WorldWideScience

Sample records for stanford university stanford

  1. 77 FR 59660 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... Stanford University Archaeology Center. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below...

  2. 77 FR 59661 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Stanford University Archaeology...

  3. 77 FR 59968 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center... Archaeology Center, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items... affiliated with the cultural items may contact the Stanford University Archaeology Center. DATES...

  4. Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Tani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the following book: Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014, ISBN 9780804791595

  5. History of narcolepsy at Stanford University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, Emmanuel J M

    2014-05-01

    Although narcolepsy was first described in the late nineteenth century in Germany and France, much of the research on this disorder has been conducted at Stanford University, starting with Drs. William C. Dement and Christian Guilleminault in the 1970s. The prevalence of narcolepsy was established, and a canine model discovered. Following the finding in Japan that almost all patients with narcolepsy carry a specific HLA subtype, HLA-DR2, Hugh Mac Devitt, F. Carl Grumet, and Larry Steinman initiated immunological studies, but results were generally negative. Using the narcoleptic canines, Dr. Nishino and I established that stimulants increased wakefulness by stimulating dopaminergic transmission while antidepressants suppress cataplexy via adrenergic reuptake inhibition. A linkage study was initiated with Dr. Grumet in 1988, and after 10 years of work, the canine narcolepsy gene was cloned by in 1999 and identified as the hypocretin (orexin) receptor 2. In 1992, studying African Americans, we also found that DQ0602 rather than DR2 was a better marker for narcolepsy across all ethnic groups. In 2000, Dr. Nishino and I, in collaboration with Dr. Lammers in the Netherlands, found that hypocretin 1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were undetectable in most cases, establishing hypocretin deficiency as the cause of narcolepsy. Pursuing this research, our and Dr. Siegel's group, examining postmortem brains, found that the decreased CSF hypocretin 1 was secondary to the loss the 70,000 neurons producing hypocretin in the hypothalamus. This finding revived the autoimmune hypothesis but attempts at demonstrating immune targeting of hypocretin cells failed until 2013. At this date, Dr. Elisabeth Mellins and I discovered that narcolepsy is characterized by the presence of autoreactive CD4(+) T cells to hypocretin fragments when presented by DQ0602. Following reports that narcolepsy cases were triggered by vaccinations and infections against influenza A 2009 pH1N1, a new

  6. The Stanford University US-Japan Technology Management Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-07

    This grant established the U.S.-Japan Technology Management Center, Stanford University School of Engineering, as an ongoing center of excellence for...networking, nanotechnologies, MEMS, system-level chip integration, and advanced manufacturing. Our technology management focus embraced industry

  7. Stanford's Online Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Stanford University (CA) is MOOC Central. While the school may not have launched the first massive open online course (MOOC), its efforts have propelled the concept to the forefront of higher education in a matter of months. Starting with Sebastian Thrun's Introduction to Artificial Intelligence course, which enrolled 160,000 students, Stanford…

  8. Mending the Stanford Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Charles

    1998-01-01

    Describes efforts to reclaim the historical campus plan for Stanford University (California), including preserving views; restoring open space; realigning streets and pedestrian paths; consolidating parking; connecting paths; adding a new shuttle bus, bike lanes, and bike parking; and correcting the haphazard development of athletic and recreation…

  9. Rational Budgeting? The Stanford Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle

    The budget decision making process at Stanford University, California, from 1970 through 1979 was evaluated in relation to the allocation of general funds to 38 academic departments. Using Simon's theory of bounded rationality and an organizational level of analysis, the Stanford decision process was tested for its rationality through…

  10. Stanford University: The Building Energy Retrofit Programs. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Stanford University's Energy Retrofit Program was created in 1993 to target resource reduction and conservation focused projects on campus. Fahmida Ahmed, Associate Director of the Department of Sustainability and Energy Management, says that Stanford has been investing in sustainability and energy-efficiency since the late 1970s, longer than many…

  11. Topics from the 20th annual workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering, Stanford University; Stanford Daigaku chinetsu choryuso kogaku waku shoppu ni sanka shite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akasaka, C. [Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-03-15

    The 20th Stanford University geothermal reservoir engineering workshop was held in the Stanford University in the suburbs of San Francisco, State of California, United States, for 3 days from January 24th to 26th in 1995. This workshop has started in 1975, and is held once a year, and has a long history, which is an only workshop named the geothermal reservoir engineering in the world. In the petroleum engineering section of the Stanford University, there is an organization regarding to the geothermal reservoir engineering named the Stanford Geothermal Program, which centering around this workshop manages and operates. Its purpose is a development of an effective utilization technology of geothermal resources, inheritance of technology, and rearing men of ability. Through participating this workshop, in the geothermal reservoir engineering as an interdiscipline part between the earth science and engineering, that there is a plenty of room to be elucidated still left was recognized over again. There are many things to be learned from an abundant experiences and knowledges of the geothermally advanced country. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  12. System Scope for Library Automation and Generalized Information Storage and Retrieval at Stanford University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Glee; And Others

    The scope of a manual-automated system serving the 40 libraries and the teaching and research community of Stanford University is defined. Also defined are the library operations to be supported and the bibliographic information storage and retrieval capabilities to be provided in the system. Two major projects have been working jointly on library…

  13. Bringing Faith to Campus: Religious and Spiritual Space, Time, and Practice at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin-Neumann, Patricia; Sanders, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    This essay examines how Stanford University, secular in its origins, yet with a church at its center, addresses the religious and spiritual concerns of current students, whether from traditional or innovative religious backgrounds. Identified religious and spiritual needs prompt questions about the balance between the spiritual health and…

  14. Case study: the Stanford University School of Medicine and its teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Philip A

    2008-09-01

    There is wide variation in the governance and organization of academic health centers (AHCs), often prompted by or associated with changes in leadership. Changes at AHCs are influenced by institutional priorities, economic factors, competing needs, and the personality and performance of leaders. No organizational model has uniform applicability, and it is important for each AHC to learn what works or does not on the basis of its experiences. This case study of the Stanford University School of Medicine and its teaching hospitals--which constitute Stanford's AHC, the Stanford University Medical Center--reflects responses to the consequences of a failed merger of the teaching hospitals and related clinical enterprises with those of the University of California-San Francisco School of Medicine that required a new definition of institutional priorities and directions. These were shaped by a strategic plan that helped define goals and objectives in education, research, patient care, and the necessary financial and administrative underpinnings needed. A governance model was created that made the medical school and its two major affiliated teaching hospitals partners; this arrangement requires collaboration and coordination that is highly dependent on the shared objectives of the institutional leaders involved. The case study provides the background factors and issues that led to these changes, how they were envisioned and implemented, the current status and challenges, and some lessons learned. Although the current model is working, future changes may be needed to respond to internal and external forces and changes in leadership.

  15. Stanford's gene patents hit snags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M

    1982-11-26

    Background information is presented on the preliminary rejection of a 1978 recombinant DNA patent application by Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer. The Patent Office is concerned about the omission of important information from the application, the exclusion of a third collaborator as co-inventor, and the interval between public disclosure and the date of filing. The dispute could lead to a challenge of a related Cohen-Boyer patent issued in 1980, posing a financial threat to Stanford University, which holds the lucrative patent rights, and the University of California, which shares the licensing fees and royalties.

  16. Stanford Geothermal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Horn

    1999-06-30

    Reliable measurement of steam-water relative permeability functions is of great importance for geothermal reservoir performance simulation. Despite their importance, these functions are poorly known due to the lack of fundamental understanding of steam-water flows, and the difficulty of making direct measurements. The Stanford Geothermal Program has used an X-ray CT (Computer Tomography) scanner to obtain accurate saturation profiles by direct measurement. During the last five years, the authors have carried out experiments with nitrogen-water flow and with steam-water flow, and examined the effects of heat transfer and phase change by comparing these sets of results. In porous rocks, it was found that the steam-water relative permeabilities follow Corey type relationships similar to those in nitrogen-water flow, but that the irreducible gas phase saturation is smaller for steam than for nitrogen. The irreducible saturations represent substantial fractions of the recoverable energy in place yet are hard to determine in the field. Understanding the typical magnitude of irreducible saturations will lead to a much clearer forecast of geothermal field performance. In fracture flow, indirect measurements suggested that the relative permeabilities follow a linear (or ''X-curve'') behavior - but there is still considerable uncertainty in the knowledge of this behavior.

  17. Stanford U.: With $7.5M gift, Stanford physics institute to open in 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Springer, M

    2003-01-01

    Thanks to a recent $7.5 million gift from the Kavli Foundation, construction has resumed on the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University. It is schedule for completion in 2005 (1 page).

  18. A new US-UK diagnostic project: mood elevation and depression in first-year undergraduates at Oxford and Stanford universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, R A; Wang, P W; Ketter, T A; Goodwin, G M

    2008-07-01

    To investigate differences in prevalence of mood elevation, distress and depression among first-year undergraduates at Oxford and Stanford universities. An online survey was sent to Oxford and Stanford first-year undergraduate students for two consecutive years in the winter of 2005 and 2006. Students completed a survey that assessed mood symptoms and medication use. Both universities had similar rates of distress by General Health Questionnaire (Oxford - 42.4%; Stanford - 38.3%), depression by Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (Oxford - 6.2%; Stanford - 6.6%), and psychotropic and non-psychotropic medication usage (psychotropic: Oxford - 1.5%; Stanford 3.5%; nonpsychotropic: Oxford - 13.3%; Stanford - 18%). Oxford had higher rates of mood elevation by Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) (Oxford - 4%; Stanford - 1.7%). Oxford and Stanford students have similar rates of mood distress, depression and general medication usage. Students at Oxford have a higher prevalence of MDQ scores that possibly indicate a bipolar disorder, while Stanford students are prescribed more psychotropics.

  19. The Stanford how things work project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, Richard; Gruber, Tom; Iwasaki, Yumi

    1994-01-01

    We provide an overview of the Stanford How Things Work (HTW) project, an ongoing integrated collection of research activities in the Knowledge Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. The project is developing technology for representing knowledge about engineered devices in a form that enables the knowledge to be used in multiple systems for multiple reasoning tasks and reasoning methods that enable the represented knowledge to be effectively applied to the performance of the core engineering task of simulating and analyzing device behavior. The central new capabilities currently being developed in the project are automated assistance with model formulation and with verification that a design for an electro-mechanical device satisfies its functional specification.

  20. Effects of university affiliation and "school spirit" on color preferences: Berkeley versus Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Karen B; Poggesi, Rosa M; Palmer, Stephen E

    2011-06-01

    The ecological valence theory (EVT) posits that preference for a color is determined by people's average affective response to everything associated with it (Palmer & Schloss, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107, 8877-8882, 2010). The EVT thus implies the existence of sociocultural effects: Color preference should increase with positive feelings (or decrease with negative feelings) toward an institution strongly associated with a color. We tested this prediction by measuring undergraduates' color preferences at two rival universities, Berkeley and Stanford, to determine whether students liked their university's colors better than their rivals did. Students not only preferred their own colors more than their rivals did, but the degree of their preference increased with self-rated positive affect ("school spirit") for their university. These results support the EVT's claim that color preference is caused by learned affective responses to associated objects and institutions, because it is unlikely that students choose their university or develop their degree of school spirit on the basis of preexisting color preferences.

  1. Reflections on the revolution at Stanford

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    We inquire into the question whether the Aristotelian or classical ideal of science has been realised by the Model Revolution, initiated at Stanford University during the 1950s and spread all around the world of philosophy of science—salute Suppes. The guiding principle of the Model Revolution is: a

  2. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  3. How Stanford and Yamaha Cut an Unusual Technological Deal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    1998-01-01

    Stanford University (California) and the Yamaha Corporation have agreed to pool over 400 patents and patent applications, most involving sound synthesis, and to license them as a package along with rights to the trademark, and share the royalties. The deal builds on a 23-year relationship between Stanford and Yamaha, one which is both fruitful and…

  4. Organization of the 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop by Stanford University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hogan, Mark [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Essentially all we know today and will learn in the future about the fundamental nature of matter is derived from probing it with directed beams of particles such as electrons, protons, neutrons, heavy ions, and photons. The resulting ability to “see” the building blocks of matter has had an immense impact on society and our standard of living. Over the last century, particle accelerators have changed the way we look at nature and the universe we live in and have become an integral part of the Nation’s technical infrastructure. Today, particle accelerators are essential tools of modern science and technology. The cost and capabilities of accelerators would be greatly enhanced by breakthroughs in acceleration methods and technology. For the last 32 years, the Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop has acted as the focal point for discussion and development of the most promising acceleration physics and technology. It is a particularly effective forum where the discussion is leveraged and promoted by the unique and demanding feature of the AAC Workshop: the working group structure, in which participants are asked to consider their contributions in terms of even larger problems to be solved. The 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC2014) Workshop was organized by Stanford University from July 13 - 18, 2014 at the Dolce Hays Mansion in San Jose, California. The conference had a record 282 attendees including 62 students. Attendees came from 11 countries representing 66 different institutions. The workshop format consisted of plenary sessions in the morning with topical leaders from around the world presenting the latest breakthroughs to the entire workshop. In the late morning and afternoons attendees broke out into eight different working groups for more detailed presentations and discussions that were summarized on the final day of the workshop. In addition, there were student tutorial presentations on two afternoons to provide in depth education and

  5. Collaboration and Community Building in Summer Undergraduate Research Programs in the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevle, R. J.; Watson Nelson, T.; Harris, J. M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In 2012, the School of Earth Sciences (SES) at Stanford University sponsored two summer undergraduate research programs. Here we describe these programs and efforts to build a cohesive research cohort among the programs' diverse participants. The two programs, the Stanford School of Earth Sciences Undergraduate Research (SESUR) Program and Stanford School of Earth Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research in Geoscience and Engineering (SURGE) Program, serve different undergraduate populations and have somewhat different objectives, but both provide students with opportunities to work on strongly mentored yet individualized research projects. In addition to research, enrichment activities co-sponsored by both programs support the development of community within the combined SES summer undergraduate research cohort. Over the course of 6 to 9 months, the SESUR Program engages Stanford undergraduates, primarily rising sophomores and juniors, with opportunities to deeply explore Earth sciences research while learning about diverse areas of inquiry within SES. Now in its eleventh year, the SESUR experience incorporates the breadth of the scientific endeavor: finding an advisor, proposal writing, obtaining funding, conducting research, and presenting results. Goals of the SESUR program include (1) providing a challenging and rewarding research experience for undergraduates who wish to explore the Earth sciences; (2) fostering interdisciplinary study in the Earth sciences among the undergraduate population; and (3) encouraging students to major or minor in the Earth sciences and/or to complete advanced undergraduate research in one of the departments or programs within SES. The SURGE Program, now in its second year, draws high performing students, primarily rising juniors and seniors, from 14 colleges and universities nationwide, including Stanford. Seventy percent of SURGE students are from racial/ethnic backgrounds underrepresented in STEM fields, and approximately one

  6. A Tale of Three Campuses: Planning and Design in Response to the Cultural Heritages at Mills College, the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiene, Karen; Sabbatini, Robert

    2011-01-01

    How do forward-looking institutions with rich landscape and architectural heritages integrate contemporary programming and design? This article explores the evolution of the Mills College campus and compares it with two larger western universities: the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and Leland Stanford, Jr., University (Stanford…

  7. Evaluation of Parallel Authentic Research-Based Courses in Human Biology on Student Experiences at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Jacob; Annerstedt, Claes; Besier, Thor; Matheson, Gordon O.; Rydmark, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Under a previous grant (2005-08), researchers and teachers at Stanford University (SU) and the University of Gothenburg (GU) co-designed a ten-week interdisciplinary, research-based laboratory course in human biology to be taught online to undergraduate students. Essentials in the subject were taught during the first four weeks of this course.…

  8. The Many Features of Stanford's Housing Maintenance Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Explains how Stanford University custom designed its own building maintenance and administration software package: the Housing Operations Maintenance Enterprise Resource (HOMER). Describes how HOMER relieved facility maintenance staff from some archaic systems, and its development and functionality. (GR)

  9. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium, Stanford University, California, USA, 28 June-2 July 2010 Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium, Stanford University, California, USA, 28 June-2 July 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Sasha; Sun, Ke-Xun

    2011-05-01

    The international research community interested in the Laser Interferometric Space Antenna (LISA) program meets every two years to exchange scientific and technical information. From 28 June-2 July 2010, Stanford University hosted the 8th International LISA Symposium. The symposium was held on the campus of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Many of the foremost scientific and technological researchers in LISA and gravitational wave theory and detection presented their work and ideas. Over one hundred engineers and graduate students attended the meeting. The leadership from NASA and ESA research centers and programs joined the symposium. A total of 280 delegates participated in the 8th LISA Symposium, and enjoyed the scientific and social programs. The scientific program included 46 invited plenary lectures, 44 parallel talks, and 77 posters, totaling 167 presentations. The one-slide introduction presentation of the posters is a new format in this symposium and allowed graduate students the opportunity to talk in front of a large audience of scientists. The topics covered included LISA Science, LISA Interferometry, LISA PathFinder (LPF), LISA and LPF Data Analysis, Astrophysics, Numerical Relativity, Gravitational Wave Theory, GRS Technologies, Other Space Programs, and Ground Detectors. Large gravitational wave detection efforts, DECIGO, and LIGO were presented, as well as a number of other fundamental physics space experiments, with GP-B and STEP being examples. A public evening lecture was also presented at the symposium. Professor Bernard Schutz from the Albert Einstein Institute gave a general audience, multimedia presentation on `Gravitational waves: Listening to the music of spheres'. For more detailed information about the symposium and many presentation files, please browse through the website: http://www.stanford.edu/group/lisasymposium The Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium are jointly published by Classical and Quantum Gravity

  10. The early history of Stanford Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patricia P; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2014-05-01

    From its 1960 beginnings in a pair of windowless Genetics Department laboratories under the Stanford Medical School Dean's Office to its current broad-based program, which joins faculty members from departments across the Medical School, the Stanford Immunology Program has played a central role in shaping both basic and clinical immunology thinking. In this article, we tell the story of the beginnings of this odyssey in a reminiscence-based format that brings the flavor of the time in the words of people who lived and built the history.

  11. A Close Look at Stanford v. Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Update on Law-Related Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Discusses whether the imposition of capital punishment on an individual for a crime committed as a juvenile constitutes cruel and unusual punishment under the Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Explores the crimes of Kevin Stanford and David Allen who were 16 and 17 respectively when they each committed murder. (CMK)

  12. Stanford, Duke, Rice,... and Gates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an open letter to Bill Gates. In his letter, the author suggests that Bill Gates should build a brand-new university, a great 21st-century institution of higher learning. This university will be unlike anything the world has ever seen. He asks Bill Gates not to stop helping existing colleges create the higher-education system…

  13. Research Training in Medical Informatics: The Stanford Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortliffe, Edward H.; Fagan, Lawrence M.

    1989-01-01

    Stanford University created an interdisciplinary program to train researchers and academic leaders in the field of medical information sciences. The program is described, identifying experiences of interest to people developing such a program. The program's background and history, students, curriculum and philosophy, and lessons learned are…

  14. The comparative study of the ICT collaborative environments in master courses ITC Euromaster and A/E/C University of Stanford

    OpenAIRE

    Klinc, Robert; Istenič Starčič, Andreja

    2007-01-01

    ICT collaborative environments surpasses old practices with drawing learning closer to a real life with interactivity and authenticity of real world problems in learning and consequently reducing de-contextualization in the learning process. Contemporary educational ICT usage in learning processes is student-centred. In 1993 University of Stanford (USA) started an ICT supported distance learning course named Architecture/Engineering/Construction Computer Integrated Global Teamwork Course (AEC...

  15. 7 March 2013 -Stanford University Professor N. McKeown FREng, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and B. Leslie, Creative Labs visiting CERN Control Centre and the LHC tunnel with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    7 March 2013 -Stanford University Professor N. McKeown FREng, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and B. Leslie, Creative Labs visiting CERN Control Centre and the LHC tunnel with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  16. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, silicate, and phosphate data collected in Pacific Ocean from Monterey Submarine Canyon Station by Stanford University from 1951-01-02 to 1955-12-31 (NODC Accession 0093160)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, oxygen, silicate, and phosphate data collected in Pacific Ocean from Montery Submarine Canyon Station by Stanford University from 1951-01-02...

  17. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center selects Verity Ultraseek for public and internal Web Sites

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Verity Inc., a provider of enterprise software has announced the latest version of its powerful, downloadable Verity(R) Ultraseek(R) enterprise search engine is being used by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, a research facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Stanford University (1/2 page).

  18. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior…

  19. Dazzling new light source opens at Stanford synchrotron radiation laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    SPEAR3, the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring, was formally opened at a dedication ceremony at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center on Jan. 29. It incorporates the latest technology to make it competitive with the best synchrotron sources in the world (1/2 page)

  20. Budget cuts force early closure of Stanford collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    in Brief Stanford's B-meson work is coming to an early end.SLACIn early March, California's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) will shut down a collider that produces B mesons. The closure means that the lab's commitment to BaBar - an international collaboration studying the differences between matter and antimatter - will now end seven months early.

  1. Richter quits as director of Stanford accelerator lab

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1998-01-01

    Burt Richter stands down next August as director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre. He will remain at SLAC working on research and science policy issues. Rumours abound about the reasons behind his unexpected departure.

  2. Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.; Milovich, Marilyn M.; Moussier, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the coverage of Stanford prison experiment (SPE), including criticisms of the study, in introductory psychology courses through an online survey of introductory psychology instructors (N = 117). Results largely paralleled those of the recently published textbook analyses with ethical issues garnering the most coverage,…

  3. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal RE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rachel E Rizal,1,* Rishi P Mediratta,1,* James Xie,1 Swetha Kambhampati,1 Kelsey Hills-Evans,1 Tamara Montacute,1 Michael Zhang,1 Catherine Zaw,2 Jimmy He,2 Magali Sanchez,2 Lauren Pischel1 1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful service-learning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program’s outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians. Keywords: immunizations, vaccine delivery, vaccinations 

  4. The Stanford Medical Youth Science Program: Educational and Science-Related Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical preparatory programs (pipeline programs) have been developed at colleges and universities to better prepare youth for entering science- and health-related careers, but outcomes of such programs have seldom been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a matched cohort study to evaluate the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program's Summer…

  5. Organizational cultural survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees' opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  6. Breeding history of the Stanford colony of narcoleptic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, R; Nishino, S; Dement, W C; Mignot, E

    1998-01-10

    Narcolepsy is a disabling sleep disorder of unknown aetiology. In humans, the disease is mostly sporadic, with a few familial cases having been reported. In 1973 a sporadic case of narcolepsy was reported in a poodle, and in 1975 familial cases of narcolepsy occurred in dobermanns. As with human narcoleptics, these narcoleptic dogs exhibited excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. A colony of narcoleptic dogs was established at Stanford University in 1976 to study the pathophysiology of the disease. Between 1976 and 1995, a total of 669 animals of various breeds were born, of which 487 survived. Dobermanns accounted for 78 per cent of the total. The narcolepsy genotype in dobermanns had no significant influence on puppy mortality rate (numbers of stillborn and survival rate). The sex, maternal parity or the age of the sire or dam had no significant effect. The percentage of stillborn puppies increased from 6.1 per cent in outbred litters to 15.4 per cent in inbred litters (P = 0.10). Birth season also had a significant effect, and the highest survival rate (P = 0.02), and the lowest percentage of stillborn puppies (P = 0.09) occurred between April and June.

  7. The Problem of Partisanship in American Foreign Policy Book Review: Gries P.H. The Politics of American Foreign Policy: How Ideology Divides Liberals and Conservatives over Foreign Affairs Stanford, California: Stanford University press, 2014. 367 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il'ya Anatol'evich Sokov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This publication is the review on the book of Peter Hays Gries “The Politics of American Foreign Policy: How Ideology Divides Liberals and Conservatives over Foreign Affairs”. The book consists of Preface, Introduction, the Text from two parts: Part I “Concepts” includes 5 chapters, Part II “Cases” also includes 5 chapters and four of them description the relations of the USA with the world regions: Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, the South Asia and the last chapter - relations with the international organizations. The end of the text is the Conclusion. Besides the text of book consists of 100 illustrations and 2 charts. The Preface was written by David Lyle Boren, the President of Oklahoma University and the US Ex-Senator (1979-1994, where he was at the head of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and he knows the topic which the author of monograph studies. The problems is studied by P.H. Gries are interested by the native specialists, who studies the international relations. This book is recommended to students, post-graduate students, scientists and all of them who are interested by the problems of international relations.

  8. SLC status and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, B.

    1989-08-01

    In this presentation, I shall discuss the linear collider program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as it is now, and as we hope to see it evolve over the next few years. Of greatest interest to the high energy accelerator physics community gathered here is the development of the linear collider concept, and so I shall concentrate most of this paper on a discussion of the present status and future evolution of the SLC. I will also briefly discuss the research and development program that we are carrying out aimed at the realization of the next generation of high-energy linear colliders. SLAC had a major colliding-beam storage-ring program as well, including present rings and design studies on future high-luminosity projects, but time constraints preclude a discussion of them. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. The Case for the Stanford-Binet L-M as a Supplemental Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Linda Kreger; Kearney, Katheryn

    1992-01-01

    The Stanford-Binet IV is compared to the original version and criticized for having less power to measure the high end of intelligence and for having norms that discriminate against gifted students. Strengths of the Stanford-Binet L-M are pointed out, and use of both scales for different purposes is recommended. (JDD)

  10. Stanford Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall questionnaire in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Benjamin E; Canavan, Jane L; Smith, Cayley J; Ingram, Karen A; Fowler, Ria P; Clark, Amy L; Polkey, Michael I; Man, William D-C

    2012-08-01

    Quantification of daily physical activity is of clinical interest in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objective measures using activity monitors may take several days to obtain reliable results. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Stanford Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (PAR) against the SenseWear armband (SWA) and compare its validity with three other physical activity questionnaires. 43 COPD patients wore the SWA for 7 days. Patients completed the PAR, Baecke, Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and Zutphen questionnaires. Spearman rank correlation, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used to assess the relationship between the questionnaires and SWA. Assessed by PAR, time spent at ≥3.0 metabolic equivalents (METs) correlated significantly (r=0.54, pactive patients (≥30 min at ≥3.0 METs or a physical activity level (PAL) ≥1.55) and very inactive patients (PAL activity sufficiently accurately to make individual recommendations, it was able to identify COPD patients at extremes of the physical activity spectrum, potentially reducing the number of patients requiring direct measurement.

  11. MOOCs and the AI-Stanford Like Courses: Two Successful and Distinct Course Formats for Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C. Osvaldo

    2012-01-01

    Open online courses (OOC) with a massive number of students have represented an important development for online education in the past years. A course on artificial intelligence, CS221, at the University of Stanford was offered in the fall of 2011 free and online which attracted 160,000 registered students. It was one of three offered as an…

  12. High Power Klystrons: Theory and Practice at the Stanford Linear Accelerator CenterPart I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caryotakis, G.

    2004-12-15

    This is Part I of a two-part report on design and manufacturing methods used at SLAC to produce accelerator klystrons. Chapter 1 begins with the history and applications for klystrons, in both of which Stanford University was extensively involved. The remaining chapters review the theory of klystron operation, derive the principal formulae used in their design, and discuss the assumptions that they involve. These formulae are subsequently used in small-signal calculations of the frequency response of a particular klystron, whose performance is also simulated by two different computer codes. The results of calculations and simulations are compared to the actual performance of the klystron.

  13. Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. receives architectural and engineering design contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. announced that a subsidiary company won a contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to provide architectural and engineering design services for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) conventional facilities" (1/2 page)

  14. Risk factors for postoperative hypoxemia in patients undergoing Stanford A aortic dissection surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yinghua; Xue, Song; Zhu, Hongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to identify the risk factors for postoperative hypoxemia in patients with Stanford A aortic dissection surgery and their relation to clinical outcomes. Methods Clinical records of 186 patients with postoperative hypoxemia in Stanford A aortic dissection were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups by postoperative oxygen fraction (PaO2/FiO2):hypoxemia group (N=92) and non-hypoxemia group (N=94). Results We found that the inci...

  15. Engaging Scientists and Educators in the IHY: A Case Study of Stanford's Space Weather Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, D. K.; Burress, B.; Hoeksema, T.

    2007-05-01

    The IHY offers unique opportunities to provide education and public outreach programs throughout the world. The Stanford Solar Center has developed a student-focused space weather monitoring program aimed at developing global understanding of the response of Earth's atmosphere to terrestrial and extraterrestrial drivers. Through our educational component, we hope to inspire the next generation of space and Earth scientists and spread the knowledge of our solar system and the exciting process of scientific exploration to the people of the world! Stanford's Solar Center in conjunction with the Space, Telecommunications and Radioscience Laboratory and local educators have developed inexpensive Space Weather Monitor instruments that students around the world can use to track and study solar- and lightning-induced changes to the Earth's ionosphere. Through the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) and the IHY Education and Public Outreach Program, we are deploying these instruments for student use at high school and early university levels. The distribution includes science resources as well as classroom materials and educator support. A centralized database allows collection of, and free access to, world-wide data. Scientists and radio experts serve as mentors to students, and assist them in understanding their data. We will describe the monitor distribution program, focusing particularly on how we are engaging scientists to participate and on the role of educators, plus the resources provided to them, in high schools and universities throughout the world.

  16. Observations on the Stanford 4800 KG gravity wave detector with a cosmic ray monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, B. E.

    1986-09-01

    The group at Stanford University has constructed a 4800 kg cryogenic detector which is the most sensitive detector for gravitational radiation successfully operated to date. In this dissertation data are presented from the 1985 run of 36.8 days aggregate collection time. Over the full bandwidth of approximately 13 Hz, the optimum detector noise temperature was found to be 8 mK when the system was operated at 4.3 K. An actual filter was implemented over a 5 Hz bandwidth which yielded the filtered noise temperature of 15 mK. Filtering over the entire bandwidth and operation of a dilution refrigerator at 1 K should lower the noise temperature to below 3 mK. The rate of events whose signal temperature exceeded 0.6 K was found to be higher than that for a similar run in 1981, partly due to greater general activity in the laboratory. A preliminary coincidence experiment was conducted between the Stanford detector and a room temperature detector in Guangzhou, China. In a total of 9.38 days of simultaneous data collection the number of coincidences observed was entirely consistent with random statistics. In the second half of this dissertation, the effect of cosmic rays on a gravity wave bar detector is considered. A one-dimensional thermoacoustic model is used to predict the size of the signal. Measurable effects are restricted to rarer events which may easily be vetoed as gravity wave candidates.

  17. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Rachel E; Mediratta, Rishi P; Xie, James; Kambhampati, Swetha; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Montacute, Tamara; Zhang, Michael; Zaw, Catherine; He, Jimmy; Sanchez, Magali; Pischel, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful servicelearning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program's outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians.

  18. Empowerment evaluation at the Stanford University School of Medicine: using a critical friend to improve the clerkship experience Evaluación de Concesión Legal de Poder de la Escuela de medicina de la Universidad de Stanford: usando un amigo crítico para mejorar la experiencia en la residencia Avaliação da concessão legal de poder da escola de medicina da Universidade de Stanford: usando um amigo crítico para melhorar a experiência na residência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fetterman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Empowerment evaluation was adopted by Stanford University's School of Medicine to engage in curricular reform. It was also used to prepare for an accreditation site visit. Empowerment evaluation is a guided form of self-evaluation. It was selected because the principles and practices of empowerment evaluation resonated with the collaborative and participatory nature of the curricular reform in the School. This article highlights one of the most important features of an empowerment evaluation: a critical friend. This individual has evaluation expertise but serves as a coach, advisor, or guide, rather than "the expert". The evaluation is in the hands of the people in the program, but a critical friend helps to keep it on track and rigorous. As one indication of the importance of this role, student ratings on selected clerkship rotations, where a critical friend was requested to respond to student concerns, resulted in significant increases in student ratings.La evaluación de concesión legal de poder fue adoptada por la Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad de Stanford para participar de la reforma curricular. También fue usada para preparar un credenciamento en un site de visita. La evaluación de concesión legal de poder es una forma guiada de autoevaluación. Los principios y prácticas de evaluación legal de poder corresponden harmoniosamente a la naturaleza colaboradora y participativa de la reforma curricular en la escuela. Este artigo destaca una de las más importantes características de la evaluación de concesión legal de poder: el amigo crítico. Este individuo tiene experiencia en evaluación, pero sirve como instructor, consejero y guía en lugar del "perito". La evaluación esta en las manos de las personas del programa, pero el amigo crítico ayuda a mantener el bueno camino y la precisión. Como un indicador de la importancia de ese papel, las evaluaciones de los alumnos en las escalas de residencia seleccionadas, donde un

  19. Stanford test called a net breakthrough - data sent at 3,500 times the speed of broadband

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at a Stanford University-affiliated research center have found a way to send data across the Internet more than 3,500 times faster than the typical broadband connection. The technical breakthrough set an Internet speed record too fast to be of use with present-day computers but could open the way for scientists to share and ship massive databases around the world, according to the researchers.

  20. Experiments in advanced control concepts for space robotics - An overview of the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollars, M. G.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Alexander, H. L.; Morse, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford University Aerospace Robotics Laboratory is actively developing and experimentally testing advanced robot control strategies for space robotic applications. Early experiments focused on control of very lightweight one-link manipulators and other flexible structures. The results are being extended to position and force control of mini-manipulators attached to flexible manipulators and multilink manipulators with flexible drive trains. Experimental results show that end-point sensing and careful dynamic modeling or adaptive control are key to the success of these control strategies. Free-flying space robot simulators that operate on an air cushion table have been built to test control strategies in which the dynamics of the base of the robot and the payload are important.

  1. Stanford-Binet and WAIS IQ Differences and Their Implications for Adults with Intellectual Disability (aka Mental Retardation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Wayne; Miezejeski, Charles; Ryan, Robert; Zigman, Warren; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon; Urv, Tiina

    2010-01-01

    Stanford-Binet and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) IQs were compared for a group of 74 adults with intellectual disability (ID). In every case, WAIS Full Scale IQ was higher than the Stanford-Binet Composite IQ, with a mean difference of 16.7 points. These differences did not appear to be due to the lower minimum possible score for the…

  2. Research in free-flying robots and flexible manipulators at the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhaus, W. L.; Alder, L. J.; Chen, V. W.; Dickson, W. C.; Ullman, M. A.; Wilson, E.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last ten years, the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) has developed a hardware facility in which a number of space robotics issues have been, and continue to be addressed. This paper reviews two of the current ARL research areas: navigation and control of free flying space robots, and modeling and control of extremely flexible space structures.

  3. Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Social Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.; Whitehead, George I., III

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with the nature of the coverage in introductory social psychology textbooks of the Stanford prison experiment (SPE), given the many criticisms, especially recently, of the SPE. These criticisms concern both the study's methodology and the situationist explanation of the outcome. Ten textbooks were analyzed for coverage of…

  4. College Writing, Identification, and the Production of Intellectual Property: Voices from the Stanford Study of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Andrea A.; Fishman, Jenn; Liew, Warren M.

    2013-01-01

    When, why, and how do college students come to value their writing as intellectual property? How do their conceptions of intellectual property reflect broader understandings and personal engagements with concepts of authorship, collaboration, identification, and capital? We address these questions based on findings from the Stanford Study of…

  5. The Construct Validity of the Stanford-Binet 5 Measures of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomplun, Mark; Custer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the validity of the measures of verbal and nonverbal working memory on the Stanford-Binet Fifth Edition (SB5). The validity evidence included Rasch-based, criterion-referenced item mapping, correlations with other clinical measures of memory, and prediction of reading and mathematics scores. The item mapping clearly…

  6. Utility of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition, with Ethnically Diverse Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Brittany A.; Finch, Maria HernÁndez; Mcintosh, David E.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.; Finch, W. Holmes

    2014-01-01

    Current research on the use of revisions of intelligence measures with ethnically diverse populations and younger children is limited. The present study investigated the utility of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition (SB5), with an ethnically diverse preschool sample. African American and Caucasian preschoolers, matched on age,…

  7. An Interview with Elizabeth Hagen: Giftedness, Intelligence and the New Stanford-Binet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Linda Kreger

    1986-01-01

    The interview with Elizabeth Hagen, the co-creator of the Cognitive Abilities Test and a revisor of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test, deals with such issues in gifted education as general intelligence vs. specific abilities, validity of test scores at the preschool level, and misconceptions about retesting gifted students. (Author/CL)

  8. The Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Textbooks: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    The present content analysis examines the coverage of theoretical and methodological problems with the Stanford prison experiment (SPE) in a sample of introductory psychology textbooks. Categories included the interpretation and replication of the study, variance in guard behavior, participant selection bias, the presence of demand characteristics…

  9. Evaluating Teacher Education Outcomes: A Study of the Stanford Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; Newton, Xiaoxia; Wei, Ruth Chung

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers a set of research and assessment strategies used to evaluate programme outcomes in the Stanford Teacher Education Programme (STEP) during a period of programme redesign over 10 years. These strategies include surveys and interviews of students' perceptions of programme elements and their own preparedness, observations of their…

  10. Stanford-A acute aortic dissection, inflammation, and metalloproteinases: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifani, Noemi; Proietta, Maria; Tritapepe, Luigi; Di Gioia, Cira; Ferri, Livia; Taurino, Maurizio; Del Porto, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is a life-threatening disease with an incidence of about 2.6-3.6 cases per 100,000/year. Depending on the site of rupture, AAD is classified as Stanford-A when the ascending aortic thoracic tract and/or the arch are involved, and Stanford-B when the descending thoracic aorta and/or aortic abdominal tract are targeted. It was recently shown that inflammatory pathways underlie aortic rupture in both type A and type B Stanford AAD. An immune infiltrate has been found within the middle and outer tunics of dissected aortic specimens. It has also been observed that the recall and activation of macrophages inside the middle tunic are key events in the early phases of AAD. Macrophages are able to release metalloproteinases (MMPs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines which, in turn, give rise to matrix degradation and neoangiogenesis. An imbalance between the production of MMPs and MMP tissue inhibitors is pivotal in the extracellular matrix degradation underlying aortic wall remodelling in dissections occurring both in inherited conditions and in atherosclerosis. Among MMPs, MMP-12 is considered a specific marker of aortic wall disease, whatever the genetic predisposition may be. The aim of this review is, therefore, to take a close look at the immune-inflammatory mechanisms underlying Stanford-A AAD.

  11. Adapting Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program to Hawaii's Multicultural Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Michiyo; Braun, Kathryn L.; Compton, Merlita; Tanoue, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been proven to increase patients' ability to manage distress. We describe how we replicated CDSMP in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) communities. Design and Methods: We used the "track changes" tool to deconstruct CDSMP into its various components…

  12. Stanford University's Archimedes Project: Design for Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Tom, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The Archimedes Project's primary goal is to educate those who will develop the next generation of software and hardware on the obstacles and opportunities that technology presents for people with disabilities. Its research program designs prototypes, explores accessibility problems, and conducts research on relevant scientific issues. (Author/PEN)

  13. Current and Future Research Programs at Stanford's Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madejski, Greg

    2013-12-01

    The Kavli Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, or KIPAC, at Stanford University, and the LeCosPA Institute at the Taiwan National University were sibling institutions even before their respective official births. The existence of both institutes was to a great extent facilitated by the foresight of Prof. Pisin Chen, current director of LeCosPA, and we fully envision the vibrant on-going collaboration between the two institutes for the years to come. This presentation highlights the current research direction of KIPAC, including the wide range of programs in particle astrophysics and cosmology. Of the on-going projects, the main current effort at KIPAC is the operation of, and the analysis of data from the Large Area Telescope on-board the space-borne Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which is described in more detail in the article by Prof. Kamae in these proceedings. That article focuses on the instrument, and the results gleaned from observations of our own Galaxy. Here, the second part of this article also includes the highlights for astrophysics of jets emanating from the vicinity of black holes, which are prominent gamma-ray sources detected by Fermi: this is the area of research of the article's author.

  14. The rotation of the Sun: Observations at Stanford. [using the Doppler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, J. M.; Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric rotation rate using the Doppler effect made at the Stanford Solar Observatory since May 1976 are analyzed. Results show that these observations show no daily or long period variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is the same as that of the sunspot and the large-scale magnetic field structures.

  15. Læring skal være sjovt: Aalborg – Stanford t/r

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Konnerup, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    Gennem en 4-dages workshop om hvorledes Problem Based Learning (PBL) kan praktiseres og nytænkes i ikt-medierede sociale læringsmiljøer, blev der diskuteret, idégenereret, grinet og dramatiseret – alt sammen med det formål at få en fælles forståelse af PBL på tværs af universiteter (Stanford/Aalb...

  16. The development of seismic guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggins, R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the development of Seismic Guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Although structures have always been built conservatively, SLAC management decided to review and update their seismic guidelines. SLAC is about mid-way between the epicenters of the 8.3 Richter magnitude 1906 San Francisco and the 7.2 Loma Prieta Earthquakes. The west end of the two mile long electron/positron particle accelerator lies a half mile from the large San Andreas Fault. Suggestions for seismic planning processes were solicited from local computer manufacturing firms, universities, and federal laboratories. A Committee of the various stakeholders in SLAC`s seismic planning retained an internationally known Seismic Planning Consultant and reviewed relevant standards and drafted Guidelines. A panel of seismic experts was convened to help define the hazard, site response spectra, probabilistic analysis of shaking, and near field effects. The Facility`s structures were assigned to seismic classes of importance, and an initial assessment of a sample of a dozen buildings conducted. This assessment resulted in emergency repairs to one structure, and provided a {open_quotes}reality basis{close_quotes} for establishing the final Guidelines and Administrative Procedures, and a program to evaluate remaining buildings, shielding walls, tunnels, and other special structures.

  17. Development of robots for rehabilitation therapy: the Palo Alto VA/Stanford experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgar, C G; Lum, P S; Shor, P C; Machiel Van der Loos, H F

    2000-01-01

    For over 25 years, personal assistant robots for severely disabled individuals have been in development. More recently, using robots to deliver rehabilitation therapy has been proposed. This paper summarizes the development and clinical testing of three mechatronic systems for post-stroke therapy conducted at the VA Palo Alto in collaboration with Stanford University. We describe the philosophy and experiences that guided their evolution. Unique to the Palo Alto approach is provision for bimanual, mirror-image, patient-controlled therapeutic exercise. Proof-of-concept was established with a 2-degree-of-freedom (DOF) elbow/forearm manipulator. Tests of a second-generation therapy robot producing planar forearm movements in 19 hemiplegic and control subjects confirmed the validity and reliability of interaction forces during mechanically assisted upper-limb movements. Clinical trials comparing 3-D robot-assisted therapy to traditional therapy in 21 chronic stroke subjects showed significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer (FM) measure of motor recovery in the robot group, which exceeded improvements in the control group.

  18. Total skin electron irradiation in mycosis fungoides: comparison between a modified Christie Hospital translational technique and the Stanford technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacak, Y; Arican, Z; Drumea, K; Rosenblatt, E; Tamir, A; Chetver, L; Stein, M; Bar Deroma, R; Kuten, A

    2002-11-01

    Seventy-one patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) were treated by Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) using either a modified Christie Hospital translational technique (44 pts) or a six dual-field Stanford technique (27 pts). There was no statistical difference in response rate, disease-free survival and overall survival between the two irradiation techniques. However, the Stanford technique was significantly less toxic than the modified Christie Hospital technique.

  19. The Stanford Medical Youth Science Program: educational and science-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Biomedical preparatory programs (pipeline programs) have been developed at colleges and universities to better prepare youth for entering science- and health-related careers, but outcomes of such programs have seldom been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a matched cohort study to evaluate the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program's Summer Residential Program (SRP), a 25-year-old university-based biomedical pipeline program that reaches out to low-income and underrepresented ethnic minority high school students. Five annual surveys were used to assess educational outcomes and science-related experience among 96 SRP participants and a comparison group of 192 youth who applied but were not selected to participate in the SRP, using ~2:1 matching on sociodemographic and academic background to control for potential confounders. SRP participants were more likely than the comparison group to enter college (100.0 vs. 84.4 %, p = 0.002), and both of these matriculation rates were more than double the statewide average (40.8 %). In most areas of science-related experience, SRP participants reported significantly more experience (>twofold odds) than the comparison group at 1 year of follow-up, but these differences did not persist after 2-4 years. The comparison group reported substantially more participation in science or college preparatory programs, more academic role models, and less personal adversity than SRP participants, which likely influenced these findings toward the null hypothesis. SRP applicants, irrespective of whether selected for participation, had significantly better educational outcomes than population averages. Short-term science-related experience was better among SRP participants, although longer-term outcomes were similar, most likely due to college and science-related opportunities among the comparison group. We discuss implications for future evaluations of other biomedical pipeline programs.

  20. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  1. Matching the dosimetry characteristics of a dual-field Stanford technique to a customized single-field Stanford technique for total skin electron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Agostinelli, Alfred G; Wilson, Lynn D; Nath, Ravinder

    2004-07-01

    To compare the dosimetry characteristics of a customized single-field and a matching dual-field electron beam for total skin electron therapy (TSET) within the framework of the Stanford technique. To examine and quantify its impact on patient dosimetry. Two characteristically different electron beams were used for TSET employing the Stanford technique: a single-field beam created from a pencil beam of electrons passing through 7 meters of air and a dual-field beam created from two heavily scattered electron beams directed at oblique angles to patients. The dosimetry characteristics of the two beams were measured by using ionization chambers, radiographic films, and thermal luminescent detectors. The impact of beam characteristic on patient dosimetry was quantified on both anthromorphic phantoms and on patients. Treatment protocols aimed at matching the patient dose between the two systems were established on the basis of these and other measurements. The dual-field beam was matched to the single-field beam, resulting in approximately the same mean energy (approximately 4.0 MeV) and most probable energy (approximately 4.5 MeV) at their respective treatment source-to-patient-surface distance (SSD). The depth dose curves on the beam axis were nearly identical for both beams. X-ray contamination on the beam axis was 0.43% for the dual-field beam, slightly higher than that (0.4%) of the single-field beam. The beam uniformity, however, was quite different: the dual-field beam was more uniform in the vertical direction but was worse in the lateral direction compared to the single-field beam. For a TSET treatment using the Stanford technique, the composite depth dose curves were nearly identically at the level of beam axis: with an effective depth of maximum buildup (d(max)) at approximately 1 mm below the skin surface and the depth to 80% depth dose at around 6 mm. The overall X-ray contamination was approximately 1.0% and 1.2% for the single-field and dual-field system

  2. Validation of the Italian version of the Stanford Presenteeism Scale in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicolini, Giancarlo; Della Pelle, Carlo; Cerratti, Francesca; Franza, Marcello; Flacco, Maria E

    2016-07-01

    To ascertain the validity and reliability of the Italian version of the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6). Presenteeism has been associated with a work productivity reduction, a lower quality of work and an increased risk of developing health disorders. It is particularly high among nurses and needs valid tools to be assessed. A validation study was carried out from July to September 2014. A three-section tool, made of a demographic form, the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) was administered to a sample of nurses, enrolled in three Italian hospitals. Cronbach's α for the entire sample (229 nurses) was found to be 0.72. A significant negative correlation between SPS and perceived stress scores evidenced the external validity. The factor analysis showed a two-component solution, accounting for 71.2% of the variance. The confirmatory factor analysis showed an adequate fit. The Italian SPS-6 is a valid and reliable tool for workplace surveys. Since the validity and reliability of SPS-6 has been confirmed for the Italian version, we have now a valid tool that can measure the levels of presenteeism among Italian nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Reconstructing, Investigating the Reliability and Validity and Scoring the Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Saleh Sedghpour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to reconstruct determining validity, and score The Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test fourth edition (SDRT4 in the sixth grade students. Methods: The population of the study was all sixth grades of the 19 educational districts from Tehran, 571 students (255 boys and 316 girls were selected by using a random multi-cluster sampling. The data were analyzed. The techniques were item analysis (difficulty index, discriminative index, and loop techniques. Validity, translation validity, content validity, and construct validity (factorial analysis, and reliability (Kuder-Richardson. Results: The exploratory factor analysis determined five factors: declarative knowledge, inferential knowledge, procedural knowledge and visualization knowledge. The reliability of the Stanford diagnostic Reading Test’s subtests by computing the Kuder-Richardson coefficient were 0.778, 0.732 and 0.748 for comprehension subtest, vocabulary subtest and scanning subtest in order. Discussion: By considering the results of present study, SDRT4 has good reliability and validity and can appropriately diagnose the reading disabled students in the sixth grade.

  4. Reproducibility of the acute rejection diagnosis in human cardiac allografts. The Stanford Classification and the International Grading System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Nielsen, B

    1993-01-01

    Transplantation has become an accepted treatment of many cardiac end-stage diseases. Acute cellular rejection accounts for 15% to 20% of all graft failures. The first grading system of acute cellular rejection, the Stanford Classification, was introduced in 1979, and since then many other grading...... systems have evolved. Most recently, the International Grading System was introduced in The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. In this study the interobserver reproducibility of both the Stanford Classification and the International Grading System is evaluated using Kappa statistics. Three...... observers evaluated 168 endomyocardial biopsy specimens according to the Stanford Classification and 100 endomyocardial biopsy specimens according to the International Grading System. The evaluation was carried out blindly. Kappa values of 54.1% and 51.5%, respectively, were obtained, both significantly...

  5. Characterizing potential earthquake signals on the Stanford-USGS ultra-low frequency electromagnetic (ULFEM) array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, L.; Connor, D.; McPhee, D. K.; Glen, J. M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Anomalous ultra-low frequency (0.01-10 Hz) electromagnetic signals have been reported prior to and during M ≥ 6.0 earthquakes in a variety of places around the world, most notably prior to the 1989 Ms 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake in California. Stanford University, in conjunction with the USGS and UC Berkeley, has maintained five ULFEM recording stations along the San Andreas Fault. We are searching our ULFEM data for anomalous signals before earthquakes. Previous reports of possible ULFEM precursors, or their absence following exhaustive searches of available data, define a crude distance-magnitude relationship with larger-closer earthquakes capable of producing detectable precursors. No earthquakes exceeding this distance-magnitude relationship have yet occurred within 500 km of our network; therefore our study is as yet mostly an attempt to develop appropriate methodologies. We examined 40 Hz EM data around the arrival time of the largest/closest earthquakes to our array, focusing on co-shaking signals and pulsations as have been described preceding the 10/31/2007 Alum Rock M 5.4 earthquake. For the three stations in the Bay Area, our search included data from when the BART electric train was operating and also dormant. We observed co-shaking signals at stations between 10-40 km from the epicenters of earthquakes with varying magnitudes (M 2.6-M 6.0). A search of data in the week prior to the Alum Rock earthquake on our closest station (41 km from the epicenter) has thus far identified pulsations of similar duration and polarity as those identified by other workers on a station 2 km from the epicenter (~9 km from the hypocenter). The amplitudes of the majority of the pulsations identified in this study are within several standard deviations of background noise levels and are otherwise not distinguishable from other signals of similar frequency in the time series. To establish and maintain the integrity of the data recorded from the stations in our array, a

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  7. Saw-tooth Instability Studies At The Stanford Linear Collider Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Podobedov, B V

    2000-01-01

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blowup in quadrupole or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of our instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional we had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency (10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. We have also employed the state-of the art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of our streak camera experiments we have quantitatively described the p...

  8. The Sound Games: Introducing Gamification into Stanford's Orientation on Emergency Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Viveta; Stromberg, Andrew Q; Rosston, Peter

    2017-09-18

    Point-of-care ultrasound is a critical component of graduate medical training in emergency medicine. Innovation in ultrasound teaching methods is greatly needed to keep up with a changing medical landscape. A field-wide trend promoting simulation and technology-enhanced learning is underway in an effort to improve patient care, as well as patient safety. In an effort to both motivate students and increase their skill retention, training methods are shifting towards a friendly competition model and are gaining popularity nationwide. In line with this emerging trend, Stanford incorporated the Sound Games - an educational ultrasound event with a distinctly competitive thread - within its existing two-day point-of-care ultrasound orientation course for emergency medicine interns. In this study, we demonstrate successful implementation of the orientation program, significant learning gains in participants, and overall student satisfaction with the course.

  9. Dosimetric characterization and optimization of a customized Stanford total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luĉić, Felipe; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Caprile, Paola; Zelada, Gabriel; Goset, Karen

    2013-09-06

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) has been used as a treatment for mycosis fungoides. Our center has implemented a modified Stanford technique with six pairs of 6 MeV adjacent electron beams, incident perpendicularly on the patient who remains lying on a translational platform, at 200 cm from the source. The purpose of this study is to perform a dosimetric characterization of this technique and to investigate its optimization in terms of energy characteristics, extension, and uniformity of the treatment field. In order to improve the homogeneity of the distribution, a custom-made polyester filter of variable thickness and a uniform PMMA degrader plate were used. It was found that the characteristics of a 9 MeV beam with an 8 mm thick degrader were similar to those of the 6 MeV beam without filter, but with an increased surface dose. The combination of the degrader and the polyester filter improved the uniformity of the distribution along the dual field (180cm long), increasing the dose at the borders of field by 43%. The optimum angles for the pair of beams were ± 27°. This configuration avoided displacement of the patient, and reduced the treatment time and the positioning problems related to the abutting superior and inferior fields. Dose distributions in the transversal plane were measured for the six incidences of the Stanford technique with film dosimetry in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom. This was performed for the optimized treatment and compared with the previously implemented technique. The comparison showed an increased superficial dose and improved uniformity of the 85% isodose curve coverage for the optimized technique.

  10. Implementation and evaluation of Stanford Health Care direct-care teledermatology program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh S Pathipati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teledermatology has proven to be an effective means of providing dermatologic care. The existing research has primarily evaluated its usefulness in a consultative model. Few academic centers have evaluated a patient-initiated model, and direct-to-consumer services remain the subject of controversy. Stanford Health Care recently launched a direct-care, patient-initiated teledermatology pilot program. This article evaluates the viability and patient satisfaction with this service. Materials and Methods: During the pilot period, patients were able to seek remote dermatologic care using an eVisit tool in their MyHealth account. Patients initiated the consultation, answered questions regarding their complaint, and uploaded a picture if relevant. A Stanford dermatologist reviewed each eVisit and responded with an assessment and plan. The dermatologist noted whether they were able to make a diagnosis and their level of confidence in it. After the study, 10 patients participated in a focus group to provide feedback on the service. Results: In all, 38 patients sought care during the pilot period. A dermatologist was able to make a diagnosis in 36 of 38 (95% cases, with an average confidence level of 7.9 of 10. The average time to consultation was 0.8 days. Patients indicated high levels of satisfaction with the service although they had suggestions for improvement. Discussion: Patients provided clinically useful images and information in a direct-care teledermatology model. Such services allow dermatology providers to increase access while maintaining high-quality care in an academic medical center. Further research is needed on standalone services that cannot integrate encounters with the patient’s existing medical record.

  11. A Validity Study of the K-ABC, the WISC-R, and the Stanford-Binet with Nonreferred Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zins, Joseph E.; Barnett, David W.

    1984-01-01

    Reports findings about the relationship between the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC), the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R), and the Stanford-Binet for 40 children with no known impairments. The overall results suggested some support for the use of the K-ABC as a measure of intelligence. (BH)

  12. Cognitive Development and Down Syndrome: Age-Related Change on the Stanford-Binet Test (Fourth Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzens, Donna; Cuskelly, Monica; Haynes, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Growth models for subtests of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, 4th edition (R. L. Thorndike, E. P. Hagen, & J. M. Sattler, 1986a, 1986b) were developed for individuals with Down syndrome. Models were based on the assessments of 208 individuals who participated in longitudinal and cross-sectional research between 1987 and 2004. Variation…

  13. La introducción de la escala de inteligencia de Stanford-Binet en el Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. García

    2016-06-01

    s intelligence. These were later modified in the United States by Lewis Terman, who published the most known and influential review. In Latin America and other regions of the world the local adaptations took place at the same time. In Paraguay, the Stanford-Binet test was introduced in the decade of 1920 by the school teacher Ramón Indalecio Cardozo. He did not limit himself to an uncritical reproduction, but realized some modifications to adapt the scale to the local culture and improve its reliability. This article studies the introduction of the Stanford-Binet test to the general context of the Paraguayan education and Cardozo's adaptations. To achieve this, we proceed to a review of primary and secondary sources, putting ideas and concepts in its correct historical context. It also contributes to extend previous papers focused on the author’s works and Paraguayan psychology during the pre-university period.

  14. Enhancing the training of internal medicine residents at Stanford by establishing a model group practice and raising its clinical educators' status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, M B; Tower, D

    1992-10-01

    The education of residents is shifting to the ambulatory care setting. In addition, there is a growing trend toward managed care and increasing competition for patients to be served by "real-world" practices. The authors describe the formation and operation of a program that was established in 1981 at the Stanford University School of Medicine to respond to these changes: the Stanford Medical Group (SMG), a model group practice in internal medicine that operates within the academic medical center. Because raising the status of the clinician-educator faculty was a critical issue for the SMG, the authors also describe the Medical Center Professoriate, a separate faculty track created in 1989 to recognize and reward Stanford's clinician-educators. The authors conclude that the SMG has succeeded in its training and patient care goals and has weathered the great changes in the health care environment that have taken place since 1981. They also report that the separate faculty track is serving its purpose well. They hope that educators and program directors at other academic medical centers may find the descriptions of the SMG and the professoriate useful in solving similar problems.

  15. The Impact of Postgraduate Health Technology Innovation Training: Outcomes of the Stanford Biodesign Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, James; Hellman, Eva; Denend, Lyn; Rait, Douglas; Venook, Ross; Lucian, Linda; Azagury, Dan; Yock, Paul G; Brinton, Todd J

    2017-05-01

    Stanford Biodesign launched its Innovation Fellowship in 2001 as a first-of-its kind postgraduate training experience for teaching biomedical technology innovators a need-driven process for developing medical technologies and delivering them to patients. Since then, many design-oriented educational programs have been initiated, yet the impact of this type of training remains poorly understood. This study measures the career focus, leadership trajectory, and productivity of 114 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship alumni based on survey data and public career information. It also compares alumni on certain publicly available metrics to finalists interviewed but not selected. Overall, 60% of alumni are employed in health technology in contrast to 35% of finalists interviewed but not selected. On leadership, 72% of alumni hold managerial or higher positions compared to 48% of the finalist group. A total of 67% of alumni reported that the fellowship had been "extremely beneficial" on their careers. As a measure of technology translation, more than 440,000 patients have been reached with technologies developed directly out of the Biodesign Innovation Fellowship, with another 1,000,000+ aided by solutions initiated by alumni after their training. This study suggests a positive impact of the fellowship program on the career focus, leadership, and productivity of its alumni.

  16. Outcomes from a postgraduate biomedical technology innovation training program: the first 12 years of Stanford Biodesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Todd J; Kurihara, Christine Q; Camarillo, David B; Pietzsch, Jan B; Gorodsky, Julian; Zenios, Stefanos A; Doshi, Rajiv; Shen, Christopher; Kumar, Uday N; Mairal, Anurag; Watkins, Jay; Popp, Richard L; Wang, Paul J; Makower, Josh; Krummel, Thomas M; Yock, Paul G

    2013-09-01

    The Stanford Biodesign Program began in 2001 with a mission of helping to train leaders in biomedical technology innovation. A key feature of the program is a full-time postgraduate fellowship where multidisciplinary teams undergo a process of sourcing clinical needs, inventing solutions and planning for implementation of a business strategy. The program places a priority on needs identification, a formal process of selecting, researching and characterizing needs before beginning the process of inventing. Fellows and students from the program have gone on to careers that emphasize technology innovation across industry and academia. Biodesign trainees have started 26 companies within the program that have raised over $200 million and led to the creation of over 500 new jobs. More importantly, although most of these technologies are still at a very early stage, several projects have received regulatory approval and so far more than 150,000 patients have been treated by technologies invented by our trainees. This paper reviews the initial outcomes of the program and discusses lessons learned and future directions in terms of training priorities.

  17. [Clinical practice and thoughts on the strategy of root reconstruction for Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C S; Li, J; Lai, H

    2017-04-01

    The strategy of root reconstruction for Stanford type A aortic dissection (AAD) includes resection of the intimal tear site, correction of concomitant aortic valve dysfunction and amendment of coronary lesion. Supracommissural tube graft replacement is a well-adopted and convenient procedure for most patients, although its application is limited when distinct sinus expansion and severe intimal damage is present. Composite valve conduit replacement (Bentall procedure) is suitable for patients with overt sinus damage. However, a fraction of patients with functional aortic valve will be unnecessarily put into risks for prosthetic complications. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSRR), which includes aortic root remodeling (Yacoub procedure) and reimplantation (David procedure) techniques, has the advantage of retaining autologous aortic valve while guaranteeing resection of damaged vessel segments.The Yacoub procedure is relatively convenient but harbors long-term risk for annulus expansion, while the David procedure demonstrates long-term benefit but may be too demanding to be operated in emergent scenario as AAD. The last decade has witnessed worldwide endeavors to investigate the treatment strategy for aortic root, especially the VSRR approach. The preliminary results are encouraging and demonstrating improvements for both mid- and long-term outcomes of AAD, which enables standardized and personalized surgical management for these patients.

  18. [The relationship between preoperative renal failure and severe postoperative hypoxemia of patients received surgical procedures for Stanford A aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X D; Ju, F; Liu, N; Zheng, J; Sun, L Z; Zheng, S H

    2016-08-01

    To study the relationship between renal failure and severe postoperative hypoxemia of patients received surgical procedure for Stanford A aortic dissection. Clinical data of 411 consecutive patients from January 2014 to April 2015, who received surgical procedure for Stanford A aortic dissection in Department of Cardiovascular Surgery of Beijing Anzhen Hospital, were collected retrospectively. The appearance of severe postoperative hypoxemia was recorded in all the cases. All the data about potential prognostic factors was put into the database and analyzed by univariate and multivariate Logistic regression respectively. Severe postoperative hypoxemia (PO2/FiO2hypoxemia showed no statistical significance. However, the influence of preoperative serum creatinine showed statistical significance (OR=1.009, 95%CI: 1.000 to 1.018, P=0.048). The preoperative creatinine clearance rate of patients has no direct relationship with severe postoperative hypoxemia. But the preoperative serum creatinine could be regarded as an independent predictor of severe postoperative hypoxemia.

  19. Assessment of the Psychometric Properties of the New Version of Tehran- Stanford- Binet Intelligence Scale in Children with Dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas Mahvashe-Wernosfaderani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive abilities assessment, is considered to be one of the most complicated and controversial issues in psychological tests. In spite of great usage of new version of Tehran- Stanford- Binet intelligence scale in screening and diagnosis, they have not made so many endeavors to use this valid test in our country and little researches have been conducted to survey psychometric characteristics of mentioned scale. Given the above considerations, the aim of this study is to investigate Tehran-Stanford-Binet intelligence scale psychometric characteristics in dyslectic children. Materials and Methods: In this psychometric study with classical approach, the statistical society was all the students with dyslexia in the elementary schools of Tehran provinces in 1390. The sample size was equal with 120 students with dyslexia who were selected based on purposive sampling. The new version of Tehran-Stanford-Binet intelligence Scale which includes 10 subtests in verbal and nonverbal domains (fluid reasoning, knowledge, quantitative reasoning, visual spatial processing and working memory and eight IQ was used for them. Findings highlight characteristics of this tool is its ability to calculate the combined scores connected to the reading skills. ROC curve methods, kronbach alpha and pearson correlation was used to analyze the data. Results: Result show that SB5 Test has a good reliability and diagnostic validity. It has 98% sensitivity and a desirable potential to identify student with dyslexia (72%. Conclusion: SB5 could be used as an identificationtoal test for dyslexia.

  20. Reminiscing about thesis work with E T Jaynes at Stanford in the 1950s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Frederick W.

    2013-11-01

    work there. I thought it sounded about right as an approximately two-three year position: repay some debts and look around at other possibilities (especially academe?). I left around June 1960 to take up this position in the research lab in Newport Beach. At about this same time (~late 1959), Ed was moving to his new 'chair' at Washington University in St Louis. I proceeded as quickly as I could to put together a thesis after arriving in Newport Beach; I wrote about what I had done, as best as I could in my naiveté about such undertakings. I wrote of the work I had done under Ed's kind and patient guidance for the two years in Palo Alto. I soon remembered that Ed had done a recent Stanford Microwave Lab report on our project; his writing was so much better than mine that I thought it witless to put out something as 'uneven' as I had written by then. At just this time that I was cobbling together a thesis, a consultant at Aeroneutronic, Jay Singer of UC Berkeley EE department, approached me in the hall, (no tele-commuting then!) asking if I might have something to contribute to a special issue of a journal of the IEEE he was editing, on the subject of 'Quantum Electronics'. (Comment: One of the earliest predecessors to the MRI, Jay Singer was then measuring the blood flow in rat tails and human arms; he holds two key MRI patents). I said I thought I did have something. The journal sounded appropriate, so I soon handed my 'thesis' to Jay, put Ed's name first (of course, since it consisted so largely of his words from the Microwave Lab report, but also since Ed was my 'guru'), ...and that was that...done [4]. From my perspective, it seemed to subsequently sink to the bottom of the sea, not to be seen by me again for many years until the elegant Walther-Rempe-Klein (WRK) experiments of 1987 on long-time coherent radiative behavior appeared [5]. They confirmed the long-time quantum-theoretical results of Eberly, Narozhny and Sanchez-Mondragon [6]. Bob Buley and I, while at

  1. New Evaluation Vector through the Stanford Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning Environment (SMILE) for Participatory Action Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; An, Ji-Young

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews an evaluation vector model driven from a participatory action research leveraging a collective inquiry system named SMILE (Stanford Mobile Inquiry-based Learning Environment). SMILE has been implemented in a diverse set of collective inquiry generation and analysis scenarios including community health care-specific professional development sessions and community-based participatory action research projects. In each scenario, participants are given opportunities to construct inquiries around physical and emotional health-related phenomena in their own community. Participants formulated inquiries as well as potential clinical treatments and hypothetical scenarios to address health concerns or clarify misunderstandings or misdiagnoses often found in their community practices. From medical universities to rural village health promotion organizations, all participatory inquiries and potential solutions can be collected and analyzed. The inquiry and solution sets represent an evaluation vector which helps educators better understand community health issues at a much deeper level. SMILE helps collect problems that are most important and central to their community health concerns. The evaluation vector, consisting participatory and collective inquiries and potential solutions, helps the researchers assess the participants' level of understanding on issues around health concerns and practices while helping the community adequately formulate follow-up action plans. The method used in SMILE requires much further enhancement with machine learning and advanced data visualization.

  2. Development and psychometric characteristics of a new domain of the stanford faculty development program instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Mayowa O

    2014-01-01

    Teacher's attitude domain, a pivotal aspect of clinical teaching, is missing in the Stanford Faculty Development Program Questionnaire (SFDPQ), the most widely used student-based assessment method of clinical teaching skills. This study was conducted to develop and validate the teacher's attitude domain and evaluate the validity and internal consistency reliability of the augmented SFDPQ. Items generated for the new domain included teacher's enthusiasm, sobriety, humility, thoroughness, empathy, and accessibility. The study involved 20 resident doctors assessed once by 64 medical students using the augmented SFDPQ. Construct validity was explored using correlation among the different domains and a global rating scale. Factor analysis was performed. The response rate was 94%. The new domain had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.89, with 1-factor solution explaining 57.1% of its variance. It showed the strongest correlation to the global rating scale (rho = 0.71). The augmented SFDPQ, which had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.93, correlated better (rho = 0.72, p < 0.00001) to the global rating scale than the original SFDPQ (rho = 0.67, p < 0.00001). The new teacher's attitude domain exhibited good internal consistency and construct and factorial validity. It enhanced the content and construct validity of the SFDPQ. The validated construct of the augmented SFDPQ is recommended for design and evaluation of basic and continuing clinical teaching programs. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  3. Saw-tooth instability studies at the Stanford Linear Collider damping rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podobedov, B.

    1999-12-14

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch, and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blow-up in quadruple or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of the instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional the authors had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency ({approximately}10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. The authors have also employed a state-of-the-art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of the streak camera experiments the authors have quantitatively described the phase space of unstable bunches. The authors have found the radial structure of the instability mode and established that it only displaces a few percent of the beam particles. In another series of experiments the authors have correlated the instability signals from the beams before the extraction from the damping rings with their trajectories in the linac downstream. This showed that the instability results in a significant transverse beam jitter in the linac which compromises the damping ring performance as an injector. In addition, the authors have studied the instability behavior under the broad range of stored beam parameters using both passive observation and driven excitation. These measurements revealed unexpected beam behavior significantly above the instability threshold. Finally, the authors performed several low current experiments to estimate the damping ring vacuum chamber impedance.

  4. The Stanford Data Miner: a novel approach for integrating and exploring heterogeneous immunological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebert Janet C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems-level approaches are increasingly common in both murine and human translational studies. These approaches employ multiple high information content assays. As a result, there is a need for tools to integrate heterogeneous types of laboratory and clinical/demographic data, and to allow the exploration of that data by aggregating and/or segregating results based on particular variables (e.g., mean cytokine levels by age and gender. Methods Here we describe the application of standard data warehousing tools to create a novel environment for user-driven upload, integration, and exploration of heterogeneous data. The system presented here currently supports flow cytometry and immunoassays performed in the Stanford Human Immune Monitoring Center, but could be applied more generally. Results Users upload assay results contained in platform-specific spreadsheets of a defined format, and clinical and demographic data in spreadsheets of flexible format. Users then map sample IDs to connect the assay results with the metadata. An OLAP (on-line analytical processing data exploration interface allows filtering and display of various dimensions (e.g., Luminex analytes in rows, treatment group in columns, filtered on a particular study. Statistics such as mean, median, and N can be displayed. The views can be expanded or contracted to aggregate or segregate data at various levels. Individual-level data is accessible with a single click. The result is a user-driven system that permits data integration and exploration in a variety of settings. We show how the system can be used to find gender-specific differences in serum cytokine levels, and compare them across experiments and assay types. Conclusions We have used the tools and techniques of data warehousing, including open-source business intelligence software, to support investigator-driven data integration and mining of diverse immunological data.

  5. The Stanford Data Miner: a novel approach for integrating and exploring heterogeneous immunological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Janet C; Munsil, Wes; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Davis, Mark M; Maecker, Holden T

    2012-03-28

    Systems-level approaches are increasingly common in both murine and human translational studies. These approaches employ multiple high information content assays. As a result, there is a need for tools to integrate heterogeneous types of laboratory and clinical/demographic data, and to allow the exploration of that data by aggregating and/or segregating results based on particular variables (e.g., mean cytokine levels by age and gender). Here we describe the application of standard data warehousing tools to create a novel environment for user-driven upload, integration, and exploration of heterogeneous data. The system presented here currently supports flow cytometry and immunoassays performed in the Stanford Human Immune Monitoring Center, but could be applied more generally. Users upload assay results contained in platform-specific spreadsheets of a defined format, and clinical and demographic data in spreadsheets of flexible format. Users then map sample IDs to connect the assay results with the metadata. An OLAP (on-line analytical processing) data exploration interface allows filtering and display of various dimensions (e.g., Luminex analytes in rows, treatment group in columns, filtered on a particular study). Statistics such as mean, median, and N can be displayed. The views can be expanded or contracted to aggregate or segregate data at various levels. Individual-level data is accessible with a single click. The result is a user-driven system that permits data integration and exploration in a variety of settings. We show how the system can be used to find gender-specific differences in serum cytokine levels, and compare them across experiments and assay types. We have used the tools and techniques of data warehousing, including open-source business intelligence software, to support investigator-driven data integration and mining of diverse immunological data.

  6. Saw-tooth instability studies at the Stanford Linear Collider damping rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobedov, Boris Vyacheslavovich

    2000-08-01

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blowup in quadrupole or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of our instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional we had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency (10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. We have also employed the state-of the art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of our streak camera experiments we have quantitatively described the phase space of unstable bunches. We have found the radial structure of the instability mode and established that it only displaces a few percent of the beam particles. In another series of experiments we have correlated the instability signals from the beams before the extraction from the damping rings with their trajectories in the linac downstream. This showed that the instability results in a significant transverse beam jitter in the linac which compromises the damping ring performance as an injector. In addition, we have studied the instability behavior under the broad range of stored beam parameters using both passive and driven excitation. These measurements revealed unexpected beam behavior significantly above the instability threshold. Finally we performed several low current experiments to estimate the damping ring vacuum chamber impedance. We also present some analytical results regarding the instability and compare them to the observations. In

  7. Constraints on spatially oscillating sub-mm forces from the Stanford Optically Levitated Microsphere Experiment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, I.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2017-11-01

    A recent analysis by one of the authors [L. Perivolaropoulos, Phys. Rev. D 95, 084050 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevD.95.084050] has indicated the presence of a 2 σ signal of spatially oscillating new force residuals in the torsion balance data of the Washington experiment. We extend that study and analyze the data of the Stanford Optically Levitated Microsphere Experiment (SOLME) [A. D. Rider et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 101101 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.101101] (kindly provided by A. D. Rider et al.) searching for sub-mm spatially oscillating new force signals. We find a statistically significant oscillating signal for a force residual of the form F (z )=α cos (2/π λ z +c ) where z is the distance between the macroscopic interacting masses (levitated microsphere and cantilever). The best fit parameter values are α =(1.1 ±0.4 )×10-17N , λ =(35.2 ±0.6 ) μ m . Monte Carlo simulation of the SOLME data under the assumption of zero force residuals has indicated that the statistical significance of this signal is at about 2 σ level. The improvement of the χ2 fit compared to the null hypothesis (zero residual force) corresponds to Δ χ2=13.1 . There are indications that this previously unnoticed signal is indeed in the data but is most probably induced by a systematic effect caused by diffraction of non-Gaussian tails of the laser beam. Thus the amplitude of this detected signal can only be useful as an upper bound to the amplitude of new spatially oscillating forces on sub-mm scales. In the context of gravitational origin of the signal emerging from a fundamental modification of the Newtonian potential of the form Veff(r )=-G M/r (1 +αOcos (2/π λ r +θ ))≡VN(r )+Vosc(r ) , we evaluate the source integral of the oscillating macroscopically induced force. If the origin of the SOLME oscillating signal is systematic, the parameter αO is bounded as αOchameleon oscillating potentials etc.).

  8. The Longhorn Array Database (LAD: An Open-Source, MIAME compliant implementation of the Stanford Microarray Database (SMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Vishwanath R

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The power of microarray analysis can be realized only if data is systematically archived and linked to biological annotations as well as analysis algorithms. Description The Longhorn Array Database (LAD is a MIAME compliant microarray database that operates on PostgreSQL and Linux. It is a fully open source version of the Stanford Microarray Database (SMD, one of the largest microarray databases. LAD is available at http://www.longhornarraydatabase.org Conclusions Our development of LAD provides a simple, free, open, reliable and proven solution for storage and analysis of two-color microarray data.

  9. Sir Stanford Cade KBE CB FRCS (1895-1973): a pioneer in the modern treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbury, Gerald; Ellis, Harold

    2009-02-01

    Stanford Cade, born in Tsarist Russia, trained in Medicine first in Brussels and then in London at King's College and Westminster Hospital. His potential as a brilliant clinician was recognized by his appointment to the surgical staff at Westminster at the early age of 29. Here he was one of the first in the UK to use radium in the treatment of a wide variety of tumours. His interests covered the broad spectrum of malignant diseases including the head and neck, breast, bone and soft tissues. He was an early exponent of the multidisciplinary approach to the management of cancer.

  10. Gonadal status and reproductive function following treatment for Hodgkin's disease in childhood: The Stanford experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortin, T.T.; Shostak, C.A.; Donaldson, S.S. (Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    To ascertain the impact of therapy on gonadal function and reproductive outcome among children treated for Hodgkin's disease, we reviewed the experience at Stanford University Medical Center during the years 1965-1986. There were 240 children 15 years of age or younger, 92 girls and 148 boys; with median follow-up of 9 years, maximum follow-up was 26 years. Of this cohort, data on gonadal function were available on 20 boys, 5 of whom were considered prepubescent; they had no clinical evidence of sexual maturation and were less than 13 years of age. Evaluation of the boys included testicular biopsy, semen analyses and the ability to procreate. Serum gonadotropin hormone levels (FSH, LH) were studied in 11 boys who also had semen analyses. Sexual maturation was attained in all boys without the need for androgen replacement. Among the eight boys treated with radiation alone, four were able to father a child (3 following 40-45 Gy pelvic radiation dose, 1 without pelvic radiation) from 3-19 years following treatment. Three others who received 30-44 Gy pelvic radiation were oligospermic when tested at 10 to 15 years post-treatment. Semen analyses in 10 of 12 (83%) boys who had been treated with six cycles of MOPP with or without pelvic radiation revealed absolute azoospermia with no evidence of recovery as along as 11 years of follow-up. Following prolonged azoospermia, 2 of the 12 boys (17%) had recovery of fertility, with normalization of sperm count and/or ability to procreate at 12 and 15 years following treatment. There was no correlation with serum gonadotropin levels and sterility. Data on menstrual history, pregnancy and offspring were available in 86 (92%) of the girls. Seventy-five of the 86 girls (87%) have normal menstrual function. However, none of the females who underwent pelvic radiation without prior oophoropexy has maintained ovarian function.

  11. [Spiral CT and MRT of the operated Stanford-type-A aortic dissection: its course and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, T; Abu-Ramadan, D; Pauleit, D; Hofer, U; Likungu, J; Preusse, K; Layer, G; Schild, H

    1998-02-01

    To demonstrate normal postoperative spiral CT and MRI findings and typical complications in patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection. 24 patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection were followed up by spiral CT and MRI (0.5 Tesla). Presence of persistent dissection, progressive or new dissection, proximal and distal anastomosis, periprosthetic space, supraaortic vessels, thrombosis and dilatation of the true and false lumen were evaluated. The following postoperative complications were seen: three pseudoaneurysms which developed at the proximal anastomoses of the Dacron prosthesis in two cases and at the insertion site of the reimplanted left coronary artery after implantation of a composite graft (Bentall procedure) in one case; one re-dissection; one perforation of the false lumen; periprosthetic flow in one patient after surgical repair of type A dissection by the graft inclusion technique; progressive dilatation of the false lumen in 4 cases; dilatation of the aortic root in a Marfan patient after replacement of the ascending aorta. Precise knowledge of the surgical technique performed is crucial to accurate postoperative imaging evaluation. MRI is the method of choice in the postoperative follow-up of clinically stable patients with aortic dissections.

  12. 75 FR 18482 - Stanford University Habitat Conservation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ...), California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii), San Francisco garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis... The public meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language...

  13. Postoperative follow-up of Stanford type A aortic dissections with Spiral-CT and MRI: Normal imaging findings and typical complications; Spiral-CT und MRT der operierten Stanford Typ A-Aortendissektion: Verlauf und Komplikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Pauleit, D.; Hofer, U.; Preusse, K.; Layer, G.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Abu-Ramadan, D.; Likungu, J. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Herz- und Gefaesschirurgie

    1998-02-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate normal postoperative Spiral-CT and MRI findings and typical complications in patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection. Results: The following postoperative complications were seen: Three pseudoaneurysms which developed at the proximal anastomoses of the Dacron prosthesis in two cases and at the insertion site of the reimplanted left coronary artery after implantation of a composite graft (Bentall procedure) in one case; one re-dissection; one perforation of the false lumen; periprostethic flow in one patient after surgical repair of type A dissection by the graft inclusion technique; progressive dilatation of the false lumen in 4 cases; dilatation of the aortic root in a Marfan patient after replacement of the ascending aorta. Conclusion: Precise knowledge of the surgical technique performed is crucial to accurate postoperative imaging evaluation. MRI is the method of choice in the postoperative follow-up of clinically stable patients with aortic dissections. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Darstellung der verschiedenen Operationsverfahren bei der Stanford Typ A-Dissektion mit ihren typischen Aspekten in Spiral-CT und MRT sowie ihren spezifischen Komplikationen. Ergebnisse: Folgende postoperative Komplikationen traten auf: Drei Pseudoaneurysmen, die zweimal von der proximalen Anastomose des Aorta-ascendens-Ersatzes sowie einmal von der Insertionsstelle der reimplantierten linken Koronararterie (Operation nach Bentall) ausgingen; eine Re-Dissektion; eine gedeckte Perforation des falschen Lumens; periprothetischer Fluss nach Anwendung der Graft-Inclusion-Technik; progrediente Dilatation des falschen Lumens in 4 Faellen; aneurysmatische Erweiterung des originaeren Aortenbulbus bei einem Marfan-Patienten nach suprakoronarem Aorta-ascendens-Ersatz. Schlussfolgerung: Bei der postoperativen Verlaufskontrolle von Patienten mit Aortendissektionen mittels Spiral-CT und MRT sind Kenntnisse der verschiedenen Operationsverfahren mit

  14. [Thoraco-abdominal aortic replacement in chronic phase in a patient with temporary paraplegia after Stanford B acute dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Goro; Hata, Masaki; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2013-07-01

    A 42-year-old man underwent was performed with thoraco-abdominal aneurysm replacement accompaniedy with reconstruction of abdominal branches and intercostal arteries. Eighteen months before, he had suffered from Stanford already been cured with paraplegia on being type B acute aortic dissection combined with paraplegia. When paraplegia had been occurred, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was had been performed promptly, and 4 days later, neurologic deficit was disappeared in 1 day. During the thoraco-abdominal aortic operation, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was performed done again. After the operation, paraplegia did was not occurred and he did not feel somewhat wrong with his legs. He was discharged from hospital on foot by himself. This case showed the efficacy of cerebral spinal fluid drainage for not only both with the prevention but also and treatment of paraplegia.

  15. Assessing Giftedness in Children: Comparing the Accuracy of Three Shortened Measures of Intelligence to the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Jocelyn H.; McIntosh, David E.; Dixon, Felicia; Williams, Tasha; Youman, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the accuracy of three shortened measures of intelligence: the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability, Third Edition Brief Intellectual Ability (WJ III COG BIA) score; the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, Fifth Edition Abbreviated IQ (SB5 ABIQ); and the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test IQ Composite (K-BIT) in predicting…

  16. Psychological Evaluation of Preschool Children: Or Can Learning Disabilities be Evaluated in the Preschool Child Using the Stanford-Binet as a Screening Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Pearl; Graf, Mercedes

    Tested with the Stanford-Binet Scale of Intelligence were 70 children, aged 3- to 5-years with IQ's from 75 to 145, to determine whether the test could serve as a diagnostic tool for identifying learning disabilities (LD) in preschool children. It was hypothesized that LD children would have a basal age no more than two levels below chronological…

  17. Complicating Culture and Difference: Situating Asian American Youth Identities in Lisa Yee's "Millicent Min," "Girl Genius" and "Stanford Wong Flunks Big-Time"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This review situates how culture, difference, and identity are discursively constructed in "Millicent Min, Girl Genius" and "Stanford Wong Flunks Big-Time," two award-winning books written by critically acclaimed Asian American author Lisa Yee. Using contextual literacy approaches, the characters, cultural motifs, and physical settings in these…

  18. Efficiency of Screening Procedures for Assigning Levels of the Stanford Achievement Test (Eighth Edition) to Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the efficiency of over 5,000 reading and mathematics screening tests specifically developed for assigning levels of the Stanford Achievement Test, 8th edition (SAT-8), to deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Analysis found the screening tests more effective in assigning student levels for some SAT-8 subtests than for others. (DB)

  19. Risk factors of pre-operational aortic rupture in acute and subacute Stanford type A aortic dissection patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo-Dong; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Jun; Lu, Fang-Lin; Han, Lin; Xu, Zhi-Yun

    2017-12-01

    Aortic rupture is one of the main causes of early death in acute and subacute Stanford type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) patients. This study aimed to analyze potential risk factors for pre-operational aortic rupture in ATAAD patients. We retrospectively reviewed aortic dissection cases treated between May 2013 and May 2016 in Changhai Hospital, Shanghai. A total of 329 patients with ATAAD were included in the final analysis, and 31 patients died of aortic rupture before surgery. Clinical data on basic characteristics, clinical presentation, and biochemical measurements for all 329 patients were analyzed. The in-hospital aortic rupture rate was 9.4% (31/329), and the rupture accounted for 47% (31/66) of all in-hospital deaths of ATAAD patients. Patients who experienced rupture were significantly older (P0.7 ng/mL (OR: 9.28; 95% CI, 1.72-50.06; P=0.010), and D-dimer level ≥10 µg/mL (OR: 13.37; 95% CI, 2.18-81.97; P=0.005). Aortic rupture accounted for 47% of all in-hospital deaths among patient with ATAAD. Shock, pain requiring medication, a troponin level >0.7 ng/mL and a D-dimer level ≥10 µg/mL are independent risk factors for aortic rupture in these patients.

  20. The Stanford-ReSurge Burn Scar Contracture Scale for Neck: Development and Initial Validation for Burn Scar Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lawrence; Puri, Vinita; Dangol, Mohan Krishna; Mannan, Iftekhar Ibne; Khundkar, Shafquat Hussain; Le Thua, Trung-Hau; Muguti, Godfrey; Rai, Shankar Man; Karanas, Yvonne; Chang, James

    2016-11-01

    Burn contractures can cause significant disability, particularly in patients in resource-limited settings. However, a gap exists in our ability to measure outcomes in patients with burn contractures of the neck. The objective of this study was to develop and validate the Stanford-ReSurge Burn Scar Contracture Scale-Neck to longitudinally assess functional status and measure functional improvement following contracture release of the neck. A literature review was performed to identify scales used in neck assessment and burn assessment. Items were then removed from the pool based on redundancy, feasibility, cultural appropriateness, and applicability to patients in international resource-limited environments. Remaining items were administered to patients with burn contracture of the neck. The initial literature review found 33 scales that were combined to create an initial pool of 714 items, which was first reduced to 40 items. Feedback from field testing then yielded a 20-item outcome tool to assess appearance, activities of daily living, somatosensation, satisfaction, and range of motion, with a floor of 20 and a ceiling score of 100 points. Preliminary testing with 10 patients showed an average preoperative score of 58 points and an average 1-month postoperative score of 42 points. The authors have created an outcome tool for measuring functional status following burn contracture release of the neck, which can easily be implemented in resource-limited settings where the burden of burn injuries and morbidities is disproportionately high. Ongoing work includes a multicountry study to evaluate validity and reliability.

  1. Transcarotid Artery Endovascular Reconstruction of the Aortic Arch by Modified Bifurcated Stent Graft for Stanford Type A Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old man with Stanford type B dissection underwent his first endovascular repair (EVAR in April 2004 by Talent thoracic stent graft. He had an uncomplicated recovery and maintained good blood pressure control. However, a new retrograde dissection appeared in September 2004. The new dissection involved his aortic arch and ascending thoracic aorta to the opening of the coronary arteries. To reconstruct the aortic arch, bypasses between the right common carotid artery (RCCA, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery were performed before endovascular repair. A modified bifurcated Talent stent graft was deployed from the RCCA to the ascending thoracic aorta with a long limb in the innominate artery and a short limb in the aortic arch. A further two pieces of graft were deployed via the common femoral artery. The ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch were reconstructed completely by the bifurcated stent graft. The final angiography confirmed that there was good stent graft configuration, normal blood flow, and stable haemodynamics. No endoleak or other major complications were encountered. This result indicated that it is possible to reconstruct the aortic arch with a bifurcated stent graft and could be a new endovascular repair model for complex thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

  2. Defending the Freedom to Innovate: Faculty Intellectual Property Rights after "Stanford v. Roche"

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Professors, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Tensions over faculty control of the fruits of their scholarship have been slowly building since the 1980s, but they have also intensified since late 2011. There have long been differences of opinion over ownership of patentable inventions, but over the last two years a number of universities have categorically asserted that they own these…

  3. Protection of xenon against postoperative oxygen impairment in adults undergoing Stanford Type-A acute aortic dissection surgery: Study protocol for a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Mu; Cheng, Yi; Yang, Yanwei; Pan, Xudong; Lu, Jiakai; Cheng, Weiping

    2017-08-01

    The available evidence shows that hypoxemia after Stanford Type-A acute aortic dissection (AAD) surgery is a frequent cause of several adverse consequences. The pathogenesis of postoperative hypoxemia after AAD surgery is complex, and ischemia/reperfusion and inflammation are likely to be underlying risk factors. Xenon, recognized as an ideal anesthetic and anti-inflammatory treatment, might be a possible treatment for these adverse effects. The trial is a prospective, double-blind, 4-group, parallel, randomized controlled, a signal-center clinical trial. We will recruit 160 adult patients undergoing Stanford type-A AAD surgery. Patients will be allocated a study number and will be randomized on a 1:1:1:1 basis to receive 1 of the 3 treatment options (pulmonary inflated with 50% xenon, 75% xenon, or 100% xenon) or no treatment (control group, pulmonary inflated with 50% nitrogen). The aims of this study are to clarify the lung protection capability of xenon and its possible mechanisms in patients undergoing the Stanford type-A AAD surgery. This trial uses an innovative design to account for the xenon effects of postoperative oxygen impairment, and it also delineates the mechanism for any benefit from xenon. The investigational xenon group is considered a treatment intervention, as it includes 3 groups of pulmonary static inflation with 50%, 75%, and 100% xenon. It is suggested that future trials might define an appropriate concentration of xenon for the best practice intervention.

  4. Children with chronic lung diseases have cognitive dysfunction as assessed by event-related potential (auditory P300) and Stanford-Binet IQ (SB-IV) test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Terez Boshra; Abd Elmonaem, Mahmoud Tarek; Khalil, Lobna Hamed; Goda, Mona Hamdy; Sanyelbhaa, Hossam; Ramzy, Mourad Alfy

    2016-10-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) in children represents a heterogeneous group of many clinico-pathological entities with risk of adverse impact of chronic or intermittent hypoxia. So far, few researchers have investigated the cognitive function in these children, and the role of auditory P300 in the assessment of their cognitive function has not been investigated yet. This study was designed to assess the cognitive functions among schoolchildren with different chronic pulmonary diseases using both auditory P300 and Stanford-Binet test. This cross-sectional study included 40 school-aged children who were suffering from chronic chest troubles other than asthma and 30 healthy children of similar age, gender and socioeconomic state as a control group. All subjects were evaluated through clinical examination, radiological evaluation and spirometry. Audiological evaluation included (basic otological examination, pure-tone, speech audiometry and immittancemetry). Cognitive function was assessed by auditory P300 and psychological evaluation using Stanford-Binet test (4th edition). Children with chronic lung diseases had significantly lower anthropometric measures compared to healthy controls. They had statistically significant lower IQ scores and delayed P300 latencies denoting lower cognitive abilities. Cognitive dysfunction correlated to severity of disease. P300 latencies were prolonged among hypoxic patients. Cognitive deficits in children with different chronic lung diseases were best detected using both Stanford-Binet test and auditory P300. P300 is an easy objective tool. P300 is affected early with hypoxia and could alarm subtle cognitive dysfunction.

  5. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  6. The history and future of the fluorescence activated cell sorter and flow cytometry: a view from Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzenberg, Leonard A; Parks, David; Sahaf, Bita; Perez, Omar; Roederer, Mario; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2002-10-01

    The Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter (FACS) was invented in the late 1960s by Bonner, Sweet, Hulett, Herzenberg, and others to do flow cytometry and cell sorting of viable cells. Becton Dickinson Immunocytometry Systems introduced the commercial machines in the early 1970s, using the Stanford patent and expertise supplied by the Herzenberg Laboratory and a Becton Dickinson engineering group under Bernie Shoor. Over the years, we have increased the number of measured FACS dimensions (parameters) and the speed of sorting to where we now simultaneously measure 12 fluorescent colors plus 2 scatter parameters. In this history, I illustrate the great utility of this state-of-the-art instrument, which allows us to simultaneously stain, analyze, and then sort cells from small samples of human blood cells from AIDS patients, infants, stem cell transplant patients, and others. I also illustrate analysis and sorting of multiple subpopulations of lymphocytes by use of 8-12 colors. In addition, I review single cell sorting used to clone and analyze hybridomas and discuss other applications of FACS developed over the past 30 years, as well as give our ideas on the future of FACS. These ideas are currently being implemented in new programs using the internet for data storage and analysis as well as developing new fluorochromes, e.g., green fluorescent protein and tandem dyes, with applications in such areas as apoptosis, gene expression, cytokine expression, cell biochemistry, redox regulation, and AIDS. Finally, I describe new FACS methods for measuring activated kinases and phosphatases and redox active enzymes in individual cells simultaneously with cell surface phenotyping. Thus, key functions can be studied in various subsets of cells without the need for prior sorting.

  7. Stanford aitab Eestit tutvustada

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2011-01-01

    Tallinna okupatsioonide muuseumi rahastav Kistler-Ritso fond teeb miljonite dollarite suuruse annetuse USAs asuva Stanfordi ülikooli fondile. Üks sihtotstarve on Eesti ajaloo dokumentide digitaliseerimine. Kistler-Ritso Eesti Sihtasutuse liikmeks kutsuti ka president Toomas Hendrik Ilvese poeg, Stanfordi ülikooli vilistlane Luukas Ilves

  8. Cultural resource survey report for construction of office building, driveway, and parking lot at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    An Environmental Assessment and associated documentation is reported for the construction of an office building and parking lot in support of environmental management personnel activities. As part of the documentation process, the DOE determined that the proposed project constituted an undertaking as defined in Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. In accordance with the regulations implementing Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, a records and literature search and historic resource identification effort were carried out on behalf of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This report summarizes cultural resource literature and record searches and a historic resource identification effort.

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP001177 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available u Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stan...ford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, ...California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Califo...rnia, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, ...titute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute

  10. Effects of pulmonary static inflation with 50% xenon on oxygen impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass for stanford type A acute aortic dissection: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Mu; Yang, Yanwei; Pan, Xudong; Lu, Jiakai; Zhang, Zhiquan; Cheng, Weiping

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of pulmonary static inflation with 50% xenon on postoperative oxygen impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection (AAD). This prospective single-center nonrandomized controlled clinical trial included 100 adult patients undergoing surgery for Stanford type A AAD at an academic hospital in China. Fifty subjects underwent pulmonary static inflation with 50% oxygen from January 2013 to January 2014, and 50 underwent inflation with 50% xenon from January 2014 to December 2014. During CPB, the lungs were inflated with either 50% xenon (xenon group) or 50% oxygen (control group) to maintain an airway pressure of 5 cm H2O. The primary outcome was oxygenation index (OI) value after intubation, and 10 minutes and 6 hours after the operation. The second outcome was cytokine and reactive oxygen species levels after intubation and 10 minutes, 6 hours, and 24 hours after the operation. Patients treated with xenon had lower OI levels compared to the control group before surgery (P = 0.002); however, there was no difference in postoperative values between the 2 groups. Following surgery, mean maximal OI values decreased by 18.8% and 33.8%, respectively, in the xenon and control groups. After surgery, the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and thromboxane B2 decreased by 23.5%, 9.1%, and 30.2%, respectively, in the xenon group, but increased by 10.8%, 26.2%, and 26.4%, respectively, in the control group. Moreover, IL-10 levels increased by 28% in the xenon group and decreased by 7.5% in the control group. There were significant time and treatment-time interaction effects on methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (P = 0.000 and P = 0.050, respectively) and myeloperoxidase (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001 in xenon and control groups, respectively). There was no difference in hospital mortality and 1-year survival rate between the 2 groups

  11. Utility of an abbreviated version of the stanford-binet intelligence scales (5th ed.) in estimating 'full scale' IQ for young children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Conal; O'Connell, Helen; Lillis, Mary; Tarpey, Sarah Louise; O'Reilly, Gary

    2017-12-28

    The fifth edition of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence scales allows 'full scale' IQ (FSIQ) to be estimated using an abridged version of the test-the abbreviated battery IQ (ABIQ). Set within a public early intervention team service, the current cross-sectional study investigated the utility of the ABIQ in estimating FSIQ for 40 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 3-5 years. A strong ABIQ-FSIQ association was yielded (r = 0.89; r2  = 0.808) and the ABIQ did not over-estimate mean FSIQ above a clinically-relevant threshold; however, clinically significant over-estimation occurred in 17.5% of individual cases. While the findings provide support for the utility of the ABIQ in estimating FSIQ for young children with ASD, caution relating to the over-estimation of FSIQ is warranted. Careful clinical judgment-ideally based on examination of previous cognitive assessment results (if available), thorough interactional observations, and close multi-disciplinary consultation-is necessary to determine the applicability of the ABIQ to individual cases. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. We investigated the utility of a shortened version of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales in estimating IQ for 40 young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings provide qualified support for the instrument: acceptably accurate IQ estimation was achieved for most cases; but not so for a sizeable minority (17.5%). Careful clinical judgment is necessary to determine the applicability of the ABIQ to individual cases. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Transcultural adaptation and validation of the Stanford Presenteeism Scale for the evaluation of presenteeism for Brazilian Portuguese Adaptación transcultural y validación para el portugués brasileño del Stanford Presenteeism Scale para evaluación del presentismo Adaptação transcultural e validação para o português brasileiro do Stanford Presenteeism Scale para avaliação do presenteísmo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Campos Paschoalin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: describe the process of transcultural adaptation and validation of the Stanford Presenteeism Scale for Brazilian Portuguese. METHODS: Methodological study of the cultural adaptation and validation of the tool which involved 153 nursing staff and included six aspects of equivalence, obtained through the following stages: translation, first version of consent, retranslation, specialist committee, pre-test, study of test-retest credibleness and dimensional validity. RESULTS: The stability of the items varied from moderate to almost perfect and the sequence constancy was almost perfect. Two factors were identified through the exploratory fact analysis: the first one included the physical aspects - completing work; and the second one the psychological aspects - avoided distraction . CONCLUSIONS: the results suggest adequacy of the tool in the Brazilian Portuguese version, indicating its use in the context of the study group and in similar groups, contributing to the study of evidences which consolidate strategies that favor the health conditions of the jobholders.OBJETIVO: describir el proceso de adaptación transcultural y validación para el portugués brasileño del Stanford Presenteeism Scale. MÉTODOS: se trata de un estudio metodológico de adaptación cultural y validación de instrumento en que participaron 153 trabajadores de enfermería, incluyendo seis aspectos de equivalencia obtenidos en las siguientes etapas: traducción, primera versión de consenso, retrotraducción, comité de especialistas, prueba piloto, estudio de confiabilidad prueba-reprueba y validez dimensional. RESULTADOS: La estabilidad de los ítems varió de moderado a casi perfecto y el de la escala fue casi perfecto. Dos factores fueron identificados por el análisis factorial exploratorio: el primero incluye los aspectos físicos - trabajo finalizado y el segundo a los aspectos psicológicos - concentración mantenida. CONCLUSIONES: los resultados sugieren

  13. Translation into Brazilian Portuguese, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Stanford presenteeism scale-6 and work instability scale for ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauendorf, Renata; de Medeiros Pinheiro, Marcelo; Ciconelli, Rozana Mesquita

    2014-12-01

    Loss of productivity at work, as a result of health problems, is becoming an issue of interest due to the high burden it represents in society. The measurement of such phenomenon can be made using generic and specific scales for certain diseases such as the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6) and the Work Instability Scale for Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS-WIS), specific for patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The aim of this study was to translate and perform a cross-cultural adaptation of SPS-6 and AS-WIS into Portuguese and check their psychometric properties. The study also aimed to evaluate the relationship between the general scores of the scales and the main sociodemographic and clinical data, lifestyles, and absenteeism in patients with AS and correlate these variables with SPS-6 and AS-WIS scales. A sample of 120 patients with AS and 80 workers at a university hospital was evaluated. The processes for the translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the instruments followed preestablished steps and rules presented in the literature. For the evaluation of measurement properties and correlations between scales, intra-class correlation coefficient (reproducibility analysis), Cronbach alpha (internal consistency), and Pearson correlation coefficient (validity) were employed. The inter-observer (0.986) and intra-observer (0.992) reproducibilities of the AS-WIS were shown to be high as well as the internal consistency (0.995). Similarly, the inter-observer reliability of SPS-6 was considered good (0.890), although it showed a poorer performance when considering the same observer (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.675 and intra-class correlation = 0.656). Internal consistency, for the total number of items, as measured by Cronbach alpha, was 0.889. The validity of the scales was evaluated thru the comparison of the achieved scores with the results of the WLQ, SF-36, ASQoL, BASFI, BASDAI, HAQ-S, and SRQ-20 instruments. Correlations between loss of

  14. The acceptability and outcomes of a peer- and health-professional-led Stanford self-management program for Vietnam veterans with alcohol misuse and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Jill; Battersby, Malcolm W; Pols, Rene G

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acceptability of peer- and health-professional-led self-management education using the Stanford Program with Australian veterans and their partners. The 6-week program taught problem-solving and decision-making skills to activate healthful behaviors, including action-planning and goal-setting. The evaluation included a participant and facilitator postprogram questionnaire; group interview; and alcohol, posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression, anger, relationship, and quality-of-life measures as part of a randomized controlled study. Participants included 25 male veterans with comorbid alcohol dependency, psychiatric and medical conditions, and 18 female partners (n = 43), 61.5% of who reported a chronic condition. The primary outcome was a self-reported improvement in self-management of their conditions in 69% of participants, with another 22.2% reporting that their confidence to self-manage had improved. There was an improvement in all measures at 9 months. The program resulted in improvements in lifestyle and confidence in self-management for Vietnam veterans, a cohort difficult to engage in healthy behaviors. Most participants were also accompanied by their partners. The program is a valuable resource for providing self-management education to veterans with alcohol dependency and various chronic conditions and needs to be considered in the suite of rehabilitation programs available to Defense Force personnel, veterans, and their partners. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. SPEAR3 Workshop: Making the Scientific Case: Report from Workshop held at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, May 29-30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, S.

    1998-08-13

    As part of the planning process for the proposed upgrade to the SPEAR electron storage ring, SSRL, the SSRL Users Organization and the SSRL faculty sponsored a 1 1/2 day workshop on May 29-30 1997. The goal was to assess and document the impact of SPEAR3 on current and future science and technology research programs of the users of SSRL. The hard and soft x-ray beams produced at SSRL are used in a number of different scientific and technological disciplines. The workshop was organized by defining a set of areas of science and technology covering the basic activities at SSRL and inviting key people from outside Stanford to work with the SSRL faculty and staff in a set of topical groups on estimating the impact of SPEAR3 on their respective fields and developing a vision of the future opportunities. This report documents those scientific and technological opportunities and provides written summaries of the discussions. The report is organized with a brief technical description of SPEAR3 and planned beam line upgrades (which summarizes material presented to the workshop participants prior to the breakout sessions) following this executive summary. More detailed information from the topical working groups then follows. Finally, an appendix provides a list of workshop participants and a copy of the workshop agenda as well as some more detailed information on the SPEAR3 lattice and machine.

  16. Stratification of Highest-Risk Patients with Chronic Skin Ulcers in a Stanford Retrospective Cohort Includes Diabetes, Need for Systemic Antibiotics, and Albumin Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Amir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic nonsurgical skin wounds such as venous stasis and diabetic ulcers have been associated with a number of comorbid conditions; however, the strength of these associations has not been compared. We utilized the Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment (STRIDE system to identify a cohort of 637 patients with chronic skin ulcers. Preliminary analysis ( showed that 49.7% of the patients had a poor prognosis such as amputation or a nonhealing ulcer for at least a year. Factors significantly associated ( with these outcomes included diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, and need for systemic antibiotics. Patients with poor outcomes also tended to have lower hemoglobin levels (, higher WBC levels (, and lower albumin levels (. On multivariate analysis, however, only diabetes mellitus (OR 5.87, 1.36–25.3, need for systemic antibiotics (OR 3.88, 1.06–14.2, and albumin levels (0.20 per unit, 0.07–0.60 remained significant independent predictors of poor wound-healing outcomes. These data identify patients at the highest risk for poor wound-healing and who may benefit the most from more aggressive wound care and treatment.

  17. Predicting night-time natural ventilation in Stanford's Y2E2 building using an integral model in combination with a CFD model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberti, Giacomo; Gorle', Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Natural ventilation can significantly reduce energy consumption in buildings, but the presence of uncertainty makes robust design a challenging task. We will discuss the prediction of the natural ventilation performance during a 4 hour night-flush in Stanford's Y2E2 building using a combination of two models with different levels of fidelity: an integral model that solves for the average air and thermal mass temperature and a CFD model, used to calculate discharge and heat transfer coefficients to update the integral model. Uncertainties are propagated using polynomial chaos expansion to compute the mean and 95% confidence intervals of the quantities of interest. Comparison with building measurements shows that, despite a slightly to fast cooling rate, the measured air temperature is inside the 95% confidence interval predicted by the integral model. The use of information from the CFD model in the integral model reduces the maximum standard deviation of the volume-averaged air temperature by 20% when compared to using literature-based estimates for these quantities. The heat transfer coefficient resulting from the CFD model was found to be within the literature-based interval initially assumed for the integral model, but the discharge coefficients were found to be different.

  18. Conference on Stochastic Processes and their Applications (16th) Held in Stanford, California on August 17-21, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    Gorostiza Centro de Investigaci6n y Estudios Avanzado8, Mexico - ABSTRACT We consider a particle system in Rd where the particles are subject to... ANOVA for time series. O4. c-. "/" "At present on leave at the University of Oxford, supported by FAPESP-Brasil. ,.-’. ""Supported by CONACYT, project...Haifa 32000 Carleton University Israel Ottawa, Ontario K1S5B6 Canada Begona Fernandez Centro De Investigacion Martin Day Y Estudios Avanzados Department

  19. [Case in which renal function improved following stent-graft placement in the aorta two months after the onset of stanford type B acute aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusamae, Juri; Nishino, Tomoya; Uramatsu, Tadashi; Obata, Yoko; Furusu, Akira; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Kohno, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    A 48-year-old man was admitted to the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery in our hospital after developing Stanford type B acute aortic dissection with a patent false lumen in July 2008. Conservative treatment involving rest and antihypertensive therapy was provided following admission. Urine volume decreased from day 9, and serum creatinine increased to 7.7 mg/dL. As it was suspected that the reduced renal blood flow was caused by progression of aortic dissection, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT)was performed. The left kidney showed reduced enhancement and the right kidney was heterogeneously enhanced. The dissection had extended to the left renal artery, and the reduced renal blood flow caused by narrowing of the left renal artery was thought to have caused the renal dysfunction. As elevated urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels and hyperkalemia persisted, hemodialysis was performed a total of four times. Although the patient was subsequently withdrawn from dialysis, he continued to display severe renal dysfunction and was transferred to our department on day 28 for the treatment of renal failure. Conservative treatment was continued, but the maximum diameter of the thoracic aorta gradually increased, and stent placement at the entry of aortic dissection was indicated. On day 86, two stent-grafts were placed for entries at the distal site of the descending aorta and the distal site of the aortic arch. Postoperative abdominal contrast-enhanced CT showed expansion of the true lumen, and blood flow and contrast enhancement improved in both kidneys. Postoperatively, serum creatinine gradually decreased, improving to 1.16 mg/dL on day 96. Renography in the third month after stent-graft placement showed improved renal function in both kidneys. These findings suggest that even at approximately 2 months after the onset of acute renal failure associated with aortic dissection, renal function can be improved by restoring blood flow in the renal arteries.

  20. Stanford Center for Military Photomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-08

    integration of a fluorescence microscope . Nature Methods 8, 871-878, doi:10.1038/nmeth.1694 (2011). 8 Marshall, J. D. & Schnitzer, M. J. Optical... fluorescence microscope . The Journal of Investigative Dermatology 131, 1061-1066, doi:10.1038/jid.2010.401 (2011). 7. Liu, J. T., Loewke, N. O

  1. Materials Research at Stanford University, 1 July 1980-30 June 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    constants of U(VI) aquo complexes with OH and any other ligands present in solution (F , PO4 , CO in our experiments). We have completed critical...both longitudinal and shear wave scanning to sort out more complex residual stress states. The acoustic experiments require the use of samples which are...large enough to yield results at a significant number of scanning points. The easiest complex residual stress state to induce is that in a rolled

  2. Joint Services Electronics Program of the Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory of Stanford University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    March 1980). - 91 - G.L. No. Report Contract 3111 A.E. Siegman, "A Prony Algorithm for AFOSR 80-0145 Fitting Exponential Factors or Extract- ing Matrix...Piezoelectric PVF2 Polymer 7/31/: Films and Devices N0001-79-C-0222 Auld Elastic Domain Wall Waves 1/312/ in Ferroelectric Ceramics and Single Crystals

  3. Solar space and water heating system at Stanford University Central Food Services Building. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    This active hydronic domestic hot water and space heating system was 840 ft/sup 2/ of single-glazed, liquid, flat plate collectors and 1550 gal heat storage tanks. The following are discussed: energy conservation, design philosophy, operation, acceptance testing, performance data, collector selection, bidding, costs, economics, problems, and recommendations. An operation and maintenance manual and as-built drawings are included in appendices. (MHR)

  4. Effects of university affiliation and “school spirit” on color preferences: Berkeley versus Stanford

    OpenAIRE

    Schloss, Karen B.; Poggesi, Rosa M.; Palmer, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    The ecological valence theory (EVT) posits that preference for a color is determined by people’s average affective response to everything associated with it (Palmer & Schloss, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107, 8877–8882, 2010). The EVT thus implies the existence of sociocultural effects: Color preference should increase with positive feelings (or decrease with negative feelings) toward an institution strongly associated with a color. We tested this prediction by measuring ...

  5. Materials Research at Stanford University, 1 July 1979 - 30 June 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    glutamate 5) F-actin 6) lambda-phage DNA . For BPTI and RNase, we have, as previously reported, obtained translational and rotational diffusion coefficients...signed to characterize- th- spectral content of the Grasshopper Monochrom- ator at the new SSRL soft x-ray beam line has also been performed, and the

  6. Implementation of case management to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in the Stanford and San Mateo Heart to Heart randomized controlled trial: study protocol and baseline characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stafford Randall S

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Case management has emerged as a promising alternative approach to supplement traditional one-on-one sessions between patients and doctors for improving the quality of care in chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD. However, data are lacking in terms of its efficacy and cost-effectiveness when implemented in ethnic and low-income populations. Methods The Stanford and San Mateo Heart to Heart (HTH project is a randomized controlled clinical trial designed to rigorously evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multi-risk cardiovascular case management program in low-income, primarily ethnic minority patients served by a local county health care system in California. Randomization occurred at the patient level. The primary outcome measure is the absolute CHD risk over 10 years. Secondary outcome measures include adherence to guidelines on CHD prevention practice. We documented the study design, methodology, and baseline sociodemographic, clinical and lifestyle characteristics of 419 participants. Results We achieved equal distributions of the sociodemographic, biophysical and lifestyle characteristics between the two randomization groups. HTH participants had a mean age of 56 years, 63% were Latinos/Hispanics, 65% female, 61% less educated, and 62% were not employed. Twenty percent of participants reported having a prior cardiovascular event. 10-year CHD risk averaged 18% in men and 13% in women despite a modest low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and a high on-treatment percentage at baseline. Sixty-three percent of participants were diagnosed with diabetes and an additional 22% had metabolic syndrome. In addition, many participants had depressed high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol levels and elevated values of total cholesterol-to-HDL ratio, triglycerides, triglyceride-to-HDL ratio, and blood pressure. Furthermore, nearly 70% of participants were obese, 45% had a family history of CHD or

  7. Implementation of case management to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in the Stanford and San Mateo Heart to Heart randomized controlled trial: study protocol and baseline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Lee, Ky-Van; Berra, Kathy; Stafford, Randall S

    2006-09-27

    Case management has emerged as a promising alternative approach to supplement traditional one-on-one sessions between patients and doctors for improving the quality of care in chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease (CHD). However, data are lacking in terms of its efficacy and cost-effectiveness when implemented in ethnic and low-income populations. The Stanford and San Mateo Heart to Heart (HTH) project is a randomized controlled clinical trial designed to rigorously evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a multi-risk cardiovascular case management program in low-income, primarily ethnic minority patients served by a local county health care system in California. Randomization occurred at the patient level. The primary outcome measure is the absolute CHD risk over 10 years. Secondary outcome measures include adherence to guidelines on CHD prevention practice. We documented the study design, methodology, and baseline sociodemographic, clinical and lifestyle characteristics of 419 participants. We achieved equal distributions of the sociodemographic, biophysical and lifestyle characteristics between the two randomization groups. HTH participants had a mean age of 56 years, 63% were Latinos/Hispanics, 65% female, 61% less educated, and 62% were not employed. Twenty percent of participants reported having a prior cardiovascular event. 10-year CHD risk averaged 18% in men and 13% in women despite a modest low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level and a high on-treatment percentage at baseline. Sixty-three percent of participants were diagnosed with diabetes and an additional 22% had metabolic syndrome. In addition, many participants had depressed high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and elevated values of total cholesterol-to-HDL ratio, triglycerides, triglyceride-to-HDL ratio, and blood pressure. Furthermore, nearly 70% of participants were obese, 45% had a family history of CHD or stroke, and 16% were current smokers. We have recruited

  8. Characterization and comparison of ultra-low frequency electromagnetic (ULFEM) signals on the QuakeFinder array and the Stanford-USGS array, and their potential relation to seismic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, L.; Glen, J. M.; McPhee, D.; Klemperer, S. L.; Dunson, C.

    2013-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of ultra-low frequency electromagnetic (ULFEM) data around the 31 October 2007 Alum Rock M 5.4 earthquake. Several studies around the world have reported seeing anomalous ultra-low frequency (0.01 to 10 Hz) electromagnetic (ULFEM) signals occurring before earthquakes, most notably for the 1989 Ms 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake near Santa Cruz, California although many questions have arisen concerning the reality of these signals. Stanford, USGS and UC Berkeley jointly maintain five ULFEM recording stations at sites in northern California along the San Andreas Fault system. QuakeFinder, Inc. (QF), has a network of magnetometers, on Aug. 2013 at more than 120 sites in California. Here we examine magnetic data from the weeks immediately preceding and following the Alum Rock earthquake, at the closest QF site (site 609, ~ 9 km hypocentral distance and the closest Stanford-USGS site (JRSC, ~ 42 km hypocentral distance). Previous work (Bleier et al., 2009, NHESS 9, 585-603) reported anomalous magnetic pulsations on one site in the San Francisco Bay area peaking 13 days before the Alum Rock earthquake. Possible sources of anomalous spikes or signals in electromagnetic data include local cultural noise, ionospheric/magnetospheric variations, lightning and recording system problems. We are interested in identifying anomalous spikes that are unrelated to these sources, whether stations in independent arrays record similar anomalies and whether these spikes have any relationship to seismic activity. We consider a pulse to be any spike in the signal that exceeds a certain threshold. Bleier et al. (2009) counted pulses with amplitudes more than twice the typical background noise, lasting 0.01 to several seconds, with the majority being unipolar excursions. In this study we defined a threshold of four times the standard deviation of the site-specific background noise of the time series data over the time examined. We focus on pulses with a rise time

  9. Stemcell Information: SKIP001182 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanfor...d Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Cal...ifornia, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Californi...a, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA...ute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, S

  10. Stemcell Information: SKIP001181 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascu...lar Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.... Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanf...ord Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Paul W Burr...icine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine

  11. Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Rutherford: Successful tests on bubble chamber target technique; Stanford (SLAC): New storage rings proposal; Berkeley: The HAPPE project to examine cosmic rays with superconducting magnets; The 60th birthday of Professor N.N. Bogolyubov; Argonne: Performance of the automatic film measuring system POLLY II

  12. Around the laboratories: Dubna: Physics results and progress on bubble chamber techniques; Stanford (SLAC): Operation of a very rapid cycling bubble chamber; Daresbury: Photographs of visitors to the Laboratory; Argonne: Charge exchange injection tests into the ZGS in preparation for a proposed Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1969-01-01

    Around the laboratories: Dubna: Physics results and progress on bubble chamber techniques; Stanford (SLAC): Operation of a very rapid cycling bubble chamber; Daresbury: Photographs of visitors to the Laboratory; Argonne: Charge exchange injection tests into the ZGS in preparation for a proposed Booster

  13. Stemcell Information: SKIP001184 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Card...iovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Californi...a, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.... Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Paul...tanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanfor

  14. Stemcell Information: SKIP001180 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Card...iovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Californi...a, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.... Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Paul...tanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanfor

  15. Stemcell Information: SKIP001183 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available , Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stan...ford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovas...cular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular ...Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Paul W Burridge Paul W Burridg...e Information Only Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine

  16. Stemcell Information: SKIP001179 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, St...anford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiov...ascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascula...r Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Paul W Burridge Paul W Burri...dge Information Only Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine

  17. Stemcell Information: SKIP001178 [SKIP Stemcell Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, St...anford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiov...ascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Stanford Cardiovascula...r Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA. Paul W Burridge Paul W Burri...dge Information Only Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine

  18. Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Third annual report for the period October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

    1983-09-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs; radon reservoir engineering; well test analysis and bench scale experiments; field applications; workshop, seminars, and technical information; reinjection technology; and seismic monitoring of vapor/liquid interfaces. (MHR)

  19. Modeling caffeine concentrations with the Stanford Caffeine Questionnaire: preliminary evidence for an interaction of chronotype with the effects of caffeine on sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova, Philip; Hernandez, Beatriz; Ptolemy, Adam S; Zeitzer, Jamie M

    2012-04-01

    To examine the validity of a novel caffeine intake questionnaire and to examine the effects of caffeine on sleep in college students. One-week, ad libitum behavior of 50 university students (28 female, 22 male; aged 20.9 ± 1.78 years) was examined with sleep logs, wrist actigraphy, and a novel daily questionnaire assessing caffeine intake at different times of day. Saliva samples were collected for caffeine assessment (questionnaire validation) and DNA extraction, and for analysis of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the adenosine receptor 2A (ADORA2A) gene. The caffeine questionnaire was able to accurately predict salivary concentrations of caffeine (R(2) = 0.41, Pcaffeine concentration during sleep were correlated with wake after sleep onset (WASO) most strongly in morning-type individuals (R(2) = 0.49; Pcaffeine on WASO, but did independently alter WASO such that those with the CC genotype had nearly three-times as much WASO as those with CT or TT. Our questionnaire was able to accurately predict salivary caffeine concentrations and helped to describe a novel relationship between the effects of caffeine on sleep and genotype and chronotype. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SSRL at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was built in 1974 to take and use for synchrotron studies the intense x-ray beams from the SPEAR storage ring that...

  1. The Stanford Digital Library Metadata Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    InfoBus components ?This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement IRI-9411306. Funding for...proxy-based infra- structure the InfoBus [1]. This paper provides a framework for understanding the classes of metadata and range of metadata needs that...are necessary for our InfoBus services. We outline and ground this framework in Sect. 2 by surveying our InfoBus services and analyzing the

  2. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L. [eds.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials.

  3. Stanford MFEL and Near Infrared Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    biodegradable polymers such as poly ( lactic acid ) (PLA) and poly ( lactic -co-glycolic acid ) (PLGA) with well-controlled size and surface properties. The...thermal damage, which allowed predicting the size of the damage zone in tissue. In addition, we developed micofluidic devices driven by pulsed energy ...beef carcass surface tissues using a bioluminescent reporter. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 65(4): 1738-1745. Zhang, W, Contag, PR, Hajenda

  4. The Problem of Partisanship in American Foreign Policy Book Review: Gries P.H. The Politics of American Foreign Policy: How Ideology Divides Liberals and Conservatives over Foreign Affairs Stanford, California: Stanford University press, 2014. 367 p.

    OpenAIRE

    Il'ya Anatol'evich Sokov

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the review on the book of Peter Hays Gries “The Politics of American Foreign Policy: How Ideology Divides Liberals and Conservatives over Foreign Affairs”. The book consists of Preface, Introduction, the Text from two parts: Part I “Concepts” includes 5 chapters, Part II “Cases” also includes 5 chapters and four of them description the relations of the USA with the world regions: Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, the South Asia and the last chapter - relations with t...

  5. Universities Improve Services with E-Commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gina Adams

    2001-01-01

    This follow-up to a December 2000 article provides more details on Stanford University's venture into the "sell-side" of e-commerce, then describes another "sell-side" success story at the University of Wisconsin. Madison. Discusses experiences on the "buy-side" of e-commerce at the Massachusetts Institute of…

  6. Thumb Carpometacarpal Ligaments Inside and Out: A Comparative Study of Arthroscopic and Gross Anatomy from the Robert A. Chase Hand and Upper Limb Center at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Andrew Y.; Van Nortwick, Sarah; Hagert, Elisabet; Ladd, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We propose to identify and correlate arthroscopic internal ligaments with external ligaments, providing an accurate roadmap for arthroscopic ligament and joint anatomy. Ligamentous laxity is considered an important risk factor in developing the common basilar arthritis of the thumb. Controversy exists as to the precise ligamentous anatomy of the thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) joint (CMC-I); description of the internal arthroscopic anatomy is limited. Methods We performed CMC-I joint arthroscopy using the 1-Ulnar (1U) and thenar portals in five cadavers, seeking to identify the following seven ligaments arthroscopically: the superficial anterior oblique ligament (sAOL), deep anterior oblique ligament (dAOL), ulnar collateral ligament (UCL), dorsal trapeziometacarpal ligament (DTM-1), posterior oblique ligament (POL), dorsal central ligament (DCL), and dorsal radial ligament (DRL). After grading articular changes of the trapezium, we passed Kirschner wires (K-wires) (0.028) outside-in to mark the arthroscopic insertion of each ligament on the trapezium. Gross dissection was performed to confirm the wire placement; the anatomic identity and position of joint stabilizing ligaments, and the location of frequently used portals. Results The volar ligaments—the sAOL, dAOL, and UCL—were highly variable in their arthroscopic appearance and precise location. The sAOL is a thin veil of membranous tissue that variably drapes across the anterior joint capsule. The reported dAOL and UCL, in our study, correlated to a thickened portion of this veil around the volar beak and was not consistently identified with gross dissection. In contrast, the arthroscopic appearance and location of the dorsal ligaments—DTM-I, POL, DCL, and DRL—were consistent in all specimens. Conclusion Our study further defines and correlates the arthroscopic and external ligamentous anatomy of the CMC-I joint. PMID:24436790

  7. Temporal Trends in Clinical and Pathological Characteristics for Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy Between 1995 and 2013 at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, and Stanford University Hospital, United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Mathias Dyrberg; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze how prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening and practice patterns has affected trends in tumor characteristics in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) in the United States and Denmark. Unlike in the United States, PSA screening has not been recommended in Denmark...... according to Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment-Postsurgical (CAPRA-S) risk groups and D'Amico risk classification and were clustered into 4 time periods (1995-1999, 2000-2004, 2005-2009, and 2010-2013). Temporal trends in the proportions of patients of a given variable at the 2 institutions were...

  8. Results from the Stanford 10 m Sagnac interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Beyersdorf, P T; Fejer, M M

    2002-01-01

    The design of a 10 m all-reflective prototype Sagnac interferometer with suspended optics is described and the experimental results are presented. It uses a polarization scheme to allow detection of the dark fringe on the symmetric port of the beamsplitter for optimal interference contrast. The necessary low-frequency response of the interferometer requires delay lines in the arms. To deal with the noise introduced by scattered light in the delay lines, a laser frequency sweep frequency shifts the scattered light so that it does not produce noise near zero frequency. This results in a shot-noise-limited phase sensitivity of DELTA phi = 1.6 x 10 sup - sup 9 rad Hz sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. Scaling this prototype to several kilometres with kilowatts of circulating power requires several technical improvements in high-power solid-state lasers, second harmonic generation and the fabrication of large mirrors, which are likely to be made in the next 10 years.

  9. Tunnel radio communications system at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struven, W.C.

    1980-07-01

    A unique single frequency, dual daisy chain tunnel radio communication system has been developed for use in our new Positron-Electron Storage Ring. Communications are possible between portables in the underground ring and between a portable in the ring and all control rooms on the site. The system is designed as a wide band facility and therefore can carry many simplex and duplex transmissions. This system utilizes TV twinlead as a distributed antenna and repeater amplifiers to cover more than 7000 feet of underground tunnel. The design philosophy, tests and initial design are discussed and contrasted with the final implementation of the system. Future uses of the system are discussed.

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  11. Stanford geothermal program. Final report, July 1990--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report discusses the following: (1) improving models of vapor-dominated geothermal fields: the effects of adsorption; (2) adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA; (3) optimizing reinjection strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines based on chloride data; (4) optimization of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs; and (5) steam-water relative permeability.

  12. Phase and amplitude control system for Stanford Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, S.J.

    1983-09-26

    The computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 micro-second 2856 MHz rf pulse at a 180 Hz rate. This will be used for phase feedback control, and also for phase and amplitude jitter measurement. The program, which was originally written by John Fox and Keith Jobe, has been modified to improve the function of the system. The software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system.

  13. Gravitation experiments at Stanford. [using general relativity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipa, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental situation in post-Newtonian gravitation is briefly reviewed in order to reexamine the extent to which experiment supports or refutes general relativity. A description is given of the equivalence principle project, the gyroscope experiment, and the search for gravity waves. It is noted that even though some doubt has been cast on the value of the perihelion advance and the gravitational redshift as precise tests of general relativity in the past few years, many competing theories have been ruled out; in particular, the results from the Viking mission significantly reduce the credibility of the Brans-Dicke theory (Brans and Dicke, 1961). The dimensionless constant omega in this theory is now forced to exceed 50, while the value originally proposed was 6 (omega being infinity in general relativity). It is noted that the gyro experiment described is capable of putting much tighter limits on this parameter, and together with the other experiments in progress will help place gravitational theory on a firmer experimental footing.

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  17. Why is the universe more partial to mater than antimatter?

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "B factory experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) in the USA and at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Japan have reached a new milestone in the quest to understand the matter-antimatter imbalance in our universe.

  18. Le programme d’enseignement général à l’université de Stanford de 1935 à 1998 : transmission de substances de référence ou construction de métasubstances ? The General Education Course at Stanford University (1935-1998 : From Transmitting Substances to Structuring Metasubstance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Bouchet-Sala

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available General Education frequently involves studying several disciplines, and aims to provide a common culture and experience for all students entering a particular institution. As cultural constructs, emblematic of American society’s self representation at a given time, the cultural contents of these courses are not neutral. The recent debates over the “sacrality” of the reading list (the “canon of Great Works” bear testimony to the interests at stake. Yet, the purpose of such courses could be less to furnish the mind with some reference substance than to enable students to build a cross-cultural understanding of the various human experiences, or metasubstance. Therefore, it not only questions the choice of the cultural contents, but also the nature of the substance to be transmitted, or in other words, the initial ambition of the General Education Course.

  19. Proceedings of USC (University of Southern California) Workshop on VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) & Modern Signal Processing, held at Los Angeles, California on 1-3 November 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-15

    Technology; P. Losleben, DARPA; J. Meindl , Stanford University; L. Sumney, Semiconductor Research Corp. VI "The Microelectronics Center - A New...signal processing be maximized so as to enhance the leadership position that we now enjoy. ■■» -j> mm »;■—7~ś~ T-—r™i W^-WJWJ^W |-- I-- i AUTHOR

  20. LATTICEEASY A Program for Lattice Simulations of Scalar Fields in an Expanding Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G; Tkachev, Igor; Felder, Gary

    2008-01-01

    We describe a C++ program that we have written and made available for calculating the evolution of interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. The program is particularly useful for the study of reheating and thermalization after inflation. The program and its full documentation are available on the Web at http://physics.stanford.edu/gfelder/latticeeasy. In this paper we provide a brief overview of what the program does and what it is useful for.

  1. Remodelación ósea a través del Modelo de Stanford // Bone remodeling through the Stanford´s Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Figueredo-Losada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El material óseo es radicalmente distinto a cualquier otro material tratado por la mecánica clásica,su estructura es heterogénea y anisótropa, y sus propiedades mecánicas varían no solo entredistintos individuos, sino también, para un mismo hueso. En los tratamientos e intervencionesquirúrgicas donde está presente la readaptación, el crecimiento inducido del hueso puede sermodelado mediante el empleo de los criterios de remodelación ósea interna propuesto por algunosautores (Cowin y R. Huiskes, R. Carter, Doblare y García, Jacob y Beaupré y otros.En este trabajo se toma el modelo de remodelación ósea propuesto por Jacob (1994 y seimplementa con la utilización del programa Abaqus 6.4 utilizando una subrutina de usuario (UMAT,se aplico a un modelo 2D de hueso genérico con un sistema de cargas para comprobar los efectosde la remodelación y las variaciones de los valores de densidad. Como parte del trabajo fueroncreados dos programas para el procesamiento de los datos, para un análisis de resultados fuera delvisualizador del Abaqus, logrando una apreciación cualitativamente y cuantitativamente de losresultados.Palabras claves: remodelación ósea, elementos finitos, biomecánica._____________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe bone material is radically different to any other material tried by the classic mechanics, itsstructure is heterogeneous and anisótropic, and its mechanical properties not vary alone amongdifferent individuals, but also, for oneself bone. In the medical treatments and surgicalinterventions where it is present the readaptation, the induced growth of the bone can be modeledby means of the employment of the approaches of remodeling bone intern proposed by someauthors (Cowin and R. Huiskes, R. Crankcase, I will Doblare & García, Jacob & Beaupré and other.In this work it takes the pattern of bone remodelling proposed by Jacob (1994 and it isimplemented with the use of the software Abaqus using user's subroutine (UMAT, its applies amodel 2D of generic bone with a system of loads to check the effects of the remodelling and thevariations of the values of density. As part of the work two software were created for theprosecution of the data, for an analysis of results outside of the visualizador of the Abaqus,achieving a qualitative and quantitative appreciation of the result.Key words: bone remodelling, finite elements method, biomechanic, jacob´s model

  2. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 18 November  2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Highlights of the European Strategy Workshop for Future Neutrino Physics Dr Ilias Efthymiopoulos, CERN   Seminar cancelled! Information Organizer : J.-S. Graulich Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge s...

  3. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 7 December 2009 PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Topological insulators and topological superconductors Professor Shoucheng Zhang Department of Physics, Stanford University, CA   Recently, a new class of topological states has been theoretically predicted and experimentally realized. The topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge or surface states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the edge states give rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in the absence of any external magnetic field. I shall review the theoretical prediction of the QSH state in HgTe/CdTe semiconductor quantum wells, and its recent experimental observation. The edge states of the QSH state supports fr...

  4. Maximal Objects and the Semantics of Universal Relation Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    AD-A13 042 STANFORD UNIV CA DIEpT OF COPUTER SCIENCE P/S 9/2 MAXIMAL OBCTS AND THE SEMANTICS OF UNIVERSAL RELATION DYAAS--ETC(U) OCT I 0 MAIER, J D...STANDARDS 1953A October 1981 Report. No. STANI-S1-7M XlOSR-TR- 8 2 -0 2 7 2 hMaximal Objects and the Semantics of Universal Relation Databases 1-4 1 pt by...4. TITLE (aid Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED MAXIMAL OBJECTS AND THE SEMANTICS OF UNIVERSAL Interim RELATION DATABASES Inter i P TNB 7

  5. We have no idea a guide to the unknown universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cham, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Everything we still don’t know about our strange, mostly mysterious universe. Jorge Cham is the creator of the popular online comic Piled Higher and Deeper, popularly known as PHD Comics. He earned his PhD in robotics at Stanford. Daniel Whiteson is an associate professor of experimental particle physics at the University of California, Irvine, and conducts research using the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Their PHD TV videos have been viewed millions of times on YouTube and aired on PBS.

  6. The U.S. Combat and Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Fleets: Issues and Suggestions for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The Army After Next: The First Postindustrial Army, Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2008. Modeling and Simulation 91 and strategic...en-US Adams, Thomas K., The Army After Next: The First Postindustrial Army, Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2008. Anulare, Louis, Program

  7. Engineering at SLAC: Designing and constructing experimental devices for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djang, Austin [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-22

    Thanks to the versatility of the beam lines at SSRL, research there is varied and benefits multiple fields. Each experiment requires a particular set of experiment equipment, which in turns requires its own particular assembly. As such, new engineering challenges arise from each new experiment. My role as an engineering intern has been to help solve these challenges, by designing and assembling experimental devices. My first project was to design a heated sample holder, which will be used to investigate the effect of temperature on a sample's x-ray diffraction pattern. My second project was to help set up an imaging test, which involved designing a cooled grating holder and assembling multiple positioning stages. My third project was designing a 3D-printed pencil holder for the SSRL workstations.

  8. Team sports for overweight children: the Stanford Sports to Prevent Obesity Randomized Trial (SPORT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Dana L; Tirumalai, Evelyn C; Haydel, K Farish; Fujimoto, Michelle; Fulton, Janet E; Robinson, Thomas N

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of an after-school team sports program for reducing weight gain in low-income overweight children. Six-month, 2-arm, parallel-group, pilot randomized controlled trial. Low-income, racial/ethnic minority community. Twenty-one children in grades 4 and 5 with a body mass index at or above the 85th percentile. The treatment intervention consisted of an after-school soccer program. The "active placebo" control intervention consisted of an after-school health education program. Implementation, acceptability, body mass index, physical activity measured using accelerometers, reported television and other screen time, self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and weight concerns. All 21 children completed the study. Compared with children receiving health education, children in the soccer group had significant decreases in body mass index z scores at 3 and 6 months and significant increases in total daily, moderate, and vigorous physical activity at 3 months. An after-school team soccer program for overweight children can be a feasible, acceptable, and efficacious intervention for weight control.

  9. UC Berkeley/Stanford Children’s Environment Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The overall goal of this Center is to better understand the effects of exposure in the womb to air pollutants and airborne bacteria on newborn health, immune system...

  10. Theory and Development of Position-Sensitive Quantum Calorimeters. Degree awarded by Stanford Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Quantum calorimeters are being developed as imaging spectrometers for future X-ray astrophysics observatories. Much of the science to be done by these instruments could benefit greatly from larger focal-plane coverage of the detector (without increasing pixel size). An order of magnitude more area will greatly increase the science throughput of these future instruments. One of the main deterrents to achieving this goal is the complexity of the readout schemes involved. We have devised a way to increase the number of pixels from the current baseline designs by an order of magnitude without increasing the number of channels required for readout. The instrument is a high energy resolution, distributed-readout imaging spectrometer called a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (POST). A POST is a quantum calorimeter consisting of two Transition-Edge Sensors (TESS) on the ends of a long absorber capable of one-dimensional imaging spectroscopy. Comparing rise time and energy information from the two TESS, the position of the event in the POST is determined. The energy of the event is inferred from the sum of the two pulses. We have developed a generalized theoretical formalism for distributed-readout calorimeters and apply it to our devices. We derive the noise theory and calculate the theoretical energy resolution of a POST. Our calculations show that a 7-pixel POST with 6 keV saturation energy can achieve 2.3 eV resolution, making this a competitive design for future quantum calorimeter instruments. For this thesis we fabricated 7- and 15-pixel POSTS using Mo/Au TESs and gold absorbers, and moved from concept drawings on scraps of napkins to a 32 eV energy resolution at 1.5 keV, 7-pixel POST calorimeter.

  11. Remodelación ósea a través del modelo de Stanford.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Figueredo Losada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available El material óseo es radicalmente distinto a cualquier otro material tratado por la mecánica clásica, su estructura es heterogénea y anisótropa, y sus propiedades mecánicas varían no solo entre distintos individuos, sino también, para un mismo hueso En los tratamientos e intervenciones quirúrgicas donde está presente la readaptación, el crecimiento inducido del hueso puede ser modelado mediante el empleo de los criterios de remodelación ósea interna propuesto por algunos autores (Cowin y R. Huiskes, R. Carter, Doblare y García, Jacob y Beaupré y otros.En este trabajo se toma el modelo de remodelación ósea propuesto por Jacob (1994 y se implementa con la utilización del programa Abaqus 6.4 utilizando una subrutina de usuario (UMAT, se aplico a un modelo 2D de hueso genérico con un sistema de cargas para comprobar los efectos de la remodelación y las variaciones de los valores de densidad. Como parte del trabajo fueron creados dos programas para el procesamiento de los datos, para un análisis de resultados fuera del visualizador del Abaqus, logrando una apreciación cualitativamente y cuantitativamente de los resultados. The bone material is radically different to any other material tried by the classic mechanics, its structure is heterogeneous and anisótropic, and its mechanical properties not vary alone among different individuals, but also, for oneself bone In the medical treatments and surgical interventions where it is present the readaptation, the induced growth of the bone can be modeled by means of the employment of the approaches of remodeling bone intern proposed by some authors (Cowin and R. Huiskes, R. Crankcase, I will Doblare & García, Jacob & Beaupré and other.In this work it takes the pattern of bone remodelling proposed by Jacob (1994 and it is implemented with the use of the software Abaqus using user's subroutine (UMAT, its applies a model 2D of generic bone with a system of loads to check the effects of the remodelling and the variations of the values of density. As part of the work two software were created for the prosecution of the data, for an analysis of results outside of the visualizador of the Abaqus, achieving a qualitative and quantitative appreciation of the result.

  12. NIEHS/EPA CEHCs: Berkeley/Stanford Children's Environment Health Center - UC Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this Center is to better understand the effects of exposure in the womb to air pollutants and airborne bacteria on newborn health, immune system health during childhood, and to understand the relationship of these early-life exposures to asthma

  13. The first colliders: AdA, VEP-1 and Princeton-Stanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-07-11

    The idea of exploring collisions in the center-of-mass system to fully exploit the energy of the accelerated particles had been given serious consideration by the Norwegian engineer and inventor Rolf Wideröe, who had applied for a patent on the idea in 1943 (and got the patent in 1953 [1]) after considering the kinematic advantage of keeping the center of mass at rest to produce larger momentum transfers. Describing this advantage G.K.O’Neill, one of the collider pioneers, wrote in 1956 [2]: “…as accelerators of higher and higher energy are built, their usefulness is limited by the fact that the energy available for creating new particles is measured in the center-of-mass system of the target nucleon and the bombarding particle. In the relativistic limit, this energy rises only as the square root of the accelerator energy. However, if two particles of equal energy traveling in opposite directions could be made to collide, the available energy would be twice the whole energy of one particle...” Therefore, no kinetic energy is wasted by the motion of the center of mass of the system, and the available reaction energy ER = 2Ebeam (while a particle with the same energy Ebeam colliding with another particle of the mass m at rest produces only ER = (2Ebeam m)½ in the extreme relativistic case.) One can also add that the colliders are “cleaner” machines with respect to the fixed target ones since the colliding beams do not interact with the target materials. The other advantage is that it is much easier to organize collisions of beams composed of matter-antimatter particles, like in electron-positron and proton-antiproton colliders.

  14. LINGUISTIC CONSIDERATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF THE STANFORD COMPUTER-BASED CURRICULUM IN INITIAL READING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RODGERS, THEODORE S.

    SOME VIEWS ON THE ROLE OF LINGUISTIC SCIENCE IN THE DESIGN OF READING MATERIALS AND THE TEACHING OF PRIMARY READING ARE CONTRASTED. FOUR AREAS OF LINGUISTIC STUDY RELEVANT TO READING ARE EXAMINED BRIEFLY--(1) THE STRUCTURE OF THE SPEECH SYSTEM, (2) THE STRUCTURE OF THE GRAPHIC SYSTEM, (3) THE RELATIONSHIP OF GRAPHOLOGY TO PHONOLOGY, AND (4) THE…

  15. Tarihin İncelenmesi İçin Bir Kılavuz - Michael Stanford

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Satılmış

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Yazarın Türkçeye çevrilmemiş diğer önemli eserleri şunlardır: The Nature of Historical Knowledge, Wiley- Blackwell, 1986 ve An Introduction to the Philosophy of History, Wiley-Blackwell, 1997

  16. Notes from the Stanford Sun-Weather Workshop, 11-15 August 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    utilized (15 years of bi-daily observations). b. It is fairly easy to identify the trough, more difficult to identify associated centers. c. A method to deal...problem which we are addressing. Can we get a mechanism which generates clusters of storms? g. Markson proposes a geoelectric index of the earth...circulation may reflect something (some earlier work suggested no ridge effect related to solar sectors). 13. Method for test a. Hypothesis: something

  17. A BASIC REFERENCE SHELF ON PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION. A SERIES ONE PAPER FROM ERIC AT STANFORD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GLASER, ROBERT; MARINO, MARY LOUISE

    ANNOTATED REFERENCES ARE DIVIDED INTO GENERAL INTRODUCTIONS TO PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION (INCLUDING PSYCHOLOGICAL AND LEARNING PRINCIPLES), USER GUIDES (CASE STUDIES), PROGRAMERS' MANUALS (INCLUDING DEFINITION OF OBJECTIVES AND PROGRAM ANALYSIS), AND REFERENCES FOR PROFESSIONALS EXPERIENCED IN PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION (THEORETICAL AND ANALYTICAL PAPERS).…

  18. Geneva University

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    École de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél: (022) 379 62 73 - Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 13 May 2009 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 – Stückelberg Auditorium Observing the extreme universe with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Prof. Olaf Reimer / Stanford University The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST, formerly GLAST) is an international observatory-type satellite mission with a physics program spanning from gamma-ray astronomy to particle astrophysics and cosmology. FGST was launched on June 11, 2008 and is successfully conducting science observations of the high-energy gamma-ray sky since August 2008. A varienty of discoveries has been made already, including monitoring rapid blazar variability, the existence of GeV gamma-ray bursts, and numerous new gamma-ray sources of different types, including those belonging to previously unknown gamma-ray source classes like msPSRs, globula...

  19. Intellectual Amplification through Reflection and Didactic Change in Distributed Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth K.

    Presented at the Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL99, Stanford University, California, December 11-18, 1999 Presented at the Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL99, Stanford University, California, December 11-18, 1999...

  20. Abnormally large magnetospheric electric field on 9 November 2004 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Center for Atmospheric Research, University of Massachussets, Lowell, USA. Stanford Research Institute, Stanford, USA. Department of Physics, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, India. Space Physics Laboratory, Thiruvananthapuram, India. National Institute of Information and Communication Technology, Tokyo, Japan.

  1. An Exploratory Study on Sniper Well-Being: Report on the First Year of Sniper Well-Being Research (FY 2008-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    strives to reduce this tension by modifying one or more of the conflicting beliefs. Called cognitive dissonance ( Festinger , 1957), such...2005). War: The new edition. Toronto: Vintage Canada. Festinger , L. (1957). A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance. Stanford, CA: Stanford University

  2. Communities’ Strategic Opportunities Through Broken Window Repair and Global Commons Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Hoover Institution Journal, Stanford University, Stanford:CA. 2011. http://www.hoover.org/publications/defining-ideas/article/67756 ( Asimov ...1957) – Asimov , Isaac, Profession. Street and Smith, Publications, Inc., Astounding Science Fiction, July 1957. In collection: Nine Tomorrows

  3. Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-16

    A workshop titled "Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe" was held December 9-11, 2008, at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center-National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary purpose of the meeting was to examine how computing at the extreme scale can contribute to meeting forefront scientific challenges in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. The workshop was organized around five research areas with associated panels. Three of these, "High Energy Theoretical Physics," "Accelerator Simulation," and "Experimental Particle Physics," addressed research of the Office of High Energy Physics’ Energy and Intensity Frontiers, while the"Cosmology and Astrophysics Simulation" and "Astrophysics Data Handling, Archiving, and Mining" panels were associated with the Cosmic Frontier.

  4. Was sind, und wie wirken Grundüberzeugungen in unserer Zeit? Über „Paradigmen“ und „Paradigmenveränderungen“ in der heutigen politischen und sozialen Sphäre – und die Folgen. Ein Gespräch mit Roland Benedikter, Stanford Universität. English summary included. What are basic assumptions, and which effects do they have in our time? On “paradigms” and “paradigm change” in the contemporary political and social domain, and the consequences. A conversation with Roland Benedikter, Stanford University.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Benedikter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available English Summary: This talk clarifies what is meant by the pervasive but seldom-precise use of the term “paradigm change.” While it appears that this term is often (unwillingly misused particularly by integral and progressive intellectuals and civil society groups as an instrument of predicting future cultural change, it is argued that it should rather be used as a tool of analysis of the past and the present of basic cultural and scientific convictions that dominate their times. In fact, a “paradigm” is defined as a collective bias (or, to use a more technical explanation, a “knowledge-constituting collective prejudice” on certain issues. It defines the validity of what is meant to be true, and what to be false, and what can be accepted as valid, and what not, in a given society at a given time for a given period. A “paradigm” is always functioning (a as a “constitutive paradox” because its claim is to define what is true and what not, but at the same time it is continuously replaced by new paradigms that coin different definitions – thus contradicting the very essence of “paradigm” as such; and (b by incubation periods, i.e., by phases where different claims on what is valid coexist or even form hybrids among them. In the end, “paradigms” are something irrational and in most cases un- or half-conscious cultural formations; but they seem to exist in every period of cultural development. This talk explains the mechanisms of how dominating cultural biases become “paradigms” in order to rule temporarily over the academic and political correctness of their times; and how and to which extent the one-sided “paradigm fetishism” of the epoch of “postmodernity” is currently coming at its end, with new, more integrative and integral blueprints arising that are in their majority trying to balance the prevailing “paradigmatic” nominalism with new, empirical forms of neo-essentialism and neo-substantialism. Specifically, integral approaches try to create a paradigm for our time that connects deconstructivism and substantialism (realism.

  5. Влияние партийной принадлежности на внешнюю политику США рецензия на книгу: Gries p. H. The Politics of American Foreign Policy: How Ideology Divides Liberals and Conservatives over Foreign Affairs Stanford, california: Stanford University press, 2014. 367 p

    OpenAIRE

    СОКОВ ИЛЬЯ АНАТОЛЬЕВИЧ

    2015-01-01

    Данная публикация является рецензией на книгу Питера Хейса Гриса «Политические основания американской внешней политики: как идеология разделяет либералов и консерваторов по иностранным делам». Книга состоит из предисловия, введения, текст состоит из двух частей: первая часть «Понятия» включает 5 глав, вторая часть «Случаи» также включает 5 глав, четыре из которых описывают отношения США с мировыми регионами: Латинской Америкой, Европой, Ближним Востоком, Южной Азией и последняя глава отношени...

  6. The Japanese Attack on Darwin: 19 February 1942: A Case Study in Surprise at the Operational Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-30

    cognitive dissonance and intolerance of ambiguity. The former, defined by Leon Festinger , is concerned with ways in which a decisionmaker tries to increase...situation and are reluctant to suspend judgement while examining evidence. Leon Festinger , A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance (Stanford, California...The Coastwatchers. Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 1946. 65 18. Festinger , Leon . A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance. Stanford: Stanford University

  7. Anonymous Agencies, Backstreet Businesses and Covert Collectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause Hansen, Hans; Schoeneborn, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Book review of: Anonymous Agencies, Backstreet Businesses and Covert Collectives: rethinking Organizations in the 21st Century, C. R. Scott. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2013. 272 pp. £45.90. ISBN 9780804781381......Book review of: Anonymous Agencies, Backstreet Businesses and Covert Collectives: rethinking Organizations in the 21st Century, C. R. Scott. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2013. 272 pp. £45.90. ISBN 9780804781381...

  8. Identification of new drug candidates against Borrelia burgdorferi using high-throughput screening

    OpenAIRE

    Pothineni VR; Wagh D; Babar MM; Inayathullah M; Solow-Cordero DE; KM, Kim; Samineni AV; Parekh MB; Tayebi L; Rajadas J

    2016-01-01

    Venkata Raveendra Pothineni,1 Dhananjay Wagh,1 Mustafeez Mujtaba Babar,1 Mohammed Inayathullah,1 David Solow-Cordero,2 Kwang-Min Kim,1 Aneesh V Samineni,1 Mansi B Parekh,1 Lobat Tayebi,3 Jayakumar Rajadas1 1Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory, Stanford Cardiovascular Pharmacology Division, Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, 2Chemical & Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 3Department of Develop...

  9. What Lies beyond the Bubble? Trying out One of the Stanford History Education Group's New History Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwin, David

    2014-01-01

    Trying out a "Beyond the Bubble" assessment in a social studies methods classroom revealed that the assessment worked much better than any multiple choice item while retaining great ease in marking. However, as discussion of the item showed, the rubrics for the item apply the "sourcing" heuristic so literally that it loses some…

  10. Measuring the Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version of Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire in Iranian Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mobini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reliability and validity of health assessment questioner have been shown for rheumatoid arthritis but not osteoarthritis in Iranian patients. Having an instrument for measuring of pain and disability is needed for evaluation of patients and disease course in studies. So this study was designed for evaluating of validity and reliability of Persian HAQ in osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: From 177 patients with hand and/or knee osteoarthritis, 100 patients were chosen according HADS score equal or less than 7. Short Form of Health Survey (SF-36, pain and disability according Visual analogue scale (VAS and Persian version of Health assessment questioner (HAQ were completed. HAQ was re-evaluated after one week. Correlation between Persian HAQ, SF 36 and VAS and test-retest reliability were evaluated by Spearman correlation coefficient and Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Results: Correlation coefficient for HAQ 1 and VAS for pain was (r=0.75, p=0.001 and for SF 36 was (r=0.70, p=0.001. Correlation coefficient for HAQ 1 and HAQ 2 was 0.93 for hand OA, 0.96 for knee OA and 0.94 for all patients (r= 0.92, p=0.001. HAQ had a good internal consistency in osteoarthritis (Cronbach's alpha coefficient=0.87. Criterion and structure validity used in study. Conclusion: This study has shown good validity reliability for Persian HAQ in Iranian patients with osteoarthritis.

  11. Reproducibility of the acute rejection diagnosis in human cardiac allografts. The Stanford Classification and the International Grading System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Nielsen, B

    1993-01-01

    above zero but not optimal. In addition to the interobserver reproducibility analysis of the two grading systems, the International Grading System is discussed. In the original description of the grading system terms such as focal, multifocal, and aggressive infiltrates and myocyte damage and myocyte...

  12. Evolving interpretation of the athlete's electrocardiogram: from European Society of Cardiology and Stanford criteria, to Seattle criteria and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; ElMaghawry, Mohamed; Corrado, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) pre-participation screening can prevent sudden cardiac death in the athletes by early diagnosis and disqualification of affected individuals. Interpretation of the athlete's ECG should be based on specific criteria, because ECG changes that would be considered abnormal in the untrained population may develop in trained athletes as a physiologic and benign consequence of the heart's adaptation to exercise. In 2010, a stem document from the Section of Sports Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) proposed to classify the athlete's ECG changes according to the prevalence, relation to exercise training, association with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and need for further investigations into two groups: "common and training-related" (Group 1) and "uncommon and training-unrelated" (Group 2). Over the last years, several efforts have been made to refine the ESC criteria for interpretation of the athlete's ECG in order to improve specificity maintaining good sensitivity, especially among elite and Afro-Caribbean athletes, which show the highest rate of false positives Group 2 ECG abnormalities. However, the balance between improvement in specificity and loss of sensitivity should be evaluated keeping in mind that the primary aim of the screening program is to save the athlete's lives rather than money. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 333. Procedimiento Híbrido Emergente en Disección Aguda Tipo B Stanford Tipo III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Velasco García de Sierra

    2012-04-01

    Paciente de 54 años que acude al servicio de urgencias por dolor dorsal y abdominal de reciente comienzo, e isquemia crítica de miembro inferior izquierdo. En TC se objetivó disección aguda tipo B con una gran puerta de entrada proximal al origen de la arteria subclavia izquierda (ASI y con extensión distal a los vasos viscerales y ambas arterias ilíacas. Presentaba inestabilidad hemodinámica y acidosis metabólica en relación con isquemia visceral. A través de esternotomía media se realizó translocación de ASI y arteria carótida izquierda a aorta ascendente, consiguiéndose una zona de anclaje proximal segura para una endoprótesis (34 × 150 mm. El control postoperatorio confirmó la correcta colocación de la misma con recuperación de la perfusión visceral y renal, pero sin mejoría de la isquemia de miembro inferior que precisó realización de bypass femorofemoral cruzado. En el postoperatorio presentó fracaso renal agudo, neumonía y taponamiento cardíaco, siendo necesaria pericardiocentesis. El paciente fue dado de alta tras 40 días de ingreso hospitalario con labetalol para control de su hipertensión arterial (HTA y continúa bien tras 1 año de seguimiento.

  14. A BASIC REFERENCE SHELF ON FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA. A SERIES ONE PAPER FROM ERIC AT STANFORD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MACCONNELL, JAMES D.; SCHILLER, CLARKE E.

    ANNOTATED REFERENCES ENCOMPASS DESIGN, PLANNING, CONSTRUCTION COSTS, TECHNICAL EQUIPMENT, AND TEACHING TECHNIQUES FOR SCHOOLS AT ALL LEVELS WHICH UTILIZE THE NEW INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA. EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES LABORATORIES, INC. WHICH HAS BEEN ESTABLISHED TO ENCOURAGE RESEARCH, AND APPLICATIONS OF NEW IDEAS FOR THE ENVIRONMENTS OF GROWING…

  15. Reservoir technology - geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fifth annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

    1985-09-01

    The objective is to carry out research on geothermal reservoir engineering techniques useful to the geothermal industry. A parallel objective is the training of geothermal engineers and scientists. The research is focused toward accelerated development of hydrothermal resources through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection technology is a research area receiving special attention. The program is divided into reservoir definition research, modeling of heat extraction from fractured reservoirs, application and testing of new and proven reservoir engineering technology, and technology transfer. (ACR)

  16. Conference on Stochastic Processes and their Applications (16th) Held in Stanford, California on 16-21 August 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-21

    Fleischmann do" Academy of Sciences of G.D.R. Luis G. Gorostiza Centro de Inve8tigacidn y Estudios Avanzados, Mexico ABSTRACT We consider a particle...simple non-verbal communication experiment. %- , Keywords: EEG statistical analysis, interhemispheric concordance, non-verbal com- munication, ANOVA

  17. Integrating Technology and Pedagogy for Inquiry-Based Learning: The Stanford Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning Environment (SMILE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Elizabeth; Kim, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Despite the long-standing interest in educational technology reforms, many researchers have found that it is difficult to incorporate advanced information and communications technologies (ICT) in classrooms. Many ICT projects, particularly in the developing world, are limited by the lack of integration between pedagogy and technology. This article…

  18. An on-line equivalent system identification scheme for adaptive control. Ph.D. Thesis - Stanford Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    A prime obstacle to the widespread use of adaptive control is the degradation of performance and possible instability resulting from the presence of unmodeled dynamics. The approach taken is to explicitly include the unstructured model uncertainty in the output error identification algorithm. The order of the compensator is successively increased by including identified modes. During this model building stage, heuristic rules are used to test for convergence prior to designing compensators. Additionally, the recursive identification algorithm as extended to multi-input, multi-output systems. Enhancements were also made to reduce the computational burden of an algorithm for obtaining minimal state space realizations from the inexact, multivariate transfer functions which result from the identification process. A number of potential adaptive control applications for this approach are illustrated using computer simulations. Results indicated that when speed of adaptation and plant stability are not critical, the proposed schemes converge to enhance system performance.

  19. Determinants of Conflict in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    1965), 13. 137 Tedd Gurr, Why Men Rebel (1965), 13. 138 Jonathan Wolff, " Karl Marx ," The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2011 Edition...490961276. Wolff, Jonathan. “ Karl Marx .” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Spring 2011 Edition (n.d.). http://plato.stanford.edu/archives...accessed March 10, 2011, http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/spr2011/entries/ marx /. 139 Tedd Gurr, Why Men Rebel, (Princeton: Princeton University

  20. Toward 21st Century Supports: An Interview with Linda Darling-Hammond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umphrey, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Linda Darling-Hammond who is the Charles Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University, the director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy and Education, and the co-director of the school redesign network at Stanford. In this interview, Darling-Hammond shares her thoughts on how issues of…

  1. Paulraj, Prof. Arogyaswami J

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2014 Honorary. Paulraj, Prof. Arogyaswami J. Date of birth: 1944. Address: Information Systems Laboratory, Stanford University, 232, David Packard EE Building, 350, Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-9510, USA Contact: Email: apaulraj@stanford.edu. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  2. Zare, Prof. Richard N

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 2009 Honorary. Zare, Prof. Richard N. Date of birth: 19 November 1939. Address: Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-5080, USA Contact: Email: zare@stanford.edu. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook ...

  3. Experiment list: SRX150729 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 51207813,81.3,12.9,1290 GSM935650: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 IRF3 IgG-rab source_na...me=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || dat

  4. Experiment list: SRX150700 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 14464225,91.6,3.8,1953 GSM935621: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 forskolin ERRA std sou...rce_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University

  5. Experiment list: SRX150511 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Adenocarcinoma 36207830,97.6,6.2,28207 GSM935432: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 CHD2 (AB68301) IgG-rab source_...name=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  6. Experiment list: SRX186629 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ue Diagnosis=Neuroblastoma 44104587,91.5,13.3,2453 GSM1003624: Stanford ChipSeq SK-N-SH Input IgG-rab source..._name=SK-N-SH || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University |

  7. Experiment list: SRX150512 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 38042782,50.9,17.9,7845 GSM935433: Stanford ChipSeq K562 NF-YA std source_nam...e=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datat

  8. Experiment list: SRX150354 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 66267342,97.2,6.4,1767 GSM935274: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 CEBPZ IgG-rab source_n...ame=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || da

  9. Experiment list: SRX150591 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iagnosis=Normal 66396650,90.8,13.3,1635 GSM935512: Stanford ChipSeq IMR90 Input IgG-rab source_name=IMR90 ||... biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipS

  10. Experiment list: SRX150356 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Adenocarcinoma 60127219,66.8,6.7,21713 GSM935276: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 STAT3 IgG-rab source_name=HeL...a-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatyp

  11. Experiment list: SRX150578 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 56776188,89.9,9.6,69762 GSM935499: Stanford ChipSeq K562 CEBPB IgG-rab sourc...e_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  12. Experiment list: SRX140355 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on=Leukemia (K562 analog) 49580100,86.5,11.8,1677 GSM912892: Stanford ChipSeq MEL USF2 IgG-mus source_name=M...EL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  13. Experiment list: SRX140377 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on=Leukemia (K562 analog) 49712317,79.5,15.7,8040 GSM912914: Stanford ChipSeq MEL E2F4 IgG-rab source_name=M...EL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  14. Experiment list: SRX150572 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 47852383,93.0,6.9,79010 GSM935493: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 CEBPB IgG-rab source_...name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || d

  15. Experiment list: SRX150461 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5,85.8,15.0,1444 GSM935381: Stanford ChipSeq H1-hESC Input IgG-rab source_name=H1-hESC || biomaterial_provid...er=WiCell Research Institute || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=Chi

  16. Experiment list: SRX140395 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=Leukemia (K562 analog) 56641548,89.9,14.8,23052 GSM912932: Stanford ChipSeq MEL NELFe IgG-rab source_nam...e=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University

  17. Experiment list: SRX186618 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Normal 60420926,91.8,21.9,31737 GSM1003613: Stanford ChipSeq IMR90 MAZ (ab85725) IgG-rab source_name=IMR90 |...| biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=Chip

  18. Experiment list: SRX150708 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gnosis=Carcinoma 52854099,96.4,11.1,1372 GSM935629: Stanford ChipSeq A549 Input IgG-rab source_name=A549 || ...biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipSe

  19. Experiment list: SRX150364 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ection, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transformed 35300070,53.8,4.5,723 GSM935284: Stanford ChipSeq GM15510 ...Input IgG-mus source_name=GM15510 || biomaterial_provider=Coriell || lab=Stanford... || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Se

  20. Experiment list: SRX140397 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n=Leukemia (K562 analog) 53644987,74.2,22.0,33664 GSM912934: Stanford ChipSeq MEL c-Myc IgG-rab source_name=...MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University |

  1. Experiment list: SRX150444 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 57054097,78.1,6.7,17322 GSM935364: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 c-Jun IgG-rab source_na...me=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || dat

  2. Experiment list: SRX150367 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transformed 117700576,56.9,8.7,31434 GSM935287: Stanford ChipSeq GM12891 Pol2 Ig...G-mus source_name=GM12891 || biomaterial_provider=Coriell || lab=Stanford || lab ...description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing

  3. Experiment list: SRX150566 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 32904365,69.7,3.2,3200 GSM935487: Stanford ChipSeq K562 IFNg30 STAT1 std sou...rce_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University |

  4. Experiment list: SRX150567 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 23027869,78.6,2.6,4414 GSM935488: Stanford ChipSeq K562 IFNg6h STAT1 std sou...rce_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University |

  5. Experiment list: SRX150706 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 11958882,92.4,3.7,4428 GSM935627: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 insulin SREBP1 std so...urce_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University

  6. Experiment list: SRX186637 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Neuroblastoma 56001976,93.7,8.4,37857 GSM1003632: Stanford ChipSeq SK-N-SH JunD IgG-rab source_name=SK-...N-SH || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatyp

  7. Experiment list: SRX467561 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Leukemia (K562 analog) 50698180,95.8,14.2,568 Stanford ChipSeq MEL H3K27me3 IgG-rab source_name=MEL || bioma...terial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=C

  8. Experiment list: SRX150714 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nosis=Adenocarcinoma 38808032,82.1,6.4,11777 GSM935635: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 Ini1 IgG-mus source_name=He...La-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || dataty

  9. Experiment list: SRX186612 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rcinoma 60613630,96.8,11.1,8605 GSM1003607: Stanford ChipSeq A549 c-Myc IgG-rab source_name=A549 || biomater...ial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipSeq || dat

  10. Experiment list: SRX150705 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 11781272,92.2,2.5,2525 GSM935626: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 forskolin HSF1 std sour...ce_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University |

  11. Experiment list: SRX150725 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 74603296,82.3,5.3,8354 GSM935646: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 USF2 IgG-rab source_nam...e=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || data

  12. Experiment list: SRX150419 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Diagnosis=Adenocarcinoma 55865436,73.1,8.3,1030 GSM935339: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 Input IgG-rab source_na...me=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || d

  13. Experiment list: SRX150716 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nosis=Adenocarcinoma 55542657,70.0,6.0,8908 GSM935637: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 BAF155 IgG-mus source_name=H...eLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datat

  14. Experiment list: SRX150466 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sion, Epstein-Barr Virus 60061473,83.6,10.0,30867 GSM935386: Stanford ChipSeq GM12878 Pol2 IgG-mus source_na...h/Search.aspx?PgId=165&q=GM12878 || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype

  15. Experiment list: SRX150703 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s=Normal 59655760,93.9,11.7,49513 GSM935624: Stanford ChipSeq IMR90 Rad21 IgG-rab source_name=IMR90 || bioma...terial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipSeq ||

  16. Experiment list: SRX150408 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Adenocarcinoma 54912044,71.2,17.6,40981 GSM935328: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 JunD IgG-rab source_name=HeLa...-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype

  17. Experiment list: SRX186633 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nosis=Neuroblastoma 64441171,97.4,17.9,69441 GSM1003628: Stanford ChipSeq SK-N-SH Rad21 IgG-rab source_name=...SK-N-SH || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || data

  18. Experiment list: SRX188811 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=Leukemia (K562 analog) 54415931,87.6,24.3,6904 GSM1003791: Stanford ChipSeq MEL Nrf2 IgG-rab source_name...=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University

  19. Experiment list: SRX150579 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Adenocarcinoma 61147610,67.9,8.8,31444 GSM935500: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 p300 (SC-584) IgG-rab source_...name=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  20. Experiment list: SRX150649 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Adenocarcinoma 53617929,77.6,9.0,2330 GSM935570: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 IRF3 IgG-rab source_name=HeLa-S...3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=C

  1. Experiment list: SRX186794 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eukemia (K562 analog) 60683714,96.0,25.9,732 GSM1003755: Stanford ChipSeq MEL H3K9me3 IgG-rab source_name=ME...L || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  2. Experiment list: SRX140378 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on=Leukemia (K562 analog) 52408616,78.2,22.0,13205 GSM912915: Stanford ChipSeq MEL JunD IgG-rab source_name=...MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University |

  3. Experiment list: SRX150352 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s=Adenocarcinoma 54638333,95.6,5.0,22347 GSM935272: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 MAZ (ab85725) IgG-rab source_na...me=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || d

  4. Experiment list: SRX186632 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Neuroblastoma 51561491,94.9,8.6,39348 GSM1003627: Stanford ChipSeq SK-N-SH SMC3 (ab9263) IgG-rab source..._name=SK-N-SH || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University |

  5. Experiment list: SRX150436 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 49630901,84.3,3.9,3569 GSM935356: Stanford ChipSeq K562 USF2 IgG-rab source_n...ame=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || dat

  6. Experiment list: SRX186792 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eukemia (K562 analog) 44609962,97.6,21.8,42177 GSM1003753: Stanford ChipSeq MEL H3K4me3 IgG-rab source_name=...MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University |

  7. Experiment list: SRX150712 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 33314406,88.3,8.4,3216 GSM935633: Stanford ChipSeq K562 Brg1 IgG-mus sourc...e_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  8. Experiment list: SRX150632 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Adenocarcinoma 51037868,90.5,16.1,103960 GSM935553: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 CEBPB IgG-rab source_name=H...eLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datat

  9. Experiment list: SRX150358 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d|Tissue Diagnosis=Normal 46845015,72.2,5.4,31860 GSM935278: Stanford ChipSeq HUVEC c-Jun std source_name=HU...VEC || biomaterial_provider=Lonza || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatyp

  10. Experiment list: SRX186783 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eukemia (K562 analog) 57319101,97.7,13.7,22245 GSM1003744: Stanford ChipSeq MEL H3K4me1 IgG-rab source_name=...MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University |

  11. Experiment list: SRX150634 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Adenocarcinoma 60004465,75.0,12.4,5537 GSM935555: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 PRDM1 (9115) IgG-rab source_n...ame=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  12. Experiment list: SRX150717 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nosis=Adenocarcinoma 60758749,64.9,5.6,1824 GSM935638: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 BAF170 IgG-mus source_name=H...eLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datat

  13. Experiment list: SRX150595 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available =Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 52583959,91.7,9.5,36276 GSM935516: Stanford ChipSeq K562 c-Myc IgG-rab source_...name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || da

  14. Experiment list: SRX150481 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 64892865,93.4,10.5,36220 GSM935401: Stanford ChipSeq K562 p300 IgG-rab sourc...e_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  15. Experiment list: SRX150726 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 50009165,84.9,6.5,41443 GSM935647: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 Rad21 IgG-rab source_...name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || d

  16. Experiment list: SRX150577 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Adenocarcinoma 56885769,77.4,11.6,15543 GSM935498: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 Mxi1 (AF4185) IgG-rab source_...name=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  17. Experiment list: SRX150650 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Adenocarcinoma 53754249,73.2,14.6,65879 GSM935571: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 Rad21 IgG-rab source_name=He...La-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || dataty

  18. Experiment list: SRX140398 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=Leukemia (K562 analog) 56736927,88.7,25.4,48271 GSM912935: Stanford ChipSeq MEL Rad21 IgG-rab source_nam...e=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University

  19. Experiment list: SRX150627 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available =Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 50733951,79.3,7.6,48661 GSM935548: Stanford ChipSeq K562 IFNg30 c-Myc std sour...ce_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University ||

  20. Experiment list: SRX186620 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available =Normal 61119489,90.7,18.5,3770 GSM1003615: Stanford ChipSeq IMR90 RFX5 (200-401-194) IgG-rab source_name=IM...R90 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype

  1. Experiment list: SRX150526 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ection, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transformed 12960848,90.7,2.7,524 GSM935447: Stanford ChipSeq GM15510 ...TNFa Input IgG-rab source_name=GM15510 || biomaterial_provider=Coriell || lab=Stanford... || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin

  2. Experiment list: SRX150728 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 50617623,83.9,6.7,54855 GSM935649: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 JunD IgG-rab source_na...me=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || dat

  3. Experiment list: SRX150380 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Carcinoma 61556786,97.5,8.2,24298 GSM935300: Stanford ChipSeq A549 Rad21 IgG-rab source_name=A549 || biomate...rial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipSeq || da

  4. Experiment list: SRX150421 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s=Adenocarcinoma 55327071,71.0,15.0,21504 GSM935341: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 c-Jun IgG-rab source_name=HeLa...-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype

  5. Final Report: High Energy Physics Program (HEP), Physics Department, Princeton University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callan, Curtis G. [Princeton University; Gubser, Steven S. [Princeton University; Marlow, Daniel R. [Princeton University; McDonald, Kirk T. [Princeton University; Meyers, Peter D. [Princeton University; Olsen, James D. [Princeton University; Smith, Arthur J.S. [Princeton University; Steinhardt, Paul J. [Princeton University; Tully, Christopher G. [Princeton University; Stickland, David P. [Princeton University

    2013-04-30

    The activities of the Princeton Elementary particles group funded through Department of Energy Grant# DEFG02-91 ER40671 during the period October 1, 1991 through January 31, 2013 are summarized. These activities include experiments performed at Brookhaven National Lab; the CERN Lab in Geneva, Switzerland; Fermilab; KEK in Tsukuba City, Japan; the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; as well as extensive experimental and the- oretical studies conducted on the campus of Princeton University. Funded senior personnel include: Curtis Callan, Stephen Gubser, Valerie Halyo, Daniel Marlow, Kirk McDonald, Pe- ter Meyers, James Olsen, Pierre Pirou e, Eric Prebys, A.J. Stewart Smith, Frank Shoemaker (deceased), Paul Steinhardt, David Stickland, Christopher Tully, and Liantao Wang.

  6. The Role of Hypoxia in the Tumor Microenvironment: Implications for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Nat Commun. 2017 May 31;8:15580 2. Kariolis MS, Miao YR, Diep A, Nash SE, Olcina MM, Jiang D, Jones DS 2nd, Kapur S, Math II, Koong AC, Rankin EB...and Angiogenesis (Stanford University) 2016 Guest Instructor CBIO 280: Cancer Biology Journal Club (Stanford University) 2015 Instructor CBIO 280...Cancer Biology Journal Club (Stanford University) 2006 Teaching Assistant BIOM 555: Gene Expression (University of Pennsylvania)

  7. Building Sustainable Capacity with University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Universities can play an important role in building scientific and technical capacity by providing educational opportunities for local and regional populations in developing countries. These opportunities may be short term or long term through for example faculty exchanges, student exchanges, and collaborative teaching and research activities. As the demand for talented graduates expands in developing countries, local universities face competition for students, lecturers, and professors from the same industries and communities they serve. This competition is in many ways counterproductive to building the sustainable human resource that is needed to support local development, management, and governance. Such competition is particularly evident for top science and engineering students in energy rich countries. University partnerships, e.g., in particular those between universities in OECD countries and universities in developing countries, have an important role to play in bridging the gap between today's lack of capacity and a sustainable human resource for the future. Such university partnerships, however, face many challenges, some of which can be traced to organizational and cultural differences In this presentation, I will discuss how university partnerships are formed, some of the benefits to partners, and some pitfalls to avoid during implementation of university partnerships. The examples are taken from Stanford partnerships that involve geoscience and engineering, and will include representative goals and content of the example partnerships. These partnerships I'll describe are actually trilateral, with partners from two or more universities and a private company or government agency. I conclude the presentation with a brief discussion on multiculturalism, perhaps the most important consideration when planning a partnership between diverse organizations. Organizers of partnerships must recognize the fact that multiculturalism and diversity are assets that

  8. Electrolyte Gating of Correlated Electron Materials and Nanostructures in Complex Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Leland Stanford Junior University , The Stanford University 450 Serra Mall Stanford...interactions and spin physics play a role (notably spin liquids) and materials in which local conduction has recently been achieved or discovered...electrons, Mott transition, spin liquids 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON

  9. Motivation Modeling: Influencing Subordinate Motivation and Organizational Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    rganization," Journal of Psycholoqy 21 1946, p. 190. 55. Leon Festinger , A Theory of Coaritive Di ance (Stanford, CA% Stanford University Press. 1957...University Press, 1957. Festinger , Leon , et al. Theory and Eyperiment in Social LC(’,U, oinaari. Ann Arbor, MI: Research Center for Group Dynamics...An Experimental Approach. Malabar, ?-L: Robert E. Kriegar Publishing Co., 1982. Festinger , Leun. A Theory of Coqnitive Dissonance. Stanford. Stattford

  10. Being Human Beings: The Domains and a Human Realm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    potential confrontation between the Chinese military and the United States in the region and outlines a proposed departure strategy to counter the...threat. The concept draws parallels between growing Chinese assertiveness and past competition with the Soviet Union. AirSea Battle is a valid...Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Stanford: The Metaphysics Research Lab Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University

  11. Experiment list: SRX150593 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l_provider=WiCell Research Institute || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || data...,7.3,51412 GSM935514: Stanford ChipSeq H1-hESC Znf143 (16618-1-AP) IgG-rab source_name=H1-hESC || biomateria...SRX150593 hg19 TFs and others ZNF143 Pluripotent stem cell hESC H1 NA 62399777,95.8

  12. Experiment list: SRX150660 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ovider=WiCell Research Institute || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype...SRX150660 hg19 TFs and others GTF2F1 Pluripotent stem cell hESC H1 NA 54896984,95.5...,6.3,2714 GSM935581: Stanford ChipSeq H1-hESC GTF2F1 (AB28179) IgG-rab source_name=H1-hESC || biomaterial_pr

  13. Experiment list: SRX150375 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ll Research Institute || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipSeq ||...SRX150375 hg19 TFs and others CEBPB Pluripotent stem cell hESC H1 NA 52613013,97.0,...7.6,26019 GSM935295: Stanford ChipSeq H1-hESC CEBPB IgG-rab source_name=H1-hESC || biomaterial_provider=WiCe

  14. Experiment list: SRX150588 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Research Institute || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipSeq || d...SRX150588 hg19 TFs and others MYC Pluripotent stem cell hESC H1 NA 63502297,93.1,15.9,3413 GSM935509: Stanfo...rd ChipSeq H1-hESC c-Myc IgG-rab source_name=H1-hESC || biomaterial_provider=WiCell

  15. Experiment list: SRX150373 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available r=WiCell Research Institute || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=Chip...SRX150373 hg19 TFs and others MXI1 Pluripotent stem cell hESC H1 NA 61783189,95.8,6.5,8244 GSM935293: Stanfo...rd ChipSeq H1-hESC Mxi1 (AF4185) IgG-rab source_name=H1-hESC || biomaterial_provide

  16. Experiment list: SRX150513 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l Research Institute || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford University || datatype=ChipSeq || ...SRX150513 hg19 TFs and others JUND Pluripotent stem cell hESC H1 NA 61708942,95.5,10.6,21179 GSM935434: Stan...ford ChipSeq H1-hESC JunD IgG-rab source_name=H1-hESC || biomaterial_provider=WiCel

  17. An Overview of Production Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    DISTRIBUTED BY: Matonal Tochnica! Infonu srice U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 028143 Stanford Artificil Inteligence Laboratory October 1975 Memo AIM-271...ORGANIZATION NAMEL AND ADDRESS 18. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASK Artificial Intelligence Laboratory AE OKUI UBR Stanford University ARPA Order 249...014-64011I j SEC-jRITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (When, Data bHISP011 A Stanford Artificial ktteligncs Laboratory October 1975 Memo AIM-271 Computer

  18. How to Provide Gadolinium-Free PET/MR Cancer Staging of Children and Young Adults in Less than 1 h: the Stanford Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, Anne M; Theruvath, Ashok J; Lai, Lillian; Aghighi, Maryam; Quon, Andrew; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Wang, Jia; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Marina, Neyssa; Advani, Ranjana; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2017-07-18

    To provide clinically useful gadolinium-free whole-body cancer staging of children and young adults with integrated positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in less than 1 h. In this prospective clinical trial, 20 children and young adults (11-30 years old, 6 male, 14 female) with solid tumors underwent 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) PET/MR on a 3T PET/MR scanner after intravenous injection of ferumoxytol (5 mg Fe/kg) and [18F]FDG (2-3 MBq/kg). Time needed for patient preparation, PET/MR image acquisition, and data processing was compared before (n = 5) and after (n = 15) time-saving interventions, using a Wilcoxon test. The ferumoxytol-enhanced PET/MR images were compared with clinical standard staging tests regarding radiation exposure and tumor staging results, using Fisher's exact tests. Tailored workflows significantly reduced scan times from 36 to 24 min for head to mid thigh scans (p PET/MR scans were obtained with significantly reduced radiation exposure (mean 3.4 mSv) compared to PET/CT with diagnostic CT (mean 13.1 mSv; p = 0.003). Using the iron supplement ferumoxytol "off label" as an MR contrast agent avoided gadolinium chelate administration. The ferumoxytol-enhanced PET/MR scans provided equal or superior tumor staging results compared to clinical standard tests in 17 out of 20 patients. Compared to PET/CT, PET/MR had comparable detection rates for pulmonary nodules with diameters of equal or greater than 5 mm (94 vs. 100 %), yet detected significantly fewer nodules with diameters of less than 5 mm (20 vs 100 %) (p = 0.03). [18F]FDG-avid nodules were detected with slightly higher sensitivity on the PET of the PET/MR compared to the PET of the PET/CT (59 vs 49 %). Our streamlined ferumoxytol-enhanced PET/MR protocol provided cancer staging of children and young adults in less than 1 h with equivalent or superior clinical information compared to clinical standard staging tests. The detection of small pulmonary nodules with PET/MR needs to be improved.

  19. Science and Technology in the Soviet Union: Proceedings of a Conference Held at Stanford, California on 26-27 July 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-31

    8217) would not be very popular among Soviet scientists, and it is not. Con- sidering all the attention given to collective research in contemporary "big...SSSR of I April 1961, No. 282. In M. Ya. Chernyak (ed.), Zakonodatel’stvo o kapital’nom stroitel’stve, Vypusk 1, Moscow: "Yuridicheskaya Literatura

  20. Content Analysis of Work Limitation, Stanford Presenteeism, and Work Instability Questionnaires Using International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health and Item Perspective Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanitha Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Presenteeism refers to reduced performance or productivity while at work due to health reasons. WLQ-26, SPS-6, and RA-WIS are the commonly used self-report presenteeism questionnaires. These questionnaires have acceptable psychometric properties but have not been subject to structured content analysis that would define their conceptual basis. Objective. To describe the conceptual basis of the three questionnaires using ICF and IPF and then compare the distribution and content of codes to those on the vocational rehabilitation core set. Methods. Two researchers independently linked the items of the WLQ-26, SPS-6, and RA-WIS to the ICF and IPF following the established linking rules. The percentage agreement on coding was calculated between the researchers. Results. WLQ-26 was linked to 62 ICF codes, SPS-6 was linked to 17 ICF codes, and RA-WIS was linked to 74 ICF codes. Most of these codes belonged to the activity and participation domains. All the concepts were classified by the IPF, and the most were rational appraisals within the social domain. Only 12% of codes of the core set for vocational rehabilitation were used in this study to code these questionnaires. Conclusion. The specific nature of work disability that was included in these three questionnaires was difficult to explain using ICF since many aspects of content were not confined. The core set for vocational rehabilitation covered very limited content of the WLQ-26, SPS-6, and RA-WIS.

  1. Content Analysis of Work Limitation, Stanford Presenteeism, and Work Instability Questionnaires Using International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health and Item Perspective Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDermid, Joy C.; Grewal, Ruby

    2013-01-01

    Background. Presenteeism refers to reduced performance or productivity while at work due to health reasons. WLQ-26, SPS-6, and RA-WIS are the commonly used self-report presenteeism questionnaires. These questionnaires have acceptable psychometric properties but have not been subject to structured content analysis that would define their conceptual basis. Objective. To describe the conceptual basis of the three questionnaires using ICF and IPF and then compare the distribution and content of codes to those on the vocational rehabilitation core set. Methods. Two researchers independently linked the items of the WLQ-26, SPS-6, and RA-WIS to the ICF and IPF following the established linking rules. The percentage agreement on coding was calculated between the researchers. Results. WLQ-26 was linked to 62 ICF codes, SPS-6 was linked to 17 ICF codes, and RA-WIS was linked to 74 ICF codes. Most of these codes belonged to the activity and participation domains. All the concepts were classified by the IPF, and the most were rational appraisals within the social domain. Only 12% of codes of the core set for vocational rehabilitation were used in this study to code these questionnaires. Conclusion. The specific nature of work disability that was included in these three questionnaires was difficult to explain using ICF since many aspects of content were not confined. The core set for vocational rehabilitation covered very limited content of the WLQ-26, SPS-6, and RA-WIS. PMID:24459587

  2. Hosing Instability of the Drive Electron Beam in the E157 Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Brent Edward; /SLAC /UCLA

    2005-10-10

    In the plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC, known as E157, an ultra-relativistic electron beam is used to both excite and witness a plasma wave for advanced accelerator applications. If the beam is tilted, then it will undergo transverse oscillations inside of the plasma. These oscillations can grow exponentially via an instability know as the electron hose instability. The linear theory of electron-hose instability in a uniform ion column predicts that for the parameters of the E157 experiment (beam charge, bunch length, and plasma density) a growth of the centroid offset should occur. Analysis of the E157 data has provided four critical results. The first was that the incoming beam did have a tilt. The tilt was much smaller than the radius and was measured to be 5.3 {micro}m/{delta}{sub z} at the entrance of the plasma (IP1.) The second was the beam centroid oscillates in the ion channel at half the frequency of the beam radius (betatron beam oscillations), and these oscillations can be predicted by the envelope equation. Third, up to the maximum operating plasma density of E157 ({approx}2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), no growth of the centroid offset was measured. Finally, time-resolved data of the beam shows that up to this density, no significant growth of the tail of the beam (up to 8ps from the centroid) occurred even though the beam had an initial tilt.

  3. A single-center experience of hemofiltration treatment for acute aortic dissection (Stanford type A) complicated with postoperative acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Peng; Zhang, Xi-Quan; Pang, Xin-Yan; Cao, Guang-Qing; Fang, Chang-Cun; Wu, Shu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) for aortic dissection patients with acute renal failure after surgery in retrospective manner. A total of thirty-seven aortic dissection patients with postoperative acute renal failure accepted CVVH therapy. The effect of CVVH was evaluated by analyzing clinical condition changes and laboratory examination results. After treatment of CVVH, renal function and clinical symptoms were significantly improved in thirty patients. Eight of the thirty patients got completely renal function recovery within two weeks after CVVH therapy; and twenty-two of the thirty patients got completely renal function recovery within four weeks after CVVH therapy. Nevertheless, seven patients got no benefit from CVVH therapy with poor prognosis. CVVH is an effective treatment to most aortic dissection patients with postoperative acute renal failure. The effect of CVVH was correlated with original renal function, early CVVH therapy, and continuous intensive care.

  4. Numerical methods in laminar and turbulent flow; Proceedings of the 7th International Conference, Stanford Univ., CA, July 15-19, 1991. Vol. 7, pts. 1 & 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, C. (Editor); Chin, J. H. (Editor); Homsy, G. M. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to the impulse response of a laminar boundary layer and receptivity; numerical transition to turbulence in plane Poiseuille flow; large eddy simulation of turbulent wake flow; a viscous model and loss calculation of a multisplitter cascade; vortex initiation during dynamic stall of an airfoil; a numerical analysis of isothermal flow in a combustion chamber; and compressible flow calculations with a two-equation turbulence model and unstructured grids. Attention is also given to a 2D calculation of a buoyant flow around a burning sphere, a fast multigrid method for 3D turbulent incompressible flows, a streaming flow induced by an oscillating cascade of circular cylinders, an algebraic multigrid scheme for solving the Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes; and nonlinear coupled multigrid solutions to thermal problems employing different nodal grid arrangements and convective transport approximations.

  5. University College London ARPANET Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    protocol Which has been proposed for process-to- unique functions of the ARPANEI N?•P thereforeprocess comunication across connected comput.er are to...Stanford TCP. although it iould In this .,ction we will briefly describe the have bien very inefficient to imrl,•ne-t This version of TIM current... Comunication Costs to the ADMS and MP (C3 ) (iv) Retrieval Communication Costs from the ADUS (C4 ) (v) Retrieval Communications Costs in the Data Network (C5

  6. Reports of the AAAI 2016 Spring Symposium Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amato, C.; Amir, O.; Bryson, J.; Grosz, B.; Indurkhya, B.; Kiciman, E.; Kido, T.; Lawless, W.F.; Liu, M.; McDorman, B.; Mead, R.; Oliehoek, F.A.; Specian, A.; Stojanov, G.; Takadama, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2016 Spring Symposium Series on Monday through Wednesday, March 21-23, 2016 at Stanford University. The titles of the seven symposia were (1) AI and

  7. A study of Enlisted Attrition in the United States Coast Guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    Executive behavior and interaction. Industrial Relations, 1964, 3,(2), 99-108. Festinger , L. A Theory of cognitive dissonance . 1957 , Evanston, Ill.: Row...reenlist or exit. Data analyses were performed Jointly at Stanford University and Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. Standard descriptive...leading to retention or attrition, Lieutenant Kerry Patterson of Stanford University , Commander Robert Kuhnle, and Chief Warrant Officer Stephen

  8. Abstracting Main Ideas from Technical Prose: A Preliminary Study of Six Passages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-30

    STUDIES IN UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS THE SOCIAL SCIENCES CHAMPAIGN, IL 61920 STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CA 94305 1 Dr. Alan Schoenfeld Department of...Mathematics 1 Dr. Brad Syripson Hamilton College Psychometric Research Group Clinton, NY 13323 Educational Testing Service Princeton, NJ 08541 1 DR. ROBERT

  9. Guidon-Watch: A Graphic Interface for Viewing a Knowledge-Based System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    H. Schoenfeld val School of Ialth Senes University of California Military Assistant for Training and National Naval Medical Center Departent of...Mssachstts Santa Clara, CA 95052 Stanford University Amherst, MA 01003 School of Education Dr. Douglas Wetzel Stanford, CA 94305 Mr. Brad ympson Code 12

  10. Phil Knight and the Public Purposes of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Barrett; Morphew, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Philip H. Knight, co-founder of Nike, Inc., pledged $400 million to Stanford University last year (Gioia, 2016; Stanford University, 2016a). The gift will partially endow a $750 million fund intended to support 100 graduate students per year, with awards typically lasting for three years. The resulting Knight-Hennessy Scholars program will be the…

  11. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Blandford Roger David, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology,. Stanford, CA 94025, USA rdb3@stanford.edu. Brandenburg Axel, NORDITA, AlbaNova University Center, Roslagstullsbacken 23,. SE 10691 Stockholm, Sweden brandenb@nordita.org. Chamandy Luke, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and ...

  12. N-ov-emb-er

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    " to. Andrew Z Fire - Stanford University School of Medicine Stanford, CA, USA. Craig C Mello - University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, MA, USA. -96----------------------------~~--------R-ES-O-N-A-N-C-E--1 -N-ov-e-m-b-er--2-oo-6.

  13. AAAI 1991 Spring Symposium Series Reports

    OpenAIRE

    AAAI,

    1991-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1991 Spring Symposium Series on March 26-28 at Stanford University, Stanford, California. This article contains short summaries of the eight symposia that were conducted: Argumentation and Belief, Composite System Design, Connectionist Natural Language Processing, Constraint-Based Reasoning, Implemented Knowledge Representation and Reasoning Systems, Integrated Intelligent Architectures, Logical Formalizations of Commonse...

  14. China’s Military Modernization; An Analysis of the PLA Improved Logistic Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    issues/julaug08/chinese_log_mod.html (accessed October 10, 2012). 7. Major General SB Asthana, SM, VSM . "Transformation of PLA Logistics System...November 2011. Lewis, John Wilson, and Xue Lital. Imagined Enemies. Stanford: Stanford University, 2006. Major General SB Asthana, SM, VSM

  15. Informal Institutions and the "Weaknesses" of Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    FESTINGER , L.A. [ 1957 ], A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance , Stanford University Press: Stanford . GOETZMANN, W.N., AND N...behavior. Based on HEIDER’s balance theory [1946], which proclaims that individuals seek consistency between various elements of cognition , FESTINGER [ 1957 ...behavioural model a consumption patterns: The effects of cognitive dissonance and conformity", Working Paper, Center for Economic Research,

  16. A Research Study to Develop an Army-Wide Equal Opportunity Training Model. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-03-01

    Festinger , L. A Theojy of Cognitive Dissonance . Stanford , Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1957 . Fiedler...The theory of cognitive dissonance provides a possible theoretical underpinning for linking individual changes resulting from training experiences to...behavior, he is said to be in a state of cognitive dissonance . Consistent behavior S-,- is labeled consonant. As developed by Festinger , there are

  17. A wormhole catastrophe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischler, W.; Susskind, L.

    1989-01-01

    We review the assumptions of the recent wormhole solution to the cosmological constant problem. We argue that the assumptions inevitably lead to the unphysical conclusion that large scale wormholes materialize in spacetime with maximal density. On leave from Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

  18. Current Issues in Teacher Education: An Interview with Dr. Linda Darling-Hammond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Linda E.; Mulvihill, Thalia M.

    2017-01-01

    Dr. Linda Darling-Hammond is the Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education Emeritus at the Stanford Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. She is former president of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and member of the National Academy of Education and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She also served as a…

  19. Topicalization Effects in Memory for Technical Prose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-30

    STUDIES It’ 1:DUIV.RITY OF ILLINOIS THE SOCIAL SCIENCES CHAPA!GN, IL 61 F20 STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CA 94305 Dr. (Jan Schoenfeld Departmaent of...Mathematics 1 Dr. Brad Sympson L!i’iil.ton College Psychometric Research Group C tintoi, NY 13323 Educational Testing Service Princeton, NJ 08541

  20. Formation, spectroscopy and reactivity of the [L3Cu 2Cu O2] core: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    core: A new structural motif in copper dioxygen chemistry. PULAKESH MUKHERJEE 1, TIM MACHONKIN 1,. JENNIFER L DUBOIS 1, ADAM P COLE 1, BRITT HEDMAN 1,2,. KEITH O HODGSON 1,2, EDWARD I SOLOMON 1 and T D P STACK 1. 1Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

  1. Learning to Recognize Features of Valid Textual Entailments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    Marneffe, Daniel Cer, and Christopher D. Manning Computer Science Department Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 {wcmac, grenager, mcdm , cerd, manning...surpass previously reported results for alignment-based systems. 1 Introduction During the last five years there has been a surge in work which aims to

  2. Do Identical Polar Diatomic Molecules Form Stacked or Linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Hydrogen bonding; electrostatic interactions; dipole–dipole interactions; van der Waals equation. Author Affiliations. C W Williams Richard N Zare1 E Arunan2. Department of Chemistry Stanford University Stanford California 94305-5080 USA; Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of ...

  3. How the Embrace of MOOC's Could Hurt Middle America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Sebastian Thrun gave up tenure at Stanford University after 160,000 students signed up for his free online version of the course "Introduction to Artificial Intelligence." The experience completely changed his perspective on education, he said, so he ditched teaching at Stanford and launched the private Web site Udacity, which offers…

  4. Akademiese geletterdheid: Von studie

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1998) have termed the ... distinction between “deep, and “surface, learning. ...... Reconstructı'ng Individualı'snz: Autonorny, Individuality, and the Self in Western Thought,. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. 222~236. Hacking, I, 1994.

  5. CAREL. A Visible Distributed Lisp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    having two kinds of parallelism (which Filman and Friedman called parallelism by lexical elaboration and parallelism by explicit processes). CAREL...Delagi. CARE User’s Manual Heuristic Programming Project, Stanford University. Stanford, Ca. 94305. 1986. [ Filman and Friedman 84] R. E. Filman and D. P

  6. Development of Novel Treatment Plan Verification Techniques for Prostate Intensity Modulation Arc Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    include continuous kV imaging (7); pe- riodic kV according to previously established prostate motion statis- tics ; and using kV imaging only if the...Graves1 , (1) Stanford University, Stanford, CA, (2) PheniCo Inc., Fremont, CA, (3) Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Honduras, Tegucigalpa, Honduras

  7. Inspiration, perspiration, and execution: An innovator's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makower, Josh

    2017-05-01

    Josh Makower, MD, is a General Partner at New Enterprise Associates, Consulting Professor of Medicine at Stanford University Medical School, Co-Founder of Stanford's Biodesign Innovation Program, and Founder and Executive Chairman of the medical device incubator, ExploraMed Development, LLC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Külma sõja piirid Ida-Aasias ajaloolaste pilgu läbi / Jaanika Erne

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Erne, Jaanika, 1967-

    2016-01-01

    Raamatuülevaade: The Cold War in East Asia 1945–1991. T. Hasegawa (Ed.). Washington D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Center Press 2011, Stanford: Stanford University Press 2011, viii + 340 lk. Külma sõja aegsetest poliitilistest sündmustest

  9. Three-Dimensional Properties of Coronal Mass Ejections from STEREO/SECCHI Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de V. Bothmer e-mail: bothmer@astro.physik.uni-goettingen.de G. Nisticò Dipartimento di Fisica , Universita della Calabria...Cremades (2004). In 7Stanford-Lockheed Institute for Space Research, W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory (HEPL), Stanford University: 2010, MDI

  10. Contesting Border/Frontier Studies in China and Beyond: The Prospects and Pitfalls of Zomia as a Metaphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinba Tenzin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Megan Bryson. Goddess on the Frontier: Religion, Ethnicity, and Gender in Southwest China. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2016. 264 pp. $60 (cloth. Xiaofei Kang and Donald S. Sutton. Contesting the Yellow Dragon: Ethnicity, Religion, and the State in the Sino-Tibetan Borderland. Leiden: Brill, 2016. 494 pp. $202 (cloth/e-book.

  11. GNU Emacs TEX Mode. Version 1.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    Massachusetts, 1986. [5] Oren Patashnik. BIBTEXing. Computer Science Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California, March 1985. [6] Richard M. Stallman ...GNU Emacs Manual, 4th Edition, Version 17, Free Software Foundation, Cam- bridge, Massachusetts, February 1986. [7] Richard M. Stallman . TEXInfo, The

  12. Stimmungen or "In the Mood for Differentiality"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus de Brito

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Review of Hans Ulrich GUMBRECHT. Atmosphere, Mood, Stimmung: On a Hidden Potential of Literature, Trans. Erik Butler, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2012, pp. 148 [1st ed. Munich, Carl Hanser Verlag, 2011]. ISBN 978-0-8047-8121-0

  13. Superior Volumetic Modulated Arc Therapy Planning Solution for Prostate Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    10016 Edgar Garduño Departamento de Ciencias de la Computación, Instituto de Investigaciones en Matemáticas Aplicadas y en Sistemas, Universidad ...Nacional Autónoma de México, Cd. Universitaria, Mexico City C.P. 04510, Mexico Ran Davidi Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford

  14. Is the Culture of the British Army Conducive to the Successful Execution of Mission Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    John W. Creswell , Research Design : Qualitative , Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches (Los Angeles, CA: SAGE Publications, 2014), 14, 242...in the U.S., British, and Israeli Armies. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2011. Creswell , John W., Research Design : Qualitative ...The research for this paper was qualitative in nature. It investigated the relationship between two elements, Mission Command and British Army

  15. Fístula aortoesofágica após correção endovascular da dissecção de aorta torácica tipo B de Stanford Aortic-esophageal fistula after endovascular repair of Stanford type B thoracic aortic dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Gurgel Marques

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A correção endovascular da dissecção de aorta tipo B tem se mostrado como uma nova alternativa para reduzir o trauma cirúrgico. No entanto, as complicações de médio e longo prazo, tais como a fístula aortoesofágica, são ainda pouco conhecidas e pouco relatadas. O objetivo deste trabalho é descrever três casos de fístula aortoesofágica após o tratamento endovascular de 23 casos de dissecção de aorta descendente conduzidos pela equipe de Cirurgia Vascular da Santa Casa de São Paulo em um estudo retrospectivo. Esses pacientes apresentavam características em comum, como dissecção crônica, pós-operatório imediato sem intercorrências, necessidade de reintervenções, oclusão de troncos arteriais como a artéria subclávia, mesentérica, tronco celíaco, e, ainda, uma rápida evolução para o óbito após os primeiros sinais de fístula. Portanto, embora raramente descrita na literatura, a ocorrência de fístula aortoesofágica é uma complicação de causa até o momento indefinida do tratamento endovascular da dissecção de aorta descendente que merece atenção, dada sua recorrência e evolução fatal.Endoluminal stent-graft for type B aortic dissection is a new alternative to reduce surgical trauma. However, medium- and long-term complications are still little known and poorly reported, such as the aortic-esophageal fistula. The objective of this study is to describe three cases of aortic-esophageal fistula after the endovascular treatment of 23 cases of descending aortic dissection conducted by the vascular surgery team of Santa Casa de São Paulo in a retrospective study. These patients presented some common characteristics: chronic dissection, successful early outcome, need of reinterventions, occlusion of arterial trunks such as subclavian artery, mesenteric artery, celiac trunk, and finally, a fast fatal course after the first fistula-related symptoms. Therefore, despite rarely described in the literature, aortic-esophageal fistula is a complication of the endovascular treatment of descending aortic dissection which demands attention due to its unpredictability, recurrence, and fatal outcome.

  16. Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    2015-07-04

    -Smith, Sanger Institute, UK. • Toomas Kivisild, Cambridge University, UK. • Gyaneshwer Chaubey, Estonia Bio-Centre, Estonia. • Peter Underhill, Stanford University, USA. • Bob Brown, Harvard University, USA. Collaborators.

  17. university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Universities occupy a special place in the city’s life, the place where centuries-old traditions of the past meet the future. Universities keep their ancestral roots stretching back into the Middle Ages. University rooms and laboratories are the places where the future of science and society is built and discussed.The oldest Siberian University located in Tomsk was included in the City Charter as a city-forming enterprise. Other Siberian cities have not yet come to such deep comprehension of the role of universities. But who can doubt the significance and beneficence of this role?A complex and debatable process of reformation of the Russian higher education has been going on for several decades. Many things are perceived painfully. Irkutsk has been a student city for a long time and ranked second in the percentage of students among citizens. But recently we have lost Irkutsk High Military Aviation Engineering School, nearly lost the MIA High School. Pedagogical University has lost its status of university, and then its independence. Linguistic University has turned into a branch of Moscow University…Besides, external threats still exist and even grow. The lands and the buildings of universities are of keen interest among big businessmen, speculators and developers… Isn’t it the reason why the ideas to evacuate universities to suburban campuses arise increasingly frequently?What is the impact of dislocation of universities out of the city historical center? Does it make the city poorer and older? Or safer and more manageable? As usual, we tried to show the challenge and diversity of the main topic of the issue.

  18. "I Have at Least Nine Jobs."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Henry

    2000-01-01

    An interview with Gerhard Casper, former president of Stanford University, addresses the challenges of running a modern research university as he reflects on money, power, football, and online learning. (JOW)

  19. Exploratory basic energy research conducted at Standord University in the period September, 1979-August, 1983. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    In September, 1978, the Department of Energy awarded a contract to Stanford for Exploratory Basic Research. Projects to be supported were to be chosen by Stanford, with emphasis being placed on exploratory research likely to lead to full-scale research programs under support of appropriate agencies. Funding was provided for three years, as follows: FY 1979, $150K; FY 1980, 200K; and FY 1981, 250K for a total of $600K. The DOE funds provided through this contract were used, in combination with the IES industrial funds, to support exploratory basic energy research in three ways: (1) Funding of faculty members for the initial phases of research. Most of the funding was used in this manner. (2) Support of the Energy Information Center, a small special document center that holds information pertinent to energy research, both as related to energy policy and energy technology and to the supporting basic sciences. Approximately 12% of the funding was used in this manner. (3) Through support for seminars, occasional visitors, and program administration. Approximately 6% of the funding was used for this general support of the energy ambiance at Stanford.

  20. Future of virtuality in-the-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürsimsek, Remzi Ates

    2011-01-01

    Blog post by Remzi Ates Gürsimsek, researcher at Roskilde University and visiting scholar at Stanford University's H-STAR Institute. His field of interest is collaborative design and innovation in virtual worlds.......Blog post by Remzi Ates Gürsimsek, researcher at Roskilde University and visiting scholar at Stanford University's H-STAR Institute. His field of interest is collaborative design and innovation in virtual worlds....

  1. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  2. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  3. Proactive medicine: the "UCI 30," an ultrasound-based clinical initiative from the University of California, Irvine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J Christian; Schlang, Joelle R; Maldonado, Graciela; Lotfipour, Shahram; Clayman, Ralph V

    2014-07-01

    This article discusses the benefits of integrating point-of-care diagnostic ultrasound into the four-year medical school curriculum. Handheld ultrasound devices have been used to teach medical students at the University of California (UC), Irvine, since August 2010, and the article explains how the use of this inexpensive, safe, and noninvasive tool enhances the ability of a physician conducting a standard physical exam to confirm suspected findings and uncover other suspected pathology at a reasonable cost. The authors describe the ultrasound curriculum at UC Irvine and the process of its implementation. In the appendix to the article, the authors describe the specific diagnostic benefits of using a handheld ultrasound device for each element of the Stanford 25 physical exam. Their ultrasound-enhanced approach to the physical exam is referred to as the "UCI 30." They make recommendations for how and when to integrate ultrasound into the physical exam. The article points out that early training of medical students in the use of ultrasound can avoid the diagnostic problems of ultrasound by maximizing students' comfort and ability to obtain accurate ultrasound images for diagnostic and procedural purposes.

  4. Carl Von Clausewitz: Two Letters on Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paret, Peter; Moran, Daniel

    1984-01-01

    .... The Army War College wishes to express its gratitude to the co-editors and translators, Professor Peter Paret, Spruance Professor of International History at Stanford University, and Dr. Daniel Moran...

  5. What Is Climate Change? (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... explanation of the difference between climate change and global warming Climate Change (Tox Town - National Library of Medicine) - Explanation ... Teachers Climate Change Education (Stanford University) - ... the classroom. Global Warming (PDF, 85.81 KB)(Public Broadcasting Services (including ...

  6. Default-and-refinement approach to pronunciation prediction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Davel, MH

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available - ter Daelemans and Steven Gillis, ?Meta-learning for phonemic annotation of corpora,? in Proceedings of the ICML-2000, Stanford University, USA, 2000. [8] M. Davel and E. Barnard, ?The efficient creation of pronunciation dictionaries: Machine...

  7. Antibodies to presenilin proteins detect neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, GM, Jr; Forno, LS; Ellis, WG; Nochlin, D; Levy-Lahad, E; Poorkaj, P; Bird, TD; Jiang, Z; Cordell, B

    1996-01-01

    GM Murphy Jr, LS Forno, WG Ellis, D Nochlin, E Levy-Lahad, P Poorkaj, TD Bird, Z Jiang and B Cordell Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University Medical Center, California, USA...

  8. Controlled Precipitation of Radiation Belt Particles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bell, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    .... During the period of performance, Stanford University concentrated on the critical issues which determine the properties of the ion and electron sheaths which surround dipole antennas in a plasma...

  9. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  10. Rib Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MPH, Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, Section of Trauma & Critical Care, Stanford University School of Medicine NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Chest Injuries Introduction to Chest Injuries Blunt Injury to ...

  11. Through Enemy Eyes: A Soviet View of U.S. Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Pentagon, and frequently its intelligence departments, while possessing the newest technical means of espionage, artificial earth satellites included...government as proof of official membership in the intellignece community. The characterization of the Hoover Institute of Stanford University is typical

  12. Compact High-Power Widely Tunable Mid-IR Light Source for Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research, Inc. (LGR) and Professor Martin Fejer and his group at Stanford University propose to develop and demonstrate a compact, monolithic, efficient,...

  13. Advanced space-based InSAR risk analysis of planned and existing transportation infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    The purpose of this document is to summarize activities by Stanford University and : MDA Geospatial Services Inc. (MDA) to estimate surface deformation and associated : risk to transportation infrastructure using SAR Interferometric methods for the :...

  14. Generic UAV Modeling to Obtain Its Aerodynamic and Control Derivatives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chua, Choon S

    2008-01-01

    .... The first approach explored in this thesis involves using the LinAir software program developed about a decade ago at Stanford University, the second one relies on the Athena Vortex Lattice package...

  15. Experiment list: SRX342282 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e3 in Human Psoas Muscle Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=None || BIOMATERIAL_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATE...RIAL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSUE_TYPE=Psoas Muscle ||

  16. Experiment list: SRX347265 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available man Aorta Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=iron deficiency, bipolar || BIOMATERIAL_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, ...Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSUE_TYPE=Aorta || TI

  17. Experiment list: SRX190764 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNA || DISEASE=iron deficiency, bipolar || BIOMATERIAL_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERI...AL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSUE_TYPE=Esophagus || TISSUE_DEPOT=N/A || COLLECTION_M

  18. Experiment list: SRX157639 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 in Human Psoas Muscle Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=None || BIOMATERIAL_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATER...IAL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSUE_TYPE=Psoas Muscle || T

  19. Promising Results for Drug to Fight Arthritis Linked to Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Results for Drug to Fight Arthritis Linked to Psoriasis Psoriatic arthritis causes painful joint swelling, but new ... of a form of arthritis often linked to psoriasis. According to Stanford University researchers, psoriatic arthritis is ...

  20. CCD-scale Far-IR Detector Arrays Using Code Domain Multiplexing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For this program, we are partnering with Stanford University, who will provide CDM multiplexers. We will assemble the multiplexers into a scalable detector...

  1. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the TAGE from 08 May 1969 to 30 December 1969 (NODC Accession 7100605)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the TAGE from 08 May 1969 to 30 December 1969. Data were submitted by the Stanford University;...

  2. Experiment list: SRX213929 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is of H3K4me1 in Human Liver Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=coronary artery disease || BIOMATERIAL_P...ROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSU

  3. Experiment list: SRX213921 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nce Epigenome: ChIP-Seq Analysis of H3K4me1 in Human Lung Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=None || BIOMATERIAL..._PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=Primary Tissu

  4. Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence for Translational Diagnostics, which forms the third cycle CCNE Program at Stanford University, is a consortium that has three highly synchronized Projects and three Cores.

  5. Experiment list: SRX157627 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE=iron deficiency, bipolar || BIOMATERIAL_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=P...sy || DONOR_ID=STL002 || DONOR_AGE=30 || DONOR_HEALTH_STATUS=iron deficiency, bipolar disease (NO diabetes,

  6. Experiment list: SRX190780 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DISEASE=iron deficiency, bipolar || BIOMATERIAL_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=P...sy || DONOR_ID=STL002 || DONOR_AGE=30 || DONOR_HEALTH_STATUS=iron deficiency, bipolar disease (NO diabetes,

  7. Experiment list: SRX190765 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNA || DISEASE=iron deficiency, bipolar || BIOMATERIAL_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL...HOD=Autopsy || DONOR_ID=STL002 || DONOR_AGE=30 || DONOR_HEALTH_STATUS=iron deficiency, bipolar disease (NO d

  8. Excitation of Solar-like Oscillations: From PMS to MS Stellar Models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Astrophysique Spatiale, Orsay, France. Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, USA. Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mt. Stromlo Observatory, Weston, Australia. Michigan ...

  9. Fostering innovation without compromising integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Philip A

    2007-03-01

    Industry's interaction with academia has created vast opportunity for innovation but also the potential for undue financial influence. Potential conflicts of interest can occur at the level of the individual researcher or the institution. Implementing guidelines and policies on conflicts of interest can help maintain appropriate separation between academic medicine and industry while permitting medical innovation to proceed. In an effort to retain public trust, Stanford University School of Medicine has enacted policies to identify and manage potential conflicts among its faculty, to divest of holdings in companies conducting studies involving Stanford investigators, and to ban all industry marketing and gifts from Stanford facilities.

  10. OSA Proceedings on Picosecond Electronics and Optoelectronics. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Diamond ................ 170 Don Kania, Otto L. Landen, Lawrence Pan, Piero Pianetta, and K V. Ravi- ,. Part 6 Optical Switches, Detectors, and...pro- of the fitted parameters are listed in vided by Prof. Sergio Cova from the Poly- Table lB. Figure 3A shows the instrumental technical University of...Livennore, California 94550 Lawrence Pan and Piero Pianetta Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford University, Bin 99, P.O. Box 4349

  11. Cognition and Arousal as Predictors of Risk Taking: Effects of Load and Cognitive Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    A theory of cognitive dissonance . Stanford , Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1957 . Heider, F. The psychology of interpersonal relations. New York...Heider, 1958; Festinger , 1957 , etc.) and the information search based theories (e.g., Berlyne, 1950; Maddi, 1961) into a single theorectical structure...Arousal as Predictors of Risk Taking: Effects of Load and Cognitive Style Siegfried Streufert Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine By

  12. Organizational Technology, Control Processes, and Individual Knowledge as Predictors of Performance and Satisfaction: An Analysis of Organizational Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Systems Thinking. London: Penguin, 1969. Fayol , Henri . General and Industrial Management . Trans- lated by Constance Storrs. London: Pitman Publishing...pp. Z86-309. Holden, Paul E., Lounsbury S . Fish, and Hubert L. Smith. Top- Management Organization and Control. Stanford CA: Stanford University...expressed in the document are those of the author( s ) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the School of Systems and Loqistics, the Air University

  13. DARPA Internet Program. Internet and Transmission Control Specifications,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    rrr.rrr.rrr DIALNET DIALNET [26. 16,MRC] 023.rrr.rrr.rrr MITRE MITRE Cablenet [44,APS] 024.rrr.rrr.rrr BBN-LOCAL BBN Local Network ’SGC] 025.rrr.rrr.rrr...34 DIALNET Protocols", Stanford University Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, July 1978. [17] Feinler, E. and J. Postel, eds., "ARPANET Protocol...34 DIALNET ", Stanford University Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Undated. [27] McKenzie, A., "File Transfer Protocol", RFC 454, NIC 14333, 16 February

  14. Management of chronic hepatitis C treatment failures: role of consensus interferon

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Stevan A; Keeffe, Emmet B

    2009-01-01

    Stevan A Gonzalez1, Emmet B Keeffe21Division of Hepatology, Baylor Regional Transplant Institute, Baylor All Saints Medical Center, Fort Worth and Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USAAbstract: A significant proportion of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who undergo antiviral therapy have persistent or recurrent viremia and fail to ach...

  15. Commitment in American Foreign Policy, a Theoretical Examination for the Post-Vietnam Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    University Press, 1975), p. 81 footnote. 5. See works by Charles Kiesler, Kurt Lewin, Leon Festinger , Irving Janis, and Leon Mann for this widely held view...For cognitive dissonance, see Leon Festinger , A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1957), and Conflict, Decision, and...decisionmaker. Schelling, Arms and Influence, pp. 51- 52. Irving L. Janis and Leon Mann, Decision Making: A Psychological Analysis of Conflict, Choice, and

  16. New developments in magnetic resonance imaging techniques for shoulder instability in athletes

    OpenAIRE

    McAdams, Timothy R; Fredericson, Michael; Vogelsong, Melissa; Gold, Garry

    2010-01-01

    Timothy R McAdams1, Michael Fredericson1, Melissa Vogelsong2, Garry Gold21Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of MedicineAbstract: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be a very useful tool in the evaluation of instability in the athlete’s shoulder. Technical options of MR imaging, such as arthrography, higher power magnets, and shoulder positioning, have enhanced MR evaluation of the shoulder....

  17. The 1980-81 AFOSR-HTTM (Heat Transfer and Turbulence Mechanics)-Stanford Conference on Complex Turbulent Flows: Comparison of Computation and Experiment. Volume 2. Taxonomies, Reporters’ Summaries, Evaluation, and Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    opposite sign), where it is called the production term. Indeed, this term is re- sponsible for exchange of energy between the mean flow and the fluctuating... chaleur ," # Rocherche AgrOipj No. 6 (English translation ESA T’T-193). East, L. P., and W. G. Sawyer (19ŝ). "An investigation of the structure of equilib...which divides the spectrum In two parts with exchange betweeu them. 29D-52 Cambon et al. Spherically averaged spectral model. 2ED-52A Cambon et al

  18. The 1980-81 AFOSR-HTTM (Heat Transfer and Turbulence Mechanics)-Stanford Conference on Complex Turbulent Flows: Comparison of Computation and Experiment. Volume 1. Objectives, Evaluation of Data, Specifications of Test Cases, Discussion, and Position Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    Armstrong, R. R., H. V. Fuchs, A. Michalke, and U. Michel (1976). "Influence of Mach number on pressure fluctuations relevant to jet noise," presented...Ailziary do Roquefort , and R. Goethals (19719). ’Tru lence behavior in a sho’._k wave/boundary laver interact! on," AGARD Conference oil *Turbulert Boundary

  19. Reliabilita a validita slovenskej verzie a modifikacia Stanfordskeho dotaznika hodnotiaceho zdravie pomocou indexu disability (HAQ) u pacientov s reumatoidnou artritidou. [Reliability and validition of the Slovak modified version of the Stanford Health As

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szilasiova, A.; Macejova, Z.; Nagyova, I.; Kovarova, M.; Beresova, A.; Szilasiova, J.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Functional disability is one of the most important consequences of RA in the patient's daily life. The HAQ has been widely used in its self administered form for the assessment of disability. A sensitive and valid instrument is needed for a Slovak population with RA. OBJECTIVE: To

  20. The Application of Nuclear Techniques to Solid State Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-15

    characterized phenomeno- logically . Our efforts therefore addressed themselves toward broaden- ing the basis of experimental facts and deepening the...Italy C. L. Ramiller Student Intel Magnetics, Santa Clara, California J. L. Regolini Collaborator Stanford University, Stanford, California P. Revesz...316 (1978). 20. "Radioactive Silicon as a Marker in Thin-Film Silicide Formation", R. Pretorius, C. L. Ramiller , S. S. Lau and M-A. Nicolet, Appl. Phys

  1. Strategic Rationality is not Enough: Hitler and the Concept of Crazy States

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-08

    also Leon Festinger , A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1957. "As long as Prussia limited herself to purely...even if military success is not assured, so long as political and psychological goals can be achieved, to include such intangibles as the...encountered in personality formulation, which should also be examined when possible. Walter Langer’s wartime psychological study of Hitler, in this

  2. Strategic Vision: A Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    2005) Glassman , Alan M., Deone Zell, and Shari Duron. Thinking Strategically in Turbulent Times: An Inside View of Strategy Making. Armonk: Sharpe...Leadership: Learning to Lead with Emotional Intelligence , 225-248. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2004. (HD57.7 .G542 2004) Govindarajan, Vijay, and...American Intelligence . Stanford: Stanford University, Hoover Institution Press, 2005. 184pp. (JK468 .I6F77 2005) Biddle, Stephen D. American Grand

  3. Are you British or Muslim; Can You be Both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-21

    Democracy and the Global Order: From the Modern State to Cosmopolitan Governance (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1995). 166 Martha Nussbaum ...April 2006: 143-161. Nussbaum , Martha . For Love of Country: Debating the Limits of Patriotism. Edited by Joshua Cohen. Boston, Massachusetts: Beacon...2005), 2. Although it examines American identity Renshon‘s work focuses on the dilemmas of, and conflicts created by, social diversity. 25 Martha

  4. Development of a Procedure to Increase Awareness and Reporting of Counterintelligence and Terrorism Indicators: Personal Acknowledgment of Staff Security (PASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    Festinger , 1957) in individuals who have observed but not reported FIE threat indicators. Cognitive dissonance is a state of psychological tension that...cognitive dissonance ( Festinger , 1957; Aronson, 1992; Dickerson et al., 1992). FIELD RESEARCH Open-ended and semi-structured Interviews were...Telecommunications Functions, as amended by E.O. 13286 February 28, 2003. Festinger , L. (1957). A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance. Stanford: Stanford University

  5. Development of lifitegrast: a novel T-cell inhibitor for the treatment of dry eye disease

    OpenAIRE

    Semba, Charles; Gadek,Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Charles P Semba,1 Thomas R Gadek2 1Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Ophthalma Logic Consulting, Park City, UT, USA Abstract: Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disorder of the ocular surface characterized by symptoms of discomfort, decreased tear quality, and chronic inflammation that affects an estimated 20 million patients in the US alone. DED is associated with localized inflammation of the ocular surface and perioc...

  6. An Information Processing Analysis of the Function of Conceptual Understanding in the Learning of Arithmetic Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Hiebert, 1986; Romberg & Carpenter, 1986; Shoenfeld , 1985; Silver, 1985). The research reported here has a different purpose. Our goal is to clarify the...Dr. Derek Sleeman Computing Science Department King’s College Old Aberdeen AB9 2UB .Scotland UNITED KINGDOM SNOW RICHARD SYMPSON BRAD Dr. Richard E...Snow Mr. Brad Sympoon School of Education Navy Personnel R&D Center Stanford University Code-62 Stanford, CA 94305 San Diego, CA 92152-6800 SOLOWAY

  7. Treatment challenges in the management of relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin?s lymphoma ? novel and emerging therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Mark P Chao Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Over the last few decades, advances in immunochemotherapy have led to dramatic improvement in the prognosis of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Despite these advances, relapsed and refractory disease represents a major treatment challenge. For both aggressive and indolent subtypes of NHL, there is no standard of care for salvage regimens, with prognosis after relapse...

  8. Improving the Diagnostic Specificity of CT for Early Detection of Lung Cancer: 4D CT-Based Pulmonary Nodule Elastometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Peter G Maxim, Ph.D. * Departments of * Radiation Oncology , † Radiology, and ‡ Pediatrics , Stanford University, Stanford, CA † Biomaterials and...right column) for the purpose of elasticity calculation. M. Negahdar et al. / Radiotherapy and Oncology 115 (2015) 35–40 37Results Patient and tumor...processing of 4D CT images and their validation in an animal model and in a retrospective review of over 200 4D CT scans from patients with small

  9. In pursuit of the practice of radical equality: Rancière inspired pedagogical inquiries in elementary school science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoide, Lorraine

    2017-06-01

    This article outlines a study of praxis. Inspired by my reading of Jacques Rancière's (The ignorant schoolmaster: Five lessons in intellectual emancipation, trans. K. Ross, Stanford University Press, Stanford, 1991) influential text, The Ignorant School Master, I explore the practical applications of his work for teaching and outline a pedagogical response that sought to effect educational change through a philosophically driven teacher inquiry.

  10. The Foreign Fighter Problem Analyzing the Impact of Social Media and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    in the Spanish Civil War, 1 edition (Stanford, Calif: Stanford University Press, 1994), 11. 3 Vincent Brome , The International Brigades: Spain...make the IBs a reality. 37 Pozharskaya, “Comintern and the Spanish Civil War in Spain,” 48. 38 Brome , The...its 40 Brome , The International Brigades, 16. 41 Pozharskaya, “Comintern and the Spanish Civil War in Spain

  11. Digital Analog Design: A Highly-Efficient Method to Design Analog Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Digital Analog Design: A Highly-Efficient Method to Design Analog Circuits* Mark Horowitz and Byong Lim Department of Electrical Engineering...Stanford University Stanford, CA, 940305 Abstract: The past 30 years have seen an enormous growth in the power and sophistication of digital ...design tools, while progress in analog tools has been much more modest. Digital tools use many abstractions to allow them to validate

  12. Decision-Making in National Security Affairs: Toward a Typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-07

    decisional behavior generally recognize as seminal the work of Leon Festinger in A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance. The characterization of choice as the...Economics, #75, 1961; pp. 693-699. Festinger , Leon , A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1957. Falkowski...associating model and actor in a systematic fashion. This task is undertaken in the chapters which follow. 46 Irving L. Janis & Leon Mann. Decision Making

  13. Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

    2013-04-17

    With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

  14. SuchThatCast Episode 9: John Dupré

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soraker, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    John Dupré is the director of the ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society and professor of philosophy at the University of Exeter. Dupré was educated at the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge and taught at Oxford, Stanford University and Birkbeck College of the University of London

  15. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Universities, Oceanographic Institutions, Science Centers and Aquariums Working Together to Improve Ocean Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S.; McDonnell, J.; Halversen, C.; Zimmerman, T.; Ingram, L.

    2007-12-01

    and inquiry-based ocean sciences activities for children and families visiting informal institutions. The following COSIA partners have taught the course: Hampton University - Virginia Aquarium; Oregon State University - Hatfield Marine Science Visitor's Center; Rutgers University - Liberty Science Center; University of California, Berkeley - Lawrence Hall of Science; University of Southern California - Aquarium of the Pacific; and Scripps Institution of Oceanography - Birch Aquarium. Communicating Ocean Sciences has also been taught at Stanford, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, University of Oregon (GK-12 program), University of Washington, and others. Data from surveys of students demonstrates improvement in their understanding of how people learn and how to effectively communicate. Providing college students with a background in current learning theory, and applying that theory through practical science communication experiences, will empower future generations of scientists to meet the communication challenges they will encounter in their careers.

  16. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Universe or Multiverse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2008-11-01

    More than 2000 years ago, Epicurus taught that there are an infinite number of other worlds, both like and unlike ours, and Aristotle taught that there are none. Neither hypothesis can currently be falsified, and this issue of potential for falsification (that is testability) goes to the heart of many of the chapters in Carr's book. All but one of the 27 chapters, provided by 27 pundits (almost but not quite a one-to-one mapping) are written versions of talks given at one of three meetings, held between 2001 and 2005 at Stanford and Cambridge Universities and partly sponsored by the Templeton Foundation. Every reader will surely find some chapters interesting and informative, some provocative, and some rather vacuous. These will not be the same chapters for all readers. Two 'conflict of interest' statements: first, I spoke at one of these meetings, but was not one of those asked to provide a chapter. And, second, the first time I suggested in a lecture for scientists that 'many universes, either in temporal succession or embedded in higher dimensional space' was a possible explanation of the habitability of ours was fall 1974, shortly after Brandon Carter's first paper on anthropic principles and explanations, but before Bernard Carr and Martin Rees's 1979 Nature paper, which presented all the anthropic arguments then known and divided them into numbers that required no additional physics beyond the four standard forces (like the number of particles in a star) and those that seemed essential for life but not calculable (like the ratio of the electromagnetic to nuclear force constant). My other three possibilities were 'G.d has been very careful' (now called intelligent design), additional physics to be learned, and shear complexity. The core multiverse concept is that our universe (the 4-dimensional spacetime with which we are or could be connected and all its contents) is one of many, perhaps infinitely many, probably with different values of the constants of

  18. Slide 55

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. R. Rao. Anthropological Survey of India, Kolkata. K. Gopal, Madras University, Chennai. David Reich, Harvard University, USA. Chris Tyler-Smith, Sanger Institute, UK. Toomas Kivisild, Cambridge University, UK. Gyaneshwer Chaubey, Estonia Bio-Centre, Estonia. Peter Underhill, Stanford University, USA. Students from ...

  19. International Journal of Arts and Humanities(IJAH) Bahir Dar- Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    Educational Psychology. The results showed that the abstracts were difficult to read. In addition, Gazni (2011) examined the abstracts of articles of the five most cited institutions in the world (Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, Stanford. University and Washington University as well as the Max Planck Institute) to.

  20. A conversation with Lincoln E. Moses

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Byron Wm., Jr.; Hollander, Myles

    1999-01-01

    Lincoln E. Moses was born on December 21, 1921 in Kansas City, Missouri. He attended San Bernardino Valley Junior College from 1937 to 1939 and earned an AA degree, earned an A.B. in Social Sciences from Stanford University in 1941 and a Ph.D. in Statistics from Stanford University in 1950. He was Assistant Professor of Education at Teacher’s College, Columbia University (1950–1952), Assistant Professor of Statistics in the Department of Statistics and the Department of Prev...

  1. Inspired Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Robert; Spruch, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    It has been nearly 400 years since Harvard College was created, and since then, thousands of colleges and universities have been built across the United States. From the classically inspired lines of Thomas Jefferson's University of Virginia to the Spanish architecture at Stanford University, every campus has its own personality. It's not unusual,…

  2. Disappearances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Library with the Lead Pipe welcomes David B. Morris. In between twenty years as a self-employed writer, Morris held professorships at the University of Iowa, at the University of Virginia, and at Stanford University. His wider understanding of books and lives owes much to his wife, Ruth, a technical services librarian and library [...

  3. Kennedy: Future Academic Research Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The president of Stanford University discusses his views on problems facing research universities, including research secrecy, ethics, and economics of proprietary knowledge generated in the university, faculty conflict of interest, place of humanities in a society driven by technology, and decline of government support for academic research.…

  4. On Beyond Star Trek, the Role of Synthetic Biology in Nasa's Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    The time has come to for NASA to exploit the nascent field of synthetic biology in pursuit of its mission, including aeronautics, earth science, astrobiology and notably, human exploration. Conversely, NASA advances the fundamental technology of synthetic biology as no one else can because of its unique expertise in the origin of life and life in extreme environments, including the potential for alternate life forms. This enables unique, creative "game changing" advances. NASA's requirement for minimizing upmass in flight will also drive the field toward miniaturization and automation. These drivers will greatly increase the utility of synthetic biology solutions for military, health in remote areas and commercial purposes. To this end, we have begun a program at NASA to explore the use of synthetic biology in NASA's missions, particularly space exploration. As part of this program, we began hosting an iGEM team of undergraduates drawn from Brown and Stanford Universities to conduct synthetic biology research at NASA Ames Research Center. The 2011 team (http://2011.igem.org/Team:Brown-Stanford) produced an award-winning project on using synthetic biology as a basis for a human Mars settlement and the 2012 team has expanded the use of synthetic biology to estimate the potential for life in the clouds of other planets (http://2012.igem.org/Team:Stanford-Brown; http://www.calacademy.org/sciencetoday/igem-competition/). More recent projects from the Stanford-Brown team have expanded our ideas of how synthetic biology can aid NASA's missions from "Synthetic BioCommunication" (http://2013.igem.org/Team:Stanford-Brown) to a "Biodegradable UAS (drone)" in collaboration with Spelman College (http://2014.igem.org/Team:StanfordBrownSpelman#SBS%20iGEM) and most recently, "Self-Folding Origami" (http://2015.igem.org/Team:Stanford-Brown), the winner of the 2015 award for Manufacturing.

  5. Visual consequences of medications for multiple sclerosis: the good, the bad, the ugly, and the unknown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss HE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Heather E Moss1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Department of Neurology & Neuroscience, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is associated with vision changes both due to MS effects on visual pathways and due to medication effects on the visual pathways. Distinguishing the causes of vision change are critical to appropriate diagnosis and management. The incidence, presentation, and treatment of fingolimod-associated macular edema, alemtuzumab-associated thyroid orbitopathy, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in MS patients are reviewed. Evidence for beneficial effects of acute, chronic, and symptomatic MS medications on vision is presented. Keywords: macular edema, thyroid eye disease, optic nerve, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, optic neuritis

  6. Internet Protocol Transition Workbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    VGC] 020.rrr.rrr.rrr DC-PR D.C. Packet Radio Network [VGCJ 021.rrr.rrr.rrr EDN OCEC EON [EC5] 022.rrr.rrr.rrr DIALNET DIALNE1 (26, 16.MRCJ 023...41953. 7 October 1977. Also in [17]. [16] Crispin. M. and I. Zabala. " DIALNET Protocols". Stanford University Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, July...34. IEN 158. October 1980. (26] McCarthy, J. and L. Earnest, " DIALNET ", Stanford University Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Undated. (27] McKenzie

  7. Effects of body mass index-related disorders on cognition: preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Yesavage JA; Kinoshita LM; Noda A; Lazzeroni LC; Fairchild JK; Taylor J; Kulick D; Friedman L; Cheng J; Zeitzer JM; O'Hara R

    2014-01-01

    Jerome A Yesavage,1,2 Lisa M Kinoshita,1,2 Art Noda,2 Laura C Lazzeroni,2 Jennifer Kaci Fairchild,1,2 Joy Taylor,1,2 Doina Kulick,3 Leah Friedman,1,2 Jauhtai Cheng,1,2 Jamie M Zeitzer,1,2 Ruth O’Hara1,21Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Department of Medicine, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV, USABackground: Well-known r...

  8. A cognitive operating system (COGNOSYS) for JPL's robot, phase 1 report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, F. P.

    1972-01-01

    The most important software requirement for any robot development is the COGNitive Operating SYStem (COGNOSYS). This report describes the Stanford University Artificial Intelligence Laboratory's hand eye software system from the point of view of developing a cognitive operating system for JPL's robot. In this, the Phase 1 of the JPL robot COGNOSYS task the installation of a SAIL compiler and a FAIL assembler on Caltech's PDP-10 have been accomplished and guidelines have been prepared for the implementation of a Stanford University type hand eye software system on JPL-Caltech's computing facility. The alternatives offered by using RAND-USC's PDP-10 Tenex operating sytem are also considered.

  9. Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Issacharoff. Discourse as Performance . Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1989. vii + 161 pp. Reviewed by Gerald Prince, University of Pennsylvania Thomas M. Kavanagh, ed. The Limits of Theory . Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1989. 254 pp. Reviewed by André J.M. Prévos, Pennsylvania State University, Worthington Scranton Campus Wendy B. Faris. Labyrinths of Language: Symbolic Landscape and Narrative Design in Modern Fiction . Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1988. 242 pp. Reviewed by Carol Rigolot, Princeton University Eve Tavor Bannet. Structuralism and the Logic of Dissent: Barthes, Derrida, Foucault, Lacan . Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1989. 299 pp. Reviewed by Andrew J. McKenna, Loyoyla University of Chicago Gary Saul Morson and Caryl Emerson, eds. Rethinking Bakhtin: Extensions and Challenges . Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1989. Reviewed by Lewis Bagby, University of Wyoming Fernando Moreno. Carlos Fuentes. La mort d'Artemio Cruz: entre le mythe et l'histoire . Paris: Editions Caribeennes, 1989. Reviewed by Susan Levine, Lawrence, Kansas

  10. Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short descriptions of NSF support for the State University of New York computer network, one year trial of educational materials from the United Kingdom's Open University, A Dartmouth course on control of life, Stanford action on a course on dysgenics, and a bioengineering program at Texas A&M. (TS)

  11. Play and the History of American Childhood: An Interview with Steven Mintz

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Journal of Play, 2010

    2010-01-01

    An authority on the history of American children and families, Steven Mintz is a professor of history at Columbia University, where he also directs the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Teaching Center. Previously, he was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and the Moores Professor of…

  12. Human Rights in the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  13. determination of reaeration coefficient k2 for polluted stream as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of surface water in Pescadro Creek watershed. San. Mateo County, California, PhD dissertation, Stanford. University, 1968. 22. Ugbebor, J.N. Modelling the variation of water qual- ity of the Oshika lake. PhD thesis, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Nigeria Nsukka,. March 2011. Nigerian Journal of Technology.

  14. Estudiando imposibles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ernesto Ramírez

    1987-10-01

    Full Text Available Aprendizaje politico en una sociedad bloqueada o cómo hacer sensible a la burocracia. Political learning in a contained society: the elite housing bureaucrats of Colombia. John Crothers Pollock. Ann Arbor University microfilms. 1984 (Tesis en Stanford University 214 págs., apéndice.

  15. The Dynamics of Information

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    efficacy at making predictions in the real world. About the speaker Bernardo Huberman is a Senior HP Fellow and Director of the Information Dynamics Lab at Hewlett Packard Laboratories. He received his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Pennsylvania, and is currently a Consulting Professor in the Department of Applied Physics at Stanford University...

  16. Sociopathic Knowledge Bases: Correct Knowledge Can Be Harmful Even Given Unlimited Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    University Woehingoen, DC 20415 LUnivrsiey of New Eogland Dept. of Computer Science Deportment of Psycology 4400 Univers.ity Drive Armidole, New South Woes...the Social Sciences Sc.h.uley Park Stlanrd Stanford, CA 320-4116 Pittsburgh, PA 16213 UNITED KINGDOM Dr. Valrie L. Shalin Hone.ywell SkRC Dr. Richard

  17. International Symposium on Recent Advances in Aerodynamics and Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Charles

    1986-01-01

    The Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics at Stanford University was established in October 1973 to provide an academic environment for long-term cooperative research between Stanford and NASA Ames Research Center. Since its establishment, the Institute has conducted theoretical and experimental work in the areas of aerodynamics, acoustics, fluid mechanics, flight dynamics, guidance and control, and human factors. This research has involved Stanford faculty, research associates, graduate students, and many distinguished visitors in collaborative efforts with the research staff of NASA Ames Research Center. The occasion of the Institute's tenth anniversary was used to reflect back on where that research has brought us, and to consider where our endeavors should be directed next. Thus, an International Symposium was held to review recent advances in the fields relevant to the activities of the Institute and to discuss the areas of research to be undertaken in the future. This anniversary was also chosen...

  18. Experiment list: SRX150683 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Diagnosis=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 56440690,78.7,6.6,1892 GSM935604: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 Input IgG-rab s...ource_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universit

  19. Experiment list: SRX150639 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Adenocarcinoma 67477197,73.9,9.5,38034 GSM935560: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 RFX5 (200-401-194) IgG-rab sou...rce_name=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universit

  20. Experiment list: SRX150387 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 48871992,92.3,5.5,7341 GSM935307: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 CHD2 (AB68301) IgG-rab ...source_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universi

  1. Experiment list: SRX150560 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available issue Diagnosis=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 7207010,84.0,5.0,363 GSM935481: Stanford ChipSeq K562 Pol3 std ...source_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universit

  2. Experiment list: SRX150633 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Adenocarcinoma 60397010,67.8,5.0,20170 GSM935554: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 GTF2F1 (AB28179) IgG-rab sou...rce_name=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universit

  3. Experiment list: SRX140370 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=Leukemia (K562 analog) 52363123,78.6,13.8,50136 GSM912907: Stanford ChipSeq MEL GATA-1 IgG-rat source_na...me=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universit

  4. Experiment list: SRX140366 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n=Leukemia (K562 analog) 50357982,90.1,17.8,15061 GSM912903: Stanford ChipSeq MEL c-Myb (SC-7874) IgG-rab so...urce_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Un

  5. Experiment list: SRX140357 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available escription=Leukemia (K562 analog) 56211757,78.9,20.0,929 GSM912894: Stanford ChipSeq MEL Input IgG-rat sourc...e_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Unive

  6. Experiment list: SRX186623 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Adenocarcinoma 48696280,97.9,10.8,13475 GSM1003618: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 HCFC1 (NB100-68209) IgG-rab... source_name=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Unive

  7. Experiment list: SRX140364 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on=B-cell lymphoma (GM12878 analog) 47089985,72.3,22.3,22039 GSM912901: Stanford ChipSeq CH12 c-Jun IgG-rab ...source_name=CH12 || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  8. Experiment list: SRX150576 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 55586400,86.2,9.6,7442 GSM935497: Stanford ChipSeq K562 Mxi1 (AF4185) IgG-rab... source_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universi

  9. Experiment list: SRX150463 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available issue Diagnosis=Adenocarcinoma 46169004,92.2,4.6,21389 GSM935383: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 Pol2(phosphoS2) I...gG-rab source_name=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  10. Experiment list: SRX150624 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 52756547,91.2,5.7,8914 GSM935545: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 p300 (SC-584) IgG-rab ...source_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universi

  11. Experiment list: SRX150594 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Diagnosis=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 41101131,96.5,3.7,1309 GSM935515: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 Input IgG-goat ...source_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universi

  12. Experiment list: SRX150522 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Diagnosis=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 10770153,67.5,7.9,436 GSM935443: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 insulin Input st...d source_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Univer

  13. Experiment list: SRX140368 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available escription=Leukemia (K562 analog) 40760390,72.9,28.0,3178 GSM912905: Stanford ChipSeq MEL Input IgG-rab sour...ce_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Univ

  14. Experiment list: SRX186630 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 52670140,96.5,8.7,17224 GSM1003625: Stanford ChipSeq K562 HCFC1 (NB100-68209...) IgG-rab source_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  15. Experiment list: SRX150515 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available osis=Adenocarcinoma 57279254,96.6,6.2,12479 GSM935436: Stanford ChipSeq HeLa-S3 Znf143 (16618-1-AP) IgG-rab ...source_name=HeLa-S3 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Univer

  16. Experiment list: SRX140391 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on=Leukemia (K562 analog) 64944615,83.8,16.4,41657 GSM912928: Stanford ChipSeq MEL Mxi1 (AF4185) IgG-rab sou...rce_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Uni

  17. Experiment list: SRX150523 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Diagnosis=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 11696595,94.0,3.0,537 GSM935444: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 forskolin Input ...std source_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Univ

  18. Experiment list: SRX140386 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on=Leukemia (K562 analog) 53351670,96.7,17.2,44033 GSM912923: Stanford ChipSeq MEL SMC3 (ab9263) IgG-rab sou...rce_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Uni

  19. Experiment list: SRX186793 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eukemia (K562 analog) 49075329,97.0,18.9,41961 GSM1003754: Stanford ChipSeq MEL H3K4me3 DMSO 2.0pct std sour...ce_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Univ

  20. Experiment list: SRX140358 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ine|Description=Leukemia (K562 analog) 48310664,81.0,18.7,27817 GSM912895: Stanford ChipSeq MEL Pol2 IgG-mus... source_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  1. Experiment list: SRX186796 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eukemia (K562 analog) 50943734,97.7,12.2,9675 GSM1003757: Stanford ChipSeq MEL H3K4me1 DMSO 2.0pct std sourc...e_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Unive

  2. Experiment list: SRX150724 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ssue Diagnosis=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 17352923,94.5,3.0,1082 GSM935645: Stanford ChipSeq K562 Pol2(pho...sphoS2) std source_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  3. Experiment list: SRX188812 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iption=B-cell lymphoma (GM12878 analog) 59045006,95.0,17.0,23887 GSM1003792: Stanford ChipSeq CH12 ZC3H11A (...NB100-74650) IgG-rab source_name=CH12 || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  4. Experiment list: SRX188818 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=Leukemia (K562 analog) 52471414,86.9,22.7,19508 GSM1003798: Stanford ChipSeq MEL ZNF-MIZD-CP1 (ab65767) ...IgG-rab source_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  5. Experiment list: SRX140385 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iption=B-cell lymphoma (GM12878 analog) 62673281,96.7,18.4,57283 GSM912922: Stanford ChipSeq CH12 BHLHE40 (N...B100-1800) IgG-rab source_name=CH12 || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  6. Experiment list: SRX150575 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 53991556,91.3,11.5,36326 GSM935496: Stanford ChipSeq K562 TAL1 (SC-12984) IgG...-mus source_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Univ

  7. Experiment list: SRX150473 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available =Umbilical Cord|Tissue Diagnosis=Normal 50298885,62.1,7.2,14639 GSM935393: Stanford ChipSeq HUVEC Pol2 std s...ource_name=HUVEC || biomaterial_provider=Lonza || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universi

  8. Experiment list: SRX188794 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=B-cell lymphoma (GM12878 analog) 54533955,95.8,23.3,42087 GSM1003774: Stanford ChipSeq CH12 ETS1 IgG-rab... source_name=CH12 || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  9. Experiment list: SRX140392 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on=Leukemia (K562 analog) 70730803,84.9,13.3,18020 GSM912929: Stanford ChipSeq MEL CHD2 (AB68301) IgG-rab so...urce_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Un

  10. Experiment list: SRX140367 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available escription=Leukemia (K562 analog) 47218260,74.8,25.4,896 GSM912904: Stanford ChipSeq MEL Input IgG-mus sourc...e_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Unive

  11. Experiment list: SRX140354 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Line|Description=B-cell lymphoma (GM12878 analog) 40468050,83.0,19.1,28078 GSM912891: Stanford ChipSeq CH12 ...Pol2 IgG-mus source_name=CH12 || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  12. Experiment list: SRX140356 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=Leukemia (K562 analog) 77095563,87.1,14.9,45597 GSM912893: Stanford ChipSeq MEL p300 (SC-584) IgG-rab so...urce_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Un

  13. Experiment list: SRX150384 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 59978839,89.6,7.7,8358 GSM935304: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 RFX5 (200-401-194) IgG-...rab source_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Univ

  14. Experiment list: SRX140394 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Line|Description=B-cell lymphoma (GM12878 analog) 51620997,93.6,9.8,19356 GSM912931: Stanford ChipSeq CH12 P...ol2(phosphoS2) IgG-rab source_name=CH12 || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  15. Experiment list: SRX186784 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Leukemia (K562 analog) 56028995,96.7,11.1,680 GSM1003745: Stanford ChipSeq MEL H3K27me3B DMSO 2.0pct std sou...rce_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Uni

  16. Experiment list: SRX188828 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=Leukemia (K562 analog) 45707381,94.2,15.7,31368 GSM1003808: Stanford ChipSeq MEL GATA-1 DMSO 2.0pct std ...source_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  17. Experiment list: SRX140396 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=Leukemia (K562 analog) 53088498,91.3,21.5,47339 GSM912933: Stanford ChipSeq MEL Rad21 DMSO 2.0pct IgG-ra...b source_name=MEL || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  18. Experiment list: SRX140365 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=B-cell lymphoma (GM12878 analog) 54624304,76.0,12.7,30319 GSM912902: Stanford ChipSeq CH12 JunD IgG-rab ...source_name=CH12 || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  19. Experiment list: SRX140369 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on=B-cell lymphoma (GM12878 analog) 53228221,73.7,16.6,36793 GSM912906: Stanford ChipSeq CH12 c-Myc IgG-rab ...source_name=CH12 || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  20. Experiment list: SRX150711 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ssue Diagnosis=Leukemia Chronic Myelogenous 37055925,58.8,4.5,9098 GSM935632: Stanford ChipSeq K562 Pol2 IgG...-mus source_name=K562 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Univ

  1. Experiment list: SRX150621 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is=Carcinoma Hepatocellular 59426527,90.2,5.6,34818 GSM935542: Stanford ChipSeq HepG2 SMC3 (ab9263) IgG-rab ...source_name=HepG2 || biomaterial_provider=ATCC || lab=Stanford || lab description=Snyder - Stanford Universi

  2. Experiment list: SRX188820 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tion=B-cell lymphoma (GM12878 analog) 58001088,87.5,16.3,8869 GSM1003800: Stanford ChipSeq CH12 Nrf2 IgG-rab... source_name=CH12 || biomaterial_provider=Weissman lab || lab=Stanford-m || lab description=Snyder - Stanford

  3. Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Single-Peakedness Along a Linearly Ordered Set of Policy Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    Mirrlees, Amartya Sen , and David Starrett. Professor Hinich’s work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant SOC-7900034. Dr. Coughlin’s... SOCIAL S. UNCLASSIFIED P J COUGHLIN ET AL. APR 82 TR-376 F/G 12/1i N EhhhhhhhhENi mhhhhhhhhhLL 1.0 11 1. 1 .4 1. E-- !ii! 1W1H MICROCOPY RESOLUTION...MATHEMATICAL STUDIES IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES FOURTH FLOOR, ENCINA HALL 0STANFORD UNIVERSITY DTIC STANFORD, CALIFORNIA NOV 2 2 198 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A S

  4. Atomic Oxygen (AO) and Nitrogen (AN) In-situ Flux Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-10

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0126 DURIP 09) AN ATOMIC OXYGEN FLUX MONITOR FOR USE IN THE SEARCH FOR NEW AND BETT Malcolm Beasley LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV...Grant # FA9550-01-1-0433 M. R. Beasley, PI Stanford University Project Title: Atomic Oxygen (AO) and Nitrogen (AN) In-situ Flux Sensor...with its ability to achieve controlled layer-by-layer growth on the atomic level. In the case of oxides and nitrides, one problem has been the lack

  5. Computational models of human vision with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandell, Brian A.

    1987-01-01

    The research program supported by this grant was initiated in l977 by the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. The purpose of the research was to study human performance with the goal of improving the design of flight instrumentation. By mutual agreement between the scientists at NASA-Ames and Stanford, all research activities in this area were consolidated into a single funding mechanism, NCC 2-307 (Center of Excellence Grant, 7/1/84 - present). This is the final report on this research grant.

  6. Without Testing: Stockpile Stewardship in the Second Nuclear Age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martz, Joseph C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-07

    Stockpile stewardship is a topic dear to my heart. I’ve been fascinated by it, and I’ve lived it—mostly on the technical side but also on the policy side from 2009 to 2010 at Stanford University as a visiting scholar and the inaugural William J. Perry Fellow. At Stanford I worked with Perry, former secretary of defense, and Sig Hecker, former Los Alamos Lab director (1986–1997), looking at nuclear deterrence, nuclear policy, and stockpile stewardship and at where all this was headed.

  7. International Conference on Multiphoton Processes (4th) Held in Boulder, Colorado on July 13-17, 1987: Program and Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    600 Mountain Avenue, Murray Hill, NJ 07974 201/582-3793 Roberto Befft, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 415/723-1945 Keith Barnett, Blackett...11+ 1/2) o A (cos1 a)(sin a)P (cos 2a)n r A A Z (1112m1m2 11112LM)Ym1 1 (r1)y1 2(r2). mm 2 The subscript nr of the Jacobi polynomial is the radial...correlation quantum number (nrc of Fano8 ). It equals the number of nodes in the Jacobi polynomial along 2 2 21 rI -r 2 coso R" 2 and can be

  8. W. W. Hansen, Microwave Physics, and Silicon Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeson, David

    2009-03-01

    The Stanford physicist W. W. Hansen (b. 1909, AB '29 and PhD '32, MIT post-doc 1933-4, Prof. physics '35-'49, d. 1949) played a seminal role in the development of microwave electronics. His contributions underlay Silicon Valley's postwar ``microwave'' phase, when numerous companies, acknowledging their unique scientific debt to Hansen, flourished around Stanford University. As had the prewar ``radio'' companies, they furthered the regional entrepreneurial culture and prepared the ground for the later semiconductor and computer developments we know as Silicon Valley. In the 1930's, Hansen invented the cavity resonator. He applied this to his concept of the radio-frequency (RF) linear accelerator and, with the Varian brothers, to the invention of the klystron, which made microwave radar practical. As WWII loomed, Hansen was asked to lecture on microwaves to the physicists recruited to the MIT Radiation Laboratory. Hansen's ``Notes on Microwaves,'' the Rad Lab ``bible'' on the subject, had a seminal impact on subsequent works, including the Rad Lab Series. Because of Hansen's failing health, his postwar work, and MIT-Stanford rivalries, the Notes were never published, languishing as an underground classic. I have located remaining copies, and will publish the Notes with a biography honoring the centenary of Hansen's birth. After the war, Hansen founded Stanford's Microwave Laboratory to develop powerful klystrons and linear accelerators. He collaborated with Felix Bloch in the discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance. Hansen experienced first-hand Stanford's evolution from its depression-era physics department to corporate, then government funding. Hansen's brilliant career was cut short by his death in 1949, after his induction in the National Academy of Sciences. His ideas were carried on in Stanford's two-mile long linear accelerator and the development of Silicon Valley.

  9. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  10. Experiment list: SRX213927 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX213927 hg19 No description NA Others Adrenal Glands MeSH Description=A pair of g...hIP-Seq Analysis of H3K4me1 in Human Adrenal Gland Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=None || BIOMATERIA...L_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSUE_TYPE=Adrenal Gland ||

  11. Experiment list: SRX263895 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX263895 hg19 No description NA Others Adrenal Glands MeSH Description=A pair of g...hIP-Seq Analysis of H3K27ac in Human Adrenal Gland Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=None || BIOMATERIA...L_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSUE_TYPE=Adrenal Gland ||

  12. Experiment list: SRX136974 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX136974 hg19 No description NA Others Adrenal Glands MeSH Description=A pair of g...hIP-Seq Analysis of H3K9me3 in Human Adrenal Gland Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=None || BIOMATERIA...L_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSUE_TYPE=Adrenal Gland ||

  13. Experiment list: SRX157633 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX157633 hg19 No description NA Others Adrenal Glands MeSH Description=A pair of g...hIP-Seq Analysis of H3K36me3 in Human Adrenal Gland Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=None || BIOMATERI...AL_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSUE_TYPE=Adrenal Gland ||

  14. Experiment list: SRX342272 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX342272 hg19 No description NA Others Adrenal Glands MeSH Description=A pair of g...IP-Seq Analysis of H3K27me3 in Human Adrenal Gland Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=None || BIOMATERIA...L_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSUE_TYPE=Adrenal Gland ||

  15. Experiment list: SRX342279 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX342279 hg19 No description NA Others Adrenal Glands MeSH Description=A pair of g...hIP-Seq Analysis of H3K4me3 in Human Adrenal Gland Tissue MOLECULE=genomic DNA || DISEASE=None || BIOMATERIA...L_PROVIDER=Shin Lin, Stanford University || BIOMATERIAL_TYPE=Primary Tissue || TISSUE_TYPE=Adrenal Gland ||

  16. Who Owns Educational Theory? Big Data, Algorithms and the Expert Power of Education Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ben

    2017-01-01

    "Education data science" is an emerging methodological field which possesses the algorithm-driven technologies required to generate insights and knowledge from educational big data. This article consists of an analysis of the Lytics Lab, Stanford University's laboratory for research and development in learning analytics, and the Center…

  17. Platform computing powers enterprise grid

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Platform Computing, today announced that the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is using Platform LSF 5, to carry out groundbreaking research into the origins of the universe. Platform LSF 5 will deliver the mammoth computing power that SLAC's Linear Accelerator needs to process the data associated with intense high-energy physics research (1 page).

  18. Monitoring Species of Concern Using Noninvasive Genetic Sampling and Capture-Recapture Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Buchan, J.C., E.A. Archie, R.C. Van Horn, C.J. Moss , and S.C. Alberts. 2005. Locus effects and sources of error in noninvasive genotyping. Molecular...I. Wiggins. 1964. Vegetation and flora of the Sonoran Desert, Vol. 1. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press. 1752 pp. Slone, S.C. 2011. Cabeza

  19. Summary Report of the Summer Conference of the Defense Sciences Research Council Held in La Jolla, California on 6-30 July 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    COUNCIL PARTICIPANTS Profesor Malcolm K Beasley Profess David , Ferry Department of Applied Physics Dept of Electrical. Eng. Stanford University Arizona...well as improved data records and stress histories. (ii) Extend actual longevity of aging systems through improved diagnos- tics in conjunction with

  20. The Economic Implications of Korean Unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Kim Il Sung: Continuity Or Change? (Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1997), 75-78. 101 Ralph C Hassig, (et. al.). North Korea through the Looking Glass (Washington...Princeton University Press, 2002) Hassig, Ralph C. (et. al.). North Korea through the Looking Glass (Washington, DC: The Brookings Institute, 2000

  1. Moral Life and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noddings, Nel

    2016-01-01

    Nel Noddings, Lee Jacks Professor of Education, Emerita, at Stanford University, agrees with Professors Lapsley and Woodbury that moral aims are central to education. She has argued that the main aim of education is to produce better people--better in "all aspects of a complete life: moral, physical, social, vocational, aesthetic,…

  2. NCDP Research Projects and Research Supported Projects (June ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Amal Ben Ameur

    prevent non-communicable diseases in India. 139,600. India. Asia. 1) The Board of Trustees of the. Leland Stanford Junior University. 2) Public Health Foundation of. India. 24. Multiple risk factors. Beyond the UN meeting: meeting the commitments on non-communicable diseases. 106,900. Global. Global. National Heart ...

  3. Wrinkles in Time and Place: Using Performance Assessments to Understand the Knowledge of History Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Suzanne M.; Wineburg, Samuel S.

    1993-01-01

    Responses of two high school history teachers on three performance assessments of teaching, part of the Stanford University Teacher Assessment Project, were analyzed. Differences that emerged in teacher attitudes and knowledge level illustrate what performance assessment can reveal about pedagogical knowledge and the implications for educational…

  4. AFRICAN JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC REVIEW

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Kazungu

    Edited by D. Lederman and W. F. Maloney. Washington, DC 20433, USA: Stanford University Press, and the World Bank. WTO (2010) World Trade Report 2010: Trade in Natural Resources. Geneva, World Trade. Organization. Yang, M. (2015) 'Ownership participation of cross-border mergers and acquisitions by emerging.

  5. A Study of the Less-Developed-Countries Debt Crisis in Mexico and Subsequent Economic Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    15 Lederman , Mahoney, and Serve´n, Lessons from NAFTA, 2. 16 Esquivel and Hernández-Trillo, “How Can Reforms Help Deliver Growth in Mexico?,” 193... Lederman , Daniel, William F. Mahoney, and Luis Serve´n. Lessons from NAFTA. World Bank and Stanford University Press, 2005. Lehoucq, Fabrice

  6. Institutions and Scholars Face Ethical Dilemmas over Pursuit of Research with Commercial Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine S.

    1987-01-01

    Increased university efforts to help faculty members transfer the results of their research from the laboratory to the marketplace are posing ethical dilemmas for both institutions and scholars. Stanford's Office of Technology Licensing is cited, as are biotechnology developments, and secrecy and competitiveness issues. (LB)

  7. Basic Research in Artificial Intelligence and Foundations of Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    and would benefit from "smart sensor" technology. A new technique [Arnold 1978) ArnoldR.D.; "Local Context in has been developed to use edge features in...Lines, J. ACAI , October 1971. International Joint Conference on Artiftial Intelligence, Stanford University, August 57. Igarashi, S., R. L. London, D

  8. Spelling Correction in User Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-20

    we have concluded that there are considerable benefits and few obstacles to providing a spelling corrector in almost any interactie user interface. Key...the ACAI 23, 12 (December 1980), 676-687. 8. John F. Reiser (ed.). SAIL Manual. Stanford University Computer Science Department, 1976. 9. Warren

  9. Brownian Motion, "Diverse and Undulating"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplantier, Bertrand

    Truly man is a marvelously vain, diverse, and undulating object. It is hard to found any constant and uniform judgment on him. Michel de Montaigne, Les Essais, Book I, Chapter 1: "By diverse means we arrive at the same end"; in The Complete Essays of Montaigne, Donald M. Frame transl., Stanford University Press (1958).

  10. The Challenges of Supporting New Teachers: A Conversation with Linda Darling-Hammond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Marge

    2012-01-01

    In this wide-ranging interview with Educational Leadership, Stanford University Professor of Education Linda Darling-Hammond discusses the kind of preparation and support new teachers need to survive their critical first years in the classroom. Among her central recommendations are more intensive mentoring that lasts through the first year of…

  11. Germany As We Saw It. Third Edition, 1963.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford Univ., CA.

    Closeup studies of German life in the Stuttgart area are reported here by 79 participants of Stanford University's 1963 National Defense Education Act Second-Level Institute for Elementary and Secondary School Teachers held at Bad Boll, Germany. Elementary and secondary education, work and family life, and housing and housing developments are…

  12. Clustering in ICT: From Route 128 to Silicon Valley, from DEC to Google, from Hardware to Content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Hulsink (Wim); D. Manuel; H. Bouwman (Harry)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractOne of the pioneers in academic entrepreneurship and high-tech clustering is MIT and the Route 128/Boston region. Silicon Valley centered around Stanford University was originally a fast follower and only later emerged as a scientific and industrial hotspot. Several technology and

  13. Majority of Youths Found to Lack a Direction in Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    A majority of young people are struggling to make the leap into adulthood, and educators, parents, and communities should make a more concerted effort to help rudderless youths find a clear direction and overarching sense of purpose, according to a new book by Stanford University psychologist William Damon. In "The Path to Purpose: Helping Our…

  14. N.Y.C. Study Finds Gains for Charters: Research Shows Schools Closing City-Suburb Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    New York City's charter schools are making strides in closing achievement gaps between disadvantaged inner-city students and their better-off suburban counterparts, a new study concludes. The study, conducted by Stanford University researcher Caroline M. Hoxby and her co-authors Sonali Mararka and Jenny Kang, is based on eight years of data for…

  15. Scholars Probe Diverse Effects of Exit Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on a study released in April 2009 that suggests that California's high school exit exams are affecting some student demographic groups more than others. The California study, which was released by the Institute for Research on Education Policy and Practice at Stanford University, is the latest in a small spate of studies…

  16. Review of Sowa’s Conceptual Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    58th St. Chicago, IL 60637 CIR Karen Reider Dr. Alan H. Schoenfeld Naval School of Health Sciences University of California Military Assistant for...Wetzel Stanford, CA 94305 Mr. Brad Sympson Code 12 Navy Personnel Fl Center Navy Personnel R&D Center Dr. Charles F. Smith San Diego, CA 92152 San

  17. America’s Strategic Posture: The Final Report of the Congressional Commission on the Strategic Posture of the United States. Advance Copy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Pantex Plant Chris Gentile—Vice President, Savannah River Site Carl Beard—Associate Director, Los Alamos National Laboratory Bob Jensen—Vice President...Reiss, William and Mary School of Law Scott Sagan , Stanford University Henry Sokolski, Nonproliferation Policy Education Center External Conditions and

  18. International Summer Institute in Surface Science (4th), (ISISS 1979).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-09

    Interfaces IV. Transition metal surfaces A. Clean surfaces B. Chemisorption V. Summary and Conclusions Klaus Heinemann, Stanford University...of the prospects for in situ studies of catalytic reactions on single crystals. Georg-Maria Schwab , Universit°t M~nchen, Germany Development of Kinetic

  19. BaBar Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "B factory experiments at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) in the USA and at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Japan have reached a new milestone in the quest to understand the matter-antimatter imbalance in our universe. These experiments are used by scientists from around the world, including the UK, to probe such fundamental questions."

  20. Alan Guth and Andrei Linde win international cosmology award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Leading theoretical cosmologists Alan Guth, Weisskopf Professor of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Andrei Linde, Professor of Physics at Stanford University, who played prominent roles in developing and refining the theory of cosmic inflation, have been selected by an international panel of experts to receive the 2004 Cosmology Prize of the Peter Gruber Foundation" (1 page).