite de Marne la Vallee, 5 Boulevard Descartes Champs sur Marne, 77454 Marne la Vallee Cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: larguem@univ-mlv.fr; Trocellier, P. [Service de Recherche de Metallurgie Physique, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, CEA-DEN/DMN, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Tarrida, M. [Laboratoire des Geomateriaux, Universite de Marne la Vallee, 5 Boulevard Descartes Champs sur Marne, 77454 Marne la Vallee Cedex 2 (France); Madon, M. [Laboratoire des Geomateriaux, Universite de Marne la Vallee, 5 Boulevard Descartes Champs sur Marne, 77454 Marne la Vallee Cedex 2 (France); Poissonnet, S. [Service de Recherche de Metallurgie Physique, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, CEA-DEN/DMN, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Gosset, D. [Service de Recherche de Metallurgie Appliquee, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, CEA-DEN/DMN, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Leseigneur, O. [Service de Recherche de Metallurgie Physique, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, CEA-DEN/DMN, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Martin, H. [Service de Recherche de Metallurgie Physique, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, CEA-DEN/DMN, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Bonnaillie, P. [Service de Recherche de Metallurgie Physique, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, CEA-DEN/DMN, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Beck, L.; Vaubaillon, S.; Miro, S. [Laboratoire du Van de Graaff, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, CEA-DEN/DMN, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-08-15

    Oxide ceramics of two neighboring families: perovskite A(II)B(IV)O{sub 3} and zirconolite A(II)B(IV)C(IV){sub 2}O{sub 7} have been synthesized by a classical solid route. Substitution of divalent cation (Ca) by trivalent cation (Nd) was tested on zirconolite compositions. Then, the ceramic pellets were submitted to aqueous leaching tests at 90 deg. C in deionized water. Some of them were previously ion irradiated with 150 keV Xe{sup +} within a fluence range 5 x 10{sup 13}-1 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} in order to study the effect of ion damaging on their intrinsic chemical reactivity. X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and ion beam analysis (IBA) methods were used to characterize the evolution of the crystallinity level and the surface chemical composition of the ceramics after each step (synthesis, irradiation, leaching). The alteration mechanism of unirradiated titanate ceramics appears to be not uniform at the sample surface. Chemical durability of zirconolite is shown to be dependent both on the pH of the aqueous solution and the ceramic composition. Surface hydration only concerns a very thin layer, typically 200 nm and the hydrogen content does not go beyond 1-2 at.%. No differences have been detected in the leaching behaviour of unirradiated or irradiated perovskite samples.

  9. Effect of the manganese in (Pb1-x Lax) TiO3 piezoelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, D.; Eiras, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of the relative dielectric constant K, the electric dissipation factor tan δ and the electrochemical coupling factors of the thickness k t and planar K p vibration modes were realized in lead titanate piezoelectric ceramics, with batched composition (Pb 1-3/2x La x )TiO 3 , 0,025 ≤ x ≤0,20. The same parameters were determined in these compositions after the addition of 1%mol of Mn. The results shown clearly that manganese increases the electrochanical anisotropy (K t /K p ) and decreases the dielectric constant and the electric dissipation factor of these materials. (author) [pt

  10. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  11. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  12. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  13. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  14. Plasma environment of Titan: a 3-D hybrid simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Titan possesses a dense atmosphere, consisting mainly of molecular nitrogen. Titan's orbit is located within the Saturnian magnetosphere most of the time, where the corotating plasma flow is super-Alfvénic, yet subsonic and submagnetosonic. Since Titan does not possess a significant intrinsic magnetic field, the incident plasma interacts directly with the atmosphere and ionosphere. Due to the characteristic length scales of the interaction region being comparable to the ion gyroradii in the vicinity of Titan, magnetohydrodynamic models can only offer a rough description of Titan's interaction with the corotating magnetospheric plasma flow. For this reason, Titan's plasma environment has been studied by using a 3-D hybrid simulation code, treating the electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid, whereas a completely kinetic approach is used to cover ion dynamics. The calculations are performed on a curvilinear simulation grid which is adapted to the spherical geometry of the obstacle. In the model, Titan's dayside ionosphere is mainly generated by solar UV radiation; hence, the local ion production rate depends on the solar zenith angle. Because the Titan interaction features the possibility of having the densest ionosphere located on a face not aligned with the ram flow of the magnetospheric plasma, a variety of different scenarios can be studied. The simulations show the formation of a strong magnetic draping pattern and an extended pick-up region, being highly asymmetric with respect to the direction of the convective electric field. In general, the mechanism giving rise to these structures exhibits similarities to the interaction of the ionospheres of Mars and Venus with the supersonic solar wind. The simulation results are in agreement with data from recent Cassini flybys.

  15. Plasma environment of Titan: a 3-D hybrid simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Titan possesses a dense atmosphere, consisting mainly of molecular nitrogen. Titan's orbit is located within the Saturnian magnetosphere most of the time, where the corotating plasma flow is super-Alfvénic, yet subsonic and submagnetosonic. Since Titan does not possess a significant intrinsic magnetic field, the incident plasma interacts directly with the atmosphere and ionosphere. Due to the characteristic length scales of the interaction region being comparable to the ion gyroradii in the vicinity of Titan, magnetohydrodynamic models can only offer a rough description of Titan's interaction with the corotating magnetospheric plasma flow. For this reason, Titan's plasma environment has been studied by using a 3-D hybrid simulation code, treating the electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid, whereas a completely kinetic approach is used to cover ion dynamics. The calculations are performed on a curvilinear simulation grid which is adapted to the spherical geometry of the obstacle. In the model, Titan's dayside ionosphere is mainly generated by solar UV radiation; hence, the local ion production rate depends on the solar zenith angle. Because the Titan interaction features the possibility of having the densest ionosphere located on a face not aligned with the ram flow of the magnetospheric plasma, a variety of different scenarios can be studied. The simulations show the formation of a strong magnetic draping pattern and an extended pick-up region, being highly asymmetric with respect to the direction of the convective electric field. In general, the mechanism giving rise to these structures exhibits similarities to the interaction of the ionospheres of Mars and Venus with the supersonic solar wind. The simulation results are in agreement with data from recent Cassini flybys.

  16. Titan Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (T-LEAF) Science Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G.; Sen, B.; Ross, F.; Sokol, D.

    2016-12-01

    Northrop Grumman has been developing the Titan Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (T-LEAF) sky rover to roam the lower atmosphere and observe at close quarters the lakes and plains of Saturn's ocean moon, Titan. T-LEAF also supports surface exploration and science by providing precision delivery of in-situ instruments to the surface of Titan. T-LEAF is a highly maneuverable sky rover and its aerodynamic shape (i.e., a flying wing) does not restrict it to following prevailing wind patterns on Titan, but allows mission operators to chart its course. This freedom of mobility allows T-LEAF to follow the shorelines of Titan's methane lakes, for example, or to target very specific surface locations. We will present a straw man concept of T-LEAF, including size, mass, power, on-board science payloads and measurement, and surface science dropsonde deployment CONOPS. We will discuss the various science instruments and their vehicle level impacts, such as meteorological and electric field sensors, acoustic sensors for measuring shallow depths, multi-spectral imagers, high definition cameras and surface science dropsondes. The stability of T-LEAF and its long residence time on Titan will provide for time to perform a large aerial survey of select prime surface targets deployment of dropsondes at selected locations surface measurements that are coordinated with on-board remote measurements communication relay capabilities to orbiter (or Earth). In this context, we will specifically focus upon key factors impacting the design and performance of T-LEAF science: science payload accommodation, constraints and opportunities characteristics of flight, payload deployment and measurement CONOPS in the Titan atmosphere. This presentation will show how these factors provide constraints as well as enable opportunities for novel long duration scientific studies of Titan's surface.

  17. Titan Partnership – iPads Study:Final Report

    OpenAIRE

    Passey, Don

    2013-01-01

    The Titan Partnership piloted uses of iPads in four schools (10 iPads in each of two primary and two secondary schools) in 2012. The Titan Partnership provided training sessions for teachers involved in the pilot, prior to their main uses of the iPads, between May and December 2012. The Centre for Technology Enhanced Learning at Lancaster University was commissioned to evaluate this pilot, and this report presents evidence gathered, findings and conclusions.

  18. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m 2 and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m 2 ; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings

  19. A Single Deformed Bow Shock for Titan-Saturn System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, A. H.; Omidi, N.; Kurth, W. S.; Madanian, H.; Cravens, T.; Sergis, N.; Dougherty, M. K.; Edberg, N. J. T.

    2017-12-01

    During periods of high solar wind pressure, Saturn's bow shock is pushed inside Titan's orbit exposing the moon and its ionosphere to the supersonic solar wind. The Cassini spacecraft's T96 encounter with Titan occurred during such a period and is the subject of this presentation. The observations during this encounter show evidence for the presence of outbound and inbound shock crossings associated with Saturn and Titan. They also reveal the presence of two foreshocks: one between the outbound Kronian and inbound Titan bow shocks (foreshock-1) and the other between the outbound Titan and inbound Kronian bow shocks (foreshock-2). Using electromagnetic hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulations and Cassini observations we show that the origin of foreshock-1 is tied to the formation of a single deformed bow shock for the Titan-Saturn system. We also report for the first time, the observations of spontaneous hot flow anomalies (SHFAs) in foreshock-1 making Saturn the fourth planet this phenomenon has been observed and indicating its universal nature. The results of hybrid simulations also show the generation of oblique fast magnetosonic waves upstream of the outbound Titan bow shock in agreement with the observations of large amplitude magnetosonic pulsations in foreshock-2. The formation of a single deformed bow shock results in unique foreshock-bow shock or foreshock-foreshock geometries. For example, the presence of Saturn's foreshock upstream of Titan's quasi-perpendicular bow shock result in ion acceleration through a combination of shock drift and Fermi processes. We also discuss the implications of a single deformed bow shock for Saturn's magnetopause and magnetosphere.

  20. Large Flexoelectric Anisotropy in Paraelectric Barium Titanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvaez, Jackeline; Saremi, Sahar; Hong, Jiawang; Stengel, Massimiliano; Catalan, Gustau

    2015-07-17

    The bending-induced polarization of barium titanate single crystals has been measured with an aim to elucidate the origin of the large difference between theoretically predicted and experimentally measured flexoelectricity in this material. The results indicate that part of the difference is due to polar regions (short-range order) that exist above T(C) and up to T*≈200-225 °C. Above T*, however, the flexovoltage coefficient still shows an unexpectedly large anisotropy for a cubic material, with (001)-oriented crystals displaying 10 times more flexoelectricity than (111)-oriented crystals. Theoretical analysis shows that this anisotropy cannot be a bulk property, and we therefore interpret it as indirect evidence for the theoretically predicted but experimentally elusive contribution of surface piezoelectricity to macroscopic bending-induced polarization.

  1. Large Flexoelectric Anisotropy in Paraelectric Barium Titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvaez, Jackeline; Saremi, Sahar; Hong, Jiawang; Stengel, Massimiliano; Catalan, Gustau

    2015-07-01

    The bending-induced polarization of barium titanate single crystals has been measured with an aim to elucidate the origin of the large difference between theoretically predicted and experimentally measured flexoelectricity in this material. The results indicate that part of the difference is due to polar regions (short-range order) that exist above TC and up to T*≈2 00 - 2 2 5 °C . Above T* , however, the flexovoltage coefficient still shows an unexpectedly large anisotropy for a cubic material, with (001)-oriented crystals displaying 10 times more flexoelectricity than (111)-oriented crystals. Theoretical analysis shows that this anisotropy cannot be a bulk property, and we therefore interpret it as indirect evidence for the theoretically predicted but experimentally elusive contribution of surface piezoelectricity to macroscopic bending-induced polarization.

  2. Does Titan have an Active Surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.

    2009-12-01

    Robert M. Nelson-1, L. W. Kamp-1, R. M. C. Lopes-1, D. L. Matson-1, R. L. Kirk-2, B. W. Hapke-3, M. D. Boryta-4, F. E. Leader-1, W. D. Smythe-1, K. L. Mitchell-1, K. H. Baines-1, R. Jaumann-5, C. Sotin-1, R. N. Clark-6, D. P. Cruikshank-7 , P. Drossart-8, J. I. Lunine-9, M. Combes-10, G. Bellucci-11, J.-P. Bibring-12, F. Capaccioni-11, P. Cerroni-11, A. Coradini-11, V. Formisano-11, G. Filacchione-11, Y. Langevin-12, T. B. McCord-13, V. Mennella-14, B. Sicardy-8, P. G. J. Irwin-15 ,J.C. Pearl-16 1-JPL, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena CA 91109;2-USGS, Flagstaff; 3-U Pittsburgh; 4-Mt. San Antonio College; 5-DLR, Berlin;6-USGS Denver; 7-NASA AMES; 8-U Paris-Meudon; 9-U Arizona; 10- Obs de Paris; 11-INAF-ISAF Rome; 12-U Paris -Sud. Orsay; 13-Bear Flt Cntr. Winthrop WA;14-Obs Capodimonte Naples; 15-Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford, UK, 16-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD Surface changes on Saturn’s moon Titan have been reported during the Cassini spacecraft’s four-year orbital tour of the Saturnian system based on Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) data [1]. Titan’s surface is hard to observe because it’s atmosphere is opaque at visual wavelengths due to absorption by methane in Titan’s atmosphere. VIMS is able to image the surface through “windows” at infrared wavelengths where the methane is relatively transparent [1,2]. VIMS infrared images find surface reflectance variability at Hotei Reggio (26S,78W) and suggest that the variability might be due to deposition, followed by coverage or dissipation, of ammonia frost. Subsequently, Cassini RADAR images found that Hotei Reggio, has lobate “flow” forms, consistent with the morphology of volcanic terrain [3]. Here we report the discovery of lobate “flow” patterns at Hotei Reggio based on VIMS infrared images taken during Cassini close flybys during 2008-2009. This new evidence is consistent with the suggestion that the brightness variability at Hotei Reggio is associated with

  3. EIS Data Call Report: Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in new facilities at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiSabatino, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources and, through a ceramic immobilization process, converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans

  4. Synthesis, Structural and Morphological Property of BaSnO3 Nanopowder Prepared by Solid State Ceramic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Jibi; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Thomas, Anitta Rose; Philip, Reji; Joseph, Jaison; Muthunatesan, S.; Ragavendran, V.; Prabhu, Radhakrishna

    2017-05-01

    BaSnO3 is a cubic perovskite-type oxide that behaves as an n-type semiconductor with a wide band gap of 3.4 eV and remains stable at temperatures up to 1000°C. It has wide applications such as thermally stable capacitors, humidity sensors, gas sensors, etc. Barium stannate has also been used in optical applications, in capacitors and ceramic boundary layers, and as a promising material to produce gas phase sensors for the detection of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. BaSnO3 powder was prepared by solid state ceramic method. X-ray diffraction pattern of the prepared sample presents all the characteristic peaks of cubic phase of BaSnO3 (JCPDScard no: 15 -0780). The lattice constant for the compound was calculated and found to be 4.101A0 which is in agreement with the reported value (4.112A0). The average size of the crystallites estimated by Debye Scherrer’s formula was found to be 49 nm shows the nanostructured nature. The Raman bands observed ~ 139, 833 and 1122 cm-1 can be assigned on the basis of the fundamental vibrations of SnO6 octahedron which has Oh symmetry, in the distorted perovskite structure. The SEM image shows a porous surface morphology with grains of cuboidal structure with well-defined grain boundaries. UV-Visible spectra shows BaSnO3powder exhibit high reflectance in the 400-700 nm range.

  5. DISCOVERY OF FOG AT THE SOUTH POLE OF TITAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M. E.; Smith, A. L.; Chen, C.; Adamkovics, M.

    2009-01-01

    While Saturn's moon Titan appears to support an active methane hydrological cycle, no direct evidence for surface-atmosphere exchange has yet appeared. The indirect evidence, while compelling, could be misleading. It is possible, for example, that the identified lake features could be filled with ethane, an involatile long-term residue of atmospheric photolysis; the apparent stream and channel features could be ancient remnants of a previous climate; and the tropospheric methane clouds, while frequent, could cause no rain to reach the surface. We report here the detection of fog at the south pole of Titan during late summer using observations from the VIMS instrument on board the Cassini spacecraft. While terrestrial fog can form from a variety of causes, most of these processes are inoperable on Titan. Fog on Titan can only be caused by evaporation of nearly pure liquid methane; the detection of fog provides the first direct link between surface and atmospheric methane. Based on the detections presented here, liquid methane appears widespread at the south pole of Titan in late southern summer, and the hydrological cycle on Titan is currently active.

  6. A Survey of Titan Balloon Concepts and Technology Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeffery L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the options for, and technology status of, balloon vehicles to explore Saturn's moon Titan. A significant amount of Titan balloon concept thinking and technology development has been performed in recent years, particularly following the spectacular results from the descent and landing of the Huygens probe and remote sensing observations by the Cassini spacecraft. There is widespread recognition that a balloon vehicle on the next Titan mission could provide an outstanding and unmatched capability for in situ exploration on a global scale. The rich variety of revealed science targets has combined with a highly favorable Titan flight environment to yield a wide diversity of proposed balloon concepts. The paper presents a conceptual framework for thinking about balloon vehicle design choices and uses it to analyze various Titan options. The result is a list of recommended Titan balloon vehicle concepts that could perform a variety of science missions, along with their projected performance metrics. Recent technology developments for these balloon concepts are discussed to provide context for an assessment of outstanding risk areas and technological maturity. The paper concludes with suggestions for technology investments needed to achieve flight readiness.

  7. Titan atmospheric composition by hypervelocity shock layer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.F.; Park, C.; Whiting, E.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Cassini Mission, a NASA/ESA cooperative project which includes a deployment of probe into the atmosphere of Titan, is described, with particular attention given to the shock radiometer experiment planned for the Titan probe for the analysis of Titan's atmosphere. Results from a shock layer analysis are presented, demonstrating that the mole fractions of the major species (N2, CH4, and, possibly Ar) in the Titan atmosphere can be successfully determined by the Titan-probe radiometer, by measuring the intensity of the CN(violet) radiation emitted in the shock layer during the high velocity portion of the probe entry between 200 and 400 km altitude. It is shown that the sensitivity of the CN(violet) radiation makes it possible to determine the mole fractions of N2, CH4, and Ar to about 0.015, 0.003, and 0.01, respectively, i.e., much better than the present uncertainties in the composition of Titan atmosphere. 29 refs

  8. Three-Dimensional Views of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, R. L.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Redding, B. L.; Becker, T. L.; Lee, E. M.; Stiles, B. W.; Hensley, S.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2009-04-01

    By the end of its four-year prime mission, Cassini obtained 300-1500 m resolution synthetic aperture radar images of the surface of Titan during 19 flybys, with ~2% of the surface imaged two or more times. Most image pairs have different viewing directions, and thus contain stereo parallax that encodes information about Titan's surface relief over distances of ~1 km and greater. Our first step toward extracting quantitative topographic information was our development of rigorous "sensor models" that allowed the stereo systems previously used at the USGS and JPL to map Venus with Magellan images to be used for Titan mapping. The second major step toward extensive topomapping of Titan has been the reprocessing of the RADAR images based on an improved model of the satellite's rotation. Whereas the original images (except for a few pairs obtained at similar orbital phase, some of which we have mapped previously) were offset by as much as 30 km, the new versions align much better. The remaining misalignments, typically trajectories before mapping. The stereo coverage includes a large portion of Titan's north polar lake country, a continuous traverse of high resolution data from the lakes to mid-southern latitudes, and widely distributed smaller areas (more than 20 in all). Many of these areas are viewed and illuminated from very different directions, making image matching difficult, but we find that is possible to produce digital topographic models (DTMs) even from opposite-side image pairs by a combination of automatic image matching and interactive editing. We are collecting DTMs of all usable image pairs and will present the most interesting results. The first six areas mapped may be summarized as follows. T25-T28-T29 We have mapped the 200x100 km overlap between the T25 and T28 images, covering parts of Titan's largest north polar sea, Kraken Mare. The most basic discovery is that the darkest areas occupy the topographic lows, consistent with their interpretation as

  9. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  10. Ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.; Kummerer, K.R.; Roth, E.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramic materials are under investigation as potential breeder material in fusion reactors. This paper will review candidate materials with respect to fabrication routes and characterization, properties in as-fabricated and irradiated condition, and experimental results from laboratory and inpile investigations on tritium transport and release. Also discussed are the resources of beryllium, which is being considered as a neutron multiplier. The comparison of ceramic properties that is attempted here aims at the identification of the most-promising material for use in a tritium breeding blanket. 82 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Cyclic mechanical fatigue in ceramic-ceramic composites: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D. III

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to cyclic mechanical fatigue effects in a number of ceramics and ceramic composites, including several monolithic ceramics in which significant residual stresses should be present as a result of thermal expansion mismatches and anisotropy. Fatigue is also noted in several BN-containing ceramic matrix-particulate composites and in SiC fiber-ceramic matrix composites. These results suggest that fatigue testing is imperative for ceramics and ceramic composites that are to be used in applications subject to cyclic loading. Fatigue process models are proposed which provide a rationale for fatigue effect observations, but do not as yet provide quantitative results. Fiber composite fatigue damage models indicate that design stresses in these materials may have to be maintained below the level at which fiber pullout occurs

  12. THE APPLICATION OF STEREOLOGY METHOD FOR ESTIMATING THE NUMBER OF 3D BaTiO3 – CERAMIC GRAINS CONTACT SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojislav V Mitić

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Methods of stereological study are of great importance for structural research of electronic ceramic materials including BaTiO3-ceramic materials. The broad application of ceramics, based on barium-titanate, in advanced electronics nowadays demands a constant research of its structure, that through the correlation structureproperties, a fundamental in the basic materials properties prognosis triad (technology-structure-properties, leads to further prognosis and properties design of these ceramics. Microstructure properties of BaTiO3- ceramic material, expressed in grains' boundary contact, are of basic importance for electric properties of this material, particularly the capacity. In this paper, a significant step towards establishing control under capacitive properties of BaTiO3-ceramics is being done by estimating the number of grains contact surfaces. Defining an efficient stereology method for estimating the number of BaTiO3-ceramic grains contact surfaces, we have started from a mathematical model of mutual grains distribution in the prescribed volume of BaTiO3-ceramic sample. Since the real microstructure morphology of BaTiO3-ceramics is in some way disordered, spherical shaped grains, using computer-modelling methods, are approximated by polyhedra with a great number of small convex polygons. By dividing the volume of BaTiO3-ceramic sample with the definite number of parallel planes, according to a given pace, into the intersection plane a certain number of grains contact surfaces are identified. According to quantitative estimation of 2D stereological parameters the modelled 3D internal microstructure is obtained. Experiments were made by using the scanning electronic microscopy (SEM method with the ceramic samples prepared under pressing pressures up to 150 MPa and sintering temperature up to 1370°C while the obtained microphotographs were used as a base of confirming the validity of presented stereology method. This paper, by applying

  13. Preparation of titanates and zeolites and their uses in radioactive waste management, particularly in the treatment of spent resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.; Airola, C.; Forsberg, S.; Faelt, L.

    1983-05-01

    Work on the preparation of titanates and zeolites was started and their possible uses in the management of radioactive wastes proposed in the first years of the 1970's by the Department of Nuclear Chemistry at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm and the Chemical Center of the University of Lund, respectively. The major part of these efforts was sponsored by the National Council for Radioactive Waste (Prav), while the concluding phase including an over-all system design study adapted to the Swedish nuclear power programme for an economic evaluation was sponsored by the KBS Division of the Swedish Nuclear Fuel Supply Co. The preparation work resulted in processes ready for industrial scale production of sorbents of qualities adequate for applications in radioactive waste treatment. The essential effort was devoted to the treatment of spent resins from nuclear power plants by transfer to their radioactive contents to titanates and zeolites, which can then be sintered to stabel ceramic bodies (the PILO process). The economic evaluation indicated a significant economic incentive for the introduction of the PILO process if an incineration step is included for all types of spent resins. The essential efforts and results from this programme are summarized in this report. (Authors)

  14. Titan's Stratospheric Condensibles at High Northern Latitudes During Northern Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, R.; Achterberg, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer (IRIS) instrument on board Voyager 1 caught the first glimpse of an unidentified particulate feature in Titan's stratosphere that spectrally peaks at 221 per centimeter. Until recently, this feature that we have termed 'the haystack,' has been seen persistently at high northern latitudes with the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument onboard Cassini, The strength of the haystack emission feature diminishes rapidly with season, becoming drastically reduced at high northern latitudes, as Titan transitions from northern winter into spring, In contrast to IRIS whose shortest wavenumber was 200 per centimeter, CIRS extends down to 10 per centimeter, thus revealing an entirely unexplored spectral region in which nitrile ices have numerous broad lattice vibration features, Unlike the haystack, which is only found at high northern latitudes during northern winter/early northern spring, this geometrically thin nitrile cloud pervades Titan's lower stratosphere, spectrally peaking at 160 per centimeter, and is almost global in extent spanning latitudes 85 N to 600 S, The inference of nitrile ices are consistent with the highly restricted altitude ranges over which these features are observed, and appear to be dominated by a mixture of HCN and HC3N, The narrow range in altitude over which the nitrile ices extend is unlike the haystack, whose vertical distribution is significantly broader, spanning roughly 70 kilometers in altitude in Titan's lower stratosphere, The nitrile clouds that CIRS observes are located in a dynamically stable region of Titan's atmosphere, whereas CH4 clouds, which ordinarily form in the troposphere, form in a more dynamically unstable region, where convective cloud systems tend to occur. In the unusual situation where Titan's tropopause cools significantly from the HASI 70.5K temperature minimum, CH4 should condense in Titan's lower stratosphere, just like the aforementioned nitrile clouds, although

  15. Electron acceleration in Titan's ionosphere and Saturn's kilometric radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Rucker, H.

    2008-09-01

    Prior to Cassini flights the solar wind was considered as the only source of electrons responsible for Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR). Detected correlation of the SKR occurrence and Titan position at its orbit points out the energy source of SKR associated with Titan [1], [2]. The observed correlation is not the only indication of acceleration mechanism in the satellite ionosphere. Spacecrafts Voyager I and II discovered ultraviolet airglow from excited molecules in Titan's atmosphere. Estimations showed that the observed radiation intensity corresponded to energy input (3-5)x109W into Titan's atmosphere. It was also shown that solar photons and photo-electrons are not able to provide the necessary energy input, and energetic magnetosphere electrons can give not more than [3]. The presence of acceleration mechanism in Titan' ionosphere is also confirmed by the results of Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiments during Cassini flyby through Titan's atmosphere tail: energetic electrons and ions with parameters different from those for particles coming from Saturn's magnetosphere have been discovered there [4]. ~ 2×109 W In this contribution we consider electron acceleration mechanism in Titan's ionosphere which was successfully used for explanation of observed Io influence on decametric radio emission from Jupiter [5], [6]. According to suggested mechanism electron acceleration in the ionosphere occurs due to electric field of charge separation. This field is of the order of induced electric field, but has a field-aligned component. Under Titan's conditions the accelerated electron energy can reach 10 keV that is sufficient for SKR generation. Acceleration mechanism power is enough also for explanation of ultraviolet airglow from Titan. References [1] Farrell, W. M. Et al. (2005) Geophys. Res.Lett., 32, L18107, doi:10.1029/2005GL023449. [2] Menietti, J. D. et al. (2007) JGR, 112, A08211, doi:10.1029/2007JA012331. [3] Hunten, D. M.et al. (1984) Titan, in

  16. Co-crystals on the Surface of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Morgan; Vu, Tuan; Hodyss, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Titan and Earth are the only bodies in the Solar System that have standing liquids on their surface. At Titan's low surface temperatures (90-95 K), this liquid is comprised of hydrocarbons, primarily methane and ethane. Photochemistry in the atmosphere, driven by solar radiation and energy from Saturn's magnetosphere, generates a wide range of organic products. Some of these products will dissolve in the hydrocarbon fluids and be concentrated in the lakes. Evaporation or other processes that reduce lake levels could potentially induce precipitation, forming evaporite deposits around the lakes. This might explain the deposits seen by the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) around some of the northern lakes. These evaporites would play an important role in Titan's surface chemistry.While studying the potential identity of these evaporites, we discovered that solid benzene, when immersed in liquid ethane at Titan surface temperatures, forms a stable co-crystalline structure that can hold considerable amounts of ethane. Such material represents an exciting new class of compounds for Titan's surface, and implies that lake edges and evaporite basins could serve as hydrocarbon reservoirs on Titan. This finding has motivated our search for other co-crystals that may form under similar conditions. In this work, we report on the formation of a co-crystal between acetylene and ammonia (two other possible surface molecules) under Titan's conditions. A series of optical Raman experiments was performed in which solid acetylene was deposited onto solid ammonia at 100 K. Spectral features indicate that co-crystallization happens within minutes, with the structure being stabilized by a network of C-H…N interactions. Subsequent thermal stability studies show that this co-crystal can remain intact until a relatively warm temperature of 130 K. Thus, the ammonia-acetylene co-crystal can be expected to occur readily and remain

  17. HST observations of the limb polarization of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzon, A.; Schmid, H. M.; Buenzli, E.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Titan is an excellent test case for detailed studies of the scattering polarization from thick hazy atmospheres. Accurate scattering and polarization parameters have been provided by the in situ measurements of the Cassini-Huygens landing probe. For Earth-bound observations Titan can only be observed at a backscattering situation, where the disk-integrated polarization is close to zero. However, with resolved imaging polarimetry a second order polarization signal along the entire limb of Titan can be measured. Aims: We present the first limb polarization measurements of Titan, which are compared as a test to our limb polarization models. Methods: Previously unpublished imaging polarimetry from the HST archive is presented, which resolves the disk of Titan. We determine flux-weighted averages of the limb polarization and radial limb polarization profiles, and investigate the degradation and cancelation effects in the polarization signal due to the limited spatial resolution of our observations. Taking this into account we derive corrected values for the limb polarization in Titan. The results are compared with limb polarization models, using atmosphere and haze scattering parameters from the literature. Results: In the wavelength bands between 250 nm and 2 μm a strong limb polarization of about 2 - 7% is detected with a position angle perpendicular to the limb. The fractional polarization is highest around 1 μm. As a first approximation, the polarization seems to be equally strong along the entire limb. The comparison of our data with model calculations and the literature shows that the detected polarization is compatible with expectations from previous polarimetric observations taken with Voyager 2, Pioneer 11, and the Huygens probe. Conclusions: Our results indicate that ground-based monitoring measurements of the limb-polarization of Titan could be useful for investigating local haze properties and the impact of short-term and seasonal variations of

  18. Investigation of La3+ Doping Effect on Piezoelectric Coefficients of BLT Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wodecka-Dus B.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of La3+ admixture in barium lanthanum titanate (BLT ceramics system with colossal permittivity on performance of prospective piezoelectric cold plasma application were studied. Usage of cold atmospheric pressure plasma appears promising in terms of industrial and healthcare applications. Performed investigation provide consistent evaluation of doping lanthanum amount on piezoelectric coefficients values with simultaneous capability of charge accumulation for effective plasma generation. Modification of ferroelectric materials with heterovalent ions, however with the lower radii than the original atoms, significantly affects their domain mobility and consequently electromechanical properties. To determine the piezoelectric coefficients, the resonance-antiresonance method was implemented, and values of piezoelectric and dielectric parameters were recorded. Finally the results indicated that addition of 0.4 mol.% of La3+ ions to the ceramic structure maximally increased the values of piezoelectric coefficient to d33 = 20 pC/N and to huge dielectric constant to ε33T = 29277.

  19. Processing and characterization of CaTiO3 perovskite ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Gralik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium titanate (CaTiO3 ceramics with perovskite structure were produced by solid state reaction. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3 and titanium dioxide (TiO2 were mixed (in molar ratios 1/1 and 3/2, and the obtained mixtures were calcined at 1150 °C in successive thermal cycles. The obtained samples were characterized by differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry, X-ray diffraction, measurement of particle size distribution and linear thermal shrinkage. XRD results indicated that the samples have perovskite CaTiO3 structure with small amount of secondary CaO and TiO2 phases, and their phase composition depends on the heat treatment conditions. The measured values of electrical resistivity were within the characteristic range of insulating materials and approach values corresponding to semiconducting ceramics.

  20. Radiation Damage Effects in Candidate Ceramics for Plutonium Immobilization: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Buck, Edgar C.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Rachel L.; Elovich, Robert J.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2004-01-01

    In this document, we summarize our study of the effects of radiation induced damage to the titanate ceramics that were to be the immobilization form for surplus weapons-grade Pu. In this study, we made five ceramic materials: pure-phase pyrochlore, pure-phase zirconolite, pyrochlore-rich baseline, zirconolite-rich baseline, and impurity baseline. Two-hundred specimens were made of which 130 contained approximately 10 mass% 238Pu and 70 contained 10 mass% 239Pu. The specimens containing 239Pu served as materials against which the behavior of the 238Pu-bearing specimens could be compared. In our studies, we measured the true density (density exclusive of surface connected porosity), bulk density, crystalline-phase composition with X-ray diffraction (XRD), and dissolution rates as radiation induced damage accumulated in the 238Pu-bearing specimens. We routinely took photographs of the specimens during each characterization period. From our studies, we determined that these materials swell less than 10% and generally less than 5%. As the material swells, some open porosity can be converted to closed porosity, often causing the true density to decrease more rapidly than the bulk density. In general, 3?1018 a/g of damage accumulation were required for the materials to become amorphous as determined with the XRD method. The order in which the phases became amorphous was brannerite, pyrochlore, and zirconolite with brannerite being the most susceptible to radiation induced damage. However, we also show that Pu is not evenly distributed amongst the phases when multiple phases are present. We were unsuccessful in making a pure brannerite to study. Therefore, the brannerite was always present with other phases. For a material containing about 10 mass% 239Pu, 3?1018 a/g represent about 500 years in the geologic repository. At no time in our studies was there evidence for microcracking in these materials, even upon close examination in a scanning-electron microscope . Upon

  1. Tick-proof ceramics. Bo dani ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimono, F. (Ishizuka Glass Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    Ishizuka Glass has developed SiO2-B2O3-R2O(RO) based tick-proof ceramics (trade name; Segrocera) in cooperation with Yamato Chemical Industry, insecticide maker. This article is a report on effectiveness of this ceramics. Ticks living indoors are roughly divided into two kinds, namely ticks living in a house itself and ticks which enter the house by parasitizing on animals and plants, and Segrocera has been developed aiming at the former ticks which, irrespective of its kind, need the temperature of 20-30[degree]C and the moisture of 60% or more as its breeding conditions. The tick-proof effect of Segrocera is as excellent as 90-99% and even after keeping its specimen at 75RH for 12 months, it has shown the ratio of inhibiting ticks' breeding of 98-99%. In comparison with that the effect of other tick-proof agent, pyrethroids-based aerosol is limited up to 24 hours, it is the feature of Segrocera that its life is considerably longer. Safety of Segrocera is also very high. 2 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  3. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  4. Dense ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockbain, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the manufacture of articles of substantially pure dense ceramic materials, for use in severe environments. Si N is very suitable for use in such environments, but suffers from the disadvantage that it is not amenable to sintering. Some disadvantages of the methods normally used for making articles of Si N are mentioned. The method described comprises mixing a powder of the substantially pure ceramic material with an additive that promotes densification, and which is capable of nuclear transmutation into a gas when exposed to radiation, and hot pressing the mixture to form a billet. The billet is then irradiated to convert the additive into a gas which is held captive in the billet, and it is then subjected to a hot forging operation, during which the captive gas escapes and an article of substantially pure dense ceramic material is forged. The method is intended primarily for use for Si N, but may be applied to other ceramic materials. The additive may be Li or Be or their compounds, to the extent of at least 5 ppm and not more than 5% by weight. Irradiation is effected by proton or neutron bombardment. (UK)

  5. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  6. Grain size and boundary-related effects on the properties of nanocrystalline barium titanate ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buscaglia, V.; Buscaglia, M. T.; Viviani, M.; Mitoseriu, L.; Nanni, P.; Trefiletti, V.; Piaggio, P.; Gregora, Ivan; Ostapchuk, Tetyana; Pokorný, Jan; Petzelt, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 26, - (2006), s. 2889-2898 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 525.20 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : grain size * grain boundaries * spectroscopy * dielectric properties * BaTiO 3 Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.576, year: 2006

  7. Synthesis, Microstructure and the Crystalline Structure of the Barium Titanate Ceramics Doped with Lanthanum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wodecka-Duś B.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available W prezentowanej pracy przeprowadzono badania ceramiki BaTiO3 i Ba1-xLąxTi1-x/4O3 (BLT dla koncentracji z prze- działu 0,001< x <0,004 (0,l-0,4mol.% La. Ceramikę BLT wytworzono z mieszaniny prostych tlenków La203, TiOi i BaCOj (wszystkie o czystości 99,9+%, Aldrich Chemical Co. Proszki ceramiczne otrzymano metodą konwencjonalną w stanie stałym (metodą MOM i poddano badaniu mikrostruktury i struktury krystalicznej. Mieszaniny proszków poddano analizie termicznej. Wyniki analizy termicznej określiły optymalną temperaturę syntezy oraz procesy zachodzące podczas ogrzewania proszków. Następnie proszki formowano w dyski pod ciśnieniem 300MPa w matrycach ze stali nierdzewnej o średnicy 10 mm. Syntezę przeprowadzono w Ts =950°C t =2godz. Ostatnim krokiem technologii było bezciśnieniowe spiekanie metodą swobodnego spiekania w T = 1350^ przez / =2 godziny. Morfologię otrzymanego materiału ceramicznego obserwowano metodą skaningowej mikroskopii elektronowej. Ceramikę BLT badano również pod względem składu chemicznego metodą EDS. Analizę strukturalną przeprowadzono metodą dyfrakcji rentgenowskiej. Badania mikrostruktury i struktury krystalicznej ceramiki przeprowadzono w temperaturze pokojowej. Badania EDS potwierdziły zachowanie stechiometrii otrzymanych próbek według wzoru chemicznego. Rentgenowska analiza dyfrakcyjna potwierdziły wytworzenie pożądanej struktury krystalicznej zarówno czystej ceramiki BaTiOj jak i z domieszką Lau. Otrzymana ceramika wykazuje strukturę typu perowskitu A BO? o symetrii tetragonalnej P4 mm. Stwierdzono, że wraz ze wzrostem stężenia La3* w BaTiOj następuje zmniejszenie wielkości ziam krystalicznych, zmniejszenie średniego wymiaru krystalitów, zmniejszenie objętości komórki elementarnej oraz wzrost obliczonej rentgenowskiej gęstości.

  8. Microstructure and Properties of Plasma Sprayed Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) Ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Pala, Zdeněk; Boldyryeva, Hanna; Sedláček, J.; Kmetík, Viliam

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2012), s. 64-75 ISSN 2079-6412 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010878 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma spraying * electroceramics * PZT * phase composition * permittivity Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://www.mdpi.com/2079-6412/2/2/64

  9. Centrifugal Jet Spinning for Highly Efficient and Large-scale Fabrication of Barium Titanate Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Liyun; Kotha, Shiva P.

    2013-01-01

    The centrifugal jet spinning (CJS) method has been developed to enable large-scale synthesis of barium titanate nanofibers. Barium titanate nanofibers with fiber diameters down to 50 nm and grain sizes around 25 nm were prepared with CJS by spinning a sol-gel solution of barium titanate and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) with subsequent heat treatment at 850 °C. XRD and FTIR analysis demonstrated high purity and tetragonal perovskite structured barium titanate nanofibers. SEM and TEM images confirm t...

  10. Sintering of Lead-Free Piezoelectric Sodium Potassium Niobate Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Malič

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The potassium sodium niobate, K0.5Na0.5NbO3, solid solution (KNN is considered as one of the most promising, environment-friendly, lead-free candidates to replace highly efficient, lead-based piezoelectrics. Since the first reports of KNN, it has been recognized that obtaining phase-pure materials with a high density and a uniform, fine-grained microstructure is a major challenge. For this reason the present paper reviews the different methods for consolidating KNN ceramics. The difficulties involved in the solid-state synthesis of KNN powder, i.e., obtaining phase purity, the stoichiometry of the perovskite phase, and the chemical homogeneity, are discussed. The solid-state sintering of stoichiometric KNN is characterized by poor densification and an extremely narrow sintering-temperature range, which is close to the solidus temperature. A study of the initial sintering stage revealed that coarsening of the microstructure without densification contributes to a reduction of the driving force for sintering. The influences of the (K + Na/Nb molar ratio, the presence of a liquid phase, chemical modifications (doping, complex solid solutions and different atmospheres (i.e., defect chemistry on the sintering are discussed. Special sintering techniques, such as pressure-assisted sintering and spark-plasma sintering, can be effective methods for enhancing the density of KNN ceramics. The sintering behavior of KNN is compared to that of a representative piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT.

  11. Sintering of Lead-Free Piezoelectric Sodium Potassium Niobate Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malič, Barbara; Koruza, Jurij; Hreščak, Jitka; Bernard, Janez; Wang, Ke; Fisher, John G.; Benčan, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The potassium sodium niobate, K0.5Na0.5NbO3, solid solution (KNN) is considered as one of the most promising, environment-friendly, lead-free candidates to replace highly efficient, lead-based piezoelectrics. Since the first reports of KNN, it has been recognized that obtaining phase-pure materials with a high density and a uniform, fine-grained microstructure is a major challenge. For this reason the present paper reviews the different methods for consolidating KNN ceramics. The difficulties involved in the solid-state synthesis of KNN powder, i.e., obtaining phase purity, the stoichiometry of the perovskite phase, and the chemical homogeneity, are discussed. The solid-state sintering of stoichiometric KNN is characterized by poor densification and an extremely narrow sintering-temperature range, which is close to the solidus temperature. A study of the initial sintering stage revealed that coarsening of the microstructure without densification contributes to a reduction of the driving force for sintering. The influences of the (K + Na)/Nb molar ratio, the presence of a liquid phase, chemical modifications (doping, complex solid solutions) and different atmospheres (i.e., defect chemistry) on the sintering are discussed. Special sintering techniques, such as pressure-assisted sintering and spark-plasma sintering, can be effective methods for enhancing the density of KNN ceramics. The sintering behavior of KNN is compared to that of a representative piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT). PMID:28793702

  12. Broadband Electromagnetic Emission from PZT Ferroelectric Ceramics after Shock Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiodoras ANISIMOVAS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It was experimentally registered pulsed electromagnetic (EM radiation in frequency range higher than television one using wideband horns with coaxial and waveguide outputs. The EM radiation was received during shock loading of lead zirconate titanate (PZT ceramics cylinders in conventional piezoelectric ignition mechanisms. Digital oscilloscope allows registering whole series of EM pulses and each pulse from the series transmitted from horn antenna of (1 – 18 GHz operating band frequencies. There is (1 – 4 ms delay between the shock and the first pulse of the series. Duration of the series is about (3 – 4 ms. The PZT cylinders were cleaved along their axes and the surfaces formed in the process were investigated by scanning electron microscope. It was concluded that from electrical point of view PZT ceramics contain interacting subsystems. It was found that EM radiation spectrum of pulse detected by waveguide detector heads has harmonics reaching 80 GHz. Presence of harmonics higher than 20 GHz indicates on radiation due to deceleration of electrons emitted during the switching. The EM pulses in the series appear randomly and have different amplitudes which partly confirmed thesis on independent switching dynamics of small volumes governed by a local electric field.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.3137

  13. Multi-wavelength search for complex molecules in Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C. A.; Cordiner, M. A.; Greathouse, T. K.; Richter, M.; Kisiel, Z.; Irwin, P. G.; Teanby, N. A.; Kuan, Y. J.; Charnley, S. B.

    2017-12-01

    Titan's atmosphere is one of the most complex astrochemical environments known: the photochemistry of methane and nitrogen, induced by solar UV and Saturn magnetospheric electron impacts, creates a bonanza of organic molecules like no other place in the solar system. Cassini has unveiled the first glimpses of Titan's chemical wonderland, but many gaps remain. In particular, interpreting the mass spectra of Titan's upper atmosphere requires external knowledge, to disentangle the signature of molecules from their identical-mass brethren. Cassini infrared spectroscopy with CIRS has helped to some extent, but is also limited by low spectral resolution. Potentially to the rescue, comes high-resolution spectroscopy from the Earth at infrared and sub-millimeter wavelengths, where molecules exhibit vibrational and rotational transitions respectively. In this presentation, we describe the quest to make new, unique identifications of large molecules in Titan's atmosphere, focusing specifically on cyclic molecules including N-heterocycles. This molecular family is of high astrobiological significance, forming the basic ring structure for DNA nucleobases. We present the latest spectroscopic observations of Titan from ALMA and NASA's IRTF telescope, discussing present findings and directions for future work.

  14. Ultraviolet photochemistry of cyanoacetylene: Application to Titan. [Abstract only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, D. W.; Ferris, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Cyanoacetylene is believed to have had a central role in the formation of the pyrimidines essential for RNA synthesis leading to the origin of life on Earth. Cyanoacetylene has also been detected on Titan, Saturn's largest moon, and the only moon in the solar system that possesses a dense atmosphere. It is generally accepted that photochemistry plays a major role in the formation of the complex organic molecules and aerosols found in Titan's atmosphere. Because of its long wavelength absorption and low dissociation threshold it is expected that cyanoacetylene is an important part of these photochemical processes. Since cyanoacetylene would also have been subject to ultraviolet light in the atmosphere of early Earth, an investigation of cyanoacetylene photochemistry on Titan might lead to a better understanding of both the photochemical reactions occurring on primitive earth and the processes of chemical evolution as they occur in planetary atmospheres. The effects of irradiation wavelength, mixing with Titan's atmospheric gases, reducing the temperature and lowering cyanoacetylene partial pressures on product formation and polymer composition have been determined with the ultimate goal of understanding the chemical transformations taking place in Titan's atmosphere.

  15. ARPS Enabled Titan Rover Concept with Inflatable Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Tibor S.; Schriener, Timothy M.; Shirley, James H.

    2006-01-01

    The Decadal Survey identified Titan as one of the top priority science destinations in the large moons category, while NASA's proposed Design Reference Mission Set ranked a Titan in-situ explorer second, after a recommended Europa Geophysical Observer mission. This paper discusses a Titan rover concept, enabled by a single advanced Radioisotope Power System that could provide about 110We (BOL). The concept targets the smaller Flagship or potentially the New Frontiers mission class. This MSL class rover would traverse on four 1.5 m diameter inflatable wheels during its 3 years mission duration and would use as much design and flight heritage as possible to reduce mission cost. Direct to Earth communication would remove the need for a relay orbiter. Details on the strawman instrument payload, and rover subsystems are given for this science driven mission concept. In addition, power system trades between Advanced RTG, TPV, and Advanced Stirling and Brayton Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are outlined. While many possible approaches exist for Titan in-situ exploration, the Titan rover concept presented here could provide a scientifically interesting and programmatically affordable solution.

  16. Crater Topography on Titan: Implications for Landscape Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Kirk, R.L.; Lorenz, R. D.; Bray, V. J.; Schenk, P.; Stiles, B. W.; Turtle, E.; Mitchell, K.; Hayes, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive review of available crater topography measurements for Saturn's moon Titan. In general, the depths of Titan's craters are within the range of depths observed for similarly sized fresh craters on Ganymede, but several hundreds of meters shallower than Ganymede's average depth vs. diameter trend. Depth-to-diameter ratios are between 0.0012 +/- 0.0003 (for the largest crater studied, Menrva, D approximately 425 km) and 0.017 +/- 0.004 (for the smallest crater studied, Ksa, D approximately 39 km). When we evaluate the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit parameter, we find that there is less than a 10% probability that Titan's craters have a current depth distribution that is consistent with the depth distribution of fresh craters on Ganymede. There is, however, a much higher probability that the relative depths are uniformly distributed between 0 (fresh) and 1 (completely infilled). This distribution is consistent with an infilling process that is relatively constant with time, such as aeolian deposition. Assuming that Ganymede represents a close 'airless' analogue to Titan, the difference in depths represents the first quantitative measure of the amount of modification that has shaped Titan's surface, the only body in the outer Solar System with extensive surface-atmosphere exchange.

  17. Development of a stress sensor based on the piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate for impact stress measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiming; Xu, Bin; Li, Lifei; Li, Bing

    2012-04-01

    The measurement of stress of concrete structures under impact loading and other strong dynamic loadings is crucial for the monitoring of health and damage detection. Due to its main advantages including availability, extremely high rigidity, high natural frequency, wide measuring range, high stability, high reproducibility, high linearity and wide operating temperature range, piezoelectric (Lead Zirconate Titanate, PZT) ceramic materials has been a widely used smart material for both sensing and actuation for monitoring and control in engineering structures. In this paper, a kind of stress sensor based on piezoelectric ceramics for impact stress measuring of concrete structures is developed. Because the PZT is fragile, in order to employ it for the health monitoring of concrete structures, special handling and treatment should be taken to protect the PZT and to make it survive and work properly in concrete. The commercially available PZT patch with lead wires is first applied with an insulation coating to prevent water and moisture damage, and then is packaged by jacketing it by two small precasted cylinder concrete blocks with enough strength to form a smart aggregate (SA). The employed PZT patch has a dimension of 10mm x 10mm x 0.3mm. In order to calibrate the PZT based stress sensor for impact stress measuring, a dropping hammer was designed and calibration test on the sensitivity of the proposed transducer was carried out with an industry charge amplifier. The voltage output of the stress sensor and the impact force under different free falling heights and impact mass were recorded with a high sampling rate data acquisition system. Based on the test measurements, the sensibility of the PZT based stress sensor was determined. Results show that the output of the PZT based stress sensor is proportional to the stress level and the repeatability of the measurement is very good. The self-made piezoelectric stress sensor can be easily embedded in concrete and provide

  18. Wonderland of ceramics superplasticity; Ceramics chososei no sekai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, F. [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It has been ten years since it was found that ceramics, which is strong and hard at room temperatures and does not deform at all, may exhibit a superplasticity phenomenon at high temperatures that it endlessly elongates when pulled as if it were chewing gum. This phenomenon is one of peculiar behaviours which nano-crystal ceramics, pulverized to an extent that the crystalline particle size is on the order of nanometers, show. The application of superplasticity made the material engineers`s old dream come true that hard ceramics are arbitrarily deformed and machined like metal. Using as models materials such as silicone nitride, alumina and zirconia, this paper describes the history and deformation mechanism of ceramics superplasticity, material design aiming at superplasticization and application of ceramics superplasticity to the machining technology. Furthermore, it describes the trend and future development of international joint researches on the basic surveys on ceramics superplasticity. 25 refs., 11 figs.

  19. The Novel Formation of Barium Titanate Nanodendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Jung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The barium titanate (BaTiO3 nanoparticles with novel dendrite-like structures have been successfully fabricated via a simple coprecipitation method, the so-called BaTiO3 nanodendrites (BTNDs. This method was remarkable, fast, simple, and scalable. The growth solution is prepared by barium chloride (BaCl2, titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4, and oxalic acid. The shape and size of BaTiO3 depend on the amount of added BaCl2 solvent. To investigate the influence of amount of BaCl2 on BTNDs, the amount of BaCl2 was varied in the range from 3 to 6 mL. The role of BaCl2 is found to have remarkable influence on the morphology, crystallite size, and formation of dendrite-like structures. The thickness and length of the central stem of BTND were ~300 nm and ~20 μm, respectively. The branchings were found to occur at irregular intervals along the main stem. Besides, the formation mechanism of BTND is proposed and discussed.

  20. Environmental risks and environmental justice, or how titanic risks are not so titanic after all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, Margarita V; Freudenburg, William R

    2010-01-01

    Some of the best-known social scientific theories of risks are those that have been elaborated by Anthony Giddens and Ulrich Beck. Although their arguments differ greatly, they agree in seeing the technologically induced risks of today's "Risk Society" as global - so pervasive that they transcend all socioeconomic as well as geopolitical and national boundaries. Most empirical work, however, provides greater support for a theoretical tradition exemplified by Short and Erikson. In this paper, we argue that many of the technological mega-risks described by Giddens and Beck as "transcending" social boundaries are better described as "Titanic risks," referring not so much to their colossal impact as to the fact that - as was the case for the majority of the victims on the Titanic - actual risks are related to victims' socioeconomic as well as sociogeographic locations. Previous research has shown this to be the case with high-risk technologies, such as nuclear energy and weaponry, and also with localized ones, such as toxic waste disposal. This article illustrates that the same is true even for the most genuinely "global" risks of all, namely those associated with global climate disruption.

  1. Effect of Temperature and Pressure on the Thickness Mode Resonant Spectra of Piezoelectric Ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhye, Vaishali M.; Agashe, Sudhir D.

    2017-08-01

    Piezoelectric Lead ZirconateTitanate (PZT) ceramics based acoustic transducers are widely used in a multitude of applications as sensors and actuators. Different modeling techniques are used by transducer designers to test the original designs without building costly prototypes. The equivalent circuit of piezoelectric vibrator represented by Van Dykemodel is used to plot the resonant curve. Based on the application, piezoelectric materials in the acoustic transducers are subjected to a variety of environmental conditions. This results in the shift in the resonant frequency. This paper reports the effect of change in temperature and pressure on the thickness mode response of equivalent circuit of piezoelectric Lead ZirconateTitanate (PZT) ceramic. The ranges considered are suitable for under water applications. With varying conditions of temperature and pressure, the changes in resonant and anti-resonant frequencies of the piezoelectric material are noted. Using these practically obtained values, parameters of the model are computed and the shift in the resonance curve is observed for the conditions considered. The values of resonant and anti-resonant frequencies obtained from the model response match with those obtained experimentally for the given conditions. Other material constants required for building realistic Finite Element Analysis models can be computed using these practically obtained values of resonant and anti-resonant frequencies.

  2. Effect of processing routes on microstructure, electrical and dielectric behavior of Mg-doped CaCu3Ti4O12 electro-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Laxman; Rai, U. S.; Mandal, K. D.; Rai, Alok Kumar

    2013-09-01

    In the present communication, data on magnesium-doped calcium copper titanate CaCu2.90Mg0.10Ti4O12 (CCMTO) electro-ceramic, synthesized by the semi-wet route (SWR), ball-milled route (BMR) and solid-state route (SSR), is characterized by TG-DTA, XRD, SEM, EDX and TEM techniques. XRD confirmed the formation of single phase in CCMTO ceramic. The CuO phase present at grain boundaries in SWR ceramic was shown by the SEM micrograph, which was verified by EDX. The TEM image of SWR ceramic shows nanocrystalline particles in the range 80±20 nm. The value of the dielectric constant of SWR ( ɛ r ˜20091) ceramic is higher than those of BMR and SSR ( ɛ r ˜1247) ceramics at 1 kHz at 450 K. A dielectric relaxation has been observed in the frequency range 100 Hz-100 kHz. The high-temperature dielectric dispersion shows one large low-frequency response and two Debye-type relaxations. The impedance and modulus studies show the highest grain-boundary resistance for BMR ceramic.

  3. Synthesis of SiCN@TiO2 core-shell ceramic microspheres via PDCs method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongli; Wei, Ning; Li, Jing; Zhang, Haiyuan; Chu, Peng

    2018-02-01

    A facile and effective polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) emulsification-crosslinking-pyrolysis method was developed to fabricate SiCN@TiO2 core-shell ceramic microspheres with polyvinylsilazane (PVSZ) and tetrabutyl titanate (TBT) as precursors. The TBT: PVSZ mass ratios, emulsifier concentrations and the pyrolysis temperature were examined as control parameters to tune the size and morphology of microspheres. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the synthesized SiCN@TiO2 microspheres to be comprised of SiCN core coated with TiO2 crystals, with an average size of 0.88 μm when pyrolyzed at 1400 °C. The analysis of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) ensured that SiCN@TiO2 core-shell ceramic microspheres composed of rutile TiO2, β-SiC and Si3N4 crystalline phases, The thermal properties were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The obtained SiCN@TiO2 core-shell ceramic microspheres were the promising candidate of the infrared opacifier in silica aerogels and this technique can be extended to other preceramic polymers.

  4. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husband, P; Selim, F A; Bartošová, I; Slugeň, V

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics. (paper)

  5. Joining ceramics, glass and metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, W.

    1989-01-01

    In many areas of electronics, engine manufacturing, machine and apparatus construction and aearospace, different combinations of materials such as ceramics/metal and glass/metal are gaining increasingly in importance. The proceedings cover the 53 papers presented to the 3rd International Conference on Joining Ceramics, Glass and Metal, held in Bad Nauheim (FRG) from April 26 to 28, 1989. The papers discuss problems and results under the following main topics of the conference: (1) Active brazing applied to non-oxide ceramics and oxide ceramics. (2) Diffusion bonding of metals and ceramics. (3) Friction welding, reaction bonding, and other joining methods. (4) Properties of metal-ceramic joints (as e.g. residual stress, fracture toughness, thermal stress) and various investigation methods for their determination. (MM) [de

  6. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  7. Barium titanate thick films prepared by screen printing technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana M. Vijatović

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The barium titanate (BaTiO3 thick films were prepared by screen printing technique using powders obtained by soft chemical route, modified Pechini process. Three different barium titanate powders were prepared: i pure, ii doped with lanthanum and iii doped with antimony. Pastes for screen printing were prepared using previously obtained powders. The thick films were deposited onto Al2O3 substrates and fired at 850°C together with electrode material (silver/palladium in the moving belt furnace in the air atmosphere. Measurements of thickness and roughness of barium titanate thick films were performed. The electrical properties of thick films such as dielectric constant, dielectric losses, Curie temperature, hysteresis loop were reported. The influence of different factors on electrical properties values was analyzed.

  8. Exploring inner structure of Titan's dunes from Cassini Radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P.; Heggy, E.; Farr, T. G.

    2013-12-01

    Linear dunes discovered in the equatorial regions of Titan by the Cassini-Huygens mission are morphologically very similar to many terrestrial linear dune fields. These features have been compared with terrestrial longitudinal dune fields like the ones in Namib desert in western Africa. This comparison is based on the overall parallel orientation of Titan's dunes to the predominant wind direction on Titan, their superposition on other geomorphological features and the way they wrap around topographic obstacles. Studying the internal layering of dunes has strong implications in understanding the hypothesis for their origin and evolution. In Titan's case, although the morphology of the dunes has been studied from Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, it has not been possible to investigate their internal structure in detail as of yet. Since no radar sounding data is available for studying Titan's subsurface yet, we have developed another technique to examine the inner layering of the dunes. In this study, we utilize multiple complementary radar datasets, including radar imaging data for Titan's and Earth's dunes and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)/radar sounding data for terrestrial dunes. Based on dielectric mixing models, we suggest that the Cassini Ku-band microwaves should be able to penetrate up to ~ 3 m through Titan's dunes, indicating that the returned radar backscatter signal would include contributions from both surface and shallow subsurface echoes. This implies that the shallow subsurface properties can be retrieved from the observed radar backscatter (σ0). In our analysis, the variation of the radar backscatter as a function of dune height is used to provide an insight into the layering in Titan's dunes. We compare the variation of radar backscatter with elevation over individual dunes on Titan and analogous terrestrial dunes in three sites (Great Sand Sea, Siwa dunes and Qattaniya dunes) in the Egyptian Sahara. We observe a strong, positive

  9. Titan: a distant but enticing destination for human visitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nott, Julian

    2009-10-01

    Until recently, very little was known about Saturn's largest satellite, Titan. But that has changed dramatically since the Cassini spacecraft started orbiting in the Saturn system in 2004. Larger than Mercury and with a dense atmosphere, Titan has many of the characteristics of a planet. Indeed, many scientists now see it as the most interesting place in the Solar System for robotic exploration, with many unique features and even the possibility of exotic forms of life. This paper points out that Titan is also a potential destination for humans. With its predominantly nitrogen atmosphere, moderate gravity, and available water and oxygen, it also appears that, once it becomes possible to travel there, it will prove to be much more hospitable for human visitors than any other destination in the Solar System.

  10. Photometric changes on Saturn's Titan: Evidence for active cryovolcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.M.; Kamp, L.W.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Matson, D.L.; Kirk, R.L.; Hapke, B.W.; Wall, S.D.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.E.; Smythe, W.D.; Mitchell, K.L.; Baines, K.H.; Jaumann, R.; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Lunine, J.I.; Combes, M.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Formisano, V.; Filacchione, G.; Langevin, Y.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Irwin, P.G.J.; Pearl, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    We report infrared spectrophotometric variability on the surface of Saturn's moon Titan detected in images returned by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) onboard the Cassini Saturn Orbiter. The changes were observed at 7??S, 138??W and occurred between October 27, 2005 and January 15, 2006. After that date the surface was unchanged until the most recent observation, March 18, 2006. We previously reported spectrophotometric variability at another location (26??S, 78??W). Cassini Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR) images find that the surface morphology at both locations is consistent with surface flows possibly resulting from cryovolcanic activity (Wall et al., companion paper, this issue). The VIMS-reported time variability and SAR morphology results suggest that Titan currently exhibits intermittent surface changes consistent with present ongoing surface processes. We suggest that these processes involve material from Titan's interior being extruded or effiised and deposited on the surface, as might be expected from cryovolcanism. ?? 2009.

  11. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying responses to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today that will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications. (author)

  12. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications

  13. Effects of barium titanate nanoparticles on proliferation and differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Ricotti, Leonardo; Canale, Claudio; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Berrettini, Stefano; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-02-01

    Nanomaterials hold great promise in the manipulation and treatments of mesenchymal stem cells, since they allow the modulation of their properties and differentiation. However, systematic studies have to be carried out in order to assess their potential toxicological effects. The present study reports on biocompatibility evaluation of glycol-chitosan coated barium titanate nanoparticles (BTNPs) on rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). BTNPs are a class of ceramic systems which possess interesting features for biological applications thanks to their peculiar dielectric and piezoelectric properties. Viability was evaluated up to 5 days of incubation (concentrations in the range 0-100 μg/ml) both quantitatively and qualitatively with specific assays. Interactions cells/nanoparticles were further investigated with analysis of the cytoskeleton conformation, with SEM and TEM imaging, and with AFM analysis. Finally, differentiation in adipocytes and osteocytes was achieved in the presence of high doses of BTNPs, thus highlighting the safety of these nanostructures towards mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Low-Temperature Synthesis and Thermodynamic and Electrical Properties of Barium Titanate Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Maxim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies regarding the morphology dependence of the perovskite-type oxides functional materials properties are of recent interest. With this aim, nanorods (NRs and nanocubes (NCs of barium titanate (BaTiO3 have been successfully synthesized via a hydrothermal route at temperature as low as 408 K, employing barium acetate, titanium isopropoxide, and sodium hydroxide as reagents without any surfactant or template. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, used for the morphology and structure analyses, showed that the NRs were formed by an oriented attachment of the NCs building-blocks with 20 nm average crystallites size. The thermodynamic properties represented by the relative partial molar free energies, enthalpies, and entropies of the oxygen dissolution in the perovskite phase, as well as the equilibrium partial pressure of oxygen, indicated that NRs powders have lower oxygen vacancies concentration than the NCs. This NRs characteristic, together with higher tetragonallity of the structure, leads to the enhancement of the dielectric properties of BaTiO3 ceramics. The results presented in this work show indubitably the importance of the nanopowders morphology on the material properties.

  15. Titanate nanotubes for reinforcement of a poly(ethylene oxide)/chitosan polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, R.; Bavykin, D. V.; Zekonyte, J.; Walsh, F. C.; Wood, R. J.

    2016-05-01

    Soft polyethylene oxide (PEO)/chitosan mixtures, reinforced with hard titanate nanotubes (TiNTs) by co-precipitation from aqueous solution, have been used to produce compact coatings by the ‘drop-cast’ method, using water soluble PEO polymer and stable, aqueous colloidal solutions of TiNTs. The effects of the nanotube concentration and their length on the hardness and modulus of the prepared composite have been studied using nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques. The uniformity of TiNT dispersion within the polymer matrix has been studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A remarkable increase in hardness and reduced Young’s modulus of the composites, compared to pure polymer blends, has been observed at a TiNT concentration of 25 wt %. The short (up to 30 min) ultrasound treatment of aqueous solutions containing polymers and a colloidal TiNT mixture prior to drop casting has resulted in some improvements in both hardness and reduced Young’s modulus of dry composite films, probably due to a better dispersion of ceramic nanotubes within the matrix. However, further (more than 1 h) treatment of the mixture with ultrasound resulted in a deterioration of the mechanical properties of the composite accompanied by a shortening of the nanotubes, as observed by the TEM.

  16. Advanced ceramic in structural engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Rodea, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The work deals with "Advanced Ceramics in Structural Engineering”. Throughout this work we present the different types of ceramic that are currently in wider use, and the main research lines that are being followed. Ceramics have very interesting properties, both mechanical and electrical and refractory where we can find some of the most interesting points of inquiry. Through this work we try tounderstand this complex world, analyzing both general and specific properties of ...

  17. Dragonfly: In Situ Exploration of Titan's Organic Chemistry and Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, E. P.; Barnes, J. W.; Trainer, M. G.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2017-12-01

    Titan's abundant complex carbon-rich chemistry, interior ocean, and past presence of liquid water on the surface make it an ideal destination to study prebiotic chemical processes and document the habitability of an extraterrestrial environment. Titan exploration is a high science priority due to the level of organic synthesis that it supports. Moreover, opportunities for organics to have interacted with liquid water at the surface (e.g., in impact melt sheets) increase the potential for chemical processes to progress further, providing an unparalleled opportunity to investigate prebiotic chemistry, as well as to search for signatures of potential water-based or even hydrocarbon-based life. The diversity of Titan's surface materials and environments drives the scientific need to be able to sample a variety of locations, thus mobility is key for in situ measurements. Titan's atmosphere is 4 times denser than Earth's reducing the wing/rotor area required to generate a given amount of lift, and the low gravity reduces the required magnitude of lift, making heavier-than-air mobility highly efficient. Dragonfly is a rotorcraft lander mission proposed to NASA's New Frontiers Program to take advantage of Titan's unique natural laboratory to understand how far chemistry can progress in environments that provide key ingredients for life. Measuring the compositions of materials in different environments will reveal how far organic chemistry has progressed. Surface material can be sampled into a mass spectrometer to identify the chemical components available and processes at work to produce biologically relevant compounds. Bulk elemental surface composition can be determined by a neutron-activated gamma-ray spectrometer. Meteorology measurements can characterize Titan's atmosphere and diurnal and spatial variations therein. Geologic features can be characterized via remote-sensing observations, which also provide context for samples. Seismic sensing can probe subsurface

  18. The Greenhouse and Anti-Greenhouse Effects on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, C. P.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Titan is the largest moon of Saturn and is the only moon in the solar system with a substantial atmosphere. Its atmosphere is mostly made of nitrogen, with a few percent CH4, 0.1% H2 and an uncertain level of Ar (less than 10%). The surface pressure is 1.5 atms and the surface temperature is 95 K, decreasing to 71 at the tropopause before rising to stratospheric temperatures of 180 K. In pressure and composition Titan's atmosphere is the closest twin to Earth's. The surface of Titan remains unknown, hidden by the thick smog layer, but it may be an ocean of liquid methane and ethane. Titan's atmosphere has a greenhouse effect which is much stronger than the Earth's - 92% of the surface warming is due to greenhouse radiation. However an organic smog layer in the upper atmosphere produces an anti-greenhouse effect that cuts the greenhouse warming in half - removing 35% of the incoming solar radiation. Models suggest that during its formation Titan's atmosphere was heated to high temperatures due to accretional energy. This was followed by a cold Triton-like period which gradually warmed to the present conditions. The coupled greenhouse and haze anti-greenhouse may be relevant to recent suggestions for haze shielding of a CH4 - NH3 early atmosphere on Earth or Mars. When the NASA/ESA mission to the Saturn System, Cassini, launches in a few years it will carry a probe that will be sent to the surface of Titan and show us this world that is strange and yet in many ways similar to our own.

  19. Coexistence of Dunes and Humid Conditions at Titan's Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebaugh, Jani; Lorenz, R. D.; Lunine, J. I.; Kirk, R. L.; Ori, G. G.; Farr, T. G.; Malaska, M.; Le Gall, A.; Liu, Z. Y. C.; Encrenaz, P. J.; Paillou, P.; Hayes, A.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Turtle, E. P.; Wall, S. D.; Stofan, E. R.; Wood, C. A.; Cassini RADAR Team

    2012-10-01

    At Titan's equatorial latitudes there are tens of thousands of dunes, a landform typical of desert environments where sand does not become anchored by vegetation or fluids. Model climate simulations predict generally dry conditions at the equator and humid conditions near the poles of Titan, where lakes of methane/ethane are found. However, moderate relative methane humidity was observed at the Huygens landing site, recent rainfall was seen by Cassini ISS near the Belet Sand Sea, and a putative transient lake in Shangri-La was observed by Cassini VIMS, all of which indicate abundant fluids may be present, at least periodically, at Titan's equatorial latitudes. Terrestrial observations and studies demonstrate dunes can exist and migrate in conditions of high humidity. Active dunes are found in humid climates, indicating the movement of sand is not always prohibited by the presence of fluids. Sand mobility is related to precipitation, evaporation and wind speed and direction. If dune surfaces become wetted by rainfall or rising subsurface fluids, they can become immobilized. However, winds can act to dry the uppermost layers, freeing sands for saltation and enabling dune migration in wet conditions. Active dunes are found in tropical NE Brazil and NE Australia, where there are alternating dry and wet periods, a condition possible for Titan's tropics. Rising and falling water levels lead to the alteration of dune forms, mainly from being anchored by vegetation, but also from cementation by carbonates or clays. Studies of Titan's dunes, which could undergo anchoring of organic sediments by hydrocarbon fluids, could inform the relative strength of vegetation vs. cementation at humid dune regions on Earth. Furthermore, a comprehensive survey of dune morphologies near regions deemed low by SARTopo and stereo, where liquids may collect in wet conditions, could reveal if bodies of liquid have recently existed at Titan's tropics.

  20. Latitudinal and altitudinal controls of Titan's dune field morphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A.; Hayes, A. G.; Ewing, R.; Janssen, M. A.; Radebaugh, J.; Savage, C.; Encrenaz, P.; the Cassini Radar Team

    2012-01-01

    Dune fields dominate ˜13% of Titan's surface and represent an important sink of carbon in the methane cycle. Herein, we discuss correlations in dune morphometry with altitude and latitude. These correlations, which have important implications in terms of geological processes and climate on Titan, are investigated through the microwave electromagnetic signatures of dune fields using Cassini radar and radiometry observations. The backscatter and emissivity from Titan's dune terrains are primarily controlled by the amount of interdune area within the radar footprint and are also expected to vary with the degree of the interdunal sand cover. Using SAR-derived topography, we find that Titan's main dune fields (Shangri-La, Fensal, Belet and Aztlan) tend to occupy the lowest elevation areas in Equatorial regions occurring at mean elevations between ˜-400 and ˜0 m (relative to the geoid). In elevated dune terrains, we show a definite trend towards a smaller dune to interdune ratio and possibly a thinner sand cover in the interdune areas. A similar correlation is observed with latitude, suggesting that the quantity of windblown sand in the dune fields tends to decrease as one moves farther north. The altitudinal trend among Titan's sand seas is consistent with the idea that sediment source zones most probably occur in lowlands, which would reduce the sand supply toward elevated regions. The latitudinal preference could result from a gradual increase in dampness with latitude due to the asymmetric seasonal forcing associated with Titan's current orbital configuration unless it is indicative of a latitudinal preference in the sand source distribution or wind transport capacity.

  1. Ion conductivity of nasicon ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoj, J.W.; Engell, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Nasicon ss ,Na 1 + X Zr 2 Si X P 3 - X O 12 o , X , 3, includes some of the best solid state sodium conductors known today. Compositions in the interval 1.6 , X , 2.6 show conductivities comparable to the best β double-prime-alumina ceramics. It is well known that the ion conductivity of β-alumina is strongly dependent on the texture of the ceramic. Here a similar behavior is reported for Nasicon ceramics. Ceramics of the bulk composition Na 2.94 Zr 1.49 Si 2.20 P 0.80 O 10.85 were prepared by a gel method. The final ceramics consist of Nasicon crystals with x = 2.14 and a glass phase. The grain size and texture of the ceramics were controlled by varying the thermal history of the gel based raw materials and the sintering conditions. The room temperature resistivity of the resulting ceramics varies from 3.65*10 3 ohm cm to 1.23*10 3 ohm cm. Using the temperature comparison method and estimates of the area of grain boundaries in the ceramics, the resistivity of the Nasicon phase is estimated to be 225 ohm cm at 25 degrees C. B 2 O 3 - or Al 2 O 3 -doping of the glass bearing Nasicon ceramic lower the room temperature resistivity by a factor 2 to 5. The dopants do not substitute into the Nasicon phase in substantial amounts

  2. Ground Based Monitoring of Cloud Activity on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlies, Paul; Hayes, Alexander; Rojo, Patricio; Ádámkovics, Máté; Turtle, Elizabeth; Buratti, Bonnie

    2014-11-01

    We will report on the latest results of an on-going ground based monitoring campaign of Saturn’s moon Titan using the SINFONI (Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared) instrument on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Presently, much is still unknown about the complex and dynamic hydrologic system of Titan as observations have yet to be made through an entire Titan year (29.7 Earth years). Because of the limited ability to observe Titan with Cassini, a combined ground and spaced-based approach provides a steady cadence of observation throughout the duration of a Titan year. We will present the results of observations to date using the adaptive optics (AO) mode (weather dependent) of SINFONI. We have been regularly observing Titan since April 2014 for the purpose of monitoring and identifying clouds and have also been in collaboration with the Cassini team that has concurrent ISS observations and historical VIMS observations of clouds. Our discussion will focus on the various algorithms and approaches used for cloud identification and analysis. Currently, we are entering into a very interesting time for clouds and Titan hydrology as Saturn moves into north polar summer for the first time since Cassini entered the Saturnian system. The increased insolation that this will bring to the north, where the majority of the liquid methane lakes reside, will give us our first observations of the potentially complex interplay between surface liquid and atmospheric conditions. By carefully monitoring and characterizing clouds (size, optical depth, altitude, etc.) we will also be able to derive constraints that can help to guide and validate GCMs. Since the beginning of our observations, no clouds have been observed through ground based observations, while Cassini has only observed a single cloud event in the north polar region over Ligeia Mare. We will provide an update on the latest results of our cloud monitoring campaign and discuss how this

  3. Organic chemistry in the atmosphere. [laboratory modeling of Titan atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of an at least moderately complex organic chemistry on Titan is stipulated based on clear evidence of methane, and at least presumptive evidence of hydrogen in its atmosphere. The ratio of methane to hydrogen is the highest of any atmosphere in the solar system. Irradiation of hydrogen/methane mixtures produces aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. A very reasonable hypothesis assumes that the red cloud cover of Titan is made of organic chemicals. Two-carbon hydrocarbons experimentally produced from irradiated mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen bear out the possible organic chemistry of the Titanian environment.

  4. Methods for producing monodispersed particles of barium titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a low-temperature controlled method for producing high-quality, ultrafine monodispersed nanocrystalline microsphere powders of barium titanate and other pure or composite oxide materials having particles ranging from nanosized to micronsized particles. The method of the subject invention comprises a two-stage process. The first stage produces high quality monodispersed hydrous titania microsphere particles prepared by homogeneous precipitation via dielectric tuning in alcohol-water mixed solutions of inorganic salts. Titanium tetrachloride is used as an inorganic salt precursor material. The second stage converts the pure hydrous titania microsphere particles into crystalline barium titanate microsphere powders via low-temperature, hydrothermal reactions.

  5. Selective adsorption and ion exchange of metal cations and anions with silico-titanates and layered titanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, R.G.; Philip, C.V.

    1993-01-01

    Metal ions may be removed from aqueous wastes from metal processing plants and from refineries. They may also be used in concentrating radioactive elements found in dilute, aqueous, nuclear wastes. A new series of silico-titanates and alkali titanates are shown to have specific selectivity for cations of lead, mercury, and cadmium and the dichromate anion in solutions with low and high pH. Furthermore, one particular silico-titanate, TAM-5, was found to be highly selective for Cs + and Sr 2+ in solutions of 5.7 M Na + and 0.6 M Oh - . A high potential exists for these materials for removing Cs + and Sr 2+ from radioactive aqueous wastes containing high concentrations of Na + at high and low pH

  6. Dielectric loss of strontium titanate thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalberth, Mark Joseph

    1999-12-01

    Interest in strontium titanate (STO) thin films for microwave device applications continues to grow, fueled by the telecommunications industry's interest in phase shifters and tunable filters. The optimization of these devices depends upon increasing the phase or frequency tuning and decreasing the losses in the films. Currently, the dielectric response of thin film STO is poorly understood through lack of data and a theory to describe it. We have studied the growth of STO using pulsed laser deposition and single crystal substrates like lanthanum aluminate and neodymium gallate. We have researched ways to use ring resonators to accurately measure the dielectric response as a function of temperature, electric field, and frequency from low radio frequencies to a few gigahertz. Our films grown on lanthanum aluminate show marked frequency dispersion in the real part of the dielectric constant and hints of thermally activated loss behavior. We also found that films grown with conditions that optimized the dielectric constant showed increased losses. In an attempt to simplify the system, we developed a technique called epitaxial lift off, which has allowed us to study films removed from their growth substrates. These free standing films have low losses and show obvious thermally activated behavior. The "amount of tuning," as measured by a figure of merit, KE, is greater in these films than in the films still attached to their growth substrates. We have developed a theory that describes the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant. The theory models the real part using a mean field description of the ionic motion in the crystal and includes the loss by incorporating the motion of charged defects in the films.

  7. Antibacterial Properties of Titanate Nano fiber Thin Films Formed on a Titanium Plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yada, M.; Inoue, Y.; Morita, T.; Torikai, T.; Watari, T.; Noda, I.; Hotokebuchi, T.

    2013-01-01

    A sodium titanate nano fiber thin film and a silver nanoparticle/silver titanate nano fiber thin film formed on the surface of a titanium plate exhibited strong antibacterial activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which is one of the major bacteria causing in-hospital infections. Exposure of the sodium titanate nano fiber thin film to ultraviolet rays generated a high antibacterial activity due to photo catalysis and the sodium titanate nano fiber thin film immediately after its synthesis possessed a high antibacterial activity even without exposure to ultraviolet rays. Elution of silver from the silver nanoparticle/silver titanate nano fiber thin film caused by the silver ion exchange reaction was considered to contribute substantially to the strong antibacterial activity. The titanate nano fiber thin films adhered firmly to titanium. Therefore, these titanate nano fiber thin film/titanium composites will be extremely useful as implant materials that have excellent antibacterial activities.

  8. Concentrated solar energy used for sintering magnesium titanates for electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Irina; Rodríguez, Jose; Cañadas, Inmaculada; Galindo, Jose; Mendez, Senen Lanceros; de Abreu Martins, Pedro Libȃnio; Cunha, Luis; Saravanan, Kandasamy Venkata

    2018-04-01

    Solar energy is an important renewable source of energy with many advantages: it is unlimited, clean and free. The main objective of this work was to sinter magnesium titanate ceramics in a solar furnace using concentrated solar energy, which is a novel and original process. The direct conversion of solar power into high temperature makes this process simple, feasible and ecologically viable/environmentally sustainable. We performed the solar sintering experiments at Plataforma Solar de Almeria-CIEMAT, Spain. This process takes place in a vertical axis solar furnace (SF5-5 kW) hosting a mobile flat mirror heliostat, a fixed parabolic mirror concentrator, an attenuator and a test table the concentrator focus. We sintered (MgO)0.63(TiO2)0.37, (MgO)0.49(TiO2)0.51, (MgO)0.50(TiO2)0.50 ceramics samples in air at about 1100 °C for a duration of 16 min, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h in the solar furnace. The MgO/TiO2 ratio and the dwell time was varied in order to obtain phase pure MgTiO3 ceramic. We obtained a pure MgTiO3 geikielite phase by solar sintering of (MgO)0.63(TiO2)0.37 samples at 1100 °C (16 min-3 h). Samples of (MgO)0.63(TiO2)0.37, solar sintered at 1100 °C for 3 h, resulted in well-sintered, non-porous samples with good density (3.46 g/cm3). The sintered samples were analyzed by XRD for phase determination. The grain and surface morphology was observed using SEM. Electrical measurements were carried out on solar sintered samples. The effect of processing parameters on microstructure and dielectric properties were investigated and is presented.

  9. Deodorant ceramic catalyst. Dasshu ceramics shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K. (Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)); Naka, R. (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    Concerning debromination to be used for the filter of deodorizing device, those of long life and high deodorizing performance are demanded a great deal. As one of this kind of debromination, a deodorant ceramic catalyst (mangantid) has been developed and put for practical use as deodorant for refrigerator. In this article, the information and knowledge obtained by the development of mangantid, the features as well as several properties of the product are stated. The deodorizing methods currently used practically are roughly divided into 6 kinds such as the adsorption method, the direct combustion method, the catalytic method and the oxidation method, but each of them has its own merit and demerit, hence it is necessary to select the method in accordance with the kind of odor and its generating condition. Mangantid is a compound body of high deodorant material in a honeycomb configuration, and has the features that in comparison with the existing deordorants, its pressure loss is smaller, its deodorizing rate is bigger, and acidic, neutral and basic gaseous components can be removed in a well-balanced manner. Deodorization with mangantid has the mechanism to let the odorous component contact and react with the catalyst and change the component to the non-odorous component in the temperature range from room temperature to the low temperature region. 5 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Temperature dependence on the electrical properties of Ba(Ti{sub 0.90}Zr{sub 0.10})O{sub 3}:2V ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, F. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica (LIEC), Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP, CEP 14800-900, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Simoes, A.Z., E-mail: alezipo@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Itajuba-Unifei - Campus Itabira, Rua Sao Paulo 377, Bairro: Amazonas, CEP 35900-37, Itabira, MG (Brazil); Paskocimas, C.A.; Zaghete, M.A.; Varela, J.A.; Longo, E. [Laboratorio Interdisciplinar em Ceramica (LIEC), Departamento de Fisico-Quimica, Instituto de Quimica, UNESP, CEP 14800-900, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2010-10-01

    Barium zirconium titanate ferroelectric ceramics modified with vanadium Ba(Ti{sub 0.90}Zr{sub 0.10}V{sub 0.02})O{sub 3} (BZT:2V) were prepared from powders synthesized using the mixed oxide method. The effect of temperature on the structural and electrical properties of BZT:2V ceramics was investigated. X-ray diffraction data evidenced no secondary phases. As temperature decreases, the maximum dielectric permittivity decreased. The fine-grained sample showed a 'relaxor-like' ferroelectric behavior. The dielectric permittivity reaches a maximum value ({epsilon}{sub m} {approx} 16,000 at 1 kHz) for the BZT:2V ceramics sintered at 1623 K for 4 h. Remnant polarization (P{sub r}) and coercive field were also temperature dependent.

  11. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 12. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Functional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 12 December 1999 pp 21-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Traditional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  14. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  15. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  16. Co-catalyst free Titanate Nanorods for improved Hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Herein, we report a simplified method for the preparation of photo-active titanate nanorods catalyst .... The TEM images were taken with Philips Technai G2 FEI F12 trans- mission electron microscope operating at 80-100 kV. Optical properties were measured in DRS ..... Chen X, Shen S, Guo L and Mao S S 2010 Chem. Rev ...

  17. TITAN Legal Weight Truck cask preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Preliminary Design of the TITAN Legal Weight Truck (LWT) Cask System and Ancillary Equipment is presented in this document. The scope of the document includes the LWT cask with fuel baskets; impact limiters, and lifting and tiedown features; the cask support system for transportation; intermodal transfer skid; personnel barrier; and cask lifting yoke assembly. 75 figs., 48 tabs

  18. A Flood of Tears: "Titanic" and the Tearjerker Romance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathleen M.

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of tearjerker romances and adolescent responses, particularly female responses, focuses on the recent movie "Titanic." Places the tearjerker romance in context with other works representing a wave of new romanticism and includes an annotated bibliography of tearjerkers in several genres appealing to adolescents. (LRW)

  19. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Saturn and Titan from Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Brasunas, J. C.; Carlson, R. C.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Nixon, A.; Pearl, J. C.; Romani, P. N.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; hide

    2009-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft completed its nominal mission at Saturn in 2008 and began its extended mission. Cassini carries the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); a Fourier transform spectrometer that measures the composition, thermal structure and dynamics of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan, and also the temperatures of other moons and the rings.

  20. Growth of larger hydrocarbons in the ionosphere of Titan

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ricketts, Claire; Schröder, Detlef; Alcaraz, Ch.; Roithová, Jana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 16 (2008), s. 4779-4783 ISSN 0947-6539 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : C-Ccoupling * dications * mass spectrometry * synchrotron radiation * Titan Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.454, year: 2008

  1. Sodium titanate nanorods: Preparation, microstructure characterization and photocatalytic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štengl, Václav; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Šubrt, Jan; Večerníková, Eva; Szatmáry, Lórant; Klementová, Mariana; Balek, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 63, 1-2 (2006), s. 20-30 ISSN 0926-3373 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0577 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : sodium titanate * nanorods * ethylene glycol Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.942, year: 2006

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmospheres of Titan and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Khare, B. N.; Thompson, W. R.; Mcdonald, G. D.; Wing, Michael R.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Arakawa, E. T.

    1993-01-01

    PAHs are important components of the interstellar medium and carbonaceous chondrites, but have never been identified in the reducing atmospheres of the outer solar system. Incompletely characterized complex organic solids (tholins) produced by irradiating simulated Titan atmospheres reproduce well the observed UV/visible/IR optical constants of the Titan stratospheric haze. Titan tholin and a tholin generated in a crude simulation of the atmosphere of Jupiter are examined by two-step laser desorption/multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry. A range of two- to four-ring PAHs, some with one to four alkylation sites, are identified, with a net abundance of about 0.0001 g/g (grams per gram) of tholins produced. Synchronous fluorescence techniques confirm this detection. Titan tholins have proportionately more one- and two-ring PAHs than do Jupiter tholins, which in turn have more four-ring and larger PAHs. The four-ringed PAH chrysene, prominent in some discussions of interstellar grains, is found in Jupiter tholins.

  3. A Heuristic Approach to Examining Volatile Equilibrium at Titan's Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    R. D. Lorenz, J. I. Lunine, and C. P. McKay have shown in a manuscript accepted for publication that, for a given ethane abundance and surface temperature, the nitrogen and methane abundances in Titan's atmosphere can be calculated, yielding a surface pressure that can be compared with the observed value. This is potentially a very valuable tool for examining the evolution of Titan's climatology. Its validity does depend on two important assumptions, however: 1) that the atmosphere of Titan is in global radiative equilibrium, and 2) that volatiles present are in vapor equilibrium with the surface. The former assumption has been shown to be likely, but the latter has not. Water vapor in the Earth's atmosphere, in fact, is generally not very close to equilibrium in a global sense. In the present work a heuristic approach is used to examine the likelihood that methane vapor is in equilibrium with Titan's surface. Plausible climate scenerios are examined that are consistent with methane vapor abundances derived from Voyager IRIS data. Simple precipitation and surface diffusion models are incorporated into the analysis. It is tentatively inferred that methane may be in surface equilibrium near the poles, but that equilibrium at low latitudes is more difficult to establish.

  4. Synthesis of nanosized barium titanate/epoxy resin composites and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anechoic chamber; barium titanate; electromagnetic interference and compatibility; epoxy resin composites; microwave absorbers; radio frequency absorbers. ... The reflection loss (RL) and transmission loss (TL) of the composite materials were measured by the reflection/transmission method using a vector network ...

  5. Reduced-graphene-oxide-and-strontium-titanate-based double ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    All the results are discussed in terms of complex permeability and permittivity. The study revealed that intrinsic conductivity and polarization of the r-GO particles and dielectric polarization of the strontium titanate within epoxy matrix contribute to the microwave absorption. Keywords. Composite; absorption; reflection loss; ...

  6. Geochemistry and Organic Chemistry on the Surface of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunine, J. I.; Beauchamp, P.; Beauchamp, J.; Dougherty, D.; Welch, C.; Raulin, F.; Shapiro, R.; Smith, M.

    2001-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere produces a wealth of organic products from methane and nitrogen. These products, deposited on the surface in liquid and solid form, may interact with surface ices and energy sources to produce compounds of exobiological interest. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. A study on structural stability of bismuth titanate with lanthanum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 3. A study on structural stability of bismuth titanate with lanthanum ... In addition, the enlarged region of Bi 4f, Bi 4d, Ti 2p, La 3d and O 1s of doping sample was clearly seen after deconvolution. Based on binding energy position, it can be unambiguously stated ...

  8. peroxo-oxalate preparation of doped barium titanate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gijp, S.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Verweij, H.

    1999-01-01

    The peroxo-oxalate complexation method is a method that can be used for the preparation of doped barium titanate. In this paper we focus on BaTi0.91Zr0.09O3, which can be used for discharge capacitors in lamp starters. The preparation method described here is based on the complexation and subsequent

  9. Probing Small Lakes on Titan Using the Cassini RADAR Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Poggiali, V.; Hayes, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Seu, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Mitri, G.; Mitchell, K. L.; Janssen, M. A.; Casarano, D.; Notarnicola, C.; Le Gall, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    The T126 Cassini's final flyby of Titan has offered a unique opportunity to observe an area in the Northern Polar terrain, where several small - medium size (10 - 50 km) hydrocarbon lakes are present and have been previously imaged by Cassini. The successful observation allowed the radar to operate at the closest approach over several small lakes, using its altimetry mode for the investigation of depth and liquid composition. Herein we present the result of a dedicate processing previously applied to altimetric data acquired over Ligeia Mare where the radar revealed the bathymetry and composition of the sea [1,2]. We show that, the optimal geometry condition met during the T126 fly-by allowed the radar to probe Titan's lakes revealing that such small liquid bodies can exceed one-hundred meters of depth. [1] M. Mastrogiuseppe et al. (2014, Mar.). The bathymetry of a Titan Sea. Geophysical Research Letters. [Online]. 41 (5), pp. 1432-1437. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2013GL058618 [2] M.Mastrogiuseppe et al. (2016, Oct). Radar Sounding Using the Cassini Altimeter: Waveform Modeling and Monte Carlo Approach for Data Inversion of Observations of Titan's Seas, IEEE Transactions On Geoscience And Remote Sensing, Vol. 54, No. 10, doi: 10.1109/TGRS.2016.2563426.

  10. Characterizing GEO Titan Transtage Fragmentations using Ground-based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2016-01-01

    In a continued effort to better characterize the Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) environment, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) utilizes various ground-based optical assets to acquire photometric and spectral data of known debris associated with fragmentations in or near GEO. The Titan IIIC Transtage upper stage is known to have fragmented four times. Two of the four fragmentations were in GEO while a third Transtage fragmented in GEO transfer orbit. The forth fragmentation occurred in Low Earth Orbit. In order to better assess what may be causing these fragmentations, the NASA ODPO recently acquired a Titan Transtage test and display article that was previously in the custody of the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) in Tucson, Arizona. After initial inspections at AMARG demonstrated that the test article was of sufficient fidelity to be of interest, the test article was brought to JSC to continue material analysis and historical documentation of the Titan Transtage. The Transtage will be a subject of forensic analysis using spectral measurements to compare with telescopic data; as well, a scale model will be created to use in the Optical Measurement Center for photometric analysis of an intact Transtage, including a BRDF. The following presentation will provide a review of the Titan Transtage, the current analysis that has been done to date, and the future work to be completed in support of characterizing the GEO and near GEO orbital debris environment.

  11. Ionic and electronic conductivity in lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukamp, Bernard A.; Pham thi ngoc mai, P.T.N.M.; Blank, David H.A.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate impedance measurements on differently sized samples of lead–zirconate–titanate (PbZr0.53Ti0.47O3, PZT) have been analyzed with a CNLS procedure, resulting in the separation of the ionic and electronic conductivities over a temperature range from f150 to 630 jC. At 603 jC the electronic

  12. Optimized antimicrobial and antiproliferative activities of titanate nanofibers containing silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su YH

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Yong Hua Su*, Zi Fei Yin*, Hai Liang Xin, Hui Qing Zhang, Jia Yu Sheng, Yan Long Yang, Juan Du, Chang Quan LingDepartment of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Changhai Hospital, The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equallyAbstract: Titanate nanofibers containing silver have been demonstrated through the experiments reported herein to have effective antifungal and antiproliferative activities in the presence of UV light. The titanate nanofibers containing silver can be fabricated by means of ion exchange followed by a topochemical process in an environment suitable for reductive reactions. Excellent antibacterial, antifungal, and antiproliferative activities could be demonstrated by both Ag2Ti5O11 · xH2O and Ag/titanate (UV light irradiation due to their unique structures and compositions, which have photocatalytic activities to generate reactive oxygen species and capabilities to continuously release the silver ions. Therefore these materials have the potential to produce a membrane for the treatment of superficial malignant tumor, esophageal cancer, or cervical carcinoma. They may also hold utility if incorporated into a coating on stents in moderate and advanced stage esophageal carcinoma or for endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage. These approaches may significantly reduce infections, inhibit tumor growth, and importantly, improve quality of life and prolong survival time for patients with tumors.Keywords: silver, titanate, photocatalytic, antiproliferative, antimicrobial

  13. Large Abundances of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Moriconi, M. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 micron in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al.We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 micron. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) × 10(exp 4) particles / cubic cm. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is approx 430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 sq. nm; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  14. Hybrid n-Alkylamine Intercalated Layered Titanates for Solid Lubrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Rodriguez, P.; Yuan, H.; van den Nieuwenhuijzen, Karin Jacqueline Huberta; Lette, W.; Schipper, Dirk J.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2016-01-01

    The intercalation of different primary n-alkylamines in the structure of a layered titanate of the lepidocrocite type (H1.07Ti1.73O4) for application in high-temperature solid lubrication is reported. The intercalation process of the amines was explored by means of in situ small-angle X-ray

  15. Synthesis and characterization of pyrochlore-type yttrium titanate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    result in better behaviour in hydrogen storage. Keywords. Yttrium titanate; sol–gel method; synthesis. ... cursor, in which metal ions are uniformly distributed. During the calcination step the polymeric network col- ... mined using an EDX spectrometer attached to the FESEM. (FESEM, JSM-7001F, JEOL Japan). TEM samples ...

  16. Production and global transport of Titan's sand particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jason W.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Radebaugh, Jani; Hayes, Alexander G.; Arnold, Karl; Chandler, Clayton

    2015-06-01

    Previous authors have suggested that Titan's individual sand particles form by either sintering or by lithification and erosion. We suggest two new mechanisms for the production of Titan's organic sand particles that would occur within bodies of liquid: flocculation and evaporitic precipitation. Such production mechanisms would suggest discrete sand sources in dry lakebeds. We search for such sources, but find no convincing candidates with the present Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer coverage. As a result we propose that Titan's equatorial dunes may represent a single, global sand sea with west-to-east transport providing sources and sinks for sand in each interconnected basin. The sand might then be transported around Xanadu by fast-moving Barchan dune chains and/or fluvial transport in transient riverbeds. A river at the Xanadu/Shangri-La border could explain the sharp edge of the sand sea there, much like the Kuiseb River stops the Namib Sand Sea in southwest Africa on Earth. Future missions could use the composition of Titan's sands to constrain the global hydrocarbon cycle.

  17. Are Titan's radial Labyrinth terrains surface expressions of large laccoliths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurmeier, L.; Dombard, A. J.; Malaska, M.; Radebaugh, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Labyrinth terrain unit may be the one of the best examples of the surface expression of Titan's complicated history. They are characterized as highly eroded, dissected, and elevated plateaus and remnant ridges, with an assumed composition that is likely organic-rich based on radar emissivity. How these features accumulated organic-rich sediments and formed topographic highs by either locally uplifting or surviving pervasive regional deflation or erosion is an important question for understanding the history of Titan. There are several subsets of Labyrinth terrains, presumably with differing evolutionary histories and formation processes. We aim to explain the formation of a subset of Labyrinth terrain units informally referred to as "radial Labyrinth terrains." They are elevated and appear dome-like, circular in planform, have a strong radial dissection pattern, are bordered by Undifferentiated Plains units, and are found in the mid-latitudes. Based on their shape, clustering, and dimensions, we suggest that they may be the surface expression of large subsurface laccoliths. A recent study by Manga and Michaut (Icarus, 2017) explained Europa's lenticulae (pits, domes, spots) with the formation of saucer-shaped sills that form laccoliths around the brittle-ductile transition depth within the ice shell (1-5 km). Here, we apply the same scaling relationships and find that the larger size of radial labyrinth terrains with Titan's higher gravity implies deeper intrusion depths of around 20-40 km. This intrusion depth matches the expected brittle-ductile transition on Titan based on our finite element simulations and yield strength envelope analyses. We hypothesize that Titan's radial labyrinth terrains formed as cryovolcanic (water) intrusions that rose to the brittle-ductile transition within the ice shell where they spread horizontally, and uplifted the overlying ice. The organic-rich sedimentary cover also uplifted, becoming more susceptible to pluvial and fluvial

  18. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  19. Zirconia based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressiani, J.C.; Bressiani, A.H.A.

    1989-05-01

    Within the new generation of ceramic materials, zirconia continues to attract ever increasing attention of scients, technologists and users by virtue of its singular combination of properties and being able to perform thermo-mechanical, electroeletronic, chemico-biological functions. Nevertheless, in order to obtain these properties, a through understanding of the phase transformation mechanisms and microstructural changes is necessary. This paper discusses the main parameters that require control during fabrication of these materials to obtain desired properties for a specific application. (author) [pt

  20. Transformation Toughening of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    irilugal Coimoi’datiio of Ai:0, and Al.O,/ZrO1 Compositte Slurries vit December 1991 Enhanced Fracture Toughness in Layered Microcomposites of Ce-ZrOz and...34 Nature (London), 258, 703-705 (1975). 2. K.E. Tsukuma and M. Shimada, *Strength, Fracture Toughness, and Vickers Hardness of CeO2 -Stabilized Tetragonal...Transformation Plasticity of CeO2 -stabllized Tetragonal Zirconia Polycrystals and I Stress Assistance and Autocatalysis," 3. Am. Ceram. Soc. 72(5] 343-53