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Sample records for stanford university stanford

  1. 77 FR 59968 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY... the cultural items may contact the Stanford University Archaeology Center. DATES: Representatives of... to repatriate cultural items in the possession of the Stanford University Archaeology Center that...

  2. 77 FR 59661 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology Center has completed an inventory of... determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and a present-day Indian tribe...

  3. 77 FR 59660 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology Center has completed an inventory of... has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and present-day Indian...

  4. The Stanford University US-Japan Technology Management Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dasher, Richard

    2002-01-01

    This grant established the U.S.-Japan Technology Management Center, Stanford University School of Engineering, as an ongoing center of excellence for the study of emerging trends and interrelationships between technology...

  5. Computing at Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenbaum, Edward A.; Nielsen, Norman R.

    1969-01-01

    This article provides a current status report on the computing and computer science activities at Stanford University, focusing on the Computer Science Department, the Stanford Computation Center, the recently established regional computing network, and the Institute for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences. Also considered are such topics…

  6. Stanford University: The Building Energy Retrofit Programs. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Stanford University's Energy Retrofit Program was created in 1993 to target resource reduction and conservation focused projects on campus. Fahmida Ahmed, Associate Director of the Department of Sustainability and Energy Management, says that Stanford has been investing in sustainability and energy-efficiency since the late 1970s, longer than many…

  7. Stanford's linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, B.

    1985-01-01

    The peak of the construction phase of the Stanford Linear Collider, SLC, to achieve 50 GeV electron-positron collisions has now been passed. The work remains on schedule to attempt colliding beams, initially at comparatively low luminosity, early in 1987. (orig./HSI).

  8. Travel funds for Stanford University to Host Mott MURI Annual Review and Oxide Workshop, August 6-8, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-25

    Travel funds for Stanford University to host Mott MURI Annual Review and Oxide Workshop, August 6-8, 2013 In conjunction with a program review for...Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Travel funds for Stanford University to host Mott MURI Annual Review and Oxide

  9. STANFORD: Internal targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riordan, Michael

    1989-05-15

    Of burgeoning interest to many nuclear and particle physicists is a storage ring technique for fixed target experiments. It hinges on the use of gas-jet targets, shooting a narrow stream of atoms through a circulating beam of electrons or protons. Pioneered at CERN and the Soviet Novosibirsk Laboratory, more such 'internal targets' are being built or contemplated for storage rings in Europe, the Soviet Union, and the United States. From 9-12 January, physicists from around the world met at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to discuss prospects and problems in this expanding field.

  10. The Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is the first and only high-energy e + e - linear collider in the world. Its most remarkable features are high intensity, submicron sized, polarized (e - ) beams at a single interaction point. The main challenges posed by these unique characteristics include machine-wide emittance preservation, consistent high intensity operation, polarized electron production and transport, and the achievement of a high degree of beam stability on all time scales. In addition to serving as an important machine for the study of Z 0 boson production and decay using polarized beams, the SLC is also an indispensable source of hands-on experience for future linear colliders. Each new year of operation has been highlighted with a marked improvement in performance. The most significant improvements for the 1994-95 run include new low impedance vacuum chambers for the damping rings, an upgrade to the optics and diagnostics of the final focus systems, and a higher degree of polarization from the electron source. As a result, the average luminosity has nearly doubled over the previous year with peaks approaching 10 30 cm -2 s -1 and an 80% electron polarization at the interaction point. These developments as well as the remaining identifiable performance limitations will be discussed

  11. The Global Climate and Energy Project at Stanford University: Fundamental Research Towards Future Energy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Jennifer L.; Sassoon, Richard E.; Hung, Emilie; Bosshard, Paolo; Benson, Sally M.

    The Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP), at Stanford University, invests in research with the potential to lead to energy technologies with lower greenhouse gas emissions than current energy technologies. GCEP is sponsored by four international companies, ExxonMobil, GE, Schlumberger, and Toyota and supports research programs in academic institutions worldwide. Research falls into the broad areas of carbon based energy systems, renewables, electrochemistry, and the electric grid. Within these areas research efforts are underway that are aimed at achieving break-throughs and innovations that greatly improve efficiency, performance, functionality and cost of many potential energy technologies of the future including solar, batteries, fuel cells, biofuels, hydrogen storage and carbon capture and storage. This paper presents a summary of some of GCEP's activities over the past 7 years with current research areas of interest and potential research directions in the near future.

  12. STANFORD (SLAC): Precision electroweak result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Precision testing of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model has intensified with the recent publication* of results from the SLD collaboration's 1993 run on the Stanford Linear Collider, SLC. Using a highly polarized electron beam colliding with an unpolarized positron beam, SLD physicists measured the left-right asymmetry at the Z boson resonance with dramatically improved accuracy over 1992

  13. New Stanford collider starts at Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    On 11 April the new SLC Stanford Linear Collider created its first Z particle, inaugurating high energy physics research at this novel machine based on the two-mile linac at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre, SLAC. (orig./HSI).

  14. NOVOSIBIRSK/STANFORD: colliding linac beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Plans to use colliding beams from linear accelerators are being considered at Novosibirsk and Stanford. The VLEPP scheme proposed for Novosibirsk and the Stanford single pass collider scheme are described. (W.D.L.).

  15. Low power signal processing research at Stanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, J.; Williamson, P. R.; Peterson, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the research being conducted at Stanford University's Space, Telecommunications, and Radioscience Laboratory in the area of low energy computation. It discusses the work we are doing in large scale digital VLSI neural networks, interleaved processor and pipelined memory architectures, energy estimation and optimization, multichip module packaging, and low voltage digital logic.

  16. Stanford: SLC back in action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1990-05-15

    During January, Stanford's SLC Linear Collider began producing Z particles again after the major disruptions in October due to the Loma Prieta earthquake. What's more, the pulse repetition rate climbed smoothly from 60 to 120 Hz as part of the ongoing collider improvement programme. Although the SLC luminosity has not quite returned to its best pre-quake levels, the collider managed to produce enough Z particles to permit Mark II physicists to test their newly installed Vertex Detection System (VDS)

  17. Stanford Linear Collider magnet positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wand, B.T.

    1991-08-01

    For the installation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) the positioning and alignment of the beam line components was performed in several individual steps. In the following the general procedures for each step are outlined. The calculation of ideal coordinates for the magnets in the entire SLC will be discussed in detail. Special emphasis was given to the mathematical algorithms and geometry used in the programs to calculate these ideal positions. 35 refs., 21 figs

  18. Empowerment evaluation at the Stanford University School of Medicine: using a critical friend to improve the clerkship experience

    OpenAIRE

    Fetterman,David

    2009-01-01

    Empowerment evaluation was adopted by Stanford University's School of Medicine to engage in curricular reform. It was also used to prepare for an accreditation site visit. Empowerment evaluation is a guided form of self-evaluation. It was selected because the principles and practices of empowerment evaluation resonated with the collaborative and participatory nature of the curricular reform in the School. This article highlights one of the most important features of an empowerment evaluation:...

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  20. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs

  1. Stanford: SLC back in action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    During January, Stanford's SLC Linear Collider began producing Z particles again after the major disruptions in October due to the Loma Prieta earthquake. What's more, the pulse repetition rate climbed smoothly from 60 to 120 Hz as part of the ongoing collider improvement programme. Although the SLC luminosity has not quite returned to its best pre-quake levels, the collider managed to produce enough Z particles to permit Mark II physicists to test their newly installed Vertex Detection System (VDS)

  2. Stanford Lepton-Photon Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-10-15

    With CERN's new LEP electron-positron collider poised to make its physics debut, the physics at the 14th International Symposium on Lepton and Photon Interactions, held at Stanford from 7-12 August, featured a ripple of new results on the Z and W bosons, the carriers of respectively the electrically neutral and charged components of the weak nuclear force. These new W and Z results, combined with refined measurements in other sectors, have interesting implications for expected but as yet unseen particles, notably the sixth ('top') quark.

  3. Collaboration and Community Building in Summer Undergraduate Research Programs in the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevle, R. J.; Watson Nelson, T.; Harris, J. M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In 2012, the School of Earth Sciences (SES) at Stanford University sponsored two summer undergraduate research programs. Here we describe these programs and efforts to build a cohesive research cohort among the programs' diverse participants. The two programs, the Stanford School of Earth Sciences Undergraduate Research (SESUR) Program and Stanford School of Earth Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research in Geoscience and Engineering (SURGE) Program, serve different undergraduate populations and have somewhat different objectives, but both provide students with opportunities to work on strongly mentored yet individualized research projects. In addition to research, enrichment activities co-sponsored by both programs support the development of community within the combined SES summer undergraduate research cohort. Over the course of 6 to 9 months, the SESUR Program engages Stanford undergraduates, primarily rising sophomores and juniors, with opportunities to deeply explore Earth sciences research while learning about diverse areas of inquiry within SES. Now in its eleventh year, the SESUR experience incorporates the breadth of the scientific endeavor: finding an advisor, proposal writing, obtaining funding, conducting research, and presenting results. Goals of the SESUR program include (1) providing a challenging and rewarding research experience for undergraduates who wish to explore the Earth sciences; (2) fostering interdisciplinary study in the Earth sciences among the undergraduate population; and (3) encouraging students to major or minor in the Earth sciences and/or to complete advanced undergraduate research in one of the departments or programs within SES. The SURGE Program, now in its second year, draws high performing students, primarily rising juniors and seniors, from 14 colleges and universities nationwide, including Stanford. Seventy percent of SURGE students are from racial/ethnic backgrounds underrepresented in STEM fields, and approximately one

  4. Organization of the 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop by Stanford University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hogan, Mark [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Essentially all we know today and will learn in the future about the fundamental nature of matter is derived from probing it with directed beams of particles such as electrons, protons, neutrons, heavy ions, and photons. The resulting ability to “see” the building blocks of matter has had an immense impact on society and our standard of living. Over the last century, particle accelerators have changed the way we look at nature and the universe we live in and have become an integral part of the Nation’s technical infrastructure. Today, particle accelerators are essential tools of modern science and technology. The cost and capabilities of accelerators would be greatly enhanced by breakthroughs in acceleration methods and technology. For the last 32 years, the Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop has acted as the focal point for discussion and development of the most promising acceleration physics and technology. It is a particularly effective forum where the discussion is leveraged and promoted by the unique and demanding feature of the AAC Workshop: the working group structure, in which participants are asked to consider their contributions in terms of even larger problems to be solved. The 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC2014) Workshop was organized by Stanford University from July 13 - 18, 2014 at the Dolce Hays Mansion in San Jose, California. The conference had a record 282 attendees including 62 students. Attendees came from 11 countries representing 66 different institutions. The workshop format consisted of plenary sessions in the morning with topical leaders from around the world presenting the latest breakthroughs to the entire workshop. In the late morning and afternoons attendees broke out into eight different working groups for more detailed presentations and discussions that were summarized on the final day of the workshop. In addition, there were student tutorial presentations on two afternoons to provide in depth education and

  5. The Many Features of Stanford's Housing Maintenance Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Explains how Stanford University custom designed its own building maintenance and administration software package: the Housing Operations Maintenance Enterprise Resource (HOMER). Describes how HOMER relieved facility maintenance staff from some archaic systems, and its development and functionality. (GR)

  6. Survey on university governance system in U.S.A. Case study in Stanford University; Beikoku ni okeru daigaku governance system no chosa. Stanford daigaku no case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    In order to provide reference for the university reformation policy of Japan, the features and strength of the U.S. university management and operation systems were put into order and analyzed through a case study in Stamford University in the United States. In the U.S. research universities, it is not only how high the quality is in the faculties and researchers, but also how far the structuring has been advanced in the systems to manage and operate them efficiently, which supports the infrastructures of research activities. The 'research management and operation staff' is knowledgeable in the system to manage the inside of a university and the system to procure research funds from the government and foundations. The staff enhances the productivity of research activities by professionally handling various operations taking place in research laboratories. In association with increase of the size of research projects, those who have been experienced in industries, or those who have acquired the doctor's degree exist in a large number in the projects as the research management staff. In Japanese universities, management staff posts with high specialty to undertake the research management do not exist. This facts results in young researchers consuming a great amount of time for this work. (NEDO)

  7. Initial developments in the Stanford SQUIRT program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Christopher A.; Twiggs, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Stanford University's Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics has commenced full scale development of a new microsatellite initiative. Known as the satellite quick research testbed (SQUIRT) program, the project's goal is to produce student engineered satellites capable of servicing state-of-the-art research payloads on a yearly basis. This program is specifically designed to meet the education and research goals of the department's Satellite Systems Development Laboratory. SQUIRT vehicles are envisioned to consist of a 25 pound, 9 inch tall, 16 inch diameter hexagonal structure with complete processor, communications, power, thermal, and attitude subsystems. These spacecraft cater to low power, volume, and mass research experiments and student developed educational packages. Mission lifetimes of up to one year are considered. Through student participation, voluntary mentoring from the academic and industrial communities, and the extensive use of off-the-shelf components, the cash outlay target for SQUIRT class vehicles is $50,000. This paper discusses the educational and research issues surrounding the development of Stanford's spacecraft design curriculum and the formulation of the SQUIRT program. A technical review of the first SQUIRT satellite, named SAPPHIRE, and an outline of the conceptual plans for other missions is also presented. Additionally, initiatives concerning partner academic institutions and public domain design information are featured.

  8. Stanford survives 7.1 shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riordan, Michael

    1989-12-15

    The Monday morning of 16 October looked like the start of a quiet week at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). After a successful six-month physics run, the SLC Stanford Linear Collider was shut down to begin scheduled upgrades and the installation of two vertex detectors for the Mark II detector. Then at 5.04 p.m. the next day, the Earth's crust had had enough. A major earthquake measuring 7.1 on the Richter scale rocked the San Francisco Bay Area from an epicentre along the wicked San Andreas Fault in the Southern Santa Cruz mountains.

  9. Stanford survives 7.1 shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riordan, Michael

    1989-01-01

    The Monday morning of 16 October looked like the start of a quiet week at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). After a successful six-month physics run, the SLC Stanford Linear Collider was shut down to begin scheduled upgrades and the installation of two vertex detectors for the Mark II detector. Then at 5.04 p.m. the next day, the Earth's crust had had enough. A major earthquake measuring 7.1 on the Richter scale rocked the San Francisco Bay Area from an epicentre along the wicked San Andreas Fault in the Southern Santa Cruz mountains

  10. What John Browne actually said at Stanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    In May 1997, the Chief Executive of BP, John Browne, delivered a speech on global climate change at Stanford University, California. A shortened version of the speech is presented. BP have accepted the possibility of a link between greenhouse gas emissions and climate change and are basing their policies on that acceptance. The company is committed to a step-by-step process, involving both action to develop solutions and continuing research to improve knowledge, that will balance the requirements of economic development and environmental protection. Five specific steps are outlined. These are: the monitoring and controlling of carbon dioxide emissions in all aspects of the company's operations increasing the level of support given to continuing scientific work on climate change; technology transfer and joint implementation with other parties to limit and reduce net emission levels; the development of alternative energy sources, in particular, solar power; contributing to the public policy debate in search of wider global answers to the problem. (Author)

  11. The status of the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiening, R.

    1987-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider is described, and the status of commissioning of the major SLC systems is given, including the electron source and 1.2 GeV linac, storage rings, 50 GeV linac, and positron source. Beam transport between the linac and final focus, and the final focus optical system are described

  12. BERKELEY/STANFORD: B factory plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    For the past several years, accelerator physicists at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) have been involved in the design of an Asymmetric B Factory to be sited in the tunnel of the PEP electron-positron collider at SLAC

  13. STANFORD: Producing highly polarized electrons (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Electron spin polarization above 70% by photoemission from a specially prepared semiconductor has been achieved by T. Maruyama and E. Garwin of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), R. Prepost and G. Zapalac of Wisconsin, and J. Walker and S. Smith of Berkeley

  14. Working Paper on the Future of Library Automation at Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David C.

    A number of important factors require Stanford University to review the progress and future implications of technological innovations in the library for the community of scholars which it serves. These factors include: The general economic climate of the University in 1971 and in the immediate years ahead; The problem of future funding of the…

  15. Stanford, Duke, Rice,... and Gates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to Bill Gates. In his letter, the author suggests that Bill Gates should build a brand-new university, a great 21st-century institution of higher learning. This university will be unlike anything the world has ever seen. He asks Bill Gates not to stop helping existing colleges create the higher-education system…

  16. 7 March 2013 -Stanford University Professor N. McKeown FREng, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and B. Leslie, Creative Labs visiting CERN Control Centre and the LHC tunnel with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    7 March 2013 -Stanford University Professor N. McKeown FREng, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and B. Leslie, Creative Labs visiting CERN Control Centre and the LHC tunnel with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  17. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center selects Verity Ultraseek for public and internal Web Sites

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Verity Inc., a provider of enterprise software has announced the latest version of its powerful, downloadable Verity(R) Ultraseek(R) enterprise search engine is being used by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, a research facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Stanford University (1/2 page).

  18. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior…

  19. STANFORD (SLAC): B factory construction begins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1994-03-15

    At a ceremony marking the start of construction, members of the US Congress and Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary hailed the new Asymmetric B Factory as the key to continued vitality of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Being built in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the B factory is a $177 million upgrade of the existing PEP electron-positron collider. Scheduled for completion in 1998, the B factory will generate many millions of B mesons, allowing, among other physics, an intensive search for the phenomena of CP violation in the decays of these particles.

  20. Bunch compression at the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzapple, R.L.; Decker, F.J.; Simopoulos, C.

    1995-08-01

    The production and measurement of short electron and positron bunches in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will be presented in this paper. The bunches are compressed in a transport line between the damping rings and the linac. The electron and positron bunch distributions in the SLC linac have been measured using a Hamamatsu, model N3373-02, 500-femtosecond streak camera. The distributions were measured at the end of the SLC linac versus the bunch compressor RF voltage. The measurements are compared with simulations

  1. STANFORD (SLAC): B factory construction begins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    At a ceremony marking the start of construction, members of the US Congress and Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary hailed the new Asymmetric B Factory as the key to continued vitality of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Being built in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the B factory is a $177 million upgrade of the existing PEP electron-positron collider. Scheduled for completion in 1998, the B factory will generate many millions of B mesons, allowing, among other physics, an intensive search for the phenomena of CP violation in the decays of these particles

  2. LIONs at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, T.N.; Zdarko, R.W.; Simmons, R.H.; Bennett, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    The term LION is an acronym for Long Ionization Chamber. This is a distributed ion chamber which is used to monitor secondary ionization along the shield walls of a beam line resulting from incorrectly steered charged particle beams in lieu of the use of many discrete ion chambers. A cone of ionizing radiation emanating from a point source as a result of incorrect steering intercepts a portion of 1-5/8 inch Heliax cable (about 100 meters in length) filled with Argon gas at 20 psi and induces a pulsed current which is proportional to the ionizing charge. This signal is transmitted via the cable to an integrator circuit whose output is directed to an electronic comparators, which in turn is used to turn off the accelerated primary beam when preset limits are exceeded. This device is used in the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Beam Containment System (BCS) to prevent potentially hazardous ionizing radiation resulting from incorrectly steered beams in areas that might be occupied by people. This paper describes the design parameters and experience in use in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) area of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

  3. Dazzling new light source opens at Stanford synchrotron radiation laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    SPEAR3, the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring, was formally opened at a dedication ceremony at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center on Jan. 29. It incorporates the latest technology to make it competitive with the best synchrotron sources in the world (1/2 page)

  4. The Role of Research Universities in Helping Solve our Energy Challenges: A Case Study at Stanford and SLAC (2011 EFRC Summit)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennessey, John

    2011-01-01

    The first speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled 'Leading Perspectives in Energy Research' was John Hennessey, President of Stanford University. He discussed the important role that the academic world plays as a partner in innovative energy research by presenting a case study involving Stanford and SLAC. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss 'Science for our Nation's Energy Future.' In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  5. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB 66 crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing

  6. STANFORD: Highly polarized SLC electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Using specialized photocathodes made with 'strained' gallium arsenide, physicists at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) have generated electron beams with polarizations in excess of 60 percent a year ahead of schedule. Together with recent luminosity increases, this breakthrough will have a major impact on the physics output of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Beam polarization was almost tripled using photocathodes in which a gallium arsenide layer was grown epitaxially over a substrate of gallium arsenide phosphide. The mismatch between these two layers deforms the crystal structure and removes a degeneracy in the valence band structure, permitting selective optical pumping of one unique spin state. Whereas conventional gallium arsenide photocathodes are limited to 50 percent polarization because of this degeneracy (and realistic cathodes fall substantially below this theoretical limit), such strained crystal lattices have the potential to yield polarizations close to 100 percent. Polarization enhancement with strained lattices was first demonstrated in 1991 by a SLAC/Wisconsin/ Berkeley group (May 1991, page 6) with a 71 percent polarization in a laboratory experiment. More recently this group has achieved polarization in excess of 90 percent, reported last November at the Nagoya Spin Symposium. (In a complementary development, a Japanese KEK/ Nagoya/KEK obtains polarized beams using a 'superlattice' - May 1991, page 4.) The 1993 SLC run, the strained gallium arsenide photocathode technique's debut in an operating particle accelerator, has proved to be a resounding, unqualified success - as have physics experiments on the Z particles produced by the highly polarized beam. A conservative approach was called for, due to concerns about possible charge saturation effects. A relatively thick (0.3 micron) gallium arsenide layer was used for the photocathode in the SLC polarized electron source. With a titanium

  7. Alignment of the stanford linear collider Arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitthan, R.; Bell, B.; Friedsam, H.

    1987-01-01

    The alignment of the Arcs for the Stanford Linear Collider at SLAC has posed problems in accelerator survey and alignment not encountered before. These problems come less from the tight tolerances of 0.1 mm, although reaching such a tight statistically defined accuracy in a controlled manner is difficult enough, but from the absence of a common reference plane for the Arcs. Traditional circular accelerators, including HERA and LEP, have been designed in one plane referenced to local gravity. For the SLC Arcs no such single plane exists. Methods and concepts developed to solve these and other problems, connected with the unique design of SLC, range from the first use of satellites for accelerator alignment, use of electronic laser theodolites for placement of components, computer control of the manual adjustment process, complete automation of the data flow incorporating the most advanced concepts of geodesy, strict separation of survey and alignment, to linear principal component analysis for the final statistical smoothing of the mechanical components

  8. Phase and amplitude detection system for the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.D.; Schwarz, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    A computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system to measure and stabilize the rf power sources in the Stanford Linear Accelerator is described. This system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 microsecond 2856 MHz rf pulse and will be used for phase feedback control and for amplitude and phase jitter detection. This paper discusses the measurement system performance requirements for the operation of the Stanford Linear Collider, and the design and implementation of the phase and amplitude detection system. The fundamental software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system

  9. Engineering aspects of the Stanford relativity gyro experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.; Debra, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    According to certain theoretical predictions, the Newtonian laws of motion must be corrected for the effect of a gravitational field. Schiff (1960) proposed an experiment which would demonstrate the effect predicted by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity on a gyroscope. The experiment has been under development at Stanford University since 1961. The requirements involved make it necessary that the test be performed in a satellite to take advantage of weightlessness in space. In a discussion of engineering developments related to the experiment, attention is given to the development of proportional helium thrusters, the simulation of the attitude control system, aspects of inner loop control, the mechanization of the two-loop attitude control system, the effects of helium slosh on spacecraft pointing, and the data instrumentation system.

  10. Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.; Milovich, Marilyn M.; Moussier, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the coverage of Stanford prison experiment (SPE), including criticisms of the study, in introductory psychology courses through an online survey of introductory psychology instructors (N = 117). Results largely paralleled those of the recently published textbook analyses with ethical issues garnering the most coverage,…

  11. Information Systems to Support a Decision Process at Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle

    1982-01-01

    When a rational decision process is desired, information specialists can contribute information and also contribute to the process in which that information is used, thereby promoting rational decision-making. The contribution of Stanford's information specialists to rational decision-making is described. (MLW)

  12. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal RE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rachel E Rizal,1,* Rishi P Mediratta,1,* James Xie,1 Swetha Kambhampati,1 Kelsey Hills-Evans,1 Tamara Montacute,1 Michael Zhang,1 Catherine Zaw,2 Jimmy He,2 Magali Sanchez,2 Lauren Pischel1 1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful service-learning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program’s outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians. Keywords: immunizations, vaccine delivery, vaccinations 

  13. Positron--electron storage ring project: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California. Final environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    A final environmental statement is given which was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act to support the Energy Research and Development Administration project to design and construct the positron-electron colliding beam storage ring (PEP) facilities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The PEP storage ring will be constructed underground adjacent to the existing two-mile long SLAC particle accelerator to utilize its beam. The ring will be about 700 meters in diameter, buried at depths of 20 to 100 feet, and located at the eastern extremity of the SLAC site. Positron and electron beams will collide in the storage ring to provide higher energies and hence higher particle velocities than have been heretofore achieved. Some of the energy from the collisions is transformed back into matter and produces a variety of particles of immense interest to physicists. The environmental impacts during the estimated two and one-half years construction period will consist of movement of an estimated 320,000 cubic yards of earth and the creation of some rubble, refuse, and dust and noise which will be kept to a practical minimum through planned construction procedures. The terrain will be restored to very nearly its original conditions. Normal operation of the storage ring facility will not produce significant adverse environmental effects different from operation of the existing facilities and the addition of one water cooling tower. No overall increase in SLAC staff is anticipated for operation of the facility. Alternatives to the proposed project that were considered include: termination, postponement, other locations and construction of a conventional high energy accelerator

  14. An Integrated Career Coaching and Time-Banking System Promoting Flexibility, Wellness, and Success: A Pilot Program at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassiotto, Magali; Simard, Caroline; Sandborg, Christy; Valantine, Hannah; Raymond, Jennifer

    2018-06-01

    Faculty in academic medicine experience multiple demands on their time at work and home, which can become a source of stress and dissatisfaction, compromising success. A taskforce convened to diagnose the state of work-life flexibility at Stanford University School of Medicine uncovered two major sources of conflict: work-life conflict, caused by juggling demands of career and home; and work-work conflict, caused by competing priorities of the research, teaching, and clinical missions combined with service and administrative tasks. Using human-centered design research principles, the 2013-2014 Academic Biomedical Career Customization (ABCC) pilot program incorporated two elements to mitigate work-life and work-work conflict: integrated career-life planning, coaching to create a customized plan to meet both career and life goals; and a time-banking system, recognizing behaviors that promote team success with benefits that mitigate work-life and work-work conflicts. A matched-sample pre-post evaluation survey found the two-part program increased perceptions of a culture of flexibility (P = .020), wellness (P = .013), understanding of professional development opportunities (P = .036), and institutional satisfaction (P = .020) among participants. In addition, analysis of research productivity indicated that over the two-year program, ABCC participants received 1.3 more awards, on average, compared with a matched set of nonparticipants, a funding difference of approximately $1.1 million per person. These results suggest it is possible to mitigate the effects of extreme time pressure on academic medicine faculty, even within existing institutional structures.

  15. 1998 NASA-ASEE-Stanford Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the essential features and highlights of the 1998 Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at Ames Research Center and Dryden Flight Research Center in a comprehensive and concise form. Summary reports describing the fellows' technical accomplishments are enclosed in the attached technical report. The proposal for the 1999 NASA-ASEE-Stanford Summer Faculty Fellowship Program is being submitted under separate cover. Of the 31 participating fellows, 27 were at Ames and 4 were at Dryden. The Program's central feature is the active participation by each fellow in one of the key technical activities currently under way at either the NASA Ames Research Center or the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The research topic is carefully chosen in advance to satisfy the criteria of: (1) importance to NASA, (2) high technical level, and (3) a good match to the interests, ability, and experience of the fellow, with the implied possibility of NASA-supported follow-on work at the fellow's home institution. Other features of the Summer Faculty Fellowship Program include participation by the fellows in workshops and seminars at Stanford, the Ames Research Center, and other off-site locations. These enrichment programs take place either directly or remotely, via the Stanford Center for Professional Development, and also involve specific interactions between fellows and Stanford faculty on technical and other academic subjects. A few, brief remarks are in order to summarize the fellows' opinions of the summer program. It is noteworthy that 90% of the fellows gave the NASA-Ames/Dryden- Stanford program an "excellent" rating and the remaining 10%, "good." Also, 100% would recommend the program to their colleagues as an effective means of furthering their professional development as teachers and researchers. Last, but not least, 87% of the fellows stated that a continuing research relationship with their NASA colleagues' organization probably would be maintained. Therefore

  16. Optimization on Trajectory of Stanford Manipulator based on Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Xi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of robot manipulator’s trajectory has become a hot topic in academic and industrial fields. In this paper, a method for minimizing the moving distance of robot manipulators is presented. The Stanford Manipulator is used as the research object and the inverse kinematics model is established with Denavit-Hartenberg method. Base on the initial posture matrix, the inverse kinematics model is used to find the initial state of each joint. In accordance with the given beginning moment, cubic polynomial interpolation is applied to each joint variable and the positive kinematic model is used to calculate the moving distance of end effector. Genetic algorithm is used to optimize the sequential order of each joint and the time difference between different starting time of joints. Numerical applications involving a Stanford manipulator are presented.

  17. A new timing system for the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paffrath, L.; Bernstein, D.; Kang, H.; Koontz, R.; Leger, G.; Pierce, W.; Ross, M.; Wilmunder, A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to be able to meet the goals of the Stanford Linear Collider, a much more precise timing system had to be implemented. This paper describes the specification and design of this system, and the results obtained from its use on 1/3 of the SLAC linac. The functions of various elements are described, and a programmable delay unit (PDU) is described in detail

  18. Emittance calculations for the Stanford Linear Collider injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Clendenin, J.E.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Miller, R.H.; Blocker, C.A.

    1983-03-01

    A series of measurements have been performed to determine the emittance of the high intensity, single bunch beam that is to be injected into the Stanford Linear Collider. On-line computer programs were used to control the Linac for the purpose of data acquisition and to fit the data to a model in order to deduce the beam emittance. This paper will describe the method of emittance calculation and present some of the measurement results

  19. On-line control models for the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Helm, R.H.; Lee, M.J.; Woodley, M.D.

    1983-03-01

    Models for computer control of the SLAC three-kilometer linear accelerator and damping rings have been developed as part of the control system for the Stanford Linear Collider. Some of these models have been tested experimentally and implemented in the control program for routine linac operations. This paper will describe the development and implementation of these models, as well as some of the operational results

  20. Design and performance of the Stanford Linear Collider Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melen, R.E.

    1984-10-01

    The success of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) will be dependent upon the implementation of a very large advanced computer-based instrumentation and control system. This paper describes the architectural design of this system as well as a critique of its performance. This critique is based on experience obtained from its use in the control and monitoring of 1/3 of the SLAC linac and in support of an expensive experimental machine physics experimental program. 11 references, 3 figures

  1. Proceedings of the workshop on a comparative analysis of approaches to the protection of fissile materials, Stanford University, July 28-30, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodby, J.E.; Lehman, R. III; Potter, W.C.

    1998-01-01

    Events in recent years have caused heightened concern about the security of weapons-usable nuclear material. The possibility of illicit trafficking in, or seizure of, such material, leading to nuclear terrorism, is a worry for all states and their citizens. And given the relatively small quantities required, material obtained in one part of the world could be made into a weapon in another and threaten lives in a third. It is truly a global problem. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, the physical protection of fissile material has been a responsibility of the individual states possessing the material. These states have different organizational approaches for providing physical protection; and while cognizant of recommended general standards, they tend to follow their own practices, shaped by custom, costs, and threat perception. Moreover, the existence of military as well as civil programs in some states adds another dimension to the physical protection issue. Because physical protection is a sovereign matter and not part of an international regime (except for transit of civil material across borders), there has been less attention in much of the world community to the issues of physical protection than to the other elements of nuclear safeguards and controls. (An important exception to this situation is the effort being made to assist the states of the former Soviet Union in the disposition of their weapons-usable nuclear materials.) The lack of a general dialog about a problem of growing concern motivated us to hold a three-day workshop at Stanford University to develop a better understanding of some of the important underlying questions and issues, and to undertake a comparative examination of states' approaches to physical protection. We were pleased to have knowledgeable participants from a number of the countries and regions where physical protection of fissile materials is, or will become, a day-to-day matter. The results of the workshop are reported in

  2. Temporal Trends in Clinical and Pathological Characteristics for Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy Between 1995 and 2013 at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, and Stanford University Hospital, United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Mathias Dyrberg; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Kjaer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze how prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening and practice patterns has affected trends in tumor characteristics in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) in the United States and Denmark. Unlike in the United States, PSA screening has not been recommended in Denmark...... evaluated with Cochran-Armitage test for trends and chi-square testing. Results: A total of 4404 patients were included. Temporal changes in preoperative PSA, age, grade, and stage was found in both cohorts. Median preoperative PSA declined in both cohorts, while median age increased, with the Danish cohort...... showing the greatest changes in both PSA and age. In both cohorts, there was a trend for higher-risk preoperative features before RP over time. In 2010-2013, 27.7% and 21.8% of the patients were in the D'Amico high-risk group at Copenhagen and Stanford, respectively. Conclusion: Despite recommendation...

  3. Rethinking the Relationship Between Academia and Industry: Qualitative Case Studies of MIT and Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengliang; Hawk, Soaring

    2016-10-01

    As knowledge has become more closely tied to economic development, the interrelationship between academia and industry has become stronger. The result has been the emergence of what Slaughter and Leslie call academic capitalism. Inevitably, tensions between academia and industry arise; however, universities such as MIT and Stanford with long traditions of industry interaction have been able to achieve a balance between academic and market values. This paper describes the strategies adopted by MIT and Stanford to achieve this balance. The results indicate that implicit culture is a stronger determinant of balance than are explicit rules. Finally, the author proposes a concept of balance to reconsider the relationship between academia and industry: today's universities, particularly those with strengths in engineering and management, are both symbiotic and interdependent with industry. A reasonable attitude toward the university-industry relationship is that of balance rather than strict separation. Universities can thus establish effective mechanisms to reach a balance between conflicting values.

  4. The prototype design of the Stanford Relativity Gyro Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Bradford W.; Everitt, C. W. Francis; Turneaure, John P.; Parmley, Richard T.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford Relativity Gyroscope Experiment constitutes a fundamental test of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, probing such heretofore untested aspects of the theory as those that relate to spin by means of drag-free satellite-borne gyroscopes. General Relativity's prediction of two orthogonal precessions (motional and geodetic) for a perfect Newtonian gyroscope in polar orbit has not yet been experimentally assessed, and will mark a significant advancement in experimental gravitation. The technology employed in the experiment has been under development for 25 years at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Four fused quartz gyroscopes will be used.

  5. Optimalisasi Ukuran Manipulabilitas Robot Stanford Menggunakan Metode Pseudo-inverse

    OpenAIRE

    admin, Gina Fahrina

    2013-01-01

    Robot is one of the most important element in the industrial world which has been growing very rapidly. Stanford robot arm is one of robot that use in industry, it has five degrees of freedom (DOF). Movement of the robot arm in his workspace called manipulability or manipulability measure. More the optimal manipulability measure manipulator, the more movement of the robotic arm will be more flexible in his workspace. The purpose of this research are to get knowledge and learn how to solve inv...

  6. Redefining Scientist-Educator Partnerships: Science in Service at Stanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, K.

    2005-05-01

    The Stanford Solar Observatories Group and Haas Center for Public Service have created an innovative model for scientist-educator partnerships in which science students are trained and mentored by public service education professionals to create outreach events for local communities. The program, Science in Service, is part of the EPO plan for the Solar Group's participation in NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission. Based on the principles of service learning, the Science in Service Program mentors college science students in best practices for communicating science and engages these students in public service projects that center on teaching solar science. The program goals are to - Enhance and expand the learning experiences that pre-college students, from underserved and underrepresented groups in particular, have in science and technology. - Promote leadership in community service in the area of science and engineering among the next generation of scientists and engineers, today's undergraduate students. - Encourage science and engineering faculty to think creatively about their outreach requirements and to create a community of faculty committed to quality outreach programs. This talk will describe the unique advantages and challenges of a research-public service partnership, explain the structure of Stanford's Science in Service Program, and present the experiences of the undergraduates and the outreach communities that have been involved in the program.

  7. Tiger Team Assessment of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) near San Francisco, California. SLAC/SSRL is the twenty-eighth DOE site to be assessed by a Tiger Team. SLAC and SSRL are single-purpose laboratories. SLAC is dedicated to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and to the development of new techniques in high-energy accelerators and elementary particle detectors. SSRL is dedicated to research in atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. The purpose of the SLAC/SSRL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on the following: current ES ampersand H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; adequacy of DOE and SLAC/SSRL ES ampersand H management programs; response actions to address identified problem areas; and effectiveness of self-assessment

  8. SLC status and SLAC [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center] future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1989-08-01

    In this presentation, I shall discuss the linear collider program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as it is now, and as we hope to see it evolve over the next few years. Of greatest interest to the high energy accelerator physics community gathered here is the development of the linear collider concept, and so I shall concentrate most of this paper on a discussion of the present status and future evolution of the SLC. I will also briefly discuss the research and development program that we are carrying out aimed at the realization of the next generation of high-energy linear colliders. SLAC had a major colliding-beam storage-ring program as well, including present rings and design studies on future high-luminosity projects, but time constraints preclude a discussion of them. 8 figs., 3 tabs

  9. User issues at the Stanford picosecond free electron laser center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.I.

    1995-01-01

    Assembling a productive user facility around a Free Electron Laser (FEL) is a complex task. Reliable operation of the FEL is a necessary, but by no means sufficient, condition to ensure that the center will be able to attract and keep the interest of first rate researchers. Some other issues which are important include: center wavelength stability and ease of tuning, bandwidth control, amplitude and position stability, ability to select arbitrary sequences of micropulses, and real time availability of information of the FEL's important parameters (spectral width, center wavelength, micropulse length and energy, etc.). In addition, at the Stanford Center we have found that providing additional systems (conventional picosecond lasers synchronized to the FEL, an FTIR spectrometer, a confocal microscopy, ...) has been important. (author)

  10. MOOCs and the AI-Stanford Like Courses: Two Successful and Distinct Course Formats for Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C. Osvaldo

    2012-01-01

    Open online courses (OOC) with a massive number of students have represented an important development for online education in the past years. A course on artificial intelligence, CS221, at the University of Stanford was offered in the fall of 2011 free and online which attracted 160,000 registered students. It was one of three offered as an…

  11. Environmental Management Assessment of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Management Assessment of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Menlo Park, California. During this assessment, the activities conducted by the assessment team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous assessments; interviews with the US Department of Energy (DOE), US Environmental Protection Agency, State Water Resources Board, California Regional Water Quality Control Board, and SLAC contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. Onsite portion of the assessment was conducted from January 18 through January 31, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH), and the Environment and Safety Support Division (ESS), located within the Oakland Operations Office (OAK). The EH-24 environmental management assessment and the OAK functional appraisal were combined to minimize disruptions to the site. The management disciplines and three technical areas (air quality, groundwater, and inactive waste sites) were evaluated by EH-24, and four other technical areas (surface water, waste management, toxic and chemical materials, and environmental radiation) were assessed by ESS

  12. Alignment of the Stanford Linear Collider Arcs: Concepts and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitthan, R.; Bell, B.; Friedsam, H.; Pietryka, M.; Oren, W.; Ruland, R.

    1987-02-01

    The alignment of the Arcs for the Stanford Linear Collider at SLAC has posed problems in accelerator survey and alignment not encountered before. These problems come less from the tight tolerances of 0.1 mm, although reaching such a tight statistically defined accuracy in a controlled manner is difficult enough, but from the absence of a common reference plane for the Arcs. Traditional circular accelerators, including HERA and LEP, have been designed in one plane referenced to local gravity. For the SLC Arcs no such single plane exists. Methods and concepts developed to solve these and other problems, connected with the unique design of SLC, range from the first use of satellites for accelerator alignment, use of electronic laser theodolites for placement of components, computer control of the manual adjustment process, complete automation of the data flow incorporating the most advanced concepts of geodesy, strict separation of survey and alignment, to linear principal component analysis for the final statistical smoothing of the mechanical components

  13. Bunch lengthening in the SLC [Stanford Linear Collider] damping rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K.L.F.

    1990-02-01

    A high level of current dependent bunch lengthening has been observed on the North damping ring of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). At currents of 3 x 10 10 this behavior does not appear to degrade the machine's performance significantly. However, at the higher currents that are envisioned for the future one fears that its performance could be greatly degraded due to the phenomenon of bunch lengthening. This was the motivation for the work described in this paper. In this paper we calculate the longitudinal impedance of the damping ring vacuum chamber. More specifically, in this paper we find the response function of the ring to a short Gaussian bunch, which we call the Green function wake. In addition, we try to estimate the relative importance of the different vacuum chamber objects, in order to see how we might reduce the ring impedance. This paper also describes bunch length measurements performed on the North damping ring. We use the Green function wake, discussed above, to compute the bunch lengthening. Then we compare these results with those obtained from the measurements. In addition, we calculate the current dependence of the tune distribution

  14. [Experiment studies of electron-positron interactions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzbach, S.S.; Kofler, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    The High Energy Physics group at the University of Massachusetts has continued its' program of experimental studies of electron-positron interactions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The group activities have included: analysis of data taken between 1982 and 1990 with the TPC detector at the PEP facility, continuing data collection and data analysis using the SLC/SLD facility, planning for the newly approved B-factory at SLAC, and participation in design studies for future high energy linear colliders. This report will briefly summarize these activities

  15. High Power Klystrons: Theory and Practice at the Stanford Linear Accelerator CenterPart I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caryotakis, G.

    2004-12-15

    This is Part I of a two-part report on design and manufacturing methods used at SLAC to produce accelerator klystrons. Chapter 1 begins with the history and applications for klystrons, in both of which Stanford University was extensively involved. The remaining chapters review the theory of klystron operation, derive the principal formulae used in their design, and discuss the assumptions that they involve. These formulae are subsequently used in small-signal calculations of the frequency response of a particular klystron, whose performance is also simulated by two different computer codes. The results of calculations and simulations are compared to the actual performance of the klystron.

  16. Application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in treating dwarfism with Stanford B aortic dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian; Cai, Wenwu; Shu, Chang; Li, Ming; Xiong, Qinggen; Li, Quanming; Li, Xin

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: To apply thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to treat dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. Patient concerns: In this report, we presented a 63-year-old male patient of dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection successfully treated with TEVAR. Diagnoses: He was diagnosed with dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. Interventions: After conservative treatment, the male patient underwent TEVAR at 1 week after hospitalization. After operation, he presented with numbness and weakness of his bilateral lower extremities, and these symptoms were significantly mitigated after effective treatment. At 1- and 3-week after TEVAR, the aorta status was maintained stable and restored. Outcomes: The patient obtained favorable clinical prognosis and was smoothly discharged. During subsequent follow-up, he remained physically stable. Lessons: TEVAR is probably an option for treating dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection, which remains to be validated by subsequent studies with larger sample size. PMID:29703033

  17. Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. receives architectural and engineering design contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. announced that a subsidiary company won a contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to provide architectural and engineering design services for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) conventional facilities" (1/2 page)

  18. Caroline B. Palmer: Pioneer Physician Anesthetist and First Chair of Anesthesia at Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B; Saidman, Lawrence J

    2015-12-01

    Caroline B. Palmer was appointed as Chief of Anesthesia at Cooper Medical College (soon renamed as Stanford Medical School) in 1909. For the next 28 years, she was an innovative leader, a clinical researcher, and a strong advocate for recognition of anesthesiology as a medical specialty. To honor her accomplishments, the operating room suite in the new Stanford Hospital will be named after this pioneering woman anesthesiologist.

  19. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Rachel E; Mediratta, Rishi P; Xie, James; Kambhampati, Swetha; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Montacute, Tamara; Zhang, Michael; Zaw, Catherine; He, Jimmy; Sanchez, Magali; Pischel, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful servicelearning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program's outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians.

  20. Stanford-Binet & WAIS IQ Differences and Their Implications for Adults with Intellectual Disability (aka Mental Retardation)

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, Wayne; Miezejeski, Charles; Ryan, Robert; Zigman, Warren; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon; Urv, Tiina

    2010-01-01

    Stanford-Binet and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) IQs were compared for a group of 74 adults with intellectual disability (ID). In every case, WAIS Full Scale IQ was higher than the Stanford-Binet Composite IQ, with a mean difference of 16.7 points. These differences did not appear to be due to the lower minimum possible score for the Stanford-Binet. Additional comparisons with other measures suggested that the WAIS might systematically underestimate severity of intellectual impairm...

  1. Stanford test called a net breakthrough - data sent at 3,500 times the speed of broadband

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at a Stanford University-affiliated research center have found a way to send data across the Internet more than 3,500 times faster than the typical broadband connection. The technical breakthrough set an Internet speed record too fast to be of use with present-day computers but could open the way for scientists to share and ship massive databases around the world, according to the researchers.

  2. Empowerment evaluation at the Stanford University School of Medicine: using a critical friend to improve the clerkship experience Evaluación de Concesión Legal de Poder de la Escuela de medicina de la Universidad de Stanford: usando un amigo crítico para mejorar la experiencia en la residencia Avaliação da concessão legal de poder da escola de medicina da Universidade de Stanford: usando um amigo crítico para melhorar a experiência na residência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fetterman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Empowerment evaluation was adopted by Stanford University's School of Medicine to engage in curricular reform. It was also used to prepare for an accreditation site visit. Empowerment evaluation is a guided form of self-evaluation. It was selected because the principles and practices of empowerment evaluation resonated with the collaborative and participatory nature of the curricular reform in the School. This article highlights one of the most important features of an empowerment evaluation: a critical friend. This individual has evaluation expertise but serves as a coach, advisor, or guide, rather than "the expert". The evaluation is in the hands of the people in the program, but a critical friend helps to keep it on track and rigorous. As one indication of the importance of this role, student ratings on selected clerkship rotations, where a critical friend was requested to respond to student concerns, resulted in significant increases in student ratings.La evaluación de concesión legal de poder fue adoptada por la Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad de Stanford para participar de la reforma curricular. También fue usada para preparar un credenciamento en un site de visita. La evaluación de concesión legal de poder es una forma guiada de autoevaluación. Los principios y prácticas de evaluación legal de poder corresponden harmoniosamente a la naturaleza colaboradora y participativa de la reforma curricular en la escuela. Este artigo destaca una de las más importantes características de la evaluación de concesión legal de poder: el amigo crítico. Este individuo tiene experiencia en evaluación, pero sirve como instructor, consejero y guía en lugar del "perito". La evaluación esta en las manos de las personas del programa, pero el amigo crítico ayuda a mantener el bueno camino y la precisión. Como un indicador de la importancia de ese papel, las evaluaciones de los alumnos en las escalas de residencia seleccionadas, donde un

  3. Construction and performance of a permanent earth anchor (tieback) system for the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obergfell, M.N.

    1987-02-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider is the newest addition to the high-energy physics research complex at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. One of the many unique features of this project is the large, underground pit, where massive particle detectors will study the collision of subatomic particles. The large, open pit utilizes nearly 600 permanent earth anchors (tiebacks) for the support of the 56 ft (17 m) high walls, and is one of the largest applications of tiebacks for permanent support of a structure. This paper examines the use of tiebacks on this project with emphasis on their installation and performance

  4. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deynes-Exclusa, Yazmin; Sayers-Montalvo, Sean K; Martinez-Taboas, Alfonso

    2011-04-01

    The only hypnotizability scale that has been translated and validated for the Puerto Rican population is the Barber Suggestibility Scale (BSS). In this article, the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale (SHCS) was translated and validated for this population. The translated SHCS ("Escala Stanford de Hipnosis Clinica" [ESHC]) was administered individually to 100 Puerto Rican college students. There were no significant differences found between the norms of the original SHCS samples and the Spanish version of the SHCS. Both samples showed similar distributions. The Spanish version's internal reliability as well as the item discrimination index were adequate. The authors conclude that the ESHC is an adequate instrument to measure hypnotizability in the Puerto Rican population.

  5. The madness of the Wind Water and Sun scenario by Mark Z. Jacobson (Stanford)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Philippe; Wagner, F.

    2016-01-01

    A first part criticizes the work and publications of Mark Jacobson, a teacher in Stanford University, who states that wind energy and solar energy could supply the World with enough energy, and more particularly enough electricity as he supposes a generalisation of the use of electricity. His assessments for France are indicated. The author of the article outlines that some of these predictions or hypotheses are wrong. Notably, they are much higher than an assessment made by the French regions regarding their potential production. He also outlines that production could be too low in some circumstances, and thus considers that this plan is a non sense. The second part proposes a PowerPoint presentation on the properties of an electricity system with intermittent sources which describes, analyses and comments data related to the production of wind and solar energy in Germany and its evolution in time (installed power, daily variations, and so on)

  6. Stanford-Binet and WAIS IQ Differences and Their Implications for Adults with Intellectual Disability (aka Mental Retardation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Wayne; Miezejeski, Charles; Ryan, Robert; Zigman, Warren; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon; Urv, Tiina

    2010-01-01

    Stanford-Binet and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) IQs were compared for a group of 74 adults with intellectual disability (ID). In every case, WAIS Full Scale IQ was higher than the Stanford-Binet Composite IQ, with a mean difference of 16.7 points. These differences did not appear to be due to the lower minimum possible score for the…

  7. Beam trajectory acquisition system for the arcs of the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Ross, M.C.; Scott, B.D.; Wilson, D.S.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes the beam position monitoring system of the collider arcs at the Stanford Linear Collider. This beam position monitoring system is different from others at SLAC in its large amount of hardware and its use of ungated, self-triggered electronics. All of the processing electronics are installed in the accelerator tunnel

  8. A calorimeter software trigger for the Mark II detector at SLC [Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, D.; Glanzman, T.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Tinsman, J.; Holmgren, S.; Schaad, M.W.

    1989-04-01

    A new FASTBUS-based calorimeter software trigger for the upgraded Mark II at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is presented. The trigger requirements for SLC and a short description of the hardware used for this purpose are given, followed by a detailed description of the software. Some preliminary results are presented. 9 refs., 4 figs

  9. Big Machines and Big Science: 80 Years of Accelerators at Stanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, Gregory

    2008-12-16

    Longtime SLAC physicist Greg Loew will present a trip through SLAC's origins, highlighting its scientific achievements, and provide a glimpse of the lab's future in 'Big Machines and Big Science: 80 Years of Accelerators at Stanford.'

  10. The Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Textbooks: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    The present content analysis examines the coverage of theoretical and methodological problems with the Stanford prison experiment (SPE) in a sample of introductory psychology textbooks. Categories included the interpretation and replication of the study, variance in guard behavior, participant selection bias, the presence of demand characteristics…

  11. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center] annual environmental monitoring report, January--December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This progress report discusses environmental monitoring activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for 1989. Topics include climate, site geology, site water usage, land use, demography, unusual events or releases, radioactive and nonradioactive releases, compliance summary, environmental nonradiological program information, environmental radiological program information, groundwater protection monitoring ad quality assurance. 5 figs., 7 tabs

  12. [Value of bedside echocardiography in diagnosis and risk assessment of in-hospital death for patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H J; Xiao, Z Y; Gu, G R; Xue, Y; Shao, M; Deng, Z; Tao, Z G; Yao, C L; Tong, C Y

    2017-11-24

    Objective: To investigate the value of bedside echocardiography in diagnosis and risk assessment of in-hospital death of patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection. Methods: The clinical data of 229 patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection diagnosed by CT angiography in Zhongshan Hospital affiliated to Fudan University between January 2009 and January 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into survival group(191 cases)and non-survival group(38 cases)according to presence or absence of in-hospital death. The bedside echocardiography features were analyzed, and influence factors of in-hospital death were determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: (1) Compared with the survival group, the non-survival group had lower surgery rate (60.52%(23/38) vs. 85.34%(163/191), P 0.05). (2) The bedside echocardiography results showed that prevalence of aortic valve involvement(65.79%(25/38) vs.34.03%(65/191), P 0.05). (3) The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that aortic valve involvement( OR =3.275, 95% CI 1.290-8.313, P risk factors for in-hospital death in patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection. Conclusions: Bedside echocardiography has significant diagnostic value for Stanford type A aortic dissection. Aortic valve involvement, enlargement of aortic root diameter and without surgery are independent risk factors for patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection.

  13. A 15-year review of the Stanford Internal Medicine Residency Program: predictors of resident satisfaction and dissatisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn JS

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available James S Kahn,1–3 Ronald M Witteles,3,4 Kenneth W Mahaffey,3–5 Sumbul A Desai,2,3 Errol Ozdalga,2,3 Paul A Heidenreich1,3 1Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, 2Division of Primary Care and Population Health, 3Department of Medicine, 4Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, 5Stanford Center for Clinical Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Introduction: Satisfaction with training and with educational experiences represents important internal medicine (IM programmatic goals. Graduates from IM residency programs are uniquely poised to provide insights into their educational and training experiences and to assess whether these experiences were satisfactory and relevant to their current employment. Methods: We surveyed former IM residents from the training program held during the years 2000–2015 at the Department of Medicine, Stanford University. The first part of the survey reviewed the IM residency program and the second part sought identifying data regarding gender, race, ethnicity, work, relationships, and financial matters. The primary outcome was satisfaction with the residency experience. Results: Of the 405 individuals who completed the Stanford IM residency program in the study period, we identified 384 (95% former residents with a known email address. Two hundred and one (52% former residents responded to the first part and 185 (48% answered both the parts of the survey. The mean age of the respondents was 36.9 years; 44% were female and the mean time from IM residency was 6.1 (±4.3 years. Fifty-eight percent reported extreme satisfaction with their IM residency experience. Predictors associated with being less than extremely satisfied included insufficient outpatient experience, insufficient international experience, insufficient clinical research experience, and insufficient time spent with family and peers. Conclusion: The residents expressed an overall high satisfaction rate with

  14. Stanford SsTO Mission to Mars: A Realistic, Safe and Cost Effective Approach to Human Mars Exploration Using the Stanford SsTO Launch System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Robert D.

    1999-06-01

    In recent years, a lot of time and energy has been spent exploring possible mission scenarios for a human mission to Mars. NASA along with the privately funded Mars Society and a number of universities have come up with many options that could place people on the surface of Mars in a relatively short period of time at a relatively low cost. However, a common theme among all or at least most of these missions is that they require heavy lift vehicles such as the Russian Energia or the NASA proposed Magnum 100MT class vehicle to transport large payloads from the surface of Earth into a staging orbit about Earth. However, there is no current budget or any signs for a future budget to review the Russian Energia, the US made Saturn V, or to design and build a new heavy lift vehicle. However, there is a lot of interest and many companies looking into the possibility of "space planes". These vehicles will have the capability to place a payload into orbit without throwing any parts of the vehicle away. The concept of a space plane is basically that the plane is transported to a given altitude either by it's own power or on the back of another air worthy vehicle before the rocket engines are ignited. From this altitude, a Single Step to Orbit (SsTO) vehicle with a significant payload is possible. This report looks at the possibility of removing the requirement of a heavy lift vehicle by using the Stanford designed Single Step to Orbit.(SsTO) Launch Vehicle. The SsTO would eliminate the need for heavy lift vehicles and actually reduce the cost of the mission because of the very low costs involved with each SSTO launch. Although this scenario may add a small amount of risk assembling transfer vehicles in Earth orbit, it should add no additional risk to the crew.

  15. Application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in treating dwarfism with Stanford B aortic dissection: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jian; Cai, Wenwu; Shu, Chang; Li, Ming; Xiong, Qinggen; Li, Quanming; Li, Xin

    2018-04-01

    To apply thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) to treat dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. In this report, we presented a 63-year-old male patient of dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection successfully treated with TEVAR. He was diagnosed with dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection. After conservative treatment, the male patient underwent TEVAR at 1 week after hospitalization. After operation, he presented with numbness and weakness of his bilateral lower extremities, and these symptoms were significantly mitigated after effective treatment. At 1- and 3-week after TEVAR, the aorta status was maintained stable and restored. The patient obtained favorable clinical prognosis and was smoothly discharged. During subsequent follow-up, he remained physically stable. TEVAR is probably an option for treating dwarfism complicated with Stanford B aortic dissection, which remains to be validated by subsequent studies with larger sample size.

  16. The development of seismic guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggins, R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the development of Seismic Guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Although structures have always been built conservatively, SLAC management decided to review and update their seismic guidelines. SLAC is about mid-way between the epicenters of the 8.3 Richter magnitude 1906 San Francisco and the 7.2 Loma Prieta Earthquakes. The west end of the two mile long electron/positron particle accelerator lies a half mile from the large San Andreas Fault. Suggestions for seismic planning processes were solicited from local computer manufacturing firms, universities, and federal laboratories. A Committee of the various stakeholders in SLAC`s seismic planning retained an internationally known Seismic Planning Consultant and reviewed relevant standards and drafted Guidelines. A panel of seismic experts was convened to help define the hazard, site response spectra, probabilistic analysis of shaking, and near field effects. The Facility`s structures were assigned to seismic classes of importance, and an initial assessment of a sample of a dozen buildings conducted. This assessment resulted in emergency repairs to one structure, and provided a {open_quotes}reality basis{close_quotes} for establishing the final Guidelines and Administrative Procedures, and a program to evaluate remaining buildings, shielding walls, tunnels, and other special structures.

  17. The development of seismic guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the development of Seismic Guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Although structures have always been built conservatively, SLAC management decided to review and update their seismic guidelines. SLAC is about mid-way between the epicenters of the 8.3 Richter magnitude 1906 San Francisco and the 7.2 Loma Prieta Earthquakes. The west end of the two mile long electron/positron particle accelerator lies a half mile from the large San Andreas Fault. Suggestions for seismic planning processes were solicited from local computer manufacturing firms, universities, and federal laboratories. A Committee of the various stakeholders in SLAC's seismic planning retained an internationally known Seismic Planning Consultant and reviewed relevant standards and drafted Guidelines. A panel of seismic experts was convened to help define the hazard, site response spectra, probabilistic analysis of shaking, and near field effects. The Facility's structures were assigned to seismic classes of importance, and an initial assessment of a sample of a dozen buildings conducted. This assessment resulted in emergency repairs to one structure, and provided a open-quotes reality basisclose quotes for establishing the final Guidelines and Administrative Procedures, and a program to evaluate remaining buildings, shielding walls, tunnels, and other special structures

  18. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  19. A measurement of the Z boson resonance parameters at the SLC [Stanford Linear Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.

    1989-11-01

    We have measured the resonance parameters of the Z boson using 480 hadronic and Leptonic Z decays collected by the Mark II Detector at the Stanford Linear Collider. We find the Mass to be 91.14 ± 0.12 GeV/c 2 , and the width to be 2.42 +0.45 -0.35 GeV. If we constrain the visible width to its Standard Model value, we find a partial width to invisible decay modes corresponding to 2.8 ± 0.6 neutrino species with a 95% confidence level limit of 3.9. 9 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  20. Gonadal status and reproductive function following treatment for Hodgkin's disease in childhood: The Stanford experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortin, T.T.; Shostak, C.A.; Donaldson, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    To ascertain the impact of therapy on gonadal function and reproductive outcome among children treated for Hodgkin's disease, we reviewed the experience at Stanford University Medical Center during the years 1965-1986. There were 240 children 15 years of age or younger, 92 girls and 148 boys; with median follow-up of 9 years, maximum follow-up was 26 years. Of this cohort, data on gonadal function were available on 20 boys, 5 of whom were considered prepubescent; they had no clinical evidence of sexual maturation and were less than 13 years of age. Evaluation of the boys included testicular biopsy, semen analyses and the ability to procreate. Serum gonadotropin hormone levels (FSH, LH) were studied in 11 boys who also had semen analyses. Sexual maturation was attained in all boys without the need for androgen replacement. Among the eight boys treated with radiation alone, four were able to father a child (3 following 40-45 Gy pelvic radiation dose, 1 without pelvic radiation) from 3-19 years following treatment. Three others who received 30-44 Gy pelvic radiation were oligospermic when tested at 10 to 15 years post-treatment. Semen analyses in 10 of 12 (83%) boys who had been treated with six cycles of MOPP with or without pelvic radiation revealed absolute azoospermia with no evidence of recovery as along as 11 years of follow-up. Following prolonged azoospermia, 2 of the 12 boys (17%) had recovery of fertility, with normalization of sperm count and/or ability to procreate at 12 and 15 years following treatment. There was no correlation with serum gonadotropin levels and sterility. Data on menstrual history, pregnancy and offspring were available in 86 (92%) of the girls. Seventy-five of the 86 girls (87%) have normal menstrual function. However, none of the females who underwent pelvic radiation without prior oophoropexy has maintained ovarian function

  1. The Stanford Automated Mounter: Enabling High-Throughput Protein Crystal Screening at SSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.A.; Cohen, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography experiment lends itself perfectly to high-throughput technologies. The initial steps including the expression, purification, and crystallization of protein crystals, along with some of the later steps involving data processing and structure determination have all been automated to the point where some of the last remaining bottlenecks in the process have been crystal mounting, crystal screening, and data collection. At the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, a National User Facility that provides extremely brilliant X-ray photon beams for use in materials science, environmental science, and structural biology research, the incorporation of advanced robotics has enabled crystals to be screened in a true high-throughput fashion, thus dramatically accelerating the final steps. Up to 288 frozen crystals can be mounted by the beamline robot (the Stanford Auto-Mounting System) and screened for diffraction quality in a matter of hours without intervention. The best quality crystals can then be remounted for the collection of complete X-ray diffraction data sets. Furthermore, the entire screening and data collection experiment can be controlled from the experimenter's home laboratory by means of advanced software tools that enable network-based control of the highly automated beamlines.

  2. Likelihood of women vs. men to receive bachelor's degrees in physics at Stanford, 1900-1929.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nero, Anthony

    2005-04-01

    Work by K. Tolley indicates that girls in mid to late 19th century U.S. high schools were more likely to study mathematics and natural philosophy (i.e., physics and astronomy) than were boys (who pursued the classics).* She also found that after the turn of the century women were more likely than men to receive bachelor's degrees in math and biological sciences at Stanford, but her sampling of every fifth year yielded too few data to be conclusive about physics. Reexamination of graduation lists at Stanford, yielding data for each year from 1900 to 1929, shows that, while absolute numbers were small, women were as likely as men to receive bachelor's degrees in physics during the first decade of the century, in the second decade they were notably more likely, and in the third their likelihood decreased substantially, while that of men rose to exceed that of women. (Women were much more likely to receive bachelor's degrees in math, exceeding the likelihood for men by an order of magnitude during the second and third decades.) *K. Tolley, The Science Education of American Girls: A Historical Perspective (Routledge, N.Y.), 2003.

  3. Stanford-Binet & WAIS IQ Differences and Their Implications for Adults with Intellectual Disability (aka Mental Retardation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Wayne; Miezejeski, Charles; Ryan, Robert; Zigman, Warren; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon; Urv, Tiina

    2010-03-01

    Stanford-Binet and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) IQs were compared for a group of 74 adults with intellectual disability (ID). In every case, WAIS Full Scale IQ was higher than the Stanford-Binet Composite IQ, with a mean difference of 16.7 points. These differences did not appear to be due to the lower minimum possible score for the Stanford-Binet. Additional comparisons with other measures suggested that the WAIS might systematically underestimate severity of intellectual impairment. Implications of these findings are discussed regarding determination of disability status, estimating prevalence of ID, assessing dementia and aging-related cognitive declines, and diagnosis of ID in forensic cases involving a possible death penalty.

  4. Performance of the front-end signal processing electronics for the drift chambers of the Stanford Large Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, A.; Haller, G.M.; Usher, T.; Shypit, R.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reports on the performance of the front-end analog and digital signal processing electronics for the drift chambers of the Stanford Large Detector (SLD) detector at the Stanford Linear Collider. The electronics mounted on printed circuit boards include up to 64 channels of transimpedance amplification, analog sampling, A/D conversion, and associated control circuitry. Measurements of the time resolution, gain, noise, linearity, crosstalk, and stability of the readout electronics are described and presented. The expected contribution of the electronics to the relevant drift chamber measurement resolutions (i.e., timing and charge division) is given

  5. Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program in myotonic dystrophy: New opportunities for occupational therapists: Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program dans la dystrophie myotonique : De nouvelles opportunités pour les ergothérapeutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kateri; Levasseur, Mélanie; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Mathieu, Jean; Gagnon, Cynthia

    2016-06-01

    Chronic disease self-management is a priority in health care. Personal and environmental barriers for populations with neuromuscular disorders might diminish the efficacy of self-management programs, although they have been shown to be an effective intervention in many populations. Owing to their occupational expertise, occupational therapists might optimize self-management program interventions. This study aimed to adapt the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) for people with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and assess its acceptability and feasibility in this population. Using an adapted version of the Stanford CDSMP, a descriptive pilot study was conducted with 10 participants (five adults with DM1 and their caregivers). A semi-structured interview and questionnaires were used. The Stanford CDSMP is acceptable and feasible for individuals with DM1. However, improvements are required, such as the involvement of occupational therapists to help foster concrete utilization of self-management strategies into day-to-day tasks using their expertise in enabling occupation. Although adaptations are needed, the Stanford CDSMP remains a relevant intervention with populations requiring the application of self-management strategies. © CAOT 2016.

  6. 150-MW S-Band klystron program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Phillips, R.M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Two S-Band klystrons operating at 150 MW have been designed, fabricated and tested at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) during the past two years for use in an experimental accelerator at Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. Both klystrons operate at the design power, 60 Hz repetition rate, 3 {mu}s pulsewidth, with an efficiency > 40%, and agreement between the experimental results and simulations is excellent. The 535 kV, 700 A electron gun was tested by constructing a solenoidal focused beam-stick which identified a source of oscillation, subsequently engineered out of the klystron guns. Design of the beam-stick and the two klystrons is discussed, along with observation and suppression of spurious oscillations. Differences in design and the resulting performance of the klystrons is emphasized. (author)

  7. The calculated longitudinal impedance of the SLC [Stanford Linear Collider] damping rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K.L.F.

    1988-05-01

    A high level of current dependent bunch lengthening has been observed in the north damping ring of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), indicating that the ring's impedance is very inductive. This level of bunch lengthening will limit the performance of the SLC. In order to study the problem of bunch lengthening in the damping ring and the possibility of reducing their inductance we compute, in this report, the longitudinal impedance of the damping ring vacuum chamber. More specifically we find the response function of the ring to a short gaussian bunch. This function will later be used as a driving term in the longitudinal equation of motion. We also identify the important inductive elements of the vacuum chamber and estimate their contribution to the total ring inductance. This information will be useful in assessing the effect of vacuum chamber modifications. 7 refs. , 8 figs., 1 tab

  8. Wavelength and power stability measurements of the Stanford SCA/FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van der Geer, B.; de Loos, M.J.; Conde, M.E.; Leemans, W.P.

    1994-08-01

    Wavelength and power stability of the Stanford infrared SCA/FEL operating with the TRW wiggler have been measured using a high-resolution spectrometer and an image dissector system. The image dissector is capable of reading the spectrum of every single micropulse at 12 MHz throughout a macropulse of up to 2 ms duration. The intrinsic wavelength and power stability of the SCA/FEL are found to be δλ/λ=0.035% and δP/P=18%. The use of a feedback control system to stabilize the wavelength, and an acousto-optic modulator for output power smoothing, improves the performance to δλ/λ=0.012% and δP/P=7%

  9. Revisiting the Stanford prison experiment: could participant self-selection have led to the cruelty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Thomas; McFarland, Sam

    2007-05-01

    The authors investigated whether students who selectively volunteer for a study of prison life possess dispositions associated with behaving abusively. Students were recruited for a psychological study of prison life using a virtually identical newspaper ad as used in the Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE; Haney, Banks & Zimbardo, 1973) or for a psychological study, an identical ad minus the words of prison life. Volunteers for the prison study scored significantly higher on measures of the abuse-related dispositions of aggressiveness, authoritarianism, Machiavellianism, narcissism, and social dominance and lower on empathy and altruism, two qualities inversely related to aggressive abuse. Although implications for the SPE remain a matter of conjecture, an interpretation in terms of person-situation interactionism rather than a strict situationist account is indicated by these findings. Implications for interpreting the abusiveness of American military guards at Abu Ghraib Prison also are discussed.

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M.

    1992-01-01

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included

  11. The Sound Games: Introducing Gamification into Stanford's Orientation on Emergency Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Viveta; Stromberg, Andrew Q; Rosston, Peter

    2017-09-18

    Point-of-care ultrasound is a critical component of graduate medical training in emergency medicine. Innovation in ultrasound teaching methods is greatly needed to keep up with a changing medical landscape. A field-wide trend promoting simulation and technology-enhanced learning is underway in an effort to improve patient care, as well as patient safety. In an effort to both motivate students and increase their skill retention, training methods are shifting towards a friendly competition model and are gaining popularity nationwide. In line with this emerging trend, Stanford incorporated the Sound Games - an educational ultrasound event with a distinctly competitive thread - within its existing two-day point-of-care ultrasound orientation course for emergency medicine interns. In this study, we demonstrate successful implementation of the orientation program, significant learning gains in participants, and overall student satisfaction with the course.

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  13. Prevention of paraplegia after endovascular exclusion for stanford B thoracic aortic dissection aneurism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Rui; Jing Zaiping; Bao Junmin; Zhao Zhiqing; Zhao Jun; Feng Xiang; Lu Qingsheng; Huang Cheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prophylactic measures of paraplegia and paralysis after endovascular graft exclusion (EVE) for Stanford B thoracic aortic dissections (TAD). Methods: The records of 116 consecutive patients undergoing endovascular TAD repair from 1998 to 2001 were retrospectively reviewed. Steroids were administrated postoperatively in high risk patients likely to be candidates for paraplegia or paralysis. Results: No paraplegia or paralysis occurred postoperatively in all cases, including the patient undergone selective spinal artery angiography (SSAA). Conclusions: Transluminal repair can avoid spinal cord ischemia due to aortic cross-clamping, there is still a risk of spinal cord injury caused by occlusion of intercostal arteries under the cover of endograft. A combination of the prophylactic measures, including SSAA and steroids, have been able to reduce the risk of paraplegia and paralysis. A graft-stent of appropriate length is the key point of this procedure

  14. The high peak current polarized electron source of the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.; Alley, R.; Aoyagi, H.; Clendenin, J.; Frisch, J.; Garden, C.; Hoyt, E.; Kirby, R.; Klaisner, L.; Kulikov, A.; Mulhollan, G.; Prescott, C.; Saez, P.; Tang, H.; Turner, J.; Woods, M.; Yeremian, D.; Zolotorev, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider injector requires two 2 ns pulses of 4.5-5.5 x 10 10 electrons, separated by 61 ns at 120 Hz, from its source. Since 1992, these currents have been provided by a polarized electron source based on GaAs photocathodes. A beam polarization of 76±4% has been measured at the end of the 50 GeV linac. At low photocathode quantum efficiencies, and for excitation near threshold, the maximum current delivered by the source is constrained, not by the space charge limit of the gun, but by a ''charge limit'' of the photocathode. The charge limited current is proportional to the photocathode quantum efficiency, but the proportionality varies for different photocathode types. Experience with high polarization strained GaAs photocathodes on a test beamline and on the SLC is presented. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of the LLL HANDYL76 code with three Stanford Linac experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, J.K.

    1976-06-01

    HANDYL76, the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory version of SANDYL, the multidimensional Monte Carlo electron/photon computer code, was compared with experimental work performed on the Stanford Mark III Linear Accelerator. The three pieces of experimental work involved bombardment of Al, C, Cu, Sn, and Pb by using 185-MeV electrons, electron-induced cascade showers in Cu, Sn, and Pb at 900 MeV, and cascades in H 2 O and Al at 1 GeV. Agreement between experiment and code calculations were good for the 900-MeV work, but only the aluminum at 185 MeV was within associated uncertainties for the major part of the target. Although good agreement was attained at 1 GeV in aluminum, the H 2 O at 1 GeV produced moderate variations. Possible reasons for the differences obtained are discussed. 89 figures, 16 tables

  16. Implementation and evaluation of Stanford Health Care direct-care teledermatology program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh S Pathipati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teledermatology has proven to be an effective means of providing dermatologic care. The existing research has primarily evaluated its usefulness in a consultative model. Few academic centers have evaluated a patient-initiated model, and direct-to-consumer services remain the subject of controversy. Stanford Health Care recently launched a direct-care, patient-initiated teledermatology pilot program. This article evaluates the viability and patient satisfaction with this service. Materials and Methods: During the pilot period, patients were able to seek remote dermatologic care using an eVisit tool in their MyHealth account. Patients initiated the consultation, answered questions regarding their complaint, and uploaded a picture if relevant. A Stanford dermatologist reviewed each eVisit and responded with an assessment and plan. The dermatologist noted whether they were able to make a diagnosis and their level of confidence in it. After the study, 10 patients participated in a focus group to provide feedback on the service. Results: In all, 38 patients sought care during the pilot period. A dermatologist was able to make a diagnosis in 36 of 38 (95% cases, with an average confidence level of 7.9 of 10. The average time to consultation was 0.8 days. Patients indicated high levels of satisfaction with the service although they had suggestions for improvement. Discussion: Patients provided clinically useful images and information in a direct-care teledermatology model. Such services allow dermatology providers to increase access while maintaining high-quality care in an academic medical center. Further research is needed on standalone services that cannot integrate encounters with the patient’s existing medical record.

  17. Reproducibility of the acute rejection diagnosis in human cardiac allografts. The Stanford Classification and the International Grading System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Nielsen, B

    1993-01-01

    Transplantation has become an accepted treatment of many cardiac end-stage diseases. Acute cellular rejection accounts for 15% to 20% of all graft failures. The first grading system of acute cellular rejection, the Stanford Classification, was introduced in 1979, and since then many other grading...

  18. Correlations between the Stanford-Binet, 4th Edition, and the WISC-R with a Learning Disabled Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, LeAdelle; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compared Stanford-Binet (Fourth Edition) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised as instruments for assessing the intellectual strengths and weaknesses of students (N=35) classified as learning disabled in elementary and secondary grades. Results suggest the tests will yield similar intelligence quotients for the learning disabled…

  19. Cognitive Development and Down Syndrome: Age-Related Change on the Stanford-Binet Test (Fourth Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzens, Donna; Cuskelly, Monica; Haynes, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Growth models for subtests of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, 4th edition (R. L. Thorndike, E. P. Hagen, & J. M. Sattler, 1986a, 1986b) were developed for individuals with Down syndrome. Models were based on the assessments of 208 individuals who participated in longitudinal and cross-sectional research between 1987 and 2004. Variation…

  20. La introducción de la escala de inteligencia de Stanford-Binet en el Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. García

    2016-06-01

    s intelligence. These were later modified in the United States by Lewis Terman, who published the most known and influential review. In Latin America and other regions of the world the local adaptations took place at the same time. In Paraguay, the Stanford-Binet test was introduced in the decade of 1920 by the school teacher Ramón Indalecio Cardozo. He did not limit himself to an uncritical reproduction, but realized some modifications to adapt the scale to the local culture and improve its reliability. This article studies the introduction of the Stanford-Binet test to the general context of the Paraguayan education and Cardozo's adaptations. To achieve this, we proceed to a review of primary and secondary sources, putting ideas and concepts in its correct historical context. It also contributes to extend previous papers focused on the author’s works and Paraguayan psychology during the pre-university period.

  1. Validating computational predictions of night-time ventilation in Stanford's Y2E2 building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Lamberti, Giacomo; Gorle, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    Natural ventilation can significantly reduce building energy consumption, but robust design is a challenging task. We previously presented predictions of natural ventilation performance in Stanford's Y2E2 building using two models with different levels of fidelity, embedded in an uncertainty quantification framework to identify the dominant uncertain parameters and predict quantified confidence intervals. The results showed a slightly high cooling rate for the volume-averaged temperature, and the initial thermal mass temperature and window discharge coefficients were found to have an important influence on the results. To further investigate the potential role of these parameters on the observed discrepancies, the current study is performing additional measurements in the Y2E2 building. Wall temperatures are recorded throughout the nightflush using thermocouples; flow rates through windows are measured using hotwires; and spatial variability in the air temperature is explored. The measured wall temperatures are found the be within the range of our model assumptions, and the measured velocities agree reasonably well with our CFD predications. Considerable local variations in the indoor air temperature have been recorded, largely explaining the discrepancies in our earlier validation study. Future work will therefore focus on a local validation of the CFD results with the measurements. Center for Integrated Facility Engineering (CIFE).

  2. Spin physics with polarized electrons at the SLC [Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1990-11-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. A gallium arsenide-based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 40 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positions. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moeller and Compton scattering will be used. Spin physics with longitudinally polarized electrons uses the measurement of the left-right asymmetry to provide tests of the Standard Model. The uncertainty in the measurement is precise enough to be sensitive to the effects of particles which can not be produced directly in the machines we have today. 5 refs

  3. Optical tuning in the arcs and final focus sections of the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambade, P.S.

    1989-03-01

    In this thesis, we present the experimental tuning procedures developed for the Arcs and for the Final Focus Section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Such tuning is necessary to maximize the luminosity, by minimizing the beam size at the interaction point, and to reduce backgrounds in the experiment. In the final Focus Section, the correction strategy must result from the principles of the optical design, which is based on cancellations between second order aberrations, and on the ability to measure micron-size beams typical of the SLC. In the Arcs, the corrections were designed after the initial commissioning, to make the system more error-tolerant, through a modification in the optical design, and to enable adjustments of the beam phase-space a the injection to the Final Focus System, through a harmonic perturbation technique inspired from circular accelerators. Although the overall optimization of the SLC is not entirely finished, an almost optimal set-up has been achieved for the optics of the Arcs and of the Final Focus Section. Beams with transverse sizes close to the nominal ones, of a few microns, have been obtained at the interaction point. We present and discuss our results and the optical limits to the present performance. 24 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Top-Off Injection and Higher Currents at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Johannes M.; Liu, James C.; Prinz, Alyssa A.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a 234 m circumference storage ring for 3 GeV electrons with its synchrotron radiation serving currently 13 beamlines with about 27 experimental stations. It operated for long time with 100 mA peak current provided by usually three injections per day. In July 2009, the maximum beam current was raised to 200 mA. Over the period from June 2009 to March 2010, Top-Off operation started at every beamline. Top-Off, i.e., the injection of electrons into the storage ring with injection stoppers open, is necessary for SSRL to reach its design current of 500 mA. In the future, the maximal power of the injection current will also soon be raised from currently 1.5 W to 5 W. The Radiation Protection Department at SLAC worked with SSRL on the specifications for the safety systems for operation with Top-Off injection and higher beam currents.

  5. Pulse-by-pulse energy measurement at the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, G.; Briggs, D.; Collins, B.; Petree, M.

    1992-01-01

    The stanford Linear Collider (SLC) collides a beam of electrons and positrons at 92 GeV. It is the first colliding linac, and produces Z 0 particles for High-Energy Physics measurements. The energy of each beam must be measured to one part in 10 4 on every collision (120 Hz). An Energy Spectrometer in each beam line after collision produces two stripes of high-energy synchrotron radiation with critical energy of a few MeV. The distance between these two stripes at an imaging plane measures the beam energy. The Wire- Imaging Synchrotron Radiation Detector (WISRD) system comprises a novel detector, data acquisition electronics, readout and analysis. The detector comprises an array of wires for each synchrotron stripe. The electronics measure secondary emission charge on each wire of each array. A Macintosh II (using THINK C, THINK Class Library) and DSP coprocessor (using ANSI C) acquire and analyze the data, and display and report the results for SLC operation

  6. Optical tuning in the arcs and final focus sections of the Stanford Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bambade, P.S.

    1989-03-01

    In this thesis, we present the experimental tuning procedures developed for the Arcs and for the Final Focus Section of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Such tuning is necessary to maximize the luminosity, by minimizing the beam size at the interaction point, and to reduce backgrounds in the experiment. In the final Focus Section, the correction strategy must result from the principles of the optical design, which is based on cancellations between second order aberrations, and on the ability to measure micron-size beams typical of the SLC. In the Arcs, the corrections were designed after the initial commissioning, to make the system more error-tolerant, through a modification in the optical design, and to enable adjustments of the beam phase-space a the injection to the Final Focus System, through a harmonic perturbation technique inspired from circular accelerators. Although the overall optimization of the SLC is not entirely finished, an almost optimal set-up has been achieved for the optics of the Arcs and of the Final Focus Section. Beams with transverse sizes close to the nominal ones, of a few microns, have been obtained at the interaction point. We present and discuss our results and the optical limits to the present performance. 24 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The Impact of Postgraduate Health Technology Innovation Training: Outcomes of the Stanford Biodesign Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, James; Hellman, Eva; Denend, Lyn; Rait, Douglas; Venook, Ross; Lucian, Linda; Azagury, Dan; Yock, Paul G; Brinton, Todd J

    2017-05-01

    Stanford Biodesign launched its Innovation Fellowship in 2001 as a first-of-its kind postgraduate training experience for teaching biomedical technology innovators a need-driven process for developing medical technologies and delivering them to patients. Since then, many design-oriented educational programs have been initiated, yet the impact of this type of training remains poorly understood. This study measures the career focus, leadership trajectory, and productivity of 114 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship alumni based on survey data and public career information. It also compares alumni on certain publicly available metrics to finalists interviewed but not selected. Overall, 60% of alumni are employed in health technology in contrast to 35% of finalists interviewed but not selected. On leadership, 72% of alumni hold managerial or higher positions compared to 48% of the finalist group. A total of 67% of alumni reported that the fellowship had been "extremely beneficial" on their careers. As a measure of technology translation, more than 440,000 patients have been reached with technologies developed directly out of the Biodesign Innovation Fellowship, with another 1,000,000+ aided by solutions initiated by alumni after their training. This study suggests a positive impact of the fellowship program on the career focus, leadership, and productivity of its alumni.

  8. Pulse-by-pulse energy measurement at the Stanford Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, G.; Briggs, D.; Collins, B.; Petree, M.

    1992-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) collides a beam of electrons and positrons at 92 GeV. It is the first colliding linac, and produces Z(sup 0) particles for High-Energy Physics measurements. The energy of each beam must be measured to one part in 10(exp 4) on every collision (120 Hz). An Energy Spectrometer in each beam line after the collision produces two stripes of high-energy synchrotron radiation with critical energy of a few MeV. The distance between these two stripes at an imaging plane measures the beam energy. The Wire-Imaging Synchrotron Radiation Detector (WISRD) system comprises a novel detector, data acquisition electronics, readout, and analysis. The detector comprises an array of wires for each synchrotron stripe. The electronics measure secondary emission charge on each wire of each array. A Macintosh II (using THINK C, THINK Class Library) and DSP coprocessor (using ANSI C) acquire and analyze the data, and display and report the results for SLC operation.

  9. A history of thyratron lifetimes at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficklin, D.B. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has been in almost continuous operation since the middle 1960s, providing a remarkable opportunity to amass thyratron data. This paper reviews the history of this thyratron usage, focusing primarily on data collected during the last ten years of accelerator operation. There have been two distinct operating conditions during the history of operation at SLAC. Prior to 1985, the fundamental thyratron operating points were 46 kV anode voltage (Epy), 4.2 kA peak current, 3.8 μs equivalent square pulse (esp), with a maximum repetition rate of 360 pulses per second (pps). The accelerator was upgraded during 1985, and the thyratron operating points are now 46 kV Epy, 6.3 kA, 5.4 μs esp, with a maximum repetition rate of 120 pps. The SLAC high-energy physics research program requires that each of the available modulator klystron units provide a stable microwave energy source. Within these constraints, this paper explores historical thyratron lifetimes at SLAC, reviewing the available data to determine how long these thyratrons can be expected to operate before failure currently or recently used in the 243 accelerator modulators

  10. Outcomes from a postgraduate biomedical technology innovation training program: the first 12 years of Stanford Biodesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Todd J; Kurihara, Christine Q; Camarillo, David B; Pietzsch, Jan B; Gorodsky, Julian; Zenios, Stefanos A; Doshi, Rajiv; Shen, Christopher; Kumar, Uday N; Mairal, Anurag; Watkins, Jay; Popp, Richard L; Wang, Paul J; Makower, Josh; Krummel, Thomas M; Yock, Paul G

    2013-09-01

    The Stanford Biodesign Program began in 2001 with a mission of helping to train leaders in biomedical technology innovation. A key feature of the program is a full-time postgraduate fellowship where multidisciplinary teams undergo a process of sourcing clinical needs, inventing solutions and planning for implementation of a business strategy. The program places a priority on needs identification, a formal process of selecting, researching and characterizing needs before beginning the process of inventing. Fellows and students from the program have gone on to careers that emphasize technology innovation across industry and academia. Biodesign trainees have started 26 companies within the program that have raised over $200 million and led to the creation of over 500 new jobs. More importantly, although most of these technologies are still at a very early stage, several projects have received regulatory approval and so far more than 150,000 patients have been treated by technologies invented by our trainees. This paper reviews the initial outcomes of the program and discusses lessons learned and future directions in terms of training priorities.

  11. Basic considerations in simulated treatment planning for the Stanford Medical Pion Generator (SMPG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistenma, D.A.; Li, G.C.; Bagshaw, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Recent interest in charged heavy particle irradiation is based upon expected improved local tumor control rates because of the greater precision in dose localization and the increased biological effectiveness of the high linear energy transfer ionization of particle beams in their stopping regions (Bragg peaks). A novel 60 beam cylindrical geometry pion spectrometer designed for a hospital-based pion therapy facility has been constructed at Stanford. In conjunction with the development and testing of the SMPG a program of simulated treatment planning is being conducted. This paper presents basic considerations in treatment planning for pions and other charged heavy particles. It also presents the status of simulated treatment planning calculations for the SMPG including a discussion of the principle of irradiation of hypothetical tumor volumes illustrated by examples of simplified treatment plans incorporating tissue density inhomogeneity corrections. Also presented are considerations for realistic simulated treatment planning calculations using computerized tomographic scan cross sections of actual patients and a conceptual plan for an integrated treatment planning and patient treatment system for the SMPG

  12. The front-end analog and digital signal processing electronics for the drift chambers of the Stanford Large Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, G.M.; Freytag, D.R.; Fox, J.; Olsen, J.; Paffrath, L.; Yim, A.; Honma, A.

    1990-10-01

    The front-end signal processing electronics for the drift-chambers of the Stanford Large Detector (SLD) at the Stanford Linear Collider is described. The system is implemented with printed-circuit boards which are shaped for direct mounting on the detector. Typically, a motherboard comprises 64 channels of transimpedance amplification and analog waveform sampling, A/D conversion, and associated control and readout circuitry. The loaded motherboard thus forms a processor which records low-level wave forms from 64 detector channels and transforms the information into a 64 k-byte serial data stream. In addition, the package performs calibration functions, measures leakage currents on the wires, and generates wire hit patterns for triggering purposes. The construction and operation of the electronic circuits utilizing monolithic, hybridized, and programmable components are discussed

  13. Reminiscing about thesis work with E T Jaynes at Stanford in the 1950s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Frederick W.

    2013-11-01

    work there. I thought it sounded about right as an approximately two-three year position: repay some debts and look around at other possibilities (especially academe?). I left around June 1960 to take up this position in the research lab in Newport Beach. At about this same time (~late 1959), Ed was moving to his new 'chair' at Washington University in St Louis. I proceeded as quickly as I could to put together a thesis after arriving in Newport Beach; I wrote about what I had done, as best as I could in my naiveté about such undertakings. I wrote of the work I had done under Ed's kind and patient guidance for the two years in Palo Alto. I soon remembered that Ed had done a recent Stanford Microwave Lab report on our project; his writing was so much better than mine that I thought it witless to put out something as 'uneven' as I had written by then. At just this time that I was cobbling together a thesis, a consultant at Aeroneutronic, Jay Singer of UC Berkeley EE department, approached me in the hall, (no tele-commuting then!) asking if I might have something to contribute to a special issue of a journal of the IEEE he was editing, on the subject of 'Quantum Electronics'. (Comment: One of the earliest predecessors to the MRI, Jay Singer was then measuring the blood flow in rat tails and human arms; he holds two key MRI patents). I said I thought I did have something. The journal sounded appropriate, so I soon handed my 'thesis' to Jay, put Ed's name first (of course, since it consisted so largely of his words from the Microwave Lab report, but also since Ed was my 'guru'), ...and that was that...done [4]. From my perspective, it seemed to subsequently sink to the bottom of the sea, not to be seen by me again for many years until the elegant Walther-Rempe-Klein (WRK) experiments of 1987 on long-time coherent radiative behavior appeared [5]. They confirmed the long-time quantum-theoretical results of Eberly, Narozhny and Sanchez-Mondragon [6]. Bob Buley and I, while at

  14. Opportunistic or event-driven maintenance at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.; Anderson, S.; Erickson, R.; Linebarger, W.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stanek, M.

    1997-03-01

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) uses a maintenance management philosophy that is best described as opportunistic or event-driven. Opportunistic maintenance can be defined as a systematic method of collecting, investigating, pre-planning, and publishing a set of proposed maintenance tasks and acting on them when there is an unscheduled failure or repair ''opportunity''. Opportunistic maintenance can be thought of as a modification of the run-to-fail maintenance management philosophy. This maintenance plan was adopted and developed to improve the overall availability of SLAC's linear accelerator, beam delivery systems, and associated controls, power systems, and utilities. In the late 1980's, as the technical complexity of the accelerator facility increased, variations on a conventional maintenance plan were used with mixed results. These variations typically included some type of regular periodic interruption to operations. The periodic shutdowns and unscheduled failures were additive and resulted in unsatisfactory availability. Maintenance issues are evaluated in a daily meeting that includes the accelerator managers, maintenance supervisors and managers, safety office personnel, program managers, and accelerator operators. Lists of pending maintenance tasks are made available to the general SLAC population by a World Wide Web site on a local internet. A conventional information system which pre-dates the WWW site is still being used to provide paper copies to groups that are not yet integrated into the WWW system. The local internet provides real time maintenance information, allowing people throughout the facility to track progress on tasks with essentially real-time status updates. With the introduction of opportunistic maintenance, the accelerator's availability has been measurably better. This paper will discuss processes, rolls and responsibilities of key maintenance groups, and management tools developed to support opportunistic maintenance

  15. The Stanford Data Miner: a novel approach for integrating and exploring heterogeneous immunological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Janet C; Munsil, Wes; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Davis, Mark M; Maecker, Holden T

    2012-03-28

    Systems-level approaches are increasingly common in both murine and human translational studies. These approaches employ multiple high information content assays. As a result, there is a need for tools to integrate heterogeneous types of laboratory and clinical/demographic data, and to allow the exploration of that data by aggregating and/or segregating results based on particular variables (e.g., mean cytokine levels by age and gender). Here we describe the application of standard data warehousing tools to create a novel environment for user-driven upload, integration, and exploration of heterogeneous data. The system presented here currently supports flow cytometry and immunoassays performed in the Stanford Human Immune Monitoring Center, but could be applied more generally. Users upload assay results contained in platform-specific spreadsheets of a defined format, and clinical and demographic data in spreadsheets of flexible format. Users then map sample IDs to connect the assay results with the metadata. An OLAP (on-line analytical processing) data exploration interface allows filtering and display of various dimensions (e.g., Luminex analytes in rows, treatment group in columns, filtered on a particular study). Statistics such as mean, median, and N can be displayed. The views can be expanded or contracted to aggregate or segregate data at various levels. Individual-level data is accessible with a single click. The result is a user-driven system that permits data integration and exploration in a variety of settings. We show how the system can be used to find gender-specific differences in serum cytokine levels, and compare them across experiments and assay types. We have used the tools and techniques of data warehousing, including open-source business intelligence software, to support investigator-driven data integration and mining of diverse immunological data.

  16. The Stanford Data Miner: a novel approach for integrating and exploring heterogeneous immunological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebert Janet C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems-level approaches are increasingly common in both murine and human translational studies. These approaches employ multiple high information content assays. As a result, there is a need for tools to integrate heterogeneous types of laboratory and clinical/demographic data, and to allow the exploration of that data by aggregating and/or segregating results based on particular variables (e.g., mean cytokine levels by age and gender. Methods Here we describe the application of standard data warehousing tools to create a novel environment for user-driven upload, integration, and exploration of heterogeneous data. The system presented here currently supports flow cytometry and immunoassays performed in the Stanford Human Immune Monitoring Center, but could be applied more generally. Results Users upload assay results contained in platform-specific spreadsheets of a defined format, and clinical and demographic data in spreadsheets of flexible format. Users then map sample IDs to connect the assay results with the metadata. An OLAP (on-line analytical processing data exploration interface allows filtering and display of various dimensions (e.g., Luminex analytes in rows, treatment group in columns, filtered on a particular study. Statistics such as mean, median, and N can be displayed. The views can be expanded or contracted to aggregate or segregate data at various levels. Individual-level data is accessible with a single click. The result is a user-driven system that permits data integration and exploration in a variety of settings. We show how the system can be used to find gender-specific differences in serum cytokine levels, and compare them across experiments and assay types. Conclusions We have used the tools and techniques of data warehousing, including open-source business intelligence software, to support investigator-driven data integration and mining of diverse immunological data.

  17. The treatment experience of 13 cases with Stanford B type aortic intramural hematoma%急性 Stanford B型主动脉壁间血肿13例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪钢; 白斗; 武少辉; 张效杰; 蒋岚杉

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析急性Stanford B型主动脉壁间血肿的临床特点及诊治情况。方法2013年6月—2014年8月共收治13例急性Stanford B型主动脉壁间血肿患者,入院初始均采用降压、止痛、镇静为主的药物治疗,通过CT血管造影( CTA)严密观察,对于病情发展者选择主动脉腔内修复术。结果药物治疗过程中,5例患者血肿均较稳定,经药物治疗后缓解出院;2例10 d后血肿增大而进行腔内修复术;6例伴发有主动脉溃疡而选择腔内手术。5例药物治疗患者随访3~14个月,CTA示壁间血肿均有不同程度吸收,未再次出现胸背部疼痛症状。8例腔内治疗者随访6个月,血肿大部分已吸收,未发生内漏、支架移位等并发症。结论对急性Stanford B型主动脉壁间血肿可在CTA严密观察下,首先进行降压、止痛、镇静为主的药物治疗,若血肿增大或伴发主动脉溃疡等情况,则应及时行腔内修复术。%Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics , diagnosis and treatment experience of acute B type Stanford aortic intramural hematoma .Methods From June 2013 to August 2014 , 13 patients with acute B Stanford type aortic intramural hematoma were enrolled , the initial admission are treated with lower blood pressure , releasing pain and given seda-tion treatment, CT angiography (CTA) were performed to observe the disease progression , and patients with disease progres-sion were treated with aortic endovascular repair .Results In the course of drug treatment , 5 patients were more stable , after drug treatment, they were discharged from hospital , and 2 patients the intramural hematoma enlarged after 10 days, and they were treated with endovascular repair , 6 cases with aortic ulcer were selected intraluminal surgery .5 patients with drug treat-ment were followed up for 3-14 months, the CTA showed that the intramural hematoma was absorbed in different degree , and there was no

  18. The Stanford-U.S. Geological Survey SHRIMP ion microprobe--a tool for micro-scale chemical and isotopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles R.; Grove, Marty; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Coble, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Answers to many questions in Earth science require chemical analysis of minute volumes of minerals, volcanic glass, or biological materials. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is an extremely sensitive analytical method in which a 5–30 micrometer diameter "primary" beam of charged particles (ions) is focused on a region of a solid specimen to sputter secondary ions from 1–5 nanograms of the sample under high vacuum. The elemental abundances and isotopic ratios of these secondary ions are determined with a mass spectrometer. These results can be used for geochronology to determine the age of a region within a crystal thousands to billions of years old or to precisely measure trace abundances of chemical elements at concentrations as low as parts per billion. A partnership of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Stanford University School of Earth Sciences operates a large SIMS instrument, the Sensitive High-Resolution Ion Microprobe with Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP–RG) on the Stanford campus.

  19. Constraints on spatially oscillating sub-mm forces from the Stanford Optically Levitated Microsphere Experiment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, I.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2017-11-01

    A recent analysis by one of the authors [L. Perivolaropoulos, Phys. Rev. D 95, 084050 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevD.95.084050] has indicated the presence of a 2 σ signal of spatially oscillating new force residuals in the torsion balance data of the Washington experiment. We extend that study and analyze the data of the Stanford Optically Levitated Microsphere Experiment (SOLME) [A. D. Rider et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 101101 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.101101] (kindly provided by A. D. Rider et al.) searching for sub-mm spatially oscillating new force signals. We find a statistically significant oscillating signal for a force residual of the form F (z )=α cos (2/π λ z +c ) where z is the distance between the macroscopic interacting masses (levitated microsphere and cantilever). The best fit parameter values are α =(1.1 ±0.4 )×10-17N , λ =(35.2 ±0.6 ) μ m . Monte Carlo simulation of the SOLME data under the assumption of zero force residuals has indicated that the statistical significance of this signal is at about 2 σ level. The improvement of the χ2 fit compared to the null hypothesis (zero residual force) corresponds to Δ χ2=13.1 . There are indications that this previously unnoticed signal is indeed in the data but is most probably induced by a systematic effect caused by diffraction of non-Gaussian tails of the laser beam. Thus the amplitude of this detected signal can only be useful as an upper bound to the amplitude of new spatially oscillating forces on sub-mm scales. In the context of gravitational origin of the signal emerging from a fundamental modification of the Newtonian potential of the form Veff(r )=-G M/r (1 +αOcos (2/π λ r +θ ))≡VN(r )+Vosc(r ) , we evaluate the source integral of the oscillating macroscopically induced force. If the origin of the SOLME oscillating signal is systematic, the parameter αO is bounded as αOchameleon oscillating potentials etc.).

  20. Curvas de referência de pontos brutos no Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale de crianças e adolescentes Curvas de referencia de puntaje bruto en el Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale de niños y adolescentes Curves reference crude scores in Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale for children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Regina Fumagalli Marteleto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve como objetivo construir curvas de referência de pontos brutos das Áreas e do Total do Stanford-Binet em crianças e adolescentes paulistanos. Foram avaliadas individualmente 257 crianças e adolescentes, com idade média de 5 anos e 10 meses, sendo 130 (50,58% do sexo feminino e 127 (49,42% do sexo masculino, todas frequentadoras de Escolas Públicas de Educação Infantil e Fundamental, de diferentes regiões da cidade de São Paulo. O teste foi aplicado individualmente na própria escola das crianças, sempre a partir do primeiro item, independentemente da idade da criança. Os participantes foram agrupados por idade; calcularam-se medidas descritivas para cada faixa etária desta população. Foram confeccionadas curvas de referência para Áreas e Total do Stanford Binet com os pontos brutos obtidos. Os pontos brutos foram distribuídos de acordo com a curva normal.El estudio tuvo como objetivo construir curvas de referencia de puntajes brutos de las Áreas y del Total del Stanford-Binet en niños y adolescentes del estado de São Paulo-Brasil. Fueron evaluados individualmente 257 niños y adolescentes, con edad media de 5 años y 10 meses, siendo 130 (50,58% del sexo femenino y 127 (49,42% del sexo masculino, todos frecuentadores de escuelas públicas de educación infantil y básica, de diferentes regiones de la ciudad de São Paulo. El test fue aplicado individualmente en la propia escuela de los niños, siempre a partir del primer ítem, independientemente de la edad del niño. Los participantes fueron agrupados por edad; se calculó medidas descriptivas para cada rango etario de esta población. Fueron confeccionadas curvas de referencia para Áreas y Total del Stanford Binet con los puntajes brutos obtenidos. Los puntajes brutos fueron distribuidos de acuerdo con la curva normal.The objective of this study was to construct curves reference crude scores on the areas and total of the Stanford-Binet test for children in

  1. Gonadal status and reproductive function following treatment for Hodgkin's disease in childhood: The Stanford experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortin, T.T.; Shostak, C.A.; Donaldson, S.S. (Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    To ascertain the impact of therapy on gonadal function and reproductive outcome among children treated for Hodgkin's disease, we reviewed the experience at Stanford University Medical Center during the years 1965-1986. There were 240 children 15 years of age or younger, 92 girls and 148 boys; with median follow-up of 9 years, maximum follow-up was 26 years. Of this cohort, data on gonadal function were available on 20 boys, 5 of whom were considered prepubescent; they had no clinical evidence of sexual maturation and were less than 13 years of age. Evaluation of the boys included testicular biopsy, semen analyses and the ability to procreate. Serum gonadotropin hormone levels (FSH, LH) were studied in 11 boys who also had semen analyses. Sexual maturation was attained in all boys without the need for androgen replacement. Among the eight boys treated with radiation alone, four were able to father a child (3 following 40-45 Gy pelvic radiation dose, 1 without pelvic radiation) from 3-19 years following treatment. Three others who received 30-44 Gy pelvic radiation were oligospermic when tested at 10 to 15 years post-treatment. Semen analyses in 10 of 12 (83%) boys who had been treated with six cycles of MOPP with or without pelvic radiation revealed absolute azoospermia with no evidence of recovery as along as 11 years of follow-up. Following prolonged azoospermia, 2 of the 12 boys (17%) had recovery of fertility, with normalization of sperm count and/or ability to procreate at 12 and 15 years following treatment. There was no correlation with serum gonadotropin levels and sterility. Data on menstrual history, pregnancy and offspring were available in 86 (92%) of the girls. Seventy-five of the 86 girls (87%) have normal menstrual function. However, none of the females who underwent pelvic radiation without prior oophoropexy has maintained ovarian function.

  2. 75 FR 18482 - Stanford University Habitat Conservation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... Library, 1213 Newell Road, Palo Alto, CA 94303. Individuals wishing copies of the DEIS, Plan, or IA should... threatened (16 U.S.C. 1538). The term ''take'' means to harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap... significant habitat modification or degradation that actually kills or injures listed wildlife by...

  3. The Stanford University US-Japan Technology Management Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dasher, Richard

    2002-01-01

    ..., nanotechnologies, MEMS, system-level chip integration, and advanced manufacturing. Our technology management focus embraced industry standards and standardization, intellectual property management, U.S...

  4. Endovascular repair of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection%腔内修复术治疗原发性逆撕型Stanford A型主动脉夹层

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴海卫; 孙磊; 李德闽; 景华; 许飚; 王常田; 张雷

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the short-and mid-term results on endovascular repair of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection with an entry tear in distal aortic arch or descending aorta.Methods Between December 2009 and December 2014,21 male patients of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection with a mean age of (52 ± 9) years received endovascular repair in Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery,Jinling Hospital.Among the 21 cases,17 patients were presented as ascending aortic intramural hematoma,4 patients as active blood flow in false lumen and partial thrombosis,8 patients as ulcer on descending aorta combined intramural hematoma in descending aorta,and 13 patients as typical dissection changes.All patients received cndovascular stent-graft repair successfully,with 15 cases in acute phase and 6 cases in chronic phase.Results Cone stent was implanted in 13 cases,while straight stent in 8 cases,including 1 case of left common carotid-left subclavian artery bypass surgery and 1 case of restrictive bare-metal stent implantation.No perioperative stroke,paraplegia,stent fracture or displacement,limbs or abdominal organ ischemia or other severe complications occured,except for tracheotomy in 2 patients.Active blood flow in ascending aorta or aortic arch disappeared,and intramural hematoma started being absorbed on CT angiography images before discharge.All patients were alive during follow-up (6 to 72 months),and intramural hematoma in ascending aorta and aortic arch was absorbed thoroughly.Type Ⅰ endoleak and ulcer expansion were found in 1 patient,and type Ⅳ endoleak in distal stent was found in another one patient.Secondary ascending aortic dissection was found in 1 case two years later,which was cured by hybrid procedure with cardiopulmonary bypass.Conclusion Endovascular repair of primary retrograde Stanford type A aortic dissection was safe and effective,which correlated with favorable short-and mid-term results.%目的 探讨腔内修复

  5. [Anesthetic Management of a Patient Complicated with Marfan Syndrome and Suffering from Stanford Type A Aortic Dissection during Pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uozaki, Nako; Mizuno, Kaori; Shiraishi, Yoshito; Doi, Matsuyuki; Sato, Shigehito

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of a 36-year-old woman at 34 weeks of gestation complicated with Marfan syndrome who underwent Bentall type aortic replacement surgery due to Stanford type A aortic dissection after undergoing caesarean section. Since this patient exhibited severe hypotension before coming to the operating room, it was very difficult to determine whether the cardiac surgery or caesarean section should be performed first. In this case, the caesarean section was performed first, followed by Bentall's surgery. Although intra-aortic balloon pumping and percutaneous cardiopulmonary support were required after weaning from the cardiopulmonary bypass, she was discharged on post-operative day (POD) 40 and the baby was discharged on POD 60, without signs of cerebral palsy. Unfortunately, this patient died on POD 57, due to heart failure. We discuss how to determine the priority of surgeries for patients who require emergency surgery for cardiovascular disease during pregnancy.

  6. Intraoperative Diagnosis of Stanford Type A Dissection by Transesophageal Echocardiogram in a Patient Presenting for Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Hand

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old patient with hypertensive end-stage renal disease presented for cadaveric renal transplantation. On physical exam, a previously undocumented diastolic murmur was heard loudest at the left lower sternal border. The patient had a history of pericardial effusions and reported “a feeling of chest fullness” when lying flat. As such, a transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE was performed after induction of anesthesia to evaluate the pericardial space and possibly determine the etiology and severity of the new murmur. The TEE revealed a Stanford Type A aortic dissection. The renal transplant was cancelled (organ reassigned within region, and the patient underwent an urgent ascending and proximal hemiarch aortic replacement. This case demonstrates the importance of a thorough physical exam and highlights the utility of TEE for noncardiac surgical cases.

  7. Coefficients of Correlation of IQ's on the WAIS-R with Standard Age Scores on the Stanford-Binet, 4th Edition for Previously Identified Mentally Handicapped Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, John C.

    This paper presents a study regarding the correlation of the Stanford-Binet: 4th Edition Intelligence Quotient (IQ) scores with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) IQ scores for the purpose of improving the identification process for educable mentally handicapped (EMH) school age adolescents and young adults. The sample included…

  8. Complicating Culture and Difference: Situating Asian American Youth Identities in Lisa Yee's "Millicent Min," "Girl Genius" and "Stanford Wong Flunks Big-Time"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This review situates how culture, difference, and identity are discursively constructed in "Millicent Min, Girl Genius" and "Stanford Wong Flunks Big-Time," two award-winning books written by critically acclaimed Asian American author Lisa Yee. Using contextual literacy approaches, the characters, cultural motifs, and physical settings in these…

  9. Chalcraft John, The invisible cage, Syrian migrant workers in Lebanon, Stanford, California, Stanford University Press, 2009, 310 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élisabeth Longuenesse

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available On connaissait John Chalcraft comme historien de la fin des corporations en Égypte. Il avait tiré de sa première recherche un très passionnant petit livre, dans lequel il proposait une relecture critique de l’histoire du travail dans l’Égypte de la seconde moitié du xixe siècle. L’objet de ce nouveau livre est complètement différent, puisqu’il s’agit d’une histoire encore en train de se faire, celle des travailleurs syriens au Liban. La première qualité du livre est de s’attaquer à une quest...

  10. Proposed heat transfer model for the gas-liquid heat transfer effects observed in the Stanford Research Institute scaled tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.; Sonin, A.A.; Todreas, N.

    1976-12-01

    In 1971-72, the Stanford Research Institute conducted a series of scaled experiments which simulated a sodium-vapor expansion in a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) for the Fast Flux Test Facility. A non-condensible explosive source was used to model the pressure-volume expansion characteristics of sodium vapor as predicted by computer code calculations. Rigid piston-cylinder experiments ( 1 / 10 and 1 / 30 scale) were undertaken to determine these expansion characteristics. The results showed that the pressure-volume characteristics depend significantly on the presence of water in the cylinder reducing the work output by about 50 percent when a sufficient water depth was present. The study presented proposes that the mechanism of heat transfer between the water and high temperature gas was due to area enhancement by Taylor instabilities at the gas-liquid interface. A simple heat transfer model is proposed which describes this energy transport process and agrees well with the experimental data from both scaled experiments. The consequences of this analysis suggest that an estimate of the heat transfer to the cold slug during a full-scale HCDA due to sodium vapor expansion and the accompanying reduction in mechanical work energy warrants further investigation. The implication of this analysis is that for either sodium or fuel vapor expansion in an HCDA, there is an inherent heat transfer mechanism which significantly reduces the work output of the expanding bubble

  11. Stanford type A aortic dissection with closed false lumen: Analysis of prognostic factors at initial CT or MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Yohjiro; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Ogawa, Yohji; Sueyoshi, Eijun; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Takagi, Masatake [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Narimatsu, Motoharu

    1997-08-01

    Nineteen patients with Stanford type A acute aortic dissection with closed false lumen were reviewed. In the follow-up examinations, ulcerlike projection (ULP) in the ascending aorta (AA) or aortic arch (AR) was identified in 8 of 19 patients. In 5 of these 8 patients, acute cardiac tamponade occurred and 3 of them died. In the other 11 patients, there was no mortality, and only one patient underwent elective surgery. The appearance of ULP in the AA/AR is considered an indication for urgent surgery because it is regarded as a precursor of lethal complications such as cardiac tamponade. The purpose of this study was to investigate predictors of the appearance of ULP in the AA/AR with early imagings (CT or MRI) before the appearance of ULP. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with ULP in the AA/AR (8 patients) and others (11 patients). Initial CT or MRI findings of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively statistically analyzed in each group. Three predictive factors were statistically significant for the appearance of ULP in the AA/AR (diameter of the AA{>=}5 cm, thickness of the false lumen of the AA{>=}1 cm, thickness of the false lumen of the AA{>=} that of the descending aorta). Close attention should be paid, if any of these 3 factors is observed at initial CT or MRI. (author)

  12. Stanford type A aortic dissection with closed false lumen: Analysis of prognostic factors at initial CT or MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Yohjiro; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Ogawa, Yohji; Sueyoshi, Eijun; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Takagi, Masatake; Narimatsu, Motoharu.

    1997-01-01

    Nineteen patients with Stanford type A acute aortic dissection with closed false lumen were reviewed. In the follow-up examinations, ulcerlike projection (ULP) in the ascending aorta (AA) or aortic arch (AR) was identified in 8 of 19 patients. In 5 of these 8 patients, acute cardiac tamponade occurred and 3 of them died. In the other 11 patients, there was no mortality, and only one patient underwent elective surgery. The appearance of ULP in the AA/AR is considered an indication for urgent surgery because it is regarded as a precursor of lethal complications such as cardiac tamponade. The purpose of this study was to investigate predictors of the appearance of ULP in the AA/AR with early imagings (CT or MRI) before the appearance of ULP. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with ULP in the AA/AR (8 patients) and others (11 patients). Initial CT or MRI findings of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively statistically analyzed in each group. Three predictive factors were statistically significant for the appearance of ULP in the AA/AR (diameter of the AA≥5 cm, thickness of the false lumen of the AA≥1 cm, thickness of the false lumen of the AA≥ that of the descending aorta). Close attention should be paid, if any of these 3 factors is observed at initial CT or MRI. (author)

  13. Continuing the Original Stanford Sleep Surgery Protocol From Upper Airway Reconstruction to Upper Airway Stimulation: Our First Successful Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Stanley Yung; Riley, Robert Wayne

    2017-07-01

    In 1993, a surgical protocol for dynamic upper airway reconstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was published, and it became commonly known as the Stanford phase 1 and 2 sleep surgery protocol. It served as a platform on which research and clinical studies have continued to perfect the surgical care of patients with OSA. However, relapse is inevitable in a chronic condition such as OSA, and a subset of previously cured surgical patients return with complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness. This report describes a patient who was successfully treated with phase 1 and 2 operations more than a decade previously. He returned at 65 years of age with relapse of moderate OSA, and after workup with polysomnography and drug-induced sleep endoscopy, he underwent upper airway stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve that resulted in a cure of OSA. This case shows why upper airway stimulation is an appropriate option for patients with OSA relapse, after previously successful maxillomandibular advancement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Visualization of the Adamkiewicz artery in patients with acute Stanford A dissections. A prospective 64-row multi-detector CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Attila; Willinek, W.A.; Schild, H.; Urbach, H.; Schiller, W.; Gerhards, H.M.; Welz, A.; Flacke, S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the detectability of the Adamkiewicz artery (AA) in patients with acute Stanford type A aortic dissections with multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). Materials and Methods: 51 patients with Stanford type A dissection underwent contrast-enhanced 64-row MDCT of the entire aorta (collimation 64 x 0.625 mm; rotation time 0.4sec; 120kV; 300 mAs). The visualization of the AA, its origin, and whether it originated from the true or false lumen were analyzed using source and multiplanar reformation images. Results: a single anterior radicular artery that formed a hairpin turn constituting the anterior spinal artery was visualized in 36 (70%) patients. Thirty (83%) of these arteries originated from the left side, and 35 (97%) originated between the level T7 and L2. Twenty-three (64%) arteries originated from the true and 13 (36%) from the false lumen. Two AAs in the same patient were not observed. Conclusion: MDCT depicts the AA in a high percentage of patients with acute Stanford type A aortic dissection. (orig.)

  15. Report on the Stanford/KACST/AMES UVLED small satellite mission to demonstrate charge management of an electrically isolated proof mass for drag-free operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Shailendhar

    A spacecraft demonstration of ultra-violet (UV) LEDs and UV LED charge management based on research done at Stanford University is being developed jointly by the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) Saudi Arabia and NASA Ames Research Center, with an expected launch date of June 2014. This paper will report on the payload design and testing, mission preparation, satellite launch and payload bring -up in space. Mission lifetime is expected to be at least one month, during which time the ability for the UV LEDs to mitigate actual space-based charging and the effects of radiation on the UV LED device performance will be studied. Precise control over the potential of an electrically isolated proof mass is necessary for the operation of devices such as a Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS) and satellite missions such as LISA. The mission will demonstrate that AlGaN UV LEDs operating at 255 nm are an effective low-cost, low-power and compact substitute for Mercury vapor lamps used in previous missions. The goal of the mission is to increase the UV LED device to TRL-9 and the charge management system to TRL-7.

  16. A qualitative study of shopper experiences at an urban farmers' market using the Stanford Healthy Neighborhood Discovery Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buman, Matthew P; Bertmann, Farryl; Hekler, Eric B; Winter, Sandra J; Sheats, Jylana L; King, Abby C; Wharton, Christopher M

    2015-04-01

    To understand factors which enhance or detract from farmers' market shopper experiences to inform targeted interventions to increase farmers' market utilization, community-building and social marketing strategies. A consumer-intercept study using the Stanford Healthy Neighborhood Discovery Tool to capture real-time perceptions via photographs and audio narratives. An urban farmers' market in a large metropolitan US city. Thirty-eight farmers' market shoppers, who recorded 748 unique coded elements through community-based participatory research methods. Shoppers were primarily women (65 %), 18-35 years of age (54 %), non-Hispanic (81 %) and white (73 %). Shoppers captured 291 photographs (7·9 (sd 6·3) per shopper), 171 audio narratives (5·3 (sd 4·7) per shopper), and ninety-one linked photograph + audio narrative pairs (3·8 (sd 2·8) per shopper). A systematic content analysis of the photographs and audio narratives was conducted by eight independent coders. In total, nine common elements emerged from the data that enhanced the farmers' market experience (61·8 %), detracted from the experience (5·7 %) or were neutral (32·4 %). The most frequently noted elements were freshness/abundance of produce (23·3 %), product presentation (12·8 %), social interactions (12·4 %) and farmers' market attractions (e.g. live entertainment, dining offerings; 10·3 %). While produce quality (i.e. freshness/abundance) was of primary importance, other contextual factors also appeared important to the shoppers' experiences. These results may inform social marketing strategies to increase farmers' market utilization and community-building efforts that target market venues.

  17. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe

  18. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  19. Stanford's big new detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    A detector constructed for the Standford Linear Collider is described. It consists of a central drift chamber in the field of a surrounding superconducting solenoid. Furthermore included are a Cherenkov ring imaging detector for particle identification and a liquid argon calorimeter. (HSI).

  20. Stanford aitab Eestit tutvustada

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2011-01-01

    Tallinna okupatsioonide muuseumi rahastav Kistler-Ritso fond teeb miljonite dollarite suuruse annetuse USAs asuva Stanfordi ülikooli fondile. Üks sihtotstarve on Eesti ajaloo dokumentide digitaliseerimine. Kistler-Ritso Eesti Sihtasutuse liikmeks kutsuti ka president Toomas Hendrik Ilvese poeg, Stanfordi ülikooli vilistlane Luukas Ilves

  1. STANFORD ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PROJECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE , GAME THEORY, DECISION MAKING, BIONICS, AUTOMATA, SPEECH RECOGNITION, GEOMETRIC FORMS, LEARNING MACHINES, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, PATTERN RECOGNITION, SERVOMECHANISMS, SIMULATION, BIBLIOGRAPHIES.

  2. Cultural resource survey report for construction of office building, driveway, and parking lot at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    An Environmental Assessment and associated documentation is reported for the construction of an office building and parking lot in support of environmental management personnel activities. As part of the documentation process, the DOE determined that the proposed project constituted an undertaking as defined in Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. In accordance with the regulations implementing Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, a records and literature search and historic resource identification effort were carried out on behalf of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This report summarizes cultural resource literature and record searches and a historic resource identification effort

  3. Use of the Stanford Brief Activity Survey for physical activity assessment in postpartum Latinas: a validation study of a linguistically translated Spanish version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Rodney P; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Vega-López, Sonia; Keller, Colleen S

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the concurrent validity of the English and a linguistic Spanish translation of the Stanford Brief Activity Survey (SBAS) with pedometer-measured physical activity (PA) among postpartum Latinas. Latinas (n 97) completed the SBAS in either English (n 47) or Spanish (n 50) and wore pedometers 7 days at three different assessment periods. The English version demonstrated significant trends (p .01) for differentiating aerobic walking steps (AWS) and aerobic walking time (AWT) across SBAS intensity categories at two of the three assessment periods. The Spanish version showed marginally significant trends for differentiating AWS (p .048) and AWT (p .052) across SBAS intensity categories at only one assessment period. The English version of the SBAS is effective in assessing PA status among Latinas; however, the Spanish version indicates a need for research to further explore cultural and linguistic adaptations of the SBAS.

  4. Utility of an abbreviated version of the stanford-binet intelligence scales (5th ed.) in estimating 'full scale' IQ for young children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Conal; O'Connell, Helen; Lillis, Mary; Tarpey, Sarah Louise; O'Reilly, Gary

    2018-03-01

    The fifth edition of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence scales allows 'full scale' IQ (FSIQ) to be estimated using an abridged version of the test-the abbreviated battery IQ (ABIQ). Set within a public early intervention team service, the current cross-sectional study investigated the utility of the ABIQ in estimating FSIQ for 40 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 3-5 years. A strong ABIQ-FSIQ association was yielded (r = 0.89; r 2  = 0.808) and the ABIQ did not over-estimate mean FSIQ above a clinically-relevant threshold; however, clinically significant over-estimation occurred in 17.5% of individual cases. While the findings provide support for the utility of the ABIQ in estimating FSIQ for young children with ASD, caution relating to the over-estimation of FSIQ is warranted. Careful clinical judgment-ideally based on examination of previous cognitive assessment results (if available), thorough interactional observations, and close multi-disciplinary consultation-is necessary to determine the applicability of the ABIQ to individual cases. Autism Res 2018, 11: 503-508. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. We investigated the utility of a shortened version of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales in estimating IQ for 40 young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings provide qualified support for the instrument: acceptably accurate IQ estimation was achieved for most cases; but not so for a sizeable minority (17.5%). Careful clinical judgment is necessary to determine the applicability of the ABIQ to individual cases. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Translation into Brazilian Portuguese, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Stanford presenteeism scale-6 and work instability scale for ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauendorf, Renata; de Medeiros Pinheiro, Marcelo; Ciconelli, Rozana Mesquita

    2014-12-01

    Loss of productivity at work, as a result of health problems, is becoming an issue of interest due to the high burden it represents in society. The measurement of such phenomenon can be made using generic and specific scales for certain diseases such as the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6) and the Work Instability Scale for Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS-WIS), specific for patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The aim of this study was to translate and perform a cross-cultural adaptation of SPS-6 and AS-WIS into Portuguese and check their psychometric properties. The study also aimed to evaluate the relationship between the general scores of the scales and the main sociodemographic and clinical data, lifestyles, and absenteeism in patients with AS and correlate these variables with SPS-6 and AS-WIS scales. A sample of 120 patients with AS and 80 workers at a university hospital was evaluated. The processes for the translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the instruments followed preestablished steps and rules presented in the literature. For the evaluation of measurement properties and correlations between scales, intra-class correlation coefficient (reproducibility analysis), Cronbach alpha (internal consistency), and Pearson correlation coefficient (validity) were employed. The inter-observer (0.986) and intra-observer (0.992) reproducibilities of the AS-WIS were shown to be high as well as the internal consistency (0.995). Similarly, the inter-observer reliability of SPS-6 was considered good (0.890), although it showed a poorer performance when considering the same observer (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.675 and intra-class correlation = 0.656). Internal consistency, for the total number of items, as measured by Cronbach alpha, was 0.889. The validity of the scales was evaluated thru the comparison of the achieved scores with the results of the WLQ, SF-36, ASQoL, BASFI, BASDAI, HAQ-S, and SRQ-20 instruments. Correlations between loss of

  6. SPEAR3 Workshop: Making the Scientific Case: Report from Workshop held at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, May 29-30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, S.

    1998-08-13

    As part of the planning process for the proposed upgrade to the SPEAR electron storage ring, SSRL, the SSRL Users Organization and the SSRL faculty sponsored a 1 1/2 day workshop on May 29-30 1997. The goal was to assess and document the impact of SPEAR3 on current and future science and technology research programs of the users of SSRL. The hard and soft x-ray beams produced at SSRL are used in a number of different scientific and technological disciplines. The workshop was organized by defining a set of areas of science and technology covering the basic activities at SSRL and inviting key people from outside Stanford to work with the SSRL faculty and staff in a set of topical groups on estimating the impact of SPEAR3 on their respective fields and developing a vision of the future opportunities. This report documents those scientific and technological opportunities and provides written summaries of the discussions. The report is organized with a brief technical description of SPEAR3 and planned beam line upgrades (which summarizes material presented to the workshop participants prior to the breakout sessions) following this executive summary. More detailed information from the topical working groups then follows. Finally, an appendix provides a list of workshop participants and a copy of the workshop agenda as well as some more detailed information on the SPEAR3 lattice and machine.

  7. Conference on Stochastic Processes and their Applications (16th) Held in Stanford, California on August 17-21, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    ESTIMATION FOR STOCHASTIC PROCESSES by C. C. Heyde Australian National University Canberra, Australia ABSTRACT Optimality is a widely and loosely used...Case 240 S. Australia 1211 Geneva 24 Switzerland Christopher C. Heyde Dept. of Statistics, IAS Patricia Jacobs . Australian National University...Universitat Regensburg USA Postfach D-8400 Regensburg Anatole Joffe W. Germany Dept. of Mathematics & Statatistics Frank Kelly Universite de Montreal

  8. Mortality within the endovascular treatment in Stanford type B aortic dissections Mortalidade no tratamento endovascular nas dissecções aórticas tipo B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fioranelli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endovascular stent-graft repair of aortic dissections is a relatively new procedure, and although apparently less invasive, the efficacy and safety of this technique have not been fully established. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate mortality in patients with complicated Stanford type B aortic dissections submitted to endovascular treatment. METHODS: Clinical, anatomical, imaging and autopsy data of 23 patients with complicated type B aortic dissections were reviewed from November 2004 to October 2007. The main indications for transluminal thoracic stent-grafting included: persistent pain in spite of medical therapy, signs of distal limb ischemia, signs of aortic rupture, progression of aneurismal dilation of the descending aorta during follow-up (defined as a diameter > 50 mm and the diameter of descending thoracic aorta of 40mm or larger at the onset of aortic dissection. Data were analyzed statistically; all p-values were two-tailed and differences INTRODUÇÃO: O tratamento endovascular na dissecção de aorta é um procedimento relativamente novo e, embora aparentemente menos invasivo, a eficácia e a segurança dessa técnica não estão totalmente estabelecidas. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a mortalidade e complicações nos pacientes submetidos a tratamento endovascular na dissecção de aorta tipo B de Stanford. MÉTODOS: Foram revisados, a partir de novembro de 2004 a outubro de 2007, em estudo clínico, anatômico, de imagens e dados da autopsia de 23 pacientes com dissecção aórtica tipo B. As principais indicações para o procedimento foram: dor persistente apesar da terapia médica, sinais de isquemia distal do membro, sinais de ruptura da aorta, progressão da dilatação do aneurisma da aorta descendente, durante o seguimento (definida como um diâmetro > 5 cm e descendente da aorta torácica de 40 mm ou mais de diâmetro no início da dissecção aórtica. Os dados foram analisados estatisticamente considerados erro alfa de 5%. As vari

  9. The Stanford Microsurgery and Resident Training (SMaRT) Scale: validation of an on-line global rating scale for technical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterwhite, Thomas; Son, Ji; Carey, Joseph; Echo, Anthony; Spurling, Terry; Paro, John; Gurtner, Geoffrey; Chang, James; Lee, Gordon K

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported results of our on-line microsurgery training program, showing that residents who had access to our website significantly improved their cognitive and technical skills. In this study, we report an objective means for expert evaluators to reliably rate trainees' technical skills under the microscope, with the use of our novel global rating scale. "Microsurgery Essentials" (http://smartmicrosurgery.com) is our on-line training curriculum. Residents were randomly divided into 2 groups: 1 group reviewed this online resource and the other did not. Pre- and post-tests consisted of videotaped microsurgical sessions in which the trainee performed "microsurgery" on 3 different models: latex glove, penrose drain, and the dorsal vessel of a chicken foot. The SMaRT (Stanford Microsurgery and Resident Training) scale, consisting of 9 categories graded on a 5-point Likert scale, was used to assess the trainees. Results were analyzed with ANOVA and Student t test, with P less than 0.05 indicating statistical significance. Seventeen residents participated in the study. The SMaRT scale adequately differentiated the performance of more experienced senior residents (PGY-4 to PGY-6, total average score=3.43) from less experienced junior residents (PGY-1 to PGY-3, total average score=2.10, P0.05). Additionally, junior residents who had access to our website showed a significant increase in their graded technical performance by 0.7 points when compared to residents who did not have access to the website who showed an improvement of only 0.2 points (P=0.01). Our SMaRT scale is valid and reliable in assessing the microsurgical skills of residents and other trainees. Current trainees are more likely to use self-directed on-line education because of its easy accessibility and interactive format. Our global rating scale can help ensure residents are achieving appropriate technical milestones.

  10. Hazards analysis for the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory x-ray absorption experiments to be performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.B.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the oxidation state(s) of neptunium (Np) in mouse skeleton and in soft tissue by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). If Np is present in sufficient concentration, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data will be obtained in order to further identify the Np species present. These data will be crucial in understanding the metabolic pathway of Np in mammals which will help in the design of reagents which can eliminate Np from mammals in the event of accidental exposure. It is proposed to run these experiments at the Standard Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). This laboratory is a DOE national user facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The 237 Np nucleus decays by the emission of an alpha particle and this particle emission is the principal hazard in handling Np samples. This hazard is mitigated by physical containment of the sample which stops the alpha particles within the containment. The total amount of Np material that will be shipped to and be at SSRL at any one time will be less than 1 gram. This limit on the amount of Np will ensure that SLAC remains a low hazard, non-nuclear facility. The Np samples will be solids or Np ions in aqueous solution. The Np samples will be shipped to SSRL/SLAC OHP. SLAC OHP will inventory the samples and swipe the containers holding the triply contained samples, and then bring them to the SSRL Actinide trailer located outside building 131. The QA counting records from the samples, as measured at LBNL, will be provided to SSRL and SLAC OHP prior to the arrival of the samples at SLAC OHP. In addition, strict monitoring of the storage and experimental areas will be performed in accordance with SLAC/OHP radiation protection procedures to ensure against the release of contamination

  11. In search of security: Finding an alternative to nuclear deterrence. 4 November 2004, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford University, Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) remains the global anchor for humanity's efforts to curb nuclear proliferation and move towards nuclear disarmament. There is no doubt that the implementation of the NPT continues to provide important security benefits, by providing assurance that, in the great majority of non-nuclear-weapon States, nuclear energy is not being misused for weapon purposes. The NPT is also the only binding agreement in which all five of the nuclear-weapon States have committed themselves to move forward towards nuclear disarmament. Still, for all of us who have been intimately associated with the implementation of the Treaty for over three decades, it is clear that recent events have placed the NPT and the regime supporting it under unprecedented stress, exposing some of its inherent limitations and pointing to areas that need to be adjusted. This presentation discusses some of the lessons that can be taken from recent experience, and a number of possible ways for moving forward. Of course, the Iraq experience is the most glaring recent case relevant to nuclear proliferation and security, but unfortunately not the only one. The IAEA's efforts to verify undeclared nuclear programmes in Iran, Libya and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea have also provided considerable insights and a number of lessons. For centuries, perhaps for millennia, security strategies have been based on boundaries: city walls, border patrols, and the use of racial and religious groupings or other categories to separate friend from foe. Those strategies no longer work. This is a mindset we must change. In this century, in this generation, we must develop a new approach to security capable of transcending borders - an inclusive approach that is centred on the value of every human life. The sooner we can make that transition, the sooner we will achieve our goal of a planet with peace and justice as its hallmark

  12. Alignment Despite Antagonism: the United States-Korea-Japan Security Triangle; Victor D. Cha : Stanford University Press. Stanford, California. 1999. 374 pp

    OpenAIRE

    Stanganelli, Isabel Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    De todas las relaciones bilaterales en el Asia, la relativa a Corea del Sur y Japón es la más importante. La proximidad geográfica, familiaridad cultural y similares sistemas económicos deberían asegurar relaciones de cooperación entre ambos. Los enemigos comunes durante la guerra fría, la retórica beligerante y las capacidades de armamento ofensivo debieron actuar como un factor de cohesión. (Párrafo extraído del texto a modo de resumen)

  13. In search of security: Finding an alternative to nuclear deterrence. 4 November 2004, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford University, Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElBaradei, M

    2004-11-04

    Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) remains the global anchor for humanity's efforts to curb nuclear proliferation and move towards nuclear disarmament. There is no doubt that the implementation of the NPT continues to provide important security benefits, by providing assurance that, in the great majority of non-nuclear-weapon States, nuclear energy is not being misused for weapon purposes. The NPT is also the only binding agreement in which all five of the nuclear-weapon States have committed themselves to move forward towards nuclear disarmament. Still, for all of us who have been intimately associated with the implementation of the Treaty for over three decades, it is clear that recent events have placed the NPT and the regime supporting it under unprecedented stress, exposing some of its inherent limitations and pointing to areas that need to be adjusted. This presentation discusses some of the lessons that can be taken from recent experience, and a number of possible ways for moving forward. Of course, the Iraq experience is the most glaring recent case relevant to nuclear proliferation and security, but unfortunately not the only one. The IAEA's efforts to verify undeclared nuclear programmes in Iran, Libya and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea have also provided considerable insights and a number of lessons. For centuries, perhaps for millennia, security strategies have been based on boundaries: city walls, border patrols, and the use of racial and religious groupings or other categories to separate friend from foe. Those strategies no longer work. This is a mindset we must change. In this century, in this generation, we must develop a new approach to security capable of transcending borders - an inclusive approach that is centred on the value of every human life. The sooner we can make that transition, the sooner we will achieve our goal of a planet with peace and justice as its hallmark.

  14. Cardiovascular imaging and image processing: Theory and practice - 1975; Proceedings of the Conference, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., July 10-12, 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. C.; Sandler, H.; Miller, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    The present collection of papers outlines advances in ultrasonography, scintigraphy, and commercialization of medical technology as applied to cardiovascular diagnosis in research and clinical practice. Particular attention is given to instrumentation, image processing and display. As necessary concomitants to mathematical analysis, recently improved magnetic recording methods using tape or disks and high-speed computers of large capacity are coming into use. Major topics include Doppler ultrasonic techniques, high-speed cineradiography, three-dimensional imaging of the myocardium with isotopes, sector-scanning echocardiography, and commercialization of the echocardioscope. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  15. An informatics-based approach to reducing heart failure all-cause readmissions: the Stanford heart failure dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Dipanjan; Thompson, Christine; Kell, Charlene; Shetty, Rajesh; Vetteth, Yohan; Grossman, Helene; DiBiase, Aria; Fowler, Michael

    2017-05-01

    , also improved significantly from 22% to 100% over time ( P  < .0001). In an institution with a quality improvement program already in place to reduce 30-day readmission rates for HF, an EMR-based approach further significantly reduced 30-day index hospital readmission rates. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Stanford Center for Military Photomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-08

    minimally invasive insertion into the scala tympani of a ‘needle-like’ 500-µm- or 1000-µm-diameter microendoscope. These probes are composed of gradient...micropipette infused fluorescent dye into the scala media, the fluid bathing the hair cells (labeled green), via a pinhole cochleostomy that was later...sealed. The microendoscope entered via a cochleostomy in the scala tympani and was situated beneath, but did not contact, the basilar membrane during

  17. Stanford Workshop on Surgical Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salisbury, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    .... The goal of this workshop was to bring together researchers and developers from around the world who focus on modeling and simulation of deformable materials for applications requiring real-time interaction...

  18. Stanford polarized atomic beam target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavis, D.G.; Dunham, J.S.; Hugg, J.W.; Glavish, H.F.

    1976-01-01

    A polarized atomic beam source was used to produce an atomic hydrogen beam which was in turn used as a polarized proton target. A target density of 2 x 10'' atoms/cm 3 and a target polarization of 0.37 without the use of rf transitions were measured. These measurements indicate that a number of experiments are currently feasible with a variety of polarized target beams

  19. Stanford Workshop on Surgical Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salisbury, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    .... We were particularly interested in medical applications including simulation-based training, skills assessment and planning, as well as other non-medical domains where real-time interactivity is needed...

  20. Solar space and water heating system at Stanford University Central Food Services Building. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    This active hydronic domestic hot water and space heating system was 840 ft/sup 2/ of single-glazed, liquid, flat plate collectors and 1550 gal heat storage tanks. The following are discussed: energy conservation, design philosophy, operation, acceptance testing, performance data, collector selection, bidding, costs, economics, problems, and recommendations. An operation and maintenance manual and as-built drawings are included in appendices. (MHR)

  1. Materials Research at Stanford University, 1 July 1979 - 30 June 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    L. Seaward N. L. Baumrind S. L. Westphal D. G. Boyers E. M. Young R. Chow* *Received Ph.D. during report period. **Received M.S. during report...H. Garofalini N. L. Baumrind F. G. Courreges N. A. Godshall M. C. Bost W. J. Deeg L. A. Gore 0. L. Bourell S. M. De Jesus, III N. Grayeli J. C...Dissertations -435- *~.-----.~-- Bauer, R. S. Bienenstock, A. I. Braicovich, L. D-409 B-30,38 C-334 C-93 D-391 Baumrind , N. L. D-390,395 C-378

  2. Materials Research at Stanford University, 1 July 1980-30 June 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    extract such information from the tunneling that is subject to corrections required to account for both an apparent region of depressed superconductivity...temperature for the f irst time, Pre 1 im i na ry measurenh.nts show that tile detector is capable of a noise temperature for pul se detect.ion of 3 inK ...phases and couples it into a SQUID via a superconducting transformer. Because XA> XB, changes in the distribution of A & B phases cause changes in

  3. [Value of fractional flow reserve measurement in endovascular therapy for patients with Stanford B type aortic dissection complicated with renal blood flow injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xi; Li, Peng; Liu, Guangrui; Huang, Xiaoyong; Yong, Qiang; Wang, Guoqin; Huang, Lianjun

    2015-10-01

    To analyze the value of fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement on endovascular therapy for patients with renal artery stenosis. Clinical data of 12 patients with Stanford B type aortic dissection complicated with renal blood flow injury in Anzhen hospital hospitalized from May 2013 to February 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Renal artery angiography was performed and fractional flow reserve (FFR) was measured before Thoracic endovascular aortic repair. After operation, renal artery FFR was measured again, and renal artery stenting was performed in patients with FFR ≤ 0.90 or average pressure difference between proximal and distal of renal artery > 20 mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) and not applied for patients with FFR > 0.90.The patients were then subsequently followed up clinically. Kidney function were measured after 1 month, and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography data were obtained at 1 and 3 months later, respectively. The FFR of 1 patient was 0.90, while the FFR of other patients were less than 0.90 before thoracic endovascular aortic repair. After the procedure,the angiography showed that the blood flow of renal artery in 8 patients were fluency, and the FFR index was over 0.90. There were 4 patients with FFR less than 0.90. After renal artery stenting, the FFR of these 4 patients were all above 0.90. Compared with pre-procedure, blood urea nitrogen ((8.84 ± 3.99) mmol/L vs. (5.18 ± 1.69) mmol/L, P = 0.011) and uric acid ((359.3 ± 77.3) µmol/L vs. (276.9 ± 108.3) µmol/L, P = 0.008) decreased significantly after 1 month, and there was no significant difference in serum creatinine (P = 0.760). Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography results showed that blood flow of renal artery were fluency after 1 month and 3 months. In patients with aortic dissection complicating renal blood flow injury, the FFR measurement is meaningful in evaluating the blood flow status of target organs and guide the endovascular revascularization.

  4. Implementation of case management to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in the Stanford and San Mateo Heart to Heart randomized controlled trial: study protocol and baseline characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stafford Randall S

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Case management has emerged as a promising alternative approach to supplement traditional one-on-one sessions between patients and doctors for improving the quality of care in chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD. However, data are lacking in terms of its efficacy and cost-effectiveness when implemented in ethnic and low-income populations. Methods The Stanford and San Mateo Heart to Heart (HTH project is a randomized controlled clinical trial designed to rigorously evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multi-risk cardiovascular case management program in low-income, primarily ethnic minority patients served by a local county health care system in California. Randomization occurred at the patient level. The primary outcome measure is the absolute CHD risk over 10 years. Secondary outcome measures include adherence to guidelines on CHD prevention practice. We documented the study design, methodology, and baseline sociodemographic, clinical and lifestyle characteristics of 419 participants. Results We achieved equal distributions of the sociodemographic, biophysical and lifestyle characteristics between the two randomization groups. HTH participants had a mean age of 56 years, 63% were Latinos/Hispanics, 65% female, 61% less educated, and 62% were not employed. Twenty percent of participants reported having a prior cardiovascular event. 10-year CHD risk averaged 18% in men and 13% in women despite a modest low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and a high on-treatment percentage at baseline. Sixty-three percent of participants were diagnosed with diabetes and an additional 22% had metabolic syndrome. In addition, many participants had depressed high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels and elevated values of total cholesterol-to-HDL ratio, triglycerides, triglyceride-to-HDL ratio, and blood pressure. Furthermore, nearly 70% of participants were obese, 45% had a family history of CHD or

  5. Solar magnetic field - 1976 through 1985: an atlas of photospheric magnetic field observations and computed coronal magnetic fields from the John M. Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford, 1976-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeksema, J.T.; Scherrer, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    Daily magnetogram observations of the large-scale photospheric magnetic field have been made at the John M. Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford since May of 1976. These measurements provide a homogeneous record of the changing solar field through most of Solar Cycle 21. Using the photospheric data, the configuration of the coronal and heliospheric fields can be calculated using a Potential Field -- Source Surface model. This provides a 3-dimensional picture of the heliospheric field-evolution during the solar cycle. In this report the authors present the complete set of synoptic charts of the measured photospheric magnetic field, the computed field at the source surface, and the coefficients of the multipole expansion of the coronal field. The general underlying structure of the solar and heliospheric fields, which determine the environment for solar - terrestrial relations and provide the context within which solar-activity-related events occur, can be approximated from these data

  6. Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

  7. Around the laboratories: Dubna: Physics results and progress on bubble chamber techniques; Stanford (SLAC): Operation of a very rapid cycling bubble chamber; Daresbury: Photographs of visitors to the Laboratory; Argonne: Charge exchange injection tests into the ZGS in preparation for a proposed Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Dubna: Physics results and progress on bubble chamber techniques; Stanford (SLAC): Operation of a very rapid cycling bubble chamber; Daresbury: Photographs of visitors to the Laboratory; Argonne: Charge exchange injection tests into the ZGS in preparation for a proposed Booster

  8. Treatment planning and delivery of involved field radiotherapy in advanced Hodgkin's disease: results from a questionnaire-based audit for the UK Stanford V regimen vs ABVD clinical trial quality assurance programme (ISRCTN 64141244).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, P; Hoskin, P J; Aird, E G A

    2007-10-01

    This questionnaire forms the basis of the quality assurance (QA) programme for the UK randomized Phase III study of the Stanford V regimen versus ABVD for treatment of advanced Hodgkin's disease to assess differences between participating centres in treatment planning and delivery of involved-field radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma The questionnaire, which was circulated amongst 42 participating centres, consisted of seven sections: target volume definition and dose prescription; critical structures; patient positioning and irradiation techniques; planning; dose calculation; verification; and future developments The results are based on 25 responses. One-third plan using CT alone, one-third use solely the simulator and the rest individualize, depending on disease site. Eleven centres determine a dose distribution for each patient. Technique depends on disease site and whether CT or simulator planning is employed. Most departments apply isocentric techniques and use immobilization and customized shielding. In vivo dosimetry is performed in 7 centres and treatment verification occurs in 24 hospitals. In conclusion, the planning and delivery of treatment for lymphoma patients varies across the country. Conventional planning is still widespread but most centres are moving to CT-based planning and virtual simulation with extended use of immobilization, customized shielding and compensation.

  9. Protecting the source. Securing nuclear material and strong radiation sources. New threats of terrorism are prompting the need for swift action to better secure nuclear material and strong radiation sources. Are measures already in place enough? The Stanford-Salzburg initiative suggests not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhausler, F.; Bunn, G.

    2003-01-01

    At a time of growing concern over threats of terrorism, the security of nuclear and radioactive material is an urgent and serious issue. Working with a range of partners, the IAEA has put into place a multi-faceted Action Plan to help countries upgrade their capabilities. But more needs to be done to counter new types of threats. One particular area that needs to be strengthened is the physical protection of nuclear and radioactive material. The attacks of 11 September 2001 opened our eyes to i he urgent need to strengthen national physical protection (PP) practices for nuclear and other radioactive material. The principle that highly radioactive material will protect itself does not apply to the newest generation of terrorists. Existing PP systems were not designed to deal with the threat of suicidal terrorists commanding the numbers, skills, training, and resources available to those who carried out the attacks in the US. Moreover, because there are no mandatory international standards for domestic PP systems for nuclear or radioactive material, protection measures vary greatly from country to country. The IAEA recommended standards (Inference/225/Rev. 4) were not designed with the new terrorist threats in mind and national practices often fall short of even these recommendations. The result is inadequate protection against the new form of terrorism. Few argue the point that national physical protection practices for nuclear and other radioactive material need to be strengthened. This article summarizes a Stanford-Salzburg plan developed by experts from Stanford University's Center for International Security and Cooperation, (USA) and revised at the EU-Physical Protection NUMAT Conference in September 2002 in Salzburg, Austria. It includes six recommended elements to consider in addition to what the IAEA is now doing to improve PP practices around the world: Establish a global list of physical protection priorities; Create a multilateral security cooperation

  10. Symposium on Turbulent Shear Flows, 7th, Stanford University, CA, Aug. 21-23, 1989, Proceedings. Volumes 1 ampersand 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Papers on turbulent shear flows are presented, covering topics such as the structure of pressure fluctuations, fossil two-dimensional turbulence in the ocean, turbulence production and eddy structure in wall turbulence, bypass transition in a heated boundary layer, a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow, the evolution of an axisymmetric jet, plane mixing layer development, vortex models of a pseudoturbulent shear flow, numerical techniques for turbulence studies, Reynolds stress in the wall region of turbulent pipe flow, the turbulent structure of a momentumless wake, the near field of the transverse jet. Additional topics include a turbulent boundary layer disturbed by a cylinder, evolving mixing layers, flow analysis in a vortex flowmeter, ejections and bursts in pulsatile turbulent wall flow measurements, a flat plate oscillating in pitch, turbulent buoyant flows, isothermal lobed mixer flows, flow distortion on a turbulent scalar field, two phase flows. In addition, papers on the applications of turbulent shear flow studies are given, including air pollutant deposition, closures, oceanography, instrumentation, heat transfer, rotating flows, combustion, coherent structures, turbulence control, and scalar transport modeling

  11. 76 FR 9752 - Stanford University, et al.; Notice of Consolidated Decision on Applications for Duty-Free Entry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... 1966 (Pub. L. 89-651, as amended by Pub. L. 106-36; 80 Stat. 897; 15 CFR part 301). Related records can.... Campbell, Director, Subsidies Enforcement Office, Import Administration. [FR Doc. 2011-3915 Filed 2-18-11...

  12. Modeling caffeine concentrations with the Stanford Caffeine Questionnaire: preliminary evidence for an interaction of chronotype with the effects of caffeine on sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova, Philip; Hernandez, Beatriz; Ptolemy, Adam S; Zeitzer, Jamie M

    2012-04-01

    To examine the validity of a novel caffeine intake questionnaire and to examine the effects of caffeine on sleep in college students. One-week, ad libitum behavior of 50 university students (28 female, 22 male; aged 20.9 ± 1.78 years) was examined with sleep logs, wrist actigraphy, and a novel daily questionnaire assessing caffeine intake at different times of day. Saliva samples were collected for caffeine assessment (questionnaire validation) and DNA extraction, and for analysis of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the adenosine receptor 2A (ADORA2A) gene. The caffeine questionnaire was able to accurately predict salivary concentrations of caffeine (R(2) = 0.41, Psleep were correlated with wake after sleep onset (WASO) most strongly in morning-type individuals (R(2) = 0.49; Psleep and genotype and chronotype. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Proceedings of the 25th SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics: Physics of Leptons (SSI97) , Stanford, CA, August 4-15, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deporcel, Lilian

    1998-01-01

    One hundred ninety-eight physicists from 16 countries gathered at SLAC from August 4 to 15, 1997 to attend the XXV SLAC Summer Institute on Particle Physics. The theme of the school was ''The Physics of Leptons'', commemorating a century since the electron, the first lepton, was discovered. We heard about the electron's role as a probe of the structure of matter, as well as the beautifully precise tests of charged-lepton universality in Z 0 decays. The focus of the school then shifted from the charged leptons to their weak partners, the neutrinos. Summer Institute attendees were not surprised in early 1998 by Super-Kamiokande's announcement of evidence for neutrino mass. After all, they had already seen the mounting evidence, both solar and atmospheric, the preceding August, in a comprehensive review of all nonaccelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, as well as a topical conference report from Super-Kamiokande. We also heard about the past, present, and future of reactor- and accelerator-based oscillation experiments, including the prospects for terrestrial tests of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. Leptons in cosmology and as harbingers of physics beyond the Standard Model were the subject of two more lecture series. The three-day topical conference concluding the Institute was highlighted by the Super-Kamiokande neutrino results, and Beppo-Sax's report on the cosmological origin of gamma-ray bursters. As for terrestrial accelerators, SLC, LEP, and the Tevatron put increasing pressure on the electroweak sector through precision measurements, but all direct searches for new phenomena still came up empty

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SSRL at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was built in 1974 to take and use for synchrotron studies the intense x-ray beams from the SPEAR storage ring that...

  15. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1992 activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-01-01

    Under SLAC's supervision, the SPEAR ring and injector system were operated for the first time in a truly dedicated mode for user experimentation. In October, SSRL became a division of SLAC. With that organizational change, SSRL became fully responsible for the operation, maintenance and improvement of SPEAR and its injection accelerators. At the same time, other radiation sources were studied. Free electron lasers providing enormous peak brightnesses and time average brightnesses about two orders of magnitude greater than the machines presently being constructed or commissioned were the object of one line of analysis. Ultra-short pulse beams at lower photons energies were also studied. These, as well, are described in Chapter 2. Significant gains were also made on the beam lines. Perhaps the most dramatic was the introduction of YB 66 crystals into the Jumbo monochromator, as described in Chapter 3. Looking to the future, SSRL held a workshop on Fourth Generation Light Sources in February and two workshops in conjunction with the Users Meeting. The impact of the high quality running is demonstrated by the many high quality experimental programs performed on SPEAR during the year. These are described in Chapter 6

  17. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L. [eds.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials.

  18. Stanford MFEL and Near Infrared Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    are incorporated into glass catadioptric lenses that are mounted and sealed at each end of the stainless steel microscope. In addition to the self...highly effective in preventing biofilm formation , as well as in killing biofilms that are already present. b) Peer-Reviewed publications (in reversed...Multiphoton Microscopy in the Biomedical Sciences VII, SPIE, vol. 6442 (2007). 3. On Image formation in Near-field Infrared Microscopy, D. M

  19. Proceedings 43rd Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Stuart; Kirby, Stefan; Verplanck, Philip; Kelley, Karen

    2018-02-12

    Herein we summarize the results of an investigation dealing with the concentrations and inventories of strategic, critical and valuable materials (SCVM) in produced fluids from geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs (50-250° C) in Nevada and Utah. Water samples were collected from thirty-four production wells across eight geothermal fields, the Uinta Basin oil/gas province in northeast Utah, and the Covenant oil field in southwestern Utah; additional water samples were collected from six hot springs in the Sevier Thermal Belt in southwestern Utah. Most SCVM concentrations in produced waters range from <0.1 to 100 µg/kg; the main exception is lithium, which has concentrations that range from <1000 to 25,000 ug/kg. Relatively high concentrations of gallium, germanium, scandium, selenium, and tellurium are measured too. Geothermal waters contain very low concentrations of REEs, below analytical detections limits (0.01 µg/kg), but the concentrations of lanthanum, cerium, and europium range from 0.05 to 5 µg/kg in Uinta basin waters. Among the geothermal fields, the Roosevelt Hot Spring reservoir appears to have the largest inventories of germanium and lithium, and Patua appears to have the largest inventories of gallium, scandium, selenium, and tellurium. By comparison, the Uinta basin has larger inventories of gallium. The concentrations of gallium, germanium, lithium, scandium, selenium, and tellurium in produced waters appear to be partly related to reservoir temperature and concentrations of total dissolved salts. The relatively high concentration and large inventory of lithium occurring at Roosevelt Hot Springs may be related to granitic-gneissic crystalline rocks, which host the reservoir. Analyses of calcite scales from Dixie Valley indicate enrichments in cobalt, gallium, gold, palladium, selenium and tellurium, and these metals appear to be depositing at deep levels in production wells due to boiling. Comparisons with SCVM mineral deposits suggest that brines in sedimentary basins, or derived from lacustrine evaporites, enable aqueous transport of gallium, germanium, and lithium.

  20. Sibling-based association study of the PPARgamma2 Pro12Ala polymorphism and metabolic variables in Chinese and Japanese hypertension families: a SAPPHIRe study. Stanford Asian-Pacific Program in Hypertension and Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, L M; Hsiung, C A; Chen, Y D; Ho, L T; Sheu, W H; Pei, D; Nakatsuka, C H; Cox, D; Pratt, R E; Lei, H H; Tai, T Y

    2001-11-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma2 is a transcription factor that has been shown to be involved in adipocyte differentiation, adipogenesis, and insulin sensitivity. To address the role of PPARgamma2 in glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity, among many other objectives, we conducted a sibling-controlled association study in a multicenter program - the Stanford Asian-Pacific Program in Hypertension and Insulin Resistance (SAPPHIRe). Approximately 2525 subjects in 734 Chinese and Japanese families have been recruited from six field centers for SAPPHIRe. In total, 1702 subjects including parents and siblings from 449 families have been genotyped for PPARgamma2, of which 328 families were Chinese and 121 Japanese. Only 88 subjects of the 1525 siblings screened for the P12A polymorphism were found to be carriers of the A variant, the most common variant of the PPARgamma2 gene. A variant frequencies of the siblings were 4.27% in Chinese and 2.72% in Japanese. A sibling-controlled association study was performed through genetically discordant sibships (i.e., P/P genotype vs. P/A + A/A genotypes). Specifically, we examined whether there were differences in metabolic variables between the discordant siblings within families. In total, 88 subjects carrying either 1 or 2 A alleles had at least one sibling who was discordant for the P12A polymorphism, yielding a total of 180 individuals from 47 families for analyses, among which 92 siblings were homozygous for wild-type P allele. Siblings with the A variant tended to have lower levels of fasting plasma glucose (OG-10), and lower glucose levels at 60 min following oral glucose loading after adjusting for age, gender, and body mass index. Using a mixed model treating family as a random effect, we found that P12A polymorphism of the PPARgamma2 gene contributes significantly to the variance in fasting plasma glucose, glucose level at 60 min, and insulin-resistance homeostasis model assessment. Our

  1. Universities Improve Services with E-Commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gina Adams

    2001-01-01

    This follow-up to a December 2000 article provides more details on Stanford University's venture into the "sell-side" of e-commerce, then describes another "sell-side" success story at the University of Wisconsin. Madison. Discusses experiences on the "buy-side" of e-commerce at the Massachusetts Institute of…

  2. The Role of Rationality in University Budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle

    1983-01-01

    Although empirical accounts of organizational decision making often show that the process is not a rational one, a study of budgeting at Stanford University during the 1970s, while not conclusive or comprehensive, supported the claim that the institution's process was rational and provided a procedure for testing a decision-making model. (MSE)

  3. ICIASF '85 - International Congress on Instrumentation in Aerospace Simulation Facilities, 11th, Stanford University, CA, August 26-28, 1985, Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Developments related to laser Doppler velocimetry are discussed, taking into account a three-component dual beam laser-Doppler-anemometer to be operated in large wind tunnels, a new optical system for three-dimensional laser-Doppler-anemometry using an argon-ion and a dye laser, and a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter by switching fringe orientation. Other topics studied are concerned with facilities, instrumentation, control, hot wire/thin film measurements, optical diagnostic techniques, signal and data processing, facilities and adaptive wall test sections, data acquisition and processing, ballistic instrument systems, dynamic testing and material deformation measurements, optical flow measurements, test techniques, force measurement systems, and holography. Attention is given to nonlinear calibration of integral wind tunnel balances, a microcomputer system for real time digitized image compression, and two phase flow diagnostics in propulsion systems.

  4. Why is the universe more partial to mater than antimatter?

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "B factory experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) in the USA and at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Japan have reached a new milestone in the quest to understand the matter-antimatter imbalance in our universe.

  5. Vacuum system for the Stanford-LBL storage ring (PEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostic, D.; Cummings, U.; Dean, N.; Jeong, B.; Jurow, J.

    1975-03-01

    The vacuum system for PEP will be similar in design, construction and operation to the system currently in operation at SPEAR. There will, of course, be quantitative differences since the closed path of PEP will be 10 times longer than the SPEAR path. Some qualitative differences will also arise since the radiated synchrotron power for PEP will be about 13 times greater than for SPEAR giving rise to an increased linear power density incident on the chamber wall. Other differences arise from the higher energy spectrum of the synchrotron radiation. The SPEAR vacuum system has been in operation since April 1972 and has proven satisfactory in design, construction and operation. The chamber has been subject to synchrotron radiation for approximately 300 ampere-hours and beam lifetimes are now more than several hours. The details of the PEP design and the SPEAR operating experience will be further discussed in this paper. 1 ref., 4 figs

  6. Phase and amplitude control system for Stanford Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    The computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 micro-second 2856 MHz rf pulse at a 180 Hz rate. This will be used for phase feedback control, and also for phase and amplitude jitter measurement. The program, which was originally written by John Fox and Keith Jobe, has been modified to improve the function of the system. The software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL's history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia's leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR's performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY '91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL's three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL's users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report

  8. Environmental Remediation Sciences Program at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargar, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based techniques provide unique capabilities to address scientific issues underpinning environmental remediation science and have emerged as major research tools in this field. The high intensity of SR sources and x-ray photon-in/photon-out detection allow noninvasive in-situ analysis of dilute, hydrated, and chemically/structurally complex natural samples. SR x-rays can be focused to beams of micron and sub-micron dimension, which allows the study of microstructures, chemical microgradients, and microenvironments such as in biofilms, pore spaces, and around plant roots, that may control the transformation of contaminants in the environment. The utilization of SR techniques in environmental remediation sciences is often frustrated, however, by an ''activation energy barrier'', which is associated with the need to become familiar with an array of data acquisition and analysis techniques, a new technical vocabulary, beam lines, experimental instrumentation, and user facility administrative procedures. Many investigators find it challenging to become sufficiently expert in all of these areas or to maintain their training as techniques evolve. Another challenge is the dearth of facilities for hard x-ray micro-spectroscopy, particularly in the 15 to 23 KeV range, which includes x-ray absorption edges of the priority DOE contaminants Sr, U, Np, Pu, and Tc. Prior to the current program, there were only two (heavily oversubscribed) microprobe facilities in the U.S. that could fully address this energy range (one at each of APS and NSLS); none existed in the Western U.S., in spite of the relatively large number of DOE laboratories in this region

  9. Performance report for Stanford/SLAC Microstore Analog Memory Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, D.R.; Walker, J.T.

    1984-09-01

    Tests of a newly developed Analog Memory Unit (AMU) are described. The device contains 256 analog storage cells consisting of pass transistors, a storage capacitor and a differential read out buffer. By addressing the storage cells sequentially, the shape of the signal present at the input can be recorded in time. Fast response and good amplitude resolution were the design goals for the development. Measurements on individual devices will be presented and the status of hybridized subsystems containing eight AMUs discussed

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL's users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL's experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  14. The Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire: Dimensions and Practical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fries James F

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to effectively measure health-related quality-of-life longitudinally is central to describing the impacts of disease, treatment, or other insults, including normal aging, upon the patient. Over the last two decades, assessment of patient health status has undergone a dramatic paradigm shift, evolving from a predominant reliance on biochemical and physical measurements, such as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, lipid profiles, or radiographs, to an emphasis upon health outcomes based on the patient's personal appreciation of their illness. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ, published in 1980, was among the first instruments based on generic, patient-centered dimensions. The HAQ was designed to represent a model of patient-oriented outcome assessment and has played a major role in many diverse areas such as prediction of successful aging, inversion of the therapeutic pyramid in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, quantification of NSAID gastropathy, development of risk factor models for osteoarthrosis, and examination of mortality risks in RA. Evidenced by its use over the past two decades in diverse settings, the HAQ has established itself as a valuable, effective, and sensitive tool for measurement of health status. It is available in more than 60 languages and is supported by a bibliography of more than 500 references. It has increased the credibility and use of validated self-report measurement techniques as a quantifiable set of hard data endpoints and has contributed to a new appreciation of outcome assessment. In this article, information regarding the HAQ's development, content, dissemination and reference sources for its uses, translations, and validations are provided.

  15. Research at the Stanford Center for Radar Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The research is reported in the applications of radar and radio techniques to the study of the solar system, and to space programs. Experiments reported include: bistatic-radar on Apollo missions, development of an unmanned geophysical observatory in the Antartic, Bragg scattering probes of sea states, characteristics of dense solar wind disturbances, and satellite communications for Alaska.

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  17. Assessing Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in the University Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinklenberg, Julie; Patel, Bina; Gelman, Kathryn; Albucher, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To address the increasing demand for assessments of Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), the primary author developed a protocol for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at Stanford University's Vaden Student Health Center to improve the efficiency of such evaluations. Participants: As part of quality…

  18. Life, the universe ... and nothing?; Science still can't explain what happened to half of everything

    CERN Multimedia

    Davidson, K

    2002-01-01

    New measurements at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre have refined measurements of sub-atomic particles that explain why there is a dominance of matter over antimatter in the Universe. The results partially confirm an announcement made last year that describes the imbalance in these physical opposites (1 page).

  19. LATTICEEASY A Program for Lattice Simulations of Scalar Fields in an Expanding Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G; Tkachev, Igor; Felder, Gary

    2008-01-01

    We describe a C++ program that we have written and made available for calculating the evolution of interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. The program is particularly useful for the study of reheating and thermalization after inflation. The program and its full documentation are available on the Web at http://physics.stanford.edu/gfelder/latticeeasy. In this paper we provide a brief overview of what the program does and what it is useful for.

  20. Roy Macridis, Greek Politics at a Crossroads. What kind of socialism ?, Stanford, Hoover University Press, 1984, 72 p ” et “ Zafiris Tzannatos ed., Socialism in Greece, Aldershot, Brookfield, Gower, 1986, 210 p.

    OpenAIRE

    PAPADOPOULOS, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    Il s'agit de deux ouvrages se proposant d'évaluer ­ à partir d'angles d'approche fort différents ­, la politique du PASOK au pouvoir en Grèce depuis les élections d'octobre 1981, qui lui ont permis de former le premier gouvernement socialiste du pays.

  1. Brown, C. Timothy, When The AK-47s Fall Silent: Revolutionaries, Guerrillas, and the Dangers of Peace, Hoover Institution Press, Publication N. 476 Stanford University, 2000, 328p.; The Real Contra War: Highlander Peasant Resistance in Nicaragua, Norman,

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Se trata de un valioso aporte al estudio del controvertido tema del conflicto armado que sufrió Nicaragua tras la toma del poder por los sandinistas, y que dio término al proyecto revolucionario intentado por el FSLN tras la caída de Somoza. Ambas obras tratan, específicamente, del lapso de casi veinte años de enfrentamientos armados que vivió ese país durante los años 1979-1996 más conocido bajo el apelativo  acuñado por el campo adverso la Guerra de la “Contra”, que por su nombre real: Fuer...

  2. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge states give rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in the absence of any external magnetic field. I shall review the theoretical prediction of the QSH state in HgTe/CdTe semiconductor quantum wells, and its recent experimental observation. The edge states of the QSH state supports fr...

  3. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 18 November  2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Highlights of the European Strategy Workshop for Future Neutrino Physics Dr Ilias Efthymiopoulos, CERN   Seminar cancelled! Information Organizer : J.-S. Graulich Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge s...

  4. Remodelación ósea a través del Modelo de Stanford // Bone remodeling through the Stanford´s Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Figueredo-Losada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El material óseo es radicalmente distinto a cualquier otro material tratado por la mecánica clásica,su estructura es heterogénea y anisótropa, y sus propiedades mecánicas varían no solo entredistintos individuos, sino también, para un mismo hueso. En los tratamientos e intervencionesquirúrgicas donde está presente la readaptación, el crecimiento inducido del hueso puede sermodelado mediante el empleo de los criterios de remodelación ósea interna propuesto por algunosautores (Cowin y R. Huiskes, R. Carter, Doblare y García, Jacob y Beaupré y otros.En este trabajo se toma el modelo de remodelación ósea propuesto por Jacob (1994 y seimplementa con la utilización del programa Abaqus 6.4 utilizando una subrutina de usuario (UMAT,se aplico a un modelo 2D de hueso genérico con un sistema de cargas para comprobar los efectosde la remodelación y las variaciones de los valores de densidad. Como parte del trabajo fueroncreados dos programas para el procesamiento de los datos, para un análisis de resultados fuera delvisualizador del Abaqus, logrando una apreciación cualitativamente y cuantitativamente de losresultados.Palabras claves: remodelación ósea, elementos finitos, biomecánica._____________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe bone material is radically different to any other material tried by the classic mechanics, itsstructure is heterogeneous and anisótropic, and its mechanical properties not vary alone amongdifferent individuals, but also, for oneself bone. In the medical treatments and surgicalinterventions where it is present the readaptation, the induced growth of the bone can be modeledby means of the employment of the approaches of remodeling bone intern proposed by someauthors (Cowin and R. Huiskes, R. Crankcase, I will Doblare & García, Jacob & Beaupré and other.In this work it takes the pattern of bone remodelling proposed by Jacob (1994 and it isimplemented with the use of the software Abaqus using user's subroutine (UMAT, its applies amodel 2D of generic bone with a system of loads to check the effects of the remodelling and thevariations of the values of density. As part of the work two software were created for theprosecution of the data, for an analysis of results outside of the visualizador of the Abaqus,achieving a qualitative and quantitative appreciation of the result.Key words: bone remodelling, finite elements method, biomechanic, jacob´s model

  5. We have no idea a guide to the unknown universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cham, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Everything we still don’t know about our strange, mostly mysterious universe. Jorge Cham is the creator of the popular online comic Piled Higher and Deeper, popularly known as PHD Comics. He earned his PhD in robotics at Stanford. Daniel Whiteson is an associate professor of experimental particle physics at the University of California, Irvine, and conducts research using the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Their PHD TV videos have been viewed millions of times on YouTube and aired on PBS.

  6. Issues at a university based FEL center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.I.; Schwettman, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Stanford FEL Center was established in September 1990. In this paper, the FEL itself, the Center infrastructure, the interaction with experimenters and the educational mission are described. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Rollfix---An adiabatic roll transition for the SLC [Stanford Linear Collider] Arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambade, P.; Brown, K.; Fieguth, T.; Hutton, A.; Ritson, D.; Sands, M.; Toge, N.

    1989-02-01

    The SLC Arcs were rolled at achromat boundaries to follow the terrain of the SLAC site. This makes the linear optics sensitive to systematic gradient errors, from which severe cross-plane coupling effects may arise. As a partial correction, a smoother roll transition was introduced which relieves much of this sensitivity. We present an evaluation of this scheme and report on the observed improvements. 18 refs., 10 figs

  8. An adaptive noise cancelling system used for beam control at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himel, T.; Allison, S.; Grossberg, P.; Hendrickson, L.; Sass, R.; Shoaee, H.

    1993-06-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider now has a total of twenty-four beam-steering feedback loops used to keep the electron and positron beams on their desired trajectories. Seven of these loops measure and control the same beam as it proceeds down the linac through the arcs to the final focus. Ideally by each loop should correct only for disturbances that occur between it and the immediate upstream loop. In fact, in the original system each loop corrected for all upstream disturbances. This resulted in undesirable over-correction and ringing. We added MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) adaptive noise cancellers to separate the signal we wish to correct from disturbances further upstream. This adaptive control improved performance in the 1992 run

  9. The first colliders: AdA, VEP-1 and Princeton-Stanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    The idea of exploring collisions in the center-of-mass system to fully exploit the energy of the accelerated particles had been given serious consideration by the Norwegian engineer and inventor Rolf Wideröe, who applied for a patent on the idea in 1943 (and got the patent in 1953 [1]) after considering the kinematic advantage of keeping the center of mass at rest to produce larger momentum transfers. Describing this advantage, G. K. O'Neill, one of the collider pioneers, wrote in 1956 [2]: "... as accelerators of higher and higher energy are built, their usefulness is limited by the fact that the energy available for creating new particles is measured in the center-of-mass system of the target nucleon and the bombarding particle. In the relativistic limit, this energy rises only as the square root of the accelerator energy. However, if two particles of equal energy traveling in opposite directions could be made to collide, the available energy would be twice the whole energy of one particle ... " Therefore, no kinetic energy is wasted by the motion of the center of mass of the system, and the available reaction energy ER = 2Ebeam (while a particle with the same energy Ebeam colliding with another particle of the mass m at rest produces only ER = (2Ebeamm)1/2 in the extreme relativistic case). One can also add that the colliders are "cleaner" machines with respect to the fixed-target ones since the colliding beams do not interact with the target materials. The other advantage is that it is much easier to organize collisions of beams composed of matter-antimatter particles, like in electron-positron and proton-antiproton colliders...

  10. Application of local area networks to accelerator control systems at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.D.; Linstadt, E.; Melen, R.

    1983-03-01

    The history and current status of SLAC's SDLC networks for distributed accelerator control systems are discussed. These local area networks have been used for instrumentation and control of the linear accelerator. Network topologies, protocols, physical links, and logical interconnections are discussed for specific applications in distributed data acquisition and control system, computer networks and accelerator operations

  11. Physical packaging and organization of the drift chamber electronics system for the Stanford Large Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, G.M.; Freytag, M.L.; Mazaheri, G.; Olsen, J.; Paffrath, L.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper the logical organization, physical packaging, and operation of the drift chamber electronics for the SLD at SLAC is described. The system processes signals from approximately 7000 drift wires and is unusual in that most electronic functions are packaged on printed circuit boards within the detector. The circuits reside on signal-processing motherboards, controller boards, signal-transition boards, power-distribution boards, and fiber-optics-to-electrical conversion boards. The interaction and interconnection of these boards with respect to signal and control flow are presented. 11 refs., 7 figs

  12. Experimental results of two stage harmonic generation with picosecond pulses on the Stanford Mark III FEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, B.A.; Utah Univ., Salt Lake City; Stanford Univ., CA; Benson, S.V.; Madey, M.J.; Cutolo, A.; Naples Univ.

    1988-01-01

    We report experimental results on upper harmonic conversion using a lithium niobate and a beta barium borate crystal to quadruple the FEL light up into the visible and near infrared. The effects of finite linewidth, birefringent walk-off, and group velocity walk-off on conversion efficiency will be discussed with reference to the experimental results. (orig.)

  13. An intervention to increase patients' trust in their physicians. Stanford Trust Study Physician Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, D H; Bloch, D A; Segal, E S

    1999-02-01

    To investigate the effect of a one-day workshop in which physicians were taught trust-building behaviors on their patients' levels of trust and on outcomes of care. In 1994, the study recruited 20 community-based family physicians and enrolled 412 consecutive adult patients from those physicians' practices. Ten of the physicians (the intervention group) were randomly assigned to receive a one-day training course in building and maintaining patients' trust. Outcomes were patients' trust in their physicians, patients' and physicians' satisfaction with the office visit, continuity in the patient-physician relationship, patients' adherence to their treatment plans, and the numbers of diagnostic tests and referrals. Physicians and patients in the intervention and control groups were similar in demographic and other data. There was no significant difference in any outcome. Although their overall ratings were not statistically significantly different, the patients of physicians in the intervention group reported more positive physician behaviors than did the patients of physicians in the control group. The trust-building workshop had no measurable effect on patients' trust or on outcomes hypothesized to be related to trust.

  14. Some initial results from the new SLAC [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center] permeameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.K.; Early, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    A new permeameter has been built and is now available for testing samples of steel and other ferromagnetic materials for their magnetic characteristics such as permeability, remanent induction, coercive force and saturation induction. The present range of operation for the permeameter is from 0.5 Oe to 1250 Oe. Results are presented for two samples of low-carbon steel as well as some preliminary results for Vanadium Permendur. 4 refs., 8 figs

  15. Update on the high-current injector for the Stanford Linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.B.; Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; Miller, R.H.; Sheppard, J.C.; Sinclair, C.K.; Sodja, J.

    1983-03-01

    The high current injector has become operational. There are two crucial areas where improvements must be made to meet collider specifications: while the injector can produce up to 10 11 e - in a single S-band bucket, initially much of this charge was captured in a low energy tail and was this not suitable for transport through the accelerator and injection into the damping ring. Pulse to pulse position jitter has been observed, resulting in transverse wake field which increases beam emittance. The problems described above contribute to substantial current loss during transport from the injector (40 MeV) to the SLC damping ring (1.2 GeV). Experimental studies are continuing with the aim of understanding and improving beam characteristics including bunch length, pulse to pulse stability and emittance. The present status of these studies is reported

  16. Theory and Development of Position-Sensitive Quantum Calorimeters. Degree awarded by Stanford Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Quantum calorimeters are being developed as imaging spectrometers for future X-ray astrophysics observatories. Much of the science to be done by these instruments could benefit greatly from larger focal-plane coverage of the detector (without increasing pixel size). An order of magnitude more area will greatly increase the science throughput of these future instruments. One of the main deterrents to achieving this goal is the complexity of the readout schemes involved. We have devised a way to increase the number of pixels from the current baseline designs by an order of magnitude without increasing the number of channels required for readout. The instrument is a high energy resolution, distributed-readout imaging spectrometer called a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (POST). A POST is a quantum calorimeter consisting of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESS) on the ends of a long absorber capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. Comparing rise time and energy information from the two TESS, the position of the event in the POST is determined. The energy of the event is inferred from the sum of the two pulses. We have developed a generalized theoretical formalism for distributed-readout calorimeters and apply it to our devices. We derive the noise theory and calculate the theoretical energy resolution of a POST. Our calculations show that a 7-pixel POST with 6 keV saturation energy can achieve 2.3 eV resolution, making this a competitive design for future quantum calorimeter instruments. For this thesis we fabricated 7- and 15-pixel POSTS using Mo/Au TESs and gold absorbers, and moved from concept drawings on scraps of napkins to a 32 eV energy resolution at 1.5 keV, 7-pixel POST calorimeter.

  17. Bunch lengthening calculations for the SLC [Stanford Linear Collider] damping rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Ruth, R.D.

    1989-03-01

    The problem of bunch lengthening in electron storage rings has been treated by many people, and there have been many experiments. In the typical experiment, the theory is used to determine the impedance of the ring. What has been lacking thus far, however, is a calculation of bunch lengthening that uses a carefully calculated ring impedance (or wakefield). In this paper we begin by finding the potential well distortion due to some very simple impedance models, in order to illustrate different types of bunch lengthening behavior. We then give a prescription for extending potential well calculations into the turbulent regime once the threshold is known. Then finally, using the wakefield calculated for the SLC damping rings, combined with the measured value of the threshold, we calculate bunch lengthening for the damping rings, and compare the results with the measurements. 9 refs., 6 figs

  18. An Extensive Stanford Type A Aortic Dissection Involving Bilateral Carotid and Iliac Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. W. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of continuous, extensive aortic dissection (AD involving the bilateral common carotid arteries, the ascending, thoracic, and abdominal aorta, and bifurcation of the right common iliac artery. A 61-year-old man with history of chronic hypertension presented with a one-day history of chest pain, vertigo, left facial drooping, and left hemiparesis. Despite the presence of bilateral carotid bruits, doppler ultrasound of the neck was postponed, and the patient was treated with thrombolytic therapy for a presumed ischemic stroke. The patient's symptoms began to resolve within an hour of treatment, at which time treatment was withheld. Ultrasound performed the following day showed dissection of bilateral common carotid arteries, and CT angiography demonstrated extensive AD as described earlier. The patient subsequently underwent cardiovascular surgery and has been doing clinically well since then. AD has a myriad of manifestations depending on the involvement of aortic branches. Our paper illustrates the importance of having a high index of suspicion for AD when a patient presents with a picture of ischemic stroke, since overlapping signs and symptoms exist between AD and stroke. Differentiating between the two conditions is central to patient care as thrombolytic therapy can be helpful in stroke, but detrimental in AD.

  19. Mission definition study for Stanford relativity satellite. Volume 2: Engineering flight test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The need is examined for orbital flight tests of gyroscope, dewar, and other components, in order to reduce the technical and financial risk in performing the relativity experiment. A program is described that would generate engineering data to permit prediction of final performance. Two flight tests are recommended. The first flight would test a dewar smaller than that required for the final flight, but of size and form sufficient to allow extrapolation to the final design. The second flight would use the same dewar design to carry a set of three gyroscopes, which would be evaluated for spinup and drift characteristics for a period of a month or more. A proportional gas control system using boiloff helium gas from the dewar, and having the ability to prevent sloshing of liquid helium, would also be tested.

  20. Probing the structure of matter with Stanford's new $78 million high-energy accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, G.

    1981-01-01

    The US high-energy physics program recently gained a powerful new experimental tool with the completion of the Positron Electron Project (PEP). PEP is a colliding beam storage ring two kilometres in circumference. Collisions are obtained in the PEP ring by injecting electrons and positrons from SLAC's existing linear accelerator so that they circulate in opposite directions. At 6 points in the ring the beams will collide. PEP will enable collisions to be produced at up to 36 GeV

  1. The first colliders: AdA, VEP-1 and Princeton-Stanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-07-11

    The idea of exploring collisions in the center-of-mass system to fully exploit the energy of the accelerated particles had been given serious consideration by the Norwegian engineer and inventor Rolf Wideröe, who had applied for a patent on the idea in 1943 (and got the patent in 1953 [1]) after considering the kinematic advantage of keeping the center of mass at rest to produce larger momentum transfers. Describing this advantage G.K.O’Neill, one of the collider pioneers, wrote in 1956 [2]: “…as accelerators of higher and higher energy are built, their usefulness is limited by the fact that the energy available for creating new particles is measured in the center-of-mass system of the target nucleon and the bombarding particle. In the relativistic limit, this energy rises only as the square root of the accelerator energy. However, if two particles of equal energy traveling in opposite directions could be made to collide, the available energy would be twice the whole energy of one particle...” Therefore, no kinetic energy is wasted by the motion of the center of mass of the system, and the available reaction energy ER = 2Ebeam (while a particle with the same energy Ebeam colliding with another particle of the mass m at rest produces only ER = (2Ebeam m)½ in the extreme relativistic case.) One can also add that the colliders are “cleaner” machines with respect to the fixed target ones since the colliding beams do not interact with the target materials. The other advantage is that it is much easier to organize collisions of beams composed of matter-antimatter particles, like in electron-positron and proton-antiproton colliders.

  2. Wakefield dependent emittance growth in the SLAC [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center] linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K.L.F.

    1990-10-01

    In this note we describe the emittance growth we can expect at bunch populations of N = 3,4,5 x 10 10 in the SLC linac. We will discuss briefly the effects of injection jitter, injection drift, and coherent oscillations starting in the middle of the linac. Finally, we will discuss in a more thorough manner the effects of random misalignment errors throughout the linac

  3. Informal Conference on Photochemistry (15th) Held at Stanford, California on 27 June-1 July 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    spectra and by the kinetics of its thermal transformation to 3.1 Curie law analysis of the esr signal intensity shows this species to be a ground state...Soubeiran, Ann. Ch.m. Phys., 1830, 43, 407. 14. J.B.A. Dumas, Ann. Chim. Phys. 1826, 33, 355. . 15. J. L. Gay Lussac and L. J. Thenard or Ann. Chim. Phys...02CA 3Zu+)], [He] and [Ar] reveals a complex rate law that not only shows a first order dependence on [NO] and [02 (A3Fu+)] but also on [O2]. Such

  4. General, database-driven fast-feedback system for the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, F.; Allison, S.; Castillo, S.; Gromme, T.; Hall, B.; Hendrickson, L.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; Sass, B.; Shoaee, H.

    1991-05-01

    A new feedback system has been developed for stabilizing the SLC beams at many locations. The feedback loops are designed to sample and correct at the 60 Hz repetition rate of the accelerator. Each loop can be distributed across several of the standard 80386 microprocessors which control the SLC hardware. A new communications system, KISNet, has been implemented to pass signals between the microprocessors at this rate. The software is written in a general fashion using the state space formalism of digital control theory. This allows a new loop to be implemented by just setting up the online database and perhaps installing a communications link. 3 refs., 4 figs

  5. Natural scientific strategy for nuclear wastes: Philosophy of Dr. Rodney C. Ewing at Stanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, T. H. [The Cyber University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In the geological study, the naturally adapted region was discovered in Oklo, a central African area of Gabon seen in Fig. 1. Currently, this naturally operated nuclear fission site has been stabilized where the artificial shielding structure was not equipped. So, it has been studied to be an exemplified high-level nuclear waste repository. This could give a lesson that one should make the nuclear repository construction. The simplified configuration of the Oklo natural nuclear reactor site is described. The important mentions of Dr. Ewing reflected his philosophy in geological repository and there is a biography. It is necessary to understand the very big difference between human’s cognitive timescale and geological timescale where it could be nearly impossible to construct the long-term or even permanent nuclear waste repository. It is important to understand the opposite opinions of the nuclear waste repository. The government made the milestone of the South Korean repository policy in which the final repository completion was decided as 2053, about 40 years later. Until the time, there is enough time to rethink for the long-term waste repository. It is certain the policy-maker of this nuclear waste policy will be out of the nuclear community before 2053. This means the politician will not take any responsibility of the result of this policy.

  6. The hybridized front end electronics of the Central Drift Chamber in the Stanford Linear Collider Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.C.; Kirsten, F.A.; Nakamura, M.

    1987-10-01

    In order to accommodate the high packaging density requirements for the front end electronics of the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) in the SLAC Linear Collider Detector (SLD), the CDC front end electronics has been hybridized. The hybrid package contains eight channels of amplifiers together with all the associated circuits for calibration, event recognition and power economy switching functions. A total of 1280 such hybrids are used in the CDC

  7. Natural scientific strategy for nuclear wastes: Philosophy of Dr. Rodney C. Ewing at Stanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    In the geological study, the naturally adapted region was discovered in Oklo, a central African area of Gabon seen in Fig. 1. Currently, this naturally operated nuclear fission site has been stabilized where the artificial shielding structure was not equipped. So, it has been studied to be an exemplified high-level nuclear waste repository. This could give a lesson that one should make the nuclear repository construction. The simplified configuration of the Oklo natural nuclear reactor site is described. The important mentions of Dr. Ewing reflected his philosophy in geological repository and there is a biography. It is necessary to understand the very big difference between human’s cognitive timescale and geological timescale where it could be nearly impossible to construct the long-term or even permanent nuclear waste repository. It is important to understand the opposite opinions of the nuclear waste repository. The government made the milestone of the South Korean repository policy in which the final repository completion was decided as 2053, about 40 years later. Until the time, there is enough time to rethink for the long-term waste repository. It is certain the policy-maker of this nuclear waste policy will be out of the nuclear community before 2053. This means the politician will not take any responsibility of the result of this policy

  8. UC Berkeley/Stanford Children’s Environment Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The overall goal of this Center is to better understand the effects of exposure in the womb to air pollutants and airborne bacteria on newborn health, immune system...

  9. Presentations from the Second ORION Workshop, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, February 18-20, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, Robert

    2003-01-01

    ORION will be a dedicated user facility available for experimental research in plasma and laser acceleration of particles, beam-plasma physics, ultra-short pulse electron and radiation sources, and potentially laboratory astrophysics. It will bring together a diverse collection of researchers motivated to solve some of the most complex and fascinating problems in these fields. The ORION Facility will be based on the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA), an existing accelerator at SLAC capable of producing 60 to 350 MeV electron beams. The NLCTA will be augmented with a new photo-injector source, two experimental halls, extraction beamlines, a user laser room, and a data acquisition area. Facility construction is anticipated to start in October 2003, and first beam for experiments is planned for 2005. A central goal of ORION is to provide a facility responsive to the research needs of its users. The workshop's purpose is to explore the range of experiments envisioned by potential users and review the types of beams available and the desired beam parameters. This workshop is an opportunity for the research community to provide input on the facility's test beams, layout, shared diagnostic equipment, simulation and computing capabilities, and user support infrastructure. Results from the workshop will go into determining the facility's design as well as help the SLAC management plan for future user needs on the site once operations begin

  10. First images from the Stanford tabletop scanning soft x-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trail, J.A.; Byer, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have constructed a scanning soft x-ray microscope which uses a laser-produced plasma as the soft x-ray source and normal incidence multilayer coated mirrors in a Schwarzschild configuration as the focusing optics. The microscope operates at a wavelength of 140 angstrom, has a spatial resolution of 0.5 μm, and has a soft x-ray photon flux through the focus of 10 4 s -1 when operated with only 170 mW of average laser power. The microscope is compact; the complete system, including the laser, fits on a single optical table. In this paper they describe the microscope and present images of metallic microstructures

  11. Beam-based alignment technique for the SLC [Stanford Linear Collider] linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolphsen, C.E.; Lavine, T.L.; Atwood, W.B.

    1989-03-01

    Misalignment of quadrupole magnets and beam position monitors (BPMs) in the linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) cause the electron and positron beams to be steered off-center in the disk-loaded waveguide accelerator structures. Off-center beams produce wakefields which limit the SLC performance at high beam intensities by causing emittance growth. Here, we present a general method for simultaneously determining quadrupole magnet and BPM offsets using beam trajectory measurements. Results from the application of the method to the SLC linac are described. The alignment precision achieved is approximately 100 μm, which is significantly better than that obtained using optical surveying techniques. 2 refs., 4 figs

  12. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 13 May 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Observing the extreme universe with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Prof. Olaf Reimer / Stanford University The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST, formerly GLAST) is an international observatory-type satellite mission with a physics program spanning from gamma-ray astronomy to particle astrophysics and cosmology. FGST was launched on June 11, 2008 and is successfully conducting science observations of the high-energy gamma-ray sky since August 2008. A varienty of discoveries has been made already, including monitoring rapid blazar variability, the existence of GeV gamma-ray bursts, and numerous new gamma-ray sources of different types, including those belonging to previously unknown gamma-ray source classes like msPSRs, globula...

  13. Intellectual Amplification through Reflection and Didactic Change in Distributed Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth K.

    Presented at the Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL99, Stanford University, California, December 11-18, 1999 Presented at the Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL99, Stanford University, California, December 11-18, 1999...

  14. Cement for Oil Well Cementing Operations in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    For Portland cement to qualify as oil well cement, the chemical and physical properties must meet ..... Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,. Stanford, California, pp. ... Construction”, PhD Thesis, Kwame Nkrumah. University of Science ...

  15. Foraging modes of cordyliform lizards

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1996-05-27

    May 27, 1996 ... Department of Zoology, University of Stellenbosch. .... Western Cape Province at Jonaskoop (33"58' S, 19"31'E, ca. ..... Field guide to the snakes and other reptiles of southern ... Stanford University Press, Stanford, California.

  16. The Sphecidae (Hym

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BioMAP

    the most prolific of the workers in this field (Weygoldt & Paulus 1979b, Van der Hammen. 1977b, 1979, 1969 ... the Arabian Peninsula were helpful and useful guides in our work. Medically ..... Stanford University Press, Stanford, California.

  17. Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-16

    A workshop titled "Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe" was held December 9-11, 2008, at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center-National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary purpose of the meeting was to examine how computing at the extreme scale can contribute to meeting forefront scientific challenges in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. The workshop was organized around five research areas with associated panels. Three of these, "High Energy Theoretical Physics," "Accelerator Simulation," and "Experimental Particle Physics," addressed research of the Office of High Energy Physics’ Energy and Intensity Frontiers, while the"Cosmology and Astrophysics Simulation" and "Astrophysics Data Handling, Archiving, and Mining" panels were associated with the Cosmic Frontier.

  18. Anonymous Agencies, Backstreet Businesses and Covert Collectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause Hansen, Hans; Schoeneborn, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Book review of: Anonymous Agencies, Backstreet Businesses and Covert Collectives: rethinking Organizations in the 21st Century, C. R. Scott. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2013. 272 pp. £45.90. ISBN 9780804781381......Book review of: Anonymous Agencies, Backstreet Businesses and Covert Collectives: rethinking Organizations in the 21st Century, C. R. Scott. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2013. 272 pp. £45.90. ISBN 9780804781381...

  19. Determinants of Conflict in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    1965), 13. 137 Tedd Gurr, Why Men Rebel (1965), 13. 138 Jonathan Wolff, " Karl Marx ," The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2011 Edition...490961276. Wolff, Jonathan. “ Karl Marx .” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Spring 2011 Edition (n.d.). http://plato.stanford.edu/archives...accessed March 10, 2011, http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/spr2011/entries/ marx /. 139 Tedd Gurr, Why Men Rebel, (Princeton: Princeton University

  20. Paulraj, Prof. Arogyaswami J

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2014 Honorary. Paulraj, Prof. Arogyaswami J. Date of birth: 1944. Address: Information Systems Laboratory, Stanford University, 232, David Packard EE Building, 350, Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-9510, USA Contact: Email: apaulraj@stanford.edu. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  1. A Robust Alternative to the Normal Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-07

    for any Purpose of the United States Governuent DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS t -, STANFORD UIVERSITY I STANFORD, CALIFORNIA A Robust Alternative to the...Stanford University Technical Report No. 3. [5] Bhattacharya, S. K. (1966). A Modified Bessel Function lodel in Life Testing. Metrika 10, 133-144

  2. Was sind, und wie wirken Grundüberzeugungen in unserer Zeit? Über „Paradigmen“ und „Paradigmenveränderungen“ in der heutigen politischen und sozialen Sphäre – und die Folgen. Ein Gespräch mit Roland Benedikter, Stanford Universität. English summary included. What are basic assumptions, and which effects do they have in our time? On “paradigms” and “paradigm change” in the contemporary political and social domain, and the consequences. A conversation with Roland Benedikter, Stanford University.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Benedikter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available English Summary: This talk clarifies what is meant by the pervasive but seldom-precise use of the term “paradigm change.” While it appears that this term is often (unwillingly misused particularly by integral and progressive intellectuals and civil society groups as an instrument of predicting future cultural change, it is argued that it should rather be used as a tool of analysis of the past and the present of basic cultural and scientific convictions that dominate their times. In fact, a “paradigm” is defined as a collective bias (or, to use a more technical explanation, a “knowledge-constituting collective prejudice” on certain issues. It defines the validity of what is meant to be true, and what to be false, and what can be accepted as valid, and what not, in a given society at a given time for a given period. A “paradigm” is always functioning (a as a “constitutive paradox” because its claim is to define what is true and what not, but at the same time it is continuously replaced by new paradigms that coin different definitions – thus contradicting the very essence of “paradigm” as such; and (b by incubation periods, i.e., by phases where different claims on what is valid coexist or even form hybrids among them. In the end, “paradigms” are something irrational and in most cases un- or half-conscious cultural formations; but they seem to exist in every period of cultural development. This talk explains the mechanisms of how dominating cultural biases become “paradigms” in order to rule temporarily over the academic and political correctness of their times; and how and to which extent the one-sided “paradigm fetishism” of the epoch of “postmodernity” is currently coming at its end, with new, more integrative and integral blueprints arising that are in their majority trying to balance the prevailing “paradigmatic” nominalism with new, empirical forms of neo-essentialism and neo-substantialism. Specifically, integral approaches try to create a paradigm for our time that connects deconstructivism and substantialism (realism.

  3. La introducción de la escala de inteligencia de Stanford-Binet en el Paraguay

    OpenAIRE

    José E. García

    2016-01-01

    RESUMEN: Aunque las primeras estrategias para evaluar la habilidad intelectual encuentran antecedentes milenarios en la antigua China, los intentos de medición en el periodo moderno comienzan con el psicólogo inglés Francis Galton en la década de 1880, mediante la aplicación de medidas fisiológicas para estimar el talento humano. A comienzos del siglo XX, los psicólogos franceses Alfred Binet y Théodore Simon construyeron las primeras escalas métricas para estimar la inteligencia de los niños...

  4. How Far Is Stanford from Prague (and vice versa? Comparing Two Dependency-based Annotation Schemes by Network Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Passarotti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper evaluates the differences between two currently leading annotation schemes for dependency treebanks. By relying on four treebanks, we demonstrate that the treatment of conjunctions and adpositions represents the core difference between the two schemes and that this impacts the topological properties of the linguistic networks induced from the treebanks. We also show that such properties are reflected in the performances of four probabilistic dependency parsers trained on the treebanks. L’articolo valuta le differenze tra i due principali schemi di annotazione a dipenden-ze in uso. Sulla base di quattro treebank, l’articolo dimostra che il trattamento delle congiunzioni e delle pre/postposizioni rappresenta la differenza principale tra i due schemi e che ciò comporta delle conseguenze sulle proprietà topologiche dei net-work indotti dalle treebank. Inoltre, si dimostra come tali proprietà siano riflesse nell’accuratezza di quattro parser probabilistici a dipendenze addestrati sulle treebank.

  5. STANFORD-OHWAKI-KOHS TACTILE BLOCK DESIGN INTELLIGENCE TEST FOR THE BLIND. PART ONE-FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAUTERMAN, WILLIAM L.; SUINN, RICHARD M.

    THIS TEST WAS DEVELOPED TO MEASURE THE INTELLIGENCE OF BLIND ADOLESCENTS AND ADULTS. SIX HUNDRED AND THIRTY BLIND SUBJECTS 14 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER WERE USED IN REFINING AND STANDARDIZING THE NONVERBAL, PERFORMANCE OHWAKI-KOHS BLOCK DESIGN TEST FOR USE BY BLIND INDIVIDUALS IN THE UNITED STATES. RESULTS INDICATED STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT…

  6. Evolving interpretation of the athlete's electrocardiogram: from European Society of Cardiology and Stanford criteria, to Seattle criteria and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; ElMaghawry, Mohamed; Corrado, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) pre-participation screening can prevent sudden cardiac death in the athletes by early diagnosis and disqualification of affected individuals. Interpretation of the athlete's ECG should be based on specific criteria, because ECG changes that would be considered abnormal in the untrained population may develop in trained athletes as a physiologic and benign consequence of the heart's adaptation to exercise. In 2010, a stem document from the Section of Sports Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) proposed to classify the athlete's ECG changes according to the prevalence, relation to exercise training, association with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and need for further investigations into two groups: "common and training-related" (Group 1) and "uncommon and training-unrelated" (Group 2). Over the last years, several efforts have been made to refine the ESC criteria for interpretation of the athlete's ECG in order to improve specificity maintaining good sensitivity, especially among elite and Afro-Caribbean athletes, which show the highest rate of false positives Group 2 ECG abnormalities. However, the balance between improvement in specificity and loss of sensitivity should be evaluated keeping in mind that the primary aim of the screening program is to save the athlete's lives rather than money. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The 1980-81 AFOSR-HTTM-Stanford Conference on Complex Turbulent Flows: Comparison of Computation & Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    1968, 1969 and 1972 Confereaces. Zec -tain items at. the list delineate problems needing research (reattachment zones, *iv/bou j.Azy layer interactions...viscous energy equation--each in unaveraged form. As Peter Bradshaw has put it, God gave us one good model. Why should there be another model that is

  8. Conference on Stochastic Processes and their Applications (16th) Held in Stanford, California on 16-21 August 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-21

    examples of so-called self-similar processes. 522 -°- °.. 0 * - -= uu~.~w- - v , LOCAL BEHAVIOUR OF SIMPLE STOCHASTIC MODELS by Rudolf Grfibel...theorem en- tails results on the growth of matchings, Steiner trees, traveling-salesman processes as well as triangulations in large areas. These

  9. Final Report: High Energy Physics Program (HEP), Physics Department, Princeton University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan, Curtis G. [Princeton University; Gubser, Steven S. [Princeton University; Marlow, Daniel R. [Princeton University; McDonald, Kirk T. [Princeton University; Meyers, Peter D. [Princeton University; Olsen, James D. [Princeton University; Smith, Arthur J.S. [Princeton University; Steinhardt, Paul J. [Princeton University; Tully, Christopher G. [Princeton University; Stickland, David P. [Princeton University

    2013-04-30

    The activities of the Princeton Elementary particles group funded through Department of Energy Grant# DEFG02-91 ER40671 during the period October 1, 1991 through January 31, 2013 are summarized. These activities include experiments performed at Brookhaven National Lab; the CERN Lab in Geneva, Switzerland; Fermilab; KEK in Tsukuba City, Japan; the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; as well as extensive experimental and the- oretical studies conducted on the campus of Princeton University. Funded senior personnel include: Curtis Callan, Stephen Gubser, Valerie Halyo, Daniel Marlow, Kirk McDonald, Pe- ter Meyers, James Olsen, Pierre Pirou e, Eric Prebys, A.J. Stewart Smith, Frank Shoemaker (deceased), Paul Steinhardt, David Stickland, Christopher Tully, and Liantao Wang.

  10. Building Sustainable Capacity with University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Universities can play an important role in building scientific and technical capacity by providing educational opportunities for local and regional populations in developing countries. These opportunities may be short term or long term through for example faculty exchanges, student exchanges, and collaborative teaching and research activities. As the demand for talented graduates expands in developing countries, local universities face competition for students, lecturers, and professors from the same industries and communities they serve. This competition is in many ways counterproductive to building the sustainable human resource that is needed to support local development, management, and governance. Such competition is particularly evident for top science and engineering students in energy rich countries. University partnerships, e.g., in particular those between universities in OECD countries and universities in developing countries, have an important role to play in bridging the gap between today's lack of capacity and a sustainable human resource for the future. Such university partnerships, however, face many challenges, some of which can be traced to organizational and cultural differences In this presentation, I will discuss how university partnerships are formed, some of the benefits to partners, and some pitfalls to avoid during implementation of university partnerships. The examples are taken from Stanford partnerships that involve geoscience and engineering, and will include representative goals and content of the example partnerships. These partnerships I'll describe are actually trilateral, with partners from two or more universities and a private company or government agency. I conclude the presentation with a brief discussion on multiculturalism, perhaps the most important consideration when planning a partnership between diverse organizations. Organizers of partnerships must recognize the fact that multiculturalism and diversity are assets that

  11. Annual Report on Electronics Research at the University of Texas at Austin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-15

    changes. The goal of this program is to determine non-destructively where a particular sample is on its life curve or where its damage threshold is at a...EleLtOsios Iaboratory Deoty Director taford Uiversity sesearch and Teohnology Division Stanford. CA 94305 Offirs o Aeronutic. and Spare Tech. NASA

  12. Trend in patients and diseases at the coronary care unit in the Jikei University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Takahiro; Yagi, Hidenori; Sakai, Tomohisa

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the total numbers of cases of representative diseases, including acute myocardial infarction (AMI), unstable angina pectoris (uAP) and aortic dissection, treated at our coronary care unit and therapeutic strategies for them. Both AMI and uAP have been considered types of acute coronary syndrome with similar diagnostic criteria. We found, however, that the therapeutic strategies for these conditions differ slightly. Coronary bypass surgery was performed in a higher percentage of cases of uAP (7%) than of AMI (1%) because more time was available for surgery. The mortality rate was higher in cases of AMI. For aortic dissection, emergent surgery was performed in Stanford A cases with an open false lumen. Medical therapy was performed in Stanford B cases. These strategies were recommended in the guideline of the Japanese Society of Cardiology. In contrast, the strategy for Stanford A cases with intramural hematoma has been unclear. Medical control with careful follow-up computed tomography of the chest has been the preferred strategy for Stanford A cases with intramural hematoma in our coronary care unit. We have had good results with this method. (author)

  13. Development of Synthetic Catalysts for Peptide Bond Cleavage (Synthesis and Complete Kinetic Analysis of Compounds 6A, 7A, 8A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-05

    03824 Dr. Ronald Breslow Columbia University Departmont of Cemistry New York, NY 10027 Dr. James P. Colmen Department of Cmistry Stanford University...of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 Dr. Harden M. McConnell Stanford Univesity Department of Cemistry Stanford, CA 94305 Dr. Kristin lowtmn Mertes...Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 Dr. J. H. Richards California Institute of Technology Division of Cemistry and Ch e.cal Engineering

  14. Conveying the Meaning of the Economic Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Luke A.

    2010-01-01

    In the late summer of 2008, after the 2007-2008 fiscal year's books had closed, the nation's wealthiest universities were confronted with an unfamiliar sight: single-digit endowment returns. Not since 2003 had Harvard University (Cambridge, Massachusetts), Princeton University (Princeton, New Jersey), or Stanford University (Stanford, California)…

  15. The Role of Hypoxia in the Tumor Microenvironment: Implications for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Association for Cancer Research Publications ( Peer Reviewed) 1. Sinha S, Thomas D, Chan S, Gao Y, Brunen D, Torabi D, Reinisch A, Hernandez D, Chan A...Symposia, Keystone, CO Teaching 2017 Guest lecturer CBIO 242: Hypoxia and Angiogenesis (Stanford University) 2016 Guest lecturer CBIO 242: Hypoxia...Cancer Biology Journal Club (Stanford University) 2006 Teaching Assistant BIOM 555: Gene Expression (University of Pennsylvania)

  16. An Overview of Production Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    DISTRIBUTED BY: Matonal Tochnica! Infonu srice U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 028143 Stanford Artificil Inteligence Laboratory October 1975 Memo AIM-271...ORGANIZATION NAMEL AND ADDRESS 18. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK Artificial Intelligence Laboratory AE OKUI UBR Stanford University ARPA Order 249...014-64011I j SEC-jRITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When, Data bHISP011 A Stanford Artificial ktteligncs Laboratory October 1975 Memo AIM-271 Computer

  17. Reports of the AAAI 2016 Spring Symposium Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amato, C.; Amir, O.; Bryson, J.; Grosz, B.; Indurkhya, B.; Kiciman, E.; Kido, T.; Lawless, W.F.; Liu, M.; McDorman, B.; Mead, R.; Oliehoek, F.A.; Specian, A.; Stojanov, G.; Takadama, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2016 Spring Symposium Series on Monday through Wednesday, March 21-23, 2016 at Stanford University. The titles of the seven symposia were (1) AI and

  18. Shock and Vibration Bulletin No. 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    1948-04-14

    Ann Arbor Attn: Prof. J. Ormondroyd (1) Stanford University, Stanford Attn: Prof. Lydik Jacqbsen, Dept. of Engineering (I) University of Illinois...J. L. 3mu C. J. Nelson D. L. Marlowe Bureau of Ordnance NavaI Oru6imnc Teot Station D. F. Anderson, Jr. Oscar D. Terrell B. C. Belyea L. R. Evans

  19. Phil Knight and the Public Purposes of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Barrett; Morphew, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Philip H. Knight, co-founder of Nike, Inc., pledged $400 million to Stanford University last year (Gioia, 2016; Stanford University, 2016a). The gift will partially endow a $750 million fund intended to support 100 graduate students per year, with awards typically lasting for three years. The resulting Knight-Hennessy Scholars program will be the…

  20. N-ov-emb-er

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    " to. Andrew Z Fire - Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, CA, USA. Craig C Mello - University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, MA, USA. -96----------------------------~~--------R-ES-O-N-A-N-C-E--1 -N-ov-e-m-b-er--2-oo-6.

  1. Efficient algorithms for approximate time separation of events

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology – Bombay, Mumbai 400 076, India; Computer Science Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0407, USA ...

  2. Stanford Occasional Papers in Linguistics, No. 3. Papers from the Annual California Linguistics Conference (3rd, May 5-6, 1973).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James Paul, Ed.; And Others

    This volume includes 12 of the 24 papers presented at the Third Annual California Linguistics Conference. Selections are drawn from each of the four sessions, covering semantic and lexical structure, phonology, syntax, and language in context. Each of the papers includes a bibliography, as well as diagrams, charts, and appendixes when necessary.…

  3. Science and Technology in the Soviet Union: Proceedings of a Conference Held at Stanford, California on 26-27 July 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-31

    advantages and disadvantages of professional mobility are skewed: the Academy benefits from the development of new fields, and the branch institutes suffer...well. In the US, where there is a much greater professional mobility , concentrations of excellence as large as those in the SU are rare. They appear

  4. SLAC/DESY International Workshop on Interactions of Intense Sub-Picosecond X-Rays with Matter, Stanford, CA, January 23-24, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatchyn, Roman

    1998-01-01

    This is the proceedings volume of the 1997 SLAC/DESY International Workshop on Interactions of Intense Sub-picosecond X-Ray Pulses with Matter. The workshop theme evolved out of design and R and D studies, undertaken at SLAC, DESY, and elsewhere [1,2], of the new class of linac-driven X-Ray Free Electron Lasers (XRFELs) operating with photocathode-based, low-emittance electron beams in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) regime [3]. It can be noted that, following the conclusion of the workshop, funded design study reports on R and D facilities based on these novel sources have been completed and published by both laboratories [4,5]. Topical significance was imparted to the workshop agenda by a series of prior workshops organized to explore scientific and technological applications of linac driven XRFELs [6,7,8,9]. These served to highlight underlying concerns regarding the potential loading effects of the highly intense radiation pulses from this new class of light source on the instrumentation, samples, and experimental phenomena being considered. The primary objectives of the workshop were: (a) to provide tutorial overviews of existing theoretical, numerical, and experimental techniques in the study of interactions of intense, ultra-short radiation pulses with matter, and of their applicability to the parameter regimes of the SLAC and DESY XRFELs; (b) to discuss practical optics and instrumentation issues related to peak and average power density loading; (c) to identify and explore novel concepts and design approaches, with an emphasis on optical instrumentation and experimental physics; (d) to formulate independent or collaborative R and D programs and activities in the areas of theory, numerical simulation, and experimental physics relevant to the linac-driven XRFEL parameter regime

  5. Retrograde type A dissection: a serious complication due to thoracic aortic endovascular stent-graft repair for Stanford type B aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guoquan; Zhai Shuiting; Li Tianxiao; Shi Shuaitao; Zhang Kewei; Li Kun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to discuss the possible causes and prevention of retrograde type A dissection occurred after thoracic aortic endovascular stent-graft repair (TEVAR) for symptomatic type B dissection. Methods: During the period from January 2005 to January 2011, TEVAR was carried out in 189 patients (157 males and 32 females) with symptomatic type B dissection. The average age of the patients was (51.2±13.5) years, ranged from 26 to 78 years. A follow-up lasting for 3-63 months (mean 32 months) was conducted in 135 patients (71.43%). Fifty-four patients lost in touch with the authors (28.57%). The occurrence of retrograde type A dissection after TEVAR was calculated and the possible causes were analyzed. Results: After TEVAR retrograde type A dissection occurred in two patients (1.48%), and both were males. One patient developed retrograde type A dissection in perioperative period, and the patient refused to have surgery. Conservative treatment was employed for over three years and be was still alive so far. The other patient developed retrograde type A dissection one month after TEVAR, and emergency surgery was performed. The patient was followed up for three months and he was still alive. Conclusion: The retrograde type A dissection occurred after TEVAR may be closely related to the stent-graft device, to the interventional manipulations and to the vascular disorders. Close attention should be paid to the direct damage produced by the stent-graft device to the vascular wall. (authors)

  6. The Stanford Leisure-Time Activity Categorical Item (L-Cat): a single categorical item sensitive to physical activity changes in overweight/obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, M; Schoffman, D E; Lee, K; Brown, S D; Fair, J M; Perri, M G; Haskell, W L

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity is essential for chronic disease prevention, yet Cat) is a single item comprising six descriptive categories ranging from inactive to very active. This novel methodological approach assesses national activity recommendations as well as multiple clinically relevant categories below and above the recommendations, and incorporates critical methodological principles that enhance psychometrics (reliability, validity and sensitivity to change). We evaluated the L-Cat's psychometrics among 267 overweight/obese women who were asked to meet the national activity recommendations in a randomized behavioral weight-loss trial. The L-Cat had excellent test-retest reliability (κ=0.64, PCat category at 6 months was associated with 1059 more daily pedometer steps (95% CI 712-1407, β=0.38, PCat categories differentiated from each other in a dose-response gradient for steps and weight loss (PsCat was sensitive to change in response to the trial's activity component. Women increased one L-Cat category at 6 months (M=1.0±1.4, PCat categories at 6 months lost more weight than those who did not (M=-4.6%, 95% CI -6.7 to -2.5, PCat has timely potential for clinical use such as tracking activity changes via electronic medical records, especially among overweight/obese populations who are unable or unlikely to reach national recommendations.

  7. Hosing Instability of the Drive Electron Beam in the E157 Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blue, Brent Edward

    2005-01-01

    In the plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC, known as E157, an ultra-relativistic electron beam is used to both excite and witness a plasma wave for advanced accelerator applications. If the beam is tilted, then it will undergo transverse oscillations inside of the plasma. These oscillations can grow exponentially via an instability know as the electron hose instability. The linear theory of electron-hose instability in a uniform ion column predicts that for the parameters of the E157 experiment (beam charge, bunch length, and plasma density) a growth of the centroid offset should occur. Analysis of the E157 data has provided four critical results. The first was that the incoming beam did have a tilt. The tilt was much smaller than the radius and was measured to be 5.3 (micro)m/(delta) z at the entrance of the plasma (IP1.) The second was the beam centroid oscillates in the ion channel at half the frequency of the beam radius (betatron beam oscillations), and these oscillations can be predicted by the envelope equation. Third, up to the maximum operating plasma density of E157 (∼2 x 10 14 cm -3 ), no growth of the centroid offset was measured. Finally, time-resolved data of the beam shows that up to this density, no significant growth of the tail of the beam (up to 8ps from the centroid) occurred even though the beam had an initial tilt

  8. Hosing Instability of the Drive Electron Beam in the E157 Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Brent Edward; /SLAC /UCLA

    2005-10-10

    In the plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC, known as E157, an ultra-relativistic electron beam is used to both excite and witness a plasma wave for advanced accelerator applications. If the beam is tilted, then it will undergo transverse oscillations inside of the plasma. These oscillations can grow exponentially via an instability know as the electron hose instability. The linear theory of electron-hose instability in a uniform ion column predicts that for the parameters of the E157 experiment (beam charge, bunch length, and plasma density) a growth of the centroid offset should occur. Analysis of the E157 data has provided four critical results. The first was that the incoming beam did have a tilt. The tilt was much smaller than the radius and was measured to be 5.3 {micro}m/{delta}{sub z} at the entrance of the plasma (IP1.) The second was the beam centroid oscillates in the ion channel at half the frequency of the beam radius (betatron beam oscillations), and these oscillations can be predicted by the envelope equation. Third, up to the maximum operating plasma density of E157 ({approx}2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), no growth of the centroid offset was measured. Finally, time-resolved data of the beam shows that up to this density, no significant growth of the tail of the beam (up to 8ps from the centroid) occurred even though the beam had an initial tilt.

  9. What Happens in a Virtual World Has a Real-World Impact, a Scholar Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Forget the pills, hypnosis, and meditation. Losing weight or boosting self-confidence can be achieved by adopting an avatar and living in virtual reality, says Jeremy N. Bailenson, an assistant professor of communications at Stanford University. As the director of Stanford's Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Mr. Bailenson has explored ways that…

  10. Solutions of several coupled discrete models in terms of Lamé ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Departments of Mathematics and Statistics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ∗. Corresponding author. E-mail: avadh@lanl.gov. MS received 23 January 2012; revised 29 March 2012; accepted 18 April 2012. Abstract. Coupled discrete models are ubiquitous in a variety of physical contexts. We provide.

  11. Külma sõja piirid Ida-Aasias ajaloolaste pilgu läbi / Jaanika Erne

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Erne, Jaanika, 1967-

    2016-01-01

    Raamatuülevaade: The Cold War in East Asia 1945–1991. T. Hasegawa (Ed.). Washington D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Center Press 2011, Stanford: Stanford University Press 2011, viii + 340 lk. Külma sõja aegsetest poliitilistest sündmustest

  12. Contesting Border/Frontier Studies in China and Beyond: The Prospects and Pitfalls of Zomia as a Metaphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinba Tenzin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Megan Bryson. Goddess on the Frontier: Religion, Ethnicity, and Gender in Southwest China. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2016. 264 pp. $60 (cloth. Xiaofei Kang and Donald S. Sutton. Contesting the Yellow Dragon: Ethnicity, Religion, and the State in the Sino-Tibetan Borderland. Leiden: Brill, 2016. 494 pp. $202 (cloth/e-book.

  13. Getting to the Point in Pinpoint Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Assisted by Langley Research Center's Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program, IntegriNautics has developed a commercialized precision landing system. The idea finds its origins in Stanford University work on a satellite test of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, where Stanford has designed a new high-performance altitude-determining hardware.

  14. Cost Functions for Airframe Production Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    0 : 666QOOO 66u666=6L66 𔃺" ~ JM. ~ ~ OJ M %~ 0v Z𔃾:O 14% tqv6 Z6 6 𔃺 *1 199 REFERENCES 1. Alchian, Armen A. "Costs and Outputs." In, The...Allocation of Economic Resources, Edited by Moses Abramovitz. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 1959. 2. Alchian, Armen A. "Reliability of

  15. Myelodysplastic syndromes: clinical and biological advances

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenberg, Peter L

    2006-01-01

    ..., to a review of recent molecular and cytogenetic discoveries and insights. This book will be a valuable resource for clinicians and researchers who wish to learn more about myelodysplastic syndromes. Peter L. Greenberg is Professor of Medicine at Stanford University Cancer Center, Stanford, and Chief, Hematology Section, VA Palo Alto Health Care Sy...

  16. Cooperation in Japan. Grades Kindergarten-Third. Elementary Literature Series, Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Gary

    The Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE) represents a long-term effort by Stanford University to improve international and cross-cultural education in elementary and secondary schools. This volume of the elementary literature series focuses on the primary grades; utilizes primary source literature from Japan;…

  17. geo-electrical exploration for groundwater within the premises

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    where'(2L2j is the distance between the current electrodes (AB), (21) is the distance between the potential electrodes (MN), is the surface gradient of potential at the midpoint between Mand N, .... Lithostratigraphy of Nigeria: An Overview. Workshop on Geothermal. Reservation Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, ...

  18. Exploring the Uses of RNAi — Gene Knockdown and the Nobel Prize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded this year to Andrew Fire (Stanford University School of Medicine) and Craig Mello (University of Massachusetts Medical School) for their discovery of a new form of gene silencing.

  19. Observation of very low frequency emissions at Indian Antarctic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    £Space Plasma Laboratory, Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal 462 026, India. ££Geophysics ... Park and Helliwell .... [1] R A Helliwell, Whistler and related ionospheric phenomena (Stanford University Press, Stan-.

  20. 76 FR 34069 - National Board for Education Sciences; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    .... Following lunch the Board will turn to the topic, ``Communications: What are effective ways to communicate... Stanford University and Dr. Robert Slavin of Johns Hopkins University and the Success for All Foundation...

  1. "Counterterrorism Bookshelf" – Eight Books on Terrorism & Counter-terrorism Related Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Sinai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available by Joshua Sinai  Note: This column consists of capsule reviews. Future columns will continue to review books by publishers such as Palgrave Macmillan, Routledge, Springer, Stanford University Press, and the University of Chicago Press.

  2. Fusion Genes Predict Prostate Cancer Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Stanford University. The UPMC cohort includes up to 1900 well-annotated and -followed radical prostatectomy samples. University of Wisconsin will provide...probes, animal models); • clinical interventions; • new business creation; and • other. 7. PARTICIPANTS & OTHER COLLABORATING

  3. Future of virtuality in-the-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürsimsek, Remzi Ates

    2011-01-01

    Blog post by Remzi Ates Gürsimsek, researcher at Roskilde University and visiting scholar at Stanford University's H-STAR Institute. His field of interest is collaborative design and innovation in virtual worlds.......Blog post by Remzi Ates Gürsimsek, researcher at Roskilde University and visiting scholar at Stanford University's H-STAR Institute. His field of interest is collaborative design and innovation in virtual worlds....

  4. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  5. Skill Acquisition: Compilation of Weak-Method Problem Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-12

    Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Dr. Hans Crombag University of Leyden Mr. Raymond E. Christal Education Research Center AFHRL/MOE Boerhaavelaan 2 Brooks AFB, TX...78235 2334 EN Leyden The NETHERLANDS Dr. William Clancey Computer Science Department Dr. Lee Cronbach Stanford University 16 Laburnum Road Stanford, CA...1985/07/16 DISTRIBUTION LIST FOR Carnegie-Mellon University/Anderson (NR 667-530) Dr. Kathleen LaPiana Dr. Marcia C. Linn Naval Health Sciences

  6. Evolution of the Ethane Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casado, Martin; Shenker, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The Ethane architecture, developed at Stanford University, demonstrated that a novel approach to building secure networks could support superior low-level security and flexible policy-based control over individual flows...

  7. A massively parallel framework for low-dissipation, multiphysics simulations of rocket engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal, researchers from Cascade Technologies and Stanford University outline a multi-year research plan to develop large-eddy simulation (LES) tools to...

  8. The Mind-Body Connection - Can Prolonged Stress Affect Whether Breast Cancer Returns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... traumatic stress to some stress to no significant stress. According to David Spiegel, M.D., one of the study's authors and a faculty member at the Stanford University School of Medicine, there were marked differences. "Comparisons ...

  9. Through Enemy Eyes: A Soviet View of U.S. Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Pentagon, and frequently its intelligence departments, while possessing the newest technical means of espionage, artificial earth satellites included...government as proof of official membership in the intellignece community. The characterization of the Hoover Institute of Stanford University is typical

  10. Customization and the Common Good: A Conversation with Larry Cuban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Scott

    2002-01-01

    A conversation with Larry Cuban, Professor Emeritus of Education at Stanford University, about two contradictory trends in education: customization and standardization and their effect on the public schools' responsibilities to provide both individual and social benefits. (PKP)

  11. Carl Von Clausewitz: Two Letters on Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paret, Peter; Moran, Daniel

    1984-01-01

    .... The Army War College wishes to express its gratitude to the co-editors and translators, Professor Peter Paret, Spruance Professor of International History at Stanford University, and Dr. Daniel Moran...

  12. Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics, which forms the third cycle CCNE Program at Stanford University, is a consortium that has three highly synchronized Projects and three Cores.

  13. Beams at U.S. high energy physics laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    Tables are given of beam characteristics for particle accelerators at Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Cornell University, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Characteristics given include energy, momentum, and flux

  14. MPI and GPU parallelization of novel SD algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    component of molecular dynamics is the use of well-suited atomistic and .... that the limiting case f = 1 completely removes the ..... from Stanford University, that Gromacs interfaces in ... NVIDIA GEForce 9600 GT graphical card with 512 Mb.

  15. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the TAGE from 08 May 1969 to 30 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7100605)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the TAGE from 08 May 1969 to 30 December 1969. Data were submitted by the Stanford University;...

  16. Generic UAV Modeling to Obtain Its Aerodynamic and Control Derivatives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chua, Choon S

    2008-01-01

    .... The first approach explored in this thesis involves using the LinAir software program developed about a decade ago at Stanford University, the second one relies on the Athena Vortex Lattice package...

  17. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quake, Steve

    2011-10-12

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  18. Excitation of the Magnetospheric Cavity by Space-Based ELF/VLF Transmitters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bell, Timothy F; Inan, Umran; Kulkarni, P

    2004-01-01

    During the period of performance Stanford University: 1. Developed an analytical model describing the distribution of current along a dipole antenna radiating ELF/VLF waves in the magnetospheric cavity...

  19. Identifying p53 Transactivation Domain 1-Specific Inhibitors to Alleviate the Side Effects of Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    CANCER THERAPY PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. LAURA D. ATTARDI CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: STANFORD UNIVERSITY MENLO PARK, CA 94025-3434 REPORT DATE...S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBERStanford University 450 Serra Mall Stanford, CA 94305-2004 9...Generation of reporter lines in Arf-/- immortalized MEFs. As described in detail in the previous annual report, we utilized CRISPR /Cas9 targeting strategies

  20. OpenFlow Extensions for Programmable Quantum Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-19

    Introduction 1 2. Background 1 2.1 Quantum Networks 2 2.2 Software -Defined Networks 3 3. Approach 3 3.1 Metadata 4 3.2 Switch 4 3.3 Controller 5... software -defined networks . Stanford (CA): Stanford University HotNets; 2010. 9. Raychev N. Algorithm for switching 4-bit packages in full quantum...applications to communicate. Advances in network protocols and architectures have led to the development of software -defined programmable networks

  1. Continent at a Crossroads: Prosperity, Justice, and Security in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    of Democracy 17.3 (July 2006): 13-27. 11 Martins Filbo, Joao R., and Daniel Zirker. "The Brazilian Military under Cardoso: Overcoming the...1996. (HC 125 .N483 1996) Chong, Alberto , and Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes, eds. Privatization in Latin America: Myths and Reality. Palo Alto: Stanford...Rhoads, Robert A., and Carlos Alberto Torres, eds. The University, State, and Market: The Political Economy of Globalization in the Americas. Stanford

  2. In pursuit of the practice of radical equality: Rancière inspired pedagogical inquiries in elementary school science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoide, Lorraine

    2017-06-01

    This article outlines a study of praxis. Inspired by my reading of Jacques Rancière's (The ignorant schoolmaster: Five lessons in intellectual emancipation, trans. K. Ross, Stanford University Press, Stanford, 1991) influential text, The Ignorant School Master, I explore the practical applications of his work for teaching and outline a pedagogical response that sought to effect educational change through a philosophically driven teacher inquiry.

  3. On Resisting Social Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    Eds.), Law , Justice and the individual in society: Psychological and legal issues. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1977, 198-223. Hartman, J. J...Kadish, M. R., & Kadish, S. H. Discretion to disobey: A study of lawful departures from legal rules. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, Lifton, R...30 Stoner, C., & Parke, J. All God’s children. New York: Penguin, 1979. Szasz , T. Patty Hearst’s conversion: Some call it brainwashing. The New

  4. Russia-A New Empire Under Construction. The Russian Policy towards Former Communist Satellites-Mechanisms of Exertion of Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Michael Fortmann (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2004), 5-6. 19 These can be cases of Romania , Hungary, Bulgaria, and Finland who...Federation • Mitropolit .Andrian (Chetvergov) – the chief of Russian Orthodox Old Believers Church 71 John B. Dunlop, “Aleksandr...preparation for the next confrontation. As a famous Russian philosopher, Nikolay Bierdaeev wrote in 1918 : The old quarrel in the Slavic family, a

  5. Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium-Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-05

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0023 (NII) - Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium -Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts MATTHEW KANAN LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV...Effects on Rhodium -Porphyrin and NHC-Gold Catalysts Principal Investigator: Matthew W. Kanan Project Publications: 1. “An Electric Field–Induced Change...Stanford University Grant/Contract Title The full title of the funded effort. (NII)-Local Electric Field Effects on Rhodium -Porphyrin and NHC-Gold

  6. Fast Sampling Gas Chromatography (GC) System for Speciation in a Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. Stanford University 3160 Porter Drive Suite 100 Stanford, CA 94304 -8445...Conference Proceeding publications (other than abstracts): Number of Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceeding publications (other than abstracts): Books Number...Paper TOTAL: Received Paper TOTAL: Received Paper TOTAL: Received Book TOTAL: Patents Submitted Patents Awarded Awards Graduate Students Names of Post

  7. Phase Transitions on Surfaces. An International Conference. Abstracts and Program, 3-7 August 1981, Orono, Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-16

    P. J. Estrup Chemisorption-Induced Phase Transitions and Adatom Interactions on GaAs(110) P. Skeath, C. Y. Su, P. W. Chye , I. Lindau and W. E. Spicer...Transitions and Adatom Interactions on GaAs(ll0)* Perry Skeath, C. Y. Su, P. W. Chye , I Lindau, and W. E. Spicer Stanford Electronics Labs Stanford...ORDER PHASE TRANSITIONS* P. KLEBAN and CHIN -KUN HU, Department of Physics and Astronomy and Laboratory for Surface Science and Technology University of

  8. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    been calibrated and already validated precisely for this purpose. In addition, multiparametric MRI shows good correlation with grade in that only the...StanfordUniversity, Stanford,California 2Departmentof ExperimentalandClinical Pharmacology ,UniversityofMinnesota,Minneapolis,Minnesota BACKGROUND. Protein...repeat biopsies, and more recently, MRI examinations [9–11]. This follow-up is necessitated by the inability to characterize the biological potential of

  9. Feasibility Study for Design of a Biocybernetic Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-08-01

    VIRGINIA 22209 ^LtVAHU Attention: DR. GEORGE LAWRENCE, PROGRAM MANAGER Ä^Se^o.2^ C0NTRACT DpAHC-15-72-C-0167 Contractor: Stanford...cussed on page 77. Various portions of this research program have been presented orally in several scientific forums. The participants made critical...The San Francisco Bay Area Neurolinguistics Society meeting, Stanford University, Dr. Karl Pribram, Chairman. • The Department of Linguistics

  10. Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

    2013-04-17

    With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

  11. The 1980-81 AFOSR-HTTM (Heat Transfer and Turbulence Mechanics)-Stanford Conference on Complex Turbulent Flows: Comparison of Computation and Experiment. Volume 1. Objectives, Evaluation of Data, Specifications of Test Cases, Discussion, and Position Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    research community on provision for accu- racy and oil the difficulties of laboratory control of fluid flow been brought to bear in a timely manner...numbnr)I. 2. Constitutive (e.g., polymers) 3. Energy release (e.g., chemical reactions) 4.Surface tension (e.g., oil -slick calming) 5.Cryogenic...thp following flows: a. In "thin shear layer" flows, i.e., having small d6/dx and negligible ;p/3y, the equations are essencially parabolic, and the

  12. Promoting student case creation to enhance instruction of clinical reasoning skills: a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekar H

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hamsika Chandrasekar,1 Neil Gesundheit,2 Andrew B Nevins,3 Peter Pompei,4 Janine Bruce,5 Sylvia Bereknyei Merrell6 1Department of Pediatrics, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Division of Primary Care and Population Health, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 5Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 6Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Background: It is a common educational practice for medical students to engage in case-based learning (CBL exercises by working through clinical cases that have been developed by faculty. While such faculty-developed exercises have educational strengths, there are at least two major drawbacks to learning by this method: the number and diversity of cases is often limited; and students decrease their engagement with CBL cases as they grow accustomed to the teaching method. We sought to explore whether student case creation can address both of these limitations. We also compared student case creation to traditional clinical reasoning sessions in regard to tutorial group effectiveness, perceived gains in clinical reasoning, and quality of student–faculty interaction. Methods: Ten first-year medical students participated in a feasibility study wherein they worked in small groups to develop their own patient case around a preassigned diagnosis. Faculty provided feedback on case quality afterwards. Students completed pre- and post-self-assessment surveys. Students and faculty also participated in separate focus groups to compare their case creation experience to traditional CBL sessions. Results: Students reported high levels of team engagement

  13. SuchThatCast Episode 9: John Dupré

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soraker, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    John Dupré is the director of the ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society and professor of philosophy at the University of Exeter. Dupré was educated at the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge and taught at Oxford, Stanford University and Birkbeck College of the University of London

  14. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Universities, Oceanographic Institutions, Science Centers and Aquariums Working Together to Improve Ocean Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S.; McDonnell, J.; Halversen, C.; Zimmerman, T.; Ingram, L.

    2007-12-01

    and inquiry-based ocean sciences activities for children and families visiting informal institutions. The following COSIA partners have taught the course: Hampton University - Virginia Aquarium; Oregon State University - Hatfield Marine Science Visitor's Center; Rutgers University - Liberty Science Center; University of California, Berkeley - Lawrence Hall of Science; University of Southern California - Aquarium of the Pacific; and Scripps Institution of Oceanography - Birch Aquarium. Communicating Ocean Sciences has also been taught at Stanford, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, University of Oregon (GK-12 program), University of Washington, and others. Data from surveys of students demonstrates improvement in their understanding of how people learn and how to effectively communicate. Providing college students with a background in current learning theory, and applying that theory through practical science communication experiences, will empower future generations of scientists to meet the communication challenges they will encounter in their careers.

  15. The University of Arizona Nanosat Program: Making Space accessible to scientific and commercial packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, U.; Fevig, R. A.

    2003-05-01

    For the last couple of years we have been engaged in building nanosatellites within a student-mentor framework. The satellites are 10x10x10cm cubes, have a maximum mass of 1 kg, and power of a few watts. The standardized "cube-sat" form factor was suggested by Bob Twiggs of Stanford University so that a common launch platform could be utilized and more Universities could participate. We have now built four "cube-sats': a launchable Engineering model, Rincon 1 & 2, (funded by Rincon corporation), and Alcatel funded by Alcatel Espace. The costs for the four satellites are \\250,000. Launch costs using a Russian SS-18 are typically \\10,000 per kg. The payload for Rincon 1 & 2 is a sophisticated telecommunications board using only 10 mw of transmitting power. The Alcatel payload consists of three communications IC's whose radiation exposure and annealing properties will be studied over a period of years. Future nanosatellites will have considerable value in providing low cost access to space for experiments in nanotechnology, space electronics, micropropulsion, radiation experiments, astrobionics and climate change studies. For the latter area we are considering experiments to monitor the solar constant, the solar UV spectrum, the chromospheric activity through the Mg II index, the Earth's Albedo, etc. For this purpose we are developing a slightly larger satellite, 20x20x20cm and 10 kg. We have built a C-MOS camera with a 1 ms exposure time for attitude determination, and we are working with Honeywell Industries to develop micro-reaction wheels for attitude control. We are also working on micro-propulsion units with the Air Force and several aerospace companies. Preliminary calculations show that we can develop delta-V's of 5km/s which will allow us to visit 5% (about 100) of the NEA population or possibly some comets. We firmly believe a vigorous nanosatellite program will allow useful space experiments for costs of millions of Dollars instead of the present tens of

  16. BOOK REVIEW: Universe or Multiverse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2008-11-01

    More than 2000 years ago, Epicurus taught that there are an infinite number of other worlds, both like and unlike ours, and Aristotle taught that there are none. Neither hypothesis can currently be falsified, and this issue of potential for falsification (that is testability) goes to the heart of many of the chapters in Carr's book. All but one of the 27 chapters, provided by 27 pundits (almost but not quite a one-to-one mapping) are written versions of talks given at one of three meetings, held between 2001 and 2005 at Stanford and Cambridge Universities and partly sponsored by the Templeton Foundation. Every reader will surely find some chapters interesting and informative, some provocative, and some rather vacuous. These will not be the same chapters for all readers. Two 'conflict of interest' statements: first, I spoke at one of these meetings, but was not one of those asked to provide a chapter. And, second, the first time I suggested in a lecture for scientists that 'many universes, either in temporal succession or embedded in higher dimensional space' was a possible explanation of the habitability of ours was fall 1974, shortly after Brandon Carter's first paper on anthropic principles and explanations, but before Bernard Carr and Martin Rees's 1979 Nature paper, which presented all the anthropic arguments then known and divided them into numbers that required no additional physics beyond the four standard forces (like the number of particles in a star) and those that seemed essential for life but not calculable (like the ratio of the electromagnetic to nuclear force constant). My other three possibilities were 'G.d has been very careful' (now called intelligent design), additional physics to be learned, and shear complexity. The core multiverse concept is that our universe (the 4-dimensional spacetime with which we are or could be connected and all its contents) is one of many, perhaps infinitely many, probably with different values of the constants of

  17. Kennedy: Future Academic Research Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The president of Stanford University discusses his views on problems facing research universities, including research secrecy, ethics, and economics of proprietary knowledge generated in the university, faculty conflict of interest, place of humanities in a society driven by technology, and decline of government support for academic research.…

  18. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Physiology or Medicine. “for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells” to. James E Rothman, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA,. Randy W Schekman, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; Howard Hughes Medical. Institute ,. Thomas C Südhof, Stanford University ...

  19. On Beyond Star Trek, the Role of Synthetic Biology in Nasa's Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    The time has come to for NASA to exploit the nascent field of synthetic biology in pursuit of its mission, including aeronautics, earth science, astrobiology and notably, human exploration. Conversely, NASA advances the fundamental technology of synthetic biology as no one else can because of its unique expertise in the origin of life and life in extreme environments, including the potential for alternate life forms. This enables unique, creative "game changing" advances. NASA's requirement for minimizing upmass in flight will also drive the field toward miniaturization and automation. These drivers will greatly increase the utility of synthetic biology solutions for military, health in remote areas and commercial purposes. To this end, we have begun a program at NASA to explore the use of synthetic biology in NASA's missions, particularly space exploration. As part of this program, we began hosting an iGEM team of undergraduates drawn from Brown and Stanford Universities to conduct synthetic biology research at NASA Ames Research Center. The 2011 team (http://2011.igem.org/Team:Brown-Stanford) produced an award-winning project on using synthetic biology as a basis for a human Mars settlement and the 2012 team has expanded the use of synthetic biology to estimate the potential for life in the clouds of other planets (http://2012.igem.org/Team:Stanford-Brown; http://www.calacademy.org/sciencetoday/igem-competition/). More recent projects from the Stanford-Brown team have expanded our ideas of how synthetic biology can aid NASA's missions from "Synthetic BioCommunication" (http://2013.igem.org/Team:Stanford-Brown) to a "Biodegradable UAS (drone)" in collaboration with Spelman College (http://2014.igem.org/Team:StanfordBrownSpelman#SBS%20iGEM) and most recently, "Self-Folding Origami" (http://2015.igem.org/Team:Stanford-Brown), the winner of the 2015 award for Manufacturing.

  20. A cognitive operating system (COGNOSYS) for JPL's robot, phase 1 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, F. P.

    1972-01-01

    The most important software requirement for any robot development is the COGNitive Operating SYStem (COGNOSYS). This report describes the Stanford University Artificial Intelligence Laboratory's hand eye software system from the point of view of developing a cognitive operating system for JPL's robot. In this, the Phase 1 of the JPL robot COGNOSYS task the installation of a SAIL compiler and a FAIL assembler on Caltech's PDP-10 have been accomplished and guidelines have been prepared for the implementation of a Stanford University type hand eye software system on JPL-Caltech's computing facility. The alternatives offered by using RAND-USC's PDP-10 Tenex operating sytem are also considered.

  1. Behavioral activation for dementia caregivers: scheduling pleasant events and enhancing communications

    OpenAIRE

    Au, Alma; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores; Wong, Meng-Kong; Leung, Jess; Chan, Wai-Chi; Chan, Chun Chung; Lu, Hui-Jing; Lai, Man Kin; Chan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Alma Au,1,2 Dolores Gallagher-Thompson,3 Meng-Kong Wong,4 Jess Leung,4 Wai-Chi Chan,5 Chun Chung Chan,6 Hui-Jing Lu,1 Man Kin Lai,1 Kevin Chan11Department of Applied Social Sciences, 2Institute of Active Aging, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Geriatric Education Centre, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; 4Department of Psychiatry, United Christian Hosp...

  2. SDIO (Strategic Defense Initiative Office) Technical Information Management Center Bibliography of Unclassified Reports: January - December 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    Corp.Author: Stanford Univ., Edward L. Ginzton Lab., Stanford, CA94305 Index Terms: Piezoelectric Film Transducer Polyvinylidene Fluoride Phased Acoustic ...Graphite Nosetip Boundary Layer Transition Turbulent Flow Hypervelocity Radiation Pyrometer Pgs. 42 Classification: U Security Marks: Accession

  3. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  4. A Construction Grammar for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Randal

    2010-01-01

    Construction grammars (Lakoff, Women, fire and dangerous things: What categories reveal about the Mind, University of Chicago Press, 1987; Langacker, Foundations of cognitive grammar: Theoretical pre-requisites, Stanford University Press, 1987; Croft, Radical construction grammar: Syntactic theory in typological perspective, Oxford University…

  5. Collaborative Co-Design for Library Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Regina Lee; Taormina, Mattie

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a year-long application of critical information literacy theory for social-science-related library workshops. Each of these workshops had a customized section that included working with special collections and university archives. The students who participated ranged from incoming freshman to seniors at Stanford University.…

  6. The Dynamics of Information

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    efficacy at making predictions in the real world. About the speaker Bernardo Huberman is a Senior HP Fellow and Director of the Information Dynamics Lab at Hewlett Packard Laboratories. He received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Pennsylvania, and is currently a Consulting Professor in the Department of Applied Physics at Stanford University...

  7. College Curriculum-Sharing Via CTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Heather E.; And Others

    Domestic communication satellites and video compression techniques will increase communication channel capacity and reduce cost of video transmission. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center, Stanford University, and Carleton University are participants in an experiment to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate the…

  8. Data Needed for Improving Productivity Measurement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massy, William F.; Sullivan, Teresa A.; Mackie, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    William Massy is an emeritus professor and former Vice President for Business and Finance at Stanford University, Teresa Sullivan is President of the University of Virginia, and Christopher Mackie is a Study Director with the National Academies' Committee on National Statistics. This article summarizes the authors' recent National Research Council…

  9. International Symposium on Recent Advances in Aerodynamics and Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Charles

    1986-01-01

    The Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics at Stanford University was established in October 1973 to provide an academic environment for long-term cooperative research between Stanford and NASA Ames Research Center. Since its establishment, the Institute has conducted theoretical and experimental work in the areas of aerodynamics, acoustics, fluid mechanics, flight dynamics, guidance and control, and human factors. This research has involved Stanford faculty, research associates, graduate students, and many distinguished visitors in collaborative efforts with the research staff of NASA Ames Research Center. The occasion of the Institute's tenth anniversary was used to reflect back on where that research has brought us, and to consider where our endeavors should be directed next. Thus, an International Symposium was held to review recent advances in the fields relevant to the activities of the Institute and to discuss the areas of research to be undertaken in the future. This anniversary was also chosen...

  10. Large-Scale Academic Achievement Testing of Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Sen; Mitchell, Ross E.

    2012-01-01

    The first large-scale, nationwide academic achievement testing program using Stanford Achievement Test (Stanford) for deaf and hard-of-hearing children in the United States started in 1969. Over the past three decades, the Stanford has served as a benchmark in the field of deaf education for assessing student academic achievement. However, the…

  11. Without Testing: Stockpile Stewardship in the Second Nuclear Age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martz, Joseph C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-07

    Stockpile stewardship is a topic dear to my heart. I’ve been fascinated by it, and I’ve lived it—mostly on the technical side but also on the policy side from 2009 to 2010 at Stanford University as a visiting scholar and the inaugural William J. Perry Fellow. At Stanford I worked with Perry, former secretary of defense, and Sig Hecker, former Los Alamos Lab director (1986–1997), looking at nuclear deterrence, nuclear policy, and stockpile stewardship and at where all this was headed.

  12. The Tau-Charm Factory in the ERA of B-Factories and CESR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beers, L.V.; Perl, M.L.

    1994-10-01

    This paper is a collection of presentations made at a conference on tau-charm factories, held at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Stanford University on August 15-16, 1994. The papers presented summarize the physics which can be learned from such a facility, the advantages it would present over planned B-factories and large centers such as CESR, and the types of decay modes which could be observed. More detailed studies of tau physics are opened up, as well as charmonium and charmed systems. Seperate presentations to the proceedings are indexed individually into the database

  13. Jean DeBernardi, The Way that Lives in the Heart. Chinese Popular Religion and Spirit-Mediums in Penang, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Goossaert, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Jean DeBernardi a mené ses recherches anthropologiques sur la communauté chinoise de l’île de Penang en Malaisie depuis la fin des années soixante-dix, et en a tiré successivement deux ouvrages. L’un (Rites of Belonging: Memory, Modernity, and Identity in a Malaysian Chinese community. Stanford, Stanford University Press, 2004) trace une histoire de l’organisation religieuse de cette communauté et du rôle de la religion dans la formation des identités ethniques et culturelles dans le contexte...

  14. Tunnelers carve niche for new atom smasher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    This fall, two tunnel-boring machines will start carving out a 17-mile ring beneath the French-Swiss border. Each 15-ft. dia machine will advance more than 100 ft/day, creating an underground home for an advanced accelerator. The $470-million large electron-positron storage ring (LEP) is already behind rival projects, particularly the $113-million Stanford linear collider now being built at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California and scheduled to start up in 1986. The construction of the underground chambers for the LEP is described

  15. The Drone Dilemma: Investigating the Causes of Controversy Between the United States and Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    of Iran in 1953, and Jacob Guzman of Guatemala in 1954, to Ngo Diem of South Vietnam in 1963, and Salvador Allende, of Chile in 1973.105 These...of illegal immigrants across the Mexican border.144 Making FATA the core issue by the U.S. in affecting the overall success of GWOT is a claim...Counterinsurgency, ed. Thomas Johnson and Barry Scott Zellen (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2013). 144 “Illegal Immigration from Mexico,” U.S

  16. Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

  17. A Proposal to Perform New Theoretical and Experimental Research on HumanEfficiency Through Developments Within Systems Factorial Technology (SFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-26

    Mathematical Psychology and presently a graduate psychology and cognitive science student at Stanford University) developed a toolbox for standard GRT... Cognition Vol. II, A Festschrift for James T. Townsend, Scientific Psychology Series, New York: Routledge. 4. Townsend, J. T., Wenger, M. J. & Houpt...The Stevens Handbook of Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Neurosicence. Chichester, West Sussex; Malden, MA: John Willey and Sons Inc. 5

  18. U.S. Army War College Guide to Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-01

    Stanford University Press, 1993. 26. Rudolf Hrbek and Sabine Wegand, Betrifft! Europa der Regionen, Berlin: C.H. Beck, 1994. 27. John Mueller...Barracks: U.S. Army War College, November 1998. Navarro, Jaime . Joint Vision 2010: Naval Warfare Imperatives. Newport: U.S. Naval War College

  19. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  20. Michael Levitt and Computational Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Michael Levitt and Computational Biology Resources with Michael Levitt, PhD, professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, has function. ... Levitt's early work pioneered computational structural biology, which helped to predict

  1. Image of Women in Advertisements: A Preliminary Study of Avenues for Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler-Paisley, Matilda, Ed.; And Others

    The Center for Research on Women (CROW) at Stanford University along with the Communication Department, the Psychology Department, and the School of Education conducted a study on the image of women in advertising and suggested ways to improve women's image in the advertising media. With the objective of sponsoring some alternatives to expedite…

  2. African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 12(2), 2013 Copyright ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IN-SCHOOL YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULTS LIVING IN LIBERIA ... out-of-school students to develop school education and health services ... Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Child and Adolescent ... Due to stigma and pov- .... MethoD. Primary and secondary education in liberia. After the 1997 elections in ...

  3. Numerical Modeling and Combustion Studies of Scram Jet Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    An ideal gas is a medium that satisfies the law of Boyle and Gay -Lussac, and can be written in the form PV = RT M , (5.1) where R is the universal gas...and experiments conducted in a Stanford 6” Expansion Tube Facility. The flow parameters are chosen to be representative of the flow conditions found

  4. 2016 Quantum Science Gordon Research Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-10

    Poster Presenter Registered Barik , Sabyasachi IREAP Attendee Registered Beck, Mark Whitman College Poster Presenter Registered Béguin, Jean...Innsbruck Speaker Registered Bollinger, John J National Institute of Standards and Technology Speaker Registered Bondar, Denys I Princeton...Tatjana AFOSR Attendee Registered Dauphinais, Guillaume Université de Sherbrooke Poster Presenter Registered Davis, Emily J Stanford University

  5. Organizational Structures to Support Oakland Community Schools. Knowledge Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This brief is part of a series that shares findings from a research collaboration between the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities at Stanford University and Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) focused on understanding implementation of the community school model in the district. This brief highlights findings related to…

  6. Online Learning 2.0: Strategies for a Mature Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Sean; LaBrie, John

    2012-01-01

    It is an exciting time for online education. Lately, there has been breathless talk of a "revolution" and massive "disruption," largely based on Massively Open Online Course (MOOC) models pioneered by universities such as MIT and Stanford, and headline-grabbing start-up companies such as Udacity and Coursera. Meanwhile,…

  7. Teachers' Views on Performance-Based Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Provides personal perspectives from teachers about the prospects and problems illuminated by Stanford University's Teacher Assessment Project. Teacher remarks address the portfolio development process, assessment centers, implications for national board certification for teachers, personal thoughts and perspectives on teaching, and the future of…

  8. Alan Guth and Andrei Linde win international cosmology award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Leading theoretical cosmologists Alan Guth, Weisskopf Professor of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Andrei Linde, Professor of Physics at Stanford University, who played prominent roles in developing and refining the theory of cosmic inflation, have been selected by an international panel of experts to receive the 2004 Cosmology Prize of the Peter Gruber Foundation" (1 page).

  9. The Relationship of the Supportiveness of the Academic Environment to the Self-Confidence and Assertiveness in Academic Work for Men and Women Graduate Students in Science and Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Kendyll

    Situational influences on self-confidence and assertiveness in female and male graduate students in science and engineering were studied, based on responses from 328 Stanford University students (155 males and 173 females). Two dependent variables were used: an index of items measuring an individual's self-confidence in the ability to perform…

  10. Gravity Probe B Number 4 Gyro Inspected

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. In this photograph, Stanford engineer, Chris Gray, is inspecting the number 4 gyro under monochromatic light. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Stanford University.)

  11. KSC-04PD-0940

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. The Gravity Probe B spacecraft, atop a Boeing Delta II vehicle, launches at 12:57:24 p.m. EDT from Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Gravity Probe B is the relativity gyroscope experiment being developed by NASA and Stanford University to test two extraordinary, unverified predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity.

  12. Free Electron Lasers in 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Colson, W B; Voughs, T

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-eight years after the first operation of the short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) at Stanford University, there continue to be many important experiments, proposed experiments, and user facilities around the world. Properties of FELs in the infrared, visible, UV, and x-ray wavelength regimes are listed and discussed.

  13. Free Electron Lasers in 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Colson, William B

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-seven years after the first operation of the short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) at Stanford University, there continue to be many important experiments, proposed experiments, and user facilities around the world. Properties of FELs operating in the infrared, visible, UV, and x-ray wavelength regimes are listed and discussed.

  14. GUIDON-WATCH: A Graphic Interface for Viewing a Knowledge-Based System. Technical Report #14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richer, Mark H.; Clancey, William J.

    This paper describes GUIDON-WATCH, a graphic interface that uses multiple windows and a mouse to allow a student to browse a knowledge base and view reasoning processes during diagnostic problem solving. The GUIDON project at Stanford University is investigating how knowledge-based systems can provide the basis for teaching programs, and this…

  15. GUIDON. Technical Report #9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancey, William J.

    GUIDON is an intelligent computer-aided instruction (ICAI) program for teaching diagnosis, which has been tested using the infectious disease diagnosis rules of the MYCIN consultation system developed at the Stanford University School of Medicine. GUIDON engages a student in a dialogue about a patient suspected of having an infection and thus…

  16. Providing Specialty Care for the Poor and Underserved at Student-Run Free Clinics in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Max Bolun; Xiong, Grace; Boggiano, Victoria Lynn; Ye, Patrick Peiyong; Lin, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the model of specialty clinics implemented at Stanford University's two student-run free clinics, Arbor Free Clinic and Pacific Free Clinic, in the San Francisco Bay Area. We describe our patient demographic characteristics and the specialty services provided. We discuss challenges in implementing specialty care at student-run free clinics.

  17. The Politics of Human Rights in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Brysk, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Revised edition of 1994 out-of-print Stanford University Press study of human rights protest, social change, and democratization in Argentina.  A symbolic politics analysis of the truth commission, trials, and policy reform in Latin America's most sweeping transition of the 1980's.

  18. Research supported by the department of energy Task C: Experimental high energy physics. 1995 Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brau, J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes work of the University of Oregon high-energy physics group related to the Stanford Linear Detector, LEP's OPAL detector, the NuTeV experiment at Fermilab, the SSC's GEM detector, and top-quark studies at the Next Linear Collider. 160 refs., 53 figs., 12 tabs

  19. Editorial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raoul

    2009-09-04

    Sep 4, 2009 ... Provider Initiated Testing and Counseling (PITC) for HIV in resource-limited clinical settings: important questions unanswered. Joseph Becker 1&, Landry Tsague2, Ruben Sahabo2, Peter Twyman2. 1Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Emergency Medicine, ...

  20. Implications of Bandura's Observational Learning Theory for a Competency Based Teacher Education Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartjen, Raymond H.

    Albert Bandura of Stanford University has proposed four component processes to his theory of observational learning: a) attention, b) retention, c) motor reproduction, and d) reinforcement and motivation. This study represents one phase of an effort to relate modeling and observational learning theory to teacher training. The problem of this study…

  1. Energy Release in Solar Flares,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Plasma Research, Stanford University P. Kaufmanu CRAA/CNPq -Conseiho lacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico, Slo Paulo, SP, Brasil D.F...three phases of energy release in solar flares (Sturrock, 1980). However, a recent article by Feldman e a.. (1982) points to a significant

  2. SLAC physicists develop test for string theory

    CERN Multimedia

    Yajnik, Juhi

    2006-01-01

    "Under certain conditions, string theory solves many of the questions wracking the minds of physicists, but until recently it had one major flaw - it could not be tested. SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) scientists have found a way to test this revolutionary theory, which posits that there are 10 or 11 dimensions in our universe" (1 page)

  3. 75 FR 19969 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    .... 20100121, Draft EIS, DOI, CA, Stanford University Habitat Conservation Plan, Authorization for Incidental... Corridor, Propose to Construct Roadway Improvements from Farm-to-Market (FM) 2920 to Interstate Highway (IH... Mott, 512- 536-5964. EIS No. 20100124, Final EIS, NPS, CA, Prisoners Harbor Coastal Wetland Restoration...

  4. Who Owns Educational Theory? Big Data, Algorithms and the Expert Power of Education Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ben

    2017-01-01

    "Education data science" is an emerging methodological field which possesses the algorithm-driven technologies required to generate insights and knowledge from educational big data. This article consists of an analysis of the Lytics Lab, Stanford University's laboratory for research and development in learning analytics, and the Center…

  5. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  6. The Impact of Bullying on School Performance in Six Selected Schools in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    The nation's K-12 schools are faced with numerous critical challenges, such as elevating academic achievement, and meeting No Child Left Behind state standards (Kowalski et al., 2008). But bullying in schools is becoming one of the most challenging issues that school personnel are encountering. In a Stanford University, study it was revealed that…

  7. Workshop Design Thinking t.b.v. Conferentie O&O-leren op de PABO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijke Grotenhuis

    2015-01-01

    Uitwerking van een workshop. In deze workshop ga je aan de slag met de methode DT: Design Thinking (Stanford University Institute of Design). Het is een creatief proces dat je kunt inzetten om betekenisvolle oplossingen te bedenken in de klas, op school en in je netwerk. Met meerdere mensen neem je

  8. BaBar Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "B factory experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) in the USA and at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Japan have reached a new milestone in the quest to understand the matter-antimatter imbalance in our universe. These experiments are used by scientists from around the world, including the UK, to probe such fundamental questions."

  9. Toward the virtual classroom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihlman, M.; Dirks, D.H.

    1990-01-03

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) encourages its employees to remotely attend classes given by Stanford University, University of California at Davis, and the National Technological University (NTU). To improve the quality of education for LLNL employees, we are cooperating with Stanford University in upgrading the Stanford Instructional Television Network (SITN). A dedicated high-speed communication link (Tl) between Stanford and LLNL will be used for enhanced services such as videoconferencing, real time classnotes distribution, and electronic distribution of homework assignments. The new network will also allow students to take classes from their offices with the ability to ask the professor questions via an automatically dialed telephone call. As part of this upgrade, we have also proposed a new videoconferencing based classroom environment where students taking remote classes would feel as though they are attending the live class. All paperwork would be available in near real time and students may converse normally with, and see, other remote students as though they were all in the same physical location. We call this the Virtual Classroom.'' 1 ref., 6 figs.

  10. The E-Memory Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Jim; Bel, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    When Stanford University obtained the Buckminster Fuller archive, it heralded it as "one of the most extensive known personal archives in existence." Taking up 2000 linear feet of shelf space, including hundreds of thousands of pages and over 4000 hours of audio/video, Fuller's collection does indeed sound impressive. But Fuller, considered an…

  11. Stopping the Silent Killer: Hepatitis B Among Asian Americans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast discusses an underappreciated health threat to many Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States: chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus. Dr. John Ward, director of CDC's Division of Viral Hepatitis, and Dr. Sam So, founder of the Asian Liver Center at Stanford University, address the importance of testing, vaccination, and care to prevent serious health consequences from this "silent" disease.

  12. XML in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Roy, Ed.

    This book presents examples of how libraries are using XML (eXtensible Markup Language) to solve problems, expand services, and improve systems. Part I contains papers on using XML in library catalog records: "Updating MARC Records with XMLMARC" (Kevin S. Clarke, Stanford University) and "Searching and Retrieving XML Records via the…

  13. Felix Bloch (1905–1983)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    1905, to Jewish parents, Gustav and Agnes Bloch. The year he ... Both the student and the supervisor were in their 20's, separated by 5– ... up on the West Coast, in the University of Stanford, where he stayed for the rest of his academic life.

  14. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-12-31

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  15. Above-Campus Services: Shaping the Promise of Cloud Computing for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Brad; Waggener, Shelton

    2009-01-01

    The concept of today's cloud computing may date back to 1961, when John McCarthy, retired Stanford professor and Turing Award winner, delivered a speech at MIT's Centennial. In that speech, he predicted that in the future, computing would become a "public utility." Yet for colleges and universities, the recent growth of pervasive, very high speed…

  16. Effect Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Dutch Workers with a Chronic Somatic Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank van Dijk; Josephine Engels; Sarah Detaille; Yvonne Heerkens; Joost van der Gulden

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of a Self-Management Program for workers with a chronic disease. This program is based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program of Stanford University, modified for workers with a chronic somatic disease. Methods: In a

  17. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, S.I.; van der Gulden, J.W.J.; Engels, J.A.; Heerkens, Y.F.; van Dijk, F.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees

  18. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, S.I.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Engels, J.A.; Heerkens, Y.H.; Dijk, F.J. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees with a

  19. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management program for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Josephine Engels; F. van Dijk; Yvonne Heerkens; J. van der Gulden; S. Detaille

    2010-01-01

    Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees with a chronic

  20. Using intervention mapping (IM) to develop a self-management programme for employees with a chronic disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, Sarah I.; van der Gulden, Joost W. J.; Engels, Josephine A.; Heerkens, Yvonne F.; van Dijk, Frank J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Employees with a chronic disease often encounter problems at work because of their chronic disease. The current paper describes the development of a self-management programme based on the Chronic Disease Self-Management programme (CDSMP) of Stanford University to help employees with a chronic

  1. Moral Life and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noddings, Nel

    2016-01-01

    Nel Noddings, Lee Jacks Professor of Education, Emerita, at Stanford University, agrees with Professors Lapsley and Woodbury that moral aims are central to education. She has argued that the main aim of education is to produce better people--better in "all aspects of a complete life: moral, physical, social, vocational, aesthetic,…

  2. De auteursrechtelijke groeipijnen van Google

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, P.B.

    2011-01-01

    Het succesverhaal van Google behoort tot de canon van de geschiedenis van onze informatiemaatschappij. In 1998 begonnen in een studentenkamer op de campus van Stanford University, groeide Google in enkele jaren uit tot het orakel van het internet. Zo werd ‘googelen’ de gebruikelijke term voor zoeken

  3. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A friend 'of mine recently showed me this wonderful quote of the great computer scientist, Donald E Knuth of Stanford University: "I decry the current tendency to seek patents on algorithms. There are better ways to earn a living than to prevent other people from making use of one's contri- butions to computer science.", (cf.

  4. High Energy Physics. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Science of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, January 26, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This hearing considers the future of high energy physics in the USA. Testimony is from the following: J. Gibbons, OSTP; R. Eisenstein, Physics Division, NSF; M Krebs, Director of Energy Research, DOE; J. Peoples, FNAL; R. Peccei, UCLA; F.S. Merritt, Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago; S. Wojcicki, Stanford, High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

  5. Bottom up and Top Down: Making IT a Key Part of the Campus Sustainability Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Dennis; Hanks, Kristin; Engel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Information technology (IT) is regarded globally as a voracious consumer of energy. According to a 2007 research paper issued by the United Kingdom's Global Action Plan, IT accounts for 10 percent of the electrical usage in the U.K. In the United States, Stanford University estimates that IT accounts for 15 percent of its overall electrical use.…

  6. Pedestrian Friendly Outdoor Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koltai, R. N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGowan, T. K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The GATEWAY program followed two pedestrian-scale lighting projects that required multiple mockups – one at Stanford University in California and the other at Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York. The report provides insight into pedestrian lighting criteria, how they differ from street and area lighting criteria, and how solid-state lighting can be better applied in pedestrian applications.

  7. Philosophical Papers: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brian McLaughlin (Rutgers) Chris Megone (Leeds) Seumas Miller (Charles Sturt) Ruth Garrett Millikan (Connecticut) Michael Pendlebury (Witwatersrand) John Perry (Stanford) Philip Pettit (Australian National University) Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (Brandeis) Mark Sainsbury (Texas—Austin) John Searle (California Berkeley)

  8. Clustering in ICT: From Route 128 to Silicon Valley, from DEC to Google, from Hardware to Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Hulsink (Wim); D. Manuel; H. Bouwman (Harry)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractOne of the pioneers in academic entrepreneurship and high-tech clustering is MIT and the Route 128/Boston region. Silicon Valley centered around Stanford University was originally a fast follower and only later emerged as a scientific and industrial hotspot. Several technology and

  9. A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Including the Direct Experiences of Microteaching and Team Teaching, and Interaction Analysis Training in the Pre-Service Training of Foreign Language Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, David Edwin

    This study examines potentially significant factors in the training of foreign language teachers. Remarks on microteaching and interaction analysis precede a review and analysis of related literature. Included in this section are the Stanford University Summer Intern Program, Amidon's model of microteaching and interaction analysis, and…

  10. A Sequential Quadratic Programming Algorithm Using an Incomplete Solution of the Subproblem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    Electr6nica e Inform’itica Industrial E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales Universidad Polit6cnica, Madrid Technical Report SOL 90-12 September 1990 -Y...MURRAY* AND FRANCISCO J. PRIETOt *Systems Optimization Laboratory Department of Operations Research Stanford University tDept. de Automitica, Ingenieria

  11. Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry Resources with Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, at Stanford University, received the 1983 Nobel Prize in Chemistry " there from 1940-41. "I became deeply interested in chemistry soon after I came to Berkeley,"

  12. Predictive Validity of UAS/RPA Sensor Operator Training Qualification Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-30

    completion. The correlations increased after correction for direct range restriction ( Thorndike , 1949) and dichotomization (Cohen, 1983) of the...Data for all analyses were corrected for direct range restriction ( Thorndike , 1949). Data for analyses involving the RFS completion (pass/fail...Stanford University Press. Thorndike , R. L. (1949). Personnel selection. NY: Wiley. United States Air Force (2011). Medical examinations and standards

  13. Web Technology Conferences Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    1994 CERN,Geneva - First, VRML1994 NCSA,Chicago - Browsers, Mosaic1995 Fraunhofer Gesellschaft,Darmstadt - Java 1995 MIT,Boston - Security1996 INRIA Paris - SMEs;European Union1997 SLAC/Stanford University,California - Acces 1998 Southern Cross University, Australia - Internationalisation1999 University of Toronto,Toronto - XML, e-commerce2000 CWI,Amsterdam - Multimedia,SMIL2001 Universities of Hong Kong,Hong Kong2002 University of Hawaii,Hawaii

  14. Program and Abstracts of the Society for Research on Biological Rhythms (2nd) Held in Jacksonville, Florida on 9-13 May 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-15

    York State Joseph S. Takahashi. Department of Biochemistry , Psychiatric Institute, New York, "Nestle Research Molecular Biology and Cell Biology, and...Foundation, Ontario, Dept. of Psychiatry. Stanford University School of Medicine, Dept. of 15:30-17:30 Room 4 & 5 Clinical Biochemistry , University of...University of Michigan, Dept. of Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, Kinesiology , Ann Arbor, Mi. ard School of Life and Health Sciences

  15. The effects of sleep extension on the athletic performance of collegiate basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Cheri D; Mah, Kenneth E; Kezirian, Eric J; Dement, William C

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the effects of sleep extension over multiple weeks on specific measures of athletic performance as well as reaction time, mood, and daytime sleepiness. Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic and Research Laboratory and Maples Pavilion, Stanford University, Stanford, CA. Eleven healthy students on the Stanford University men's varsity basketball team (mean age 19.4 ± 1.4 years). Subjects maintained their habitual sleep-wake schedule for a 2-4 week baseline followed by a 5-7 week sleep extension period. Subjects obtained as much nocturnal sleep as possible during sleep extension with a minimum goal of 10 h in bed each night. Measures of athletic performance specific to basketball were recorded after every practice including a timed sprint and shooting accuracy. Reaction time, levels of daytime sleepiness, and mood were monitored via the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Profile of Mood States (POMS), respectively. Total objective nightly sleep time increased during sleep extension compared to baseline by 110.9 ± 79.7 min (P sleep extension (16.2 ± 0.61 sec at baseline vs. 15.5 ± 0.54 sec at end of sleep extension, P sleep extension (P sleep extension indicate that optimal sleep is likely beneficial in reaching peak athletic performance.

  16. Such Stuff as Qing Borderlands are Made On

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Bello

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Kwangmin Kim. Borderland Capitalism: Turkestan Produce, Qing Silver, and the Birth of an Eastern Market. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2016. 299 pp. $65 (cloth. Jonathan Schlesinger. A World Trimmed with Fur: Wild Things, Pristine Places, and the Natural Fringes of Qing Rule. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2017. 271 pp. $65 (cloth. The titular stuffs, silver and fur, of the two books reviewed here reveal the material basis of the books’ arguments. Nevertheless, the primary resources exploited directly by authors Kwangmin Kim and Jonathan Schlesinger were the ink and paper of the archival documents in languages other than Chinese, most especially in Manchu, that they consulted in the course of their research. In these books’ reliance on non-Chinese sources, Borderland Capitalism and A World Trimmed with Fur are representative of a growing body of Qing scholarship in English that delineates the empire within multilingual parameters that do not marginalize its borderlands. Instead, in these works, borderlands are integrated with central concerns of imperial commerce and imperial identity, as well as linked solidly to pervasive global trade patterns stretching well beyond the already-vast bounds of the Qing Empire. This reorientation is made possible largely because detailed documentation of local borderland dynamics exists, largely in Manchu, for periods of their formation, consolidation, and onset of decline from the mid-seventeenth into the early nineteenth centuries...

  17. A Fantastic Epidemiology Journey: from China to Africa and back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dr. Ann Hsing is a professor of medicine at Stanford University and a co-leader of the Population Sciences Program at Stanford Cancer Institute. She is also a professor in the Department of Health Research and Policy (epidemiology, by courtesy) and a faculty fellow for the Center for Innovation in Global Health. In addition, she chairs the Pacific Rim Alliance for Population Health at Stanford’s Center for Population Health Sciences. Prior to joining Stanford School of Medicine, Dr. Hsing served four years as Chief Scientific Officer at the Cancer Prevention Institute of California and 22 years as an intramural scientist (tenured senior investigator) at the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute. Dr. Hsing received her PhD in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins University and is widely recognized as a leading expert in the epidemiology of prostate and hepatobiliary cancer, as well as hormonal carcinogenesis and molecular epidemiology. She has authored more than 280 peer-reviewed articles and mentored over 60 pre- and post-doctoral fellows and junior scholars. At Stanford, she leads the Liver Cancer Working Group and the LDCT Screening Group, and serves as the principal investigator (PI) for wellness cohort studies in China, Taiwan, and Singapore as well as liver cancer studies in the Bay area, Taiwan, Mongolia, and Africa.

  18. Xinjiang Studies: The Third Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Perdue

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kwangmin Kim. Borderland Capitalism: Turkestan Produce, Qing Silver, and the Birth of an Eastern Market. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2016. 312 pp. $65 (cloth. Rian Thum. The Sacred Routes of Uyghur History. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014. 336 pp. $40 (cloth. David J. Brophy. Uyghur Nation: Reform and Revolution on the Russia-China Frontier. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2016. 368 pp. $40 (cloth. Judd Kinzley. Production and Power in China’s Far West: Gold, Wool, and Oil in the Transformation of Xinjiang, 1893–1965. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, forthcoming. Justin M. Jacobs. Xinjiang and the Modern Chinese State. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2016. 320 pp. $50 (cloth. Tom Cliff. Oil and Water: Being Han in Xinjiang. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2016. 280 pp. $90 (cloth; $30 (paper/e-book.

  19. Allan Cox 1926”1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Rob; Dalrymple, Brent

    More than 1000 friends, students, and colleagues from all over the country filled Stanford Memorial Chapel (Stanford, Calif.) on February 3, 1987, to join in “A Celebration of the Life of Allan Cox.” Allan died early on the morning of January 27 while bicycling, the sport he had come to love the most. Between pieces of his favorite music by Bach and Mozart, Stanford administrators and colleagues spoke in tribute of Allan's unique qualities as friend, scientist, teacher, and dean of the School of Earth Sciences. James Rosse, Vice President and Provost of Stanford University, struck a particularly resonant chord with his personal remarks: "Allan reached out to each person he knew with the warmth and attention that can only come from deep respect and affection for others. I never heard him speak ill of others, and I do not believe he was capable of doing anything that would harm another being. He cared too much to intrude where he was not wanted, but his curiosity about people and the loving care with which he approached them broke down reserve to create remarkable friendships. His enthusiasm and good humor made him a welcome guest in the hearts of the hundreds of students and colleagues who shared the opportunity of knowing Allan Cox as a person."

  20. Central obesity is important but not essential component of the metabolic syndrome for predicting diabetes mellitus in a hypertensive family-based cohort. Results from the Stanford Asia-pacific program for hypertension and insulin resistance (SAPPHIRe) Taiwan follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Te; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Hwu, Chii-Min; He, Chih-Tsueng; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Lin, Yu-Chun; Assimes, Themistocles; Curb, J David; Sheu, Wayne H-H

    2012-04-26

    Metabolic abnormalities have a cumulative effect on development of diabetes, but only central obesity has been defined as the essential criterion of metabolic syndrome (MetS) by the International Diabetes Federation. We hypothesized that central obesity contributes to a higher risk of new-onset diabetes than other metabolic abnormalities in the hypertensive families. Non-diabetic Chinese were enrolled and MetS components were assessed to establish baseline data in a hypertensive family-based cohort study. Based on medical records and glucose tolerance test (OGTT), the cumulative incidence of diabetes was analyzed in this five-year study by Cox regression models. Contribution of central obesity to development of new-onset diabetes was assessed in subjects with the same number of positive MetS components. Among the total of 595 subjects who completed the assessment, 125 (21.0%) developed diabetes. Incidence of diabetes increased in direct proportion to the number of positive MetS components (P ≪ 0.001). Although subjects with central obesity had a higher incidence of diabetes than those without (55.7 vs. 30.0 events/1000 person-years, P ≪ 0.001), the difference became non-significant after adjusting of the number of positive MetS components (hazard ratio = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.45-1.13). Furthermore, in all participants with three positive MetS components, there was no difference in the incidence of diabetes between subjects with and without central obesity (hazard ratio = 1.04, 95%CI: 0.50-2.16). In Chinese hypertensive families, the incidence of diabetes in subjects without central obesity was similar to that in subjects with central obesity when they also had the same number of positive MetS components. We suggest that central obesity is very important, but not the essential component of the metabolic syndrome for predicting of new-onset diabetes. ( NCT00260910, ClinicalTrials.gov).

  1. Accurate Control of Josephson Phase Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-14

    for Bits and Atoms and Department of Physics, MIT, Cambridge , Massachusetts 02139, USA 2Solid State and Photonics Laboratory, Stanford University...computing to simulate tun- neling effects in Josephson junction qubits, illustrating how quantum computing is useful in modeling and simulating the...Computation and Quantum Information ~ Cambridge University Press, Cambridge , 2000!. 2 J. I. Cirac and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4091 ~1995!. 3 Y

  2. AHPCRC (Army High Performance Computing Research Center) Bulletin. Volume 1, Issue 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    area and the researchers working on these projects. Also inside: news from the AHPCRC consortium partners at Morgan State University and the NASA ...Computing Research Center is provided by the supercomputing and research facilities at Stanford University and at the NASA Ames Research Center at...atomic and molecular level, he said. He noted that “every general would like to have” a Star Trek -like holodeck, where holographic avatars could

  3. Essentials of artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsberg, Matt

    1993-01-01

    Since its publication, Essentials of Artificial Intelligence has beenadopted at numerous universities and colleges offering introductory AIcourses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Based on the author'scourse at Stanford University, the book is an integrated, cohesiveintroduction to the field. The author has a fresh, entertaining writingstyle that combines clear presentations with humor and AI anecdotes. At thesame time, as an active AI researcher, he presents the materialauthoritatively and with insight that reflects a contemporary, first hand

  4. Holoprosencephaly Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations in 15 patients (6 boys and 9 girls with middle interhemispheric variant (MIH of holoprosencephaly (HPE were compared with classic subtypes (alobar, semilobar, and lobar of HPE in a multicenter study at Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital; Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; University of California at San Francisco; Texas Scottish Rite Hospital, Dallas; and Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD.

  5. Management and Development of the Western Resources Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry Brown

    2009-03-09

    The purpose of this project was to manage the Western Resources Project, which included a comprehensive, basin-wide set of experiments investigating the impacts of coal bed methane (CBM; a.k.a. coal bed natural gas, CBNG) production on surface and groundwater in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. This project included a number of participants including Apache Corporation, Conoco Phillips, Marathon, the Ucross Foundation, Stanford University, the University of Wyoming, Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, and Western Research Institute.

  6. Intelligence Virtual Analyst Capability: Governing Concepts and Science and Technology Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Canada, as represented by the Minister of National Defence, 2014 © Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que représentée par le ministre...Statistic literature analysis involving publication velocity, trend analysis, and patent analysis was conducted. DRDC-RDDC-2014-R156 3...University, Stanford University, IBM, Microsoft, Avaya, SRI International , and Alcatel Lucent were identified as key players in the ISA research

  7. Piezoelectric and Electrostrictive Materials for Transducer Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    nfornation Center Battelle Memoria : :nsz~ftu -e Army Materials and ’Iec.hanics ;05 igAeu Researcl Center Columous, O!H 13201 .iatartown, >A217 A77N...Sylvania epartment of Ceramic Engineering 100 Endicott Street University of m11incis Danvers, YA 01923 Urbana , Illinois 51801 .r. allace A. Smit...Oanvers, MA 01923 Urbana , il1inois 61801 Oi-.. allace A. Smith Professor 3. A. Aul. Ortf American Philips Laboratories Stanford University 3

  8. Thomas Docherty. Culture and a New Experience of Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik S. RORABACK

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Docherty’s freshly printed volume from Stanford University Press, Aesthetic Democracy, is requisite reading for all those thinking beings out there interested in the question of the inter-relation and even inter-articulation between culture and experience for a possible new encounter with the political that would inch toward a truer form of democracy for our current postmodern social spheres and spaces. Professor of English and Comparative Literature in the University of Warwick, long ...

  9. Distributed team innovation - a framework for distributed product development

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Andreas; Törlind, Peter; Karlsson, Lennart; Mabogunje, Ade; Leifer, Larry; Larsson, Tobias; Elfström, Bengt-Olof

    2003-01-01

    In response to the need for increased effectivity in global product development, the Polhem Laboratory at Luleå University of Technology, Sweden, and the Center for Design Research at Stanford University, USA, have created the concept of Distributed Team Innovation (DTI). The overall aim of the DTI framework is to decrease the negative impact of geographic distance on product development efforts and to further enhance current advantages of worldwide, multidisciplinary collaboration. The DTI ...

  10. Tiny cells meet big questions: a closer look at bacterial cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Goley, Erin D.

    2013-01-01

    While studying actin assembly as a graduate student with Matt Welch at the University of California at Berkeley, my interest was piqued by reports of surprising observations in bacteria: the identification of numerous cytoskeletal proteins, actin homologues fulfilling spindle-like functions, and even the presence of membrane-bound organelles. Curiosity about these phenomena drew me to Lucy Shapiro's lab at Stanford University for my postdoctoral research. In the Shapiro lab, and now in my lab...

  11. Comment on the search for the charmonium 1P1 and its theoretical interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. C.

    1984-10-01

    We comment on a recent paper which discusses the theoretical implications of the Crystal Ball search for the 1P1 state of charmonium. On behalf of the Crystal Ball collaboration: California Institute of Technology - C. Edwards, R. Partridge, C. Peck, F. Porter; Harvard University - D. Antreasyan, Y.F. Gu, K. Strauch, K. Wacker, A. Weinstein; Princeton University - D. Aschman, M. Cavalli-Sforza, D. Coyne, C. Newman-Holmes, H. Sadrozinski; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - E. Bloom, F. Bulos, G. Godfrey, C. Kiesling, W. Lockman, M. Oreglia; Stanford University - D. Gelphman, R. Hofstadter, R. Horisberger, I. Kirkbride, H. Kolanoski, K. Königsmann, R. Lee, A. Osterheld, B. Pollock and J. Tompkins.

  12. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byer, Robert L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Edward L. Ginzton Lab.

    2013-11-07

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  13. Comparative Study of Cerebral Protection during Surgery of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Sueda, Taijiro; Nomimura, Takayuki; Kagawa, Tetsuya; Morita, Satoru; Hayashi, Saiho; Orihashi, Kazumasa; Shikata, Hiroo; Ryuu, Gou; Hamanaka, Yoshiharu; Matsuura, Yuichiro; Kawaue, Yasushi; Kanehiro, Keiichi; Ishihara, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    During the past 5 years, 30 cases of thoracic aortic aneurysm were treated. Selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) were conducted for cerebral protection during aortic cross clamping. SCP was carried out in 5 cases of dissecting aneurysm (all Stanford type A, including a case of AAE) and 3 cases of arch aneurysm. RCP was conducted in 5 cases of dissecting aneurysm (4 Stanford type A; 1 Stanford type B with retrograde dissection) and 2 cases of aortic arch a...

  14. Discovering Social Circles in Ego Networks (Author’s Manuscript)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    refer to as social cir- cles. Practically all major social networks provide such functionality, for example, ‘circles’ on Google+, and ‘lists’ on Facebook ...Discovering Social Circles in Ego Networks Julian McAuley and Jure Leskovec Stanford jmcauley@cs.stanford.edu, jure@cs.stanford.edu January 11, 2013...Abstract People’s personal social networks are big and cluttered, and currently there is no good way to automatically organize them. Social networking

  15. University Internationalization and University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gulieva, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability are d......, dissimilar, and sometimes conflicting dimensions of the financial, legal, organisational, staffing, and academic autonomy of the host country, are compromising key aspects of their own autonomy and core mission?......Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability...... are determined by the structure and exercise of university autonomy settings at home and in the host countries, and that the process itself cannot be successfully achieved and maintained without changes in the autonomy settings. The key question the authors ask is to what degree universities, in embracing new...

  16. Graphical User Interface and Microprocessor Control Enhancement of a Pseudorandom Code Generator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kos, John

    1999-01-01

    .... This thesis addresses the issue of providing automated computer control to previously built, manually controlled hardware incorporating the Stanford Telecom STEL-1032 Pseudo-Random Number (PRN) Coder...

  17. David L. Rosenhan (1929-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lee; Kavanagh, David

    2013-09-01

    Presents an obituary for David L. Rosenhan (1929-2012). A distinguished psychologist and professor emeritus at Stanford University, Rosenhan died February 6, 2012, at the age of 82, after a long illness. Born in Jersey City, New Jersey, on November 22, 1929, he received a bachelor's degree in mathematics (1951) from Yeshiva College and a master's degree in economics (1953) and a doctorate in psychology (1958) from Columbia University. A professor of law and of psychology at Stanford University from 1971 until his retirement in 1998, Rosenhan was a pioneer in applying psychological methods to the practice of law, including the examination of expert witnesses, jury selection, and jury deliberation. A former president of the American Psychology-Law Society and of the American Board of Forensic Psychology, Rosenhan was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, of the American Psychological Association, and of the American Psychological Society. Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty, he was a member of the faculties of Swarthmore College, Princeton University, Haverford College, and the University of Pennsylvania. He also served as a research psychologist at the Educational Testing Service. As generations of Stanford students can attest, David Rosenhan was a spellbinding lecturer who managed to convey the sense that he was speaking to each individual, no matter how large the group. To his graduate students, he was consistently encouraging and optimistic, always ready to share a joke or story, and gently encouraging of their creativity and progressive independence as researchers. The lessons he cared most about offering, in the classroom as in his research, were about human dignity and the need to confront abuse of power and human frailties. © 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. NASA FACTS: E. coli AntiMicrobial Satellite (EcAMSat)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spremo, Stevan; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Tomko, David

    2013-01-01

    The E. coli AntiMicrobial Satellite(EcAMSat) mission will investigate space microgravity affects on the antibiotic resistance of E. coli, a bacterial pathogen responsible for urinary tract infection in humans and animals. EcAMSat is being developed through a partnership between NASAs Ames Research Center and the Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. A.C. Matin is the Stanford University Principal Investigator. EcAMSat will investigate spaceflight effects on bacterial antibiotic resistance and its genetic basis. Bacterial antibiotic resistance may pose a danger to astronauts in microgravity, where the immune response is weakened. Scientists believe that the results of this experiment could help design effective countermeasures to protect astronauts health during long duration human space missions.

  19. Computing Facilities for AI: A Survey of Present and Near-Future Options

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlman, Scott

    1981-01-01

    At the recent AAAI conference at Stanford, it became apparent that many new AI research centers are being established around the country in industrial and governmental settings and in universities that have not paid much attention to AI in the past. At the same time, many of the established AI centers are in the process of converting from older facilities, primarily based on Decsystem-10 and Decsystem-20 machines, to a variety of newer options. At present, unfortunately, there is no simple an...

  20. New developments in cognitive behavioral therapy as the first-line treatment of insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Siebern, Allison T; Manber, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Allison T Siebern, Rachel ManberSleep Medicine Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Redwood City, California, USAAbstract: Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder. Psychological, behavioral, and biological factors are implicated in the development and maintenance of insomnia as a disorder, although the etiology of insomnia remains under investigation, as it is still not fully understood. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) is a treatment for insomnia that is grounde...

  1. Multilinear Computing and Multilinear Algebraic Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Laplacians on graphs,” S. Mukherjee (Ed.), Geometry and Topology in Statistical Inference, Proc. Sympos. Appl. Math ., 73, AMS, Providence, RI, 2015...8–12, 2015. • “Fast(est) algorithms for structured matrices via tensor decompositions,” Applied Mathe - matics and Analysis Seminar, Duke University...Durham, NC, April 13, 2015. • “Fast(est) algorithms for structured matrices via tensor decompositions,” Applied Mathe - matics Seminar, Stanford

  2. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    SABR) for Early Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Billy W Loo Jr, MD PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Leland Stanford Junior University...Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Billy W Loo Jr, MD...for early stage lung cancer in patients who are not candidates for surgery because of excessive surgical risk, and will be an important treatment option

  3. Video-assisted laparoscopy for the detection and diagnosis of endometriosis: safety, reliability, and invasiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Schipper, Erica; Nezhat, Camran

    2012-01-01

    Erica Schipper,1 Camran Nezhat21Center for Minimally Invasive and Robotic Surgery, Palo Alto, CA; 2Obstetrics/Gynecology and Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, CA, USAAbstract: Endometriosis is a highly enigmatic disease with multiple presentations ranging from infertility to severe pain, often causing significant morbidity. Video-assisted laparoscopy (VALS) has now replaced laparotomy as the gold standard for the diagnosis and management of endometriosis. While imaging h...

  4. The Gravity Probe B Payload Hoisted by Crane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) payload was hoisted by crane to the transportation truck in the W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory in Stanford, California for shipment to the launch site at Vandenburg Air Force Base. GP-B is the relativity experiment being developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004, the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University, along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Photo Credit: Stanford University)

  5. Unsustainable fuelwood extraction from South African savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wessels, Konrad J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA 4 Centre for African Ecology, School of Animal, Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Johannesburg, Wits... Supplies in the Developing Countries (Forestry Paper No. 42) (Rome: Food and Agriculture Organisation) Dewees P A 1989 The woodfuel crisis reconsidered: observations on the dynamics of abundance and scarcity World Dev. 17 1159–72 Dovie D B K, Shackleton C M...

  6. The Realistic Job Preview as a Persuasive Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT. TAK AREA 6 WORK UNIT NUMBERS Michigan State Uiversity NR 170-894 Ii. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS IS. REPORT...RJP research seems to show a stronger preview effect using more intelligent subjects. That is, studies of life insurance agents (Weitz, 1956; Youngberg...University Department of Psychological Sciences west Lafayette, INl 47907 1 Dr. Philip G. Zi±bardo*2 ~ Staniford Uiversity Department of Psychology Stanford, CA 94305 <El

  7. Top scientists join Stephen Hawking at Perimeter Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Nine leading researchers are to join Stephen Hawking as visiting fellows at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Ontario, Canada. The researchers, who include string theorists Leonard Susskind from Stanford University and Asoka Sen from the Harisch-Chandra Research Institute in India, will each spend a few months of the year at the institute as "distinguished research chairs". They will be joined by another 30 scientists to be announced at a later date.

  8. Annual International Meeting on Medical Simulation (5th); Simulating Change Together, Held at the Radisson Miami Florida, on January 13-16, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Challenging Superiors in the Healthcare Environment: The Two-Challenge Center for Medical Simulation Rule IMMS Singh Shashank Trauma and Awareness Pen...Rochester * Dallas Rochester MN Rochester NY Dallas TX SMartin Eason MD JD Marc Horowitz MD - Swati Argarwal, MD ETSU University of NM Stanford...Murphy, MD Simluation-based training allows educators in medicine to finally Swati Argarwal, MD address the needs of the adult learner. This high

  9. Logical Specification of the GLBA and HIPAA Privacy Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    carrier set S. States from S are ordered according to the total order <st (and its natural weakening ≤st). In this way, we may think of states as being...January 2008. [Bar08] Adam Barth. Design and Analysis of Privacy Policies. Phd thesis, Stanford University, 2008. [BCK03] Simon Byers, Lorrie F. Cranor, and... Blackburn . Representation, reasoning, and relational structures: A hybrid logic manifesto. Logic Journal of IGPL, 8(3):339–365, 2000. [BPS03] Michael

  10. Media Violence Effects on Children, Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Craig A

    2016-07-01

    I killed my first Klingon in 1979. It took place in the computer center at Stanford University, where I was playing a new video game based on the Star Trek television series. I was an "early adopter" of the new technology of video games, and continued to be so for many years, first as a fan of this entertainment medium, and later as a researcher interested in the question of what environmental factors influence aggressive and violent behavior.

  11. Lacking hard data, theorists try democracy

    CERN Multimedia

    Overbye, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Science is not done by popylar vote. But nothing can be taken for granted when string theory is the subject. So when Stephen Shenker, a Stanford University theorist who was moderating a panel discussion here on the future of the putative theory of everything, asked for a show of hands on the fate of a strange number known as the cosmological constant, some 400 physicists and mathematicians wer happy to swallow their doubts and vote (2 pages)

  12. Stemcell Information: SKIP001180 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available did not experience cardiotoxicity. ドキソルビシン治療による心毒性が見られない乳癌患者由来iPS細胞 human ES-like Research Grade Sendai vir...d University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. ... 27089514 10.1038/nm.4087 Human induced pluripotent stem cell

  13. Constraint-Directed Search: A Case Study of Job-Shop Scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-13

    Structures But Were Unable to Represent", Proceedings of the American Association for Aritificial Intelligence , pp. 212-214, Stanford University...under these constraints raises a number of issues of interest to the artificial intelligence community such as: - knowledge representation semantics for...Management Science 15 2.3. Artificial Intelligence 17 2.4. Relationship to Previous Research 21 3. ISIS Modeling System 23 3.1. Introduction 24 3.2. Layer

  14. Energy secretary's priorities include San Francisco area research projects

    CERN Multimedia

    Widener, A

    2003-01-01

    "Bay Area research labs got a big boost Monday when the Secretary of Energy unveiled his priorities for major research projects his agency hopes to fund over the next two decades. Among the agency's 28 top priorities are a major computer expansion and an experiment examining the expanding universe that could be housed at Lawrence Berkeley Lab and a powerful X-ray laser planned for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center" (1 page).

  15. Deep Brain Stimulation Salvages a Flourishing Dental Practice: A Dentist with Essential Tremor Recounts his Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Giacopuzzi, Guy; Lising, Melanie; Halpern, Casey H

    2016-01-01

    In recounting his experience with deep brain stimulation (DBS), a practicing dentist challenged with long-standing bilateral essential tremor of the hands?shares insights into his diagnosis, treatments, and ultimately successful DBS surgery at Stanford University Medical Center, CA, USA. Now nearly one year after his surgery, his practice continues to flourish and he encourages others in his profession to consider the possibility of DBS as a definitive?treatment for tremors of the hand, which...

  16. Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragt, Alex J.

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Dragt of the University of Maryland is one of the Institutional Principal Investigators for the SciDAC Accelerator Modeling Project Advanced Computing for 21st Century Accelerator Science and Technology whose principal investigators are Dr. Kwok Ko (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and Dr. Robert Ryne (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). This report covers the activities of Dr. Dragt while at Berkeley during spring 2002 and at Maryland during fall 2003

  17. Emergent Patterns of Diversity and Dynamics in Natural Populations of Planktonic Vibrio Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    1973. Ecology of Vibrio parahemolyticus in mixed-template amplifications: formation, consequences and elimination by Chesapeake Bay. J. Bacteriol. 113...Science 1930 and Engineering DOCTORAL DISSERTATION Emergent Patterns of Diversity and Dynamics in Natural Populations of Planktonic Vibrio Bacteria by...DYNAMICS IN NATURAL POPULATIONS OF PLANKTONIC VIBRIO BACTERIA by Janelle Ren6e Thompson B.S. Biological Sciences, Stanford University 1998 M.S

  18. Assessment and Treatment of Blast-Induced Auditory and Vestibular Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    VsEP testing at Dr. Alan Cheng’s Laboratory at Stanford University and the ear specimens were delivered to NIDCD for pathological evaluation.  One...shockwave induced auditory functional and structural changes in mice,” presented at the National Capital Area TBI symposium in March 2017 in Bethesda...response waveform and the next stimulus level that produces no visible response waveform. 7 Pathology : Under deep anesthesia, mice received

  19. Expert System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas Troels; Cattani, Gian Luca

    2016-01-01

    An expert system is a computer system for inferring knowledge from a knowledge base, typically by using a set of inference rules. When the concept of expert systems was introduced at Stanford University in the early 1970s, the knowledge base was an unstructured set of facts. Today the knowledge b...... for the application of expert systems, but also raises issues regarding privacy and legal liability....

  20. Work Program. Fiscal Year 1972 for The Department of the Army. Research and Development in Training, Motivation, and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-07-01

    terms, a.d stalas the lvel of .#(fAwt for FY 1972. Further information In regard to HumRRO tesearch efforts may be obtained from. the Division Directors...Technology Directorate, Systems Development Corporation lnstitut, for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences, Stanford University Coordinated...or redundant characteristics. (6) Preliminary development of a mathematical model of aircraft detectio.. andrecognition. ( (7) Preliminary studies of

  1. Chinese strategic weapons and the plutonium option (U)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, John W.; Xui Litai

    1988-04-01

    In their article "Chinese Strategic Weapons and the Plutonium Option," John W. Lewis and Xue Litai of the Center for International Security and Arms Control at Stanford University's International Strategic Institute present an unclassified look at plutonium processing in the PRC. The article draws heavily on unclassified PRC sources for its short look at this important subject. Interested readers will find more detailed information in the recently available works referenced in the article.

  2. WIS Implementation Study Report. Volume 1. Main Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    Luenberger, Prof. David G. * Stanford University Ries, Dr. Daniel R. * Computer Corporation of America Schill, John Naval Ocean Systems Center Shrier , Dr...Robert E. 43 Kaczmarek, Dr. Thomas S. 45 Klein, Dr. Stanely A. 47 Kramer, Dr. John F. 49 Larsen, Dr. Robert E. 55 Luenberger, Prof. David G. 58...Riddle, Dr. William E. 76 Ries, Dr. Daniel R. 82 Sapp, Mr. John W. 88 Shelley, Mr. Stephen H. 89 Shrier , Dr. Stefan 94 Slusarczuk, Dr. Marko M.G. 96

  3. Universe symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The sky uniformity can be noticed in studying the repartition of objects far enough. The sky isotropy description uses space rotations. The group theory elements will allow to give a meaning at the same time precise and general to the word a ''symmetry''. Universe models are reviewed, which must have both of the following qualities: - conformity with the physic known laws; - rigorous symmetry following one of the permitted groups. Each of the models foresees that universe evolution obeys an evolution equation. Expansion and big-bang theory are recalled. Is universe an open or closed space. Universe is also electrically neutral. That leads to a work hypothesis: the existing matter is not given data of universe but it appeared by evolution from nothing. Problem of matter and antimatter is then raised up together with its place in universe [fr

  4. Microstructure and critical current density in high-Tc metal oxide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.M.; Gusman, M.I.

    1992-03-01

    Superconductor powders in the U-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) and Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) systems were synthesized by freeze-drying. Powders were characterized, and processed into samples for evaluation of superconducting behavior. Freeze-drying is attractive because the powders have high purity, are homogeneous, have a small size and are active. YBCO powders can be sintered to high density at 890 degrees C. Many compositions, processing approaches and heat treatments were explored in an effort to understand relations between microstructure and critical density, and to improve the critical current density. Powders were also formed into sputtering targets for coating preparation at Stanford University. The highest critical current density achieved with the YBCO powders was ∼15,000 A/cm 2 at 4.2K and 0.5T using powders treated to prevent carbon contamination. The BSCCO materials with the highest critical current density, ∼30,000 A/cm 2 at the same conditions were formed by heat treating melted and quenched samples. All critical current density measurements were made by Stanford University, a subcontractor to this effort. Stanford University also prepared coatings by off-axis magnetron sputtering

  5. Our Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Alan

    2001-03-01

    The Universe in which we live is unimaginably vast and ancient, with countless star systems, galaxies, and extraordinary phenomena such as black holes, dark matter, and gamma ray bursts. What phenomena remain mysteries, even to seasoned scientists? Our Universe is a fascinating collection of essays by some of the world's foremost astrophysicists. Some are theorists, some computational modelers, some observers, but all offer their insights into the most cutting-edge, difficult, and curious aspects of astrophysics. Compiled, the essays describe more than the latest techniques and findings. Each of the ten contributors offers a more personal perspective on their work, revealing what motivates them and how their careers and lives have been shaped by their desire to understand our universe. S. Alan Stern is Director of the Department of Space Studies at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He is a planetary scientist and astrophysicist with both observational and theoretical interests. Stern is an avid pilot and a principal investigator in NASA's planetary research program, and he was selected to be a NASA space shuttle mission specialist finalist. He is the author of more than 100 papers and popular articles. His most recent book is Pluto & Charon (Wiley, 1997). Contributors: Dr. John Huchra, Harvard University Dr. Esther Hu, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Dr. John Mather, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Dr. Nick Gnedin, University of Colorado, Boulder Dr. Doug Richstone, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Dr. Bohdan Paczynski, Princeton University, NJ Dr. Megan Donahue, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD Dr. Jerry Ostriker, Princeton University, New Jersey G. Bothun, University of Oregon, Eugene

  6. The path of least resistance: is there a better route?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loree, Ann; Maihack, Marcia; Powell, Marge

    2003-01-01

    In May 2000, the radiology department at Stanford University Medical Center embarked on a five-year journey toward complete digitization. While the end goal was known, there was much less certainty about the steps involved along the way. Stanford worked with a team from GE Medical Systems to implement Six Sigma process improvement methodologies and related change management techniques. The methodical and evidence-based framework of Six Sigma significantly organized the process of "going digital" by breaking it into manageable projects with clear objectives. Stanford identified five key areas where improvement could be made: MR outpatient throughput, CT inpatient throughput, CT outpatient throughput, report turnaround time, and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital CR/Ortho throughput and digitization. The CT project is presented in this article. Although labor intensive, collecting radiology data manually is often the best way to obtain the level of detail required, unless there is a robust RIS in place with solid data integrity. To gather the necessary information without unduly impacting staff and workflow at Stanford, the consultants working onsite handled the actual observation and recording of data. Some of the changes introduced through Six Sigma may appear, at least on the surface, to be common sense. It is only by presenting clear evidence in terms of data, however, that the improvements can actually be implemented and accepted. By converting all appointments to 30 minutes and expanding hours of operation, Stanford was able to boost diagnostic imaging productivity, volume and revenue. With the ability to scan over lunch breaks and rest periods, potential appointment capacity increased by 140 CT scans per month. Overall, the CT project increased potential for outpatient appointment capacity by nearly 75% and projected over $1.5 million in additional annual gross revenue. The complex process of moving toward a digital radiology department at Stanford

  7. 12th International Congress of Applied Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Vincenti, Walter

    1969-01-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Twelfth International Congress of Applied Mechanics, held at Stanford University on August 26 to 31, 1968. The Congress was organized by the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics; members of the IUTAM Congress Committee and Bureau are listed under Congress Organization. The members of the Stanford Organizing Committee, which was responsible for the detailed organization of the Congress, are also given, as are the names of the sponsors and the industrial and educational organizations that contributed so generously to the financial support of the meeting. Those attending the Congress came from 32 countries and totaled 1337 persons, plus wives and children. A list of the registered participants is included in the volume. The technical sessions of the Congress comprised four General Lectures and 281 contributed papers, the latter being presented in groups of five simultaneous sessions. The final choice of the contributed papers was made on the basis o...

  8. COSMOS: Python library for massively parallel workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Erik; Luquette, Lovelace J; Lancaster, Alex K; Hawkins, Jared B; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Souilmi, Yassine; Wall, Dennis P; Tonellato, Peter J

    2014-10-15

    Efficient workflows to shepherd clinically generated genomic data through the multiple stages of a next-generation sequencing pipeline are of critical importance in translational biomedical science. Here we present COSMOS, a Python library for workflow management that allows formal description of pipelines and partitioning of jobs. In addition, it includes a user interface for tracking the progress of jobs, abstraction of the queuing system and fine-grained control over the workflow. Workflows can be created on traditional computing clusters as well as cloud-based services. Source code is available for academic non-commercial research purposes. Links to code and documentation are provided at http://lpm.hms.harvard.edu and http://wall-lab.stanford.edu. dpwall@stanford.edu or peter_tonellato@hms.harvard.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. 1996 site environmental report, January--December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellamare, R.; Dannatt, G.; Dubrow, M.

    1997-09-01

    This report provides information about environmental programs and compliance with environmental regulations in calendar year 1996 (CY96) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national laboratory operated by Stanford University under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is devoted to experimental and theoretical research in elementary particle physics in basic sciences using synchrotron radiation, and in accelerator physics and technology. The most significant information in this report is summarized briefly in the following sections: (1) releases; (2) environmental restoration; (3) hazardous and radioactive wastes; (4) air quality; (5) storm water and industrial wastewater; (6) PCB's; (7) assessments; (8) environmental radiological program; (9) groundwater; and (10) additional information

  10. Re-ordering the Region? China, Latin America and the Western Hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Philips

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available – China in Latin America: The Whats and Wherefores, by R. Evan Ellis. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2009.– Latin America Facing China: South-South Relations beyond the Washington Consensus, edited by Alex E. Fernández Jilberto and Barbara Hogenboom. New York & Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2010.– The Dragon in the Room: China and the Future of Latin American Industrialization, by Kevin P. Gallagher and Roberto Porzecanski. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010.– China and Latin America: Economic Relations in the Twenty-First Century, edited by Rhys Jenkins and Enrique Dussel Peters. Bonn: Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik, 2009.– China’s Expansion into the Western Hemisphere: Implications for Latin America and the United States, edited by Riordan Roett and Guadalupe Paz. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution, 2008.

  11. Winning at litigation through decision analysis creating and executing winning strategies in any litigation or dispute

    CERN Document Server

    Celona, John

    2016-01-01

    This book is the first in-depth guide to applying the philosophy, theory, and methods of decision analysis to creating and executing winning legal strategies. With explanations that progress from introductory to advanced and practice problems at the end of each chapter, this is a book the reader will want to use and refer to for years to come. Practicing decision analysts, operations research and management science students, attorneys and law students will find this book an invaluable addition to their knowledge and skills. John Celona has over three decades of experience in teaching and applying decision analysis. John lectures in the School of Engineering at Stanford University and is on faculty at The Stanford Center for Professional Development, the American Course on Drug Development and Regulatory Sciences, and the Academy of the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management.

  12. Intelligent Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, F

    1983-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: chance and the universe (synthesis of proteins; the primordial soup); the gospel according to Darwin (discussion of Darwin theory of evolution); life did not originate on earth (fossils from space; life in space); the interstellar connection (living dust between the stars; bacteria in space falling to the earth; interplanetary dust); evolution by cosmic control (microorganisms; genetics); why aren't the others here (a cosmic origin of life); after the big bang (big bang and steady state); the information rich universe; what is intelligence up to; the intelligent universe.

  13. USAID University

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID University is USAID's learning management system. Features include 1) Access online courses 2) Register for instructor-led courses 3)Access your student...

  14. Runaway universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, P

    1978-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the emerging universe (general introduction, history of astronomical and cosmological research, origins, the expanding universe, stars, galaxies, electromagnetic radiation); primeval fire (the big bang model, origin of the elements, properties of the elements and of sub-atomic particles); order out of chaos (galactic evolution, star formation, nuclear fusion, the solar system, origin of life on Earth); a star called Sol (properties of the sun and of other stars); life in the universe; the catastrophe principle (the rise and fall of cosmic order); stardoom (star evolution, neutron stars); black holes and superholes (gravitational collapse); technology and survival; the dying universe (second law of thermodynamics); worlds without end (cosmological models).

  15. Rhodes University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samridhi Sharma

    2013-10-29

    Oct 29, 2013 ... been taken may improve the reception, by the target audience, of the intended communication. This may ... alcohol marketing. Similarly .... of the intended users (Rhodes University support staff ..... Digital Human Modeling and.

  16. Undulant Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  17. Emerging from the Shadows: The Visual Arts and Asian American History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon H Chang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970, the book from which this foreword is excerpted, is the first comprehensive study of the lives and artistic production of artists of Asian ancestry active in the United States before 1970. The publication features original essays by ten leading scholars, biographies of more than 150 artists, and over 400 reproductions of artwork, ephemera, and images of the artists. Aside from a few artists such as Dong Kingman, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Isamu Noguchi, and Yun Gee, artists of Asian ancestry have received inadequate historical attention, even though many of them received wide critical acclaim during their productive years. This pioneering work recovers the extraordinarily impressive artistic production of numerous Asian Americans, and offers richly informed interpretations of a long-neglected art history. To unravel the complexity of Asian American art expression and its vital place in American art, the texts consider aesthetics, the social structures of art production and criticism, and national and international historical contexts. Without a doubt, Asian American Art will profoundly influence our understanding of the history of art in America and the Asian American experience for years to come. Chang, Gordon H., Mark Johnson, and Paul Karlstrom, eds. Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2008. Reprinted with the permission of Stanford University Press. http://www.sup.org

  18. Emerging from the Shadows: The Visual Arts and Asian American History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon H Chang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970, the book from which this foreword is excerpted, is the first comprehensive study of the lives and artistic production of artists of Asian ancestry active in the United States before 1970. The publication features original essays by ten leading scholars, biographies of more than 150 artists, and over 400 reproductions of artwork, ephemera, and images of the artists. Aside from a few artists such as Dong Kingman, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Isamu Noguchi, and Yun Gee, artists of Asian ancestry have received inadequate historical attention, even though many of them received wide critical acclaim during their productive years. This pioneering work recovers the extraordinarily impressive artistic production of numerous Asian Americans, and offers richly informed interpretations of a long-neglected art history. To unravel the complexity of Asian American art expression and its vital place in American art, the texts consider aesthetics, the social structures of art production and criticism, and national and international historical contexts. Without a doubt, Asian American Art will profoundly influence our understanding of the history of art in America and the Asian American experience for years to come. Chang, Gordon H., Mark Johnson, and Paul Karlstrom, eds. Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2008. Reprinted with the permission of Stanford University Press. http://www.sup.org

  19. Neovascularization in Purtscher's retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Annie Chan, Douglas R Fredrick, Theodore Leng Department of Ophthalmology, Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: We report a case of neovascularization secondary to Purtscher's retinopathy that showed minimal improvement with photocoagulation treatment. A 14-year-old boy with a history of cerebellar medulloblastoma presented with blurry vision and floaters after being struck by a motor vehicle while riding his bike. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/400 in his right eye and counting fingers in his left eye. Fundus examination showed disk edema, retinal whitening, and retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. Optical coherence tomography demonstrated thinning of the temporal retina and disruption of the inner segment–outer segment junction of the photoreceptor layer in the right eye and thickening and edema of the nasal macula, as well as a central foveal hyper-reflectivity, in the left eye. At the initial visit, there was no ischemia or neovascularization (NV. One month later, the patient developed NV of the disk and ischemia in the mid-periphery of the left eye. The patient underwent treatment with pan-retinal photocoagulation. The NV regressed, but visual outcome remained poor at his 5-month follow-up visit. Keywords: Purtscher's retinopathy, neovascularization, laser photocoagulation, disk edema

  20. Gender and the Politics of Female Infanticide and Prostitution Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Kuo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle T. King. Between Birth and Death: Female Infanticide in Nineteenth-Century China. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2014. 264 pp. $50.00 (cloth/e-book. Elizabeth J. Remick. Regulating Prostitution in China: Gender and Local Statebuilding, 1900–1937. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2014. 288 pp. $45.00 (cloth/e-book. The two works under review are both compelling historical studies that use gender as a category of analysis to make important contributions to our understanding of the construction of the modern Chinese state, the periodization of modern Chinese history, and the political and cultural significance of controlling the female body. While both books engage with gender as broadly construed, they adopt different approaches. Michelle King’s analysis focuses on discursive representations that took place, for the most part, outside the context of the state—what Confucian elites, foreign experts and missionaries, and Chinese nationalists wrote about female infanticide over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This discursive approach has been used before but rarely to such insightful effect. King’s research deepens our understanding of gender and imperialism in the nineteenth century by illustrating how imperialist notions of China as a backward and heathen place were constructed in part on dubious claims that identified female infanticide as an emblematically Chinese cultural practice. Elizabeth Remick’s gender analysis, in contrast, centers on the state institutions that were developed in the early 1900s to regulate prostitution, including tax policies, licensing fees, zoning regulations, medical examinations, and police supervision. Her study of the newly erected local and provincial government regulatory regimes is a pathbreaking demonstration of how the regulation of gender roles was at the heart of state-building efforts in early twentieth-century China...

  1. The Effects of Sleep Extension on the Athletic Performance of Collegiate Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Cheri D.; Mah, Kenneth E.; Kezirian, Eric J.; Dement, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of sleep extension over multiple weeks on specific measures of athletic performance as well as reaction time, mood, and daytime sleepiness. Setting: Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic and Research Laboratory and Maples Pavilion, Stanford University, Stanford, CA. Participants: Eleven healthy students on the Stanford University men's varsity basketball team (mean age 19.4 ± 1.4 years). Interventions: Subjects maintained their habitual sleep-wake schedule for a 2–4 week baseline followed by a 5–7 week sleep extension period. Subjects obtained as much nocturnal sleep as possible during sleep extension with a minimum goal of 10 h in bed each night. Measures of athletic performance specific to basketball were recorded after every practice including a timed sprint and shooting accuracy. Reaction time, levels of daytime sleepiness, and mood were monitored via the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and Profile of Mood States (POMS), respectively. Results: Total objective nightly sleep time increased during sleep extension compared to baseline by 110.9 ± 79.7 min (P sleep extension (16.2 ± 0.61 sec at baseline vs. 15.5 ± 0.54 sec at end of sleep extension, P sleep extension (P performance after sleep extension indicate that optimal sleep is likely beneficial in reaching peak athletic performance. Citation: Mah CD; Mah KE; Kezirian EJ; Dement WC. The effects of sleep extension on the athletic performance of collegiate basketball players. SLEEP 2011;34(7):943-950. PMID:21731144

  2. Plasma universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-04-01

    Traditionally the views in our cosmic environment have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasma. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If we try to base a model of the universe on the plasma phenomena mentioned we find that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasma. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasma are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model we apply it to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4-5 bilions years ago with an accuracy of better than 1 percent

  3. List of collecting stations of an excursion in Fiji from 15.I.1979 – 30.III.1979 by J.P. & M.J. Duffels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffels, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    All localities in Viti Levu and Vanua Levu can be found on the 1:250.000 maps, which are published by the Directorate of Overseas Surveys and are sold by Edward Stanford Ltd., 12-14 Long Acre, London WC2E 9LP. Maps 1:50.00 of the Fiji Islands, contoured, are also sold by Edward Stanford Ltd. (a

  4. Commentary: Allocating the Blend in Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslow, Graham R.

    2012-01-01

    The biochemistry course at Stanford Medical School has been redesigned to incorporate online lectures. The Stanford instructors provide short online presentations then use class time for interactive discussions of clinical vignettes to highlight the biochemical basis of various diseases. Contemporary video capture equipment makes video lectures…

  5. Electron scattering violates parity

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Parity violation has been observed in collisions between electrons at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in the US. The resuls, which are in agreement with the Stanford Model of particle physics, also provide a new measurement of the weak charge of the electron (½ page)

  6. Microwave and Electron Beam Computer Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    Research (ONR). SCRIBE was adapted by MRC from the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Beam Trajectory Program, EGUN . oTIC NSECE Acc !,,o For IDL1C I...achieved with SCRIBE. It is a ver- sion of the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) code EGUN (Ref. 8), extensively modified by MRC for research on

  7. On Using Humor to Market Higher Education: At Whose Expense Is the Clowning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines the deliberately humorous approaches undertaken in two recent higher education marketing endeavors: The American Council on Education's "Solutions for Our Future" campaign and Stanford's "Hail, Stanford, Hail" initiative. Three television commercials from each project are described and discussed in light of a view of comedy…

  8. Perspectives on future high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1997-01-01

    A discussion of present and planned research programs and particle accelerators at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is given. Experiments with the Stanford Linear Collider Detector, B-factory design considerations and research programs the Next Linear Collider design and use, and Advanced Accelerator Research and Development at SLAC are discussed.(AIP) copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. Baby universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses how the subject of baby universes and their effects on spacetime coupling constants is in its infancy and rapidly developing. The subject is based on the non-existent (even by physicists' standards) Euclidean formulation of quantum gravity, and it is therefore necessary to make a number of assumptions in order to proceed. Nevertheless, the picture which has emerged is quite appealing: all spacetime coupling constants become dynamical variables when the effects of baby universes are taken into account. This fact might even solve the puzzle of the cosmological constant. The subject therefore seems worth further investigation

  10. Stiegler's University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Mark

    2017-01-01

    In this article, Mark Featherstone proposes to explore Bernard Stiegler's work through the lens of the politics of education and in particular the idea of the university, which becomes a pharmacological space of, on the one hand, utopian possibility, and, on the other hand, dystopian limitation, destruction, and death in his recent "States of…

  11. Podcasting the Anthropocene: Student engagement, storytelling and the rise of a new model for outreach and interdisciplinary science communication training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, M. C.; Traer, M. M.; Hayden, T.

    2012-12-01

    Generation Anthropocene is a student-driven audio podcast series and ongoing project initiated by Michael Osborne, co-produced by Miles Traer, and overseen by Thomas Hayden, all from Stanford University's School of Earth Sciences. The project began as a seminar course where students conducted long-form one-on-one interviews with faculty at Stanford's college radio station, KZSU. Conversation topics covered a range of interdisciplinary issues related to the proposed new geologic boundary delineating "the age of man," including biodiversity loss, historical perceptions of the environment, urban design, agricultural systems, and human-environment interaction. Students researched and selected their own interview subjects, proposed interviewees and questions to the group and solicited critical feedback through small-group work-shopping. Students then prepared interview questionnaires, vetted by the instructors, and conducted in-depth, in-person interviews. Students work-shopped and edited the recorded interviews in a collaborative setting. The format of each interview is conversational, inter-generational, and driven by student interest. In addition to learning areas of academic expertise, advanced interviewing techniques and elements of audio production, the students also explored the diversity of career trajectories in the Earth sciences and allied fields, and the power of human-based stories to communicate complexity and uncertainty for a general audience. The instructors produced the final pieces, and released them online for general public consumption (http://www.stanford.edu/group/anthropocene/cgi-bin/wordpress/). Following the initial release, the Generation Anthropocene podcast series has subsequently been aired weekly at the leading environmental news outlet Grist (grist.org). The program has also expanded to include interviews with non-Stanford subjects, and is currently expanding to other campuses. The Generation Anthropocene program serves as a model for

  12. People and things. CERN Courier, Nov 1984, v. 24(9)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-11-15

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. A landmark event took place at Stanford on 3-4 August in the form of a ' Pief-fest', a celebration tacked onto the end of the traditional annual Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Summer Institute to mark the retirement of Wolfgang 'Pief Panofsky as the Laboratory's Director.The University of California's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been chosen as the host institution for the Central Design Group for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The fifth Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics will be held in Saint-Vincent, Aosta Valley, Italy, from 25 February to 2 March 1985. The local users' organization at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is organizing a Workshop on Electron-Positron Physics at High Luminosities, to be held at SLAC from 30 November to 1 December. The Aspen (Colorado, USA) Center for Physics announces a Winter Physics Conference Series - Collider Physics at Ultrahigh Energies from 6-12 January 1985 and Electro weak Interactions from 13- 19 January. As this edition was going to press, the CERN SPS protonantiproton collider was back in action for physics for the first time since the historic run last year which produced the Z particle and the first evidence for the sixth ('top') quark.

  13. The Birth of Lepton Colliders in Italy and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Elizabeth

    2003-04-01

    In 1960 the highest center-of-mass energies in particle physics were being achieved via proton synchrotrons utilizing stationary targets. However, efforts were already underway to challenge this hegemony. In addition to Soviet work in Novosibirsk, groups at Stanford University in California and at the Frascati National Laboratories near Rome each had begun original investigation towards one particular type of challenger: colliding beam storage rings. For the group in California, the accomplishment involved creating the potential for feasible experiments. The energetic advantages of the colliding beam configuration had long been accepted - together with its impossibility for realization. The builders of the Princeton-Stanford machine feel that creating usable beams and a reasonable reaction rate is what stood between this concept and its glorious future. For the European builders of AdA, however, the beauty emerges from recognizing the enormous potential inherent in electron-positron annihilations. At least as important for the rise of electron-positron colliders, though, is the role of both of these projects as cultural firsts -- as places where particular sets of physicists got their feet wet associating with beams and beam problems and with the many individuals who were addressing beam problems. The Princeton-Stanford Collider provided experience which its builders would use to move on, functioning as both a technological and political platform for creating what would eventually become SPEAR. For the Roman group, the pursuit of AdA encouraged investigation which applied equally well to their next machine, Adone.

  14. Cloud-based interactive analytics for terabytes of genomic variants data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Cuiping; McInnes, Gregory; Deflaux, Nicole; Snyder, Michael; Bingham, Jonathan; Datta, Somalee; Tsao, Philip S

    2017-12-01

    Large scale genomic sequencing is now widely used to decipher questions in diverse realms such as biological function, human diseases, evolution, ecosystems, and agriculture. With the quantity and diversity these data harbor, a robust and scalable data handling and analysis solution is desired. We present interactive analytics using a cloud-based columnar database built on Dremel to perform information compression, comprehensive quality controls, and biological information retrieval in large volumes of genomic data. We demonstrate such Big Data computing paradigms can provide orders of magnitude faster turnaround for common genomic analyses, transforming long-running batch jobs submitted via a Linux shell into questions that can be asked from a web browser in seconds. Using this method, we assessed a study population of 475 deeply sequenced human genomes for genomic call rate, genotype and allele frequency distribution, variant density across the genome, and pharmacogenomic information. Our analysis framework is implemented in Google Cloud Platform and BigQuery. Codes are available at https://github.com/StanfordBioinformatics/mvp_aaa_codelabs. cuiping@stanford.edu or ptsao@stanford.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and are in the public domain in the US.

  15. People and things. CERN Courier, Nov 1984, v. 24(9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article reports on achievements of various people, staff changes and position opportunities within the CERN organization and contains news updates on upcoming or past events. A landmark event took place at Stanford on 3-4 August in the form of a ' Pief-fest', a celebration tacked onto the end of the traditional annual Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Summer Institute to mark the retirement of Wolfgang 'Pief Panofsky as the Laboratory's Director.The University of California's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been chosen as the host institution for the Central Design Group for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The fifth Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics will be held in Saint-Vincent, Aosta Valley, Italy, from 25 February to 2 March 1985. The local users' organization at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is organizing a Workshop on Electron-Positron Physics at High Luminosities, to be held at SLAC from 30 November to 1 December. The Aspen (Colorado, USA) Center for Physics announces a Winter Physics Conference Series - Collider Physics at Ultrahigh Energies from 6-12 January 1985 and Electro weak Interactions from 13- 19 January. As this edition was going to press, the CERN SPS protonantiproton collider was back in action for physics for the first time since the historic run last year which produced the Z particle and the first evidence for the sixth ('top') quark

  16. Is a career in medicine the right choice? The impact of a physician shadowing program on undergraduate premedical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jennifer Y; Lin, Hillary; Lewis, Patricia Y; Fetterman, David M; Gesundheit, Neil

    2015-05-01

    Undergraduate (i.e., baccalaureate) premedical students have limited exposure to clinical practice before applying to medical school-a shortcoming, given the personal and financial resources required to complete medical training. The Stanford Immersion in Medicine Series (SIMS) is a program that streamlines the completion of regulatory requirements for premedical students and allows them to develop one-on-one mentor-mentee relationships with practicing physicians. The program, offered quarterly since 2007, is an elective available for Stanford University sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Participants apply to the program and, if accepted, receive patient rights and professionalism training. Students shadow the physician they are paired with at least four times and submit a reflective essay about their experience.SIMS program coordinators administered surveys before and after shadowing to assess changes in students' perceptions and understanding of medical careers. The authors observed, in the 61 Stanford premedical students who participated in SIMS between March and June 2010 and completed both pre- and postprogram questionnaires, significant increases in familiarity with physician responsibilities and in understanding physician-patient interactions. The authors detected no significant changes in student commitment to pursuing medicine. Student perceptions of the value of shadowing-high both pre- and post shadowing-did not change. Physician shadowing by premedical baccalaureate students appears to promote an understanding of physician roles and workplace challenges. Future studies should identify the ideal timing, format, and duration of shadowing to optimize the experience and allow students to make informed decisions about whether to pursue a medical career.

  17. University writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  18. Universe unfolding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, I.R.

    1976-01-01

    Topics covered the setting; looking at the stars; the earth; time, place and the sky; our satellite, the moon; orbits and motion; the motions of the planets; the Copernican revolution; the planets; the other bodies of the solar system; ages, origins, and life; introducing the stars; sorting out the stars; binary stars--two are better than one; variable stars--inconstancy as a virtue; the secrets of starlight--unraveling the spectrum; the sun--our own star; the structure of a star; interstellar material; the Milky Way, our home galaxy; galaxies--the stellar continents; cosmic violence--from radio galaxies to quasars; the universe; and epilogue. The primary emphasis is on how we have come to know what we know about the universe. Star maps are included

  19. University physics

    CERN Document Server

    Arfken, George

    1984-01-01

    University Physics provides an authoritative treatment of physics. This book discusses the linear motion with constant acceleration; addition and subtraction of vectors; uniform circular motion and simple harmonic motion; and electrostatic energy of a charged capacitor. The behavior of materials in a non-uniform magnetic field; application of Kirchhoff's junction rule; Lorentz transformations; and Bernoulli's equation are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the speed of electromagnetic waves; origins of quantum physics; neutron activation analysis; and interference of light. This publi

  20. Human universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human life is a staggeringly strange thing. On the surface of a ball of rock falling around a nuclear fireball in the blackness of a vacuum the laws of nature conspired to create a naked ape that can look up at the stars and wonder where it came from. What is a human being? Objectively, nothing of consequence. Particles of dust in an infinite arena, present for an instant in eternity. Clumps of atoms in a universe with more galaxies than people. And yet a human being is necessary for the question itself to exist, and the presence of a question in the universe - any question - is the most wonderful thing. Questions require minds, and minds bring meaning. What is meaning? I don't know, except that the universe and every pointless speck inside it means something to me. I am astonished by the existence of a single atom, and find my civilisation to be an outrageous imprint on reality. I don't understand it. Nobody does, but it makes me smile. This book asks questions about our origins, our destiny, and our place i...