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Sample records for stanford researchers find

  1. Research Training in Medical Informatics: The Stanford Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortliffe, Edward H.; Fagan, Lawrence M.

    1989-01-01

    Stanford University created an interdisciplinary program to train researchers and academic leaders in the field of medical information sciences. The program is described, identifying experiences of interest to people developing such a program. The program's background and history, students, curriculum and philosophy, and lessons learned are…

  2. Collaboration and Community Building in Summer Undergraduate Research Programs in the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevle, R. J.; Watson Nelson, T.; Harris, J. M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In 2012, the School of Earth Sciences (SES) at Stanford University sponsored two summer undergraduate research programs. Here we describe these programs and efforts to build a cohesive research cohort among the programs' diverse participants. The two programs, the Stanford School of Earth Sciences Undergraduate Research (SESUR) Program and Stanford School of Earth Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research in Geoscience and Engineering (SURGE) Program, serve different undergraduate populations and have somewhat different objectives, but both provide students with opportunities to work on strongly mentored yet individualized research projects. In addition to research, enrichment activities co-sponsored by both programs support the development of community within the combined SES summer undergraduate research cohort. Over the course of 6 to 9 months, the SESUR Program engages Stanford undergraduates, primarily rising sophomores and juniors, with opportunities to deeply explore Earth sciences research while learning about diverse areas of inquiry within SES. Now in its eleventh year, the SESUR experience incorporates the breadth of the scientific endeavor: finding an advisor, proposal writing, obtaining funding, conducting research, and presenting results. Goals of the SESUR program include (1) providing a challenging and rewarding research experience for undergraduates who wish to explore the Earth sciences; (2) fostering interdisciplinary study in the Earth sciences among the undergraduate population; and (3) encouraging students to major or minor in the Earth sciences and/or to complete advanced undergraduate research in one of the departments or programs within SES. The SURGE Program, now in its second year, draws high performing students, primarily rising juniors and seniors, from 14 colleges and universities nationwide, including Stanford. Seventy percent of SURGE students are from racial/ethnic backgrounds underrepresented in STEM fields, and approximately one

  3. Research in free-flying robots and flexible manipulators at the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhaus, W. L.; Alder, L. J.; Chen, V. W.; Dickson, W. C.; Ullman, M. A.; Wilson, E.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last ten years, the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) has developed a hardware facility in which a number of space robotics issues have been, and continue to be addressed. This paper reviews two of the current ARL research areas: navigation and control of free flying space robots, and modeling and control of extremely flexible space structures.

  4. Current and Future Research Programs at Stanford's Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madejski, Greg

    2013-12-01

    The Kavli Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, or KIPAC, at Stanford University, and the LeCosPA Institute at the Taiwan National University were sibling institutions even before their respective official births. The existence of both institutes was to a great extent facilitated by the foresight of Prof. Pisin Chen, current director of LeCosPA, and we fully envision the vibrant on-going collaboration between the two institutes for the years to come. This presentation highlights the current research direction of KIPAC, including the wide range of programs in particle astrophysics and cosmology. Of the on-going projects, the main current effort at KIPAC is the operation of, and the analysis of data from the Large Area Telescope on-board the space-borne Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which is described in more detail in the article by Prof. Kamae in these proceedings. That article focuses on the instrument, and the results gleaned from observations of our own Galaxy. Here, the second part of this article also includes the highlights for astrophysics of jets emanating from the vicinity of black holes, which are prominent gamma-ray sources detected by Fermi: this is the area of research of the article's author.

  5. Postoperative follow-up of Stanford type A aortic dissections with Spiral-CT and MRI: Normal imaging findings and typical complications; Spiral-CT und MRT der operierten Stanford Typ A-Aortendissektion: Verlauf und Komplikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Pauleit, D.; Hofer, U.; Preusse, K.; Layer, G.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Abu-Ramadan, D.; Likungu, J. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Herz- und Gefaesschirurgie

    1998-02-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate normal postoperative Spiral-CT and MRI findings and typical complications in patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection. Results: The following postoperative complications were seen: Three pseudoaneurysms which developed at the proximal anastomoses of the Dacron prosthesis in two cases and at the insertion site of the reimplanted left coronary artery after implantation of a composite graft (Bentall procedure) in one case; one re-dissection; one perforation of the false lumen; periprostethic flow in one patient after surgical repair of type A dissection by the graft inclusion technique; progressive dilatation of the false lumen in 4 cases; dilatation of the aortic root in a Marfan patient after replacement of the ascending aorta. Conclusion: Precise knowledge of the surgical technique performed is crucial to accurate postoperative imaging evaluation. MRI is the method of choice in the postoperative follow-up of clinically stable patients with aortic dissections. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Darstellung der verschiedenen Operationsverfahren bei der Stanford Typ A-Dissektion mit ihren typischen Aspekten in Spiral-CT und MRT sowie ihren spezifischen Komplikationen. Ergebnisse: Folgende postoperative Komplikationen traten auf: Drei Pseudoaneurysmen, die zweimal von der proximalen Anastomose des Aorta-ascendens-Ersatzes sowie einmal von der Insertionsstelle der reimplantierten linken Koronararterie (Operation nach Bentall) ausgingen; eine Re-Dissektion; eine gedeckte Perforation des falschen Lumens; periprothetischer Fluss nach Anwendung der Graft-Inclusion-Technik; progrediente Dilatation des falschen Lumens in 4 Faellen; aneurysmatische Erweiterung des originaeren Aortenbulbus bei einem Marfan-Patienten nach suprakoronarem Aorta-ascendens-Ersatz. Schlussfolgerung: Bei der postoperativen Verlaufskontrolle von Patienten mit Aortendissektionen mittels Spiral-CT und MRT sind Kenntnisse der verschiedenen Operationsverfahren mit

  6. Evaluation of Parallel Authentic Research-Based Courses in Human Biology on Student Experiences at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Jacob; Annerstedt, Claes; Besier, Thor; Matheson, Gordon O.; Rydmark, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Under a previous grant (2005-08), researchers and teachers at Stanford University (SU) and the University of Gothenburg (GU) co-designed a ten-week interdisciplinary, research-based laboratory course in human biology to be taught online to undergraduate students. Essentials in the subject were taught during the first four weeks of this course.…

  7. New Evaluation Vector through the Stanford Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning Environment (SMILE) for Participatory Action Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; An, Ji-Young

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews an evaluation vector model driven from a participatory action research leveraging a collective inquiry system named SMILE (Stanford Mobile Inquiry-based Learning Environment). SMILE has been implemented in a diverse set of collective inquiry generation and analysis scenarios including community health care-specific professional development sessions and community-based participatory action research projects. In each scenario, participants are given opportunities to construct inquiries around physical and emotional health-related phenomena in their own community. Participants formulated inquiries as well as potential clinical treatments and hypothetical scenarios to address health concerns or clarify misunderstandings or misdiagnoses often found in their community practices. From medical universities to rural village health promotion organizations, all participatory inquiries and potential solutions can be collected and analyzed. The inquiry and solution sets represent an evaluation vector which helps educators better understand community health issues at a much deeper level. SMILE helps collect problems that are most important and central to their community health concerns. The evaluation vector, consisting participatory and collective inquiries and potential solutions, helps the researchers assess the participants' level of understanding on issues around health concerns and practices while helping the community adequately formulate follow-up action plans. The method used in SMILE requires much further enhancement with machine learning and advanced data visualization.

  8. Stanford's Online Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Stanford University (CA) is MOOC Central. While the school may not have launched the first massive open online course (MOOC), its efforts have propelled the concept to the forefront of higher education in a matter of months. Starting with Sebastian Thrun's Introduction to Artificial Intelligence course, which enrolled 160,000 students, Stanford…

  9. Mending the Stanford Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Charles

    1998-01-01

    Describes efforts to reclaim the historical campus plan for Stanford University (California), including preserving views; restoring open space; realigning streets and pedestrian paths; consolidating parking; connecting paths; adding a new shuttle bus, bike lanes, and bike parking; and correcting the haphazard development of athletic and recreation…

  10. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  11. The Stanford how things work project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, Richard; Gruber, Tom; Iwasaki, Yumi

    1994-01-01

    We provide an overview of the Stanford How Things Work (HTW) project, an ongoing integrated collection of research activities in the Knowledge Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. The project is developing technology for representing knowledge about engineered devices in a form that enables the knowledge to be used in multiple systems for multiple reasoning tasks and reasoning methods that enable the represented knowledge to be effectively applied to the performance of the core engineering task of simulating and analyzing device behavior. The central new capabilities currently being developed in the project are automated assistance with model formulation and with verification that a design for an electro-mechanical device satisfies its functional specification.

  12. Reservoir technology - geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fifth annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

    1985-09-01

    The objective is to carry out research on geothermal reservoir engineering techniques useful to the geothermal industry. A parallel objective is the training of geothermal engineers and scientists. The research is focused toward accelerated development of hydrothermal resources through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection technology is a research area receiving special attention. The program is divided into reservoir definition research, modeling of heat extraction from fractured reservoirs, application and testing of new and proven reservoir engineering technology, and technology transfer. (ACR)

  13. 77 FR 59660 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... Stanford University Archaeology Center. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below...

  14. 77 FR 59661 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Stanford University Archaeology...

  15. Rational Budgeting? The Stanford Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle

    The budget decision making process at Stanford University, California, from 1970 through 1979 was evaluated in relation to the allocation of general funds to 38 academic departments. Using Simon's theory of bounded rationality and an organizational level of analysis, the Stanford decision process was tested for its rationality through…

  16. Researchers Find a Mechanism for Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print this issue Researchers Find a Mechanism for Schizophrenia En español Send us your comments Scientists uncovered a mechanism behind genetic variations previously linked to schizophrenia. The findings may lead to new clinical approaches. ...

  17. Stanford Geothermal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Horn

    1999-06-30

    Reliable measurement of steam-water relative permeability functions is of great importance for geothermal reservoir performance simulation. Despite their importance, these functions are poorly known due to the lack of fundamental understanding of steam-water flows, and the difficulty of making direct measurements. The Stanford Geothermal Program has used an X-ray CT (Computer Tomography) scanner to obtain accurate saturation profiles by direct measurement. During the last five years, the authors have carried out experiments with nitrogen-water flow and with steam-water flow, and examined the effects of heat transfer and phase change by comparing these sets of results. In porous rocks, it was found that the steam-water relative permeabilities follow Corey type relationships similar to those in nitrogen-water flow, but that the irreducible gas phase saturation is smaller for steam than for nitrogen. The irreducible saturations represent substantial fractions of the recoverable energy in place yet are hard to determine in the field. Understanding the typical magnitude of irreducible saturations will lead to a much clearer forecast of geothermal field performance. In fracture flow, indirect measurements suggested that the relative permeabilities follow a linear (or ''X-curve'') behavior - but there is still considerable uncertainty in the knowledge of this behavior.

  18. Writing usable qualitative health research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Leeman, Jennifer

    2012-10-01

    Scholars in diverse health-related disciplines and specialty fields of practice routinely promote qualitative research as an essential component of intervention and implementation programs of research and of a comprehensive evidence base for practice. Remarkably little attention, however, has been paid to the most important element of qualitative studies--the findings in reports of those studies--and specifically to enhancing the accessibility and utilization value of these findings for diverse audiences of users. The findings in reports of qualitative health research are too often difficult to understand and even to find owing to the way they are presented. A basic strategy for enhancing the presentation of these findings is to translate them into thematic statements, which can then in turn be translated into the language of intervention and implementation. Writers of qualitative health research reports might consider these strategies better to showcase the significance and actionability of findings to a wider audience.

  19. Richter quits as director of Stanford accelerator lab

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1998-01-01

    Burt Richter stands down next August as director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre. He will remain at SLAC working on research and science policy issues. Rumours abound about the reasons behind his unexpected departure.

  20. 77 FR 52034 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION: Notice... conducted by the Joslin Diabetes Center (Joslin) and additional analysis conducted by ORI in its oversight... Cell Biology, Joslin, engaged in research misconduct in research supported by National Institute of...

  1. 77 FR 69627 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... report of an investigation conducted by the University of Kentucky (UK) and additional analysis conducted... Physiology, Department of Pediatrics and Physiology, UK, engaged in research misconduct in research supported...

  2. 77 FR 11538 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... New York, Upstate Medical University (SUNY UMU) and additional analysis conducted by ORI in its... Neuroscience and Physiology, SUNY UMU, engaged in research misconduct in research supported by National...

  3. 78 FR 77467 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) has taken final action in the following case: Dong-Pyou Han, Ph.D., Iowa State University of Science and...

  4. 77 FR 22320 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... obtained from Rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells (ECS) into a strain of rats (RCS) that develops retinal... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) has...

  5. 76 FR 68460 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... additional analysis conducted by ORI in its oversight review, ORI found that Dr. Jayant Jagannathan, former... Neurosurgery Branch, NINDS, and from NIDCR. \\1\\ T32 CA09677, Radiation Biology Training Grant,'' A. Kennedy, P...

  6. 78 FR 79460 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Findings of Research Misconduct AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... ,'' ORI found that Dr. Baoyan Xu, formerly a Postdoctoral Fellow, Hematology Branch, Systems Biology... involves a Western blot analysis of IgM and IgG antibodies from Chinese subjects in patients with non-A-E...

  7. Feeding back survey research findings within palliative care. Findings from qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rhidian A; Addington-Hall, Julia M

    2005-05-01

    The feedback of research findings to practitioners and policy makers is an important component of palliative care research. Little is, however, understood about professionals' views on the ways research findings should be fed back. This study used semi-structured telephone interviews with a vignette to understand professionals' views on the feedback of survey research findings within palliative care. Content analysis of data uncovered a range of issues professionals emphasised as important to consider. These issues are discussed within the context of existing literature in order to raise the profile of research feedback within palliative care.

  8. History of narcolepsy at Stanford University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, Emmanuel J M

    2014-05-01

    Although narcolepsy was first described in the late nineteenth century in Germany and France, much of the research on this disorder has been conducted at Stanford University, starting with Drs. William C. Dement and Christian Guilleminault in the 1970s. The prevalence of narcolepsy was established, and a canine model discovered. Following the finding in Japan that almost all patients with narcolepsy carry a specific HLA subtype, HLA-DR2, Hugh Mac Devitt, F. Carl Grumet, and Larry Steinman initiated immunological studies, but results were generally negative. Using the narcoleptic canines, Dr. Nishino and I established that stimulants increased wakefulness by stimulating dopaminergic transmission while antidepressants suppress cataplexy via adrenergic reuptake inhibition. A linkage study was initiated with Dr. Grumet in 1988, and after 10 years of work, the canine narcolepsy gene was cloned by in 1999 and identified as the hypocretin (orexin) receptor 2. In 1992, studying African Americans, we also found that DQ0602 rather than DR2 was a better marker for narcolepsy across all ethnic groups. In 2000, Dr. Nishino and I, in collaboration with Dr. Lammers in the Netherlands, found that hypocretin 1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were undetectable in most cases, establishing hypocretin deficiency as the cause of narcolepsy. Pursuing this research, our and Dr. Siegel's group, examining postmortem brains, found that the decreased CSF hypocretin 1 was secondary to the loss the 70,000 neurons producing hypocretin in the hypothalamus. This finding revived the autoimmune hypothesis but attempts at demonstrating immune targeting of hypocretin cells failed until 2013. At this date, Dr. Elisabeth Mellins and I discovered that narcolepsy is characterized by the presence of autoreactive CD4(+) T cells to hypocretin fragments when presented by DQ0602. Following reports that narcolepsy cases were triggered by vaccinations and infections against influenza A 2009 pH1N1, a new

  9. 77 FR 76491 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... investigation conducted by the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) and additional analysis... Researcher, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, TTUHSC, engaged in research misconduct in research...

  10. Stanford's gene patents hit snags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M

    1982-11-26

    Background information is presented on the preliminary rejection of a 1978 recombinant DNA patent application by Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer. The Patent Office is concerned about the omission of important information from the application, the exclusion of a third collaborator as co-inventor, and the interval between public disclosure and the date of filing. The dispute could lead to a challenge of a related Cohen-Boyer patent issued in 1980, posing a financial threat to Stanford University, which holds the lucrative patent rights, and the University of California, which shares the licensing fees and royalties.

  11. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center selects Verity Ultraseek for public and internal Web Sites

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Verity Inc., a provider of enterprise software has announced the latest version of its powerful, downloadable Verity(R) Ultraseek(R) enterprise search engine is being used by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, a research facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Stanford University (1/2 page).

  12. Russian research capabilities: Findings of site visits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, D.W.

    1994-02-01

    In June 1993, a proposal was presented to the International Environmental Institute (IEI) in Kennewick, Washington, to establish cooperation and coordination to further pursue the interests of the United States of America and the Republic of Russia in the application and promotion of environmental technology; characterization, treatment, handling, isolation, and disposal of hazardous and radioactive materials; conversion of defense sites to other purposes; and technology transfer, cooperative programs, joint technology development and contractual research. In response to this proposal, IEI and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) jointly provided funding to send Dr. Dennis W. Wester on a fact-finding mission to Novosibirsk, Moscow, and St. Petersburg, Russia. The trip covered a period of eight weeks, six of which were spent in Novosibirsk and adjoining or related cities and one of which was spent in each of Moscow and St. Petersburg. The general objectives of the trip were to establish a basis for cooperation between IEI and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) for future coordination of mutual interests and objectives such as technology acquisition, development, demonstration, application, and commercialization; use of capabilities and assets developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the RAS; and expediting of cooperative agreements, personnel exchanges, joint ventures and other contractual relationships. The particular objectives of this trip were to evaluate the capabilities of the RAS to satisfy the technology needs associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site and similar sites in the U.S. and to evaluate the expediency of establishing an IEI presence in Russia.

  13. Drugs and sport. Research findings and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, P M; Thompson, H S

    1997-12-01

    Many types of drugs are used by athletes to improve performance. This paper reviews the literature on 3 categories of drugs: those that enhance performance as stimulants (amphetamines, ephedrine, and cocaine), those that are used to reduce tremor and heart rate (beta-blockers) and those involved in bodyweight gain or loss (anabolic-androgenic steroids, growth hormone, beta 2-agonists, and diuretics). Limitations of research on these drugs as they relate to performance enhancement are also discussed. The numerous studies that have assessed the effects of amphetamines on performance report equivocal results. This may be due to the large interindividual variability in the response to the drug and the small sample sizes used. Most studies, however, show that some individuals do improve exercise performance when taking amphetamines, which may be attributed to their role in masking fatigue. As a stimulant, ephedrine has not been found to improve performance in the few studies available. More recently, ephedrine has been purported to be effective as a fat burner and used by athletes to maintain or improve muscle mass. Although research on individuals with obesity supports the use of ephedrine for fat loss, no studies have been done on athletes. The few studies of cocaine and exercise suggest that little to no performance gains are incurred from cocaine use. Moreover, the sense of euphoria may provide the illusion of better performance when, in actuality, performance was not improved or was impaired. beta-Blockers have been found to reduce heart rate and tremor and to improve performance in sports that are not physiologically challenging but require accuracy (e.g. pistol shooting). However, there is evidence that some individuals may be high responders to beta-blockers to the extent that their heart rate response is so blunted as to impair performance. Although equivocal, several studies have reported that anabolic-androgenic steroids increase muscle size and strength

  14. Translating research findings to clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Fry, Margaret; Shaban, Ramon Z; Considine, Julie

    2017-03-01

    To describe the importance of, and methods for, successfully conducting and translating research into clinical practice. There is universal acknowledgement that the clinical care provided to individuals should be informed on the best available evidence. Knowledge and evidence derived from robust scholarly methods should drive our clinical practice, decisions and change to improve the way we deliver care. Translating research evidence to clinical practice is essential to safe, transparent, effective and efficient healthcare provision and meeting the expectations of patients, families and society. Despite its importance, translating research into clinical practice is challenging. There are more nurses in the frontline of health care than any other healthcare profession. As such, nurse-led research is increasingly recognised as a critical pathway to practical and effective ways of improving patient outcomes. However, there are well-established barriers to the conduct and translation of research evidence into practice. This clinical practice discussion paper interprets the knowledge translation literature for clinicians interested in translating research into practice. This paper is informed by the scientific literature around knowledge translation, implementation science and clinician behaviour change, and presented from the nurse clinician perspective. We provide practical, evidence-informed suggestions to overcome the barriers and facilitate enablers of knowledge translation. Examples of nurse-led research incorporating the principles of knowledge translation in their study design that have resulted in improvements in patient outcomes are presented in conjunction with supporting evidence. Translation should be considered in research design, including the end users and an evaluation of the research implementation. The success of research implementation in health care is dependent on clinician/consumer behaviour change and it is critical that implementation strategy

  15. 77 FR 124 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... Medical University: Based on the report of an investigation conducted by the State University of New York, Upstate Medical University (SUNY US) and additional analysis conducted by ORI in its oversight review, ORI..., SUNY US, engaged in research misconduct in research supported by National Institute of General Medical...

  16. 75 FR 77641 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... misconduct in research supported by National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), National... of Investigative ] Oversight, Office of Research Integrity, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 750, Rockville, MD 20852, (240) 453-8800. John Dahlberg, Director, Division of Investigative Oversight, Office of...

  17. 78 FR 14797 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... Mr. Adam C. Savine, former doctoral student, Department of Psychology, WUSTL, engaged in research... that he could show a stronger relationship between brain activity and behavior in Table 2 and Figure 4...

  18. Writing and publishing your research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Charles T; Rush, A John

    2009-06-01

    Writing clearly is critical to the success of your scientific career. Unfortunately, this skill is not taught in medical school or postgraduate training. This article summarizes our approach to the writing and publication of your research. Here we focus on empirical or experimental reports of translational and clinically oriented research. We review the process of choosing what to write, how to write it clearly, and how to navigate the process of submission and publication.

  19. 78 FR 8148 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... submission to Nature Medicine; hereafter referred to as the ``Nature Medicine manuscript.'' As a result of... Biol Cell paper, the submitted Nature Medicine manuscript, and the Dissertation by altering the number of samples or the experimental results to improve the statistical results. Specifically, ORI finds...

  20. 76 FR 23599 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... taken final action in the following case: Vipul Bhrigu, PhD, University of Michigan Medical School: Based on the findings of an investigation by the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) and... been videotaped. This dishonest conduct established the Respondent's lack of present responsibility to...

  1. 78 FR 21125 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ...), and HL79615-01, Figure 7. 4. Falsified the reported methodology for flow cytometry experiments in... key hypothesis showing accelerated apoptosis in SCN and CN patients. The methodology claimed that flow... approval; the supervision plan must be designed to ensure the scientific integrity of his research...

  2. Commonsense and Research Findings in Personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    Reports results from a study of 377 high school and college students' level of personality psychology knowledge as measured by the 60-item true-false Personality Research Test. Concludes that much of what personality textbooks purport to teach undergraduates may already be known through common informal experiences. (Author/JDH)

  3. 77 FR 40059 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    ... investigation conducted by Emory University (EU) and additional analysis conducted by ORI in its oversight... General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), NIH, grant RC1 GM092035. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Dahlberg, Ph.D., Director, Division of Investigative Oversight, Office of Research Integrity, 1101 Wootton...

  4. 76 FR 64947 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... conducted by ORI in its oversight review, ORI found that Ms. Marija Manojlovic, former graduate student... General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), grant P50 GM067082, National Cancer... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Director, Division of Investigative Oversight, Office of Research Integrity...

  5. Osteoarthritis: Research Findings | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoarthritis Research Findings Past Issues / Winter 2013 Table of Contents Research Findings When osteoarthritis involves the hands, small, bony knobs may appear ...

  6. Health research in Africa: Are we communicating our findings to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health research in Africa: Are we communicating our findings to relevant stakeholders? ... ties and research institutes generate new knowledge and ideas. However, it is ... general public is part of researchers' social responsibil- ity; it ensures ...

  7. Finding Intercultural Business Communication Research Sites in Companies (Doing Research).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskill, Linda; Shaw, Peggy

    1994-01-01

    Describes important resources for discovering sites for communication research related to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), to help identify appropriate companies and contact them. (SR)

  8. 77 FR 59968 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center... Archaeology Center, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items... affiliated with the cultural items may contact the Stanford University Archaeology Center. DATES...

  9. NIH Researchers Find Potential Genetic Cause of Cushing Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2017 NIH researchers find potential genetic cause of Cushing syndrome Finding may lead to therapies that prevent ... mutations in the gene CABLES1 may lead to Cushing syndrome, a rare disorder in which the body ...

  10. The early history of Stanford Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patricia P; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2014-05-01

    From its 1960 beginnings in a pair of windowless Genetics Department laboratories under the Stanford Medical School Dean's Office to its current broad-based program, which joins faculty members from departments across the Medical School, the Stanford Immunology Program has played a central role in shaping both basic and clinical immunology thinking. In this article, we tell the story of the beginnings of this odyssey in a reminiscence-based format that brings the flavor of the time in the words of people who lived and built the history.

  11. Assessment of the Psychometric Properties of the New Version of Tehran- Stanford- Binet Intelligence Scale in Children with Dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas Mahvashe-Wernosfaderani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive abilities assessment, is considered to be one of the most complicated and controversial issues in psychological tests. In spite of great usage of new version of Tehran- Stanford- Binet intelligence scale in screening and diagnosis, they have not made so many endeavors to use this valid test in our country and little researches have been conducted to survey psychometric characteristics of mentioned scale. Given the above considerations, the aim of this study is to investigate Tehran-Stanford-Binet intelligence scale psychometric characteristics in dyslectic children. Materials and Methods: In this psychometric study with classical approach, the statistical society was all the students with dyslexia in the elementary schools of Tehran provinces in 1390. The sample size was equal with 120 students with dyslexia who were selected based on purposive sampling. The new version of Tehran-Stanford-Binet intelligence Scale which includes 10 subtests in verbal and nonverbal domains (fluid reasoning, knowledge, quantitative reasoning, visual spatial processing and working memory and eight IQ was used for them. Findings highlight characteristics of this tool is its ability to calculate the combined scores connected to the reading skills. ROC curve methods, kronbach alpha and pearson correlation was used to analyze the data. Results: Result show that SB5 Test has a good reliability and diagnostic validity. It has 98% sensitivity and a desirable potential to identify student with dyslexia (72%. Conclusion: SB5 could be used as an identificationtoal test for dyslexia.

  12. A proposal for judging the trustworthiness of research findings.

    OpenAIRE

    Gorard, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a procedure for, and a description of the elements involved in judging how trustworthy a research finding is. The idea is of value to the users of research evidence and to researchers themselves when creating a synthesis of existing evidence (i.e. in a literature review. The focus here is on active designs to address causal research questions, but the ideas can easily be extended to other types of research. Other than design, the elements suggested ar...

  13. Reflections on the revolution at Stanford

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    We inquire into the question whether the Aristotelian or classical ideal of science has been realised by the Model Revolution, initiated at Stanford University during the 1950s and spread all around the world of philosophy of science—salute Suppes. The guiding principle of the Model Revolution is: a

  14. A Close Look at Stanford v. Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Update on Law-Related Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Discusses whether the imposition of capital punishment on an individual for a crime committed as a juvenile constitutes cruel and unusual punishment under the Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Explores the crimes of Kevin Stanford and David Allen who were 16 and 17 respectively when they each committed murder. (CMK)

  15. Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... topic Print Magazine Subscribe & Order a Free Copy Classroom Poster Order a Free Poster Findings showcases diverse ... Genetics, Evolution, Stem Cells, Model Organisms, Diseases, Sleep Research Pharmacology Biochemical Actions of Drugs in the Body, Pharmacogenomics, Drug Design, ...

  16. Research malpractice and the issue of incidental findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, Alan C

    2008-01-01

    Human subject research involving brain imaging is likely to reveal significant incidental findings of abnormal brain morphology. Because of this fact and because of the fiduciary relationship between researcher and subject, board-certified or board-eligible radiologists should review the scans to look for any abnormality, the scans should be conducted in accordance with standard medical practice for reviewing the clinical status of the whole brain, and the informed consent process should disclose the possibility that incidental findings may be revealed and what consequences will follow. In the event such findings are revealed, qualified physicians should explain to the subject the significance of the findings and the alternatives available.

  17. Stanford U.: With $7.5M gift, Stanford physics institute to open in 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Springer, M

    2003-01-01

    Thanks to a recent $7.5 million gift from the Kavli Foundation, construction has resumed on the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University. It is schedule for completion in 2005 (1 page).

  18. N.Y.C. Study Finds Gains for Charters: Research Shows Schools Closing City-Suburb Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2009-01-01

    New York City's charter schools are making strides in closing achievement gaps between disadvantaged inner-city students and their better-off suburban counterparts, a new study concludes. The study, conducted by Stanford University researcher Caroline M. Hoxby and her co-authors Sonali Mararka and Jenny Kang, is based on eight years of data for…

  19. Do students eventually get to publish their research findings? The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a result, researchers are encouraged to share their research findings with the scientific world through peer review publications. In this study, we looked at the characteristics and publication rate of theses that documented studies on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Cameroon ...

  20. Research findings are catalyst to nationwide rollout of HIV ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-27

    Apr 27, 2016 ... Research findings are catalyst to nationwide rollout of HIV prevention program in Botswana. April 27 ... The research found that gender violence, regressive views of gender hierarchy, economic dependence, and substance or alcohol abuse all lead to choice disability when it comes to HIV/AIDS prevention.

  1. Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Tani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the following book: Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014, ISBN 9780804791595

  2. Strategies for Disseminating Qualitative Research Findings: Three Exemplars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Keen

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Assuming there are those who do pay attention to the dissemination of qualitative research findings, what can we learn from them? For this article, we searched for examples of qualitative research where findings have been disseminated beyond the journal article and/or conference presentation. The rationale for pursuing examples of how good qualitative research has been disseminated is that we pay attention to both scientific and communicative concerns. All three exemplars in this article go beyond the forms of dissemination that traditionally serve academic communities and attempt to address the communicative concern of qualitative research findings. This is not to say that these modes of dissemination replace the scholarship of qualitative research and/or the peer-reviewed journal manuscript—far from it. In disseminating qualitative data, researchers have an array of presentational styles and formats to choose from that best fit their research purposes, such as drama, dance, poetry, websites, video and evocative forms of writing. We conclude by considering the ethical issues that may be involved in these forms of disseminating qualitative research, as well as the challenges for evaluating the impact of such strategies. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0703174

  3. Medical practice employee selection: application of recent research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Findings based on recent research are presented to support the universal use of tests measuring general mental ability (GMA) and the Big Five personality factor of conscientiousness to evaluate applicants for all medical practice and health care system clerical, nursing, and office management positions. Widely validated measures of both of these factors are identified. These findings simplify the process of identifying employment methods for jobs in medical practices. This research also suggests that for some jobs, Work Samples, Structured Interviews, or other Big Five personality factors may add some incremental validity to the GMA + Conscientiousness combination. This should be determined based on job analysis.

  4. Teacher researchers as writers: A way to sharing findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melba Libia Cárdenas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A teacher development programme (TDP for teachers of English at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia in Bogotá has incorporated the research element as a means to motivate practitioners to widen professional knowledge. Based on the assumption that research findings gain real value if shared with other people, teachers have been challenged to establish a dialogue with academic communities by writing formal reports required by the University and articles describing the research processes they have accomplished. This paper examines the experiences of teacher researchers as writers as revealed in a research project in progress. I start by providing some background information about the TDP and then refer to the criteria that helped us to complete the writing tasks. Difficulties and strategies used to overcome them are also pointed out. Finally, I mention the benefits teachers identified after publishing their research reports in the PROFILE journal as well as some pedagogical implications.

  5. Relationships Always Matter: Findings from a Phenomenological Research Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, David L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from a hermeneutic phenomenological research inquiry which explored the nature of relational experiences in teacher education. Stories of the lived experience of relationships in an educational context were hermeneutically interpreted against the philosophical writings of Heidegger, Gadamer, Levinas, and Buber. The…

  6. Awareness, Availability and Utilization of Research Findings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This study examined the extent of awareness, availability and utilization of educational research findings in enhancing the effectiveness of educational practices for sustainable development. A structured questionnaire —completed by a sample of 726 respondents, including lecturers, government officials and ...

  7. Metaphors of Entrepreneurship among Polish Students: Preliminary Research Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Chmielecki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In Poland entrepreneurship is often viewed as an extremely risky process and entrepreneurs are often portrayed in a negative light. The research goals  of our exploratory study is to identify  the entreprenurship metaphors among Polish management students.   Research Design & Methods: Authors decided to run both qualitative and quantitative research.  In the first part we addressed 124 management students on three levels BA, MA and MBA.  The respondents were asked to give their metaphorical expressions on paper. The next step was to prepare a questionnaire based on 7 point Likert scale. This questionnaire was run among  BA management student group composed of 82 students Findings: Our results suggest that there are several major entrepreneurial narratives evident among all three groups including creativity and innovation, competition, war, journey, risk, adventure and exploitation.  Implications & Recommendations: The empirical findings serve as a starting point for further in-depth research in this area. It is recommended that in order to gain a complete picture of the issues underlying the results, both qualitative and quantitative research on a bigger sample should be undertaken. Contribution & Value Added: The originality of this work lies in studying some aspects of entrepreneurship metaphors among non-entrepreneurs in Poland.  With regards to the research limitation, it must be highlighted that it was a pilot study and the results cannot be generalized.

  8. Nest predation research: Recent findings and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, Anna D.; Ibanez-Alamo, J. D.; Magrath, R. D.; Schmidt, Kenneth A.; Thomson, R. L.; Oteyza, Juan C.; Haff, T. M.; Martin, T.E.

    2016-01-01

    Nest predation is a key source of selection for birds that has attracted increasing attention from ornithologists. The inclusion of new concepts applicable to nest predation that stem from social information, eavesdropping or physiology has expanded our knowledge considerably. Recent methodological advancements now allow focus on all three players within nest predation interactions: adults, offspring and predators. Indeed, the study of nest predation now forms a vital part of avian research in several fields, including animal behaviour, population ecology, evolution and conservation biology. However, within nest predation research there are important aspects that require further development, such as the comparison between ecological and evolutionary antipredator responses, and the role of anthropogenic change. We hope this review of recent findings and the presentation of new research avenues will encourage researchers to study this important and interesting selective pressure, and ultimately will help us to better understand the biology of birds.

  9. POLITENESS IN REQUESTS: SOME RESEARCH FINDINGS RELEVANT FOR INTERCULTURAL ENCOUNTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura CODREANU; Alina DEBU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The major aim of this article is to analyze the relationship between indirectness and politeness in requests. The research project supporting the findings of the paper was undertaken in order to find out to what extent politeness and indirectness are viewed as overlapping or mutually excluding categories by Romanians compared to other nationalities, such as the British and the Hebrew. Another inherent goal of the paper is to provide an example of the socio linguistics instruments that can be employed in the investigation of the differences and similarities likely to emerge in intercultural encounters. Thus, we believe that only through similar research undertaken in the fields contributing to the emerging field of interculturality one can actually trespass the theoretical assumptions and move on to the identification of the right tools and means through which intercultural discourse to be approached at a pragmatic level and thus better understood and taught in educational establishments.

  10. College Writing, Identification, and the Production of Intellectual Property: Voices from the Stanford Study of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Andrea A.; Fishman, Jenn; Liew, Warren M.

    2013-01-01

    When, why, and how do college students come to value their writing as intellectual property? How do their conceptions of intellectual property reflect broader understandings and personal engagements with concepts of authorship, collaboration, identification, and capital? We address these questions based on findings from the Stanford Study of…

  11. Ethical responsibilities in nursing: research findings and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, V R

    1991-01-01

    Discussions in the literature assert that nurses are becoming increasingly cognizant of their ethical responsibilities, but that they are often ill prepared to participate in ethical decision making. A review of selected research literature from 1970 to 1987 was undertaken to validate these assertions. A total of 12 studies related to ethical responsibilities was identified in the review; all studies were published between 1980 and 1987. The majority of studies were at the descriptive and exploratory levels and employed Kohlberg's cognitive theory of moral development as their conceptual framework. Significant findings related to educational level and ethical responsibilities were consistent across studies. Findings related to age and clinical experience were mixed; the effects of economic level, religion-religiosity, ethnicity, and other variables on ethical responsibilities were not significant. Issues raised in the light of the existing research include the use of Kohlberg's theory as a conceptual orientation in nursing groups and limited data on the reliability and validity of instruments used in measuring ethical constructs. Recommendations for future research on ethical responsibilities include the validation of Kohlberg's theory for nursing investigations, exploration of other frameworks for developing a multidimensional view of ethical responsibilities, and the use of qualitative research designs.

  12. Transforming the findings of narrative research into poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Sharon Lorraine

    2015-05-01

    To offer dramatic poetry as representing findings from narrative research that is more accessible. This article is drawn from the author's doctorate work on how students' stories about their 'clinical' experiences can aid learning. Nursing students' stories of clinical practice experiences when engaged in the care of patients represented as dramatic poetry. Qualitative analytical approaches in narrative data analysis to provide a review of student stories from a variety of perspectives. This article illustrates a method for converting story data to poetry. It suggests that a range of audiences can learn from nursing students' stories of clinical practice when translated into dramatic poetry. Audiences can come close to understanding what students are experiencing in practice when engaged in the care of patients and learning from their practice experiences, when these experiences are expressed as dramatic poetry. Representing findings from narrative research as dramatic poetry can help audiences engage with nursing students' experiences at an emotional level. Enabling researchers and readers to become immersed in the poem transforming their understanding of what the students have learned.

  13. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal RE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rachel E Rizal,1,* Rishi P Mediratta,1,* James Xie,1 Swetha Kambhampati,1 Kelsey Hills-Evans,1 Tamara Montacute,1 Michael Zhang,1 Catherine Zaw,2 Jimmy He,2 Magali Sanchez,2 Lauren Pischel1 1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful service-learning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program’s outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians. Keywords: immunizations, vaccine delivery, vaccinations 

  14. System Scope for Library Automation and Generalized Information Storage and Retrieval at Stanford University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Glee; And Others

    The scope of a manual-automated system serving the 40 libraries and the teaching and research community of Stanford University is defined. Also defined are the library operations to be supported and the bibliographic information storage and retrieval capabilities to be provided in the system. Two major projects have been working jointly on library…

  15. Utility of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition, with Ethnically Diverse Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Brittany A.; Finch, Maria HernÁndez; Mcintosh, David E.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.; Finch, W. Holmes

    2014-01-01

    Current research on the use of revisions of intelligence measures with ethnically diverse populations and younger children is limited. The present study investigated the utility of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition (SB5), with an ethnically diverse preschool sample. African American and Caucasian preschoolers, matched on age,…

  16. Evaluating Teacher Education Outcomes: A Study of the Stanford Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; Newton, Xiaoxia; Wei, Ruth Chung

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers a set of research and assessment strategies used to evaluate programme outcomes in the Stanford Teacher Education Programme (STEP) during a period of programme redesign over 10 years. These strategies include surveys and interviews of students' perceptions of programme elements and their own preparedness, observations of their…

  17. Educating to Tolerance: Effects of Communicating Social Psychology Research Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco La Barbera

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of communicating social psychology research findings on ingroup bias in a classroom setting has been investigated. Two hundred and twenty one high school students either read or did not read a brief report about three classical social psychological studies, then completed evaluation scales for the ingroup and the outgroup. Participants’ motivation was manipulated, and the messages were different as regards the congruency between the content and participants’ actual intergroup experience. Results showed that communication exerted a significant effect in reducing ingroup bias for participants in the high motivation/high congruency condition, that is, the communication effect was moderated by the individual’s level of motivation and the content of the arguments proposed in the report. Practical implications of results for education work and stereotype change, limitations of the study, as well as possible directions for future research are discussed.

  18. Educating to Tolerance: Effects of Communicating Social Psychology Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Barbera, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    The effect of communicating social psychology research findings on ingroup bias in a classroom setting has been investigated. Two hundred and twenty one high school students either read or did not read a brief report about three classical social psychological studies, then completed evaluation scales for the ingroup and the outgroup. Participants' motivation was manipulated, and the messages were different as regards the congruency between the content and participants' actual intergroup experience. Results showed that communication exerted a significant effect in reducing ingroup bias for participants in the high motivation/high congruency condition, that is, the communication effect was moderated by the individual's level of motivation and the content of the arguments proposed in the report. Practical implications of results for education work and stereotype change, limitations of the study, as well as possible directions for future research are discussed.

  19. Open Data in Global Environmental Research: Findings from the Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Honk, J.; Calero-Medina, C.; Costas, R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents findings from the Belmont Forum’s survey on Open Data which targeted the global environmental research and data infrastructure community (Schmidt, Gemeinholzer & Treloar, 2016). It highlights users’ perceptions of the term “open data”, expectations of infrastructure functionalities, and barriers and enablers for the sharing of data. A wide range of good practice examples was pointed out by the respondents which demonstrates a substantial uptake of data sharing through e-infrastructures and a further need for enhancement and consolidation. Among all policy responses, funder policies seem to be the most important motivator. This supports the conclusion that stronger mandates will strengthen the case for data sharing. The Belmont Forum, a group of high-level representatives from major funding agencies across the globe, coordinates funding for collaborative research to address the challenges and opportunities of global environmental change. In particular, the E-Infrastructure and Data Management Collaborative Research Action has brought together domain scientists, computer and information scientists, legal scholars, social scientists, and other experts from more than 14 countries to establish recommendations on how the Belmont Forum can implement a more coordinated, holistic, and sustainable approach to the funding and support of global environmental change research. (Author)

  20. Human papillomavirus vaccine introduction in Vietnam: formative research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghi, Nguyen Quy; Lamontagne, D Scott; Bingham, Allison; Rafiq, Mirriam; Mai, Le Thi Phuong; Lien, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Khanh, Nguyen Cong; Hong, Duong Thi; Huyen, Dang Thi Thanh; Tho, Nguyen Thi Thi; Hien, Nguyen Tran

    2010-09-01

    Formative research is a useful tool for designing new health interventions. This paper presents key findings from formative research conducted in Vietnam to guide human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine introduction. We explored the sociocultural environment, health system capacity and the policy-making process using a combined quantitative and qualitative methodology. Data collection was done through literature review, in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, observation checklists and a structured questionnaire on knowledge, attitudes and practices. Populations of interest included 11- to 14-year-old girls, their parents, community leaders, teachers, health workers, health and education officials, and policy-makers at all levels. Although HPV vaccines are new, we found high potential acceptance among parents and girls. HPV vaccine introduction was also favourably supported by health professionals if assurances for system preparedness, e.g. cold chain and human resources, were made. There were no significant barriers from the policy perspective that would prevent the introduction of a new vaccine. However, several concerns related to this new vaccine would need to be adequately addressed before implementation. Our findings provide options for potential vaccine delivery strategies, appropriate communication strategies and targeted advocacy strategies to introduce HPV vaccines in the Vietnamese context.

  1. SLC status and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, B.

    1989-08-01

    In this presentation, I shall discuss the linear collider program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as it is now, and as we hope to see it evolve over the next few years. Of greatest interest to the high energy accelerator physics community gathered here is the development of the linear collider concept, and so I shall concentrate most of this paper on a discussion of the present status and future evolution of the SLC. I will also briefly discuss the research and development program that we are carrying out aimed at the realization of the next generation of high-energy linear colliders. SLAC had a major colliding-beam storage-ring program as well, including present rings and design studies on future high-luminosity projects, but time constraints preclude a discussion of them. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. How Stanford and Yamaha Cut an Unusual Technological Deal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    1998-01-01

    Stanford University (California) and the Yamaha Corporation have agreed to pool over 400 patents and patent applications, most involving sound synthesis, and to license them as a package along with rights to the trademark, and share the royalties. The deal builds on a 23-year relationship between Stanford and Yamaha, one which is both fruitful and…

  3. Dazzling new light source opens at Stanford synchrotron radiation laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    SPEAR3, the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring, was formally opened at a dedication ceremony at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center on Jan. 29. It incorporates the latest technology to make it competitive with the best synchrotron sources in the world (1/2 page)

  4. Budget cuts force early closure of Stanford collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    in Brief Stanford's B-meson work is coming to an early end.SLACIn early March, California's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) will shut down a collider that produces B mesons. The closure means that the lab's commitment to BaBar - an international collaboration studying the differences between matter and antimatter - will now end seven months early.

  5. Rater cognition: review and integration of research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Geneviève; St-Onge, Christina; Tavares, Walter

    2016-05-01

    . This framework could help bridge the gap between researchers adopting different perspectives when studying rater cognition and enable the interpretation of contradictory findings of raters' performance by determining which mechanism is enabled or disabled in any given context. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. Towards Understanding EFL Teachers’ Conceptions of Research: Findings From Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Luis Banegas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the conceptions of research held by English as a foreign language teachers in Argentina. Quantitative data from 622 participants from an online questionnaire were followed by qualitative data from online interviews with 40 of those participants. Results show that the teachers conceptualised research through conventional notions closer to a quantitative paradigm. They felt research was not part of their job, and a lack of time was the main reason for not engaging in/with research. Teacher development, agency, empowerment, and autonomy could be sought by engaging teachers with forms of research which are meaningful to them, such as action research.

  8. English-Language Teachers' Engagement with Research: Findings from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.; Pervin, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on a small-scale study in which we investigated English-language teachers' engagement with educational research. We conceptualized engagement with research as reading and systematically using research for professional development. Using questionnaires and in-depth interviews, we gathered empirical materials from 40…

  9. School-Based Performance Awards: Research Findings and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Carolyn; Heneman, Herbert, III; Milanowski, Anthony

    This paper synthesizes research on how motivation influenced teachers at two school-based performance award (SBPA) programs in Kentucky and in North Carolina. The research was conducted between 1995 and 1998 by the Consortium for Policy Research in Education. SBPA programs provide teachers and other school staff with pay bonuses for the…

  10. The Many Features of Stanford's Housing Maintenance Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Explains how Stanford University custom designed its own building maintenance and administration software package: the Housing Operations Maintenance Enterprise Resource (HOMER). Describes how HOMER relieved facility maintenance staff from some archaic systems, and its development and functionality. (GR)

  11. Neurobiology Research Findings: How the Brain Works during Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweldju, Siusana

    2015-01-01

    In the past, neurobiology for reading was identical with neuropathology. Today, however, the advancement of modern neuroimaging techniques has contributed to the understanding of the reading processes of normal individuals. Neurobiology findings today have uncovered and illuminated the fundamental neural mechanism of reading. The findings have…

  12. Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration and Giftedness: Overexcitability Research Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendaglio, Sal; Tillier, William

    2006-01-01

    During the past 20 years, a significant body of literature has emerged focusing on the application of Dabrowski's theory of positive disintegration (TPD) to the study of gifted individuals. Although much of this literature is prescriptive, some research reports spanning this time period are available. A perusal of research on TPD's applicability…

  13. Rutgers University Research Experience for Teachers in Engineering: Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffey, Evelyn H.; Cook-Chennault, Kimberly; Hirsch, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    In addressing the nation's need for a more technologically-literate society, the Rutgers University Research Experience for Teachers in Engineering (RU RET-E) is designed to: (1) engage middle and high school math and science teachers in innovative "green" engineering research during the summer, and (2) support teachers in integrating…

  14. "Response to Comments": Finding the Narrative in Narrative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Cathy A.

    2009-01-01

    The author responds to comments by Barone (2009), Clandinin and Murphy (2009), and M. W. Smith (2009) on "The Construction Zone: Literary Elements in Narrative Research" (Coulter & M. L. Smith, 2009). She clarifies issues regarding point of view, authorial surplus, narrative coherence, and the relational qualities of narrative research. She…

  15. Highlight: Researchers share findings on making Latin American ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In Costa Rica and El Salvador, research reveals the importance of whether and how community members respond to violence and the dual role that Salvadoren youth gangs play as both protectors and threats. Venezuelan researchers show how social pacts among community members — often women — are helping to ...

  16. Health research in Africa: Are we communicating our findings to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to fund future research activities. Where possible, key policy makers and key decision makers should undergo training focused on knowledge translation. For example, some participants in a Cana- dian study9 reported that training programmes helped to educate them in the use of research evidence in deci- sion making.

  17. The Cyberterrorism Threat:Findings from a Survey of Researchers

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, Lee; Macdonald, Stuart; Nouri, Lella

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a recent research project exploring academic perspectives on the threat posed by cyberterrorism. The project employed a survey method, which returned 118 responses from researchers working across 24 different countries. The article begins with a brief review of existing literature on this topic, distinguishing between those concerned by an imminent threat of cyberterrorism, and other, more skeptical, views. Following a discussion on method, the article's analysis secti...

  18. Employee Retention at ABC & Co. Northwest Arkansas. Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Timothy; And Others

    A 7-month research project was conducted by graduate students at a garment manufacturing plant in Fayetteville, Arkansas, to gain information about high employee turnover. Information also was gathered about the employment situation in northwest Arkansas in general, union-labor relationships, and how other companies handled turnover. Data were…

  19. Joining forces to find answers — The International Research Chairs ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-08

    Oct 8, 2010 ... Sharing skills and knowledge to confront real-world problems. Under the International Research Chairs Initiative, top specialists are sharing their advanced skills and knowledge to confront real-world problems in the areas of environment, health, and technology while mentoring a new generation of ...

  20. Highlight: Researchers share findings on making Latin American ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  1. CASE STUDY: Lebanon — Researchers find new ways to resolve ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-13

    Dec 13, 2010 ... Communication is the key to conflict resolution A research team in Lebanon's remote Arsaal region used an updated version of the traditional tribal council, combined with modern technologies such as videos and GIS surveys, to resolve long-standing conflicts among land users. The results have had an ...

  2. Pain, Nicotine, and Smoking: Research Findings and Mechanistic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditre, Joseph W.; Brandon, Thomas H.; Zale, Emily L.; Meagher, Mary M.

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco addiction and chronic pain represent 2 highly prevalent and comorbid conditions that engender substantial burdens upon individuals and systems. Interrelations between pain and smoking have been of clinical and empirical interest for decades, and research in this area has increased dramatically over the past 5 years. We conceptualize the…

  3. A Validity Study of the K-ABC, the WISC-R, and the Stanford-Binet with Nonreferred Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zins, Joseph E.; Barnett, David W.

    1984-01-01

    Reports findings about the relationship between the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC), the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R), and the Stanford-Binet for 40 children with no known impairments. The overall results suggested some support for the use of the K-ABC as a measure of intelligence. (BH)

  4. Becoming a Scientist: Research Findings on STEM Students' Gains from Conducting Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, A.; Laursen, S.; Thiry, H.; Seymour, E.

    2006-12-01

    Undergraduate research is widely believed to enhance STEM students' education and increase their persistence to graduate education and careers in the sciences. Yet until very recently, little evidence from research and evaluation studies was available to substantiate such claims and document what students gain from doing undergraduate research or how these gains come about. We have conducted a three-year qualitative research study of STEM students participating in UR at four liberal arts colleges with a strong tradition of faculty-led summer research apprenticeships. Benefits to students reported by both students and their faculty advisors are categorized into six main categories of gains in skills, knowledge, "thinking like a scientist," career preparation, career development, and personal and professional growth. Student and faculty observations are strongly corroborative, but also differ in interesting ways that reflect the distinct perspectives of each group: students are still in the midst of discovering their own career paths while faculty advisors have observed the later career development of their past research students. While not all students find UR to heighten their interest in graduate school, they do find it a powerful growth experience that clarifies their career ambitions by providing a "real world" experience of science. For students whose interest in science is reinforced, UR has a significant role in their professional socialization into the culture and norms of science, which we call "becoming a scientist," through interactions that draw them into the scientific community and experiences that deepen their understanding of the nature of research. Cumulatively, the qualitative data set of nearly 350 interviews offers a rich portrayal of the UR enterprise from a variety of perspectives. Longitudinal data enable us to track the influence of UR on students' career and education trajectories in the years after college, and comparative data from a group

  5. Discovery research: the scientific challenge of finding new antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, David M

    2011-09-01

    The dwindling supply of new antibiotics largely reflects regulatory and commercial challenges, but also a failure of discovery. In the 1990s the pharmaceutical industry abandoned its classical ways of seeking antibiotics and instead adopted a strategy that combined genomics with high-throughput screening of existing compound libraries. Too much emphasis was placed on identifying targets and molecules that bound to them, and too little emphasis was placed on the ability of these molecules to permeate bacteria, evade efflux and avoid mutational resistance; moreover, the compound libraries were systematically biased against antibiotics. The sorry result is that no antibiotic found by this strategy has yet entered clinical use and many major pharmaceutical companies have abandoned antibiotic discovery. Although a raft of start-up companies-variously financed by venture capital, charity or public money--are now finding new antibiotic compounds (some of them very promising in vitro or in early trials), their development through Phase III depends on financial commitments from large pharmaceutical companies, where the discouraging regulatory environment and the poor likely return on investment remain paramount issues.

  6. Exploiting multimedia in reproductive science education: research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, P L; Oki, A C; Trevisan, M S; McLean, D J

    2012-08-01

    Education in reproductive science is operating from an outdated paradigm of teaching and learning. Traditionally, reproductive education follows the pattern where students read a textbook, listen to instructor presentations, re-read the textbook and class notes and then complete a test. This paradigm is inefficient, costly and has not incorporated the potential that technology can offer with respect to increases in student learning. Further, teachers of reproductive science (and all of science for that matter) have little training in the use of documented methods of instructional design and cognitive psychology. Thus, most of us have learned to teach by repeating the approaches our mentors used (both good and bad). The technology now exists to explain complex topics using multimedia presentations in which digital animation and three-dimensional anatomical reconstructions greatly reduce time required for delivery while at the same time improving student understanding. With funding from the Small Business Innovation Research program through the U.S. Department of Education, we have developed and tested a multimedia approach to teaching complex concepts in reproductive physiology. The results of five separate experiments involving 1058 university students and 122 patients in an OB/GYN clinic indicate that students and patients learned as much or more in less time when viewing the multimedia presentations when compared to traditional teaching methodologies. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Integration Processes of Migrants: Research Findings and Policy Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinus Penninx

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution discusses the integration processes of immigrants and minorities with a recent immigrant background, and the policies related to the process of settlement of these newcomers in European societies at all relevant levels: from the local level of municipalities and cities, to the national level of states, and the international level of the European Union. Within this general approach, however, a strong emphasis is put on the local level, since that is the level where such policies have to be implemented and are primarily felt, both by the immigrants themselves and by those parts of society that are most affected by immigration. To describe the current state of integration research and policies, this paper will explore in the first section the nature of integration processes, their conceptualisation and lessons from empirical studies. The reason for devoting some space to these topics is the assertion that any integration policy should be based on a thorough, scientifically-based knowledge of the processes of integration and exclusion: if a policy wants to steer such a process, it should have a clear idea of what instruments it can use possibly to intervene, in which part of the process, and at what particular moment. Such knowledge is a solid starting point for policy-making, but it is not enough. Processes of policy-making and implementation follow their own set course, which do not necessarily run parallel to the process of integration. That is why, in the following section, the author attempts to explain some of these processes. At the end of this paper he returns to the core questions of immigration and integration policies on the one hand, and the relationship between local, national and international integration policies on the other.

  8. HIV research in Australia: linking basic research findings with clinical and public health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaldor John M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite a population of only 20 million and sustained low prevalence of HIV infection in Australia, Australian researchers have provided many substantial original findings to the fields of HIV pathogenesis, treatment and prevention. More recently, Australian clinicians and scientists have turned their attention to assisting other countries in developing effective responses, particularly within the Asia-Pacific region. It is therefore fitting that the 4th International AIDS Society (IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention will be held in Sydney in July 2007. The meeting is expected to attract over 5000 participants and will have a dynamic and innovative programme within the three major themes of HIV basic science, clinical research and biomedical prevention.

  9. Researching the meaning of life: finding new sources of hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, Shirly

    2010-01-01

    -disciplinary staff. Case illustrations for meaning--centered interventions will be discussed in the course of the paper. Cultural and traditional differences within the Israeli society, expressed in themes of work with patients, will lead to the conclusion, that there are many creative ways for researching meaning of life and sources for hope.

  10. Case study: the Stanford University School of Medicine and its teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Philip A

    2008-09-01

    There is wide variation in the governance and organization of academic health centers (AHCs), often prompted by or associated with changes in leadership. Changes at AHCs are influenced by institutional priorities, economic factors, competing needs, and the personality and performance of leaders. No organizational model has uniform applicability, and it is important for each AHC to learn what works or does not on the basis of its experiences. This case study of the Stanford University School of Medicine and its teaching hospitals--which constitute Stanford's AHC, the Stanford University Medical Center--reflects responses to the consequences of a failed merger of the teaching hospitals and related clinical enterprises with those of the University of California-San Francisco School of Medicine that required a new definition of institutional priorities and directions. These were shaped by a strategic plan that helped define goals and objectives in education, research, patient care, and the necessary financial and administrative underpinnings needed. A governance model was created that made the medical school and its two major affiliated teaching hospitals partners; this arrangement requires collaboration and coordination that is highly dependent on the shared objectives of the institutional leaders involved. The case study provides the background factors and issues that led to these changes, how they were envisioned and implemented, the current status and challenges, and some lessons learned. Although the current model is working, future changes may be needed to respond to internal and external forces and changes in leadership.

  11. Cognitive Development and Down Syndrome: Age-Related Change on the Stanford-Binet Test (Fourth Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzens, Donna; Cuskelly, Monica; Haynes, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Growth models for subtests of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, 4th edition (R. L. Thorndike, E. P. Hagen, & J. M. Sattler, 1986a, 1986b) were developed for individuals with Down syndrome. Models were based on the assessments of 208 individuals who participated in longitudinal and cross-sectional research between 1987 and 2004. Variation…

  12. Stanford University's Archimedes Project: Design for Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Tom, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The Archimedes Project's primary goal is to educate those who will develop the next generation of software and hardware on the obstacles and opportunities that technology presents for people with disabilities. Its research program designs prototypes, explores accessibility problems, and conducts research on relevant scientific issues. (Author/PEN)

  13. The Stanford University US-Japan Technology Management Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-07

    This grant established the U.S.-Japan Technology Management Center, Stanford University School of Engineering, as an ongoing center of excellence for...networking, nanotechnologies, MEMS, system-level chip integration, and advanced manufacturing. Our technology management focus embraced industry

  14. Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.; Milovich, Marilyn M.; Moussier, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the coverage of Stanford prison experiment (SPE), including criticisms of the study, in introductory psychology courses through an online survey of introductory psychology instructors (N = 117). Results largely paralleled those of the recently published textbook analyses with ethical issues garnering the most coverage,…

  15. 42 CFR 93.410 - Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.410 Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of research misconduct. When the final HHS action does not result in a settlement or finding of... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final HHS action with no settlement or finding of...

  16. Stakeholders in psychiatry and their attitudes toward receiving pertinent and incident findings in genomic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boolsen, Merete W.; Burgdorf, Kristoffer S.; Ullum, Henrik; Hansen, Thomas F.; Middleton, Anna; Mors, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly more psychiatric research studies use whole genome sequencing or whole exome sequencing. Consequently, researchers face difficult questions, such as which genomic findings to return to research participants and how. This study aims to gain more knowledge on the attitudes among potential research participants and health professionals toward receiving pertinent and incidental findings. A cross‐sectional online survey was developed to investigate the attitudes among research participants toward receiving genomic findings. A total of 2,637 stakeholders responded: 241 persons with mental disorders, 671 relatives, 1,623 blood donors, 74 psychiatrists, and 28 clinical geneticists. Stakeholders wanted both pertinent findings (95%) and incidental findings (91%) to be made available for research participants. The majority (77%) stated that researchers should not actively search for incidental findings. Persons with mental disorders and relatives were generally more positive about receiving any kind of findings than clinical geneticists and psychiatrists. Compared with blood donors, persons with mental disorders reported to be more positive about receiving raw genomic data and information that is not of serious health importance. Psychiatrists and clinical geneticists were less positive about receiving genomic findings compared with blood donors. The attitudes toward receiving findings were very positive. Stakeholders were willing to refrain from receiving incidental information if it could compromise the research. Our results suggest that research participants consider themselves as altruistic participants. This study offers valuable insight, which may inform future programs aiming to develop new strategies to target issues relating to the return of findings in genomic research. PMID:28817238

  17. Stanford test called a net breakthrough - data sent at 3,500 times the speed of broadband

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at a Stanford University-affiliated research center have found a way to send data across the Internet more than 3,500 times faster than the typical broadband connection. The technical breakthrough set an Internet speed record too fast to be of use with present-day computers but could open the way for scientists to share and ship massive databases around the world, according to the researchers.

  18. 42 CFR 93.411 - Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Health and Human Services Research Misconduct Issues § 93.411 Final HHS action with settlement or finding of research misconduct. When a final HHS action results in a settlement or research misconduct... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final HHS action with settlement or finding of...

  19. The reinstatement model of drug relapse: recent neurobiological findings, emerging research topics, and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossert, Jennifer M; Marchant, Nathan J; Calu, Donna J; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-10-01

    Results from many clinical studies suggest that drug relapse and craving are often provoked by acute exposure to the self-administered drug or related drugs, drug-associated cues or contexts, or certain stressors. During the last two decades, this clinical scenario has been studied in laboratory animals by using the reinstatement model. In this model, reinstatement of drug seeking by drug priming, drug cues or contexts, or certain stressors is assessed following drug self-administration training and subsequent extinction of the drug-reinforced responding. In this review, we first summarize recent (2009-present) neurobiological findings from studies using the reinstatement model. We then discuss emerging research topics, including the impact of interfering with putative reconsolidation processes on cue- and context-induced reinstatement of drug seeking, and similarities and differences in mechanisms of reinstatement across drug classes. We conclude by discussing results from recent human studies that were inspired by results from rat studies using the reinstatement model. Main conclusions from the studies reviewed highlight: (1) the ventral subiculum and lateral hypothalamus as emerging brain areas important for reinstatement of drug seeking, (2) the existence of differences in brain mechanisms controlling reinstatement of drug seeking across drug classes, (3) the utility of the reinstatement model for assessing the effect of reconsolidation-related manipulations on cue-induced drug seeking, and (4) the encouraging pharmacological concordance between results from rat studies using the reinstatement model and human laboratory studies on cue- and stress-induced drug craving.

  20. Organizational cultural survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees' opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  1. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L. [eds.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials.

  2. Humor Scholarship and TESOL: Applying Findings and Establishing a Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Nancy D.

    2011-01-01

    Research in the areas of second language (L2) pragmatics and of conversational humor has increased in recent decades, resulting in a strong base of knowledge from which applied linguists can draw information for teaching purposes and undertake future research. Yet, whereas empirical findings in L2 pragmatics are beginning to find their way into…

  3. Measuring Graduate Students' Teaching and Research Skills through Self-Report: Descriptive Findings and Validity Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Joanna; Feldon, David

    2010-01-01

    This study extends research on graduate student development by examining descriptive findings and validity of a self-report survey designed to capture graduate students' assessments of their teaching and research skills. Descriptive findings provide some information about areas of growth among graduate students' in the first years of their…

  4. Do Research Findings Apply to My Students? Examining Study Samples and Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bryan G.; Cook, Lysandra

    2017-01-01

    Special educators are urged to use research findings to inform their instruction in order to improve student outcomes. However, it can be difficult to tell whether and how research findings apply to one's own students. In this article, we discuss how special educators can consider the samples and the sampling methods in studies to examine the…

  5. Affirming our commitment to research: the Medical Library Association's research policy statement: the process and findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefsheim, Suzanne F; Rankin, Jocelyn A; Perry, Gerald J; McKibbon, K Ann

    2008-04-01

    Building on its 1995 research policy statement, the Medical Library Association (MLA) has issued a new research policy, The Research Imperative. This paper shares the background research that informed the new policy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifty-one key informants representing various library types, functions, geographic locations, ages, and ethnicities. The grounded theory approach was used to analyze the resulting textual database. Additionally, to gather input from the membership as a whole, two open forums were held at MLA annual meetings. Key informant data indicated that the policy should provide roles for MLA in leadership, advocacy, collaboration, services, education, publishing, and development of a research agenda. Evidence-based library and information practice was emphasized. Six themes emerged to center the new policy: creation of a research culture, challenges, domains of research, research skills set, roles of stakeholders, and measurement of progress. Reflecting the interests and beliefs of the membership, The Research Imperative challenges MLA members to build a supportive culture that values and contributes to a research base that is recognized as an essential tool for future practice.

  6. Social Science Research Related to Wildfire Management: An Overview of Recent Findings and Future Research Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah M. McCaffrey; Eric Toman; Melanie Stidham; Bruce. Shindler

    2012-01-01

    As with other aspects of natural-resource management, the approach to managing wildland fires has evolved over time as scientific understanding has advanced and the broader context surrounding management decisions has changed. Prior to 2000 the primary focus of most fire research was on the physical and ecological aspects of fire; social science research was limited to...

  7. Applying Effective Instruction Research Findings in Teacher Education: Six Influencing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Elsie W.

    This preliminary report provides an overview of the Applying Research to Teacher Education (ARTE) Research Utilization in Elementary Teacher Education (RUETE) study which began in 1982 and will continue through 1985. ARTE: RUETE explores specific processes for incorporating recent research findings of effective instruction into preservice…

  8. Early Literacy Research: Findings Primary-Grade Teachers Will Want to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutzel, D. Ray

    2015-01-01

    This article shares recent research findings in early literacy that every primary grade teacher has had questions about at one time or another ranging from handwriting to phonemic awareness, writing to concepts about print, and more. The article reports research that elaborates upon and extends early literacy research that was reported by the…

  9. Stakeholders in psychiatry and their attitudes toward receiving pertinent and incident findings in genomic research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundby, Anna; Boolsen, Merete Watt; Burgdorf, Kristoffer Solvsten

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly more psychiatric research studies use whole genome sequencing or whole exome sequencing. Consequently, researchers face difficult questions, such as which genomic findings to return to research participants and how. This study aims to gain more knowledge on the attitudes among potent...

  10. Disaster Mental Health Epidemiology: Methodological Review and Interpretation of Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, disasters are increasing in frequency and severity. Mental health consequences of disasters are extensive, and knowledge of anticipated mental health effects is needed for effective disaster response. Difficulties inherent in conducting disaster research have limited the understanding of research findings. This article presents and interprets disaster mental health research findings in the context of research methods. A brief history of the disaster mental health research field is provided, and the presentation of findings is ordered into topical areas of disaster mental health consequences and timing and prediction of mental health outcomes. Results of different studies varied greatly by several main characteristics of research methods, especially methods of psychiatric assessment, sampling and exposure group determination, and consideration of confounding variables. In conclusion, many complexities in conducting disaster mental health research have limited the understanding and interpretation of available knowledge needed to inform efforts to plan and carry out effective mental health responses to disasters. Thoughtful interpretation of findings in the context of research design and methods is vital to accurate understanding of the types, prevalence, and predictors of anticipated mental health effects of disasters. A wealth of knowledge from disaster mental health research has accumulated in recent decades, but more research is still needed to resolve inconsistent findings through methodological refinements.

  11. Utility of an abbreviated version of the stanford-binet intelligence scales (5th ed.) in estimating 'full scale' IQ for young children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Conal; O'Connell, Helen; Lillis, Mary; Tarpey, Sarah Louise; O'Reilly, Gary

    2017-12-28

    The fifth edition of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence scales allows 'full scale' IQ (FSIQ) to be estimated using an abridged version of the test-the abbreviated battery IQ (ABIQ). Set within a public early intervention team service, the current cross-sectional study investigated the utility of the ABIQ in estimating FSIQ for 40 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 3-5 years. A strong ABIQ-FSIQ association was yielded (r = 0.89; r2  = 0.808) and the ABIQ did not over-estimate mean FSIQ above a clinically-relevant threshold; however, clinically significant over-estimation occurred in 17.5% of individual cases. While the findings provide support for the utility of the ABIQ in estimating FSIQ for young children with ASD, caution relating to the over-estimation of FSIQ is warranted. Careful clinical judgment-ideally based on examination of previous cognitive assessment results (if available), thorough interactional observations, and close multi-disciplinary consultation-is necessary to determine the applicability of the ABIQ to individual cases. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. We investigated the utility of a shortened version of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales in estimating IQ for 40 young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings provide qualified support for the instrument: acceptably accurate IQ estimation was achieved for most cases; but not so for a sizeable minority (17.5%). Careful clinical judgment is necessary to determine the applicability of the ABIQ to individual cases. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Applying Second Language Acquisition Research Findings to Materials: A cognitive-interactionist perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lani Freeborn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ELT publishers have been criticised for not incorporating the findings of second language acquisition (SLA research into the design of their teaching materials. The first aim of this article is to inform teachers of key research findings from the cognitive-interactionist approach to SLA by discussing five environmental ingredients that contribute to optimal L2 learning. The second aim of this article is to demonstrate how these research findings can be practically applied to the selection and adaptation of teaching materials. It is the author’s hope that teachers will be encouraged to apply this knowledge to their teaching contexts, and be motivated to keep themselves informed of SLA research findings. Keywords: materials development, SLA research, cognitive-interactionism

  13. Disseminating research findings: what should researchers do? A systematic scoping review of conceptual frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calnan Mike W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Addressing deficiencies in the dissemination and transfer of research-based knowledge into routine clinical practice is high on the policy agenda both in the UK and internationally. However, there is lack of clarity between funding agencies as to what represents dissemination. Moreover, the expectations and guidance provided to researchers vary from one agency to another. Against this background, we performed a systematic scoping to identify and describe any conceptual/organising frameworks that could be used by researchers to guide their dissemination activity. Methods We searched twelve electronic databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, the reference lists of included studies and of individual funding agency websites to identify potential studies for inclusion. To be included, papers had to present an explicit framework or plan either designed for use by researchers or that could be used to guide dissemination activity. Papers which mentioned dissemination (but did not provide any detail in the context of a wider knowledge translation framework, were excluded. References were screened independently by at least two reviewers; disagreements were resolved by discussion. For each included paper, the source, the date of publication, a description of the main elements of the framework, and whether there was any implicit/explicit reference to theory were extracted. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Results Thirty-three frameworks met our inclusion criteria, 20 of which were designed to be used by researchers to guide their dissemination activities. Twenty-eight included frameworks were underpinned at least in part by one or more of three different theoretical approaches, namely persuasive communication, diffusion of innovations theory, and social marketing. Conclusions There are currently a number of theoretically-informed frameworks available to researchers that can be used to help guide their

  14. Disseminating research findings: what should researchers do? A systematic scoping review of conceptual frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Addressing deficiencies in the dissemination and transfer of research-based knowledge into routine clinical practice is high on the policy agenda both in the UK and internationally. However, there is lack of clarity between funding agencies as to what represents dissemination. Moreover, the expectations and guidance provided to researchers vary from one agency to another. Against this background, we performed a systematic scoping to identify and describe any conceptual/organising frameworks that could be used by researchers to guide their dissemination activity. Methods We searched twelve electronic databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO), the reference lists of included studies and of individual funding agency websites to identify potential studies for inclusion. To be included, papers had to present an explicit framework or plan either designed for use by researchers or that could be used to guide dissemination activity. Papers which mentioned dissemination (but did not provide any detail) in the context of a wider knowledge translation framework, were excluded. References were screened independently by at least two reviewers; disagreements were resolved by discussion. For each included paper, the source, the date of publication, a description of the main elements of the framework, and whether there was any implicit/explicit reference to theory were extracted. A narrative synthesis was undertaken. Results Thirty-three frameworks met our inclusion criteria, 20 of which were designed to be used by researchers to guide their dissemination activities. Twenty-eight included frameworks were underpinned at least in part by one or more of three different theoretical approaches, namely persuasive communication, diffusion of innovations theory, and social marketing. Conclusions There are currently a number of theoretically-informed frameworks available to researchers that can be used to help guide their dissemination planning and activity

  15. Research education: findings of a study of teaching-learning research using multiple analytical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermause, Roxanne; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Fritz, Roschelle

    2014-12-01

    This multimethod, qualitative study provides results for educators of nursing doctoral students to consider. Combining the expertise of an empirical analytical researcher (who uses statistical methods) and an interpretive phenomenological researcher (who uses hermeneutic methods), a course was designed that would place doctoral students in the midst of multiparadigmatic discussions while learning fundamental research methods. Field notes and iterative analytical discussions led to patterns and themes that highlight the value of this innovative pedagogical application. Using content analysis and interpretive phenomenological approaches, together with one of the students, data were analyzed from field notes recorded in real time over the period the course was offered. This article describes the course and the study analysis, and offers the pedagogical experience as transformative. A link to a sample syllabus is included in the article. The results encourage nurse educators of doctoral nursing students to focus educational practice on multiple methodological perspectives. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Rachel E; Mediratta, Rishi P; Xie, James; Kambhampati, Swetha; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Montacute, Tamara; Zhang, Michael; Zaw, Catherine; He, Jimmy; Sanchez, Magali; Pischel, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful servicelearning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program's outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians.

  17. Sharing the Knowledge: Sharing Aggregate Genomic Findings with Research Participants in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerasidou, Angeliki

    2015-12-01

    Returning research results to participants is recognised as an obligation that researchers should always try to fulfil. But can we ascribe the same obligation to researchers who conduct genomics research producing only aggregated findings? And what about genomics research conducted in developing countries? This paper considers Beskow's et al. argument that aggregated findings should also be returned to research participants. This recommendation is examined in the context of genomics research conducted in developing countries. The risks and benefits of attempting such an exercise are identified, and suggestions on ways to avoid some of the challenges are proposed. I argue that disseminating the findings of genomic research to participating communities should be seen as sharing knowledge rather than returning results. Calling the dissemination of aggregate, population level information returning results can be confusing and misleading as participants might expect to receive individual level information. Talking about sharing knowledge is a more appropriate way of expressing and communicating the outcome of population genomic research. Considering the knowledge produced by genomics research a worthwhile output that should be shared with the participants and approaching the exercise as a 'sharing of knowledge', could help mitigate the risks of unrealistic expectations and misunderstanding of findings, whilst promoting trusting and long lasting relationships with the participating communities. © 2014 The Authors. Developing World Bioethics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Research on Self-Determination in Physical Education: Key Findings and Proposals for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berghe, Lynn; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Cardon, Greet; Kirk, David; Haerens, Leen

    2014-01-01

    Background: During the last 30 years, several theories of motivation have generated insights into the motives underlying learners' behavior in physical education. Self-determination theory (SDT), a general theory on social development and motivation, has enjoyed increasing popularity in physical education research during the past decade. SDT…

  19. Translating research findings into community based theatre: More than a dead man's wife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Susan; Hopgood, Alan; Dickins, Marissa

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly, qualitative scholars in health and social sciences are turning to innovative strategies as a way of translating research findings into informative, accessible and enjoyable forms for the community. The aim of this article is to describe how the research findings of a doctoral thesis - a narrative study about 58 older women's experiences of widowhood - were translated into a unique and professionally developed script to form the basis for a successful theatrical production that has travelled extensively within Australia. This article reports on the process of collaboration between a researcher, a highly regarded Australian actor/script writer and an ensemble of well-known and experienced professional actors. Together the collaborating partners translated the research data and findings about growing older and 'widowhood' into a high quality theatre production. In particular, we argue in this paper that research-based theatre is an appropriate medium for communicating research findings about important life issues of concern to older people in a safe, affirming and entertaining manner. By outlining the process of translating research findings into theatre we hope to show that there is a real value in this translation approach for both researcher and audience alike. © 2013.

  20. Alcohol Use Disorders, Research Findings | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alcohol Use and Abuse Alcohol Use Research Findings Past Issues / Winter 2013 Table ... and adolescents years after they were exposed to alcohol in the womb. That is according to a ...

  1. Impact of problem finding on the quality of authentic open inquiry science research projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labanca, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Problem finding is a creative process whereby individuals develop original ideas for study. Secondary science students who successfully participate in authentic, novel, open inquiry studies must engage in problem finding to determine viable and suitable topics. This study examined problem finding strategies employed by students who successfully completed and presented the results of their open inquiry research at the 2007 Connecticut Science Fair and the 2007 International Science and Engineering Fair. A multicase qualitative study was framed through the lenses of creativity, inquiry strategies, and situated cognition learning theory. Data were triangulated by methods (interviews, document analysis, surveys) and sources (students, teachers, mentors, fair directors, documents). The data demonstrated that the quality of student projects was directly impacted by the quality of their problem finding. Effective problem finding was a result of students using resources from previous, specialized experiences. They had a positive self-concept and a temperament for both the creative and logical perspectives of science research. Successful problem finding was derived from an idiosyncratic, nonlinear, and flexible use and understanding of inquiry. Finally, problem finding was influenced and assisted by the community of practicing scientists, with whom the students had an exceptional ability to communicate effectively. As a result, there appears to be a juxtaposition of creative and logical/analytical thought for open inquiry that may not be present in other forms of inquiry. Instructional strategies are suggested for teachers of science research students to improve the quality of problem finding for their students and their subsequent research projects.

  2. A Transdisciplinary Approach to Training: Preliminary Research Findings Based on a Case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimpitsos, Christos; Petridou, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the benefits, barriers and challenges of the transdisciplinary approach to training, and to present findings of a case analysis. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on the research findings of an experimental training program for Greek local government managers co-funded by the European…

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  4. Cognitive Development and Science Instruction: A Review of Some Recent Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Michael

    Reviewed are several pertinent research articles dealing with cognitive development, Piaget's theories, and science instruction, especially those that relate to procedures that can be implemented by classroom teachers. The research findings on developmental levels of Piaget discuss: (1) tasks that indicate a change from preoperational to concrete…

  5. Features of the international manager-leader of the near future - findings of the research

    OpenAIRE

    Glinkowska Beata

    2017-01-01

    The paper covers characteristics of the conducted research, including definitional approach to the essence of the terms: manager and leader. Particular attention was paid to the qualities of modern manager-leader and the qualities of manager-leader of the future, including globalization and internationalisation. The research part contains findings of the author’s own research which were confronted with the results of studies existing in this area in the subject literature.

  6. Features of the international manager-leader of the near future - findings of the research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glinkowska Beata

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper covers characteristics of the conducted research, including definitional approach to the essence of the terms: manager and leader. Particular attention was paid to the qualities of modern manager-leader and the qualities of manager-leader of the future, including globalization and internationalisation. The research part contains findings of the author’s own research which were confronted with the results of studies existing in this area in the subject literature.

  7. Reconciling incongruous qualitative and quantitative findings in mixed methods research: exemplars from research with drug using populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karla D; Davidson, Peter J; Pollini, Robin A; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Washburn, Rachel; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01

    Mixed methods research is increasingly being promoted in the health sciences as a way to gain more comprehensive understandings of how social processes and individual behaviours shape human health. Mixed methods research most commonly combines qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis strategies. Often, integrating findings from multiple methods is assumed to confirm or validate the findings from one method with the findings from another, seeking convergence or agreement between methods. Cases in which findings from different methods are congruous are generally thought of as ideal, whilst conflicting findings may, at first glance, appear problematic. However, the latter situation provides the opportunity for a process through which apparently discordant results are reconciled, potentially leading to new emergent understandings of complex social phenomena. This paper presents three case studies drawn from the authors' research on HIV risk amongst injection drug users in which mixed methods studies yielded apparently discrepant results. We use these case studies (involving injection drug users [IDUs] using a Needle/Syringe Exchange Program in Los Angeles, CA, USA; IDUs seeking to purchase needle/syringes at pharmacies in Tijuana, Mexico; and young street-based IDUs in San Francisco, CA, USA) to identify challenges associated with integrating findings from mixed methods projects, summarize lessons learned, and make recommendations for how to more successfully anticipate and manage the integration of findings. Despite the challenges inherent in reconciling apparently conflicting findings from qualitative and quantitative approaches, in keeping with others who have argued in favour of integrating mixed methods findings, we contend that such an undertaking has the potential to yield benefits that emerge only through the struggle to reconcile discrepant results and may provide a sum that is greater than the individual qualitative and quantitative parts

  8. Novel approach to improve molecular imaging research: Correlation between macroscopic and molecular pathological findings in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid, E-mail: i.boehm@uni-bonn.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, ZARF Project, Center for Molecular Imaging Research MBMB, Philipps University of Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35039 Marburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Currently, clinical research approaches are sparse in molecular imaging studies. Moreover, possible links between imaging features and pathological laboratory parameters are unknown, so far. Therefore, the goal was to find a possible relationship between imaging features and peripheral blood cell apoptosis, and thereby to present a novel way to complement molecular imaging research. Materials and methods: The investigation has been done in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototype of an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan involvement, autoantibody production, and disturbed apoptosis. Retrospectively, radiological findings have been compared to both autoantibody findings and percentage apoptotic blood cells. Results: Two SLE groups could be identified: patients with normal (annexin V binding < 20%), and with increased apoptosis (annexin V binding > 20%) of peripheral blood cells. The frequency of radiological examinations in SLE patients significantly correlated with an increased percentage of apoptotic cells (p < 0.005). In patients with characteristic imaging findings (e.g. lymph node swelling, pleural effusion) an elevated percentage of apoptotic cells was present. In contrast SLE-patients with normal imaging findings or uncharacteristic results of minimal severity had normal percentages of apoptotic blood cells. Conclusion: This correlation between radiographic findings and percentage of apoptotic blood cells provides (1) further insight into pathological mechanisms of SLE, (2) will offer the possibility to introduce apoptotic biomarkers as molecular probes for clinical molecular imaging approaches in future to early diagnose organ complaints in patients with SLE, and (3) is a plea to complement molecular imaging research by this clinical approach.

  9. Translating research findings on early experience to prevention: animal and human evidence on early attachment relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Thomas G; Cameron, Judy L

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies provide a wealth of findings on the mechanisms by which early stress exposure, particularly within the early child-parent attachment relationship, may influence long-term adaptation. Translating these findings to clinical practice and social policy is now underway. In this review, some key considerations in this translational task are examined, specifically, the conceptual bases underlying the research designs, the putative mechanisms involved, and the degree to which currently available findings might shape interventions. Although the primary focus is on depression, a broader range of phenotypes associated with poor early caregiving environments is also considered.

  10. Stanford University: The Building Energy Retrofit Programs. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Stanford University's Energy Retrofit Program was created in 1993 to target resource reduction and conservation focused projects on campus. Fahmida Ahmed, Associate Director of the Department of Sustainability and Energy Management, says that Stanford has been investing in sustainability and energy-efficiency since the late 1970s, longer than many…

  11. The Case for the Stanford-Binet L-M as a Supplemental Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Linda Kreger; Kearney, Katheryn

    1992-01-01

    The Stanford-Binet IV is compared to the original version and criticized for having less power to measure the high end of intelligence and for having norms that discriminate against gifted students. Strengths of the Stanford-Binet L-M are pointed out, and use of both scales for different purposes is recommended. (JDD)

  12. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior…

  13. Programme Implementation in Social and Emotional Learning: Basic Issues and Research Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durlak, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamental importance of achieving quality implementation when assessing the impact of social and emotional learning interventions. Recent findings in implementation science are reviewed that include a definition of implementation, its relation to programme outcomes, current research on the factors that affect…

  14. Genetically Informative Research on Adolescent Substance Use: Methods, Findings, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynskey, Michael T.; Agrawal, Arpana; Heath, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of the genetic epidemiology of substance use and misuse in adolescents. Method: A selective review of genetically informative research strategies, their limitations, and key findings examining issues related to the heritability of substance use and substance use disorders in children and adolescents is presented.…

  15. New Findings and Future Directions for Subjective Well-Being Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings on subjective well-being (SWB) are presented, and I describe the important questions for future research that these raise. Worldwide predictors of SWB such as social support and fulfillment of basic needs have been uncovered, and there are large differences in SWB between societies. A number of culture-specific predictors of SWB…

  16. Research-Doctorate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences: Selected Findings from the NRC Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorden, Joan F., Ed.; Kuh, Charlotte V., Ed.; Voytuk, James A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Research Doctorate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences: Selected Findings from the NRC Assessment" examines data on the biomedical sciences programs to gather additional insight about the talent, training environment, outcomes, diversity, and international participation in the biomedical sciences workforce. This report supports an…

  17. Public Understanding of Cognitive Neuroscience Research Findings: Trying to Peer beyond Enchanted Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotzer, Tina A.

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the appeal of cognitive neuroscience research to the general public within the context of the deep puzzles involved in using our minds to understand how our minds work. It offers a few promising examples of findings that illuminate the ways of the mind and reveal these workings to be counter-intuitive with our subjective…

  18. Plagiarism: Examination of Conceptual Issues and Evaluation of Research Findings on Using Detection Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Angelos; Theodosiadou, Dimitra; Pappos, Christos

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyze and evaluate the research findings on using Plagiarism Detection Services (PDS) in universities. In order to do that, conceptual issues about plagiarism are examined and the complex nature of plagiarism is discussed. Subsequently, the pragmatic forms of student plagiarism are listed and PDS strategies on…

  19. 75 FR 62892 - Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Correction In notice document 2010-24809 beginning on page 61220 in the issue of Monday...

  20. Research based empathic knowledge for nursing: a translational strategy for disseminating phenomenological research findings to provide evidence for caring practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Kathleen T; Todres, Les

    2011-04-01

    We are interested in the kind of knowledge that is particularly relevant to caring practice and the way in which qualitative research findings can serve such knowledge. As phenomenological researchers we have been engaged with the question of how findings from such research can be re-presented and expressed more aesthetically. Such a movement towards a more aesthetic phenomenology may serve the communicative concern to express phenomena relevant to caring practice in ways that appeal to the 'head, hand and heart'. The paper first offers some thoughts about the complex kind of knowledge relevant to caring that is not only technical or propositional, but actionable and aesthetically moving as well. We call this kind of knowledge 'embodied relational understanding'. Further, the paper outlines the development of one way of serving a more aesthetic phenomenology whereby research findings can be faithfully and evocatively translated into more empathically impactful expressions. We call this process 'embodied interpretation'. It is guided by an epistemological framework grounded in the philosophies of Gadamer and Gendlin. We finally illustrate the process with reference to the experience of living after Stroke, and consider the value of this translational process for nursing education and practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Implementation and evaluation of Stanford Health Care direct-care teledermatology program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh S Pathipati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teledermatology has proven to be an effective means of providing dermatologic care. The existing research has primarily evaluated its usefulness in a consultative model. Few academic centers have evaluated a patient-initiated model, and direct-to-consumer services remain the subject of controversy. Stanford Health Care recently launched a direct-care, patient-initiated teledermatology pilot program. This article evaluates the viability and patient satisfaction with this service. Materials and Methods: During the pilot period, patients were able to seek remote dermatologic care using an eVisit tool in their MyHealth account. Patients initiated the consultation, answered questions regarding their complaint, and uploaded a picture if relevant. A Stanford dermatologist reviewed each eVisit and responded with an assessment and plan. The dermatologist noted whether they were able to make a diagnosis and their level of confidence in it. After the study, 10 patients participated in a focus group to provide feedback on the service. Results: In all, 38 patients sought care during the pilot period. A dermatologist was able to make a diagnosis in 36 of 38 (95% cases, with an average confidence level of 7.9 of 10. The average time to consultation was 0.8 days. Patients indicated high levels of satisfaction with the service although they had suggestions for improvement. Discussion: Patients provided clinically useful images and information in a direct-care teledermatology model. Such services allow dermatology providers to increase access while maintaining high-quality care in an academic medical center. Further research is needed on standalone services that cannot integrate encounters with the patient’s existing medical record.

  2. Finding the Middle Ground in Violent Video Game Research: Lessons From Ferguson (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Patrick M

    2015-09-01

    Ferguson's comprehensive meta-analysis provides convincing data that violent video games have almost no effect on children's aggression. Although this finding is unlikely to bring unity to a divided field, Ferguson's article (2015, this issue) provides important rules that should aid all researchers. First, we need to be more accepting of results that are inconsistent with our own theories. Second, extraneous variables are often responsible for the relations previous studies have found between violent media and aggression. Third, we should avoid using unstandardized assessments of important variables whenever possible. Finally, caution is warranted when generalizing laboratory research findings to severe acts of violent in the "real world." It is hoped that, by accepting these basic rules, researchers and others will adopt less extreme positions concerning the effects of violent video games. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Can We Trust Positive Findings of Intervention Research? The Role of Conflict of Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Dennis M

    2016-04-23

    In recent years, there has been increased attention to the issue of conflict of interest within prevention research. The aims of this paper are to discuss these developments and to relate them to discussions of conflict of interest in the broader scientific literature. Although there has been concern expressed about the extent to which conflicts of interest can be defined and measured, empirical research suggests that financial conflicts can be easily identified and assessed in meta-analyses focused on their effects on research quality. Research evidence also shows that conflict of interest is associated with use of flexible data analysis practices and the reporting of chance positive findings, both within prevention research and related disciplines such as public health and psychology. However, the overwhelming majority of published studies report positive results, and there are a number of other influences within academia (such as pressure to publish) that account for this and for the use of flexible data analysis practices. Accordingly, introducing measures to improve research quality in general, rather than just focusing on problems specific to research in which there is a clearly identifiable conflict of interest, may prove more effective and less controversial. Most such efforts focus on introducing greater transparency into research design, practice, and reporting. These both curtail employment of flexible data analysis practices and make their use transparent to investigators seeking to assess their effects on research quality. Also, requiring detailed disclosures of conflicts be reported by all investigators (not just senior authors) would improve current disclosure practices.

  4. Artificial Intelligence -- Research and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    1975 through 11 April 1976 Stanford Research Institute Projects 3805 and 4763 ARIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE -- RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Edited by Bertram...of " vision by distinguishing features." Object recognition via distinguishing features is performed by looking only for those features that...August 1974). 11. T. D. Garvey, "Perceptual Strategies for Purposive Vision , Technical Note 127, Artificial Intelligence Center, Stanford Research

  5. Hermeneutic application research - finding a common understanding and consensus on care and caring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Camilla; Nyström, Lisbet

    2017-03-01

    To clinically and contextually implement the theoretical and factual knowledge of care and caring that has been developed in the last 30 years is seen as a great challenge in caring science research. Emphasis has been put on problem-solving research methodologies and action research in hopes of narrowing the divide between caring theory and clinical practice. Thus, the intention is now to further action research towards a hermeneutic approach and to put emphasis on hermeneutic application where theory and praxis become one through human dialogue. This article highlights hermeneutic application research as an alternative methodology within participatory-oriented research which presents a new opportunity to unite clinical practice and caring theory. The aim is to contribute to the development of the hermeneutical application research design in its epistemological, ontological and ethical perspective, by articulating and clarifying the central foundations in the application. On the basis of Gadamer's hermeneutical thinking and Levinas ethical thinking, the central foundations in the application research are ethics, creation of a hermeneutical room, dialogue and common understanding and appropriation and action. When theoretical understanding turns into praxis, knowledge also becomes activity and theory and practice become one. Application thus realises the basic idea that praxis and theory are one, and thus, theory of caring can only become evident and implemented in a clinical practice through moments when the participants find a common understanding and consensus on the knowledge of care and caring. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. Pathways to research impact in primary healthcare: What do Australian primary healthcare researchers believe works best to facilitate the use of their research findings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Richard L; McIntyre, Ellen; Jackson-Bowers, Eleanor; Kalucy, Libby

    2017-03-02

    Primary healthcare researchers are under increasing pressure to demonstrate measurable and lasting improvement in clinical practice and healthcare policy as a result of their work. It is therefore important to understand the effectiveness of the research dissemination strategies used. The aim of this paper is to describe the pathways for research impact that have been achieved across several government-funded primary healthcare projects, and the effectiveness of these methods as perceived by their Chief Investigators. The project used an online survey to collect information about government-funded primary healthcare research projects. Chief Investigators were asked how they disseminated their findings and how this achieved impact in policy and practice. They were also asked to express their beliefs regarding the most effective means of achieving research impact and describe how this occurred. Chief Investigators of 17 projects indicated that a number of dissemination strategies were used but that professional networks were the most effective means of promoting uptake of their research findings. Utilisation of research findings for clinical practice was most likely to occur in organisations or among individual practitioners who were most closely associated with the research team, or when research findings were included in educational programmes involving clinical practice. Uptake of both policy- and practice-related research was deemed most successful if intermediary organisations such as formal professional networks were engaged in the research. Successful primary healthcare researchers had developed critical relationships with intermediary organisations within primary healthcare before the initiation of the research and had also involved them in the design. The scale of research impact was influenced by the current policy environment, the type and significance of the results, and the endorsement (or lack thereof) of professional bodies. Chief Investigators

  7. Exploring the Best Practices of Nursing Research Councils in Magnet® Organizations: Findings From a Qualitative Research Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jennifer; Lindauer, Cathleen; Parks, Joyce; Scala, Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this descriptive qualitative study was to identify best practices of nursing research councils (NRCs) at Magnet®-designated hospitals. Nursing research (NR) is essential, adding to the body of nursing knowledge. Applying NR to the bedside improves care, enhances patient safety, and is an imperative for nursing leaders. We interviewed NR designees at 26 Magnet-recognized hospitals about the structure and function of their NRCs and used structural coding to identify best practices. Most organizations link NR and evidence-based practice. Council membership includes leadership and clinical nurses. Councils conduct scientific reviews for nursing studies, supporting nurse principal investigators. Tracking and reporting of NR vary widely and are challenging. Councils provide education, sponsor research days, and collaborate interprofessionally, including with academic partners. Findings from this study demonstrate the need to create formal processes to track and report NR and to develop outcome-focused NR education.

  8. Conceptual Fluency in Second Language Teaching: An Overview of Problems, Issues, Research Findings, and Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Danesi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual Fluency (CF and the related notion of metaphorical competence (MC emerged in the mid-1980s as a pedagogical response to the research findings and insights that were crystallizing in the fledgling field at the time of cognitive linguistics, and specifically, of conceptual metaphor theory. Since then, a considerable amount of work has been conducted on these notions investigating their main premises, researching their efficacy as teaching-learning tools, and exploring their pedagogical implications. Over three decades later, this paper presents an overview of the relevant work and raises the questions and issues that these notions continue to raise.

  9. Communicating Academic Research Findings to IS Professionals: An Analysis of Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Because research findings often do not have direct or immediate relevance to IS professionals in industry, the question arises as to how those findings should be disseminated to them in a suitable form at such time as they do become relevant. A central argument of this paper is that the traditional mechanisms whereby academic researchers disseminate their work are prone to numerous communication breakdowns, and that much work which could potentially make valuable contributions to practice is haplessly lost within the vaults of academia. Using the well-known Shannon & Weaver communication model, three major problems are analyzed: the choice of dissemination channels, language barriers, and the alienation of academia from industry.

  10. Repackaging prostate cancer support group research findings: an e-KT case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina S; Lohan, Maria; Bottorff, Joan L

    2015-01-01

    In the context of psychosocial oncology research, disseminating study findings to a range of knowledge "end-users" can advance the well-being of diverse patient subgroups and their families. This article details how findings drawn from a study of prostate cancer support groups were repackaged in a knowledge translation website--www.prostatecancerhelpyourself.ubc.ca--using Web 2.0 features. Detailed are five lessons learned from developing the website: the importance of pitching a winning but feasible idea, keeping a focus on interactivity and minimizing text, negotiating with the supplier, building in formal pretests or a pilot test with end-users, and completing formative evaluations based on data collected through Google™ and YouTube™ Analytics. The details are shared to guide the e-knowledge translation efforts of other psychosocial oncology researchers and clinicians. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Return of Individual Research Results and Incidental Findings in the Clinical Trials Cooperative Group Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriere, Michael; Van Ness, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The NCI funded cooperative group cancer clinical trial system develops experimental therapies and often collects patient samples for correlative research. The Cooperative Group Bank (CGB) system maintains biobanks with a current policy not to return research results to individuals. An online survey was created, and 10 directors of CGBs completed the surveys asking about understanding and attitudes in changing policies to consider return of Incidental Findings (IFs) and Individual Research Results (IRRs) of health significance. The potential impact of the ten consensus recommendations of Wolf et al. presented in this issue are examined. Re-identification of samples is often not problematic; however, changes to the current banking and clinical trial systems would require significant effort to fulfill an obligation of recontact of subjects. Additional resources, as well as a national advisory board would be required to standardize implementation. PMID:22382800

  12. Return of individual research results and incidental findings in the clinical trials cooperative group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriere, Michael; Van Ness, Brian

    2012-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative group cancer clinical trial system develops experimental therapies and often collects samples from patients for correlative research. The cooperative group bank (CGB) system maintains biobanks with a current policy not to return research results to individuals. An online survey was created, and 10 directors of CGBs completed the surveys asking about understanding and attitudes in changing policies to consider return of incidental findings (IFs) and individual research results (IRRs) of health significance. The potential impact of the 10 consensus recommendations of Wolf et al. presented in this issue are examined. Reidentification of samples is often not problematic; however, changes to the current banking and clinical trial systems would require significant effort to fulfill an obligation of recontact of subjects. Additional resources, as well as a national advisory board would be required to standardize implementation.

  13. Breeding history of the Stanford colony of narcoleptic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, R; Nishino, S; Dement, W C; Mignot, E

    1998-01-10

    Narcolepsy is a disabling sleep disorder of unknown aetiology. In humans, the disease is mostly sporadic, with a few familial cases having been reported. In 1973 a sporadic case of narcolepsy was reported in a poodle, and in 1975 familial cases of narcolepsy occurred in dobermanns. As with human narcoleptics, these narcoleptic dogs exhibited excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. A colony of narcoleptic dogs was established at Stanford University in 1976 to study the pathophysiology of the disease. Between 1976 and 1995, a total of 669 animals of various breeds were born, of which 487 survived. Dobermanns accounted for 78 per cent of the total. The narcolepsy genotype in dobermanns had no significant influence on puppy mortality rate (numbers of stillborn and survival rate). The sex, maternal parity or the age of the sire or dam had no significant effect. The percentage of stillborn puppies increased from 6.1 per cent in outbred litters to 15.4 per cent in inbred litters (P = 0.10). Birth season also had a significant effect, and the highest survival rate (P = 0.02), and the lowest percentage of stillborn puppies (P = 0.09) occurred between April and June.

  14. Stanford Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall questionnaire in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Benjamin E; Canavan, Jane L; Smith, Cayley J; Ingram, Karen A; Fowler, Ria P; Clark, Amy L; Polkey, Michael I; Man, William D-C

    2012-08-01

    Quantification of daily physical activity is of clinical interest in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objective measures using activity monitors may take several days to obtain reliable results. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Stanford Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (PAR) against the SenseWear armband (SWA) and compare its validity with three other physical activity questionnaires. 43 COPD patients wore the SWA for 7 days. Patients completed the PAR, Baecke, Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and Zutphen questionnaires. Spearman rank correlation, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used to assess the relationship between the questionnaires and SWA. Assessed by PAR, time spent at ≥3.0 metabolic equivalents (METs) correlated significantly (r=0.54, pactive patients (≥30 min at ≥3.0 METs or a physical activity level (PAL) ≥1.55) and very inactive patients (PAL activity sufficiently accurately to make individual recommendations, it was able to identify COPD patients at extremes of the physical activity spectrum, potentially reducing the number of patients requiring direct measurement.

  15. Assessing the effectiveness of a longitudinal knowledge dissemination intervention: Sharing research findings in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhian Twine

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge dissemination interventions (KDIs are integral to knowledge brokerage activities in research as part of the ethics of practice, but are seldom evaluated. In this case study, we critically reflect on an annual KDI as part of knowledge brokerage activities in the MRC/Wits-Agincourt Unit health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS in rural South Africa from 2001 to 2015. The HDSS findings on births, deaths and migrations, as well as nested research project results, were shared with villagers, village leaders and service providers. The data used for this case study comprised secondary analysis of 13 reports and 762 evaluation forms of annual village-based meetings; records of requests for data from stakeholders; and qualitative analysis of 15 individual and five focus group interviews with local leaders and service providers involving 60 people. Over time, the KDI evolved from taking place over one week a year to being extended over six months, and to include briefings with service providers and local leaders. Attendance at village-level meetings remained low at an average of 3 per cent of the total adult population. Since 2011, the KDI village-based meetings have developed into an embedded community forum for discussion of topical village issues. There has been a decrease in requests for health-care and other services from the research unit, with a concurrent increase in research-related questions and requests for data from service providers, village leaders and political representatives. We conclude that, in this setting, the dissemination of research findings is not a linear exchange of information from the researchers to village residents and their leadership, but is increasingly multi-directional. KDIs are a key component of knowledge brokerage activities and involve, influence and are influenced by other aspects of knowledge brokerage, such as identifying, engaging and connecting with stakeholders and supporting sustainability.

  16. Translating research findings into practice – the implementation of kangaroo mother care in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergh Anne-Marie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kangaroo mother care (KMC is a safe and effective method of caring for low birth weight infants and is promoted for its potential to improve newborn survival. Many countries find it difficult to take KMC to scale in healthcare facilities providing newborn care. KMC Ghana was an initiative to scale up KMC in four regions in Ghana. Research findings from two outreach trials in South Africa informed the design of the initiative. Two key points of departure were to equip healthcare facilities that conduct deliveries with the necessary skills for KMC practice and to single out KMC for special attention instead of embedding it in other newborn care initiatives. This paper describes the contextualisation and practical application of previous research findings and the results of monitoring the progress of the implementation of KMC in Ghana. Methods A three-phase outreach intervention was adapted from previous research findings to suit the local setting. A more structured system of KMC regional steering committees was introduced to drive the process and take the initiative forward. During Phase I, health workers in regions and districts were oriented in KMC and received basic support for the management of the outreach. Phase II entailed the strengthening of the regional steering committees. Phase III comprised a more formal assessment, utilising a previously validated KMC progress-monitoring instrument. Results Twenty-six out of 38 hospitals (68 % scored over 10 out of 30 and had reached the level of ‘evidence of practice’ by the end of Phase III. Seven hospitals exceeded expected performance by scoring at the level of ‘evidence of routine and institutionalised practice.’ The collective mean score for all participating hospitals was 12.07. Hospitals that had attained baby-friendly status or had been re-accredited in the five years before the intervention scored significantly better than the rest, with a mean score of 14

  17. Bibliometric Analysis On Research Study of Pomegranate: A Review Towards New Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Farhan Md Ariffin

    2015-06-01

    Abstract : Pomegranates are an antioxidant-rich superfood with alternative and natural medicine resources for the natural health community. From the perspective of ancient medical practice, pomegranate is in a highest ranking of healthy fruits because of its diverse beneficial in curing diseases. Trend research publications pomegranates were studied. The study focused on content analysis, especially in the field of primary research on pomegranate. Referring to the results of 'literature review' on pomegranate, researchers found that the majority of previous research on pomegranate dominated by journal articles by 85.5 percent. Research on the method of analysis conducted in the previous studies found that most studies on pomegranate done on a scientific analysis (laboratory studies. Studies on aspects of science has been divided into seven areas. Focus areas include scientific discussion of pomegranate is pharmaceutical, Food Science, Botany, Bio-Medical, Bio-Chemistry and Microbiology. Only one field of study that focuses on the analysis of Islamic view focusing on Islamic Education. Additional fields of Environmental Education (Flora are also included by researchers to collect data and find a results on plants that contain pomegranate. Comparative evaluation of research found that a total of 188 kinds of studies involves the study of the scientific aspects compared to only 11 studies based on Islam (Islamic Education and 10 studies based on environmental education. Thus, the efforts of researchers from Universiti Malaya through grants TRGS (TR001A-2014 entitled 'Safe and Health Uses of Fruits and Herbs Mentioned in Al-Quran and Ahadith: An Analysis of ethnomedicinal Importance in Islamic Products in Malaysia' are very significant in the development of science. Advanced new study of henna is expected to produce benefits to Malaysia as a whole.

  18. Brands matter: Major findings from the Alcohol Brand Research Among Underage Drinkers (ABRAND) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sarah P.; Siegel, Michael B.; DeJong, William; Ross, Craig S.; Naimi, Timothy; Albers, Alison; Skeer, Margie; Rosenbloom, David L.; Jernigan, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol research focused on underage drinkers has not comprehensively assessed the landscape of brand-level drinking behaviors among youth. This information is needed to profile youth alcohol use accurately, explore its antecedents, and develop appropriate interventions. Methods We collected national data on the alcohol brand-level consumption of underage drinkers in the United States and then examined the association between those preferences and several factors including youth exposure to brand-specific alcohol advertising, corporate sponsorships, popular music lyrics, and social networking sites, and alcohol pricing. This paper summarizes our findings, plus the results of other published studies on alcohol branding and youth drinking. Results Our findings revealed several interesting facts regarding youth drinking. For example, we found that: 1) youth are not drinking the cheapest alcohol brands; 2) youth brand preferences differ from those of adult drinkers; 3) underage drinkers are not opportunistic in their alcohol consumption, but instead consume a very specific set of brands; 4) the brands that youth are heavily exposed to in magazines and television advertising correspond to the brands they most often report consuming; and 5) youth consume more of the alcohol brands to whose advertising they are most heavily exposed. Conclusion The findings presented here suggests that brand-level alcohol research will provide important insight into youth drinking behaviors, the factors that contribute to youth alcohol consumption, and potential avenues for effective public health surveillance and programming. PMID:27034628

  19. Brands matter: Major findings from the Alcohol Brand Research Among Underage Drinkers (ABRAND) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sarah P; Siegel, Michael B; DeJong, William; Ross, Craig S; Naimi, Timothy; Albers, Alison; Skeer, Margie; Rosenbloom, David L; Jernigan, David H

    Alcohol research focused on underage drinkers has not comprehensively assessed the landscape of brand-level drinking behaviors among youth. This information is needed to profile youth alcohol use accurately, explore its antecedents, and develop appropriate interventions. We collected national data on the alcohol brand-level consumption of underage drinkers in the United States and then examined the association between those preferences and several factors including youth exposure to brand-specific alcohol advertising, corporate sponsorships, popular music lyrics, and social networking sites, and alcohol pricing. This paper summarizes our findings, plus the results of other published studies on alcohol branding and youth drinking. Our findings revealed several interesting facts regarding youth drinking. For example, we found that: 1) youth are not drinking the cheapest alcohol brands; 2) youth brand preferences differ from those of adult drinkers; 3) underage drinkers are not opportunistic in their alcohol consumption, but instead consume a very specific set of brands; 4) the brands that youth are heavily exposed to in magazines and television advertising correspond to the brands they most often report consuming; and 5) youth consume more of the alcohol brands to whose advertising they are most heavily exposed. The findings presented here suggests that brand-level alcohol research will provide important insight into youth drinking behaviors, the factors that contribute to youth alcohol consumption, and potential avenues for effective public health surveillance and programming.

  20. Early Career Researchers Demand Full-text and Rely on Google to Find Scholarly Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hayman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Nicholas, D., Boukacem-Zeghmouri, C., Rodríguez-Bravo, B., Xu, J., Watkinson, A., Abrizah, A., Herman, E., & Świgoń, M. (2017. Where and how early career researchers find scholarly information. Learned Publishing, 30(1, 19-29. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/leap.1087 Abstract Objective – To examine the attitudes and information behaviours of early career researchers (ECRs when locating scholarly information. Design – Qualitative longitudinal study. Setting – Research participants from the United Kingdom, United States of America, China, France, Malaysia, Poland, and Spain. Subjects – A total 116 participants from various disciplines, aged 35 and younger, who were holding or had previously held a research position, but not in a tenured position. All participants held a doctorate or were in the process of earning one. Methods – Using structured interviews of 60-90 minutes, researchers asked 60 questions of each participant via face-to-face, Skype, or telephone interviews. The interview format and questions were formed via focus groups. Main Results – As part of a longitudinal project, results reported are limited to the first year of the study, and focused on three primary questions identified by the authors: where do ECRs find scholarly information, whether they use their smartphones to locate and read scholarly information, and what social media do they use to find scholarly information. Researchers describe how ECRs themselves interpreted the phrase scholarly information to primarily mean journal articles, while the researchers themselves had a much expanded definition to include professional and “scholarly contacts, ideas, and data” (p. 22. This research shows that Google and Google Scholar are widely used by ECRs for locating scholarly information regardless of discipline, language, or geography. Their analysis by country points to currency and the combined breadth-and-depth search experience that Google provides as

  1. Marketing orientation in hospitals: findings from a multi-phased research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrenn, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    It is clear from numerous studies conducted over a wide variety of industries that marketing-oriented organizations perform better than those that do not adopt this business philosophy. Recent studies have confirmed this finding in healthcare organizations as well. What is now coming to light is the way in which a marketing orientation does contribute to better performance in hospitals, and the difficulties marketers face in getting recognition of that fact by non-marketers in their organization. This article reports on a multi-phased research study of the implementation of marketing-oriented behaviors in a hospital setting.

  2. Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. receives architectural and engineering design contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. announced that a subsidiary company won a contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to provide architectural and engineering design services for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) conventional facilities" (1/2 page)

  3. Science in the Eyes of Preschool Children: Findings from an Innovative Research Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubosarsky, Mia D.

    How do young children view science? Do these views reflect cultural stereotypes? When do these views develop? These fundamental questions in the field of science education have rarely been studied with the population of preschool children. One main reason is the lack of an appropriate research instrument that addresses preschool children's developmental competencies. Extensive body of research has pointed at the significance of early childhood experiences in developing positive attitudes and interests toward learning in general and the learning of science in particular. Theoretical and empirical research suggests that stereotypical views of science may be replaced by authentic views following inquiry science experience. However, no preschool science intervention program could be designed without a reliable instrument that provides baseline information about preschool children's current views of science. The current study presents preschool children's views of science as gathered from a pioneering research tool. This tool, in the form of a computer "game," does not require reading, writing, or expressive language skills and is operated by the children. The program engages children in several simple tasks involving picture recognition and yes/no answers in order to reveal their views about science. The study was conducted with 120 preschool children in two phases and found that by the age of 4 years, participants possess an emergent concept of science. Gender and school differences were detected. Findings from this interdisciplinary study will contribute to the fields of early childhood, science education, learning technologies, program evaluation, and early childhood curriculum development.

  4. Judges' views of child sexual abuse: evaluating beliefs against research findings in a Finnish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkman, Julia; Svanbäck, Jatta; Finnilä, Katarina; Santtila, Pekka

    2014-10-01

    Beliefs impact our decision-making and different professionals have been shown to have beliefs about child sexual abuse (CSA) that do not coincide with scientific findings. In the present study, judges' beliefs regarding CSA were explored. Finnish judges (N = 104) answered a questionnaire about CSA related issues as well as questions regarding their professional experience of CSA cases. The judges held both correct and incorrect beliefs; while their CSA prevalence estimates were rather well in line with research findings, half of the participants estimated that no professionals use suggestive methods when interviewing children and more than 40% thought suggestive methods can be useful when trying to get a child to tell about real events. Judges correctly assumed symptoms cannot be used to assess a CSA case, however, the majority thought play observations were appropriate means for evaluating such suspicions. Experience seemed to lead to more confidence in their own expertise but not in an actual increase in knowledge, namely, judges thought themselves more expert when more experienced although their expertise as measured by the questionnaire did not improve. Overall, the judges had both correct and erroneous beliefs but while experience did not improve the situation, gaining information about CSA did. More research about the beliefs of judges and how such beliefs impact legal decision-making is needed. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Risk factors for postoperative hypoxemia in patients undergoing Stanford A aortic dissection surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yinghua; Xue, Song; Zhu, Hongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to identify the risk factors for postoperative hypoxemia in patients with Stanford A aortic dissection surgery and their relation to clinical outcomes. Methods Clinical records of 186 patients with postoperative hypoxemia in Stanford A aortic dissection were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups by postoperative oxygen fraction (PaO2/FiO2):hypoxemia group (N=92) and non-hypoxemia group (N=94). Results We found that the inci...

  6. Topics from the 20th annual workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering, Stanford University; Stanford Daigaku chinetsu choryuso kogaku waku shoppu ni sanka shite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akasaka, C. [Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-03-15

    The 20th Stanford University geothermal reservoir engineering workshop was held in the Stanford University in the suburbs of San Francisco, State of California, United States, for 3 days from January 24th to 26th in 1995. This workshop has started in 1975, and is held once a year, and has a long history, which is an only workshop named the geothermal reservoir engineering in the world. In the petroleum engineering section of the Stanford University, there is an organization regarding to the geothermal reservoir engineering named the Stanford Geothermal Program, which centering around this workshop manages and operates. Its purpose is a development of an effective utilization technology of geothermal resources, inheritance of technology, and rearing men of ability. Through participating this workshop, in the geothermal reservoir engineering as an interdiscipline part between the earth science and engineering, that there is a plenty of room to be elucidated still left was recognized over again. There are many things to be learned from an abundant experiences and knowledges of the geothermally advanced country. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  7. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium, Stanford University, California, USA, 28 June-2 July 2010 Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium, Stanford University, California, USA, 28 June-2 July 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Sasha; Sun, Ke-Xun

    2011-05-01

    The international research community interested in the Laser Interferometric Space Antenna (LISA) program meets every two years to exchange scientific and technical information. From 28 June-2 July 2010, Stanford University hosted the 8th International LISA Symposium. The symposium was held on the campus of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Many of the foremost scientific and technological researchers in LISA and gravitational wave theory and detection presented their work and ideas. Over one hundred engineers and graduate students attended the meeting. The leadership from NASA and ESA research centers and programs joined the symposium. A total of 280 delegates participated in the 8th LISA Symposium, and enjoyed the scientific and social programs. The scientific program included 46 invited plenary lectures, 44 parallel talks, and 77 posters, totaling 167 presentations. The one-slide introduction presentation of the posters is a new format in this symposium and allowed graduate students the opportunity to talk in front of a large audience of scientists. The topics covered included LISA Science, LISA Interferometry, LISA PathFinder (LPF), LISA and LPF Data Analysis, Astrophysics, Numerical Relativity, Gravitational Wave Theory, GRS Technologies, Other Space Programs, and Ground Detectors. Large gravitational wave detection efforts, DECIGO, and LIGO were presented, as well as a number of other fundamental physics space experiments, with GP-B and STEP being examples. A public evening lecture was also presented at the symposium. Professor Bernard Schutz from the Albert Einstein Institute gave a general audience, multimedia presentation on `Gravitational waves: Listening to the music of spheres'. For more detailed information about the symposium and many presentation files, please browse through the website: http://www.stanford.edu/group/lisasymposium The Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium are jointly published by Classical and Quantum Gravity

  8. Reading and using body language in your medical practice: 25 research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Your patients and your coworkers will make judgments the moment they see you based upon your body language cues. As well, you can tell what they are thinking and feeling if you know how to read their body language behaviors. This article provides 25 research-based findings about workplace body language that medical practice personnel can use immediately to improve their communication and effectiveness. It suggests numerous telltale nonverbal signs of hidden deception, superiority, fear, discomfort, anxiety, subordination, weakness, strength, openness, and disgust. As well, this article explores proxemics, the area of nonverbal communication that explores how we use space to communicate. This article is loaded with practical tips to help every member of the medical practice staff read others better and harness nonverbal savvy to convey effective and appropriate nonverbal messages to patients and to one another.

  9. A new era in hypertension research: discussing the findings of ALLHAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furberg Curt D

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The key question in hypertension research today is, "Does it matter how elevated blood pressure is lowered?" The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT initiated in 1994 serves as a model for comparative trials. Its strengths include its independent sponsorship, scope and design. The alpha-blocker arm was stopped early; doxazosin was shown to be clearly inferior to low-dose chlorthalidone not only in preventing heart failure, but also stroke, in spite of similar blood pressure reduction. The findings have major public health implications as pointed out by Krakoff in this journal. Other commentaries by Gavras and Gavras and Hooper discuss possible mechanisms behind the excess of cardiovascular events in doxazosin-treated patients.

  10. Cross-pollination of research findings, although uncommon, may accelerate discovery of human disease genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duda Marlena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological leaps in genome sequencing have resulted in a surge in discovery of human disease genes. These discoveries have led to increased clarity on the molecular pathology of disease and have also demonstrated considerable overlap in the genetic roots of human diseases. In light of this large genetic overlap, we tested whether cross-disease research approaches lead to faster, more impactful discoveries. Methods We leveraged several gene-disease association databases to calculate a Mutual Citation Score (MCS for 10,853 pairs of genetically related diseases to measure the frequency of cross-citation between research fields. To assess the importance of cooperative research, we computed an Individual Disease Cooperation Score (ICS and the average publication rate for each disease. Results For all disease pairs with one gene in common, we found that the degree of genetic overlap was a poor predictor of cooperation (r2=0.3198 and that the vast majority of disease pairs (89.56% never cited previous discoveries of the same gene in a different disease, irrespective of the level of genetic similarity between the diseases. A fraction (0.25% of the pairs demonstrated cross-citation in greater than 5% of their published genetic discoveries and 0.037% cross-referenced discoveries more than 10% of the time. We found strong positive correlations between ICS and publication rate (r2=0.7931, and an even stronger correlation between the publication rate and the number of cross-referenced diseases (r2=0.8585. These results suggested that cross-disease research may have the potential to yield novel discoveries at a faster pace than singular disease research. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the frequency of cross-disease study is low despite the high level of genetic similarity among many human diseases, and that collaborative methods may accelerate and increase the impact of new genetic discoveries. Until we have a better

  11. Clique-finding for heterogeneity and multidimensionality in biomarker epidemiology research: the CHAMBER algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Mushlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Commonly-occurring disease etiology may involve complex combinations of genes and exposures resulting in etiologic heterogeneity. We present a computational algorithm that employs clique-finding for heterogeneity and multidimensionality in biomedical and epidemiological research (the "CHAMBER" algorithm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This algorithm uses graph-building to (1 identify genetic variants that influence disease risk and (2 predict individuals at risk for disease based on inherited genotype. We use a set-covering algorithm to identify optimal cliques and a Boolean function that identifies etiologically heterogeneous groups of individuals. We evaluated this approach using simulated case-control genotype-disease associations involving two- and four-gene patterns. The CHAMBER algorithm correctly identified these simulated etiologies. We also used two population-based case-control studies of breast and endometrial cancer in African American and Caucasian women considering data on genotypes involved in steroid hormone metabolism. We identified novel patterns in both cancer sites that involved genes that sulfate or glucuronidate estrogens or catecholestrogens. These associations were consistent with the hypothesized biological functions of these genes. We also identified cliques representing the joint effect of multiple candidate genes in all groups, suggesting the existence of biologically plausible combinations of hormone metabolism genes in both breast and endometrial cancer in both races. CONCLUSIONS: The CHAMBER algorithm may have utility in exploring the multifactorial etiology and etiologic heterogeneity in complex disease.

  12. Some recent research findings on the social dynamics of environmental risk perception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horlick-Jones, T. [Surrey Univ., Centre for Environnement Strategy, Guildford (United Kingdom); Marchi, B. de; Del Zotto, M.; Pellizzoni, L.; Ungaro, D. [Institute for International Sociology, Gorizia (Italy); Prades Lopez, A.; Diaz Hidalgo, M. [CIEMAT, Centro de Investigacion Energica Medioambiental y Technologia (Spain); Pidgeon, N. [School of Psychology, University of Wales at Bangor (United Kingdom); Sime, J. [Jonathan-Sime Associates, Godalming, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: key themes: social dynamics of public risk perception; trust, tolerability, and risk management; discourses of environmental risk; implications for risk communication and environmental valuation; application of mixed qualitative/quantitative methods in risk perception research. This paper presents some of the key findings of a two-year comparative European study (the PRISP Project) on public perception of risks associated with industrial sites in the UK, Italy and Spain. The project utilised a mixed-method approach (comprising community ethnography, semi-structured interviews, questionnaire survey and focus groups), within a Grounded Theory framework, to examine the social dynamics of risk comprehension, tolerability and politics in settings adjacent to a range of industrial facilities. These often complex industrial zones present a portfolio of 'acute' and 'chronic' risks including hazards associated with sites regulated by the European Union COMAH Directive. Our findings have important implications for the regulation of both major accident hazard and pollution risks, risk communication programmes, industrial risk management practices and for the methodological basis of health and safety and environmental valuation techniques. (authors)

  13. [Spiral CT and MRT of the operated Stanford-type-A aortic dissection: its course and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, T; Abu-Ramadan, D; Pauleit, D; Hofer, U; Likungu, J; Preusse, K; Layer, G; Schild, H

    1998-02-01

    To demonstrate normal postoperative spiral CT and MRI findings and typical complications in patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection. 24 patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection were followed up by spiral CT and MRI (0.5 Tesla). Presence of persistent dissection, progressive or new dissection, proximal and distal anastomosis, periprosthetic space, supraaortic vessels, thrombosis and dilatation of the true and false lumen were evaluated. The following postoperative complications were seen: three pseudoaneurysms which developed at the proximal anastomoses of the Dacron prosthesis in two cases and at the insertion site of the reimplanted left coronary artery after implantation of a composite graft (Bentall procedure) in one case; one re-dissection; one perforation of the false lumen; periprosthetic flow in one patient after surgical repair of type A dissection by the graft inclusion technique; progressive dilatation of the false lumen in 4 cases; dilatation of the aortic root in a Marfan patient after replacement of the ascending aorta. Precise knowledge of the surgical technique performed is crucial to accurate postoperative imaging evaluation. MRI is the method of choice in the postoperative follow-up of clinically stable patients with aortic dissections.

  14. Outcomes from a postgraduate biomedical technology innovation training program: the first 12 years of Stanford Biodesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Todd J; Kurihara, Christine Q; Camarillo, David B; Pietzsch, Jan B; Gorodsky, Julian; Zenios, Stefanos A; Doshi, Rajiv; Shen, Christopher; Kumar, Uday N; Mairal, Anurag; Watkins, Jay; Popp, Richard L; Wang, Paul J; Makower, Josh; Krummel, Thomas M; Yock, Paul G

    2013-09-01

    The Stanford Biodesign Program began in 2001 with a mission of helping to train leaders in biomedical technology innovation. A key feature of the program is a full-time postgraduate fellowship where multidisciplinary teams undergo a process of sourcing clinical needs, inventing solutions and planning for implementation of a business strategy. The program places a priority on needs identification, a formal process of selecting, researching and characterizing needs before beginning the process of inventing. Fellows and students from the program have gone on to careers that emphasize technology innovation across industry and academia. Biodesign trainees have started 26 companies within the program that have raised over $200 million and led to the creation of over 500 new jobs. More importantly, although most of these technologies are still at a very early stage, several projects have received regulatory approval and so far more than 150,000 patients have been treated by technologies invented by our trainees. This paper reviews the initial outcomes of the program and discusses lessons learned and future directions in terms of training priorities.

  15. The emergence and effectiveness of global health networks: findings and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Jeremy; Schmitz, Hans Peter; Berlan, David; Smith, Stephanie L; Quissell, Kathryn; Gneiting, Uwe; Pelletier, David

    2016-04-01

    Global health issues vary in the amount of attention and resources they receive. One reason is that the networks of individuals and organizations that address these issues differ in their effectiveness. This article presents key findings from a research project on the emergence and effectiveness of global health networks addressing tobacco use, alcohol harm, maternal mortality, neonatal mortality, tuberculosis and pneumonia. Although networks are only one of many factors influencing priority, they do matter, particularly for shaping the way the problem and solutions are understood, and convincing governments, international organizations and other global actors to address the issue. Their national-level effects vary by issue and are more difficult to ascertain. Networks are most likely to produce effects when (1) their members construct a compelling framing of the issue, one that includes a shared understanding of the problem, a consensus on solutions and convincing reasons to act and (2) they build a political coalition that includes individuals and organizations beyond their traditional base in the health sector, a task that demands engagement in the politics of the issue, not just its technical aspects. Maintaining a focused frame and sustaining a broad coalition are often in tension: effective networks find ways to balance the two challenges. The emergence and effectiveness of a network are shaped both by its members' decisions and by contextual factors, including historical influences (e.g. prior failed attempts to address the problem), features of the policy environment (e.g. global development goals) and characteristics of the issue the network addresses (e.g. its mortality burden). Their proliferation raises the issue of their legitimacy. Reasons to consider them legitimate include their members' expertise and the attention they bring to neglected issues. Reasons to question their legitimacy include their largely elite composition and the fragmentation they

  16. Genetically informative research on adolescent substance use: methods, findings, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynskey, Michael T; Agrawal, Arpana; Heath, Andrew C

    2010-12-01

    To provide an overview of the genetic epidemiology of substance use and misuse in adolescents. A selective review of genetically informative research strategies, their limitations, and key findings examining issues related to the heritability of substance use and substance use disorders in children and adolescents is presented. Adoption, twin, and extended-family designs have established there is a strong heritable component to liability to nicotine, alcohol, and illicit drug dependence in adults. However, shared environmental influences are relatively stronger in youth samples and at earlier stages of substance involvement (e.g., use). There is considerable overlap in the genetic influences associated with the abuse/dependence across drug classes, and shared genetic influences contribute to the commonly observed associations between substance-use disorders and externalizing and, to a lesser extent, internalizing psychopathology. Rapid technologic advances have made the identification of specific gene variants that influence risks for substance-use disorders feasible, and linkage and association (including genomewide association studies) have identified promising candidate genes implicated in the development of substance-use disorders. Studies using genetically informative research designs, including those that examine aggregate genetic factors and those examining specific gene variants, individually and in interaction with environmental influences, offer promising avenues not only for delineating genetic effects on substance-use disorders but also for understanding the unfolding of risk across development and the interaction between environmental and genetic factors in the etiology of these disorders. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Source memory errors in schizophrenia, hallucinations and negative symptoms: a synthesis of research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brébion, G; Ohlsen, R I; Bressan, R A; David, A S

    2012-12-01

    Previous research has shown associations between source memory errors and hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia. We bring together here findings from a broad memory investigation to specify better the type of source memory failure that is associated with auditory and visual hallucinations. Forty-one patients with schizophrenia and 43 healthy participants underwent a memory task involving recall and recognition of lists of words, recognition of pictures, memory for temporal and spatial context of presentation of the stimuli, and remembering whether target items were presented as words or pictures. False recognition of words and pictures was associated with hallucination scores. The extra-list intrusions in free recall were associated with verbal hallucinations whereas the intra-list intrusions were associated with a global hallucination score. Errors in discriminating the temporal context of word presentation and the spatial context of picture presentation were associated with auditory hallucinations. The tendency to remember verbal labels of items as pictures of these items was associated with visual hallucinations. Several memory errors were also inversely associated with affective flattening and anhedonia. Verbal and visual hallucinations are associated with confusion between internal verbal thoughts or internal visual images and perception. In addition, auditory hallucinations are associated with failure to process or remember the context of presentation of the events. Certain negative symptoms have an opposite effect on memory errors.

  18. Fostering implementation of health services research findings into practice: a consolidated framework for advancing implementation science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Jeffery A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many interventions found to be effective in health services research studies fail to translate into meaningful patient care outcomes across multiple contexts. Health services researchers recognize the need to evaluate not only summative outcomes but also formative outcomes to assess the extent to which implementation is effective in a specific setting, prolongs sustainability, and promotes dissemination into other settings. Many implementation theories have been published to help promote effective implementation. However, they overlap considerably in the constructs included in individual theories, and a comparison of theories reveals that each is missing important constructs included in other theories. In addition, terminology and definitions are not consistent across theories. We describe the Consolidated Framework For Implementation Research (CFIR that offers an overarching typology to promote implementation theory development and verification about what works where and why across multiple contexts. Methods We used a snowball sampling approach to identify published theories that were evaluated to identify constructs based on strength of conceptual or empirical support for influence on implementation, consistency in definitions, alignment with our own findings, and potential for measurement. We combined constructs across published theories that had different labels but were redundant or overlapping in definition, and we parsed apart constructs that conflated underlying concepts. Results The CFIR is composed of five major domains: intervention characteristics, outer setting, inner setting, characteristics of the individuals involved, and the process of implementation. Eight constructs were identified related to the intervention (e.g., evidence strength and quality, four constructs were identified related to outer setting (e.g., patient needs and resources, 12 constructs were identified related to inner setting (e.g., culture

  19. Fostering implementation of health services research findings into practice: a consolidated framework for advancing implementation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damschroder, Laura J; Aron, David C; Keith, Rosalind E; Kirsh, Susan R; Alexander, Jeffery A; Lowery, Julie C

    2009-08-07

    Many interventions found to be effective in health services research studies fail to translate into meaningful patient care outcomes across multiple contexts. Health services researchers recognize the need to evaluate not only summative outcomes but also formative outcomes to assess the extent to which implementation is effective in a specific setting, prolongs sustainability, and promotes dissemination into other settings. Many implementation theories have been published to help promote effective implementation. However, they overlap considerably in the constructs included in individual theories, and a comparison of theories reveals that each is missing important constructs included in other theories. In addition, terminology and definitions are not consistent across theories. We describe the Consolidated Framework For Implementation Research (CFIR) that offers an overarching typology to promote implementation theory development and verification about what works where and why across multiple contexts. We used a snowball sampling approach to identify published theories that were evaluated to identify constructs based on strength of conceptual or empirical support for influence on implementation, consistency in definitions, alignment with our own findings, and potential for measurement. We combined constructs across published theories that had different labels but were redundant or overlapping in definition, and we parsed apart constructs that conflated underlying concepts. The CFIR is composed of five major domains: intervention characteristics, outer setting, inner setting, characteristics of the individuals involved, and the process of implementation. Eight constructs were identified related to the intervention (e.g., evidence strength and quality), four constructs were identified related to outer setting (e.g., patient needs and resources), 12 constructs were identified related to inner setting (e.g., culture, leadership engagement), five constructs were

  20. Enhancing the training of internal medicine residents at Stanford by establishing a model group practice and raising its clinical educators' status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, M B; Tower, D

    1992-10-01

    The education of residents is shifting to the ambulatory care setting. In addition, there is a growing trend toward managed care and increasing competition for patients to be served by "real-world" practices. The authors describe the formation and operation of a program that was established in 1981 at the Stanford University School of Medicine to respond to these changes: the Stanford Medical Group (SMG), a model group practice in internal medicine that operates within the academic medical center. Because raising the status of the clinician-educator faculty was a critical issue for the SMG, the authors also describe the Medical Center Professoriate, a separate faculty track created in 1989 to recognize and reward Stanford's clinician-educators. The authors conclude that the SMG has succeeded in its training and patient care goals and has weathered the great changes in the health care environment that have taken place since 1981. They also report that the separate faculty track is serving its purpose well. They hope that educators and program directors at other academic medical centers may find the descriptions of the SMG and the professoriate useful in solving similar problems.

  1. Summaries of Conference Papers, Theme 1, Research Findings. International Conference on Evaluation and Research in Educational Television and Radio (Milton Keynes, England, April 9-13, 1976).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Open Univ., Walton, Bletchley, Bucks (England).

    Educational television and radio research and evaluation findings are the subject of 25 papers summarized in this document. Seven papers deal with evaluation of research projects in educational television and radio. Four papers on adult education and two on educational technology in teacher training are also summarized. Research in teaching with…

  2. Children with chronic lung diseases have cognitive dysfunction as assessed by event-related potential (auditory P300) and Stanford-Binet IQ (SB-IV) test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Terez Boshra; Abd Elmonaem, Mahmoud Tarek; Khalil, Lobna Hamed; Goda, Mona Hamdy; Sanyelbhaa, Hossam; Ramzy, Mourad Alfy

    2016-10-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) in children represents a heterogeneous group of many clinico-pathological entities with risk of adverse impact of chronic or intermittent hypoxia. So far, few researchers have investigated the cognitive function in these children, and the role of auditory P300 in the assessment of their cognitive function has not been investigated yet. This study was designed to assess the cognitive functions among schoolchildren with different chronic pulmonary diseases using both auditory P300 and Stanford-Binet test. This cross-sectional study included 40 school-aged children who were suffering from chronic chest troubles other than asthma and 30 healthy children of similar age, gender and socioeconomic state as a control group. All subjects were evaluated through clinical examination, radiological evaluation and spirometry. Audiological evaluation included (basic otological examination, pure-tone, speech audiometry and immittancemetry). Cognitive function was assessed by auditory P300 and psychological evaluation using Stanford-Binet test (4th edition). Children with chronic lung diseases had significantly lower anthropometric measures compared to healthy controls. They had statistically significant lower IQ scores and delayed P300 latencies denoting lower cognitive abilities. Cognitive dysfunction correlated to severity of disease. P300 latencies were prolonged among hypoxic patients. Cognitive deficits in children with different chronic lung diseases were best detected using both Stanford-Binet test and auditory P300. P300 is an easy objective tool. P300 is affected early with hypoxia and could alarm subtle cognitive dysfunction.

  3. Incidental findings are frequent in young healthy individuals undergoing magnetic resonance imaging in brain research imaging studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Siebner, Hartwig R; Deuschl, Günther

    2010-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about how to handle incidental findings (IF) detected in healthy individuals who participate in research-driven magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. There are currently no established guidelines regarding their management.......There is an ongoing debate about how to handle incidental findings (IF) detected in healthy individuals who participate in research-driven magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. There are currently no established guidelines regarding their management....

  4. Online exclusive: functional integration of nursing research into a pediatric oncology cooperative group: finding common ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Pamela S; Baggott, Christina; DeSwarte-Wallace, Joetta; Dodd, Marilyn; Haase, Joan; Hockenberry, Marilyn; Hooke, Casey; McGuire Cullen, Patsy; Moore, Ida; Roll, Lona; Ruccione, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    To provide a brief description of the historic role of nursing and nursing research in the culture of previous pediatric oncology cooperative groups and compare the research language used in cooperative groups with the language used in nursing research. Published empirical, clinical, and methodologic reports. The culture and language of nursing research differ from those of medical research and the pediatric oncology cooperative group, the Children's Oncology Group (COG). Different approaches exist to integrate nursing research priorities into the priorities of COG, including freestanding protocols, companion protocols, and research objectives included in therapeutic protocols. Full integration of nursing research into COG is feasible but dependent on recognition of cultural and language differences among researchers. Integration will be demonstrated by the number of concepts and protocols contributed to or developed by active nurses in COG. Significant advances exist for nurses conducting research in COG. These research efforts are facilitated by a familiarity with the science language used by other disciplines in COG and an understanding of COG's research processes. Increased interdisciplinary scientific collaborations involving nurses in COG particularly benefit pediatric patients with cancer.

  5. 76 FR 33763 - Findings of Misconduct in Science/Research Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-09

    ... Hospital (St. Jude) and additional analysis conducted by ORI during its oversight review, ORI found that... misconduct in science and research misconduct in research funded by National Institute of General Medical... of Investigative Oversight, Office of Research Integrity, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 750, Rockville...

  6. Conflicting Findings in Mixed Methods Research: An Illustration from an Israeli Study on Immigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonim-Nevo, Vered; Nevo, Isaac

    2009-01-01

    Combining diverse methods in a single study raises a problem: What should be done when the findings of one method of investigation conflict with those of another? The authors illustrate this problem using an example in which three study phases--quantitative, qualitative, and intervention--are applied. The findings from the quantitative phase did…

  7. Challenge: Reframing, communicating, and finding relevance. Solution: Teachers on the research team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholow, S.; Warburton, J.

    2013-12-01

    PolarTREC (Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating) is a program in which K-12 teachers spend 2-6 weeks participating in hands-on field research experiences in the polar regions. The goal of PolarTREC is to invigorate polar science education and understanding by bringing K-12 educators and polar researchers together. Program data has illuminated a crucial dynamic that increases the potential for a successful climate change science campaign. We contend that the inclusion of a teacher into the field research campaign can tackle challenges such as reframing climate change science to better address the need for a particular campaign, as well as garnering the science project the necessary support through effective, authentic, and tangible communication efforts to policymakers, funders, students, and the public. The program evaluation queried researchers on a.) the teachers' primary roles in the field b.) the impact teachers on the team's field research, and c.) the teachers' role conducting outreach. Additionally, researchers identified the importance of the facilitator, the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS), as an integral component to the challenge of providing a meaningful broader impact statement to the science proposal. Researchers reported the value of explaining their science, in-situ, allowed them to reframe and rework the objectives of the science project to attain meaningful outcomes. More than half of the researchers specifically noted that one of the strengths of the PolarTREC project is its benefit to the scientific process. The researchers also viewed PolarTREC as an essential outreach activity for their research project. Other researchers said that the outreach provided by their teacher also improved the research project's public image and articulated complex ideas to the public at large. This presentation will speak to the practices within the PolarTREC program and how researchers can meet outreach expectations, impact

  8. Behavioral and Social Sciences at the National Institutes of Health: adoption of research findings in health research and practice as a scientific priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T

    2017-06-01

    The National Institutes of Health's Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) recently released its Strategic Plan for 2017 to 2021. This plan highlights three scientific priorities: (1) improve the synergy of basic and applied behavioral and social sciences research, (2) enhance and promote the research infrastructure, methods, and measures needed to support a more cumulative and integrated approach to behavioral and social sciences research, and (3) facilitate the adoption of behavioral and social sciences research findings in health research and in practice. This commentary focuses on the challenges and opportunities to facilitate the adoption of research findings in health research and in practice. In addition to the ongoing NIH support for dissemination and implementation (D&I) research, we must address transformative challenges and opportunities such as better disseminating and implementing D&I research, merging research and practice, adopting more rigorous and diverse methods and measures for both D&I and clinical trials research, evaluating technological-based delivery of interventions, and transitioning from minimally adaptable intervention packages to planned adaptations rooted in behavior change principles. Beyond translation into practice and policy, the OBSSR Strategic Plan also highlights the need for translation of behavioral and social science findings into the broader biomedical research enterprise.

  9. InSITEs into Practitioner Research: Findings from a Research-Based ESOL Teacher Professional Development Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matt; Kiely, Richard; Askham, James

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an innovative continuing professional development (CPD) programme for experienced English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) teachers, and a research study into its impact. The programme incorporates the principles of Practitioner Research (PR) and focuses in particular on the skills of data analysis and situated…

  10. Why do people cooperate with medical research? Findings from three studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Woods, Mary; Tarrant, Carolyn

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we distinguish decisions about cooperation with medical research from decisions about research participation. We offer an empirical and theoretical exploration of why people in three different UK-based medical research projects chose to cooperate. Data analysis of the accounts of 128 participants across the three studies was based on the constant comparative method. Participants' cooperation was engaged by a perception that they would be contributing to the 'public good', but they also wanted to justify their decision as sensible and safe. Critical to their cooperation was their belief that researchers would fulfil their side of the cooperative bargain, by not exposing participants to risks of harm or exploitation. Although participants were generally unaware of the details of the regulatory regime for research, they demonstrated a generalised reliance on regulation as a feature of everyday life that would provide a safe context for cooperation. In their assessment of particular projects, participants made judgements about whether to cooperate based on more specific cues, which acted as signs to assure them that researchers shared their cooperative intentions. These cues included organisational and professional credentials, the role identities and perceived trustworthiness of those involved in recruiting to research, and visible signs of reasonable practice mandated by regulatory systems. Thus participants drew on their understandings of an institutional field that was much broader than that of research alone. We propose that the social organisation of research is fundamental to the judgements people make about cooperation with research. Cooperation may be a more useful way of thinking about how people come to engage in collaboratively oriented actions such as research participation, rather than currently dominant individualistic models. Attention to the institutional context of research is critical to understanding what makes cooperation possible

  11. Reminiscing about thesis work with E T Jaynes at Stanford in the 1950s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Frederick W.

    2013-11-01

    Abstract A short personal and historical account of the field of radiation interacting with (two-level) atoms is given. Subsequent to 1963, developments and extensions have been extensive and fruitful. One of the most fortunate changes in my life came in late 1957. I was looking for a thesis advisor, after two years of graduate course-work at Stanford. I chanced to see a notice of an upcoming lecture by a professor named Edwin T Jaynes. I could not understand from the announcement what he intended to talk about, but I was searching; I went to find out. That decision was a very lucky one. Ed was talking about a subject that inspired him then, and had been for many years, namely his concept of 'Max-Ent'. 'Maximum-Entropy' is a subject now close to my heart also. Ed's very-clear, well-thought-out papers, spread over many subsequent years, are transforming the field of probability (albeit too gradually) to the 'subjective' outlook of Bayes. (A recent book 'Maximum Entropy and Ecology' [1] will probably convert many nay-sayers to 'Max-Ent'.) I went into Ed's office (late 1957) and asked if I could work with him on a thesis. Did he have a problem for me? Yes, he did. Somewhat to my surprise, he asked me to look into the 'maser problem', involving a comparison of the semi-classical theory of radiation to a proper quantum treatment. To make a two-year story short, Ed's guidance was expert. (I imagine that if another of Ed's students (e.g. Joe Eberly) had come into his office fifteen minutes before me, the 'Jaynes-Cummings' (J-C) model would now perhaps be called otherwise, e.g., the 'J-E' model). In the two-year time frame (~1958-60), Ed had a number of other PhD dissertation students whom I knew; these included Joe Eberly, Doug Scalapino, Baldwin Robertson, Larry Davis and Mike Duggan. My thesis work under Ed reminds me of a story about Michelangelo and his famous 'Pieta'. Michelangelo was an old man about then, so he hired a young craftsman to do much of the physical

  12. The Stanford Medical Youth Science Program: educational and science-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Biomedical preparatory programs (pipeline programs) have been developed at colleges and universities to better prepare youth for entering science- and health-related careers, but outcomes of such programs have seldom been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a matched cohort study to evaluate the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program's Summer Residential Program (SRP), a 25-year-old university-based biomedical pipeline program that reaches out to low-income and underrepresented ethnic minority high school students. Five annual surveys were used to assess educational outcomes and science-related experience among 96 SRP participants and a comparison group of 192 youth who applied but were not selected to participate in the SRP, using ~2:1 matching on sociodemographic and academic background to control for potential confounders. SRP participants were more likely than the comparison group to enter college (100.0 vs. 84.4 %, p = 0.002), and both of these matriculation rates were more than double the statewide average (40.8 %). In most areas of science-related experience, SRP participants reported significantly more experience (>twofold odds) than the comparison group at 1 year of follow-up, but these differences did not persist after 2-4 years. The comparison group reported substantially more participation in science or college preparatory programs, more academic role models, and less personal adversity than SRP participants, which likely influenced these findings toward the null hypothesis. SRP applicants, irrespective of whether selected for participation, had significantly better educational outcomes than population averages. Short-term science-related experience was better among SRP participants, although longer-term outcomes were similar, most likely due to college and science-related opportunities among the comparison group. We discuss implications for future evaluations of other biomedical pipeline programs.

  13. The Stanford Data Miner: a novel approach for integrating and exploring heterogeneous immunological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebert Janet C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems-level approaches are increasingly common in both murine and human translational studies. These approaches employ multiple high information content assays. As a result, there is a need for tools to integrate heterogeneous types of laboratory and clinical/demographic data, and to allow the exploration of that data by aggregating and/or segregating results based on particular variables (e.g., mean cytokine levels by age and gender. Methods Here we describe the application of standard data warehousing tools to create a novel environment for user-driven upload, integration, and exploration of heterogeneous data. The system presented here currently supports flow cytometry and immunoassays performed in the Stanford Human Immune Monitoring Center, but could be applied more generally. Results Users upload assay results contained in platform-specific spreadsheets of a defined format, and clinical and demographic data in spreadsheets of flexible format. Users then map sample IDs to connect the assay results with the metadata. An OLAP (on-line analytical processing data exploration interface allows filtering and display of various dimensions (e.g., Luminex analytes in rows, treatment group in columns, filtered on a particular study. Statistics such as mean, median, and N can be displayed. The views can be expanded or contracted to aggregate or segregate data at various levels. Individual-level data is accessible with a single click. The result is a user-driven system that permits data integration and exploration in a variety of settings. We show how the system can be used to find gender-specific differences in serum cytokine levels, and compare them across experiments and assay types. Conclusions We have used the tools and techniques of data warehousing, including open-source business intelligence software, to support investigator-driven data integration and mining of diverse immunological data.

  14. The Stanford Data Miner: a novel approach for integrating and exploring heterogeneous immunological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Janet C; Munsil, Wes; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Davis, Mark M; Maecker, Holden T

    2012-03-28

    Systems-level approaches are increasingly common in both murine and human translational studies. These approaches employ multiple high information content assays. As a result, there is a need for tools to integrate heterogeneous types of laboratory and clinical/demographic data, and to allow the exploration of that data by aggregating and/or segregating results based on particular variables (e.g., mean cytokine levels by age and gender). Here we describe the application of standard data warehousing tools to create a novel environment for user-driven upload, integration, and exploration of heterogeneous data. The system presented here currently supports flow cytometry and immunoassays performed in the Stanford Human Immune Monitoring Center, but could be applied more generally. Users upload assay results contained in platform-specific spreadsheets of a defined format, and clinical and demographic data in spreadsheets of flexible format. Users then map sample IDs to connect the assay results with the metadata. An OLAP (on-line analytical processing) data exploration interface allows filtering and display of various dimensions (e.g., Luminex analytes in rows, treatment group in columns, filtered on a particular study). Statistics such as mean, median, and N can be displayed. The views can be expanded or contracted to aggregate or segregate data at various levels. Individual-level data is accessible with a single click. The result is a user-driven system that permits data integration and exploration in a variety of settings. We show how the system can be used to find gender-specific differences in serum cytokine levels, and compare them across experiments and assay types. We have used the tools and techniques of data warehousing, including open-source business intelligence software, to support investigator-driven data integration and mining of diverse immunological data.

  15. Stanford-Binet and WAIS IQ Differences and Their Implications for Adults with Intellectual Disability (aka Mental Retardation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Wayne; Miezejeski, Charles; Ryan, Robert; Zigman, Warren; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon; Urv, Tiina

    2010-01-01

    Stanford-Binet and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) IQs were compared for a group of 74 adults with intellectual disability (ID). In every case, WAIS Full Scale IQ was higher than the Stanford-Binet Composite IQ, with a mean difference of 16.7 points. These differences did not appear to be due to the lower minimum possible score for the…

  16. Towards Understanding EFL Teachers' Conceptions of Research: Findings from Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banegas, Darío Luis

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the conceptions of research held by English as a foreign language teachers in Argentina. Quantitative data from 622 participants from an online questionnaire were followed by qualitative data from online interviews with 40 of those participants. Results show that the teachers conceptualised research through conventional…

  17. Moving beyond Citation Analysis: How Surveys and Interviews Enhance, Enrich, and Expand Your Research Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    deVries, Susann; Kelly, Robert; Storm, Paula M.

    2010-01-01

    A traditional mixed methods research model of citation analysis, a survey, and interviews was selected to determine if the Bruce T. Halle Library at Eastern Michigan University owned the content that faculty cited in their research, if the collection was being utilized, and what library services the faculty used. The combination of objective data…

  18. Difficulties and findings of an empirical legal research: case studies built on judicial documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Dorneles Schinke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the journey of an empirical researcher during her doctoral studies. Narrated in first person, it describes the practical difficulties and theoretical discoveries built throughout the development of the research that culminated in the methodological choice of using the strategy of case study. Similarly, it inserts theoretical considerations about the methodological choices that presented themselves during the process, especially Robert Yin and Carlo Ginzburg. It explains how these works enabled the combination of several research strategies, along with case study. It describes in detail and reports the exploratory phase, the contact with other areas of research and with professionals in other fields. The text presents the results of research reported because it is not yet completed. It aims to contribute to the solidification of the debate about production of legal knowledge.

  19. Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Social Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.; Whitehead, George I., III

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with the nature of the coverage in introductory social psychology textbooks of the Stanford prison experiment (SPE), given the many criticisms, especially recently, of the SPE. These criticisms concern both the study's methodology and the situationist explanation of the outcome. Ten textbooks were analyzed for coverage of…

  20. The Construct Validity of the Stanford-Binet 5 Measures of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomplun, Mark; Custer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the validity of the measures of verbal and nonverbal working memory on the Stanford-Binet Fifth Edition (SB5). The validity evidence included Rasch-based, criterion-referenced item mapping, correlations with other clinical measures of memory, and prediction of reading and mathematics scores. The item mapping clearly…

  1. An Interview with Elizabeth Hagen: Giftedness, Intelligence and the New Stanford-Binet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Linda Kreger

    1986-01-01

    The interview with Elizabeth Hagen, the co-creator of the Cognitive Abilities Test and a revisor of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test, deals with such issues in gifted education as general intelligence vs. specific abilities, validity of test scores at the preschool level, and misconceptions about retesting gifted students. (Author/CL)

  2. The Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Textbooks: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    The present content analysis examines the coverage of theoretical and methodological problems with the Stanford prison experiment (SPE) in a sample of introductory psychology textbooks. Categories included the interpretation and replication of the study, variance in guard behavior, participant selection bias, the presence of demand characteristics…

  3. Stanford-A acute aortic dissection, inflammation, and metalloproteinases: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifani, Noemi; Proietta, Maria; Tritapepe, Luigi; Di Gioia, Cira; Ferri, Livia; Taurino, Maurizio; Del Porto, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is a life-threatening disease with an incidence of about 2.6-3.6 cases per 100,000/year. Depending on the site of rupture, AAD is classified as Stanford-A when the ascending aortic thoracic tract and/or the arch are involved, and Stanford-B when the descending thoracic aorta and/or aortic abdominal tract are targeted. It was recently shown that inflammatory pathways underlie aortic rupture in both type A and type B Stanford AAD. An immune infiltrate has been found within the middle and outer tunics of dissected aortic specimens. It has also been observed that the recall and activation of macrophages inside the middle tunic are key events in the early phases of AAD. Macrophages are able to release metalloproteinases (MMPs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines which, in turn, give rise to matrix degradation and neoangiogenesis. An imbalance between the production of MMPs and MMP tissue inhibitors is pivotal in the extracellular matrix degradation underlying aortic wall remodelling in dissections occurring both in inherited conditions and in atherosclerosis. Among MMPs, MMP-12 is considered a specific marker of aortic wall disease, whatever the genetic predisposition may be. The aim of this review is, therefore, to take a close look at the immune-inflammatory mechanisms underlying Stanford-A AAD.

  4. Bringing Faith to Campus: Religious and Spiritual Space, Time, and Practice at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin-Neumann, Patricia; Sanders, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    This essay examines how Stanford University, secular in its origins, yet with a church at its center, addresses the religious and spiritual concerns of current students, whether from traditional or innovative religious backgrounds. Identified religious and spiritual needs prompt questions about the balance between the spiritual health and…

  5. The Stanford Medical Youth Science Program: Educational and Science-Related Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical preparatory programs (pipeline programs) have been developed at colleges and universities to better prepare youth for entering science- and health-related careers, but outcomes of such programs have seldom been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a matched cohort study to evaluate the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program's Summer…

  6. Adapting Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program to Hawaii's Multicultural Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Michiyo; Braun, Kathryn L.; Compton, Merlita; Tanoue, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been proven to increase patients' ability to manage distress. We describe how we replicated CDSMP in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) communities. Design and Methods: We used the "track changes" tool to deconstruct CDSMP into its various components…

  7. Considerations and Future Research Directions for E-Cigarette Warnings—Findings from Expert Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackowski, Olivia A.; Hammond, David; O’Connor, Richard J.; Strasser, Andrew A.; Delnevo, Cristine D.

    2017-01-01

    Tobacco warning labels are important sources of risk information but research historically has been cigarette-centric. This qualitative study aimed to inform future direction and research on warnings for e-cigarettes. Between June and August 2016, we conducted interviews with 10 researchers with expertise in tobacco warning label research. Interviewees were registrants of a 2016 National Cancer Institute grantee meeting on tobacco warnings. Several participants agreed that the Food and Drug Administration’s new nicotine addiction warning for e-cigarettes could be informative but that it might not resonate with young people. Many agreed that more than one warning would be important as e-cigarette science evolves and that research on additional warning themes (e.g., nicotine exposure, harmful constituents) and execution styles (including use of pictorials) was important. Participants were somewhat mixed about the use of reduced-risk messages within e-cigarette warnings, but agreed that research on how to communicate about cigarette/e-cigarette relative risks was needed. Overall, more research is needed on tobacco warnings for non-cigarette products, including on the message content, placement, execution and potential impact on audiences’ product knowledge, risk perceptions and use intentions. This is particularly needed for products such as e-cigarettes which may have harm-reduction potential relative to cigarettes and require unique considerations. PMID:28708124

  8. Considerations and Future Research Directions for E-Cigarette Warnings-Findings from Expert Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackowski, Olivia A; Hammond, David; O'Connor, Richard J; Strasser, Andrew A; Delnevo, Cristine D

    2017-07-14

    Tobacco warning labels are important sources of risk information but research historically has been cigarette-centric. This qualitative study aimed to inform future direction and research on warnings for e-cigarettes. Between June and August 2016, we conducted interviews with 10 researchers with expertise in tobacco warning label research. Interviewees were registrants of a 2016 National Cancer Institute grantee meeting on tobacco warnings. Several participants agreed that the Food and Drug Administration's new nicotine addiction warning for e-cigarettes could be informative but that it might not resonate with young people. Many agreed that more than one warning would be important as e-cigarette science evolves and that research on additional warning themes (e.g., nicotine exposure, harmful constituents) and execution styles (including use of pictorials) was important. Participants were somewhat mixed about the use of reduced-risk messages within e-cigarette warnings, but agreed that research on how to communicate about cigarette/e-cigarette relative risks was needed. Overall, more research is needed on tobacco warnings for non-cigarette products, including on the message content, placement, execution and potential impact on audiences' product knowledge, risk perceptions and use intentions. This is particularly needed for products such as e-cigarettes which may have harm-reduction potential relative to cigarettes and require unique considerations.

  9. Cyberbullying Victimization and Behaviors Among Girls: Applying Research Findings in the Field

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia A. Snell; Elizabeth K. Englander

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Prior research on cyberbullying has been conducted; however specific research on gender differences has yet to be examined. The current study focuses on gender trends, specifically females, in cyberbullying victimization and behaviors. Approach: A survey was given to undergraduate students at Bridgewater State College in an effort to see what gender trends exist in cyberbullying behaviors. A pilot program focused on girls and cyberbullying is also examined in this article. ...

  10. Research-informed evidence and support for road safety legislation: findings from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine Clegg; Debinski, Beata; Pollack, Keshia; Vernick, Jon; Bowman, Stephen; Samuels, Alicia; Gielen, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Public opinion is influential in the policymaking process, making it important to understand the factors that influence popular support or opposition to public health policies. Researchers and policymakers tend to agree that scientific evidence can inform decision-making, but this influence has not been explored sufficiently, especially in the area of injury prevention. This paper considers the potential for the communication of evidence-based research and public health data to influence opinion about legislation that could reduce road-related injury. We conducted a nationally-representative online survey to assess public attitudes toward four road-safety laws; ignition interlock, school zone red-light cameras, restrictions on infotainment systems, and children's bicycle helmets. For each law, we assessed initial support and then provided a research-informed statistic on either the injury risk posed or the law's efficacy reducing risk and re-examined the law's support or opposition. The survey was completed by 2397 U.S. adults. Each law was initially supported by a majority of respondents, with greatest support for ignition interlock (74.4%) and children's bicycle helmets (74.8%). Exposure to research-informed statements increased legislative support for 20-30% of respondents. Paired analyses demonstrate significant increases toward supportive opinions when comparing responses to the initial and research-informed statements. The study demonstrates considerable public support for evidence-based road-related laws. Overall support was augmented by exposure to research data. Injury prevention practitioners can capitalize on this support in efforts to build support for legislation that would prevent injury. Researchers should be encouraged to expand their efforts to share research results with both the public and policymakers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Food, diversity, vulnerability and social change : research findings from insular Southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niehof, A.

    2010-01-01

    Food is a universal basic need. The diverse ways in which people and households try to meet this need, the constraints they are up against in doing so, and the strategies they develop to reduce their vulnerability to food insecurity form the core of this book. A large range of findings on these

  12. The North American long-term soil productivity experiment: findings from the first decade of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert F. Powers; D. Andrew Scott; Felipe g. Sanchez; Richard A. Voldseth; Deborah Page-Dumroese; John D. Elioff; Douglas M. Stone

    2005-01-01

    First decade findings on the impacts of organic matter removal and soil compaction are reported for the 26 oldest installations in the nation-wide network of long-term soil productivity sites. Complete removal of surface organic matter led to declines in soil C concentration to 20 cm depth and to reduced nutrient availability. The effect is attributed mainly to the...

  13. World Bank: harnessing civil society expertise in undertaking and disseminating research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The UK Consortium on AIDS and International Development was an essential partner to the evaluation leaders in harnessing the contribution and expertise of civil society. This article describes what the partnership entailed, the additional value it brought and how civil society might use the evaluation findings both as a tool for advocacy and a means for improving its own engagement with the individuals directly affected by HIV and with those who care for them.

  14. Affective States and Performance Outcomes – The Findings of Preliminary Research Involving Pentathletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samełko Aleksandra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this article is to discuss the relationship between affective states experienced by athletes and the outcome of their performance. The article presents the findings of a pilot study which made it possible to determine the relationship between the emotional states, mood, and level of stress of a group of pentathletes and the outcomes they achieved in a sports competition. Material and methods. The study involved 12 senior modern pentathletes, including 7 male and 5 female athletes. The following standard psychology questionnaires were used in the study: the 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS, and the Profile of Mood State (POMS. Performance was assessed based on the number of points achieved by the pentathletes in particular events in the pentathlon, which are held according to the rules set by the International Modern Pentathlon Union (UIPM. Results. The findings of the study confirmed that there was a correlation between the athletes’ mood and emotions and the outcome of their performance. The level of stress strongly negatively correlated with both the outcome they expected to achieve and the one they actually achieved for the combined event (running and shooting. For this event a relationship was also found between the athletes’ affective states and their outcomes: in running and shooting there was a positive and statistically significant correlation between the level of positive emotions and anger and the results achieved. However, friendliness, one of the other affective state variables that were measured, correlated negatively with the outcomes of the athletes’ performance. Conclusions. In the group of pentathletes who participated in the study, a high level of anger was associated with better outcomes, and a high level of friendliness had an adverse effect on the results achieved. The findings of the current study confirm that there is a relationship

  15. Information Technology for Clinical, Translational and Comparative Effectiveness Research. Findings from the Yearbook 2015 Section on Clinical Research Informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, C; Choquet, R

    2015-08-13

    To summarize excellent current research in the field of Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics with application in the health domain and clinical care. We provide a synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2015, from which we attempt to derive a synthetic overview of current and future activities in the field. As last year, a first step of selection was performed by querying MEDLINE with a list of MeSH descriptors completed by a list of terms adapted to the section. Each section editor has evaluated separately the set of 1,594 articles and the evaluation results were merged for retaining 15 articles for peer-review. The selection and evaluation process of this Yearbook's section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics yielded four excellent articles regarding data management and genome medicine that are mainly tool-based papers. In the first article, the authors present PPISURV a tool for uncovering the role of specific genes in cancer survival outcome. The second article describes the classifier PredictSNP which combines six performing tools for predicting disease-related mutations. In the third article, by presenting a high-coverage map of the human proteome using high resolution mass spectrometry, the authors highlight the need for using mass spectrometry to complement genome annotation. The fourth article is also related to patient survival and decision support. The authors present datamining methods of large-scale datasets of past transplants. The objective is to identify chances of survival. The current research activities still attest the continuous convergence of Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics, with a focus this year on dedicated tools and methods to advance clinical care. Indeed, there is a need for powerful tools for managing and interpreting complex, large-scale genomic and biological datasets, but also a need for user-friendly tools developed for the clinicians in their daily practice. All the recent research and

  16. La introducción de la escala de inteligencia de Stanford-Binet en el Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Aunque las primeras estrategias para evaluar la habilidad intelectual encuentran antecedentes milenarios en la antigua China, los intentos de medición en el periodo moderno comienzan con el psicólogo inglés Francis Galton en la década de 1880, mediante la aplicación de medidas fisiológicas para estimar el talento humano. A comienzos del siglo XX, los psicólogos franceses Alfred Binet y Théodore Simon construyeron las primeras escalas métricas para estimar la inteligencia de los niños. Estas fueron modificadas posteriormente en los Estados Unidos por Lewis Terman, quien publicó la revisión más conocida e influyente. En América Latina y otras regiones las adaptaciones locales se dieron en la misma época. En Paraguay, el test Stanford-Binet fue introducido en el decenio de 1920 por el maestro Ramón Indalecio Cardozo. Este no se limitó a una reproducción acrítica, sino que realizó algunas modificaciones para adaptarlo a las condiciones locales y mejorar la confiabilidad cultural de las pruebas. Este artículo estudia la introducción del test Stanford-Binet al contexto general de la educación paraguaya y los ajustes que llevó a cabo Cardozo. Para conseguirlo, se procede a una revisión de fuentes primarias y secundarias, colocando las ideas y los conceptos en el debido contexto histórico. También contribuye a ampliar otros trabajos anteriores centrados en la obra de este autor y en la psicología durante el periodo pre-universitario paraguayo. ABSTRACT: Although the first strategies to evaluate the human intellectual skills find millennial precedents in the ancient China, the attempts of measurement in the modern period began with the English psychologist Francis Galton in the decade of 1880, applying physiological measurements to estimate the human talent. At the beginning of the XXth century, the French psychologists Alfred Binet and Théodore Simon constructed the first metric scales to calculate children

  17. Institutions' Limits on Sharing of Research Findings Prompt Debate; Chilling Effect on Science Predicted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassmuck, Karen

    1991-01-01

    In the rush to profit from patented discoveries, university officials and professors are becoming more protective of research results. Although scholars are outraged at refusals to share discoveries, some critics in industry and academe say the outcry results from greed. A standard contract is being designed to facilitate information exchange.…

  18. Better Together: Research Findings on the Relationship between Racial Justice Organizations and LGBT Communities. Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Rinku; Wessler, Seth; Apollon, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    In partnership with the Arcus Foundation, the Applied Research Center (ARC) has undertaken a study of the relationship between racial justice organizations and lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender (LGBT) constituencies and issues, with the understanding that communities of color themselves, including their LGBT members, have a good deal at stake in…

  19. A Visitor's Guide to Effect Sizes--Statistical Significance versus Practical (Clinical) Importance of Research Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Xu, Gang

    2004-01-01

    Effect Sizes (ES) are an increasingly important index used to quantify the degree of practical significance of study results. This paper gives an introduction to the computation and interpretation of effect sizes from the perspective of the consumer of the research literature. The key points made are: (1) "ES" is a useful indicator of the…

  20. Implementation of Subjective Probability Estimates in Army Intelligence Procedures: A Critical Review of Research Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    subjective probabil- ity estimates have been incorporated routinely into tactical intelligence comunications . Research in the area of intelligence...analysis: Report on Phase I. Report FSC-71-5047. Gaithersburg, Md.: International Business Machines (IBM), Federal Systems Division, 1971. Kelly, C. W

  1. Quality of the working environment and productivity : research findings and case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, M. de; Broek, K. van den; Jongkind, R.; Kenny, L.; Shechtman, O.; Kuhn, K.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this working paper, prepared by the Topic Centre on Research - Work and Health of the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work, is to look at the link between a good working environment and productivity. A better understanding of positive effects of a good working environment

  2. Analyzing the Findings of the Saudi Research on Student Attrition in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljohani, Othman

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of the available literature on student attrition in Saudi higher education context. Despite the reported low student retention rates in Saudi tertiary institutions, student attrition remains an under-researched phenomenon. Thus, this paper aims to trace and collect all the available studies that addressed…

  3. Census of Institutional Repositories in the United States: MIRACLE Project Research Findings. CLIR Publication No. 140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Karen; Rieh, Soo Young; St. Jean, Beth; Kim, Jihyun; Yakel, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    In this report, the authors describe results of a nationwide census of institutional repositories in U.S. academic institutions. The census is one of several activities of the MIRACLE Project, an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)-funded research program based at the University of Michigan. The acronym MIRACLE means "Making…

  4. Research and teaching of dairy cattle well being: finding synergy between ethology and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Todd F; Leslie, Ken E; Lissemore, Kerry D; Millman, Suzanne T

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiology is a tool used to identify and quantify risk factors that contribute to the state of health or disease. In addition, the maintenance of health and recognition of nonhuman animal welfare are both key principles of health management. Animal welfare and ethology provide important contributions to our ability to understand and improve health. As such, there can be a strong connection between the disciplines of ethology and epidemiology. This connection becomes a synergy through collaborative research. At the University of Guelph, and at other institutions, dairy health management research efforts involving collaborations between faculty trained in ethology and epidemiology have led to refined and improved research programs, improved access to funding, and a broader extension audience. Furthermore, these collaborations have enhanced teaching programs and facilitated the integration of ethology and welfare topics throughout the veterinary medical curriculum. The paper provides the basis and context for the synergy between ethology and epidemiology and describes examples of teaching and research programs built upon this synergy for the enhancement of dairy cattle well being.

  5. Key Events and Lessons for Managers in a Diverse Workforce: A Report on Research and Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Christina A.

    The research documented in this report builds on earlier work in the 1980s in the area of on-the-job experiences in developing effective leaders. The current study was designed to answer the following: (1) What are the significant events from which African American managers learn and develop? (2) Are the key events and lessons learned different…

  6. Teachers' Commitment To, and Experiences of, the Teaching Profession in Tanzania: Findings of Focus Group Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkumbo, Kitila A. K.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined teachers' commitment to, and experiences of, the teaching profession in six regions of Tanzania. The study used focus group discussions as research method and data collection tool. Twenty four groups were conducted, with group membership ranging from five to nine participants. The results show that the teachers'…

  7. Research needs for community-based risk assessment: findings from a multi-disciplinary workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Yolanda Anita; Deener, Kacee; Hubal, Elaine Cohen; Knowlton, Carrie; Reif, David; Segal, Deborah

    2010-03-01

    Communities face exposures to multiple environmental toxicants and other non-chemical stressors. In addition, communities have unique activities and norms that influence exposure and vulnerability. Yet, few studies quantitatively consider the role of cumulative exposure and additive impacts. Community-based risk assessment (CBRA) is a new approach for risk assessment that aims to address the cumulative stressors faced by a particular community, while incorporating a community-based participatory research framework. This paper summarizes an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored workshop, "Research Needs for Community-Based Risk Assessment." This workshop brought together environmental and public health scientists and practitioners for fostering an innovative discussion about tools, methods, models, and approaches for CBRA. This workshop was organized around three topics: (1) Data and Measurement Methods; (2) The Biological Impact of Non-Chemical Stressors and Interaction with Environmental Exposures; and (3) Statistical and Mathematical Modeling. This report summarizes the workshop discussions, presents identified research needs, and explores future research opportunities in this emerging field.

  8. Can We Find Solutions with People? Participatory Action Research with Small Organic Producers in Andalusia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuellar-Padilla, Mamen; Calle-Collado, Angel

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment linking science with people. Taking as a paradigm the holistic scientific approach fostered by agroecology, we present a methodological proposal for the implementation of participatory action research in rural areas. Our aims were various: to solve a specific problem, i.e. the exclusion of small- and…

  9. Finding Time for Scholarship: A Survey of Canadian Research University Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, David

    2007-01-01

    More than half the participants in a survey of Canadian research university librarians indicated that scholarship activities were required or encouraged at their universities, yet most university librarians have year-round schedules of assigned duties that present challenges to the engagement in sustained, meaningful scholarship. Full-time…

  10. Domestic Violence Between Same-Gender Partners: Recent Findings and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClennen, Joan C.

    2005-01-01

    Empirical literature about same-gender domestic violence was relatively nonexistent until the past 20 years, and conducting research with this population about a sensitive topic remains a daunting endeavor. Existing studies reveal similarities between opposite- and same-gender domestic violence in prevalence, types of abuse, and various dynamics,…

  11. Designing for Dissemination Among Public Health Researchers: Findings From a National Survey in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Julie A.; Tabak, Rachel G.; Hoehner, Christine M.; Stamatakis, Katherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We have described the practice of designing for dissemination among researchers in the United States with the intent of identifying gaps and areas for improvement. Methods. In 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 266 researchers using a search of the top 12 public health journals in PubMed and lists available from government-sponsored research. The sample involved scientists at universities, the National Institutes of Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. Results. In the pooled sample, 73% of respondents estimated they spent less than 10% of their time on dissemination. About half of respondents (53%) had a person or team in their unit dedicated to dissemination. Seventeen percent of all respondents used a framework or theory to plan their dissemination activities. One third of respondents (34%) always or usually involved stakeholders in the research process. Conclusions. The current data and the existing literature suggest considerable room for improvement in designing for dissemination. PMID:23865659

  12. Can Technologies Make a Difference for Hospitalized Youth: Findings from Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maor, D.; Mitchem, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Children and youth who are hospitalized for a short or long term become socially isolated from their family, school and classmates. As their isolation increases, so does their vulnerability as a result of disrupted schooling. Research studies suggest different ways of using technologies to overcome this isolation and support children during this…

  13. An Attachment Perspective on the Child--Dog Bond: Interdisciplinary and International Research Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the process of attachment formation in young children has been a focal point in child development research for decades. However, young children's attachments are not only with human beings; they also form bonds with companion animals, particularly dogs ("Canis familiaris"). Given the number of dogs that are kept by families…

  14. Finding the right doctoral thesis – an innovative research fair for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen, Julius

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of research, as promoted by the framework, is widely acknowledged. Many medical students in Germany work on a research project as part of their doctoral thesis whilst still going to medical school. However, a significant amount of projects are abandoned unfinished, which leads to substantial wastage of resources. One reason for this is an information deficit concerning undergraduate research projects.Project description: To counteract this, we introduced an annual event at LMU Munich called with more than 600 visitors each year. It combines medical convention and research fair including keynote lectures, workshops and poster sessions as well as an exhibition of research groups and institutes. is a peer-to-peer event organized by a team of 40 students. Results: A needs analysis before its implementation underlined the information deficit as a possible cause for the high rate of abandoned projects. In the annual evaluation, visitors of rate the event with an average grade of 2.1 on a six-level Likert scale (n=558, SD=1.06, with "1=very good", "6=poor". They stated to now feel better informed about the topic and regarded visiting as a worthwhile investment of time.Discussion: Students are generally satisfied with the event and feel better informed after visiting . However, many students never visit DoktaMed for various reasons. A possible improvement would be to present a greater number of clinical studies in addition to the laboratory work that focuses on now.Conclusion: Evaluation after six years of is very promising. Visitors seem to be better informed. Nevertheless there is space for improvement in order to get more students and more faculty members involved. More studies are needed to assess long-term effects.

  15. Finding the right doctoral thesis - an innovative research fair for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Julius; Grabbert, Markus; Pander, Tanja; Gradel, Maximilian; Köhler, Lisa-Maria; Fischer, Martin R; von der Borch, Philip; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The importance of research, as promoted by the CanMEDS framework, is widely acknowledged. Many medical students in Germany work on a research project as part of their doctoral thesis whilst still going to medical school. However, a significant amount of projects are abandoned unfinished, which leads to substantial wastage of resources. One reason for this is an information deficit concerning undergraduate research projects. To counteract this, we introduced an annual event at LMU Munich called DoktaMed with more than 600 visitors each year. It combines medical convention and research fair including keynote lectures, workshops and poster sessions as well as an exhibition of research groups and institutes. DoktaMed is a peer-to-peer event organized by a team of 40 students. A needs analysis before its implementation underlined the information deficit as a possible cause for the high rate of abandoned projects. In the annual evaluation, visitors of DoktaMed rate the event with an average grade of 2.1 on a six-level Likert scale (n=558, SD=1.06, with "1=very good", "6=poor"). They stated to now feel better informed about the topic and regarded visiting DoktaMed as a worthwhile investment of time. Students are generally satisfied with the event and feel better informed after visiting DoktaMed. However, many students never visit DoktaMed for various reasons. A possible improvement would be to present a greater number of clinical studies in addition to the laboratory work that DoktaMed focuses on now. Evaluation after six years of DoktaMed is very promising. Visitors seem to be better informed. Nevertheless there is space for improvement in order to get more students and more faculty members involved. More studies are needed to assess long-term effects.

  16. Finding Spirits in Spirituality: What are We Measuring in Spirituality and Health Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Lance D; Curtis, Cara E; Morgan, Jonathan R

    2017-02-01

    What are we asking when we ask about spirituality? When research subjects check survey boxes for "religiosity" and "spirituality" measures on health surveys, those of us who use them often assume that these responses indicate a relationship with-or reaction against-normative, conventional, Protestant-shaped religious practice and experience. We present a qualitative interview study of 13 low-income mothers with a history of depression, analyzing their descriptions of spiritual and religious coping practices. On the basis of a focused analysis of four mother's narratives, we argue that conventional survey answers may frequently hide more than they reveal about people's cultural, religious, and idiosyncratic experiences with ghosts, spirits, magic, and haunting presences that are relevant, sometimes integral, to illness and healing. We demonstrate that listening to participants' narratives challenges researchers' unconsciously normative assumptions and ought to help us reshape our understanding of the ways spirituality and religion influence health in a hyperdiverse society.

  17. New Study Finds Increasing Gender Equity at U.S. Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-06-01

    Women and men faculty in science, engineering, and mathematics for the most part have comparable opportunities within major U.S. research universities, according to a report released 2 June by the U.S. National Research Council (NRC). The report found that gender does not appear to have been a factor in a number of important career transitions and outcomes, including hiring for tenure track and tenure positions and promotions. “That is probably going to be surprising to many people. It was surprising to our own panel. And it may not have been the case if we had done the study in 1985 instead of 2005,” said Claude Canizares, cochair of the NRC committee that prepared the report, entitled Gender Differences at Critical Transitions in the Careers of Science, Engineering and Mathematics Faculty.

  18. Nursing Home Residents vs. Researcher: Establishing Their Needs while Finding Your Way

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram

    2017-01-01

    in Copenhagen, Denmark, and show a solution to overcome such obstacles, by augmenting the exercise routine with the accompagnyment of recreational virtual environments. The second part of the chapter shares insights from the experiences from spending 3 years with the unique challenges and complex conditions...... that researchers face, when operating and navigating the specific field of nursing homes, due to the inherent characteris- tics of its context and users....

  19. Dietary Fiber Future Directions: Integrating New Definitions and Findings to Inform Nutrition Research and Communication12

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Julie Miller

    2013-01-01

    The CODEX Alimentarius definition of dietary fiber includes all nondigestible carbohydrate polymers with a degree of polymerization of 3 or more as dietary fiber with the proviso that they show health benefits. The global definition, if accepted by all authoritative bodies, offers a chance for international harmonization in research, food composition tables, and food labeling. Its nonacceptance highlights problems that may develop when definitions vary by region. The definition requires that ...

  20. Building an Interdisciplinary Research Program in Water Conservation: Approach, preliminary findings, and next steps

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, David E.; Endter-Wada, Joanna; Caplan, Arthur; Glenn, Diana T.; Ballard, Guy; Henderson, Katie

    2011-01-01

    Effective urban water conservation programs must harness a synergy of new technologies, public policies, social cost pricing, information dissemination, citizen engagement, and coordinated actions across decision making scales. Together, these factors affect the volume of water an individual user ultimately saves and the overall success of a conservation program or programs. Over the past 18 months, we have started building an interdisciplinary research program in urban water conservation to ...

  1. Are LGBT populations at a higher risk for suicidal behaviors in Australia? Research findings and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Delaney M; Kõlves, Kairi; De Leo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the Australian literature about suicidality in minority sexual identity and/or behavior groups in order to determine the evidence base for their reported higher vulnerability to suicidal behaviors than heterosexual and non-transgendered individuals in the Australian context, as well as to identify the factors that are predictive of suicidal behaviors in these groups in Australia. A literature search for all available years (until the end of 2012) was conducted using the databases Scopus, Medline, and Proquest for articles published in English in peer-reviewed academic journals. All peer-reviewed publications that provided empirical evidence for prevalence and predictive factors of suicidal behaviors among LGBT individuals (or a subset thereof) in Australia were included. Reference lists were also scrutinized to identify "gray" literature for inclusion. The results revealed that there is only limited research from Australia. Nevertheless, although no population-based studies have been published, research indicates that sexual minorities are indeed at a higher risk for suicidal behaviors. In order to further the understanding of suicidal behaviors and potential prevention among LGBT groups in the Australia, further research is needed, particularly on fatal suicidal behaviors.

  2. Newborn Care in the Home and Health Facility: Formative Findings for Intervention Research in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra N. Bazzano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Global coverage and scale up of interventions to reduce newborn mortality remains low, though progress has been achieved in improving newborn survival in many low-income settings. An important factor in the success of newborn health interventions, and moving to scale, is appropriate design of community-based programs and strategies for local implementation. We report the results of formative research undertaken to inform the design of a newborn health intervention in Cambodia. Information was gathered on newborn care practices over a period of three months using multiple qualitative methods of data collection in the primary health facility and home setting. Analysis of the data indicated important gaps, both at home and facility level, between recommended newborn care practices and those typical in the study area. The results of this formative research have informed strategies for behavior change and improving referral of sick infants in the subsequent implementation study. Collection and dissemination of data on newborn care practices from settings such as these can contribute to efforts to advance survival, growth and development of newborns for intervention research, and for future newborn health programming.

  3. Dietary fiber future directions: integrating new definitions and findings to inform nutrition research and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julie Miller

    2013-01-01

    The CODEX Alimentarius definition of dietary fiber includes all nondigestible carbohydrate polymers with a degree of polymerization of 3 or more as dietary fiber with the proviso that they show health benefits. The global definition, if accepted by all authoritative bodies, offers a chance for international harmonization in research, food composition tables, and food labeling. Its nonacceptance highlights problems that may develop when definitions vary by region. The definition requires that the research community agrees upon physiological effects for which there is substantial scientific agreement, e.g., fibers' effects on laxation and gut health, on attenuating blood lipids and blood glucose and insulin, and in promoting fermentation in the large bowel. The definition also necessitates the delineation of research protocols to prove the benefits of various isolated and synthesized fibers. These should emanate from evidence-based reviews that fairly weigh epidemiological data while considering that added fibers are not reflected in many food composition databases. They then should include well-controlled, randomized, control trials and utilize animal studies to determine mechanisms. Agreement on many study variables such as the type of subject and the type of baseline diet that best fits the question under investigation will also be needed. Finally, the definition establishes that all types of fiber can address the severe fiber consumption gap that exists throughout the world by recognizing that the combination of fiber-rich and -fortified foods increases fiber intake while allowing consumers to stay within allowed energy levels.

  4. Dietary Fiber Future Directions: Integrating New Definitions and Findings to Inform Nutrition Research and Communication12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julie Miller

    2013-01-01

    The CODEX Alimentarius definition of dietary fiber includes all nondigestible carbohydrate polymers with a degree of polymerization of 3 or more as dietary fiber with the proviso that they show health benefits. The global definition, if accepted by all authoritative bodies, offers a chance for international harmonization in research, food composition tables, and food labeling. Its nonacceptance highlights problems that may develop when definitions vary by region. The definition requires that the research community agrees upon physiological effects for which there is substantial scientific agreement, e.g., fibers’ effects on laxation and gut health, on attenuating blood lipids and blood glucose and insulin, and in promoting fermentation in the large bowel. The definition also necessitates the delineation of research protocols to prove the benefits of various isolated and synthesized fibers. These should emanate from evidence-based reviews that fairly weigh epidemiological data while considering that added fibers are not reflected in many food composition databases. They then should include well-controlled, randomized, control trials and utilize animal studies to determine mechanisms. Agreement on many study variables such as the type of subject and the type of baseline diet that best fits the question under investigation will also be needed. Finally, the definition establishes that all types of fiber can address the severe fiber consumption gap that exists throughout the world by recognizing that the combination of fiber-rich and -fortified foods increases fiber intake while allowing consumers to stay within allowed energy levels. PMID:23319118

  5. The educational gradient in marital disruption: a meta-analysis of European research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Anna; Styrc, Marta; Vignoli, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    A large number of empirical studies have investigated the effects of women's education on union dissolution in Europe, but results have varied substantially. This paper seeks to assess the relationship between educational attainment and the incidence of marital disruption by systematizing the existing empirical evidence. A quantitative literature review (a meta-analysis) was conducted to investigate the temporal change in the relationship, net of inter-study differences. The results point to a weakening of the positive educational gradient in marital disruption over time and even to a reversal in the direction of this gradient in some countries. The findings also show that the change in the educational gradient can be linked to an increase in access to divorce. Finally, the results suggest that women's empowerment has played an important role in changing the educational gradient, while the liberalization of divorce laws has not.

  6. The Archaeological Research In The Region Of The Modern Municipality Of Styra: Old And New Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidiroglou, M.

    This paper offers a brief outline of the results of the salvage excavations undertaken in recent years by the 11th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities (IA EPKA) in the area of Lefka, Nea Styra, together with a brief description of surface finds in the region of Styra. A more extensive archaeological description and topographical assessment of all known sites, including farm houses, towers, possible sanctuaries, tombs and quarrying areas will be provided in a forthcoming larger study by the author. The brief assessment of old and new data presented here is given as a preliminary summary of the topography of the ancient demos of Styra, which, according to inscriptional data, was incorporated in the Eretrian territory, during the last years of the 5th century B.C.

  7. Frost Action Predictive Techniques for Roads and Airfields; A Comprehensive Survey of Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    about 102 by tensiometers at depths of about 533, 813, mm of asphalt-penetration macadam stone base 1118 and 1524 mm beloA the pavement sur- A.,,: and 127...mm of gravel subbase (Fig. 7). The sub- face at Taxiwa. A and 480, 640, 840 and , grade is silty fine sand. The penetration macadam 1140 mm below the...NEERS , Atterberg Imis. FROST DESIGN SOIL L solI classication CLASSIFICATON SYSTEM IMPIEMENIATION OF ’ RESEARCH FININCS SuCpbl af [ ~rrj grout , ’UrnOe

  8. Heroin Use, HIV-Risk, and Criminal Behavior in Baltimore: Findings from Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert P; Kelly, Sharon M; Gryczynski, Jan; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews research conducted in Baltimore over the past 15 years, examining the following: (1) What factors differentiate heroin-addicted individuals who enter methadone treatment from those who do not? (2) How difficult is gaining access to methadone treatment? (3) What are effective ways to overcome barriers to treatment entry? (4) Why do so many methadone patients drop out of treatment prematurely? (5) What are the added benefits of counseling when coupled with methadone or buprenorphine treatment? (6) Does increasing access to treatment have an impact on overdose deaths? Specific recommendations are made for policymakers concerned with addressing heroin addiction.

  9. New findings and setting the research agenda for soil and water conservation for sustainable land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, Saskia; Argaman, Eli; Gomez, Jose Alfonso; Quinton, John

    2014-05-01

    The session on soil and water conservation for sustainable land management provides insights into the current research producing viable measures for sustainable land management and enhancing the lands role as provider of ecosystem services. The insights into degradation processes are essential for designing and implementing feasible measures to mitigate against degradation of the land resource and adapt to the changing environment. Land degradation occurs due to multiple pressures on the land, such as population growth, land-use and land-cover changes, climate change and over exploitation of resources, often resulting in soil erosion due to water and wind, which occurs in many parts of the world. Understanding the processes of soil erosion by wind and water and the social and economic constraints faced by farmers forms an essential component of integrated land development projects. Soil and water conservation measures are only viable and sustainable if local environmental and socio-economic conditions are taken into account and proper enabling conditions and policies can be achieved. Land degradation increasingly occurs because land use, and farming systems are subject to rapid environmental and socio-economic changes without implementation of appropriate soil and water conservation technologies. Land use and its management are thus inextricably bound up with development; farmers must adapt in order to sustain the quality of their, and their families, lives. In broader perspective, soil and water conservation is needed as regulating ecosystem service and as a tool to enhance food security and biodiversity. Since land degradation occurs in many parts of the world and threatens food production and environmental stability it affects those countries with poorer soils and resilience in the agriculture sector first. Often these are the least developed countries. Therefore the work from researchers from developing countries together with knowledge from other disciplines

  10. Synergies, strengths and challenges: findings on community capability from a systematic health systems research literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Asha S; Scott, Kerry; Mehra, Vrinda; Sriram, Veena

    2016-11-15

    Community capability is the combined influence of a community's social systems and collective resources that can address community problems and broaden community opportunities. We frame it as consisting of three domains that together support community empowerment: what communities have; how communities act; and for whom communities act. We sought to further understand these domains through a secondary analysis of a previous systematic review on community participation in health systems interventions in low and middle income countries (LMICs). We searched for journal articles published between 2000 and 2012 related to the concepts of "community", "capability/participation", "health systems research" and "LMIC." We identified 64 with rich accounts of community participation involving service delivery and governance in health systems research for thematic analysis following the three domains framing community capability. When considering what communities have, articles reported external linkages as the most frequently gained resource, especially when partnerships resulted in more community power over the intervention. In contrast, financial assets were the least mentioned, despite their importance for sustainability. With how communities act, articles discussed challenges of ensuring inclusive participation and detailed strategies to improve inclusiveness. Very little was reported about strengthening community cohesiveness and collective efficacy despite their importance in community initiatives. When reviewing for whom communities act, the importance of strong local leadership was mentioned frequently, while conflict resolution strategies and skills were rarely discussed. Synergies were found across these elements of community capability, with tangible success in one area leading to positive changes in another. Access to information and opportunities to develop skills were crucial to community participation, critical thinking, problem solving and ownership. Although

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  12. An Example of the Use of Research Methods and Findings as an Experiential Learning Exercise in an Accounting Theory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Bruce; Philipich, Kirk; Blatz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this teaching note is to describe an experiential learning exercise used in a master's level financial accounting theory course. The experiential exercise illustrates how order effects can affect user's judgments, a long-standing research finding. This experiential exercise was used in an attempt to make students more cognizant of…

  13. Embracing Complexity: Findings from a Comparative Analysis of Representations of Teachers in the British Press and Research Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemke, Emily

    2007-01-01

    This paper follows an empirical study of how teachers were represented in British newspapers during the 1990s. Its purpose is to describe some of the findings arising from a comparison of the data and representations of teachers in educational research literature. The topic of teacher representation was a matter of personal interest to the…

  14. Definite Integral Automatic Analysis Mechanism Research and Development Using the "Find the Area by Integration" Unit as an Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Mu Yu

    2017-01-01

    Using the capabilities of expert knowledge structures, the researcher prepared test questions on the university calculus topic of "finding the area by integration." The quiz is divided into two types of multiple choice items (one out of four and one out of many). After the calculus course was taught and tested, the results revealed that…

  15. Evaluation applications of instrument calibration research findings in psychology for very small samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, W. P., Jr.; Petry, P.

    2016-11-01

    Many published research studies document item calibration invariance across samples using Rasch's probabilistic models for measurement. A new approach to outcomes evaluation for very small samples was employed for two workshop series focused on stress reduction and joyful living conducted for health system employees and caregivers since 2012. Rasch-calibrated self-report instruments measuring depression, anxiety and stress, and the joyful living effects of mindfulness behaviors were identified in peer-reviewed journal articles. Items from one instrument were modified for use with a US population, other items were simplified, and some new items were written. Participants provided ratings of their depression, anxiety and stress, and the effects of their mindfulness behaviors before and after each workshop series. The numbers of participants providing both pre- and post-workshop data were low (16 and 14). Analysis of these small data sets produce results showing that, with some exceptions, the item hierarchies defining the constructs retained the same invariant profiles they had exhibited in the published research (correlations (not disattenuated) range from 0.85 to 0.96). In addition, comparisons of the pre- and post-workshop measures for the three constructs showed substantively and statistically significant changes. Implications for program evaluation comparisons, quality improvement efforts, and the organization of communications concerning outcomes in clinical fields are explored.

  16. A visitor's guide to effect sizes: statistical significance versus practical (clinical) importance of research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Xu, Gang

    2004-01-01

    Effect Sizes (ES) are an increasingly important index used to quantify the degree of practical significance of study results. This paper gives an introduction to the computation and interpretation of effect sizes from the perspective of the consumer of the research literature. The key points made are: 1. ES is a useful indicator of the practical (clinical) importance of research results that can be operationally defined from being "negligible" to "moderate", to "important". 2. The ES has two advantages over statistical significance testing: (a) it is independent of the size of the sample; (b) it is a scale-free index. Therefore, ES can be uniformly interpreted in different studies regardless of the sample size and the original scales of the variables. 3. Calculations of the ES are illustrated by using examples of comparisons between two means, correlation coefficients, chi-square tests and two proportions, along with appropriate formulas. 4. Operational definitions for the ES s are given, along with numerical examples for the purpose of illustration.

  17. A Profile of Gender-Based Violence Research in Europe: Findings From a Focused Mapping Review and Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Appleton, Jane V; Clark, Maria; Paavilainen, Eija

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a new form of review: a focused mapping review and synthesis. The aim was to create a contemporary, snapshot profile of the nature and scope of gender-based violence (GBV) studies conducted in Europe. GBV is one of the most prevalent human rights violations in the world affecting mainly women and girls. The policy context of GBV in Europe has gathered momentum in recent years, but we do not have a clear picture of how this relates to research activity. Thirteen journals were purposively selected on their likelihood to publish GBV research. All articles published in these journals during 2015 and meeting our inclusion criteria were retrieved. Data were extracted according to (1) types of methodologies used, (2) geographical location of research, and (3) patterns of research activity/interest. Thirty-two articles met the inclusion criteria. Many titles and abstracts were not explicit about the gendered nature of the research which made retrieval and analysis difficult. A range of methodologies were reported, with single-country research conducted more than international collaborations. Intimate partner violence and sexual abuse attracted most research interest. No studies explored female genital mutilation/cutting and only one investigated early and forced marriage. The findings have implications regarding GBV research in Europe, and we explore them in relation to relevant European policy. Researchers can help raise the profile of the gendered nature of most violence-related research by being explicit about this in their publications. Increasing opportunities for cross-national research will help address the global nature of GBV. Tackling GBV requires synergy of empirical evidence and policy to drive the agenda.

  18. Overview of findings from the World Trade Center Disaster Outcome Study: recommendations for future research after exposure to psychological trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscarino, Joseph A; Adams, Richard E

    2008-01-01

    In this article we review findings from the World Trade Center Disaster (WTCD) Outcomes Study, a prospective cohort study of 2,368 New York City (NYC) adults funded by the National Institutes of Health after the September 11 attacks. The findings reported were based on a baseline survey conducted one year after the disaster and a follow-up conducted two years post-disaster. One of the goals of this research was to assess the effectiveness of post-disaster treatments received by NYC residents following the attacks. Among the major findings of this study were the relatively small increase in mental health service utilization and the fact that only brief worksite interventions seemed to be an effective post-disaster treatment intervention. Specifically, those who received more conventional post-disaster interventions, such as formal psychotherapy sessions and/or psychotropic medicines, seemed to have poorer outcomes. Since this study was designed to assess treatment outcomes, use advanced measurement techniques, and incorporate propensity score matching to control for bias, these treatment findings were unexpected and raised clinical questions. Additional findings were also discussed related to minority group members, alcohol abuse, the onset and course of posttraumatic stress disorder post-disaster and other findings. Future research is recommended to resolve the issues raised by this important study, especially as this relates to treatment outcomes.

  19. Synergies, strengths and challenges: findings on community capability from a systematic health systems research literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha S. George

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community capability is the combined influence of a community’s social systems and collective resources that can address community problems and broaden community opportunities. We frame it as consisting of three domains that together support community empowerment: what communities have; how communities act; and for whom communities act. We sought to further understand these domains through a secondary analysis of a previous systematic review on community participation in health systems interventions in low and middle income countries (LMICs. Methods We searched for journal articles published between 2000 and 2012 related to the concepts of “community”, “capability/participation”, “health systems research” and “LMIC.” We identified 64 with rich accounts of community participation involving service delivery and governance in health systems research for thematic analysis following the three domains framing community capability. Results When considering what communities have, articles reported external linkages as the most frequently gained resource, especially when partnerships resulted in more community power over the intervention. In contrast, financial assets were the least mentioned, despite their importance for sustainability. With how communities act, articles discussed challenges of ensuring inclusive participation and detailed strategies to improve inclusiveness. Very little was reported about strengthening community cohesiveness and collective efficacy despite their importance in community initiatives. When reviewing for whom communities act, the importance of strong local leadership was mentioned frequently, while conflict resolution strategies and skills were rarely discussed. Synergies were found across these elements of community capability, with tangible success in one area leading to positive changes in another. Access to information and opportunities to develop skills were crucial to community

  20. The contributions of culture and ethnicity to New Zealand mental health research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapsell, Rees; Mellsop, Graham

    2007-07-01

    BACKGROUND AND MATERIAL: In the last five years a number of studies have been conducted in specialist psychiatric and primary care populations in New Zealand which have allowed comparisons in terms of clinical phenomena and therapeutic experiences between Mâori (the indigenous people of New Zealand) and non-Mâori. These studies were reviewed in terms of the methodology used, their major findings and their implications. In specialist psychiatric services Mâori were more likely to present with hallucinations and/or aggression and less likely to present with depression and/or episodes of self-harm. They were overly represented in those with schizophrenia. Mâori were more likely to be involved in acts of aggression and to be secluded, and an equivalent episode of care for Mâori appeared to be significantly more costly than for non Mâori. Other studies, conducted in prison and community-based samples, suggested that Mâori were less likely to access care and, when given a diagnosis of depression, less likely to be prescribed anti-depressant medication.The rates of depression were significantly higher in Mâori (women) and Mâori were also overly represented in those with anxiety and substance misuse disorders. These differences remained even after the sample was standardised for socio-economic status. Further exploration of the genesis and implications of these findings, derived from a strong and relatively well-defined indigenous people, may usefully inform the more general issues of culture and its significance for diagnosis, classification and service use. While the methodologies used and the actual results gained differed across studies, there do seem to be differences in phenomenological profiles at presentation, in the diagnostic patterns, the cost of care, and the therapeutic experiences between Mâori and non-Mâori New Zealanders. These differences may reflect actual differences between certain ethnic groups, which then explain the differences in the

  1. Disaster media coverage and psychological outcomes: descriptive findings in the extant research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Newman, Elana; Nelson, Summer D; Nitiéma, Pascal; Pfefferbaum, Rose L; Rahman, Ambreen

    2014-09-01

    This review of the literature on disaster media coverage describes the events, samples, and forms of media coverage (television, newspapers, radio, internet) studied and examines the association between media consumption and psychological outcomes. A total of 36 studies representing both man-made and natural events met criteria for review in this analysis. Most studies examined disaster television viewing in the context of terrorism and explored a range of outcomes including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caseness and posttraumatic stress (PTS), depression, anxiety, stress reactions, and substance use. There is good evidence establishing a relationship between disaster television viewing and various psychological outcomes, especially PTSD caseness and PTS, but studies are too few to draw definitive conclusions about the other forms of media coverage that have been examined. As media technology continues to advance, future research is needed to investigate these additional media forms especially newer forms such as social media.

  2. Promoting adoption of fall prevention measures among Latino workers and residential contractors: formative research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran, Suzanne; Blecker, Hillary; Scruggs, Kelsie; García Hernández, Javier; Rahke, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Falls from heights remain a concern in construction, particularly for foreign-born Latino construction workers employed by small residential contractors. The social ecological model provides a framework to assess the individual and contextual factors influencing the risk for falls. Five focus groups and thirteen in-depth interviews with workers, small residential contractors, and key informants were conducted in 2012 in San Francisco and Philadelphia. Data were analyzed with qualitative methods. Economic conditions in residential construction, coupled with a lack of enforcement and vulnerabilities of the foreign-born workforce, are principal contributors to risk for falls. Small contractors perceive strong economic disincentives for implementation of fall protection and foreign-born Latino workers experience a variety of social, cultural and occupational pressures impeding its use. Increased adoption of fall protection cannot be accomplished solely by targeting Latino construction workers. Research is needed on incentives to influence contractor behavior and facilitate adoption of fall protection measures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Research into cost and value in medical education: can we make findings more generalisable? Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2014-01-01

    In recent years a growing number of papers have started to appear in the literature on the subject of cost and value in medical education. However many of the articles describe tactical projects within specific areas. As a result the generalisability of such articles is often questionable. Lack of generalisability will mean that progress in research and practice in this field will be slow. Generalisability of cost-value analyses in any discipline is not always straightforward. However reports on cost and value in medical education should ideally ensure absolute clarity with regard to study centres, enrolment of learners, alternative options, perspectives of stakeholders, resources used and their costs, instruments used, variability, and any problems with the analyses (such as incomplete data).

  4. Research into cost and value in medical education: can we make findings more generalisable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Walsh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a growing number of papers have started to appear in the literature on the subject of cost and value in medical education. However many of the articles describe tactical projects within specific areas. As a result the generalisability of such articles is often questionable. Lack of generalisability will mean that progress in research and practice in this field will be slow. Generalisability of cost-value analyses in any discipline is not always straightforward. However reports on cost and value in medical education should ideally ensure absolute clarity with regard to study centres, enrolment of learners, alternative options, perspectives of stakeholders, resources used and their costs, instruments used, variability, and any problems with the analyses (such as incomplete data.

  5. Exploring arts-based knowledge translation: sharing research findings through performing the patterns, rehearsing the results, staging the synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Kendra; Schultz, Annette S H

    2014-04-01

    Cultivation of knowledge translation (KT) strategies that actively engage health professionals in critical reflection of their practice and research-based evidence are imperative to address the research-practice gap. While research-based evidence is exponentially growing, our ability to facilitate uptake by nurses and other health professionals has not kept pace. Innovative approaches that extend epistemological bias beyond a singular standpoint of postpositivism, such as the utilization of arts-based methods, expand the possibility to address the complexities of context, engage audience members, promote dissemination within communities of practice, and foster new audiences interested in research findings. In this paper, we address the importance of adopting a social constructivist epistemological stance to facilitate knowledge translation to diverse audiences, explore various arts-based knowledge translation (ABKT) strategies, and open a dialogue concerning evaluative tenets of ABKT. ABKT utilizes various art forms to disseminate research knowledge to diverse audiences and promote evidence-informed practice. ABKT initiatives translate knowledge not based upon a linear model, which views knowledge as an objective entity, but rather operate from the premise that knowledge is socially situated, which demands acknowledging and engaging the learner within their context. Theatre, dance, photography, and poetry are art forms that are commonly used to communicate research findings to diverse audiences. Given the emerging interest and importance of utilizing this KT strategy situated within a social constructivist epistemology, potential challenges and plausible evaluative criteria specific to ABKT are presented. ABKT is an emerging KT strategy that is grounded in social constructivist epistemological tenets, and holds potential for meaningfully sharing new research knowledge with diverse audiences. ABKT is an innovative and synergistic approach to traditional

  6. EMSODEV and EPOS-IP: key findings for effective management of EU research infrastructure projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materia, Paola; Bozzoli, Sabrina; Beranzoli, Laura; Cocco, Massimo; Favali, Paolo; Freda, Carmela; Sangianantoni, Agata

    2017-04-01

    EMSO (European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory, http://www.emso-eu.org) and EPOS (European Plate Observing System, https://www.epos-ip.org) are pan-European Research Infrastructures (RIs) in the ESFRI 2016 Roadmap. EMSO has recently become an ERIC (European Research Infrastructure Consortium), whilst EPOS application is in progress. Both ERICs will be hosted in Italy and the "Representing Entity" is INGV. EMSO consists of oceanic environment observation systems spanning from the Arctic through the Atlantic and Mediterranean, to the Black Sea for long-term, high-resolution, real-time monitoring of natural and man-induced processes such as hazards, climate, and marine ecosystems changes to study their evolution and interconnections. EPOS aims at creating a pan-European infrastructure for solid Earth science to support a safe and sustainable society. EPOS will enable innovative multidisciplinary research for a better understanding of Earth's physical and chemical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, ground instability, tsunami, and all those processes driving tectonics and Earth's surface dynamics. Following the conclusion of their Preparatory Phases the two RIs are now in their Implementation Phase still supported by the EC through the EMSODEV and EPOS-IP projects, both run by dedicated Project Management Offices at INGV with sound experience in EU projects. EMSODEV (H2020 project, 2015-2018) involves 11 partners and 9 associate partners and aims at improving the harmonization among the EMSO ERIC observation systems through the realization of EMSO Generic Instrument Modules (EGIMs), and a Data Management Platform (DMP) to implement interoperability and standardization. The DMP will provide access to data from all EMSO nodes, providing a unified, homogeneous, infrastructure-scale and user-oriented platform integrated with the increased measurement capabilities and functions provided by the EGIMs. EPOS IP (H2020 project, 2015

  7. "The role of oxytocin in psychiatric disorders: A review of biological and therapeutic research findings"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David; Fallon, Daniel; Hill, Michael; Frazier, Jean A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin is a peptide hormone integral in parturition, milk let-down, and maternal behaviors that has been demonstrated in animal studies to be important in the formation of pair bonds and in social behaviors. This hormone is increasingly recognized as an important regulator of human social behaviors, including social decision making, evaluating and responding to social stimuli, mediating social interactions, and forming social memories. In addition, oxytocin is intricately involved in a broad array of neuropsychiatric functions, and may be a common factor important in multiple psychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, mood and anxiety disorders. This review article examines the extant literature on the evidence for oxytocin dysfunction in a variety of psychiatric disorders and highlights the need for further research to understand the complex role of the oxytocin system in psychiatric disease to pave the way for developing new therapeutic modalities. Articles were selected that involved human participants with various psychiatric disorders, either comparing oxytocin biology to healthy controls or examining the effects of exogenous oxytocin administration. PMID:24651556

  8. Informationist programme in support of biomedical research: a programme description and preliminary findings of an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Susan C; Grefsheim, Suzanne F; Rankin, Jocelyn A

    2008-06-01

    The informationist programme at the Library of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, MD, USA has grown to 14 informationists working with 40 clinical and basic science research teams. This case report, intended to contribute to the literature on informationist programmes, describes the NIH informationist programme, including implementation experiences, the informationists' training programme, their job responsibilities and programme outcomes. The NIH informationist programme was designed to enhance the library's service capacity. Over time, the steps for introducing the service to new groups were formalized to ensure support by leadership, the team being served and the library. Job responsibilities also evolved from traditional library roles to a wide range of knowledge management activities. The commitment by the informationist, the team and the library to continuous learning is critical to the programme's success. RESULTS / OUTCOMES: NIH scientists reported that informationists saved them time and contributed to teamwork with expert searching and point-of-need instruction. Process evaluation helped refine the programme. High-level, preliminary outcomes were identified from a survey of scientists receiving informationist services, along with key informant interviews. Process evaluation examined service implementation, informationists' training and service components. Anecdotal evidence has also indicated a favourable response to the programme.

  9. On norms and bodies: findings from field research on cosmetic surgery in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneles de Andrade, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    Brazil has the second highest rate of cosmetic surgery worldwide, provided in a large number of public and private clinics and hospitals, especially in the southeast. This qualitative field research in Rio de Janeiro included participant observation and in-depth interviews with 18 women cosmetic surgery patients, 10 key informants (e.g. psychologists and sociologists) and 12 plastic surgeons. Fifteen of the women were either pre- or post-operative; three had not decided whether to have surgery. When asked about their motivations and expectations of the surgery, the majority of the women said they wanted to be "normal". Most of the surgeons said they acted as empathic companions from decision-making through surgery and beyond. Many of the key informants were critical of what was happening to medical ethics in relation to cosmetic surgery. With the growth in a consumer culture, they saw ethics in medicine becoming more bendable and subject to the "law" of the market. The cult of the body has become a mass phenomenon and taken on an important social dimension in a society where norms and images are broadcast widely by the media. The trend towards body-modification by cosmetic surgery at an early age is increasing dramatically. What demands critical thinking and further investigation are the consequences of cosmetic surgery for physical and mental health. Copyright 2010 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The prevalence of questionable occlusal caries lesions: findings from The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Sonia K; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Bader, James D; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Bauer, Michael; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Qvist, Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Questionable occlusal caries (QOC) can be defined as clinically-suspected caries with no cavitation or radiographic evidence of occlusal caries. To our knowledge, its prevalence has not been quantified; this was the objective of this study. Methods A total of 82 dentist and hygienist practitioner-investigators from “The Dental Practice-Based Research Network” (DPBRN) participated. When patients presented with at least one unrestored occlusal surface, their number of unrestored occlusal surfaces and QOC were quantified. Information also was recorded about patient characteristics on consented patients who had QOC. Data analysis adjusted for patient clustering within practices. Results Overall, 6,910 patients had at least one unrestored occlusal surface, with a total of 50,445 unrestored surfaces. Thirty-four percent of all patients and 11% of unrestored surfaces among all patients had QOC. Patient- and surface-level QOC prevalence varied significantly by region (p<0.001; p<0.03). The highest percent for patient-and surface-level prevalence was in Florida/Georgia (42%; 16%). Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify the prevalence of QOC in routine clinical practice. These results document a high prevalence overall, with wide variation in prevalence among DPBRN’s five main regions. Clinical Implications QOC lesions are common in routine practice and warrant further investigation regarding how best to manage them. PMID:23204090

  11. Factors associated with home hazards: Findings from the Malaysian Elders Longitudinal Research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romli, Muhammad H; Tan, Maw P; Mackenzie, Lynette; Lovarini, Meryl; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul B; Clemson, Lindy

    2017-11-15

    Previous studies have investigated home hazards as a risk factor for falls without considering factors associated with the presence of home hazards. The present study aimed to determine patterns of home hazards among urban community-dwelling older Malaysians, and to identify factors contributing to home hazards. Cross-sectional data from the initial wave of the Malaysian Elders Longitudinal Research study were used. Basic demographics were obtained from the Global Questionnaire. Basic and instrumental activities of daily living were measured using the Katz and Lawton-Brody scales, and home hazards were identified using the Home Falls and Accidents Screening Tool. Participants were also asked if they had fallen in the previous 12 months. Data were analyzed from 1489 participants. Hazards were frequently identified (>30%) in the toilet and bathroom areas (no grab rail, no non-slip mat, distant toilet), slippery floors, no bedside light access and inappropriate footwear. Lower educational attainment, traditional housing, Chinese ethnicity, greater number of home occupants, lower monthly expenditure, poor vision and younger age were the factors independently associated with home hazards. This study provides evidence that home hazards are a product of the interaction of the individual's function within their home environment. Hazards are also influenced by local sociocultural and environmental factors. The relationship between home hazards and falls appears complex and deserves further evaluation. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Construction ages of the Upton Stone Chamber: Preliminary findings and suggestions for future luminescence research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Shannon; Martin, Frederick; Taylor, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    The Upton Chamber in Massachusetts, an earth-covered stone structure 3.4 meters (m) in diameter, with a corbelled stone dome, and a 4.3 m long entrance passageway, is studied with the aim of determining whether optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating methods can be used to establish the approximate construction date of the entranceway. Three samples, taken from soil behind the lowest stones in the wall of the entrance passageway, returned OSL ages between 385 and 660 years ago (or from 1625 A.D. to 1350 A.D.; using the year 2011 as the 0 year). One sample, taken below the bottom of the artifact layers in an archeological test pit in front of the chamber entrance, returned OSL ages between 650 and 880 years ago. A modern sample collected from a nearby fluvial channel returned an age between 55 and 175 years. The Upton Chamber OSL sampling results are challenging to interpret because there are mixtures in the samples of both younger and older grains that likely result from human modification, root or soil processes, animal bioturbation (i.e. ants and worms), and/or partial bleaching. The ages were determined using the lowest component of the finite mixture model as applied to a distribution of quartz grains. Further research may enable us to determine whether older components are of anthropomorphic or geological origin.

  13. Understanding the findings of resilience-related research for fostering the development of African American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Frederica H; Armstrong, Mary I; Vargo, Amy; Boothroyd, Roger A

    2007-04-01

    African American youth face a number of challenges to prosocial development that the majority of American youth never encounter. Despite this, the research clearly documents that African American youth often are resilient in the face of these challenges. This article explores various factors associated with resilience in African American children and their implications for practitioners. An ecologic framework described by Bronfenbrenner is used as an organizing framework for understanding interventions at the micro-, mezzo-, and exo-system levels. In this article, the importance of identity formation, maintenance of social networks, and exposure to safe and supportive environments is expressed in conjunction with recommendations for practitioners. Practitioners are encouraged to stress the promotion of ethnic and racial identity and self-efficacy with the youth and their family and the involvement of the youth and family in meaningful activities through local community centers, schools, churches, and other organizations serving youth. A case study of an African American girl, from age 16 into adulthood and motherhood, is presented to illustrate the interplay between protective and risk factors.

  14. The role of oxytocin in psychiatric disorders: a review of biological and therapeutic research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David M; Fallon, Daniel; Hill, Michael; Frazier, Jean A

    2013-01-01

    After participating in this educational activity, the physician should be better able to 1. Identify the biological role of oxytocin in forming attachments. 2. Evaluate the relationship between various neuropsychiatric disorders and oxytocin. 3. Identify clinical implications of using oxytocin to treat various neuropsychiatric disorders. Oxytocin is a peptide hormone integral in parturition, milk letdown, and maternal behaviors that has been demonstrated in animal studies to be important in the formation of pair bonds and in social behaviors. This hormone is increasingly recognized as an important regulator of human social behaviors, including social decision making, evaluating and responding to social stimuli, mediating social interactions, and forming social memories. In addition, oxytocin is intricately involved in a broad array of neuropsychiatric functions and may be a common factor important in multiple psychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, and mood and anxiety disorders. This review article examines the extant literature on the evidence for oxytocin dysfunction in a variety of psychiatric disorders and highlights the need for further research to understand the complex role of the oxytocin system in psychiatric disease and thus pave the way for developing new therapeutic modalities. Articles were selected that involved human participants with various psychiatric disorders and that either compared oxytocin biology to healthy controls or examined the effects of exogenous oxytocin administration.

  15. The rotation of the Sun: Observations at Stanford. [using the Doppler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, J. M.; Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric rotation rate using the Doppler effect made at the Stanford Solar Observatory since May 1976 are analyzed. Results show that these observations show no daily or long period variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is the same as that of the sunspot and the large-scale magnetic field structures.

  16. Læring skal være sjovt: Aalborg – Stanford t/r

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Konnerup, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    Gennem en 4-dages workshop om hvorledes Problem Based Learning (PBL) kan praktiseres og nytænkes i ikt-medierede sociale læringsmiljøer, blev der diskuteret, idégenereret, grinet og dramatiseret – alt sammen med det formål at få en fælles forståelse af PBL på tværs af universiteter (Stanford/Aalb...

  17. Constraints on spatially oscillating sub-mm forces from the Stanford Optically Levitated Microsphere Experiment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, I.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2017-11-01

    A recent analysis by one of the authors [L. Perivolaropoulos, Phys. Rev. D 95, 084050 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevD.95.084050] has indicated the presence of a 2 σ signal of spatially oscillating new force residuals in the torsion balance data of the Washington experiment. We extend that study and analyze the data of the Stanford Optically Levitated Microsphere Experiment (SOLME) [A. D. Rider et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 101101 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.101101] (kindly provided by A. D. Rider et al.) searching for sub-mm spatially oscillating new force signals. We find a statistically significant oscillating signal for a force residual of the form F (z )=α cos (2/π λ z +c ) where z is the distance between the macroscopic interacting masses (levitated microsphere and cantilever). The best fit parameter values are α =(1.1 ±0.4 )×10-17N , λ =(35.2 ±0.6 ) μ m . Monte Carlo simulation of the SOLME data under the assumption of zero force residuals has indicated that the statistical significance of this signal is at about 2 σ level. The improvement of the χ2 fit compared to the null hypothesis (zero residual force) corresponds to Δ χ2=13.1 . There are indications that this previously unnoticed signal is indeed in the data but is most probably induced by a systematic effect caused by diffraction of non-Gaussian tails of the laser beam. Thus the amplitude of this detected signal can only be useful as an upper bound to the amplitude of new spatially oscillating forces on sub-mm scales. In the context of gravitational origin of the signal emerging from a fundamental modification of the Newtonian potential of the form Veff(r )=-G M/r (1 +αOcos (2/π λ r +θ ))≡VN(r )+Vosc(r ) , we evaluate the source integral of the oscillating macroscopically induced force. If the origin of the SOLME oscillating signal is systematic, the parameter αO is bounded as αOchameleon oscillating potentials etc.).

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  19. Overview of Findings from the World Trade Center Disaster Outcome Study: Recommendations for Future Research after Exposure to Psychological Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Boscarino, Joseph A.; Adams, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we review findings from the World Trade Center Disaster (WTCD) Outcomes Study, a prospective cohort study of 2,368 New York City (NYC) adults funded by the National Institutes of Health after the September 11 attacks. The findings reported were based on a baseline survey conducted one year after the disaster and a follow-up conducted two years post-disaster. One of the goals of this research was to assess the effectiveness of post-disaster treatments received by NYC residents ...

  20. Increasing Capacity for Stewardship of Oceans and Coasts: Findings of the National Research Council Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S. J.; Feeley, M. H.

    2008-05-01

    With the increasing stress on ocean and coastal resources, ocean resource management will require greater capacity in terms of people, institutions, technology and tools. Successful capacity-building efforts address the needs of a specific locale or region and include plans to maintain and expand capacity after the project ends. In 2008, the US National Research Council published a report that assesses past and current capacity-building efforts to identify barriers to effective management of coastal and marine resources. The report recommends ways that governments and organizations can strengthen marine conservation and management capacity. Capacity building programs instill the tools, knowledge, skills, and attitudes that address: ecosystem function and change; processes of governance that influence societal and ecosystem change; and assembling and managing interdisciplinary teams. Programs require efforts beyond traditional sector-by-sector planning because marine ecosystems range from the open ocean to coastal waters and land use practices. Collaboration among sectors, scaling from local community-based management to international ocean policies, and ranging from inland to offshore areas, will be required to establish coordinated and efficient governance of ocean and coastal ecosystems. Barriers Most capacity building activities have been initiated to address particular issues such as overfishing or coral reef degradation, or they target a particular region or country facing threats to their marine resources. This fragmentation inhibits the sharing of information and experience and makes it more difficult to design and implement management approaches at appropriate scales. Additional barriers that have limited the effectiveness of capacity building programs include: lack of an adequate needs assessment prior to program design and implementation; exclusion of targeted populations in decision- making efforts; mismanagement, corruption, or both; incomplete or

  1. Total skin electron irradiation in mycosis fungoides: comparison between a modified Christie Hospital translational technique and the Stanford technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacak, Y; Arican, Z; Drumea, K; Rosenblatt, E; Tamir, A; Chetver, L; Stein, M; Bar Deroma, R; Kuten, A

    2002-11-01

    Seventy-one patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) were treated by Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) using either a modified Christie Hospital translational technique (44 pts) or a six dual-field Stanford technique (27 pts). There was no statistical difference in response rate, disease-free survival and overall survival between the two irradiation techniques. However, the Stanford technique was significantly less toxic than the modified Christie Hospital technique.

  2. Experiences of racism and discrimination among migrant care workers in England:Findings from a mixed-methods research project

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Martin; Hussein, Shereen; Manthorpe, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Abstract This article reports part of the findings of research undertaken in 2007-09 that aimed to investigate the contribution made by migrant workers to the care workforce in England. The study involved analysis of national statistics on social care and social workers and semi-structured interviews with a wide range of stakeholders, including 96 migrant care workers. The interviews elicited some accounts relating experiences of racism and discrimination from some peo...

  3. [The Management of Depression in Older Adults and Their Family Caregivers: Findings from a Research Program in Quebec].

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Jane; Yaffe, Mark; Sussman, Tamara; Cole, Martin; Sewitch, Maida; Strumpf, Erin; Freeman, Ellen; Lambert, Sylvie; de Raad, Manon

    Objectives A research group based at St. Mary's Research Centre, St. Mary's Hospital, Montreal, has conducted a research program over the past two decades that aims to inform improvements in the management of depression in primary care and general medical settings, among older adults. This paper reviews the findings from this research program, discusses the findings in the context of other research, and highlights the implications for practice and health policy.Methods Narrative review and synthesis of 25 published articles, that included: 4 systematic reviews, 10 observational studies, 9 intervention trials, and 2 consensus conference reports.Results The results pertain to 4 research areas: detection of depression in primary care and general medical settings; collaborative care of depression; depression self-care interventions; and the role of family and friends in supporting depression self-care interventions.Conclusions We propose six recommendations for improving the management of depression in the target population. 1) Depression detection and treatment can be improved through collaborative care models that involve primary care physicians, mental health specialists and non-physician mental health workers who are trained to assist with the detection of depression, with the delivery of brief, low-intensity psychological interventions and with self-care support. More research and evaluation are necessary to determine the factors that enhance the effectiveness, cost-efficiency, and consumer-centeredness of these interventions. 2) Supported depression self-care (and other low-intensity interventions such as short problem-solving therapy) offered by telephone or via internet, either as part of collaborative or usual care are feasible treatment options but more research is necessary to determine their effectiveness in different clinical populations. Some populations (e.g., those aged 75 and over, with visual and/or mild cognitive impairment) are likely to need

  4. Enhancing the Participation of African Americans in Health-Related Genetic Research: Findings of a Collaborative Academic and Community-Based Research Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Millon Underwood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of African Americans in research has long been expressed as a concern by the scientific community. While efforts have been undertaken to identify factors inhibiting the participation of African Americans in health-related research, few efforts have been undertaken to have highlight factors associated with their engagement of health-related research. An exploratory study of factors presumed to be associated with participation in health-related research was conducted among a nonprobability sample of African Americans (n=212 from a large urban community in the Midwest. The study was guided by a framework that hypothesized the influence of knowledge, beliefs, and perceptions about genetics and the involvement of providers in decision-making on willingness to participate in health-related genetic research. The results revealed that knowledge, beliefs, and perceptions about genetics and the involvement of providers were associated with willingness to engage in health-related genetic research (P<.05. The most interesting, however, was that 88.7% of the participants who had not previously been involved in a health-related study who expressed a willingness to participate reported that they “had never been asked.” Study findings suggest the need for research that further examines factors associated with the involvement of African Americans in health-related genetic research.

  5. Assessing the Health Needs of Chinese Older Adults: Findings from a Community-Based Participatory Research Study in Chicago's Chinatown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XinQi Dong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to examine the cultural views of healthy aging, knowledge and barriers to services, and perception of health sciences research among community-dwelling Chinese older adults in Chicago's Chinatown. This qualitative study is guided by the Precede-Proceed conceptual model with community-based participatory research design. Data analysis is based on eight focus group interviews with Chinese older (age 60+ adults (n=78. We used a grounded theory framework to systematically guide the thematic structure of our data. Findings show participants described cultural conception of health in terms of physical function, psychological well-being, social support, and cognitive function. The availability, affordability, and cultural barriers towards health care services were major negative enabling factors that inhibit participants from fulfilling health needs. Perception and knowledge of health sciences research were also discussed. This study has implications for the delivery of culturally appropriate health care services to the Chinese aging population.

  6. Do Students Eventually Get to Publish their Research Findings? The Case of Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Research in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munung, Ns; Vidal, L; Ouwe-Missi-Oukem-Boyer, O

    2014-05-01

    Scientific publication is commonly used to communicate research findings and in most academic/research settings, to evaluate the potential of a researcher and for recruitment and promotion. It has also been said that researchers have the duty to make public, the findings of their research. As a result, researchers are encouraged to share their research findings with the scientific world through peer review publications. In this study, we looked at the characteristics and publication rate of theses that documented studies on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in Cameroon. TO CHECK IF A THESIS RESULTED IN A PUBLICATION, WE SEARCHED: A database of publications on HIV in Cameroon, African Journals Online, PubMed and Google scholar. For each publication we recorded if the student was an author, the position of the student in the author listing, the journal and where the journal was indexed. We also looked at the impact factor of the journals. One hundred and thirty theses/dissertations were included in the study, 74.6% (97/130) were written as part of a medical degree (MD), 23.8% (31/130) a postgraduate (PG) degree and 1.5% (2/130) for a Doctorate/PhD. On a whole, 13.9% (18/130) of the theses resulted in at least one publication in a scientific journal with a total of 22 journal articles, giving a mean publication rate of 0.17 article/thesis, 86.4% (11/22) were indexed on PubMed, 9.1% (2/22) on African Journals Online and 4.6% (1/22) on Google scholar. One PG thesis led to two book chapters. The student was the first author in 22.7% (5/22) of the articles and not an author in 9.1% (2/22) of the articles. Student supervisor was an author in all the articles. This study reveals that most students in Cameroon failed to transform their theses/dissertations to scientific publications. This indicates an urgent need to sensitize students on the importance of presenting their research findings in scientific meetings and peer reviewed journals

  7. The West African experience in establishing steering committees for better collaboration between researchers and decision-makers to increase the use of health research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, Namoudou; Lokossou, Virgil; Berthe, Abdramane; Sombie, Issiaka; Johnson, Ermel; Busia, Kofi

    2017-07-12

    Aware of the advantages of a project steering committee (SC) in terms of influencing the development of evidence-based health policies, the West African Health Organisation (WAHO) encouraged and supported the creation of such SCs around four research projects in four countries (Burkina Faso, Nigeria, Senegal and Sierra Leone). This study was conducted to describe the process that was used to establish these committees and its findings aim to assist other stakeholders in initiating this type of process. This is a cross-sectional, qualitative study of the initiative's four projects. In addition to a literature review and a review of the project documents, an interview guide was used to collect data from 14 members of the SCs, research teams, WAHO and the International Development Research Center. The respondents were selected with a view to reaching data saturation. The technique of thematic analysis by simple categorisation was used. To set up the SCs, a research team in each country worked with health authorities to identify potential members, organise meetings with these members and sought the authorities' approval to formalise the SCs. The SCs' mission was to provide technical assistance to the researchers during the implementation phase and to facilitate the transfer and use of the findings. The 'doing by learning' approach used by each research team, combined with WAHO's catalytic role with each country's Ministry of Health, helped each SC manage its contextual difficulties and function effectively. The involvement of technical and financial partners motivated the researchers and ministries of health, who, in turn, motivated other actors to volunteer on the SCs. The 'doing by learning' approach made it possible to develop strategies adapted to each context to create, facilitate and operate each SC and manage its difficulties. To reproduce such an experience, a strong understanding of the local context and the involvement of strong partners are required.

  8. Supporting institution-to-community transitions for people with psychiatric disabilities: Findings and implications from a participatory action research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gossett Zakrajsek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite preference for community-based living, large numbers of people with psychiatric disabilities live in nursing homes throughout the US. Community-based services for this population are limited by public policy and service system barriers. This paper summarizes these barriers and presents the second phase of a participatory action research project jointly developed by university-based researchers and two Centers for Independent Living. A qualitative case study methodology was used to understand the experiences of three individuals with psychiatric disabilities reintegrating into the community from nursing homes. Findings revealed themes of social isolation, participation in virtual communities, variability of impairment experiences and unmet needs for community supports. In addition to thematic findings, action products were generated for the benefit of community partners. These products included national best practice resources and a needs assessment survey tool. Study findings and products point to specific systems change and policy recommendations to better support community reintegration for this population. These recommendations are discussed in light of U.S. healthcare reform and broader disability advocacy efforts.

  9. Managing misaligned paternity findings in research including sickle cell disease screening in Kenya: 'consulting communities' to inform policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Vicki; Kombe, Francis; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Molyneux, Sassy; Parker, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The management of misaligned paternity findings raises important controversy worldwide. It has mainly, however, been discussed in the context of high-income countries. Genetic and genomics research, with the potential to show misaligned paternity, are becoming increasingly common in Africa. During a genomics study in Kenya, a dilemma arose over testing and sharing information on paternal sickle cell disease status. This dilemma may be paradigmatic of challenges in sharing misaligned paternity findings in many research and health care settings. Using a deliberative approach to community consultation to inform research practice, we explored residents' views on paternal testing and sharing misaligned paternity information. Between December 2009 and November 2010, 63 residents in Kilifi County were engaged in informed deliberative small group discussions, structured to support normative reflection within the groups, with purposive selection to explore diversity. Analysis was based on a modified framework analysis approach, drawing on relevant social science and bioethics literature. The methods generated in-depth individual and group reflection on morally important issues and uncovered wide diversity in views and values. Fundamental and conflicting values emerged around the importance of family interests and openness, underpinned by disagreement on the moral implications of marital infidelity and withholding truth. Wider consideration of ethical issues emerging in these debates supports locally-held reasoning that paternal sickle cell testing should not be undertaken in this context, in contrast to views that testing should be done with or without the disclosure of misaligned paternity information. The findings highlight the importance of facilitating wider testing of family members of affected children, contingent on the development and implementation of national policies for the management of this inherited disorder. Their richness also illustrates the potential for

  10. Managing misaligned paternity findings in research including sickle cell disease screening in Kenya: ‘Consulting communities’ to inform policy☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Vicki; Kombe, Francis; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Molyneux, Sassy; Parker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The management of misaligned paternity findings raises important controversy worldwide. It has mainly, however, been discussed in the context of high-income countries. Genetic and genomics research, with the potential to show misaligned paternity, are becoming increasingly common in Africa. During a genomics study in Kenya, a dilemma arose over testing and sharing information on paternal sickle cell disease status. This dilemma may be paradigmatic of challenges in sharing misaligned paternity findings in many research and health care settings. Using a deliberative approach to community consultation to inform research practice, we explored residents' views on paternal testing and sharing misaligned paternity information. Between December 2009 and November 2010, 63 residents in Kilifi County were engaged in informed deliberative small group discussions, structured to support normative reflection within the groups, with purposive selection to explore diversity. Analysis was based on a modified framework analysis approach, drawing on relevant social science and bioethics literature. The methods generated in-depth individual and group reflection on morally important issues and uncovered wide diversity in views and values. Fundamental and conflicting values emerged around the importance of family interests and openness, underpinned by disagreement on the moral implications of marital infidelity and withholding truth. Wider consideration of ethical issues emerging in these debates supports locally-held reasoning that paternal sickle cell testing should not be undertaken in this context, in contrast to views that testing should be done with or without the disclosure of misaligned paternity information. The findings highlight the importance of facilitating wider testing of family members of affected children, contingent on the development and implementation of national policies for the management of this inherited disorder. Their richness also illustrates the potential for

  11. Radical university-industry innovation – research design and preliminary findings from an on-going qualitative case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertsen, Frank; Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    and it is arguing that there is a lack of in-depth understanding of such collaborative radical innovation processes. The paper then suggests an abductive research design for an explorative in-depth case study of collaborative radical innovation involving a university and an established Danish manufacturing firm....... Some preliminary findings are presented and briefly discussed, including the role of the university’s formal set-up to deal with IPR/commercialisation and the researchers’ personal networking with industry as well as challenges concerning the sharing of IPR/commercialisation outcomes....

  12. Utilization of nondentist providers and attitudes toward new provider models: findings from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christine M; Funkhouser, D Ellen; Riggs, Sheila; Rindal, D Brad; Worley, Donald; Pihlstrom, Daniel J; Benjamin, Paul; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify, within the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network, current utilization of dental hygienists and assistants with expanded functions and quantify network dentists' attitudes toward a new nondentist provider model - the dental therapist. National Dental Practice-Based Research Network practitioner-investigators participated in a single, cross-sectional administration of a questionnaire. Current nondentist providers are not being utilized by network practitioner-investigators to the fullest extent allowed by law. Minnesota practitioners, practitioners in large group practices, and those with prior experience with expanded-function nondentist providers delegate at a higher rate and had more-positive perceptions of the new dental therapist model. Expanding scopes of practice for dental hygienists and assistants has not translated to the maximal delegation allowed by law among network practices. This finding may provide insight into dentists' acceptance of newer nondentist provider models. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  13. Addressing poverty and HIV using microenterprise: findings from qualitative research to reduce risk among unemployed or underemployed African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Cynthia; Marshall, Khiya; Courtenay-Quirk, Cari; Williams, Kim; Eke, Agatha; O'Leary, Ann; Stratford, Dale

    2012-08-01

    Microenterprise programs are widely used to improve health outcomes among women internationally. However, there is little information on applicability to American women living in poverty. We conducted formative research to identify activities that are viable and attractive, that may produce income to address some proportion of economic need and could be incorporated in the development of a micro-enterprise HIV-prevention intervention to reduce HIV/STD transmission among unemployed or underemployed African American women at risk for HIV. Focus groups were convened with young African American women and community leaders in two southern states. Interviews with women participating in the focus groups were also convened. Findings suggest an intervention should incorporate activities to increase self-esteem, enhance employability and job sustainability to decrease financial dependence. This research serves as the foundation for developing a novel approach to HIV prevention in the U.S. that may directly address poverty as a social determinant of health.

  14. High Power Klystrons: Theory and Practice at the Stanford Linear Accelerator CenterPart I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caryotakis, G.

    2004-12-15

    This is Part I of a two-part report on design and manufacturing methods used at SLAC to produce accelerator klystrons. Chapter 1 begins with the history and applications for klystrons, in both of which Stanford University was extensively involved. The remaining chapters review the theory of klystron operation, derive the principal formulae used in their design, and discuss the assumptions that they involve. These formulae are subsequently used in small-signal calculations of the frequency response of a particular klystron, whose performance is also simulated by two different computer codes. The results of calculations and simulations are compared to the actual performance of the klystron.

  15. Materials Research at Stanford University, 1 July 1980-30 June 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    constants of U(VI) aquo complexes with OH and any other ligands present in solution (F , PO4 , CO in our experiments). We have completed critical...both longitudinal and shear wave scanning to sort out more complex residual stress states. The acoustic experiments require the use of samples which are...large enough to yield results at a significant number of scanning points. The easiest complex residual stress state to induce is that in a rolled

  16. Materials Research at Stanford University, 1 July 1979 - 30 June 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    glutamate 5) F-actin 6) lambda-phage DNA . For BPTI and RNase, we have, as previously reported, obtained translational and rotational diffusion coefficients...signed to characterize- th- spectral content of the Grasshopper Monochrom- ator at the new SSRL soft x-ray beam line has also been performed, and the

  17. Finding and engaging patients and the public to work collaboratively on an acute infection microbiology research public panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Sally; Evans, David; Gibson, Andy; Chin, Teh Li; Stoddart, Margaret; Kok, Michele; Campbell, Richard; Kenny, Val; MacGowan, Alasdair

    2018-01-01

    In 2015 a microbiology team in Bristol joined a European research project that aims to develop new antibiotics to fight drug resistant infections. The microbiology team were convinced of the benefits of patient and public involvement, but had found it difficult to find former patients to work with on earlier microbiology research. This paper describes how the team overcame this challenge to successfully recruit a PPI panel to develop PPI within the European project.The advice from people with experience in public involvement was to decide what criteria were desirable for panel membership, think about what the work of the panel might involve and how long the project will go on. The team decided that experience of suffering a serious acute infection would qualify people to comment on this project. Next, the team needed to identify ways of finding people to join the PPI panel.The microbiology research team tried different ways to approach potential panel members. These included distributing flyers at public research events, sending emails to potentially interested people, posting a message on the hospital Facebook page and approaching eligible people known to the team. A direct approach was the most successful method - either by email, mail or in person. Ultimately 16 people were selected to form the panel. Key factors for success were planning what the work of the panel might be, perseverance despite early lack of success, and one person having overall responsibility for setting up the panel, with the support of the whole team. Background In 2015 the microbiology research team became involved in a large European programme of research aiming to bring new antimicrobial drugs onto the market to combat the increasing problem of multi-drug resistant infection. With the purpose of developing patient and public involvement (PPI) in this project, the team decided to recruit a PPI panel to work with. The microbiology team had previously worked with a PPI panel on other

  18. The benefits and challenges of research centers and institutes in academic medicine: findings from six universities and their medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, William T

    2006-06-01

    To understand the benefits and challenges of using centers and institutes in the academic research enterprise, and to explore institutional strategies that capitalize on the strengths and ameliorate the weaknesses of the center/institute structure. Using a qualitative research design, the author and associates interviewed over 150 faculty members and administrators at six medical schools and their parent universities in 2004. Interview data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. This methodology generated rich descriptions and explanations of the six institutions, which can produce extrapolations to, but not necessarily findings that are generalizable to, other institutions and settings. Centers and institutes offer a number of benefits to academic institutions. Centers can aid in faculty recruitment and retention, facilitate collaboration in research, secure research resources, offer a sense of community and promote continued learning, afford organizational flexibility, and focus on societal problems and raise funds. Despite their many benefits, centers can also create tensions and present management challenges to institutional leaders. Centers can compete with departments over resources, complicate faculty recruitment, contribute to a fragmented mission, resist effective evaluation, pose governance problems, and impede junior faculty development. Institutional leaders might capitalize on the strengths of centers through three strategies: (1) reward leaders who embrace a collaborative point of view and develop a culture that frowns upon empire building; (2) distinguish among the many entities that share the "center" or "institute" labels; and (3) acknowledge that departments must maintain their place in the organizational milieu.

  19. Matching the dosimetry characteristics of a dual-field Stanford technique to a customized single-field Stanford technique for total skin electron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Agostinelli, Alfred G; Wilson, Lynn D; Nath, Ravinder

    2004-07-01

    To compare the dosimetry characteristics of a customized single-field and a matching dual-field electron beam for total skin electron therapy (TSET) within the framework of the Stanford technique. To examine and quantify its impact on patient dosimetry. Two characteristically different electron beams were used for TSET employing the Stanford technique: a single-field beam created from a pencil beam of electrons passing through 7 meters of air and a dual-field beam created from two heavily scattered electron beams directed at oblique angles to patients. The dosimetry characteristics of the two beams were measured by using ionization chambers, radiographic films, and thermal luminescent detectors. The impact of beam characteristic on patient dosimetry was quantified on both anthromorphic phantoms and on patients. Treatment protocols aimed at matching the patient dose between the two systems were established on the basis of these and other measurements. The dual-field beam was matched to the single-field beam, resulting in approximately the same mean energy (approximately 4.0 MeV) and most probable energy (approximately 4.5 MeV) at their respective treatment source-to-patient-surface distance (SSD). The depth dose curves on the beam axis were nearly identical for both beams. X-ray contamination on the beam axis was 0.43% for the dual-field beam, slightly higher than that (0.4%) of the single-field beam. The beam uniformity, however, was quite different: the dual-field beam was more uniform in the vertical direction but was worse in the lateral direction compared to the single-field beam. For a TSET treatment using the Stanford technique, the composite depth dose curves were nearly identically at the level of beam axis: with an effective depth of maximum buildup (d(max)) at approximately 1 mm below the skin surface and the depth to 80% depth dose at around 6 mm. The overall X-ray contamination was approximately 1.0% and 1.2% for the single-field and dual-field system

  20. Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET in Web-based Classes: Preliminary Findings and a Call for Further Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Loveland, Ph.D.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Student evaluation of teaching (SET is important to faculty because SET ratings help faculty improve performance and are often used as the basis for evaluations of teaching effectiveness in administrative decisions (e.g., tenure. Researchers have conducted over 2,000 studies on SET during the past 70 years. However, despite the explosive growth in online education during the past decade, researchers have largely neglected the use of SET to evaluate teaching effectiveness in online courses. This exploratory study analyzed the actual SET data collected during a single semester at a large mid-western college that offers over 250 online/Web-based classes. The data included five dependent and eighteen independent measures of teaching effectiveness. The results indicate that average SET ratings in online classes are significantly lower than the average ratings in on-campus classes across all five dependent measures. This finding offers preliminary empirical support for anecdotal evidence cited by earlier authors in this field. Furthermore, regression analysis of the full model for each dependent variable indicated that the independent variables explained a significant portion of the variance in SET ratings. Examination of the standardized beta coefficients revealed that the strength and significance of the independent variables varied across the five dependent measures. Findings also indicate that organization of the course materials had a strong impact on all five measures of overall teaching effectiveness. Other variables including clarity of the instructor’s writing, timeliness in providing feedback, and interest in whether students learned were also significant factors in models that measured instructor effectiveness (as opposed to models that measured quality of course content. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications of this study for administrators, faculty, and researchers.

  1. Validation of the Italian version of the Stanford Presenteeism Scale in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicolini, Giancarlo; Della Pelle, Carlo; Cerratti, Francesca; Franza, Marcello; Flacco, Maria E

    2016-07-01

    To ascertain the validity and reliability of the Italian version of the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6). Presenteeism has been associated with a work productivity reduction, a lower quality of work and an increased risk of developing health disorders. It is particularly high among nurses and needs valid tools to be assessed. A validation study was carried out from July to September 2014. A three-section tool, made of a demographic form, the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) was administered to a sample of nurses, enrolled in three Italian hospitals. Cronbach's α for the entire sample (229 nurses) was found to be 0.72. A significant negative correlation between SPS and perceived stress scores evidenced the external validity. The factor analysis showed a two-component solution, accounting for 71.2% of the variance. The confirmatory factor analysis showed an adequate fit. The Italian SPS-6 is a valid and reliable tool for workplace surveys. Since the validity and reliability of SPS-6 has been confirmed for the Italian version, we have now a valid tool that can measure the levels of presenteeism among Italian nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Observations on the Stanford 4800 KG gravity wave detector with a cosmic ray monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, B. E.

    1986-09-01

    The group at Stanford University has constructed a 4800 kg cryogenic detector which is the most sensitive detector for gravitational radiation successfully operated to date. In this dissertation data are presented from the 1985 run of 36.8 days aggregate collection time. Over the full bandwidth of approximately 13 Hz, the optimum detector noise temperature was found to be 8 mK when the system was operated at 4.3 K. An actual filter was implemented over a 5 Hz bandwidth which yielded the filtered noise temperature of 15 mK. Filtering over the entire bandwidth and operation of a dilution refrigerator at 1 K should lower the noise temperature to below 3 mK. The rate of events whose signal temperature exceeded 0.6 K was found to be higher than that for a similar run in 1981, partly due to greater general activity in the laboratory. A preliminary coincidence experiment was conducted between the Stanford detector and a room temperature detector in Guangzhou, China. In a total of 9.38 days of simultaneous data collection the number of coincidences observed was entirely consistent with random statistics. In the second half of this dissertation, the effect of cosmic rays on a gravity wave bar detector is considered. A one-dimensional thermoacoustic model is used to predict the size of the signal. Measurable effects are restricted to rarer events which may easily be vetoed as gravity wave candidates.

  3. Engaging Scientists and Educators in the IHY: A Case Study of Stanford's Space Weather Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, D. K.; Burress, B.; Hoeksema, T.

    2007-05-01

    The IHY offers unique opportunities to provide education and public outreach programs throughout the world. The Stanford Solar Center has developed a student-focused space weather monitoring program aimed at developing global understanding of the response of Earth's atmosphere to terrestrial and extraterrestrial drivers. Through our educational component, we hope to inspire the next generation of space and Earth scientists and spread the knowledge of our solar system and the exciting process of scientific exploration to the people of the world! Stanford's Solar Center in conjunction with the Space, Telecommunications and Radioscience Laboratory and local educators have developed inexpensive Space Weather Monitor instruments that students around the world can use to track and study solar- and lightning-induced changes to the Earth's ionosphere. Through the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) and the IHY Education and Public Outreach Program, we are deploying these instruments for student use at high school and early university levels. The distribution includes science resources as well as classroom materials and educator support. A centralized database allows collection of, and free access to, world-wide data. Scientists and radio experts serve as mentors to students, and assist them in understanding their data. We will describe the monitor distribution program, focusing particularly on how we are engaging scientists to participate and on the role of educators, plus the resources provided to them, in high schools and universities throughout the world.

  4. Reconstructing, Investigating the Reliability and Validity and Scoring the Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Saleh Sedghpour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to reconstruct determining validity, and score The Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test fourth edition (SDRT4 in the sixth grade students. Methods: The population of the study was all sixth grades of the 19 educational districts from Tehran, 571 students (255 boys and 316 girls were selected by using a random multi-cluster sampling. The data were analyzed. The techniques were item analysis (difficulty index, discriminative index, and loop techniques. Validity, translation validity, content validity, and construct validity (factorial analysis, and reliability (Kuder-Richardson. Results: The exploratory factor analysis determined five factors: declarative knowledge, inferential knowledge, procedural knowledge and visualization knowledge. The reliability of the Stanford diagnostic Reading Test’s subtests by computing the Kuder-Richardson coefficient were 0.778, 0.732 and 0.748 for comprehension subtest, vocabulary subtest and scanning subtest in order. Discussion: By considering the results of present study, SDRT4 has good reliability and validity and can appropriately diagnose the reading disabled students in the sixth grade.

  5. FIRST AND SECOND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT IN YOUNG CHILDREN AND BILINGUALISM IN LIGHT OF LINGUISTICS, NEUROLINGUISTICS AND FINDINGS FROM BRAIN RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus PINAR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review shows that infants begin picking up elements of what will be their first language in the womb, and certainly long before their first coo according to the current guidelines and it presents a descriptive approach to bilingualism and multilingualism. This article is the outcome of a thorough survey of literature and primarily it aims to present the similarities and differences between the L1 and L2 acquisition in light of linguistics, neurolinguistics and findings from brain research. This Review will illustrate various thought and new hypotheses on first and second language development, bilingualism and multilingualism derived from studies in linguistics, neurolinguistics and brain research. In the context of our paper we shall try to describe aspects and stages of first language acquisition from even before birth especially the 20th week of the fetal development of the baby to 60th week of life, as well as the second language acquisition process, which is divided into three types: simultaneous, consecutive and adult. In particular, we will present and discuss some of the main results of the brain researchers like Franceschini and De Bleser and we shall interpret them.

  6. Climate change and human infectious diseases: A synthesis of research findings from global and spatio-temporal perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lu; Gong, Peng

    2017-06-01

    The life cycles and transmission of most infectious agents are inextricably linked with climate. In spite of a growing level of interest and progress in determining climate change effects on infectious disease, the debate on the potential health outcomes remains polarizing, which is partly attributable to the varying effects of climate change, different types of pathogen-host systems, and spatio-temporal scales. We summarize the published evidence and show that over the past few decades, the reported negative or uncertain responses of infectious diseases to climate change has been growing. A feature of the research tendency is the focus on temperature and insect-borne diseases at the local and decadal scale. Geographically, regions experiencing higher temperature anomalies have been given more research attention; unfortunately, the Earth's most vulnerable regions to climate variability and extreme events have been less studied. From local to global scales, agreements on the response of infectious diseases to climate change tend to converge. So far, an abundance of findings have been based on statistical methods, with the number of mechanistic studies slowly growing. Research gaps and trends identified in this study should be addressed in the future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact on healthcare, policy and practice from 36 multi-project research programmes: findings from two reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanney, Steve; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Blatch-Jones, Amanda; Glover, Matthew; Raftery, James

    2017-03-28

    We sought to analyse the impacts found, and the methods used, in a series of assessments of programmes and portfolios of health research consisting of multiple projects. We analysed a sample of 36 impact studies of multi-project research programmes, selected from a wider sample of impact studies included in two narrative systematic reviews published in 2007 and 2016. We included impact studies in which the individual projects in a programme had been assessed for wider impact, especially on policy or practice, and where findings had been described in such a way that allowed them to be collated and compared. Included programmes were highly diverse in terms of location (11 different countries plus two multi-country ones), number of component projects (8 to 178), nature of the programme, research field, mode of funding, time between completion and impact assessment, methods used to assess impact, and level of impact identified. Thirty-one studies reported on policy impact, 17 on clinician behaviour or informing clinical practice, three on a combined category such as policy and clinician impact, and 12 on wider elements of impact (health gain, patient benefit, improved care or other benefits to the healthcare system). In those multi-programme projects that assessed the respective categories, the percentage of projects that reported some impact was policy 35% (range 5-100%), practice 32% (10-69%), combined category 64% (60-67%), and health gain/health services 27% (6-48%). Variations in levels of impact achieved partly reflected differences in the types of programme, levels of collaboration with users, and methods and timing of impact assessment. Most commonly, principal investigators were surveyed; some studies involved desk research and some interviews with investigators and/or stakeholders. Most studies used a conceptual framework such as the Payback Framework. One study attempted to assess the monetary value of a research programme's health gain. The widespread

  8. Handling incidental findings in neuroimaging research in Japan: current state of research facilities and attitudes of investigators and the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Misao; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Tashiro, Shimon; Takashima, Kyoko; Nakazawa, Eisuke; Akabayashi, Akira

    2014-10-06

    To establish appropriate measures that deal with incidental findings (IFs), the neuroscience community needs to address various ethical issues. The current state of research facilities regarding IFs and investigator attitudes as well as potentially eligible research participants must be assessed prior to future discussions and before the development of policies and guidelines. To this end, we conducted two questionnaire surveys to clarify i) how IFs are addressed at neuroimaging research facilities in Japan and ii) the views of investigators and potential research participants regarding the handling of IFs. Thirty-one principal investigators (PIs) involved in the Strategic Research Program for Brain Sciences (SRPBS), a government-funded project, were asked to fill out a questionnaire regarding ways IFs were handled at the facility. A total of 110 investigators engaged in SRPBS tasks, including 31 PIs who participated in the research facility survey and researchers conducting studies under the management of the PIs, and 500 individuals from the general public (i.e., general population) were asked to select the most appropriate way to deal with IFs in two scenarios, namely the medical school and humanities and social sciences department scenarios. More than 40% of PIs responded that they did not know or were unsure of what type of approach was employed to handle IFs at their research facilities. Nevertheless, they were willing to improve the current status if sufficient resources were provided. With regard to specialist involvement, 37.7% of investigators responded that it was appropriate to have a specialist check all images in the medical school scenario, whereas 13.3% responded that such involvement was appropriate in the humanities and social sciences department scenario. In contrast, 76.1% and 61.0% of the general population indicated that specialist involvement was appropriate in the medical school and humanities and social sciences department scenarios

  9. A new US-UK diagnostic project: mood elevation and depression in first-year undergraduates at Oxford and Stanford universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, R A; Wang, P W; Ketter, T A; Goodwin, G M

    2008-07-01

    To investigate differences in prevalence of mood elevation, distress and depression among first-year undergraduates at Oxford and Stanford universities. An online survey was sent to Oxford and Stanford first-year undergraduate students for two consecutive years in the winter of 2005 and 2006. Students completed a survey that assessed mood symptoms and medication use. Both universities had similar rates of distress by General Health Questionnaire (Oxford - 42.4%; Stanford - 38.3%), depression by Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (Oxford - 6.2%; Stanford - 6.6%), and psychotropic and non-psychotropic medication usage (psychotropic: Oxford - 1.5%; Stanford 3.5%; nonpsychotropic: Oxford - 13.3%; Stanford - 18%). Oxford had higher rates of mood elevation by Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) (Oxford - 4%; Stanford - 1.7%). Oxford and Stanford students have similar rates of mood distress, depression and general medication usage. Students at Oxford have a higher prevalence of MDQ scores that possibly indicate a bipolar disorder, while Stanford students are prescribed more psychotropics.

  10. [Great discoveries: from the painstaking efforts of researchers to the contribution of accidental findings and the dissemination of study results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garattini, Silvio

    2015-06-01

    This article takes its cue from the original work of sir Alexander Fleming on penicillin, published in the first issue of Recenti Progressi in Medicina in 1946 and reproduced here on the occasion of the approaching 70-year anniversary of the journal. The path that brought Fleming to the discovery of penicillin, one of the major milestones in the history of clinical pharmacology, provides insight for a range of considerations: the painstaking efforts of researchers, the contribution from accidental findings, and the dissemination of study results. Although the discovery of penicillin has changed the course of medicine, the benefits deriving from such an important advance are most likely to be offset by the overprescription of antibiotics, which is the leading cause of antimicrobial resistance and one of the most serious public health problems of our time.

  11. Adolescent perceptions of violence: formative research findings from a social marketing campaign to reduce violence among middle school youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, G P; Bell-Ellison, B A; Loomis, W; Tucci, M

    2007-05-01

    To identify the specific barriers and benefits of violent behaviours as noted by middle school youth and to develop a social marketing campaign that attends to the needs and wants of the target audience. A non-experimental, qualitative study design was used to assess youth perceptions of violence in a large, southeast urban school district. Using a social marketing approach, a series of in-depth interviews were conducted with middle school youths, to gain an understanding of perceived barriers and benefits of violent behaviours. Additionally, interviews assessed youth preferences for an effective spokesperson for an anti-violence campaign. Qualitative analysis of coded transcripts revealed key themes that were incorporated into a multi-media initiative. Critical themes of the research highlighted that the majority of violence occurs at school, during school hours and most of the youths believed the use of violence was necessary to defend themselves from other peers or to protect family members. Another key finding pertained to adolescent views on violent people; although the majority of respondents reported engaging in violent acts, they did not view themselves as violent. Results were used to inform the development of a social marketing campaign designed to reduce youth violence among middle school students in a large, urban central Florida school district. Findings from the formative research led to the creation and pre-testing of five potential campaign brands. The campaign slogan that tested best with the target audience emphasized the choice youth have to either engage in violent behaviour and suffer the consequences or to 'rise above' physical conflict and reap the benefits.

  12. Reproducibility of the acute rejection diagnosis in human cardiac allografts. The Stanford Classification and the International Grading System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Nielsen, B

    1993-01-01

    Transplantation has become an accepted treatment of many cardiac end-stage diseases. Acute cellular rejection accounts for 15% to 20% of all graft failures. The first grading system of acute cellular rejection, the Stanford Classification, was introduced in 1979, and since then many other grading...... systems have evolved. Most recently, the International Grading System was introduced in The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. In this study the interobserver reproducibility of both the Stanford Classification and the International Grading System is evaluated using Kappa statistics. Three...... observers evaluated 168 endomyocardial biopsy specimens according to the Stanford Classification and 100 endomyocardial biopsy specimens according to the International Grading System. The evaluation was carried out blindly. Kappa values of 54.1% and 51.5%, respectively, were obtained, both significantly...

  13. Role of "external facilitation" in implementation of research findings: a qualitative evaluation of facilitation experiences in the Veterans Health Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagedorn Hildi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facilitation has been identified in the literature as a potentially key component of successful implementation. It has not, however, either been well-defined or well-studied. Significant questions remain about the operational definition of facilitation and about the relationship of facilitation to other interventions, especially to other change agent roles when used in multi-faceted implementation projects. Researchers who are part of the Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI are actively exploring various approaches and processes, including facilitation, to enable implementation of best practices in the Veterans Health Administration health care system – the largest integrated healthcare system in the United States. This paper describes a systematic, retrospective evaluation of implementation-related facilitation experiences within QUERI, a quality improvement program developed by the US Department of Veterans Affairs. Methods A post-hoc evaluation was conducted through a series of semi-structured interviews to examine the concept of facilitation across several multi-site QUERI implementation studies. The interview process is based on a technique developed in the field of education, which systematically enhances learning through experience by stimulating recall and reflection regarding past complex activities. An iterative content analysis approach relative to a set of conceptually-based interview questions was used for data analysis. Findings Findings suggest that facilitation, within an implementation study initiated by a central change agency, is a deliberate and valued process of interactive problem solving and support that occurs in the context of a recognized need for improvement and a supportive interpersonal relationship. Facilitation was described primarily as a distinct role with a number of potentially crucial behaviors and activities. Data further suggest that external facilitators were likely to use

  14. The Real Controversy about Child Sexual Abuse Research: Contradictory Findings and Critical Issues Not Addressed by Rind, Tromovitch, and Bauserman in Their 1998 Outcomes Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Pamela Paradis; Whittenburg, John A.; Baker, Gail L.; Lemmey, Dorothy E.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a review of all types of child sexual abuse research ignored by Rind, Tromovitch, and Bauserman in their 1998 meta-analytic study. Eight major findings are addressed. Altogether these findings demonstrate the narrow focus of the meta-analysis. By restricting a broad meta-analysis to only some of the research and population in question,…

  15. Communicating Experimental Findings in Single Case Design Research: How to Use Celeration Values and Celeration Multipliers to Measure Direction, Magnitude, and Change of Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datchuk, Shawn M.; Kubina, Richard M., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The accumulation of scientific knowledge greatly depends upon the critical review of experimental findings by ones peers. In single case design research, experimenters present findings with graphical displays of data and narrative description of a visual analysis. To aid in efficient and accurate description of experimental findings, the research…

  16. Carbohydrate supplementation and prolonged intermittent high-intensity exercise in adolescents: research findings, ethical issues and suggestions for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Shaun M

    2012-10-01

    In the last decade, research has begun to investigate the efficacy of carbohydrate supplementation for improving aspects of physical capacity and skill performance during sport-specific exercise in adolescent team games players. This research remains in its infancy, and further study would be beneficial considering the large youth population actively involved in team games. Literature on the influence of carbohydrate supplementation on skill performance is scarce, limited to shooting accuracy in adolescent basketball players and conflicting in its findings. Between-study differences in the exercise protocol, volume of fluid and carbohydrate consumed, use of prior fatiguing exercise and timing of skill tests may contribute to the different findings. Conversely, initial data supports carbohydrate supplementation in solution and gel form for improving intermittent endurance running capacity following soccer-specific shuttle running. These studies produced reliable data, but were subject to limitations including lack of quantification of the metabolic response of participants, limited generalization of data due to narrow participant age and maturation ranges, use of males and females within the same sample and non-standardized pre-exercise nutritional status between participants. There is a lack of consensus regarding the influence of frequently consuming carbohydrate-containing products on tooth enamel erosion and the development of obesity or being overweight in adolescent athletes and non-athletes. These discrepancies mean that the initiation or exacerbation of health issues due to frequent consumption of carbohydrate-containing products by adolescents cannot be conclusively refuted. Coupled with the knowledge that consuming a natural, high-carbohydrate diet -3-8 hours before exercise can significantly alter substrate use and improve exercise performance in adults, a moral and ethical concern is raised regarding the direction of future research in order to further

  17. Multicultural assessment of child and adolescent psychopathology with ASEBA and SDQ instruments: research findings, applications, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Thomas M; Becker, Andreas; Döpfner, Manfred; Heiervang, Einar; Roessner, Veit; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2008-03-01

    thus indicate more heterogeneity within populations than distinctiveness between populations. Norms from multiple populations can be used to compare children's scores with relevant peer groups. Multicultural dimensional research can advance knowledge by diversifying normative data; by comparing immigrant children with nonimmigrant compatriots and with host country children; by identifying outlier findings for elucidation by emic research; and by fostering efforts to dimensionalize DSM-V diagnostic criteria.

  18. Gender Research in the National Institute on Drug Abuse National Treatment Clinical Trials Network: A Summary of Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Shelly F.; Rosa, Carmen; Putnins, Susan I.; Green, Carla A.; Brooks, Audrey J.; Calsyn, Donald A.; Cohen, Lisa R.; Erickson, Sarah; Gordon, Susan M.; Haynes, Louise; Killeen, Therese; Miele, Gloria; Tross, Susan; Winhusen, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Background The NIDA National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) was established to foster translation of research into practice in substance abuse treatment settings. The CTN provides a unique opportunity to examine in multi-site, translational clinical trials, the outcomes of treatment interventions targeting vulnerable sub-groups of women; the comparative effectiveness of gender-specific protocols to reduce risk behaviors; and gender differences in clinical outcomes. Objectives To review gender-related findings from published CTN clinical trials and related studies from January, 2000 through March, 2010. Methods CTN studies were selected for review if they focused on treatment outcomes or services for special populations of women with substance use disorders (SUDs) including those with trauma histories, pregnancy, co-occurring eating and other psychiatric disorders and HIV risk behaviors; or implemented gender-specific protocols. Results The CTN has randomized 11,500 participants (41% women) across 200 clinics in 24 randomized clinical trials in community settings, of which 4 have been gender-specific. This paper summarizes gender-related findings from CTN clinical trials and related studies, focusing on trauma histories, pregnancy, co-occurring eating and other psychiatric disorders, and HIV risk behaviors. Conclusions These published studies have expanded the evidence base regarding interventions for vulnerable groups of women with SUDs as well as gender-specific interventions to reduce HIV risk behaviors in substance using men and women. The results also underscore the complexity of accounting for gender in the design of clinical trials and analysis of results. Scientific Relevance To fully understand the relevance of gender-specific moderators and mediators of outcome, it is essential that future translational studies adopt more sophisticated approaches to understanding and measuring gender-relevant factors and plan sample sizes that are

  19. Experiments in advanced control concepts for space robotics - An overview of the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollars, M. G.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Alexander, H. L.; Morse, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford University Aerospace Robotics Laboratory is actively developing and experimentally testing advanced robot control strategies for space robotic applications. Early experiments focused on control of very lightweight one-link manipulators and other flexible structures. The results are being extended to position and force control of mini-manipulators attached to flexible manipulators and multilink manipulators with flexible drive trains. Experimental results show that end-point sensing and careful dynamic modeling or adaptive control are key to the success of these control strategies. Free-flying space robot simulators that operate on an air cushion table have been built to test control strategies in which the dynamics of the base of the robot and the payload are important.

  20. Saw-tooth Instability Studies At The Stanford Linear Collider Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Podobedov, B V

    2000-01-01

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blowup in quadrupole or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of our instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional we had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency (10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. We have also employed the state-of the art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of our streak camera experiments we have quantitatively described the p...

  1. The Sound Games: Introducing Gamification into Stanford's Orientation on Emergency Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Viveta; Stromberg, Andrew Q; Rosston, Peter

    2017-09-18

    Point-of-care ultrasound is a critical component of graduate medical training in emergency medicine. Innovation in ultrasound teaching methods is greatly needed to keep up with a changing medical landscape. A field-wide trend promoting simulation and technology-enhanced learning is underway in an effort to improve patient care, as well as patient safety. In an effort to both motivate students and increase their skill retention, training methods are shifting towards a friendly competition model and are gaining popularity nationwide. In line with this emerging trend, Stanford incorporated the Sound Games - an educational ultrasound event with a distinctly competitive thread - within its existing two-day point-of-care ultrasound orientation course for emergency medicine interns. In this study, we demonstrate successful implementation of the orientation program, significant learning gains in participants, and overall student satisfaction with the course.

  2. Soil erosion and degradation in Mediterranean Type Ecosystems. The Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group (SEDER) approach and findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Keesstra, Saskia; Pulido, Manuel; Jordán, Antonio; Novara, Agata; Giménez-Morera, Antonio; Borja, Manuel Esteban Lucas; Francisco Martínez-Murillo, Juan; Rodrigo-Comino, Jesús; Pereira, Paulo; Nadal-Romero, Estela; Taguas, Tani; Úbeda, Xavier; Brevik, Eric C.; Tarolli, Paolo; Bagarello, Vicenzo; Parras Alcantara, Luis; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Oliva, Marc; di Prima, Simone

    2017-04-01

    The Soil Erosion and Degradation Reseach Group (SEDER) is developing a research program since 2002 to assess the soil erosion and degradation processes at the Canyoles River watershed in Eastern Spain. The research study site was selected as representative of the environmental changes that take place in the Mediterranean: abandonment of the agriculture land in the mountains, forest fire expansion, intensification of the agriculture, impact of the infraesturctures such as rail and road embankments, and soil sealing due to the urban expansion. The research is based on the continuous measurements in the Montesa and El Teularet research stations and the sampling of the soils, topographical measurements and the use of rainfall simulators, minidisk infiltrometers, ring infiltrometers and Water Drop Penetration Time tests. The research is moving from a pure scientific approach to a more socio-economic view, and the stakeholders are being researched from a perception point of view. SEDER is also moving from pure to applied science, with the objective to design new managements that will satisfy the stakeholders and will achieve the sustainability. The research is being carried out in vineyards and orchards as they show extremely high erosion rates. But also we are interested in the impact of forest fires and the road embankments. In all three research topics, SEDER wish to find the sustainable managements. Acknowledgements The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 603498 (RECARE project) and the CGL2013- 47862-C2-1-R and CGL2016-75178-C2-2-R national research projects. References Bodí, M. B., Martin, D. A., Balfour, V. N., Santín, C., Doerr, S. H., Pereira, P., . . . Mataix-Solera, J. (2014). Corrigendum to "wildland fire ash: Production, composition and eco-hydro-geomorphic effects", earth sci. rev. 130 (2014) [103-127]. Earth-Science Reviews, 138, 503. doi:10

  3. Healthy Universities: current activity and future directions--findings and reflections from a national-level qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooris, Mark; Doherty, Sharon

    2010-09-01

    This qualitative study used questionnaires to scope and explore 'healthy universities' activity taking place within English higher education institutions (HEIs). The findings revealed a wealth of health-related activity and confirmed growing interest in the healthy universities approach--reflecting an increasing recognition that investment for health within the sector will contribute not only to health targets but also to mainstream agendas such as staff and student recruitment, experience and retention; and institutional and societal productivity and sustainability. However, they also suggested that, while there is growing understanding of the need for a comprehensive whole system approach to improving health within higher education settings, there are a number of very real challenges--including a lack of rigorous evaluation, the difficulty of integrating health into a 'non-health' sector and the complexity of securing sustainable cultural change. Noting that health and well-being remain largely marginal to the core mission and organization of higher education, the article goes on to reflect on the wider implications for future research and policy at national and international levels. Within England, whereas there are Healthy Schools and Healthy Further Education Programmes, there is as yet no government-endorsed programme for universities. Similarly, at an international level, there has been no systematic investment in higher education mirroring the comprehensive and multifaceted Health Promoting Schools Programme. Key issues highlighted are: securing funding for evaluative research within and across HEIs to enable the development of a more robust evidence base for the approach; advocating for an English National Healthy Higher Education Programme that can help to build consistency across the entire spectrum of education; and exploring with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) the feasibility

  4. Dosimetric characterization and optimization of a customized Stanford total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luĉić, Felipe; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Caprile, Paola; Zelada, Gabriel; Goset, Karen

    2013-09-06

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) has been used as a treatment for mycosis fungoides. Our center has implemented a modified Stanford technique with six pairs of 6 MeV adjacent electron beams, incident perpendicularly on the patient who remains lying on a translational platform, at 200 cm from the source. The purpose of this study is to perform a dosimetric characterization of this technique and to investigate its optimization in terms of energy characteristics, extension, and uniformity of the treatment field. In order to improve the homogeneity of the distribution, a custom-made polyester filter of variable thickness and a uniform PMMA degrader plate were used. It was found that the characteristics of a 9 MeV beam with an 8 mm thick degrader were similar to those of the 6 MeV beam without filter, but with an increased surface dose. The combination of the degrader and the polyester filter improved the uniformity of the distribution along the dual field (180cm long), increasing the dose at the borders of field by 43%. The optimum angles for the pair of beams were ± 27°. This configuration avoided displacement of the patient, and reduced the treatment time and the positioning problems related to the abutting superior and inferior fields. Dose distributions in the transversal plane were measured for the six incidences of the Stanford technique with film dosimetry in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom. This was performed for the optimized treatment and compared with the previously implemented technique. The comparison showed an increased superficial dose and improved uniformity of the 85% isodose curve coverage for the optimized technique.

  5. Research cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in end stage renal disease - incidence, significance and implications of unexpected incidental findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Elaine; Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Houston, J.G.; Struthers, Allan D. [Ninewells Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular and Diabetes Medicine, Dundee (United Kingdom); Patel, Rajan K.; Jardine, Alan G.; Mark, Patrick B. [Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Roditi, Giles [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Department of Radiology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Left ventricular mass (LVM) at cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is a frequent end point in clinical trials in nephrology. Trial participants with end stage renal disease (ESRD) may have a greater frequency of incidental findings (IF). We retrospectively investigated prevalence of IF in previous research CMR and reviewed their subsequent impact on participants. Between 2002 and 2006, 161 ESRD patients underwent CMR in a transplant assessment study. Images were used to assess LV mass and function. In the current study a radiologist reviewed the scans for IF. Review of patient records determined the subsequent clinical significance of IF. There were 150 IF in 95 study participants. Eighty-four (56 %) were new diagnoses. One hundred and two were non-cardiac. Fifteen were suspicious of malignancy. There was a clinically significant IF for 14.9 % of the participants. In six cases earlier identification of an IF may have improved quality of life or survival. Without radiology support clinically important IF may be missed on CMR. Patients undergoing CMR in trials should be counselled about the frequency and implications of IF. Patients with ESRD have a higher prevalence of IF than reported in other populations. Nephrology studies require mechanisms for radiologist reporting and strategies for dealing with IF. (orig.)

  6. Country variations in depressive symptoms profile in Asian countries: Findings of the Research on Asia Psychotropic Prescription (REAP) studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Kok-Yoon; Tripathi, Adarsh; Avasthi, Ajit; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Sim, Kang; Si, Tian-Mei; Kanba, Shigenobu; He, Yan-Ling; Lee, Min-Soo; Fung-Kum Chiu, Helen; Yang, Shu-Yu; Kuga, Hironori; Udormatn, Pichet; Kallivayalil, Roy A; Tanra, Andi J; Maramis, Margarita; Grover, Sandeep; Chin, Loi-Fei; Dahlan, Rahima; Mohamad Isa, Mohd Fadzli; Ebenezer, Esther Gunaseli M; Nordin, Norhayati; Shen, Winston W; Shinfuku, Naotaka; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Sartorius, Norman

    2015-09-01

    This study was to assess differences in the symptom profile of depressive illness across various countries/territories in Asia. The study was a part of the Research on Asia Psychotropic Prescription project. The participating countries/territories include China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand. The pattern of depressive symptoms in 1,400 subjects with depressive disorder from 42 psychiatric centers in 10 Asian countries/territories was assessed. We collected information on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics with a standardized protocol and data collection procedure. The most common presentations of depressive symptoms were persistent sadness, loss of interest, and insomnia. Similar findings were found regardless of the region, country, or its income level. Patients with depressive disorder from high-income countries presented significantly more with vegetative symptom cluster (P patients with depressive symptoms had significantly less mood symptom cluster (P patients, across different countries/territories, core depressive symptoms remain the same. Variations have been found in presentation of depressive symptoms with regards to the level of income of countries. Physical or vegetative symptoms were reported more by centers in higher income countries, while depressive cognition and suicidal thoughts/acts were more frequently reported from lower income countries. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Experimental findings on actinide recovery utilizing oxidation by peroxydisulfate followed by ion exchange: Fuel cycle research & development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shehee, T. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-31

    Our research seeks to determine if inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective minor actinide (Am, Cm) separation from lanthanides. Previous work has established that a number of inorganic and UMOF ion-exchange materials exhibit varying affinities for actinides and lanthanides, which may be exploited for effective separations. During FY15, experimental work focused on investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric and perchloric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium in dilute nitric acid. Ion-exchange materials tested included a variety of alkali titanates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of AmIII. Experimental findings indicated that CeIII, NpV, and RuII are oxidized by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of CeIII, NpV, and RuII affected the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used.

  8. Role of "external facilitation" in implementation of research findings: a qualitative evaluation of facilitation experiences in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, Cheryl B; Legro, Marcia W; Rycroft-Malone, Joanne; Bowman, Candice; Curran, Geoffrey; Guihan, Marylou; Hagedorn, Hildi; Pineros, Sandra; Wallace, Carolyn M

    2006-10-18

    Facilitation has been identified in the literature as a potentially key component of successful implementation. It has not, however, either been well-defined or well-studied. Significant questions remain about the operational definition of facilitation and about the relationship of facilitation to other interventions, especially to other change agent roles when used in multi-faceted implementation projects. Researchers who are part of the Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) are actively exploring various approaches and processes, including facilitation, to enable implementation of best practices in the Veterans Health Administration health care system - the largest integrated healthcare system in the United States. This paper describes a systematic, retrospective evaluation of implementation-related facilitation experiences within QUERI, a quality improvement program developed by the US Department of Veterans Affairs. A post-hoc evaluation was conducted through a series of semi-structured interviews to examine the concept of facilitation across several multi-site QUERI implementation studies. The interview process is based on a technique developed in the field of education, which systematically enhances learning through experience by stimulating recall and reflection regarding past complex activities. An iterative content analysis approach relative to a set of conceptually-based interview questions was used for data analysis. Findings suggest that facilitation, within an implementation study initiated by a central change agency, is a deliberate and valued process of interactive problem solving and support that occurs in the context of a recognized need for improvement and a supportive interpersonal relationship. Facilitation was described primarily as a distinct role with a number of potentially crucial behaviors and activities. Data further suggest that external facilitators were likely to use or integrate other implementation interventions, while

  9. MOOCs and the AI-Stanford Like Courses: Two Successful and Distinct Course Formats for Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C. Osvaldo

    2012-01-01

    Open online courses (OOC) with a massive number of students have represented an important development for online education in the past years. A course on artificial intelligence, CS221, at the University of Stanford was offered in the fall of 2011 free and online which attracted 160,000 registered students. It was one of three offered as an…

  10. Project-based production and project management: Findings and trends in research on temporary systems in multiple contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinus Pretorius

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Globalisation is challenging almost every aspect of the political, economic, social and technological environment. Organisations, whether public or private, have to adapt their strategies and operations to stay competitive and efficient. Historically, organisations adopted project-based operations as a mode to stay competitive, although the applications tended to be the oneoff type of operations such as construction and system development projects (Edum-Fotwe & McCaffer, 2000. As the world changed from an industrially driven to a more knowledge driven economy and the pace of continuous change became more intense, organisations adopted a project-based mode of operations on a broader scale. The knowledge economy lead to the creation of many service orientated industries. Organisations started facing portfolios of projects where the nature of these projects differed in technological complexity, urgency, customer value and social impact (Gutjahr & Froeschl, 2013. Based on their experience with more technically orientated projects, organisations focused their attention more intensely on new project management methods, tools and processes and not necessarily on the human and organisational interfaces. This paradigm changed however, especially since the 1980s and more and more organisations adopted temporary organisational forms (Bakker, 2010 in order to improve their competitiveness. The contributions in this special edition of the South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences have a common focus on the importance of the human and organisational interface of project-based operations on project success. The purpose of this concluding article is to analyse the findings and recommendations in these papers and to detect trends and future research opportunities in the field of project-based operations.

  11. Law enforcement-derived data on gabapentin diversion and misuse, 2002-2015: diversion rates and qualitative research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttram, Mance E; Kurtz, Steven P; Dart, Richard C; Margolin, Zachary R

    2017-09-01

    Recent limited epidemiologic and case reports suggest that gabapentin is being misused, especially among prescription opioid misusers. However, no apparent studies have reported data from law enforcement on the diversion and misuse of gabapentin. Case report data are drawn from a quarterly survey of prescription drug diversion completed by a national sample of law enforcement and regulatory agencies who engage in drug diversion investigations. Rates of gabapentin diversion per 100 000 population were calculated for each quarter from 2002 through 2015. Qualitative data are drawn from a brief questionnaire completed by a subsample of survey respondents and were organized and presented by theme. In total, 407 new cases of diverted gabapentin were reported during the time period, with diversion rates steadily increasing from zero cases in the first 2 quarters of 2002 to a high of 0.027 cases per 100 000 population in the fourth quarter of 2015. Qualitative data suggest that gabapentin is being misused in conjunction with prescription opioids and that gabapentin and heroin are being combined and consumed together. Law enforcement reporters found these drug use trends to be contributing to gabapentin diversion. The recent increase in gabapentin diversion appears to be related to the opioid epidemic, based on law enforcement descriptions of gabapentin being misused in combination with opioids. Yet epidemiological data related to this finding is limited and research conducted among gabapentin misusers is needed to understand this problem in more depth. Greater monitoring of gabapentin abuse and diversion appear warranted. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Ethical concerns and career satisfaction in obstetrics and gynecology: a review of recent findings from the Collaborative Ambulatory Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Victoria A; Leddy, Meaghan A; Lawrence, Hal; Schulkin, Jay

    2011-09-01

    Obstetricians-gynecologists (ob-gyns) are frequently confronted with situations that have ethical implications (e.g., whether to accept gifts or samples from drug companies or disclosing medical errors to patients). Additionally, various factors, including specific job-related tasks, costs, and benefits, may impact ob-gyns' career satisfaction. Ethical concerns and career satisfaction can play a role in the quality of women's health care. This article summarizes the studies published between 2005 and 2009 by the Research Department of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, which encompass ethical concerns regarding interactions with pharmaceutical representatives and patient safety/medical error reporting, as well as ob-gyn career satisfaction. Additionally, a brief discussion regarding ethical concerns in the ob-gyn field, in general, highlights key topics for the last 30 years. Ethical dilemmas continue to be of concern for ob-gyns. Familiarity with guidelines on appropriate interactions with industry is associated with lower percentages of potentially problematic relationships with pharmaceutical industries. Physicians report that the expense of patient safety initiatives is one of the top barriers for improving patient safety, followed by fear of liability. Overall, respondents reported being satisfied with their careers. However, half of the respondents reported that they were extremely concerned about the impact of professional liability costs on the duration of their careers. Increased familiarity with guidelines may lead to a decreased ob-gyn reliance on pharmaceutical representatives and free samples, whereas specific and practical tools may help them implement patient safety techniques. The easing of malpractice insurance and threat of litigation may enhance career satisfaction among ob-gyns. This article will discuss related findings in recent years. Obstetricians & Gynecologists and Family Physicians. After the completing the CME

  13. Kennedy: Future Academic Research Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The president of Stanford University discusses his views on problems facing research universities, including research secrecy, ethics, and economics of proprietary knowledge generated in the university, faculty conflict of interest, place of humanities in a society driven by technology, and decline of government support for academic research.…

  14. The Impact of Personality Factors and Preceding User Comments on the Processing of Research Findings on Deep Brain Stimulation: A Randomized Controlled Experiment in a Simulated Online Forum

    OpenAIRE

    Feinkohl, Insa; Flemming, Danny; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background Laypeople frequently discuss medical research findings on Web-based platforms, but little is known about whether they grasp the tentativeness that is inherent in these findings. Potential influential factors involved in understanding medical tentativeness have hardly been assessed to date. Objective The research presented here aimed to examine the effects of personality factors and of other users? previous contributions in a Web-based forum on laypeople?s understanding of the tenta...

  15. The Continuing Search to Find a More Effective and Less Intimidating Way to Teach Research Methods in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Existing literature examining the teaching of research methods highlights difficulties students face when developing research competencies. Studies of student-centred teaching approaches have found increased student performance and improved confidence in undertaking research projects. To develop a student-centred approach, it could be beneficial…

  16. Experiences in the Dissemination and Utilisation of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Research Findings from Three Southern African Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaino, Luckson M.; Mtetwa, David; Kasanda, Choshi

    2014-01-01

    The dissemination and utilisation of research knowledge produced at universities has been debated in recent times. Recent changes and developments at universities suggest an entrepreneurial model of academic research production in which universities have the responsibility not only to carry out research and teaching but also to disseminate…

  17. Using quantitative and qualitative data in health services research - what happens when mixed method findings conflict? [ISRCTN61522618].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Suzanne; White, Martin; Mackintosh, Joan; Howel, Denise

    2006-03-08

    In this methodological paper we document the interpretation of a mixed methods study and outline an approach to dealing with apparent discrepancies between qualitative and quantitative research data in a pilot study evaluating whether welfare rights advice has an impact on health and social outcomes among a population aged 60 and over. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected contemporaneously. Quantitative data were collected from 126 men and women aged over 60 within a randomised controlled trial. Participants received a full welfare benefits assessment which successfully identified additional financial and non-financial resources for 60% of them. A range of demographic, health and social outcome measures were assessed at baseline, 6, 12 and 24 month follow up. Qualitative data were collected from a sub-sample of 25 participants purposively selected to take part in individual interviews to examine the perceived impact of welfare rights advice. Separate analysis of the quantitative and qualitative data revealed discrepant findings. The quantitative data showed little evidence of significant differences of a size that would be of practical or clinical interest, suggesting that the intervention had no impact on these outcome measures. The qualitative data suggested wide-ranging impacts, indicating that the intervention had a positive effect. Six ways of further exploring these data were considered: (i) treating the methods as fundamentally different; (ii) exploring the methodological rigour of each component; (iii) exploring dataset comparability; (iv) collecting further data and making further comparisons; (v) exploring the process of the intervention; and (vi) exploring whether the outcomes of the two components match. The study demonstrates how using mixed methods can lead to different and sometimes conflicting accounts and, using this six step approach, how such discrepancies can be harnessed to interrogate each dataset more fully. Not only does this

  18. Using quantitative and qualitative data in health services research – what happens when mixed method findings conflict? [ISRCTN61522618

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Suzanne; White, Martin; Mackintosh, Joan; Howel, Denise

    2006-01-01

    Background In this methodological paper we document the interpretation of a mixed methods study and outline an approach to dealing with apparent discrepancies between qualitative and quantitative research data in a pilot study evaluating whether welfare rights advice has an impact on health and social outcomes among a population aged 60 and over. Methods Quantitative and qualitative data were collected contemporaneously. Quantitative data were collected from 126 men and women aged over 60 within a randomised controlled trial. Participants received a full welfare benefits assessment which successfully identified additional financial and non-financial resources for 60% of them. A range of demographic, health and social outcome measures were assessed at baseline, 6, 12 and 24 month follow up. Qualitative data were collected from a sub-sample of 25 participants purposively selected to take part in individual interviews to examine the perceived impact of welfare rights advice. Results Separate analysis of the quantitative and qualitative data revealed discrepant findings. The quantitative data showed little evidence of significant differences of a size that would be of practical or clinical interest, suggesting that the intervention had no impact on these outcome measures. The qualitative data suggested wide-ranging impacts, indicating that the intervention had a positive effect. Six ways of further exploring these data were considered: (i) treating the methods as fundamentally different; (ii) exploring the methodological rigour of each component; (iii) exploring dataset comparability; (iv) collecting further data and making further comparisons; (v) exploring the process of the intervention; and (vi) exploring whether the outcomes of the two components match. Conclusion The study demonstrates how using mixed methods can lead to different and sometimes conflicting accounts and, using this six step approach, how such discrepancies can be harnessed to interrogate each

  19. E-Cigarettes Use Behavior and Experience of Adults: Qualitative Research Findings to Inform E-Cigarette Use Measure Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoshin; Davis, Andrew H; Dohack, Jaime L; Clark, Pamela I

    2017-02-01

    findings reveal that vaping is not a mere replacement for combustible cigarette smoking and that many users of e-cigarettes enjoy product characteristics such as flavors and "clouds" that are unavailable in combustible cigarettes. Therefore, commonly available cigarette smoking measures are not well suited to measurement of e-cigarette use behavior, and indication that new measures need to be developed to accurately track e-cigarette use. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Do countries rely on the World Health Organization for translating research findings into clinical guidelines? A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ramadhani A; Geldsetzer, Pascal; Bärnighausen, Till; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2016-10-06

    The World Health Organization's (WHO) antiretroviral therapy (ART) guidelines have generally been adopted rapidly and with high fidelity by countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Thus far, however, WHO has not published specific guidance on nutritional care and support for (non-pregnant) adults living with HIV despite a solid evidence base for some interventions. This offers an opportunity for a case study on whether national clinical guidelines in sub-Saharan Africa provide concrete recommendations in the face of limited guidance by WHO. This study, therefore, aims to determine if national HIV treatment guidelines in sub-Saharan Africa contain specific guidance on nutritional care and support for non-pregnant adults living with HIV. We identified the most recent national HIV treatment guidelines in sub-Saharan African countries with English as an official language. Using pre-specified criteria, we determined for each guideline whether it provides guidance to clinicians on each of five components of nutritional care and support for adults living with HIV: assessment of nutritional status, dietary counseling, micronutrient supplementation, ready-to-use therapeutic or supplementary foods, and food subsidies. We found that national HIV treatment guidelines in sub-Saharan Africa generally do not contain concrete recommendations on nutritional care and support for non-pregnant adults living with HIV. Given that decisions on nutritional care and support are inevitably being made at the clinician-patient level, and that clinicians have a relative disadvantage in systematically identifying, summarizing, and weighing up research evidence compared to WHO and national governments, there is a need for more specific clinical guidance. In our view, such guidance should at a minimum recommend daily micronutrient supplements for adults living with HIV who are in pre-ART stages, regular dietary counseling, periodic assessment of anthropometric status, and additional nutritional

  1. Ambient Particulate Matter during MILAGRO in Mexico City: Main Findings, Impacts (on AQ and Climate), and Future Research Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Schauer, James J.; Molina, Luisa T.; MILAGRO Pm Team

    2010-05-01

    The MILAGRO campaign was a large international field experiments conduced in Mexico City and Central Mexico during March 2006. We present an overview of the main findings related to particulate matter and aerosol radiative properties. PM levels inside Mexico City were similar or higher than those in the most polluted North American cities, but ~5 times lower than levels in the most polluted Asian megacities During the study, PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations in the urban area of were about double the concentrations in the rural areas surrounding Mexico City. PM2.5 made up about half of the PM10 concentrations, with small amounts of mass in the PM2.5-PM1.0 range. Mineral matter made up approximately 25% of the PM10 and on average 15% and 28% of the PM2.5 in the urban and rural areas, respectively. Approximately 25% of the PM2.5 was secondary inorganic ions with the remaining PM2.5 mass being comprised of largely carbonaceous aerosol. Except for surface measurements at the central sampling sites in Mexico city, the elemental carbon mass absorption efficiency was relatively constant for aircraft and surface measurements throughout the study, contrary to expectations. Although different organic aerosol (OA) source apportionment methods had some differences, there was agreement that the dominant sources of carbonaceous aerosol were secondary OA (SOA), biomass burning, and mobile sources. The impact of biomass burning to the aerosol outflow from the region was much larger than to the surface concentrations inside the city. SOA formation from primary semivolatile and intermediate volatility precursors has the potential to close the gap in predicted vs. measured SOA, while formation from glyoxal also makes an important contribution, especially to organic oxygen. Biogenic SOA advected from the coastal mountain ranges contributes about 1 μg m-3 to concentrations in the MCMA. Primary OA from anthropogenic and biomass burning sources was found to be semivolatile, while secondary

  2. Dealing with complexity in research processes and findings: how do older women negotiate and challenge images of aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Susan; Warren, Lorna

    2012-01-01

    The Representing Self-Representing Ageing initiative has been funded by the ESRC as part of the New Dynamics of Ageing cross-council research program. It has consisted of four projects with older women using visual research methods and participatory approaches to enable women to articulate their experiences of aging and to create alternative images of aging. Complex research processes were utilized. Innovative methods included the use of art elicitation, photo diaries, film booths, and phototherapy.

  3. Effects of university affiliation and "school spirit" on color preferences: Berkeley versus Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Karen B; Poggesi, Rosa M; Palmer, Stephen E

    2011-06-01

    The ecological valence theory (EVT) posits that preference for a color is determined by people's average affective response to everything associated with it (Palmer & Schloss, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107, 8877-8882, 2010). The EVT thus implies the existence of sociocultural effects: Color preference should increase with positive feelings (or decrease with negative feelings) toward an institution strongly associated with a color. We tested this prediction by measuring undergraduates' color preferences at two rival universities, Berkeley and Stanford, to determine whether students liked their university's colors better than their rivals did. Students not only preferred their own colors more than their rivals did, but the degree of their preference increased with self-rated positive affect ("school spirit") for their university. These results support the EVT's claim that color preference is caused by learned affective responses to associated objects and institutions, because it is unlikely that students choose their university or develop their degree of school spirit on the basis of preexisting color preferences.

  4. The development of seismic guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggins, R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the development of Seismic Guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Although structures have always been built conservatively, SLAC management decided to review and update their seismic guidelines. SLAC is about mid-way between the epicenters of the 8.3 Richter magnitude 1906 San Francisco and the 7.2 Loma Prieta Earthquakes. The west end of the two mile long electron/positron particle accelerator lies a half mile from the large San Andreas Fault. Suggestions for seismic planning processes were solicited from local computer manufacturing firms, universities, and federal laboratories. A Committee of the various stakeholders in SLAC`s seismic planning retained an internationally known Seismic Planning Consultant and reviewed relevant standards and drafted Guidelines. A panel of seismic experts was convened to help define the hazard, site response spectra, probabilistic analysis of shaking, and near field effects. The Facility`s structures were assigned to seismic classes of importance, and an initial assessment of a sample of a dozen buildings conducted. This assessment resulted in emergency repairs to one structure, and provided a {open_quotes}reality basis{close_quotes} for establishing the final Guidelines and Administrative Procedures, and a program to evaluate remaining buildings, shielding walls, tunnels, and other special structures.

  5. Development of robots for rehabilitation therapy: the Palo Alto VA/Stanford experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgar, C G; Lum, P S; Shor, P C; Machiel Van der Loos, H F

    2000-01-01

    For over 25 years, personal assistant robots for severely disabled individuals have been in development. More recently, using robots to deliver rehabilitation therapy has been proposed. This paper summarizes the development and clinical testing of three mechatronic systems for post-stroke therapy conducted at the VA Palo Alto in collaboration with Stanford University. We describe the philosophy and experiences that guided their evolution. Unique to the Palo Alto approach is provision for bimanual, mirror-image, patient-controlled therapeutic exercise. Proof-of-concept was established with a 2-degree-of-freedom (DOF) elbow/forearm manipulator. Tests of a second-generation therapy robot producing planar forearm movements in 19 hemiplegic and control subjects confirmed the validity and reliability of interaction forces during mechanically assisted upper-limb movements. Clinical trials comparing 3-D robot-assisted therapy to traditional therapy in 21 chronic stroke subjects showed significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer (FM) measure of motor recovery in the robot group, which exceeded improvements in the control group.

  6. The Impact of Postgraduate Health Technology Innovation Training: Outcomes of the Stanford Biodesign Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, James; Hellman, Eva; Denend, Lyn; Rait, Douglas; Venook, Ross; Lucian, Linda; Azagury, Dan; Yock, Paul G; Brinton, Todd J

    2017-05-01

    Stanford Biodesign launched its Innovation Fellowship in 2001 as a first-of-its kind postgraduate training experience for teaching biomedical technology innovators a need-driven process for developing medical technologies and delivering them to patients. Since then, many design-oriented educational programs have been initiated, yet the impact of this type of training remains poorly understood. This study measures the career focus, leadership trajectory, and productivity of 114 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship alumni based on survey data and public career information. It also compares alumni on certain publicly available metrics to finalists interviewed but not selected. Overall, 60% of alumni are employed in health technology in contrast to 35% of finalists interviewed but not selected. On leadership, 72% of alumni hold managerial or higher positions compared to 48% of the finalist group. A total of 67% of alumni reported that the fellowship had been "extremely beneficial" on their careers. As a measure of technology translation, more than 440,000 patients have been reached with technologies developed directly out of the Biodesign Innovation Fellowship, with another 1,000,000+ aided by solutions initiated by alumni after their training. This study suggests a positive impact of the fellowship program on the career focus, leadership, and productivity of its alumni.

  7. [Clinical practice and thoughts on the strategy of root reconstruction for Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C S; Li, J; Lai, H

    2017-04-01

    The strategy of root reconstruction for Stanford type A aortic dissection (AAD) includes resection of the intimal tear site, correction of concomitant aortic valve dysfunction and amendment of coronary lesion. Supracommissural tube graft replacement is a well-adopted and convenient procedure for most patients, although its application is limited when distinct sinus expansion and severe intimal damage is present. Composite valve conduit replacement (Bentall procedure) is suitable for patients with overt sinus damage. However, a fraction of patients with functional aortic valve will be unnecessarily put into risks for prosthetic complications. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSRR), which includes aortic root remodeling (Yacoub procedure) and reimplantation (David procedure) techniques, has the advantage of retaining autologous aortic valve while guaranteeing resection of damaged vessel segments.The Yacoub procedure is relatively convenient but harbors long-term risk for annulus expansion, while the David procedure demonstrates long-term benefit but may be too demanding to be operated in emergent scenario as AAD. The last decade has witnessed worldwide endeavors to investigate the treatment strategy for aortic root, especially the VSRR approach. The preliminary results are encouraging and demonstrating improvements for both mid- and long-term outcomes of AAD, which enables standardized and personalized surgical management for these patients.

  8. Young people's views about the purpose and composition of research ethics committees: findings from the PEARL qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrey, Suzanne; Brown, Lindsey; Campbell, Rona; Boyd, Andy; Macleod, John

    2016-09-02

    Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) is a birth cohort study within which the Project to Enhance ALSPAC through Record Linkage (PEARL) was established to enrich the ALSPAC resource through linkage between ALSPAC participants and routine sources of health and social data. PEARL incorporated qualitative research to seek the views of young people about data linkage, including their opinions about appropriate safeguards and research governance. In this paper we focus on views expressed about the purpose and composition of research ethics committees. Digitally recorded interviews were conducted with 48 participants aged 17-19 years. Participants were asked about whether medical research should be monitored and controlled, their knowledge of research ethics committees, who should sit on these committees and what their role should be. Interview recordings were fully transcribed and anonymised. Thematic analysis was undertaken, assisted by the Framework approach to data management. The majority of interviewees had little or no specific knowledge of ethics committees. Once given basic information about research ethics committees, only three respondents suggested there was no need for such bodies to scrutinise research. The key tasks of ethics committees were identified as monitoring the research process and protecting research participants. The difficulty of balancing the potential to inhibit research against the need to protect research participants was acknowledged. The importance of relevant research and professional expertise was identified but it was also considered important to represent wider public opinion, and to counter the bias potentially associated with self-selection possibly through a selection process similar to 'jury duty'. There is a need for more education and public awareness about the role and composition of research ethics committees. Despite an initial lack of knowledge, interviewees were able to contribute their ideas and balance

  9. Procedures of recruiting, obtaining informed consent, and compensating research participants in Qatar: findings from a qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killawi, Amal; Khidir, Amal; Elnashar, Maha; Abdelrahim, Huda; Hammoud, Maya; Elliott, Heather; Thurston, Michelle; Asad, Humna; Al-Khal, Abdul Latif; Fetters, Michael D

    2014-02-04

    Very few researchers have reported on procedures of recruiting, obtaining informed consent, and compensating participants in health research in the Arabian Gulf Region. Empirical research can inform the debate about whether to adjust these procedures for culturally diverse settings. Our objective was to delineate procedures related to recruiting, obtaining informed consent, and compensating health research participants in the extremely high-density multicultural setting of Qatar. During a multistage mixed methods project, field observations and qualitative interviews were conducted in a general medicine clinic of a major medical center in Qatar. Participants were chosen based on gender, age, literacy, and preferred language, i.e., Arabic, English, Hindi and Urdu. Qualitative analysis identified themes about recruitment, informed consent, compensation, and other research procedures. A total of 153 individuals were approached and 84 enrolled; the latter showed a diverse age range (18 to 75 years); varied language representation: Arabic (n = 24), English (n = 20), Hindi (n = 20), and Urdu (n = 20); and balanced gender distribution: women (n = 43) and men (n = 41). Primary reasons for 30 declinations included concern about interview length and recording. The study achieved a 74% participation rate. Qualitative analytics revealed key themes about hesitation to participate, decisions about participation with family members as well as discussions with them as "incidental research participants", the informed consent process, privacy and gender rules of the interview environment, reactions to member checking and compensation, and motivation for participating. Vulnerability emerged as a recurring issue throughout the process among a minority of participants. This study from Qatar is the first to provide empirical data on recruitment, informed consent, compensation and other research procedures in a general adult population in the Middle East and Arabian Gulf. This

  10. Who has used internal company documents for biomedical and public health research and where did they find them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Susan Wieland

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the sources of internal company documents used in public health and healthcare research. METHODS: We searched PubMed and Embase for articles using internal company documents to address a research question about a health-related topic. Our primary interest was where authors obtained internal company documents for their research. We also extracted information on type of company, type of research question, type of internal documents, and funding source. RESULTS: Our searches identified 9,305 citations of which 357 were eligible. Scanning of reference lists and consultation with colleagues identified 4 additional articles, resulting in 361 included articles. Most articles examined internal tobacco company documents (325/361; 90%. Articles using documents from pharmaceutical companies (20/361; 6% were the next most common. Tobacco articles used documents from repositories; pharmaceutical documents were from a range of sources. Most included articles relied upon internal company documents obtained through litigation (350/361; 97%. The research questions posed were primarily about company strategies to promote or position the company and its products (326/361; 90%. Most articles (346/361; 96% used information from miscellaneous documents such as memos or letters, or from unspecified types of documents. When explicit information about study funding was provided (290/361 articles, the most common source was the US-based National Cancer Institute. We developed an alternative and more sensitive search targeted at identifying additional research articles using internal pharmaceutical company documents, but the search retrieved an impractical number of citations for review. CONCLUSIONS: Internal company documents provide an excellent source of information on health topics (e.g., corporate behavior, study data exemplified by articles based on tobacco industry documents. Pharmaceutical and other industry documents appear to have been

  11. Who has used internal company documents for biomedical and public health research and where did they find them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, L Susan; Rutkow, Lainie; Vedula, S Swaroop; Kaufmann, Christopher N; Rosman, Lori M; Twose, Claire; Mahendraratnam, Nirosha; Dickersin, Kay

    2014-01-01

    To describe the sources of internal company documents used in public health and healthcare research. We searched PubMed and Embase for articles using internal company documents to address a research question about a health-related topic. Our primary interest was where authors obtained internal company documents for their research. We also extracted information on type of company, type of research question, type of internal documents, and funding source. Our searches identified 9,305 citations of which 357 were eligible. Scanning of reference lists and consultation with colleagues identified 4 additional articles, resulting in 361 included articles. Most articles examined internal tobacco company documents (325/361; 90%). Articles using documents from pharmaceutical companies (20/361; 6%) were the next most common. Tobacco articles used documents from repositories; pharmaceutical documents were from a range of sources. Most included articles relied upon internal company documents obtained through litigation (350/361; 97%). The research questions posed were primarily about company strategies to promote or position the company and its products (326/361; 90%). Most articles (346/361; 96%) used information from miscellaneous documents such as memos or letters, or from unspecified types of documents. When explicit information about study funding was provided (290/361 articles), the most common source was the US-based National Cancer Institute. We developed an alternative and more sensitive search targeted at identifying additional research articles using internal pharmaceutical company documents, but the search retrieved an impractical number of citations for review. Internal company documents provide an excellent source of information on health topics (e.g., corporate behavior, study data) exemplified by articles based on tobacco industry documents. Pharmaceutical and other industry documents appear to have been less used for research, indicating a need for funding for

  12. A training programme to build cancer research capacity in low- and middle-income countries: findings from Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lauren D; Barnoya, Joaquin; Gharzouzi, Eduardo N; Benson, Peter; Colditz, Graham A

    2014-04-01

    Guatemala is experiencing an increasing burden of cancer but lacks capacity for cancer prevention, control and research. In partnership with a medical school in the United States of America, a multidisciplinary Cancer Control Research Training Institute was developed at the Instituto de Cancerología (INCAN) in Guatemala City. This institute provided a year-long training programme for clinicians that focused on research methods in population health and sociocultural anthropology. The programme included didactic experiences in Guatemala and the United States as well as applied training in which participants developed research protocols responsive to Guatemala's cancer needs. Although INCAN is the point of referral and service for Guatemala's cancer patients, the institute's administration is also interested in increasing cancer research - with a focus on population health. INCAN is thus a resource for capacity building within the context of cancer prevention and control. Trainees increased their self-efficacy for the design and conduct of research. Value-added benefits included establishment of an annual cancer seminar and workshops in cancer pathology and qualitative analysis. INCAN has recently incorporated some of the programme's components into its residency training and established a research department. A training programme for clinicians can build cancer research capacity in low- and middle-income countries. Training in population-based research methods will enable countries such as Guatemala to gather country-specific data. Once collected, such data can be used to assess the burden of cancer-related disease, guide policy for reducing it and identify priority areas for cancer prevention and treatment.

  13. [The relationship between preoperative renal failure and severe postoperative hypoxemia of patients received surgical procedures for Stanford A aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X D; Ju, F; Liu, N; Zheng, J; Sun, L Z; Zheng, S H

    2016-08-01

    To study the relationship between renal failure and severe postoperative hypoxemia of patients received surgical procedure for Stanford A aortic dissection. Clinical data of 411 consecutive patients from January 2014 to April 2015, who received surgical procedure for Stanford A aortic dissection in Department of Cardiovascular Surgery of Beijing Anzhen Hospital, were collected retrospectively. The appearance of severe postoperative hypoxemia was recorded in all the cases. All the data about potential prognostic factors was put into the database and analyzed by univariate and multivariate Logistic regression respectively. Severe postoperative hypoxemia (PO2/FiO2hypoxemia showed no statistical significance. However, the influence of preoperative serum creatinine showed statistical significance (OR=1.009, 95%CI: 1.000 to 1.018, P=0.048). The preoperative creatinine clearance rate of patients has no direct relationship with severe postoperative hypoxemia. But the preoperative serum creatinine could be regarded as an independent predictor of severe postoperative hypoxemia.

  14. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    first time, on the findings of a research study on the implementation of field trips in a management module in the BPharm curriculum and to conclude whether this intervention changed pharmacy students' perception of the module. Method. A mixed-method sequential exploratory research design was followed,.

  15. Salient findings: A potentially groundbreaking study on the neuroscience of hypnotizability, a critical review of hypnosis' efficacy, and the neurophysiology of conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Michael R

    2005-01-01

    Three papers of special interest to researchers and clinicians alike have recently appeared in the general scientific and medical literatures. Two of these papers are original research studies that employ brain-imaging technologies, one using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), the other position emission tomography (PET). A third paper is a comprehensive review of the empirical findings on the clinical use of hypnosis in pediatric oncology. The research study using MRI technology is extraordinary, because it is the first to document differences in brain morphology between high hypnotizable and low hypnotizable individuals. Arguably, if its findings replicate, the study could be one of the most important developments in scientific hypnosis since the genesis of the Stanford scales 45 years ago. The PET study notes differences in brain activation during intentionally simulated and hypnotically experienced paralysis. The review article examines empirical work addressing the efficacy of hypnosis for procedural pain in pediatric oncology.

  16. Behind the Headlines: Media Representation of Children and Young People in Northern Ireland:Summary of Research Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Faith; McAlister, Siobhán; Scraton, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council this partnership project between the Childhood, Transition and Social Justice Initiative at Queen’s University and Include Youth focuses on the negative stereotyping of children and young people and the role and responsibilities of the media in the creation and transmission of negative images. Engaging with children, young people, organisations working with children and young people and media representatives, the project uses research evidenc...

  17. Finding the team for Mars: a psychological and human factors analysis of a Mars Desert Research Station crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Benjamin D; Hancock, P A; Deaton, John; Suedfeld, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A two-week mission in March and April of 2011 sent six team members to the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS). MDRS, a research facility in the high Utah desert, provides an analogue for the harsh and unusual working conditions that will be faced by men and women who one day explore Mars. During the mission a selection of quantitative and qualitative psychological tests were administered to the international, multidisciplinary team. A selection of the results are presented along with discussion.

  18. Difficulties translating research on forensic interview practices to practitioners: Finding water, leading horses, but can we get them to drink?

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, Michael Ernest

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from the American Psychological Association via https://doi.org/10.1037/amp0000039 Over the last 3 decades, researchers have elucidated the cognitive and motivational conditions that affect the capacity and willingness of young alleged victims to describe their experiences to forensic interviewers. Applied researchers have also studied the contents and features of training programs designed to help interviewers take adv...

  19. Work in progress Tim Radford on research that aims to find a tiny error in Einstein's theory of special relativity

    CERN Multimedia

    Radford, T

    2004-01-01

    "Ben Varcoe wants to find a relatively small mistake in Einstein's theory of special relativity. To do this, he will slow light down from 300,000 km per second to 10 metres per second - about the speed of Darren Campbell - and see how it behaves" (1 page)

  20. Interventions for Children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs): Overview of Findings for Five Innovative Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Jacquelyn

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that prenatal exposure to alcohol causes damage to the developing fetus, resulting in a spectrum of disorders known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Although our understanding of the deficits and disturbances associated with FASDs is far from complete, there are consistent findings indicating these are serious,…

  1. Finding the community in sustainable online community engagement: Not-for-profit organisation websites, service-learning and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Dodd

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the use of action research (2008–2014 based on a case study of the Sustainable Online Community Engagement (SOCE Project, a service-learning project in which University of South Australia students build websites for not-for-profit (NFP organisations, to demonstrate that effective teaching, public service and research are interdependent. A significant problem experienced in the SOCE project was that, despite some training and ongoing assistance, the community organisations reported that they found it difficult to make effective use of their websites. One of the proposed solutions was to develop an online community of the participating organisations that would be self-supporting, member-driven and collaborative, and enable the organisations to share information about web-based technology. The research reported here explored the usefulness of developing such an online community for the organisations involved and sought alternative ways to assist the organisations to maintain an effective and sustainable web presence. The research used a three-phase ethnographic action research approach. The first phase was a content analysis and review of the editing records of 135 organisational websites hosted by the SOCE project. The second phase was an online survey sent to 145 community organisation members responsible for the management of these websites, resulting in 48 responses. The third phase consisted of semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 18 of the website managers from 12 of these organisations. The research revealed the extent to which organisations were unable to manage their websites and found that the proposed solution of an online community would not be useful. More importantly, it suggested other useful strategies which have been implemented. In Furco’s (2010 model of the engaged campus, public engagement can be used to advance the public service, teaching and research components of higher education’s tripartite

  2. Service user involvement in research may lead to contrary rather than collaborative accounts: findings from a qualitative palliative care study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbat, Liz; Hubbard, Gill

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore what data emerge when former carergivers (co-researchers) are trained to interview current care-givers about their experiences. Despite a trend of involving service users in conducting research interviews, there have been few examinations of how and whether a common service user identity has an impact on the data generated. Four co-researchers were recruited, trained and supported to conduct qualitative interviews with 11 current carers of people receiving palliative services. Conversation analysis was used to examine the conversational characteristics of the research interviews. Data were collected in 2010-2011. Conversation analysis identified that interactional difficulties were evident across the data. When co-researchers talked about their own experiences as carers, interviewees frequently changed the topic of conversation, thereby closing-down opportunities for further disclosure or elaboration from the interviewee about the original topic. Conversation analysis identifies how caregiving identities are co-constructed and points where there is agreement and disagreement in the co-construction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Developing skills and competence of employees of the Kujawsko-Pomorskie regional operational programme managing body – research findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Michalcewicz-Kaniowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary world it is the employees or the human capital of any company who are responsible for effective management and caring for the future of their business. Organisations change all the time which means that continual staff training should be provided. The purpose of the research was to evaluate the training policy of the managing body of the Kujawsko-Pomorskie Regional Operational Programme (IZ RPO WK-P and its employees’ development potential. The research participants preferred mentoring (47%, coaching (27% and briefing (26% techniques. They also benefited from a range of educational techniques such as training courses, post-graduate studies etc. and a wide choice of subjects. Thus, it is necessary to conduct periodic research on training requirements, focusing on subjects and training techniques.

  4. The association of suicide and bullying in childhood to young adulthood: a review of cross-sectional and longitudinal research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstein Klomek, Anat; Sourander, Andre; Gould, Madelyn

    2010-05-01

    To review the research addressing the association of suicide and bullying, from childhood to young adulthood, including cross-sectional and longitudinal research findings. Relevant publications were identified via electronic searches of PsycNet and MEDLINE without date specification, in addition to perusing the reference lists of relevant articles. Cross-sectional findings indicate that there is an increased risk of suicidal ideation and (or) suicide attempts associated with bullying behaviour and cyberbullying. The few longitudinal findings available indicate that bullying and peer victimization lead to suicidality but that this association varies by sex. Discrepancies between the studies available may be due to differences in the studies' participants and methods. Bullying and peer victimization constitute more than correlates of suicidality. Future research with long-term follow-up should continue to identify specific causal paths between bullying and suicide.

  5. Participatory Action Research in Public Mental Health and a School of Nursing: Qualitative Findings from an Academic-Community Partnership

    OpenAIRE

    Mahone, Irma H.; Farrell, Sarah P.; Hinton, Ivora; Johnson, Robert; Moody, David; Rifkin, Karen; Moore, Kenneth; Becker, Marcia; Barker, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    An academic-community partnership between a school of nursing (SON) at a public university (the University of Virginia, or UVA) and a public mental health clinic developed around a shared goal of finding an acceptable shared decision making (SDM) intervention targeting medication use by persons with serious mental illness. The planning meetings of the academic-community partnership were recorded and analyzed. Issues under the partnership process included 1) clinic values and priorities, 2) re...

  6. Advancing Intervention Research in School Psychology: Finding the Balance between Process and Outcome for Social and Behavioral Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Elise; Reinke, Wendy M.; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.

    2011-01-01

    School psychology research focused on child outcomes is critical for understanding which social and behavioral interventions affect children in schools. Yet effective interventions fulfill their promise when they fit their implementation contexts, are implemented well with existing resources, and can be sustained or scaled up to new populations.…

  7. Community needs, concerns, and perceptions about health research: findings from the clinical and translational science award sentinel network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottler, Linda B; McCloskey, Donna Jo; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bennett, Nancy M; Strelnick, Hal; Dwyer-White, Molly; Collyar, Deborah E; Ajinkya, Shaun; Seifer, Sarena D; O'Leary, Catina Callahan; Striley, Catherine W; Evanoff, Bradley

    2013-09-01

    We used results generated from the first study of the National Institutes of Health Sentinel Network to understand health concerns and perceptions of research among underrepresented groups such as women, the elderly, racial/ethnic groups, and rural populations. Investigators at 5 Sentinel Network sites and 2 community-focused national organizations developed a common assessment tool used by community health workers to assess research perceptions, health concerns, and conditions. Among 5979 individuals assessed, the top 5 health concerns were hypertension, diabetes, cancer, weight, and heart problems; hypertension was the most common self-reported condition. Levels of interest in research participation ranged from 70.1% among those in the "other" racial/ethnic category to 91.0% among African Americans. Overall, African Americans were more likely than members of other racial/ethnic groups to be interested in studies requiring blood samples (82.6%), genetic samples (76.9%), or medical records (77.2%); staying overnight in a hospital (70.5%); and use of medical equipment (75.4%). Top health concerns were consistent across geographic areas. African Americans reported more willingness to participate in research even if it required blood samples or genetic testing.

  8. Dentists' use of caries risk assessment in children: findings from the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riley, Joseph L; Qvist, Vebeke; Fellows, Jeffrey L

    2010-01-01

    This study surveyed Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) member dentists (from four regions in the U.S. and Scandinavia) who perform restorative dentistry in their practices. The survey asked a range of questions about caries risk assessment in patients aged 6 to 18. Among respondents, 73...

  9. Preventing seasonal influenza worldwide through vaccination, education, and international cooperation: research, findings, and recommendations from the Global Influenza Initiative.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paget, J.

    2015-01-01

    This supplement to IORV, dedicated to the Global Influenza Initiative (GII) and associated research, covers many of the key challenges involved in influenza disease prevention, management, and treatment. This supplement shares the latest data and current thinking on a range of issues including

  10. The Relationship of Family Support to Family Outcomes: A Synthesis of Key Findings from Research on Severe Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Kathleen B.; Turnbull, Ann P.; Summers, Jean Ann; Gomez, Viviana Aya

    2012-01-01

    There has been a gradual shift from a deficit to a support model for understanding disability over the last two decades. Although more attention is focused on supports at the individual level, policy has provided for the provision of family support. Despite this policy, families' needs for support are on the rise; and research suggests that…

  11. The Search for Extension: 7 Steps to Help People Find Research-Based Information on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Paul; Rader, Heidi B.; Hino, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    For Extension's unbiased, research-based content to be found by people searching the Internet, it needs to be organized in a way conducive to the ranking criteria of a search engine. With proper web design and search engine optimization techniques, Extension's content can be found, recognized, and properly indexed by search engines and…

  12. The Effect of Television on the Religious Activities of English-Speaking Secondary School Pupils. Research Finding COMM N-119.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senekal, J. E.

    By the time SABC TV became operational in January 1976 in South Africa, television had already been firmly established in most overseas countries. Therefore prior to the introduction of television there was the opportunity to do research work to determine the effects of television on society. Between 1974 and 1981 the Institute for Communication…

  13. Research Output of Academic Librarians from Irish Higher Education Institutions 2000-2015: Findings from a Review, Analysis, and Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Terry; Cronin, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to quantify, review, and analyze published research output of academic librarians from 21 higher education Institutions in Ireland. A mixed approach using an online survey questionnaire, supplemented by content analysis and extensive literature scoping were used for data collection. Factors inhibiting and predicting…

  14. The influence of organic production on food quality - research findings, gaps and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Załęcka, Aneta; Bügel, Susanne; Paoletti, Flavio; Kahl, Johannes; Bonanno, Adriana; Dostalova, Anne; Rahmann, Gerold

    2014-10-01

    Although several meta-analysis studies have been published comparing the quality of food derived from organic and non-organic origin, it is still not clear if food from organic production per se can guarantee product-related added value to consumers. This paper aims to summarize the status quo in order to identify research gaps and suggest future research challenges. Organic food is described according to a quality model already published. The influence of organic production on food quality is structured in primary production and processing. Furthermore, organic food authentication is discussed. Organic food seems to contain fewer pesticide residues and statistically more selected health-related compounds such as polyphenols in plant products and polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk and meat products, but the health relevance for consumers is not clear yet. Comparing food from organic origin with so called 'conventional' food seems not to be appropriate, because 'conventional' is not defined. In organic food quality research a system approach is needed from which systemic markers can be selected. Research on the impact of processing technologies on the quality according to organic principles seems of high relevance, since most of the food is processed. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Building a Successful Care Path in Residential Care: Findings from Qualitative Research with Young People and Professionals in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbati, Sara; Gioga, Gianmaria

    2017-01-01

    Qualitative methods (i.e. semi-structured interviews) were used in this micro-research to explore the different ways in which young people and social and residential workers perceive the outcomes of the residential care experience. By comparing the participants' points of view, it was possible to investigate different ways of thinking about…

  16. Young Children's Research Behaviour? Children Aged Four to Eight Years Finding Solutions at Home and at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jane M.

    2013-01-01

    Children's research abilities have become increasingly recognised by adults, yet children remain excluded from the academy. This restricts children's freedom to make choices in matters affecting them, underestimates their capabilities and denies children particular rights. The present paper reports on young children's problem-solving as part of a…

  17. Tri-level study of the causes of traffic accidents : interim report 1. Vol. 1, research findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-08-31

    This is the final report of the first year of activity under a proposed three-year program entitled "Tri-Level Study of the Causes of Traffic Accidents." This study has been performed by the Indiana University institute for Research in Public Safety ...

  18. Searching for sex- and gender-sensitive tuberculosis research in public health: finding a needle in a haystack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissandjee, Bilkis; Mourid, Assia; Greenaway, Christina A; Short, Wendy E; Proctor, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    Despite broadening consideration of sex- and gender-based issues in health research, when seeking information on how sex and gender contribute to disease contexts for specific health or public health topics, a lack of consistent or systematic use of terminology in health literature means that it remains difficult to identify research with a sex or gender focus. These inconsistencies are driven, in part, by the complexity and terminological inflexibility of the indexing systems for gender- and sex-related terms in public health databases. Compounding the issue are authors’ diverse vocabularies, and in some cases lack of accuracy in defining and using fundamental sex–gender terms in writing, and when establishing keyword lists and search criteria. Considering the specific case of the tuberculosis (TB) prevention and management literature, an analysis of sex and gender sensitivity in three health databases was performed. While there is an expanding literature exploring the roles of both sex and gender in the trajectory and lived experience of TB, we demonstrate the potential to miss relevant research when attempting to retrieve literature using only the search criteria currently available. We, therefore, argue that for good clinical practice to be achieved; there is a need for both public health researchers and users to be better educated in appropriate usage of the terminology associated with sex and gender. In addition, public health database indexers ought to accept the task of developing and implementing adequate definitions of sex and gender terms so as to facilitate access to sex- and gender-related research. These twin advances will allow clinicians to more readily recognize and access knowledge pertaining to systems of redress that respond to gendered risks that compound existing health inequalities in disease management and control, particularly when dealing with already complex diseases. Given the methodological and linguistic challenges presented by the

  19. Development and psychometric characteristics of a new domain of the stanford faculty development program instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Mayowa O

    2014-01-01

    Teacher's attitude domain, a pivotal aspect of clinical teaching, is missing in the Stanford Faculty Development Program Questionnaire (SFDPQ), the most widely used student-based assessment method of clinical teaching skills. This study was conducted to develop and validate the teacher's attitude domain and evaluate the validity and internal consistency reliability of the augmented SFDPQ. Items generated for the new domain included teacher's enthusiasm, sobriety, humility, thoroughness, empathy, and accessibility. The study involved 20 resident doctors assessed once by 64 medical students using the augmented SFDPQ. Construct validity was explored using correlation among the different domains and a global rating scale. Factor analysis was performed. The response rate was 94%. The new domain had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.89, with 1-factor solution explaining 57.1% of its variance. It showed the strongest correlation to the global rating scale (rho = 0.71). The augmented SFDPQ, which had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.93, correlated better (rho = 0.72, p < 0.00001) to the global rating scale than the original SFDPQ (rho = 0.67, p < 0.00001). The new teacher's attitude domain exhibited good internal consistency and construct and factorial validity. It enhanced the content and construct validity of the SFDPQ. The validated construct of the augmented SFDPQ is recommended for design and evaluation of basic and continuing clinical teaching programs. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  20. Saw-tooth instability studies at the Stanford Linear Collider damping rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podobedov, B.

    1999-12-14

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch, and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blow-up in quadruple or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of the instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional the authors had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency ({approximately}10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. The authors have also employed a state-of-the-art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of the streak camera experiments the authors have quantitatively described the phase space of unstable bunches. The authors have found the radial structure of the instability mode and established that it only displaces a few percent of the beam particles. In another series of experiments the authors have correlated the instability signals from the beams before the extraction from the damping rings with their trajectories in the linac downstream. This showed that the instability results in a significant transverse beam jitter in the linac which compromises the damping ring performance as an injector. In addition, the authors have studied the instability behavior under the broad range of stored beam parameters using both passive observation and driven excitation. These measurements revealed unexpected beam behavior significantly above the instability threshold. Finally, the authors performed several low current experiments to estimate the damping ring vacuum chamber impedance.

  1. An unexplored ethical issue in clinical research: disclosure of individual findings in the Creando Posibilidades [Creating Possibilities] study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Karen Farchaus; Keller, Colleen; Fishstrom, Astrid

    2013-06-01

    Individual disclosure refers to the presumptive ethical responsibility of an investigator to communicate to a study participant information that was collected as a part of a research study protocol and is specific to the individual. Currently, there are no federal regulatory guidelines specifying the conditions and management of disclosure of health-related individual-specific information. In this report, the authors discuss the challenges associated with individual disclosure in the context of a longitudinal descriptive study. Arguments favoring disclosure and those challenging disclosure as a general ethical duty are presented. Finally, strategies for addressing individual disclosure are discussed using a research exemplar in which risk behaviors related to health outcomes were measured. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Effects of alcohol on the offender's sanity-Issues of criminal law and psychiatry in light of findings of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golonka, Anna Danuta

    2016-01-01

    The present report is the result of research on the causes of insanity or issuing opinions about the causes of insanity or diminished sanity perpetrators in criminal proceedings conducted in Poland (CEE). Research has shown the impact that has, in fact, use or abuse of alcohol and other alcoholic diseases on the status of the accused in criminal proceedings. This publication presents not only the results but also the basic regulations - valid in Poland and in other European countries - with respect to the responsibility of the perpetrators insane, with diminished sanity and being in a state of inebriation at the time of committing a criminal act. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of organic production on food quality - research findings, gaps and future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Załęcka, Aneta; Bügel, Susanne Gjedsted; Paoletti, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    in order to identify research gaps and suggest future research challenges. Organic food is described according to a quality model already published. The influence of organic production on food quality is structured in primary production and processing. Furthermore, organic food authentication is discussed......Although several meta-analysis studies have been published comparing the quality of food derived from organic and non-organic origin, it is still not clear if food from organic production per se can guarantee product-related added value to consumers. This paper aims to summarize the status quo....... Organic food seems to contain fewer pesticide residues and statistically more selected health-related compounds such as polyphenols in plant products and polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk and meat products, but the health relevance for consumers is not clear yet. Comparing food from organic origin...

  4. Provision of specific dental procedures by general dentists in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network: questionnaire findings

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Gregg H.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Korelitz, James J.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Oates, Thomas W; Rindal, D. Brad; Gregory, Randall J; ,

    2015-01-01

    Background Objectives were to: (1) determine whether and how often general dentists (GDs) provide specific dental procedures; and (2) test the hypothesis that provision is associated with key dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. Methods GDs (n?=?2,367) in the United States National Dental Practice-Based Research Network completed an Enrollment Questionnaire that included: (1) dentist; (2) practice; and (3) patient characteristics, and how commonly they provide each of 10 dental pro...

  5. Preventing seasonal influenza worldwide through vaccination, education, and international cooperation: research, findings, and recommendations from the Global Influenza Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Paget, J

    2015-01-01

    This supplement to IORV, dedicated to the Global Influenza Initiative (GII) and associated research, covers many of the key challenges involved in influenza disease prevention, management, and treatment. This supplement shares the latest data and current thinking on a range of issues including epidemiology and burden of disease, case definitions, vaccination of pregnant women, and the potential public health impact of quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIV) versus trivalent influenza vaccines (...

  6. Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

    2010-07-01

    High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

  7. New research findings since the 2007 Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingson, Ralph; White, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking, a publication documenting a problem linked to nearly 5,000 injury deaths annually and poor academic performance, potential cognitive deficits, risky sexual behavior, physical and sexual assaults, and other substance use. This report reviews subsequent underage drinking and related traffic fatality trends and research on determinants, consequences, and prevention interventions. New research reports, meta-analyses, and systematic literature reviews were examined. Since the Call to Action, reductions in underage frequency of drinking, heavy drinking occasions, and alcohol-related traffic deaths that began in the 1980s when the drinking age nationally became 21 have continued. Knowledge regarding determinants and consequences, particularly the effects of early-onset drinking, parental alcohol provision, and cognitive effects, has expanded. Additional studies support associations between the legal drinking age of 21, zero tolerance laws, higher alcohol prices, and reduced drinking and related problems. New research suggests that use/lose laws, social host liability, internal possession laws, graduated licensing, and night driving restrictions reduce traffic deaths involving underage drinking drivers. Additional studies support the positive effects of individually oriented interventions, especially screening and brief motivational interventions, web and face-to-face social norms interventions, college web-based interventions, parental interventions, and multicomponent community interventions. Despite reductions in underage alcohol consumption and related traffic deaths, underage drinking remains an enduring problem. Continued research is warranted in minimally studied areas, such as prospective studies of alcohol and brain development, policy studies of use/lose laws, internal possession laws, social host liability, and parent

  8. What do We Know about Consumers’ Price Perception? Research Findings of Studies in Sociology and Marketing Science

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Berdysheva

    2014-01-01

    The article argues that economic sociologists underestimate the problem of consumers’ price perception in their studies while it may be used as an effective key to the social orders of modern markets. Sociological studies of consumers’ price perception are very few and mostly performed at the theoretical level so the author makes an attempt to draw colleagues’ attention to the results of price perception research undertaken within marketing science and overviews its results in the light of so...

  9. Unlocking the potential of electronic health records for translational research. Findings from the section on bioinformatics and translational informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Y L

    2012-01-01

    To review current excellent research and trend in the field of bioinformatics and translational informatics with direct application in the medical domain. Synopsis of the articles selected for the IMIA Yearbook 2012. Six excellent articles were selected in this Yearbook's section on Bioinformatics and Translational Informatics. They exemplify current key advances in the use of patient information for translational research and health surveillance. First, two proof-of-concept studies demonstrated the cross-institutional and -geographic use of Electronic Health Records (EHR) for clinical trial subjects identification and drug safety signals detection. These reports pave ways to global large-scale population monitoring. Second, there is further evidence on the importance of coupling phenotypic information in EHR with genotypic information (either in biobank or in gene association studies) for new biomedical knowledge discovery. Third, patient data gathered via social media and self-reporting was found to be comparable to existent data and less labor intensive. This alternative means could potentially overcome data collection challenge in cohort and prospective studies. Finally, it can be noted that metagenomic studies are gaining momentum in bioinformatics and system-level analysis of human microbiome sheds important light on certain human diseases. The current literature showed that the traditional bench to bedside translational research is increasing being complemented by the reverse approach, in which bedside information can be used to provide novel biomedical insights.

  10. Difficulties translating research on forensic interview practices to practitioners: Finding water, leading horses, but can we get them to drink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Michael E

    2016-11-01

    Over the last 3 decades, researchers have elucidated the cognitive and motivational conditions that affect the capacity and willingness of young alleged victims to describe their experiences to forensic interviewers. Applied researchers have also studied the contents and features of training programs designed to help interviewers take advantage of the research on developmentally appropriate interviewing. The latter studies have highlighted a knowledge transfer problem-scientists understand best-practice techniques well, many interviewers believe that they both understand and employ those practices, but widespread training has had a limited impact on the actual quality of interviews conducted in the field. There is now clear evidence that improvements in interviewing practice occur reliably only when training courses involve multiple modules, distributed over time, with repeated opportunities for interviewers to consolidate learning and to obtain feedback on the quality of the interviews they do conduct. Barriers to the implementation of such training are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Social Media Technology and Public Health in Ontario: Findings from a Planning Meeting Exploring Current Practices and Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Richard; McMurray, Josephine; Regan, Sandra; Kothari, Anita; Donelle, Lorie; McBride, Susan; Sobel, Annette; Hall, Jodi; Fraser, Robert; Foisey, Lyndsay

    2017-01-01

    In the province of Ontario, many of the public health units (PHUs) now possess and use social media as part of their daily health promotion and communication operations. To explore this topic, a planning meeting was held to generate deeper insights toward the use of these forms of technology for preventative services delivery. The planning meeting was held with 50 participants, comprising representatives from 20 of the 36 PHUs in Ontario, interested academics, students and government representatives. A nominal group technique (NGT) was used to build consensus related to future research needs, as related to public health and social media. Participants generated a range of insights around the use of social media, including the need for: leadership buy-in and resource allocation; social media policy and governance structure; performance measurement and evaluation; practices related to engagement with program recipients and addressing the lack of resources faced by many health units. Future research priorities were also generated, related to evaluating the cost-benefit of social media activities and understanding behaviour change implications. Further research is needed to evaluate the functionality, leadership and competency requirements and impact(s) of these new forms of health communication technology within public health service delivery. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  12. Development of a Pilot Data Management Infrastructure for Biomedical Researchers at University of Manchester – Approach, Findings, Challenges and Outlook of the MaDAM Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meik Poschen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Management and curation of digital data has been becoming ever more important in a higher education and research environment characterised by large and complex data, demand for more interdisciplinary and collaborative work, extended funder requirements and use of e-infrastructures to facilitate new research methods and paradigms. This paper presents the approach, technical infrastructure, findings, challenges and outlook (including future development within the successor project, MiSS of the ‘MaDAM: Pilot data management infrastructure for biomedical researchers at University of Manchester’ project funded under the infrastructure strand of the JISC Managing Research Data (JISCMRD programme. MaDAM developed a pilot research data management solution at the University of Manchester based on biomedical researchers’ requirements, which includes technical and governance components with the flexibility to meet future needs across multiple research groups and disciplines.

  13. Patient responses to research recruitment and follow-up surveys: findings from a diverse multicultural health care setting in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khidir, Amal; Asad, Humna; Abdelrahim, Huda; Elnashar, Maha; Killawi, Amal; Hammoud, Maya; Al-Khal, Abdul Latif; Haddad, Pascale; Fetters, Michael D

    2016-01-26

    Health care researchers working in the Arabian Gulf need information on how to optimize recruitment and retention of study participants in extremely culturally diverse settings. Implemented in Doha, Qatar in 2012 with 4 language groups, namely Arabic, English, Hindi, and Urdu, this research documents persons' responses to recruitment, consent, follow-up, and reminder procedures during psychometric testing of the Multicultural Assessment Instrument (MAI), a novel self- or interviewer-administered survey. Bilingual research assistants recruited adults in outpatient clinics by approaching persons in particular who appeared to be from a target language group. Participants completed the MAI, a second acculturation instrument used for content-validity assessment, and a demographics questionnaire. Participants were asked to take the MAI again in 2-3 weeks, in person or by post, to assess test-retest reliability. Recruitment data were analyzed by using nonparametric statistics. Of 1503 persons approached during recruitment, 400 enrolled (27%)-100 per language group. The enrollment rates in the language groups were: Arabic-32%; English-33%; Hindi-18%; Urdu-30%. The groups varied somewhat in their preferences regarding consent procedure, follow-up survey administration, contact mode for follow-up reminders, and disclosure of personal mailing address (for postal follow-up). Over all, telephone was the preferred medium for follow-up reminders. Of 64 persons who accepted a research assistant's invitation for in-person follow-up, 40 participants completed the interview (follow-up rate, 63%); among 126 persons in the postal group with a deliverable address, 29 participants mailed back a completed follow-up survey (response rate, 23%). Researchers in the Arabian Gulf face challenges to successfully identify, enroll, and retain eligible study participants. Although bilingual assistants-often from the persons' own culture-recruited face-to-face, and our questionnaire contained no

  14. Patient responses to research recruitment and follow-up surveys: findings from a diverse multicultural health care setting in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Khidir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care researchers working in the Arabian Gulf need information on how to optimize recruitment and retention of study participants in extremely culturally diverse settings. Implemented in Doha, Qatar in 2012 with 4 language groups, namely Arabic, English, Hindi, and Urdu, this research documents persons’ responses to recruitment, consent, follow-up, and reminder procedures during psychometric testing of the Multicultural Assessment Instrument (MAI, a novel self- or interviewer-administered survey. Methods Bilingual research assistants recruited adults in outpatient clinics by approaching persons in particular who appeared to be from a target language group. Participants completed the MAI, a second acculturation instrument used for content-validity assessment, and a demographics questionnaire. Participants were asked to take the MAI again in 2–3 weeks, in person or by post, to assess test-retest reliability. Recruitment data were analyzed by using nonparametric statistics. Results Of 1503 persons approached during recruitment, 400 enrolled (27 %—100 per language group. The enrollment rates in the language groups were: Arabic-32 %; English-33 %; Hindi-18 %; Urdu-30 %. The groups varied somewhat in their preferences regarding consent procedure, follow-up survey administration, contact mode for follow-up reminders, and disclosure of personal mailing address (for postal follow-up. Over all, telephone was the preferred medium for follow-up reminders. Of 64 persons who accepted a research assistant’s invitation for in-person follow-up, 40 participants completed the interview (follow-up rate, 63 %; among 126 persons in the postal group with a deliverable address, 29 participants mailed back a completed follow-up survey (response rate, 23 %. Conclusions Researchers in the Arabian Gulf face challenges to successfully identify, enroll, and retain eligible study participants. Although bilingual assistants

  15. Despair and hopelessness in the context of HIV--a meta-synthesis on qualitative research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylmä, Jari

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the concepts of despair and hopelessness in the context of human immunodeficiency virus based on previous studies. Some of the consequences of living with human immunodeficiency virus or as a significant other to a person with human immunodeficiency virus include despair and hopelessness. The study is based on five earlier studies describing the dynamics of hope (including despair and hopelessness) in adult persons living with human immunodeficiency virus. Despair consists of two sub-processes. The downward sub-process of despair refers to stopping and being stuck in a situation, losing grip and sinking into a narrowing existence, focusing on impossibility and losing perspective of the future. Furthermore, the downward orientation means questioning the possibility of hope. The upward sub-process of despair implies fighting against sinking and fighting to rise back up with a glimmer of hope. Hopelessness is the polar opposite of hope and includes sub-processes of helplessly giving up everything (including hope) and living in emptiness in the face of an assumed non-existing future, collapsing mentally, and becoming paralyzed without reason to live. The results of this study support the findings of previous studies revealing that despair and hopelessness are possible elements in the life situation of persons living with human immunodeficiency virus and significant others to persons living with human immunodeficiency virus. The results of this study help to define the contents of despair and hopelessness, and help us to distinguish one from the other. The dual-dimensionality of despair has not been pointed out in previous studies and in this way the present study offers new information about the phenomenon of despair. The findings of this study offer clinical guidelines on a conceptual level about how to detect these phenomena in persons living with human immunodeficiency virus and their significant others. Furthermore, the findings

  16. Searching for sex- and gender-sensitive tuberculosis research in public health: finding a needle in a haystack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vissandjee B

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bilkis Vissandjee,1 Assia Mourid,2 Christina A Greenaway,3 Wendy E Short,4 Jodi A Proctor5 1Faculty of Nursing, Public Health Research Institute, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Allied Health Library, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, McGill University, Division of Infectious Diseases, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada; 4Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia; 5School of Social Work, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Despite broadening consideration of sex- and gender-based issues in health research, when seeking information on how sex and gender contribute to disease contexts for specific health or public health topics, a lack of consistent or systematic use of terminology in health literature means that it remains difficult to identify research with a sex or gender focus. These inconsistencies are driven, in part, by the complexity and terminological inflexibility of the indexing systems for gender- and sex-related terms in public health databases. Compounding the issue are authors’ diverse vocabularies, and in some cases lack of accuracy in defining and using fundamental sex–gender terms in writing, and when establishing keyword lists and search criteria. Considering the specific case of the tuberculosis (TB prevention and management literature, an analysis of sex and gender sensitivity in three health databases was performed. While there is an expanding literature exploring the roles of both sex and gender in the trajectory and lived experience of TB, we demonstrate the potential to miss relevant research when attempting to retrieve literature using only the search criteria currently available. We, therefore, argue that for good clinical practice to be achieved; there is a need for both public health researchers and users to be better educated in appropriate

  17. Merging the fields of mental health and social enterprise: lessons from abroad and cumulative findings from research with homeless youths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristin M

    2012-08-01

    Despite the growing integration of supported employment within the mental health system in the United States as well as the widespread use of social enterprises abroad, the fields of mental health and social enterprises remain largely separate in the USA. The mental health field currently lacks a response that strengthens homeless youths' existing human and social capital, provides them with marketable job skills and employment, and impacts their mental health. To address this gap, this paper establishes a case for using social enterprises with homeless youths, drawing on both global precedents and findings from a mixed-methods study of a social enterprise intervention with homeless youths. Recommendations are offered for how to integrate social enterprises with mental health treatment as well as how to evaluate their impact on mental health outcomes.

  18. Developing a Culture of Enquiry-Based, Independent Learning in a Research-Led Institution: Findings from a Survey of Pedagogic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, Mike; Edwards, Corony

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports select findings from an institutional survey designed to support long-term strategic developments at a research-led institution in the UK. These developments include a revised Learning and Teaching Strategy that has at its core the promotion of a "cross-institutional culture of enquiry-based, independent learning". The…

  19. Cyberbullying as a negative result of cyber-culture of Slovak children and adolescents: selected research findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollá Katarína

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyber-culture points out the life in cyberspace and goes beyond national cultures. It is particularly attractive for the young people who use Information and Communications Technologies (ICT to express their attitudes, values, beliefs and thinking. Those do not need to be necessarily in accordance with the standards of an individual society. Cyberculture becomes dangerous. Great risk lies in cyberbullying that represents negative impact of cyber-culture on human behavior. The aim of the study is to detect cyberbullying as a negative impact of cyber-culture among of Slovak children and adolescents. The research was carried out on a sample of 1619 11-18-year old respondents (average age was 14.51. Results of cyberbullying research carried out using Latent Class Analysis (LCA have proved the appropriateness of 3-latent-class module. Relative entropy of the module reached 0.915. It was demonstrated that 52.9% of respondents belonged to the group of uninvolved, 42.7% were victims and 4.4% were victims-aggressors. Being a negative consequence of cyber-culture, cyberbullying is a challenge that educators - including other assisting professions - face when educating children and adolescents to orientate in cyberspace, behave responsibly, express themselves in a way that would not interfere others’ integrity and identity (personal and virtual. The study was written under VEGA MŠVVaŠ SR a SAV č. 1/0244/15: “Detekcia a riešenie kyberšikany”.

  20. The theory-practice gap in nurse education: its causes and possible solutions. Findings from an action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaugherty, D

    1991-09-01

    Kurt Lewin, the originator of action research, proposed that it was valuable not only for innovating change, but also the process of change could lead to new insights into the nature of the problem that was being tackled. This action research project developed and evaluated a teaching model that aimed to help RGN (registered general nurse) students to bridge the theory-practice gap. During the course of this work, the possible reasons for a theory-practice gap started to become clear. This paper provides a discussion of these factors. The viewpoint for this discussion is that of the student nurse. The student is assumed to 'own' the problem and it is from her perspective that the theory-practice gap is analysed. The paper includes a critical examination of books, lectures, the school curriculum and ward nursing practice. Finally, possible solutions to the theory-practice problem are discussed and it is hoped that these will provide a rational basis for tackling the problem.

  1. Responding to Climate Change at the Poles: Findings from the National Research Council's Reports on Climate Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L. M.; McNutt, M. K.; Abdalati, W.; Caldeira, K.; Doney, S. C.; Falkowski, P. G.; Fetter, S.; Fleming, J. R.; Hamburg, S.; Morgan, G.; Penner, J.; Pierrehumbert, R.; Rasch, P. J.; Snow, J. T.; Wilcox, J.

    2015-12-01

    Earlier this year the National Research Council of the US National Academy of Sciences released a pair of reports on two strategies of climate intervention in order to reduce the risks of negative impacts from climate change. The first of the pair of reports discusses the opportunities and challenges in carbon capture and long-term, safe sequestration. The second report discusses several approaches to reflecting sunlight to cool Earth, including the risks, time scales, costs, and socio-economic, and political considerations. The primary conclusion from these pair of reports is that mitigation and adaptation are still our best choices in terms of cost and low risk for reducing harmful effects from climate change: there is no "silver bullet." Given that the polar regions of the planet are the most sensitive to climate change, the reports also touched on the potential for regional climate intervention. The majority of the methods that are currently under discussion and for which there is a body of peer-reviewed research would have global impacts, with but few exceptions.

  2. Generalizing the findings from group dynamics-based physical activity research to practice settings: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Samantha M; Burke, Shauna M; Haile, Amanda M; Estabrooks, Paul A

    2015-03-01

    The general purpose of this secondary analysis of a prior systematic review was to determine the degree to which group dynamics-based physical activity interventions align with research processes and outcomes that are more likely to facilitate the translation of research into practice. To accomplish this, a systematic search was conducted within Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, Arts and Humanities Citation Index, and MEDLINE databases to identify articles published prior to 2010 that used at least one group dynamics-based strategy (e.g., group interaction, group goal setting) in physical activity promotion. These 17 intervention studies were identified and coded based on the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, maintenance framework and Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary (for trial design characteristics). Reporting was infrequent for external validity factors (i.e., representativeness, adoption, cost, maintenance) but more frequent for internal validity factors (e.g., inclusion criteria). Intervention costs were not reported. Studies were more likely to be pragmatic (i.e., designed to determine the effects of an intervention under the usual conditions in which it will be applied) in areas of participant compliance and practitioner adherence and explanatory (i.e., designed to determine the effects of an intervention under ideal conditions) and in areas of practitioner expertise and flexibility of intervention protocol. While a number of these interventions were tested in more pragmatic settings, external validity factors were still underreported. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Prior authorization policies in Medicaid programs: The importance of study design and analysis on findings and outcomes from research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keast, Shellie L; Farmer, Kevin; Smith, Michael; Nesser, Nancy; Harrison, Donald

    2016-01-01

    U.S. State Medicaid programs for the medically indigent strive to deliver quality health care services with limited budgets. An often used cost management strategy is prior authorization of services or prescription medications. The goal of this strategy is to shape the pharmaceutical market share in the most efficient manner for the particular state Medicaid program, much like commercial managed care organizations. These policies are often scrutinized due to the population Medicaid serves, which in the past was largely composed of individuals with vulnerable health status. Unintended consequences can occur if these policies are not carried out in an appropriate manner or if they greatly restrict services. The data used for policy implementation research is prone to certain problems such as skewness and multimodality. Previous guidelines have been published regarding the best practices when analyzing these data. These guidelines were used to review the current body of literature regarding prior authorization in Medicaid. Further discussed are additional characteristics such as therapeutic areas researched and the outcomes identified. Finally, the importance of considering state-specific characteristics when reviewing individual policies and the usefulness of these results for other programs are also considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Domestic Violence and Welfare Policy: Research Findings That Can Inform Policies on Marriage and Child Well-Being. Research Forum on Children, Families, and the New Federalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Sharmila

    Asserting that the welfare reform proposals of the mid-1990s drew attention to the problem of domestic violence among individuals receiving public assistance who are among the poorest of the poor, this report examines what is known from past research on domestic violence that may inform policies related to marriage and child well-being. In…

  5. Effects of capturing and collaring on polar bears: findings from long-term research on the southern Beaufort Sea population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Karyn D.; Pagano, Anthony M.; Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.; Atwood, Todd C.; Durner, George M.; Simac, Kristin S.; Amstrup, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The potential for research methods to affect wildlife is an increasing concern among both scientists and the public. This topic has a particular urgency for polar bears because additional research is needed to monitor and understand population responses to rapid loss of sea ice habitat.Aims: This study used data collected from polar bears sampled in the Alaska portion of the southern Beaufort Sea to investigate the potential for capture to adversely affect behaviour and vital rates. We evaluated the extent to which capture, collaring and handling may influence activity and movement days to weeks post-capture, and body mass, body condition, reproduction and survival over 6 months or more.Methods: We compared post-capture activity and movement rates, and relationships between prior capture history and body mass, body condition and reproductive success. We also summarised data on capture-related mortality.Key results: Individual-based estimates of activity and movement rates reached near-normal levels within 2–3 days and fully normal levels within 5 days post-capture. Models of activity and movement rates among all bears had poor fit, but suggested potential for prolonged, lower-level rate reductions. Repeated captures was not related to negative effects on body condition, reproduction or cub growth or survival. Capture-related mortality was substantially reduced after 1986, when immobilisation drugs were changed, with only 3 mortalities in 2517 captures from 1987–2013.Conclusions: Polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea exhibited the greatest reductions in activity and movement rates 3.5 days post-capture. These shorter-term, post-capture effects do not appear to have translated into any long-term effects on body condition, reproduction, or cub survival. Additionally, collaring had no effect on polar bear recovery rates, body condition, reproduction or cub survival.Implications: This study provides empirical evidence that current capture

  6. 'Getting checked and having the test': drug injectors' perceptions of HIV testing - findings from qualitative research conducted in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rhidian

    2002-04-01

    If HIV and AIDS policy initiatives are to be successful in tackling the spread of infection it is important to understand more about the ways in which people perceive HIV and AIDS. HIV testing is a policy initiative that will work when people take the test and make appropriate changes to their behaviour as a result. This paper is based on a study that used in-depth interviews and a vignette with drug injectors to explore drug injectors' perceptions of HIV risk outside and inside prison. HIV testing was an integral part of drug injectors' perceptions of risk. Three main themes emerged from the analysis of these data: first, reasons for not taking a test; second, reasons for taking a test; and third, the impact of testing upon subsequent behaviour. The paper ends with a summary and conclusions highlighting implications for future research and policy development. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Family Pet Ownership during Childhood: Findings from a UK Birth Cohort and Implications for Public Health Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgarth, Carri; Heron, Jon; Ness, Andy R.; Bundred, Peter; Gaskell, Rosalind M.; Coyne, Karen P.; German, Alexander J.; McCune, Sandra; Dawson, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In developed nations, approximately half of household environments contain pets. Studies of Human-Animal Interaction (HAI) have proposed that there are health benefits and risks associated with pet ownership. However, accurately demonstrating and understanding these relationships first requires a better knowledge of factors associated with ownership of different pet types. A UK birth cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), were used to collect pet ownership data from the mothers, from gestation to child age 10 years old. 14,663 children were included in the study, of which mothers of 13,557 reported pet information at gestation, and 7,800 by age 10. Pet types recorded include cat, dog, rabbit, rodent, bird, fish and tortoise/turtle. The dataset also contains a number of demographic, socioeconomic and behavioural variables relevant to human health behaviour. Logistic regression was used to build multivariable models for ownership of each pet type at age 7 years. Family pet ownership increased during childhood, in particular rabbits, rodents and fish. A number of socioeconomic and demographic factors were associated with ownership of different pet types and the effects differed depending on the pet type studied. Variables which require consideration by researchers include gender, presence of older siblings, ethnicity, maternal and paternal education, maternal and paternal social class, maternal age, number of people in the household, house type, and concurrent ownership of other pets. Whether the mother had pets during her childhood was a strong predictor of pet ownership in all models. In HAI studies, care should be taken to control for confounding factors, and to treat each pet type individually. ALSPAC and other similar birth cohorts can be considered a potential resource for research into the effects of pet ownership during childhood. PMID:21139856

  8. Family Pet Ownership during Childhood: Findings from a UK Birth Cohort and Implications for Public Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Heron

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In developed nations, approximately half of household environments contain pets. Studies of Human-Animal Interaction (HAI have proposed that there are health benefits and risks associated with pet ownership. However, accurately demonstrating and understanding these relationships first requires a better knowledge of factors associated with ownership of different pet types. A UK birth cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC, were used to collect pet ownership data from the mothers, from gestation to child age 10 years old. 14,663 children were included in the study, of which mothers of 13,557 reported pet information at gestation, and 7,800 by age 10. Pet types recorded include cat, dog, rabbit, rodent, bird, fish and tortoise/turtle. The dataset also contains a number of demographic, socioeconomic and behavioural variables relevant to human health behaviour. Logistic regression was used to build multivariable models for ownership of each pet type at age 7 years. Family pet ownership increased during childhood, in particular rabbits, rodents and fish. A number of socioeconomic and demographic factors were associated with ownership of different pet types and the effects differed depending on the pet type studied. Variables which require consideration by researchers include gender, presence of older siblings, ethnicity, maternal and paternal education, maternal and paternal social class, maternal age, number of people in the household, house type, and concurrent ownership of other pets. Whether the mother had pets during her childhood was a strong predictor of pet ownership in all models. In HAI studies, care should be taken to control for confounding factors, and to treat each pet type individually. ALSPAC and other similar birth cohorts can be considered a potential resource for research into the effects of pet ownership during childhood.

  9. Family pet ownership during childhood: findings from a UK birth cohort and implications for public health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgarth, Carri; Heron, Jon; Ness, Andy R; Bundred, Peter; Gaskell, Rosalind M; Coyne, Karen P; German, Alexander J; McCune, Sandra; Dawson, Susan

    2010-10-01

    In developed nations, approximately half of household environments contain pets. Studies of Human-Animal Interaction (HAI) have proposed that there are health benefits and risks associated with pet ownership. However, accurately demonstrating and understanding these relationships first requires a better knowledge of factors associated with ownership of different pet types. A UK birth cohort, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), were used to collect pet ownership data from the mothers, from gestation to child age 10 years old. 14,663 children were included in the study, of which mothers of 13,557 reported pet information at gestation, and 7,800 by age 10. Pet types recorded include cat, dog, rabbit, rodent, bird, fish and tortoise/turtle. The dataset also contains a number of demographic, socioeconomic and behavioural variables relevant to human health behaviour. Logistic regression was used to build multivariable models for ownership of each pet type at age 7 years. Family pet ownership increased during childhood, in particular rabbits, rodents and fish. A number of socioeconomic and demographic factors were associated with ownership of different pet types and the effects differed depending on the pet type studied. Variables which require consideration by researchers include gender, presence of older siblings, ethnicity, maternal and paternal education, maternal and paternal social class, maternal age, number of people in the household, house type, and concurrent ownership of other pets. Whether the mother had pets during her childhood was a strong predictor of pet ownership in all models. In HAI studies, care should be taken to control for confounding factors, and to treat each pet type individually. ALSPAC and other similar birth cohorts can be considered a potential resource for research into the effects of pet ownership during childhood.

  10. Informing a Behavior Change Communication Strategy: Formative Research Findings From the Scaling Up Nutrition Movement in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodish, Stephen; Aburto, Nancy; Dibari, Filippo; Brieger, William; Agostinho, Saozinha P; Gittelsohn, Joel

    2015-09-01

    Nutrition interventions targeting the first 1000 days show promise to improve nutritional status, but they require effective implementation. Formative research is thus invaluable for developing such interventions, but there have been few detailed studies that describe this phase of work within the Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) movement. To inform a stunting prevention intervention in Cabo Delgado, Mozambique, by describing the sociocultural landscape and elucidating characteristics related to young child food, illness, and health. This formative research utilized a rapid assessment procedures (RAP) approach with 3 iterative phases that explored local perceptions and behaviors around food and illness among the Macua, Mwani, and Maconde ethnic groups. Ethnographic methods, including in-depth interviews, direct observations, free lists, and pile sorts, were used to collect data from community leaders, caregivers, and children 6 to 23 months. Data were analyzed drawing from grounded theory and cultural domain analysis. Geographic differences drive sociocultural characteristics amid 3 ethnic groups that allow for segmentation of the population into 2 distinct audiences for behavior change communications. These 2 communities have similar classification systems for children's foods but different adult dietary patterns. Small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplement did not fall into the existing food classification systems of either community, and participants preferred its promotion through community leader channels. Community members in both groups have little recognition of and perceived severity toward nutrition-related illnesses. Within Cabo Delgado, the cultural heterogeneity yields substantial differences related to food, illness, and health that are necessary to consider for developing an effective nutrition intervention. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Preventative lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) and young child feeding practices: findings from qualitative research in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesorogol, Carolyn; Jean-Louis, Sherlie; Green, Jamie; Iannotti, Lora

    2015-12-01

    To prevent undernutrition in an urban slum in Haiti, a lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) was introduced through a randomised control trial. Food supplementation for young child nutrition has a long history in Haiti, but there is little empirical information regarding the effects of supplementation on young child feeding practices. One of the concerns raised by supplementation is that it may disrupt other positive feeding practices such as breastfeeding and use of other complementary foods, with negative consequences for child nutrition. We conducted 29 in-depth interviews with mother-baby pairs from the three comparison groups: control, 3-month LNS supplementation and 6-month LNS supplementation. Findings from those in the LNS groups indicated high acceptance and satisfaction with LNS and perceptions that it positively affects child health and development. LNS was integrated into and enhanced ongoing complementary feeding practices. The effects of LNS use on duration and perceived quantity of breastfeeding were variable, but generally, breastfeeding was maintained during and after the intervention. Interviews generated insights into beliefs regarding infant and young child feeding practices such as introduction and use of complementary foods, and breastfeeding duration, exclusivity and cessation. Implications for the use of LNS in public health nutrition programmes are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Publication of statistically significant research findings in prosthodontics & implant dentistry in the context of other dental specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Kloukos, Dimitrios; Petridis, Haralampos; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2015-10-01

    To assess the hypothesis that there is excessive reporting of statistically significant studies published in prosthodontic and implantology journals, which could indicate selective publication. The last 30 issues of 9 journals in prosthodontics and implant dentistry were hand-searched for articles with statistical analyses. The percentages of significant and non-significant results were tabulated by parameter of interest. Univariable/multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied to identify possible predictors of reporting statistically significance findings. The results of this study were compared with similar studies in dentistry with random-effects meta-analyses. From the 2323 included studies 71% of them reported statistically significant results, with the significant results ranging from 47% to 86%. Multivariable modeling identified that geographical area and involvement of statistician were predictors of statistically significant results. Compared to interventional studies, the odds that in vitro and observational studies would report statistically significant results was increased by 1.20 times (OR: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.66-2.92) and 0.35 times (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.05-1.73), respectively. The probability of statistically significant results from randomized controlled trials was significantly lower compared to various study designs (difference: 30%, 95% CI: 11-49%). Likewise the probability of statistically significant results in prosthodontics and implant dentistry was lower compared to other dental specialties, but this result did not reach statistical significant (P>0.05). The majority of studies identified in the fields of prosthodontics and implant dentistry presented statistically significant results. The same trend existed in publications of other specialties in dentistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Organization of the 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop by Stanford University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hogan, Mark [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Essentially all we know today and will learn in the future about the fundamental nature of matter is derived from probing it with directed beams of particles such as electrons, protons, neutrons, heavy ions, and photons. The resulting ability to “see” the building blocks of matter has had an immense impact on society and our standard of living. Over the last century, particle accelerators have changed the way we look at nature and the universe we live in and have become an integral part of the Nation’s technical infrastructure. Today, particle accelerators are essential tools of modern science and technology. The cost and capabilities of accelerators would be greatly enhanced by breakthroughs in acceleration methods and technology. For the last 32 years, the Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop has acted as the focal point for discussion and development of the most promising acceleration physics and technology. It is a particularly effective forum where the discussion is leveraged and promoted by the unique and demanding feature of the AAC Workshop: the working group structure, in which participants are asked to consider their contributions in terms of even larger problems to be solved. The 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC2014) Workshop was organized by Stanford University from July 13 - 18, 2014 at the Dolce Hays Mansion in San Jose, California. The conference had a record 282 attendees including 62 students. Attendees came from 11 countries representing 66 different institutions. The workshop format consisted of plenary sessions in the morning with topical leaders from around the world presenting the latest breakthroughs to the entire workshop. In the late morning and afternoons attendees broke out into eight different working groups for more detailed presentations and discussions that were summarized on the final day of the workshop. In addition, there were student tutorial presentations on two afternoons to provide in depth education and

  14. Saw-tooth instability studies at the Stanford Linear Collider damping rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobedov, Boris Vyacheslavovich

    2000-08-01

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blowup in quadrupole or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of our instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional we had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency (10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. We have also employed the state-of the art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of our streak camera experiments we have quantitatively described the phase space of unstable bunches. We have found the radial structure of the instability mode and established that it only displaces a few percent of the beam particles. In another series of experiments we have correlated the instability signals from the beams before the extraction from the damping rings with their trajectories in the linac downstream. This showed that the instability results in a significant transverse beam jitter in the linac which compromises the damping ring performance as an injector. In addition, we have studied the instability behavior under the broad range of stored beam parameters using both passive and driven excitation. These measurements revealed unexpected beam behavior significantly above the instability threshold. Finally we performed several low current experiments to estimate the damping ring vacuum chamber impedance. We also present some analytical results regarding the instability and compare them to the observations. In

  15. Characterizing potential earthquake signals on the Stanford-USGS ultra-low frequency electromagnetic (ULFEM) array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, L.; Connor, D.; McPhee, D. K.; Glen, J. M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Anomalous ultra-low frequency (0.01-10 Hz) electromagnetic signals have been reported prior to and during M ≥ 6.0 earthquakes in a variety of places around the world, most notably prior to the 1989 Ms 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake in California. Stanford University, in conjunction with the USGS and UC Berkeley, has maintained five ULFEM recording stations along the San Andreas Fault. We are searching our ULFEM data for anomalous signals before earthquakes. Previous reports of possible ULFEM precursors, or their absence following exhaustive searches of available data, define a crude distance-magnitude relationship with larger-closer earthquakes capable of producing detectable precursors. No earthquakes exceeding this distance-magnitude relationship have yet occurred within 500 km of our network; therefore our study is as yet mostly an attempt to develop appropriate methodologies. We examined 40 Hz EM data around the arrival time of the largest/closest earthquakes to our array, focusing on co-shaking signals and pulsations as have been described preceding the 10/31/2007 Alum Rock M 5.4 earthquake. For the three stations in the Bay Area, our search included data from when the BART electric train was operating and also dormant. We observed co-shaking signals at stations between 10-40 km from the epicenters of earthquakes with varying magnitudes (M 2.6-M 6.0). A search of data in the week prior to the Alum Rock earthquake on our closest station (41 km from the epicenter) has thus far identified pulsations of similar duration and polarity as those identified by other workers on a station 2 km from the epicenter (~9 km from the hypocenter). The amplitudes of the majority of the pulsations identified in this study are within several standard deviations of background noise levels and are otherwise not distinguishable from other signals of similar frequency in the time series. To establish and maintain the integrity of the data recorded from the stations in our array, a

  16. Risk of angioedema associated with levetiracetam compared with phenytoin: Findings of the observational health data sciences and informatics research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jon D; Ryan, Patrick B; Suchard, Marc A; Hripcsak, George; Jin, Peng; Reich, Christian; Schwalm, Marie-Sophie; Khoma, Yuriy; Wu, Yonghui; Xu, Hua; Shah, Nigam H; Banda, Juan M; J Schuemie, Martijn

    2017-08-01

    Recent adverse event reports have raised the question of increased angioedema risk associated with exposure to levetiracetam. To help address this question, the Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics research network conducted a retrospective observational new-user cohort study of seizure patients exposed to levetiracetam (n = 276,665) across 10 databases. With phenytoin users (n = 74,682) as a comparator group, propensity score-matching was conducted and hazard ratios computed for angioedema events by per-protocol and intent-to-treat analyses. Angioedema events were rare in both the levetiracetam and phenytoin groups (54 vs. 71 in per-protocol and 248 vs. 435 in intent-to-treat). No significant increase in angioedema risk with levetiracetam was seen in any individual database (hazard ratios ranging from 0.43 to 1.31). Meta-analysis showed a summary hazard ratio of 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39-1.31) and 0.64 (95% CI 0.52-0.79) for the per-protocol and intent-to-treat analyses, respectively. The results suggest that levetiracetam has the same or lower risk for angioedema than phenytoin, which does not currently carry a labeled warning for angioedema. Further studies are warranted to evaluate angioedema risk across all antiepileptic drugs. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Dentist material selection for single-unit crowns: Findings from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Sonia K; Lawson, Nathaniel C; Gilbert, Gregg H; Litaker, Mark S; McClelland, Jocelyn A; Louis, David R; Gordan, Valeria V; Pihlstrom, Daniel J; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Mungia, Rahma; McCracken, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Dentists enrolled in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network completed a study questionnaire about techniques and materials used for single-unit crowns and an enrollment questionnaire about dentist/practice characteristics. The objectives were to quantify dentists' material recommendations and test the hypothesis that dentist's and practice's characteristics are significantly associated with these recommendations. Surveyed dentists responded to a contextual scenario asking what material they would use for a single-unit crown on an anterior and posterior tooth. Material choices included: full metal, porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM), all-zirconia, layered zirconia, lithium disilicate, leucite-reinforced ceramic, or other. 1777 of 2132 eligible dentists responded (83%). The top 3 choices for anterior crowns were lithium disilicate (54%), layered zirconia (17%), and leucite-reinforced glass ceramic (13%). There were significant differences (pmaterials for single-unit crowns for anterior and posterior teeth, adopting newer materials into their practices as they become available. Material choices are significantly associated with dentist's and practice's characteristics. Decisions for crown material may be influenced by factors unrelated to tooth and patient variables. Dentists should be cognizant of this when developing an evidence-based approach to selecting crown material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Provision of specific dental procedures by general dentists in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network: questionnaire findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Gordan, Valeria V; Korelitz, James J; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Oates, Thomas W; Rindal, D Brad; Gregory, Randall J

    2015-01-22

    Objectives were to: (1) determine whether and how often general dentists (GDs) provide specific dental procedures; and (2) test the hypothesis that provision is associated with key dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. GDs (n = 2,367) in the United States National Dental Practice-Based Research Network completed an Enrollment Questionnaire that included: (1) dentist; (2) practice; and (3) patient characteristics, and how commonly they provide each of 10 dental procedures. We determined how commonly procedures were provided and tested the hypothesis that provision was substantively related to the three sets of characteristics. Two procedure categories were classified as "uncommon" (orthodontics, periodontal surgery), three were "common" (molar endodontics; implants; non-surgical periodontics), and five were "very common" (restorative; esthetic procedures; extractions; removable prosthetics; non-molar endodontics). Dentist, practice, and patient characteristics were substantively related to procedure provision; several characteristics seemed to have pervasive effects, such as dentist gender, training after dental school, full-time/part-time status, private practice vs. institutional practice, presence of a specialist in the same practice, and insurance status of patients. As a group, GDs provide a comprehensive range of procedures. However, provision by individual dentists is substantively related to certain dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. A large number and broad range of factors seem to influence which procedures GDs provide. This may have implications for how GDs respond to the ever-changing landscape of dental care utilization, patient population demography, scope of practice, delivery models and GDs' evolving role in primary care.

  19. Impacts of reintroduced bison on first nations people in Yukon, Canada: Finding common ground through participatory research and social learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A Clark

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1988-1992 wood bison (Bison bison athabascae were transplanted to the southwest Yukon, inadvertently creating concerns among local First Nations about their impacts on other wildlife, habitat, and their members' traditional livelihoods. To understand these concerns we conducted a participatory impact assessment based on a multistage analysis of existing and new qualitative data. We found wood bison had since become a valued food resource, though there was a socially-determined carrying capacity for this population. Study participants desire a population large enough to sustainably harvest but avoid crossing a threshold beyond which bison may alter the regional ecosystem. An alternative problem definition emerged that focuses on how wildlife and people alike are adapting to the observed long-term changes in climate and landscape; suggesting that a wider range of acceptable policy alternatives likely exists than may have previously been thought. Collective identification of this new problem definition indicates that this specific assessment acted as a social learning process in which the participants jointly discovered new perspectives on a problem at both individual and organisational levels. Subsequent regulatory changes, based on this research, demonstrate the efficacy of participatory impact assessment for ameliorating human-wildlife conflicts.

  20. Cognitive and neuroimaging findings in developmental coordination disorder: new insights from a systematic review of recent research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Peter H; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien; Caeyenberghs, Karen; Steenbergen, Bert; Sugden, David; Clark, Jane; Mumford, Nick; Blank, Rainer

    2017-11-01

    To better understand the neural and performance factors that may underlie developmental coordination disorder (DCD), and implications for a multi-component account. A systematic review of the experimental literature published between June 2011 and September 2016 was conducted using a modified PICOS (population, intervention, comparison, outcomes, and study type) framework. A total of 106 studies were included. Behavioural data from 91 studies showed a broad cluster of deficits in the anticipatory control of movement, basic processes of motor learning, and cognitive control. Importantly, however, performance issues in DCD were often shown to be moderated by task type and difficulty. As well, we saw new evidence of compensatory processes and strategies in several studies. Neuroimaging data (15 studies, including electroencephalography) showed reduced cortical thickness in the right medial orbitofrontal cortex and altered brain activation patterns across functional networks involving prefrontal, parietal, and cerebellar regions in children with DCD than those in comparison groups. Data from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging suggested reduced white matter organization involving sensorimotor structures and altered structural connectivity across the whole brain network. Taken together, results support the hypothesis that children with DCD show differences in brain structure and function compared with typically developing children. Behaviourally, these differences may affect anticipatory planning and reduce automatization of movement skill, prompting greater reliance on slower feedback-based control and compensatory strategies. Implications for future research, theory development, and clinical practice are discussed. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  1. Calorie Labeling in a Rural Middle School Influences Food Selection: Findings from Community-Based Participatory Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Hunsberger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Calorie labeling at the point-of-purchase in chain restaurants has been shown to reduce energy intake. Objective. To investigate the impact of point-of-purchase calorie information at one rural middle school. Methods. With a community-based participatory research framework a mixed method approach was used to evaluate the impact of point-of-purchase calorie information. Students in grades 6–8, dining at the school cafeteria January and February 2010, participated for 17 school days each month; in January a menu was offered in the usual manner without calorie labels; the same menu was prepared in February with the addition of calorie labels at point-of-purchase. Gross calories served per student were measured each day allowing for matched comparison by menu. In March/April of 2010, 32 students who ate in the cafeteria 3 or more times per week were interviewed regarding their views on menu labeling. Results. Calorie consumption decreased by an average of 47 calories/day; fat intake reduced by 2.1 grams/day. Five main themes were consistent throughout the interviews. Conclusion. Point-of-purchase calorie labels can play a role in reducing the number of calories consumed by middle school age children at the lunch. The majority of students interviewed found the calorie labels helped them choose healthier food.

  2. Calorie labeling in a rural middle school influences food selection: findings from community-based participatory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsberger, Monica; McGinnis, Paul; Smith, Jamie; Beamer, Beth Ann; O'Malley, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Calorie labeling at the point-of-purchase in chain restaurants has been shown to reduce energy intake. To investigate the impact of point-of-purchase calorie information at one rural middle school. With a community-based participatory research framework a mixed method approach was used to evaluate the impact of point-of-purchase calorie information. Students in grades 6-8, dining at the school cafeteria January and February 2010, participated for 17 school days each month; in January a menu was offered in the usual manner without calorie labels; the same menu was prepared in February with the addition of calorie labels at point-of-purchase. Gross calories served per student were measured each day allowing for matched comparison by menu. In March/April of 2010, 32 students who ate in the cafeteria 3 or more times per week were interviewed regarding their views on menu labeling. Calorie consumption decreased by an average of 47 calories/day; fat intake reduced by 2.1 grams/day. Five main themes were consistent throughout the interviews. Point-of-purchase calorie labels can play a role in reducing the number of calories consumed by middle school age children at the lunch. The majority of students interviewed found the calorie labels helped them choose healthier food.

  3. Impression Techniques Used for Single-Unit Crowns: Findings from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Michael S; Louis, David R; Litaker, Mark S; Minyé, Helena M; Oates, Thomas; Gordan, Valeria V; Marshall, Don G; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2017-01-11

    To: (1) determine which impression and gingival displacement techniques practitioners use for single-unit crowns on natural teeth; and (2) test whether certain dentist and practice characteristics are significantly associated with the use of these techniques. Dentists participating in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network were eligible for this survey study. The study used a questionnaire developed by clinicians, statisticians, laboratory technicians, and survey experts. The questionnaire was pretested via cognitive interviewing with a regionally diverse group of practitioners. The survey included questions regarding gingival displacement and impression techniques. Survey responses were compared by dentist and practice characteristics using ANOVA. The response rate was 1777 of 2132 eligible dentists (83%). Regarding gingival displacement, most clinicians reported using either a single cord (35%) or dual cord (35%) technique. About 16% of respondents preferred an injectable retraction technique. For making impressions, the most frequently used techniques and materials are: poly(vinyl siloxane), 77%; polyether, 12%; optical/digital, 9%. A dental auxiliary or assistant made the final impression 2% of the time. Regarding dual-arch impression trays, 23% of practitioners report they typically use a metal frame tray, 60% use a plastic frame, and 16% do not use a dual-arch tray. Clinicians using optical impression techniques were more likely to be private practice owners or associates. This study documents current techniques for gingival displacement and making impressions for crowns. Certain dentist and practice characteristics are significantly associated with these techniques. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Horse Injury during Non-Commercial Transport: Findings from Researcher-Assisted Intercept Surveys at Southeastern Australian Equestrian Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B. Riley

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Equine transportation research has largely focused on the commercial land movement of horses. Data on the incidence and factors associated with horse injuries during non-commercial transportation (privately owned horse trucks and trailers is scant. This study surveyed 223 drivers transporting horses to 12 equestrian events in southeastern Australia. Data collected encompassed driver demographics, travel practice, vehicle characteristics, and incidents involving horse injury. Approximately 25% (55/223 of participants reported that their horses were injured during transportation. Of these 72% were owner classified as horse associated (scrambling, slipping and horse-horse interaction, 11% due to mechanical failure, and 6% due to driver error. Horse injury was not significantly associated with driver age, gender, or experience. Participants that answer the telephone whilst driving were more likely to have previously had a horse injured ( p = 0.04. There was a trend for participants with <8 hours sleep prior to the survey to have experienced a previous transportation-related injury ( p = 0.056. Increased trailer age was associated with a greater number of injury reports (r² = 0.20; p < 0.04. The diversity in trailer models prevented identification of the importance of individual design features. This study highlights the potential for horses to sustain transportation injuries in privately owned vehicles and warrants further study to address this risk to their welfare.

  5. The Gallo-Roman cremation cemeteries of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg - intial findings of current research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Polfer

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper will present the first results of a research project which aims at: ◦the elaboration of a complete corpus of all individual Gallo-Roman graves and cemeteries, including funerary monuments and inscriptions ◦the analysis of the structures and objects (typology, chronology etc. as well as the study of the religious, cultural and social attitudes and their evolution during the Roman period. The geographic area for the study is the modern Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, a major part of the ancient civitas treverorum. The project covers the period from the second half of the first century AD to the fifth century AD. The paper is divided into three main parts: 1.a short history of Gallo-Roman funerary archaeology in Luxembourg 2.a short presentation of some of the first results of the study related to: ◦the geographic distribution of the sites ◦the relationship between rural settlements, cemeteries and funerary monuments ◦the internal organisation of rural cemeteries ◦depositional practice and social differentiation in rural cemeteries ◦cremation types and the relationship between cremation and inhumation 3.a presentation (through maps and a database of the current state of the corpus (which currently has records of 300 different archaeological sites

  6. Concordance between patient satisfaction and the dentist’s view: findings from the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Joseph L.; Hudak-Boss, Susan; Fellows, Jeffery L.; Rindal, Brad; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the dentist’s view of the patient’s experience and concordance with the patient’s rating of satisfaction. Methods Practitioners from 197 practices in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network recruited consecutively seen patients who had defective restorations that were replaced or repaired. At the end of the treatment visit, the treating dentist and 5,879 patients completed and returned a survey that asked about the patient’s satisfaction. Results Dentists viewed their patients as satisfied with their treatment experience (89% n=4,719) and that they had been perceived as friendly (97%, n=5,136). Dentists had less strong feelings about whether patients had a preference for the restorative material (43%, n=2,271) or an interest in information about the procedure (33%, n=1,757). Overall, patients were satisfied, and most of the time dentists correctly predicted this. Among patients who were less than satisfied, there was a substantial subset of cases where dentists were not aware. Conclusion For improved patient-centered care, patient desires, expectations and perception of the dental care experience need to be assessed by the dentist and then managed or corrected as needed. Practice implications By taking a patient-centered approach, dentists should seek to understand how patients evaluate and rate the service provided, thereby enabling themselves to focus on what each patient values most. PMID:24686969

  7. Industry sponsorship bias in research findings: a network meta-analysis of LDL cholesterol reduction in randomised trials of statins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Sofia; Ades, A E

    2014-01-01

    cholesterol level was on average 1.77 mg/dL (95% credible interval −11.12 to 7.66) lower than the change observed in non-industry sponsored trials. There was no detectable inconsistency in the evidence network. Conclusions Our analysis shows that the findings obtained from industry sponsored statin trials seem similar in magnitude as those in non-industry sources. There are actual differences in the effectiveness of individual statins at various doses that explain previously observed discrepancies between industry and non-industry sponsored trials. PMID:25281681

  8. Treatment recommendations for single-unit crowns: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Michael S; Louis, David R; Litaker, Mark S; Minyé, Helena M; Mungia, Rahma; Gordan, Valeria V; Marshall, Don G; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to quantify practitioner variation in likelihood to recommend a crown and test whether certain dentist, practice, and clinical factors are associated significantly with this likelihood. Dentists in The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network completed a questionnaire about indications for single-unit crowns. In 4 clinical scenarios, practitioners ranked their likelihood of recommending a single-unit crown. The authors used these responses to calculate a dentist-specific crown factor (range, 0-12). A higher score implied a higher likelihood of recommending a crown. The authors tested certain characteristics for statistically significant associations with the crown factor. A total of 1,777 of 2,132 eligible dentists (83%) responded. Practitioners were most likely to recommend crowns for teeth that were fractured, cracked, or endodontically treated or had a broken restoration. Practitioners overwhelmingly recommended crowns for posterior teeth treated endodontically (94%). Practice owners, practitioners in the Southwest, and practitioners with a balanced workload were more likely to recommend crowns, as were practitioners who used optical scanners for digital impressions. There is substantial variation in the likelihood of recommending a crown. Although consensus exists in some areas (posterior endodontic treatment), variation dominates in others (size of an existing restoration). Recommendations varied according to type of practice, network region, practice busyness, patient insurance status, and use of optical scanners. Recommendations for crowns may be influenced by factors unrelated to tooth and patient variables. A concern for tooth fracture-whether from endodontic treatment, fractured teeth, or large restorations-prompted many clinicians to recommend crowns. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characteristics, detection methods, and treatment of questionable occlusal carious lesions: findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Sonia K; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Bader, James D; Gordan, Valeria V.; Rindal, D. Brad; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Qvist, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    Questionable occlusal carious lesions (QOC) can be defined as an occlusal tooth surface with no cavitation and no radiographic radiolucencies, but caries is suspected due to roughness, surface opacities, or staining. An earlier analysis of data from this study indicates ⅓ of patients have a QOC. The objective of this report is to quantify the characteristics of these common lesions, diagnostic aids used, and treatment of QOC. A total of 82 dentist and hygienist practitioner-investigators from the United States and Denmark in The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network participated. When consented patients presented with a QOC, information was recorded about the patient, tooth, lesion, and treatments. 2,603 QOC from 1,732 patients were analyzed. Lesions were usually associated with a fissure, on molars, and varied from yellow to black in color. Half presented with a chalky luster and had a rough surface when examined with an explorer. There was an association between color and luster, 10% were chalky-light, 47% were shiny-dark, and 42% were mixtures. A higher proportion of chalky than shiny lesions were light (22% vs. 9%; p < 0.001). Lesions light in color were less common in adults than pediatric patients (9% vs. 32%; p < 0.001). Lesions that were chalky and light were more common among pediatric than adult patients (22% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). This is the first study to investigate characteristics of QOC in routine clinical practice. Clinicians commonly face this diagnostic uncertainty. Determining the characteristics of these lesions are relevant when making diagnostic and treatment decisions. PMID:24480989

  10. Validity of Preoperative Clinical Findings to Identify Dental Pulp Status: A National Dental Practice-Based Research Network Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigg, Maria; Nixdorf, Donald R; Nguyen, Ruby H N; Law, Alan S

    2016-06-01

    Endodontic diagnostic tests are often used clinically to assess pulp status as a basis for the diagnosis and determination of whether root canal treatment (RCT) is indicated. Response to cold and pain on percussion are 2 common tests, yet their validity in identifying nonvital pulp in regular dental practice has not been reported. We assessed the validity of cold and percussion tests to identify nonvital pulp in teeth requiring RCT in a dental practice setting performed by 46 general dentists and 16 endodontists in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network. The influence of patient-, tooth-, and dentist-related characteristics was investigated. Observed bleeding from the pulp chamber was the clinical reference. Sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), overall test accuracy (TA), positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values, and likelihood and diagnostic odds ratios (LR+, LR-, dORs) were calculated for each single test and the combined cold and percussion tests. Seven hundred eight patient teeth were included. Cold test showed high validity to identify a nonvital pulp status (SN = 89%, SP = 80%, TA = 84%, PPV = 81%, NPV = 88%, LR+ = 4.35, LR- = 0.14, dOR = 31.4), whereas pain on percussion had lower validity (SN = 72%, SP = 41%, TA = 56%, PPV = 54%, NPV = 60%, LR+ = 1.22, LR- = 0.69, dOR = 1.78). Combining the 2 tests did not increase validity, whereas preoperative pain, medication intake, patient age and sex, and dentist training level affected test validity significantly. In regular dental practice, the cold test exhibits higher validity to discriminate between vital and nonvital pulp than the tooth percussion test. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Restorative treatment thresholds for interproximal primary caries based on radiographic images: findings from the Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Garvan, Cynthia W; Heft, Marc W; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Qvist, Vibeke; Rindal, D Brad; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to quantify the depths of proximal caries lesions that lead dentists in regular clinical practice to intervene restoratively, based on hypothetical scenarios that present radiographic images and patient background information, and to identify characteristics associated with restorative intervention in lesions that have penetrated only the enamel surface. This study surveyed dentists from the Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) who had reported doing at least some restorative dentistry (n = 901). Dentists were asked to indicate the depth at which they would restore a lesion, based on a series of radiographic images depicting interproximal caries at increasing lesion depths in a mandibular premolar; in addition, the dentists were questioned regarding two caries risk scenarios: one involving a patient with low caries risk and another involving a patient at higher risk. Logistic regression was used to analyze associations between the decision to intervene restoratively and specific dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. Of the 901 DPBRN practitioner-investigators, 500 (56%) completed the survey. For a high caries risk patient, 66% of respondents indicated that they would restore a proximal enamel lesion, while 24% would do so once the lesion had reached into the outer third of the dentin. For a low caries risk patient, 39% of respondents reported that they would restore an enamel lesion, and 54% would do so once the lesion had reached into the outer third of the dentin. In multivariate analyses that accounted for dentist and practice characteristics, dentists in large group practices were less likely to intervene surgically for enamel caries, regardless of patient's caries risk.

  12. The Impact of Personality Factors and Preceding User Comments on the Processing of Research Findings on Deep Brain Stimulation: A Randomized Controlled Experiment in a Simulated Online Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinkohl, Insa; Flemming, Danny; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2016-03-03

    Laypeople frequently discuss medical research findings on Web-based platforms, but little is known about whether they grasp the tentativeness that is inherent in these findings. Potential influential factors involved in understanding medical tentativeness have hardly been assessed to date. The research presented here aimed to examine the effects of personality factors and of other users' previous contributions in a Web-based forum on laypeople's understanding of the tentativeness of medical research findings, using the example of research on deep brain stimulation. We presented 70 university students with an online news article that reported findings on applying deep brain stimulation as a novel therapeutic method for depression, which participants were unfamiliar with. In a randomized controlled experiment, we manipulated the forum such that the article was either accompanied by user comments that addressed the issue of tentativeness, by comments that did not address this issue, or the article was accompanied by no comments at all. Participants were instructed to write their own individual user comments. Their scientific literacy, epistemological beliefs, and academic self-efficacy were measured. The outcomes measured were perceived tentativeness and tentativeness addressed in the participants' own comments. More sophisticated epistemological beliefs enhanced the perception of tentativeness (standardized β=.26, P=.034). Greater scientific literacy (stand. β=.25, P=.025) and greater academic self-efficacy (stand. β=.31, P=.007) were both predictors of a more extensive discussion of tentativeness in participants' comments. When forum posts presented in the experiment addressed the issue of tentativeness, participants' subsequent behavior tended to be consistent with what they had read in the forum, F2,63=3.66; P=.049, ηp(2)=.092. Students' understanding of the tentativeness of research findings on deep brain stimulation in an online forum is influenced by a

  13. The Longhorn Array Database (LAD: An Open-Source, MIAME compliant implementation of the Stanford Microarray Database (SMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Vishwanath R

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The power of microarray analysis can be realized only if data is systematically archived and linked to biological annotations as well as analysis algorithms. Description The Longhorn Array Database (LAD is a MIAME compliant microarray database that operates on PostgreSQL and Linux. It is a fully open source version of the Stanford Microarray Database (SMD, one of the largest microarray databases. LAD is available at http://www.longhornarraydatabase.org Conclusions Our development of LAD provides a simple, free, open, reliable and proven solution for storage and analysis of two-color microarray data.

  14. Sir Stanford Cade KBE CB FRCS (1895-1973): a pioneer in the modern treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbury, Gerald; Ellis, Harold

    2009-02-01

    Stanford Cade, born in Tsarist Russia, trained in Medicine first in Brussels and then in London at King's College and Westminster Hospital. His potential as a brilliant clinician was recognized by his appointment to the surgical staff at Westminster at the early age of 29. Here he was one of the first in the UK to use radium in the treatment of a wide variety of tumours. His interests covered the broad spectrum of malignant diseases including the head and neck, breast, bone and soft tissues. He was an early exponent of the multidisciplinary approach to the management of cancer.

  15. Using Qualitative Methods for the Analysis of Adult Immigrants’ L2 Needs: Findings from a Research Project in Greece Focusing on School-Parents Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Androulakis, George; Mastorodimou, Efi; VAN BOESCHOTEN, RIKI

    2016-01-01

    In the Greek context of economic crisis and of emerging xenophobic ideas and discourse, this article presents some findings from a research project which had the ambition to give voice to immigrants in Greece about their own language and communication needs. The target group of the project were immigrant parents, whose children attend public schools in the area of Volos. Communication between schools and immigrant families is fragmentary or non-existent, causing frustration for parents and te...

  16. SPEAR3 Workshop: Making the Scientific Case: Report from Workshop held at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, May 29-30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, S.

    1998-08-13

    As part of the planning process for the proposed upgrade to the SPEAR electron storage ring, SSRL, the SSRL Users Organization and the SSRL faculty sponsored a 1 1/2 day workshop on May 29-30 1997. The goal was to assess and document the impact of SPEAR3 on current and future science and technology research programs of the users of SSRL. The hard and soft x-ray beams produced at SSRL are used in a number of different scientific and technological disciplines. The workshop was organized by defining a set of areas of science and technology covering the basic activities at SSRL and inviting key people from outside Stanford to work with the SSRL faculty and staff in a set of topical groups on estimating the impact of SPEAR3 on their respective fields and developing a vision of the future opportunities. This report documents those scientific and technological opportunities and provides written summaries of the discussions. The report is organized with a brief technical description of SPEAR3 and planned beam line upgrades (which summarizes material presented to the workshop participants prior to the breakout sessions) following this executive summary. More detailed information from the topical working groups then follows. Finally, an appendix provides a list of workshop participants and a copy of the workshop agenda as well as some more detailed information on the SPEAR3 lattice and machine.

  17. Stratification of Highest-Risk Patients with Chronic Skin Ulcers in a Stanford Retrospective Cohort Includes Diabetes, Need for Systemic Antibiotics, and Albumin Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Amir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic nonsurgical skin wounds such as venous stasis and diabetic ulcers have been associated with a number of comorbid conditions; however, the strength of these associations has not been compared. We utilized the Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment (STRIDE system to identify a cohort of 637 patients with chronic skin ulcers. Preliminary analysis ( showed that 49.7% of the patients had a poor prognosis such as amputation or a nonhealing ulcer for at least a year. Factors significantly associated ( with these outcomes included diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, and need for systemic antibiotics. Patients with poor outcomes also tended to have lower hemoglobin levels (, higher WBC levels (, and lower albumin levels (. On multivariate analysis, however, only diabetes mellitus (OR 5.87, 1.36–25.3, need for systemic antibiotics (OR 3.88, 1.06–14.2, and albumin levels (0.20 per unit, 0.07–0.60 remained significant independent predictors of poor wound-healing outcomes. These data identify patients at the highest risk for poor wound-healing and who may benefit the most from more aggressive wound care and treatment.

  18. Priority gaps and promising areas in maternal health research in low- and middle-income countries: summary findings of a mapping of 2292 publications between 2000 and 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersich, Matthew F; Martin, Greg

    2017-02-02

    This commentary sums the findings of a series of papers on a study that mapped the global research agenda for maternal health. The mapping reviewed published interventional research across low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) from 2000 to 2012, specifically focusing on investigating the topics covered by this research, the methodologies applied, the funding landscape and trends in authorship attribution.The overarching aim underpinning the mapping activities was to evaluate whether research and funding align with causes of maternal mortality, and thereby highlight gaps in research priorities and governance. Fifteen reviewers from 8 countries screened 35,078 titles and abstracts, and extracted data from 2292 full-text articles.Over the period reviewed, the volume of publications rose several-fold, especially from 2004 to 2007. The methodologies broadened, increasingly encompassing qualitative research and systematic review. Malaria and HIV research dominated over other topics, while sexually-transmitted infection research progressively diminished. Health systems and health promotion research increased rapidly, but were less frequently evaluated in trials or published in high-impact journals. Relative to disease burden, hypertension had double the publications of haemorrhage. Many Latin American countries, China and Russia had relatively few papers per billion US dollars Gross Domestic Product. Total LMIC lead authorships rose substantially, but only a quarter of countries had a local first author lead on >75% of their research, with levels lowest in sub-Saharan Africa. The median Impact Factor of high-income country led papers was 3.1 and LMIC-led 1.8. The NIH, USAID and Gates Foundation constituted 40% of funder acknowledgements, and addressed similar topics and countries.The commentary notes that increases in outputs and broadening of methodologies suggest research capacity has expanded considerably, allowing for more nuanced, systems-based and context

  19. Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to produce actionable findings: a rapid-cycle evaluation approach to improving implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Rosalind E; Crosson, Jesse C; O'Malley, Ann S; Cromp, DeAnn; Taylor, Erin Fries

    2017-02-10

    Much research does not address the practical needs of stakeholders responsible for introducing health care delivery interventions into organizations working to achieve better outcomes. In this article, we present an approach to using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to guide systematic research that supports rapid-cycle evaluation of the implementation of health care delivery interventions and produces actionable evaluation findings intended to improve implementation in a timely manner. To present our approach, we describe a formative cross-case qualitative investigation of 21 primary care practices participating in the Comprehensive Primary Care (CPC) initiative, a multi-payer supported primary care practice transformation intervention led by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Qualitative data include observational field notes and semi-structured interviews with primary care practice leadership, clinicians, and administrative and medical support staff. We use intervention-specific codes, and CFIR constructs to reduce and organize the data to support cross-case analysis of patterns of barriers and facilitators relating to different CPC components. Using the CFIR to guide data collection, coding, analysis, and reporting of findings supported a systematic, comprehensive, and timely understanding of barriers and facilitators to practice transformation. Our approach to using the CFIR produced actionable findings for improving implementation effectiveness during this initiative and for identifying improvements to implementation strategies for future practice transformation efforts. The CFIR is a useful tool for guiding rapid-cycle evaluation of the implementation of practice transformation initiatives. Using the approach described here, we systematically identified where adjustments and refinements to the intervention could be made in the second year of the 4-year intervention. We think the approach we describe has broad

  20. ‘What difference does it make?’ Finding evidence of the impact of mental health service user researchers on research into the experiences of detained psychiatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Steven; Borschmann, Rohan; Turner, Kati; Goodrich‐Purnell, Norman; Lovell, Kathleen; Chambers, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background  Interest in the involvement of members of the public in health services research is increasingly focussed on evaluation of the impact of involvement on the research process and the production of knowledge about health. Service user involvement in mental health research is well‐established, yet empirical studies into the impact of involvement are lacking. Objective  To investigate the potential to provide empirical evidence of the impact of service user researchers (SURs) on the research process. Design  The study uses a range of secondary analyses of interview transcripts from a qualitative study of the experiences of psychiatric patients detained under the Mental Health Act (1983) to compare the way in which SURs and conventional university researchers (URs) conduct and analyse qualitative interviews. Results  Analyses indicated some differences in the ways in which service user‐ and conventional URs conducted qualitative interviews. SURs were much more likely to code (analyse) interview transcripts in terms of interviewees’ experiences and feelings, while conventional URs coded the same transcripts largely in terms of processes and procedures related to detention. The limitations of a secondary analysis based on small numbers of researchers are identified and discussed. Conclusions  The study demonstrates the potential to develop a methodologically robust approach to evaluate empirically the impact of SURs on research process and findings, and is indicative of the potential benefits of collaborative research for informing evidence‐based practice in mental health services. PMID:20536538

  1. Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Third annual report for the period October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

    1983-09-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs; radon reservoir engineering; well test analysis and bench scale experiments; field applications; workshop, seminars, and technical information; reinjection technology; and seismic monitoring of vapor/liquid interfaces. (MHR)

  2. Evidence-informed health policy 1 – Synthesis of findings from a multi-method study of organizations that support the use of research evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moynihan Ray

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organizations have been established in many countries and internationally to support the use of research evidence by producing clinical practice guidelines, undertaking health technology assessments, and/or directly supporting the use of research evidence in developing health policy on an international, national, and state or provincial level. Learning from these organizations can reduce the need to 'reinvent the wheel' and inform decisions about how best to organize support for such organizations, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. Methods We undertook a multi-method study in three phases – a survey, interviews, and case descriptions that drew on site visits – and in each of the second and third phases we focused on a purposive sample of those involved in the previous phase. We used the seven main recommendations that emerged from the advice offered in the interviews to organize much of the synthesis of findings across phases and methods. We used a constant comparative method to identify themes from across phases and methods. Results Seven recommendations emerged for those involved in establishing or leading organizations that support the use of research evidence in developing health policy: 1 collaborate with other organizations; 2 establish strong links with policymakers and involve stakeholders in the work; 3 be independent and manage conflicts of interest among those involved in the work; 4 build capacity among those working in the organization; 5 use good methods and be transparent in the work; 6 start small, have a clear audience and scope, and address important questions; and 7 be attentive to implementation considerations, even if implementation is not a remit. Four recommendations emerged for the World Health Organization (WHO and other international organizations and networks: 1 support collaborations among organizations; 2 support local adaptation efforts; 3 mobilize support; and 4 create

  3. [Thoraco-abdominal aortic replacement in chronic phase in a patient with temporary paraplegia after Stanford B acute dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Goro; Hata, Masaki; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2013-07-01

    A 42-year-old man underwent was performed with thoraco-abdominal aneurysm replacement accompaniedy with reconstruction of abdominal branches and intercostal arteries. Eighteen months before, he had suffered from Stanford already been cured with paraplegia on being type B acute aortic dissection combined with paraplegia. When paraplegia had been occurred, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was had been performed promptly, and 4 days later, neurologic deficit was disappeared in 1 day. During the thoraco-abdominal aortic operation, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was performed done again. After the operation, paraplegia did was not occurred and he did not feel somewhat wrong with his legs. He was discharged from hospital on foot by himself. This case showed the efficacy of cerebral spinal fluid drainage for not only both with the prevention but also and treatment of paraplegia.

  4. [Case in which renal function improved following stent-graft placement in the aorta two months after the onset of stanford type B acute aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusamae, Juri; Nishino, Tomoya; Uramatsu, Tadashi; Obata, Yoko; Furusu, Akira; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Kohno, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    A 48-year-old man was admitted to the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery in our hospital after developing Stanford type B acute aortic dissection with a patent false lumen in July 2008. Conservative treatment involving rest and antihypertensive therapy was provided following admission. Urine volume decreased from day 9, and serum creatinine increased to 7.7 mg/dL. As it was suspected that the reduced renal blood flow was caused by progression of aortic dissection, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT)was performed. The left kidney showed reduced enhancement and the right kidney was heterogeneously enhanced. The dissection had extended to the left renal artery, and the reduced renal blood flow caused by narrowing of the left renal artery was thought to have caused the renal dysfunction. As elevated urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels and hyperkalemia persisted, hemodialysis was performed a total of four times. Although the patient was subsequently withdrawn from dialysis, he continued to display severe renal dysfunction and was transferred to our department on day 28 for the treatment of renal failure. Conservative treatment was continued, but the maximum diameter of the thoracic aorta gradually increased, and stent placement at the entry of aortic dissection was indicated. On day 86, two stent-grafts were placed for entries at the distal site of the descending aorta and the distal site of the aortic arch. Postoperative abdominal contrast-enhanced CT showed expansion of the true lumen, and blood flow and contrast enhancement improved in both kidneys. Postoperatively, serum creatinine gradually decreased, improving to 1.16 mg/dL on day 96. Renography in the third month after stent-graft placement showed improved renal function in both kidneys. These findings suggest that even at approximately 2 months after the onset of acute renal failure associated with aortic dissection, renal function can be improved by restoring blood flow in the renal arteries.

  5. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  6. Systematic review finds that study data not published in full text articles have unclear impact on meta-analyses results in medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmucker, Christine M; Blümle, Anette; Schell, Lisa K; Schwarzer, Guido; Oeller, Patrick; Cabrera, Laura; von Elm, Erik; Briel, Matthias; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis as part of a systematic review aims to provide a thorough, comprehensive and unbiased statistical summary of data from the literature. However, relevant study results could be missing from a meta-analysis because of selective publication and inadequate dissemination. If missing outcome data differ systematically from published ones, a meta-analysis will be biased with an inaccurate assessment of the intervention effect. As part of the EU-funded OPEN project (www.open-project.eu) we conducted a systematic review that assessed whether the inclusion of data that were not published at all and/or published only in the grey literature influences pooled effect estimates in meta-analyses and leads to different interpretation. Systematic review of published literature (methodological research projects). Four bibliographic databases were searched up to February 2016 without restriction of publication year or language. Methodological research projects were considered eligible for inclusion if they reviewed a cohort of meta-analyses which (i) compared pooled effect estimates of meta-analyses of health care interventions according to publication status of data or (ii) examined whether the inclusion of unpublished or grey literature data impacts the result of a meta-analysis. Seven methodological research projects including 187 meta-analyses comparing pooled treatment effect estimates according to different publication status were identified. Two research projects showed that published data showed larger pooled treatment effects in favour of the intervention than unpublished or grey literature data (Ratio of ORs 1.15, 95% CI 1.04-1.28 and 1.34, 95% CI 1.09-1.66). In the remaining research projects pooled effect estimates and/or overall findings were not significantly changed by the inclusion of unpublished and/or grey literature data. The precision of the pooled estimate was increased with narrower 95% confidence interval. Although we may anticipate that

  7. Assessing Giftedness in Children: Comparing the Accuracy of Three Shortened Measures of Intelligence to the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Jocelyn H.; McIntosh, David E.; Dixon, Felicia; Williams, Tasha; Youman, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the accuracy of three shortened measures of intelligence: the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability, Third Edition Brief Intellectual Ability (WJ III COG BIA) score; the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, Fifth Edition Abbreviated IQ (SB5 ABIQ); and the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test IQ Composite (K-BIT) in predicting…

  8. Psychological Evaluation of Preschool Children: Or Can Learning Disabilities be Evaluated in the Preschool Child Using the Stanford-Binet as a Screening Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Pearl; Graf, Mercedes

    Tested with the Stanford-Binet Scale of Intelligence were 70 children, aged 3- to 5-years with IQ's from 75 to 145, to determine whether the test could serve as a diagnostic tool for identifying learning disabilities (LD) in preschool children. It was hypothesized that LD children would have a basal age no more than two levels below chronological…

  9. A Tale of Three Campuses: Planning and Design in Response to the Cultural Heritages at Mills College, the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiene, Karen; Sabbatini, Robert

    2011-01-01

    How do forward-looking institutions with rich landscape and architectural heritages integrate contemporary programming and design? This article explores the evolution of the Mills College campus and compares it with two larger western universities: the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and Leland Stanford, Jr., University (Stanford…

  10. Complicating Culture and Difference: Situating Asian American Youth Identities in Lisa Yee's "Millicent Min," "Girl Genius" and "Stanford Wong Flunks Big-Time"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This review situates how culture, difference, and identity are discursively constructed in "Millicent Min, Girl Genius" and "Stanford Wong Flunks Big-Time," two award-winning books written by critically acclaimed Asian American author Lisa Yee. Using contextual literacy approaches, the characters, cultural motifs, and physical settings in these…

  11. Efficiency of Screening Procedures for Assigning Levels of the Stanford Achievement Test (Eighth Edition) to Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the efficiency of over 5,000 reading and mathematics screening tests specifically developed for assigning levels of the Stanford Achievement Test, 8th edition (SAT-8), to deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Analysis found the screening tests more effective in assigning student levels for some SAT-8 subtests than for others. (DB)

  12. Finding potentially new multimorbidity patterns of psychiatric and somatic diseases: exploring the use of literature-based discovery in primary care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Rein; Aarts, Sil; van Mulligen, Erik; Metsemakers, Job; van Boxtel, Martin P; Verhey, Frans; van den Akker, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Multimorbidity, the co-occurrence of two or more chronic medical conditions within a single individual, is increasingly becoming part of daily care of general medical practice. Literature-based discovery may help to investigate the patterns of multimorbidity and to integrate medical knowledge for improving healthcare delivery for individuals with co-occurring chronic conditions. To explore the usefulness of literature-based discovery in primary care research through the key-case of finding associations between psychiatric and somatic diseases relevant to general practice in a large biomedical literature database (Medline). By using literature based discovery for matching disease profiles as vectors in a high-dimensional associative concept space, co-occurrences of a broad spectrum of chronic medical conditions were matched for their potential in biomedicine. An experimental setting was chosen in parallel with expert evaluations and expert meetings to assess performance and to generate targets for integrating literature-based discovery in multidisciplinary medical research of psychiatric and somatic disease associations. Through stepwise reductions a reference set of 21,945 disease combinations was generated, from which a set of 166 combinations between psychiatric and somatic diseases was selected and assessed by text mining and expert evaluation. Literature-based discovery tools generate specific patterns of associations between psychiatric and somatic diseases: one subset was appraised as promising for further research; the other subset surprised the experts, leading to intricate discussions and further eliciting of frameworks of biomedical knowledge. These frameworks enable us to specify targets for further developing and integrating literature-based discovery in multidisciplinary research of general practice, psychology and psychiatry, and epidemiology.

  13. Towards a cooperation between the arts, space science research and the European Space Agency - Preliminary findings of the ESA Topical Team Arts and Sciences (ETTAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Sarah Jane; Imhof, Anna Barbara; Waldvogel, Christian; Kotler, J. Michelle; Peljhan, Marko

    2014-12-01

    The arts offer alternative insights into reality, which are explored by science in general, and broadened by the activities conducted by the European Space Agency [4] and other space agencies. Similar to the way the members of ESA are ambassadors for spaceflight and science, artists and cultural professionals are ambassadors for human expression, experimentation, and exploration. In June 2011, the ESA Topical Team Arts and Sciences (ETTAS) held a three-day workshop at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany. During this workshop, topics and ideas were discussed to develop initiatives between the arts, sciences and ESA. The aim was to foster and expand the human and cultural aspects of space exploration, and at the same time offer a means of communication that aims to reach audiences beyond the scope of traditional space-related channels. The consensus of the team was that establishing and sustaining a transdisciplinary professional community consisting of ESA representatives, scientists and artists would fuel knowledge transfer, and mutual inspiration. Potential ways to provide a sustainable cooperation within and between the various groups were discussed. We present the preliminary findings including a number of measures and mechanisms to initiate and conduct such an initiative. Plausible organisational measures, procedures and consequences, as well as a proposition on how to proceed are also discussed. Overall, the involvement and cooperation between the arts, space science research and ESA will enhance in the citizens of the ESA member states the sense of public ownership of ESA results, and participation in ESA's research.

  14. Preliminary findings on the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment: outcomes during the formation of the practice-based research network, DO-Touch.NET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhardt, Brian F; Johnson, Jane C; Gross, Shanin R; Hagan, Celia; Lund, Gregg; Curry, William J

    2014-03-01

    Few studies have assessed the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) and subsequent patient-reported outcomes. To assess the current use of OMT and associated patient-reported outcomes. A retrospective medical record review and a prospective observational study. Two university-based sites and their clinics associated with the practice-based research network DO-Touch.NET. Patients aged 18 years or older who received OMT. Medical records from 2007 were retrospectively reviewed to identify conditions being managed with OMT. From 2008 to 2010, patients were recruited before seeing their physicians. Questionnaires were distributed to patients and physicians, and information including demographics, chief complaints, symptom severity, current and past treatments, interference of symptoms with quality of life, physical examination findings, diagnoses, OMT performed, and immediate patient response to OMT was collected. A subset of patients provided data on symptom severity and frequency and other treatments daily for the 7 days after OMT. On day 7, symptom interference with quality of life was reassessed. Retrospective data were collected from 2569 office visits, and prospective data were collected from 299 office visits (patient age range, 18-93 years). In the medical record review, 17 of the top 25 diagnoses (68%) were related to musculoskeletal conditions. In the prospective study, 18 of the top 24 medical diagnoses (75%) were related to musculoskeletal conditions. Immediately after OMT, patients at 271 of 296 office visits (92%) felt better or much better; those at 5 (osteopathic research and define evidence-based standards for OMT practice and training.

  15. H.U.B city steps: methods and early findings from a community-based participatory research trial to reduce blood pressure among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Jamie M; Connell, Carol C; Madson, Michael B; Wang, Bo; Reed, Vickie Blakely; Molaison, Elaine Fontenot; Yadrick, Kathleen

    2011-06-10

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has been recognized as an important approach to develop and execute health interventions among marginalized populations, and a key strategy to translate research into practice to help reduce health disparities. Despite growing interest in the CBPR approach, CBPR initiatives rarely use experimental or other rigorous research designs to evaluate health outcomes. This behavioral study describes the conceptual frameworks, methods, and early findings related to the reach, adoption, implementation, and effectiveness on primary blood pressure outcomes. The CBPR, social support, and motivational interviewing frameworks are applied to test treatment effects of a two-phased CBPR walking intervention, including a 6-month active intervention quasi experimental phase and 12-month maintenance randomized controlled trial phase to test dose effects of motivational interviewing. A community advisory board helped develop and execute the culturally-appropriate intervention components which included social support walking groups led by peer coaches, pedometer diary self-monitoring, monthly diet and physical activity education sessions, and individualized motivational interviewing sessions. Although the study is on-going, three month data is available and reported. Analyses include descriptive statistics and paired t tests. Of 269 enrolled participants, most were African American (94%) females (85%) with a mean age of 43.8 (SD = 12.1) years. Across the 3 months, 90% of all possible pedometer diaries were submitted. Attendance at the monthly education sessions was approximately 33%. At the 3-month follow-up 227 (84%) participants were retained. From baseline to 3-months, systolic BP [126.0 (SD = 19.1) to 120.3 (SD = 17.9) mmHg; p pressure outcomes demonstrate early effectiveness. Importantly, future analyses will evaluate long-term effectiveness of this CBPR behavioral intervention on health outcomes, and help inform the translational

  16. The impact of the military mission in Afghanistan on mental health in the Canadian Armed Forces: a summary of research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorski, Mark A; Boulos, David

    2014-01-01

    As Canada's mission in Afghanistan winds down, the Canadian Forces (CF) are reflecting on the psychological impact of the mission on more than 40,000 deployed personnel. All major CF studies of mental health outcomes done before and during the Afghanistan era are summarized, with an eye toward getting the most complete picture of the mental health impact of the mission. Studies on traumatic brain injury (TBI), high-risk drinking, and suicidality are included given their conceptual link to mental health. CF studies on the mental health impact of pre-Afghanistan deployments are few, and they have inadequate detail on deployment experiences. Afghanistan era findings confirm service-related mental health problems (MHPs) in an important minority. The findings of the studies cohere, both as a group and in the context of data from our Allies. Combat exposure is the most important driver of deployment-related MHPs, but meaningful rates will be found in those in low-threat areas. Reserve service and cumulative effects of multiple deployments are not major risk factors in the CF. Many deployed personnel will seek care, but further efforts to decrease the delay are needed. Only a fraction of the overall burden of mental illness is likely deployment attributable. Deployment-related mental disorders do not translate into an overall increase in in-service suicidal behavior in the CF, but there is concerning evidence of increased suicide risk after release. TBI occurred in a distinct minority on this deployment, but severe forms were rare. Most TBI cases do not have persistent "post-concussive" symptoms; such symptoms are closely associated with MHPs. The mental health impact of the mission in Afghanistan is commensurate with its difficult nature. While ongoing and planned studies will provide additional detail on its impacts, greater research attention is needed on preventive and therapeutic interventions.

  17. The impact of the military mission in Afghanistan on mental health in the Canadian Armed Forces: a summary of research findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Zamorski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: As Canada's mission in Afghanistan winds down, the Canadian Forces (CF are reflecting on the psychological impact of the mission on more than 40,000 deployed personnel. Methods: All major CF studies of mental health outcomes done before and during the Afghanistan era are summarized, with an eye toward getting the most complete picture of the mental health impact of the mission. Studies on traumatic brain injury (TBI, high-risk drinking, and suicidality are included given their conceptual link to mental health. Results: CF studies on the mental health impact of pre-Afghanistan deployments are few, and they have inadequate detail on deployment experiences. Afghanistan era findings confirm service-related mental health problems (MHPs in an important minority. The findings of the studies cohere, both as a group and in the context of data from our Allies. Combat exposure is the most important driver of deployment-related MHPs, but meaningful rates will be found in those in low-threat areas. Reserve service and cumulative effects of multiple deployments are not major risk factors in the CF. Many deployed personnel will seek care, but further efforts to decrease the delay are needed. Only a fraction of the overall burden of mental illness is likely deployment attributable. Deployment-related mental disorders do not translate into an overall increase in in-service suicidal behavior in the CF, but there is concerning evidence of increased suicide risk after release. TBI occurred in a distinct minority on this deployment, but severe forms were rare. Most TBI cases do not have persistent “post-concussive” symptoms; such symptoms are closely associated with MHPs. Conclusion: The mental health impact of the mission in Afghanistan is commensurate with its difficult nature. While ongoing and planned studies will provide additional detail on its impacts, greater research attention is needed on preventive and therapeutic interventions.

  18. Press releases issued by supplements industry organisations and non-industry organisations in response to publication of clinical research findings: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael T M; Gamble, Greg; Bolland, Mark J; Grey, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Dietary supplement use is increasing despite lack of evidence of benefits, or evidence of harm. Press releases issued by the supplements industry might contribute to this situation by using 'spin' (strategies to hype or denigrate findings) to distort the results of clinical studies. We assessed press releases issued in response to publication of clinical studies on dietary supplements. We analyzed 47 supplements industry press releases and 91 non-industry press releases and news stories, generated in response to 46 clinical studies of dietary supplements published between 1/1/2005 and 5/31/2013. The primary outcome was 'spin' content and direction. We also assessed disposition towards use of dietary supplements, reporting of study information, and dissemination of industry press releases. More supplements industry press releases (100%) contained 'spin' than non-industry media documents (55%, Pindustry than non-industry media documents for studies reporting benefit of supplements (median 'spin' score 3.3, 95% CI 1.0-5.5 vs 0.5, 0-1.0; Pindustry than non-industry media documents for studies reporting no effect (6.0, 5.0-7.0 vs 0, 0-0; PIndustry press releases advocated supplement use in response to >90% of studies that reported no benefit, or harm, of the supplement. Industry press releases less frequently reported study outcomes, sample size, and estimates of effect size than non-industry media documents (all PIndustry press releases were referenced by 148 news stories on the websites of 6 organizations that inform manufacturers, retailers and consumers of supplements. Dietary supplements industry press releases issued in response to clinical research findings are characterized by 'spin' that hypes results that are favourable to supplement use and denigrates results that are not.

  19. Explaining Variations in the Findings of Presenteeism Research: A Meta-Analytic Investigation Into the Moderating Effects of Construct Operationalizations and Chronic Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Alisha; Sharma, Rajeev; Magee, Christopher; Caputi, Peter; Iverson, Donald

    2017-10-05

    The purpose of the present study is to theorize and test the moderating effects of two variables-the way presenteeism is operationalized and the presence of a preexisting chronic health condition-on the relationships between presenteeism and its antecedents (i.e., physical health, mental health, work factors, social factors, and personal factors). A meta-analysis of 116 studies (N = 301,402) investigated the impact of both moderator variables while controlling for the country of the sample and publication source. As expected, the magnitude of the relationships between presenteeism and its antecedents varied depending on the type of operationalization of presenteeism. Specifically, the average mean correlations reported in previous studies were larger when presenteeism was operationalized using both a behavior and an outcome (e.g., productivity loss stemming from attending work while ill) as compared with when presenteeism was operationalized as a behavior only (e.g., attending work while ill). Furthermore, we found that the associations between presenteeism and its antecedents were stronger for those workers with a preexisting chronic health condition (e.g., osteoarthritis), as compared with healthier workers. These findings have important implications for research and theory. In particular, they suggest that the way presenteeism is operationalized can artificially inflate the observed effect sizes between presenteeism and its antecedents. This is a significant contribution, as it may shape future measures of presenteeism. Theoretically, the findings are also important, as they provide a framework for understanding why some workers are more prone to presenteeism than others (e.g., because individuals with chronic health problems may be more resilient). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Future Directions of Research and Care for Urinary Incontinence: Findings from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Summit on Urinary Incontinence Clinical Research in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Toby C; Asfaw, Tirsit S; Baker, Jan E; Clarkson, Becky; Coleman, Pamela; Hoffstetter, Susan; Konkel, Kimberly; Lavender, Missy; Nair, Shailaja; Norton, Jenna; Subak, Leslee; Visco, Anthony; Star, Robert A; Bavendam, Tamara

    2017-07-01

    Female urinary incontinence is prevalent, costly and morbid. Participants in a NIDDK (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) sponsored summit reviewed findings from NIH (National Institutes of Health) funded clinical research on urinary incontinence in women and discussed the future of urinary incontinence research. The NIDDK convened the Summit on Urinary Incontinence Clinical Research in Women on March 14, 2014. Participants representing a broad range of clinical expertise reviewed completed NIH sponsored urinary incontinence related studies, including results from community based epidemiological studies such as the BACH (Boston Area Community Health) Survey and from randomized clinical trials such as PRIDE (Program to Reduce Incontinence by Diet and Exercise), and studies conducted by the Pelvic Floor Disorders Network and the Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network. BACH Survey results improved our understanding of precursors, incidence, prevalence and natural history of urinary incontinence in a diverse group of women. The Pelvic Floor Disorders Network study found that anticholinergic medications and onabotulinumtoxinA are efficacious for treating urge urinary incontinence, and Burch colposuspension and retropubic mid urethral polypropylene slings are efficacious for decreasing stress urinary incontinence following pelvic organ prolapse surgery in women with potential stress urinary incontinence. The Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network study found that fascial slings were better than colposuspension, and that retropubic and transobturator mid urethral polypropylene slings were equivalent for stress urinary incontinence. In patients with stress urinary incontinence a preoperative urodynamic study was noninferior to basic office examinations for surgical outcome. The addition of behavioral intervention did not allow female patients to discontinue antimuscarinics for urge urinary incontinence. PRIDE showed that modest weight

  1. Anticipate and communicate: Ethical management of incidental and secondary findings in the clinical, research, and direct-to-consumer contexts (December 2013 report of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Christine

    2014-09-15

    Genomic population research increases the possibility of finding genetic coding anomalies that are not the primary object of research but may have significance for the current and future medical care of research participants and progeny. The December 2013 Report of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Anticipate and Communicate: Ethical Management of Incidental and Secondary Findings in the Clinical, Research, and Direct-to-Consumer Contexts (http://bioethics.gov/sites/default/files/FINALAnticipateCommunicate_PCSBI_0.pdf)) recommends that a researcher anticipate these findings and make a plan that addresses which findings will be communicated to research participants and how. Following these recommendations will be disruptive for both investigators and institutional review boards (IRBs) until the research community reaches consensus, or a mechanism for evolving consensus, on which results should be returned to research participants. A protocol-by-protocol approach, though laborious, makes sense for both investigators and IRBs as the research community thinks through the implications of genomic research. Epidemiologists will note that discussion of the return of results and the plan for communicating findings should be included in both the participant consent agreement and the research protocol submitted to the IRB. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Examining Neighborhood Social Cohesion in the Context of Community-based Participatory Research: Descriptive Findings from an Academic-Community Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Lori Brand; Fouad, Mona N; Hawk, Bianca; Osborne, Tiffany; Bae, Sejong; Eady, Sequoya; Thompson, Joanice; Brantley, Wendy; Crawford, Lovie; Heider, Laura; Schoenberger, Yu-Mei M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the process of conducting an assessment of neighborhood perceptions and cohesion by a community coalition-academic team created in the context of community-based participatory research (CBPR), to guide the design of locally relevant health initiatives. Guided by CBPR principles, a collaborative partnership was established between an academic center and a local, urban, underserved neighborhood in Birmingham, Alabama to identify and address community concerns and priorities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in September 2016 among community residents (N=90) to examine perceptions of neighborhood characteristics, including social cohesion and neighborhood problems. The major concerns voiced by the coalition were violence and lack of neighborhood cohesion and safety. The community survey verified the concerns of the coalition, with the majority of participants mentioning increasing safety and stopping the violence as the things to change about the community and the greatest hope for the community. Furthermore, results indicated residents had a moderate level of perceived social cohesion (mean = 2.87 [.67]). The Mid-South TCC Academic and Community Engagement (ACE) Core successfully partnered with community members and stakeholders to establish a coalition whose concerns and vision for the community matched the concerns of residents of the community. Collecting data from different groups strengthened the interpretation of the findings and allowed for a rich understanding of neighborhood concerns.

  3. Ernst Rüdin's Unpublished 1922-1925 Study "Inheritance of Manic-Depressive Insanity": Genetic Research Findings Subordinated to Eugenic Ideology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gundula Kösters

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the early 20th century, there were few therapeutic options for mental illness and asylum numbers were rising. This pessimistic outlook favoured the rise of the eugenics movement. Heredity was assumed to be the principal cause of mental illness. Politicians, scientists and clinicians in North America and Europe called for compulsory sterilisation of the mentally ill. Psychiatric genetic research aimed to prove a Mendelian mode of inheritance as a scientific justification for these measures. Ernst Rüdin's seminal 1916 epidemiological study on inheritance of dementia praecox featured large, systematically ascertained samples and statistical analyses. Rüdin's 1922-1925 study on the inheritance of "manic-depressive insanity" was completed in manuscript form, but never published. It failed to prove a pattern of Mendelian inheritance, counter to the tenets of eugenics of which Rüdin was a prominent proponent. It appears he withheld the study from publication, unable to reconcile this contradiction, thus subordinating his carefully derived scientific findings to his ideological preoccupations. Instead, Rüdin continued to promote prevention of assumed hereditary mental illnesses by prohibition of marriage or sterilisation and was influential in the introduction by the National Socialist regime of the 1933 "Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring" (Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses.

  4. Social Support and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Low-Income Women: Findings from Community-Based Participatory Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihu, Hamisu M; Adegoke, Korede; Turner, DeAnne; Al Agili, Dania; Berry, Estrellita Lo

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the association between social support and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among low-income women in the southeastern region of the United States. Analysis was performed on data from a community needs assessment survey that was designed to explore social determinants of health and QoL indicators using a community-based participatory research approach. The study sample comprised 132 women aged 18 years old and older. Bivariate analysis and logistic regressions with bootstrapping were performed. Social support was predictive of physical and mental HRQoL in a contrasting fashion, suggesting a complex relation. Other social determinants of global HRQoL independent of social support status include marital and employment status, maternal age, and income. Our results also demonstrate complex interaction patterns across race, social support, and HRQoL. The linkage between social support and HRQoL may not be a simple relation, as previously assumed. Rather, it is characterized by multifaceted interactions through which social determinants of health modulate the impact of social support on HRQoL. These are new findings.

  5. Agreement among dentists' restorative treatment planning thresholds for primary occlusal caries, primary proximal caries, and existing restorations: findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Tim J; Gordan, Valeria V; Litaker, Mark S; Fellows, Jeffrey L; Brad Rindal, D; Firestone, Allen R; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the agreement among individual National Dental Practice-Based Research Network dentists' self-reported treatment decisions for primary occlusal caries, primary proximal caries, and existing restorations. Five hypothetical clinical scenarios were presented: primary occlusal caries; primary proximal caries; and whether three existing restorations should be repaired or replaced. We quantified the probability that dentists who recommended later restorative intervention for primary caries were the same ones who recommended that existing restorations be repaired instead of replaced. Dentists who recommended later restorative treatment of primary occlusal caries and proximal caries at a more-advanced stage were significantly more likely to recommend repair instead of replacement. Agreement among dentists on a threshold stage for the treatment of primary caries ranged from 40 to 68%, while that for repair or replacement of existing restorations was 36 to 43%. Dentists who recommended repair rather than replacement of existing restorations were significantly more likely to recommend later treatment of primary caries. Conversely, dentists who recommended treatment of primary caries at an earlier stage were significantly more likely to recommend replacement of the entire restoration. Between-dentist agreement for primary caries treatment was better than between-dentist agreement for repair or replacement of existing restorations. These findings suggest consistency in how individual dentists approach the treatment of primary caries and existing restorations. However, substantial variation was found between dentists in their treatment decisions about the same teeth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Agreement among dentists’ restorative treatment planning thresholds for primary occlusal caries, primary proximal caries, and existing restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaven, Tim J.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Litaker, Mark S.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Rindal, D. Brad; Firestone, Allen R.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to quantify the agreement among individual National Dental Practice-Based Research Network dentists’ self-reported treatment decisions for primary occlusal caries, primary proximal caries, and existing restorations. Methods Five hypothetical clinical scenarios were presented: primary occlusal caries; primary proximal caries; and whether three existing restorations should be repaired or replaced. We quantified the probability that dentists who recommended later restorative intervention for primary caries were the same ones who recommended that existing restorations be repaired instead of replaced. Results Dentists who recommended later restorative treatment of primary occlusal caries and proximal caries at a more-advanced stage were significantly more likely to recommend repair instead of replacement. Agreement among dentists on a threshold stage for the treatment of primary caries ranged from 40 to 68%, while that for repair or replacement of existing restorations was 36 to 43%. Conclusions Dentists who recommended repair rather than replacement of existing restorations were significantly more likely to recommend later treatment of primary caries. Conversely, dentists who recommended treatment of primary caries at an earlier stage were significantly more likely to recommend replacement of the entire restoration. Between-dentist agreement for primary caries treatment was better than between-dentist agreement for repair or replacement of existing restorations. Clinical implications These findings suggest consistency in how individual dentists approach the treatment of primary caries and existing restorations. However, substantial variation was found between dentists in their treatment decisions about the same teeth. PMID:23743181

  7. H.U.B city steps: methods and early findings from a community-based participatory research trial to reduce blood pressure among african americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molaison Elaine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR has been recognized as an important approach to develop and execute health interventions among marginalized populations, and a key strategy to translate research into practice to help reduce health disparities. Despite growing interest in the CBPR approach, CBPR initiatives rarely use experimental or other rigorous research designs to evaluate health outcomes. This behavioral study describes the conceptual frameworks, methods, and early findings related to the reach, adoption, implementation, and effectiveness on primary blood pressure outcomes. Methods The CBPR, social support, and motivational interviewing frameworks are applied to test treatment effects of a two-phased CBPR walking intervention, including a 6-month active intervention quasi experimental phase and 12-month maintenance randomized controlled trial phase to test dose effects of motivational interviewing. A community advisory board helped develop and execute the culturally-appropriate intervention components which included social support walking groups led by peer coaches, pedometer diary self-monitoring, monthly diet and physical activity education sessions, and individualized motivational interviewing sessions. Although the study is on-going, three month data is available and reported. Analyses include descriptive statistics and paired t tests. Results Of 269 enrolled participants, most were African American (94% females (85% with a mean age of 43.8 (SD = 12.1 years. Across the 3 months, 90% of all possible pedometer diaries were submitted. Attendance at the monthly education sessions was approximately 33%. At the 3-month follow-up 227 (84% participants were retained. From baseline to 3-months, systolic BP [126.0 (SD = 19.1 to 120.3 (SD = 17.9 mmHg; p Conclusions This CBPR study highlights implementation factors and signifies the community's active participation in the development and execution of this study. Reach

  8. Risk factors of pre-operational aortic rupture in acute and subacute Stanford type A aortic dissection patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo-Dong; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Jun; Lu, Fang-Lin; Han, Lin; Xu, Zhi-Yun

    2017-12-01

    Aortic rupture is one of the main causes of early death in acute and subacute Stanford type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) patients. This study aimed to analyze potential risk factors for pre-operational aortic rupture in ATAAD patients. We retrospectively reviewed aortic dissection cases treated between May 2013 and May 2016 in Changhai Hospital, Shanghai. A total of 329 patients with ATAAD were included in the final analysis, and 31 patients died of aortic rupture before surgery. Clinical data on basic characteristics, clinical presentation, and biochemical measurements for all 329 patients were analyzed. The in-hospital aortic rupture rate was 9.4% (31/329), and the rupture accounted for 47% (31/66) of all in-hospital deaths of ATAAD patients. Patients who experienced rupture were significantly older (P0.7 ng/mL (OR: 9.28; 95% CI, 1.72-50.06; P=0.010), and D-dimer level ≥10 µg/mL (OR: 13.37; 95% CI, 2.18-81.97; P=0.005). Aortic rupture accounted for 47% of all in-hospital deaths among patient with ATAAD. Shock, pain requiring medication, a troponin level >0.7 ng/mL and a D-dimer level ≥10 µg/mL are independent risk factors for aortic rupture in these patients.

  9. The Stanford-ReSurge Burn Scar Contracture Scale for Neck: Development and Initial Validation for Burn Scar Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lawrence; Puri, Vinita; Dangol, Mohan Krishna; Mannan, Iftekhar Ibne; Khundkar, Shafquat Hussain; Le Thua, Trung-Hau; Muguti, Godfrey; Rai, Shankar Man; Karanas, Yvonne; Chang, James

    2016-11-01

    Burn contractures can cause significant disability, particularly in patients in resource-limited settings. However, a gap exists in our ability to measure outcomes in patients with burn contractures of the neck. The objective of this study was to develop and validate the Stanford-ReSurge Burn Scar Contracture Scale-Neck to longitudinally assess functional status and measure functional improvement following contracture release of the neck. A literature review was performed to identify scales used in neck assessment and burn assessment. Items were then removed from the pool based on redundancy, feasibility, cultural appropriateness, and applicability to patients in international resource-limited environments. Remaining items were administered to patients with burn contracture of the neck. The initial literature review found 33 scales that were combined to create an initial pool of 714 items, which was first reduced to 40 items. Feedback from field testing then yielded a 20-item outcome tool to assess appearance, activities of daily living, somatosensation, satisfaction, and range of motion, with a floor of 20 and a ceiling score of 100 points. Preliminary testing with 10 patients showed an average preoperative score of 58 points and an average 1-month postoperative score of 42 points. The authors have created an outcome tool for measuring functional status following burn contracture release of the neck, which can easily be implemented in resource-limited settings where the burden of burn injuries and morbidities is disproportionately high. Ongoing work includes a multicountry study to evaluate validity and reliability.

  10. Transcarotid Artery Endovascular Reconstruction of the Aortic Arch by Modified Bifurcated Stent Graft for Stanford Type A Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old man with Stanford type B dissection underwent his first endovascular repair (EVAR in April 2004 by Talent thoracic stent graft. He had an uncomplicated recovery and maintained good blood pressure control. However, a new retrograde dissection appeared in September 2004. The new dissection involved his aortic arch and ascending thoracic aorta to the opening of the coronary arteries. To reconstruct the aortic arch, bypasses between the right common carotid artery (RCCA, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery were performed before endovascular repair. A modified bifurcated Talent stent graft was deployed from the RCCA to the ascending thoracic aorta with a long limb in the innominate artery and a short limb in the aortic arch. A further two pieces of graft were deployed via the common femoral artery. The ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch were reconstructed completely by the bifurcated stent graft. The final angiography confirmed that there was good stent graft configuration, normal blood flow, and stable haemodynamics. No endoleak or other major complications were encountered. This result indicated that it is possible to reconstruct the aortic arch with a bifurcated stent graft and could be a new endovascular repair model for complex thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

  11. Finding Sliesthorp?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobat, Andres S.

    2016-01-01

    In 2003, a hitherto unknown Viking age settlement was discovered at Füsing in Northern Germany close to Hedeby/Schleswig, the largest of the early Scandinavian towns. Finds and building features suggest a high status residence and a seat of some chiefly elite that flourished from around 700...... and the transformation of socio‐political structures in Northern Europe as it transitioned from prehistory into the middle Ages....

  12. Engineering at SLAC: Designing and constructing experimental devices for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource - Final Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djang, Austin [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-22

    Thanks to the versatility of the beam lines at SSRL, research there is varied and benefits multiple fields. Each experiment requires a particular set of experiment equipment, which in turns requires its own particular assembly. As such, new engineering challenges arise from each new experiment. My role as an engineering intern has been to help solve these challenges, by designing and assembling experimental devices. My first project was to design a heated sample holder, which will be used to investigate the effect of temperature on a sample's x-ray diffraction pattern. My second project was to help set up an imaging test, which involved designing a cooled grating holder and assembling multiple positioning stages. My third project was designing a 3D-printed pencil holder for the SSRL workstations.

  13. Improving Aboriginal maternal and infant health services in the 'Top End' of Australia; synthesis of the findings of a health services research program aimed at engaging stakeholders, developing research capacity and embedding change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Lesley; Kruske, Sue; Bar-Zeev, Sarah; Steenkamp, Malinda; Josif, Cathryn; Narjic, Concepta Wulili; Wardaguga, Molly; Belton, Suzanne; Gao, Yu; Dunbar, Terry; Kildea, Sue

    2014-06-02

    Health services research is a well-articulated research methodology and can be a powerful vehicle to implement sustainable health service reform. This paper presents a summary of a five-year collaborative program between stakeholders and researchers that led to sustainable improvements in the maternity services for remote-dwelling Aboriginal women and their infants in the Top End (TE) of Australia. A mixed-methods health services research program of work was designed, using a participatory approach. The study area consisted of two large remote Aboriginal communities in the Top End of Australia and the hospital in the regional centre (RC) that provided birth and tertiary care for these communities. The stakeholders included consumers, midwives, doctors, nurses, Aboriginal Health Workers (AHW), managers, policy makers and support staff. Data were sourced from: hospital and health centre records; perinatal data sets and costing data sets; observations of maternal and infant health service delivery and parenting styles; formal and informal interviews with providers and women and focus groups. Studies examined: indicator sets that identify best care, the impact of quality of care and remoteness on health outcomes, discrepancies in the birth counts in a range of different data sets and ethnographic studies of 'out of hospital' or health centre birth and parenting. A new model of maternity care was introduced by the health service aiming to improve care following the findings of our research. Some of these improvements introduced during the five-year research program of research were evaluated. Cost effective improvements were made to the acceptability, quality and outcomes of maternity care. However, our synthesis identified system-wide problems that still account for poor quality of infant services, specifically, unacceptable standards of infant care and parent support, no apparent relationship between volume and acuity of presentations and staff numbers with the

  14. Rationale and design of the DP-TRANSFERS project: diabetes prevention-transferring findings from European research to society in Catalonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Bernardo; Castell, Conxa; Cos, Xavier; Solé, Claustre; Mestre, Santiago; Canela, Marta; Boquet, Antoni; Cabré, Joan-Josep; Barrio, Francisco; Flores-Mateo, Gemma; Ferrer-Vidal, Daniel; Lindström, Jaana

    2016-04-27

    Compelling evidence has been accumulated to support the effectiveness of intensive lifestyle intervention in delaying progression to Type 2 diabetes even in people identified as being at high risk determined by the Finnish diabetes risk score. The DE-PLAN-CAT project (diabetes in Europe-prevention using lifestyle, physical activity and nutritional intervention-Catalonia) evidenced that intensive lifestyle intervention was feasible and cost-effective on a short scale in real-life primary care settings, at least over 4 years. However, transferring such lifestyle interventions to society remains the major challenge of research in the field of diabetes prevention. The derived DP-TRANSFERS (diabetes prevention-transferring findings from European research to society) is a large scale national programme aimed at translating a tailored lifestyle intervention to the maximum of primary care centres where feasible through a core proposal agreed with all the partners. The method is built upon a 3-step (screening, intervention and follow-up) real-life, community-wide structure on the basis of a dual intensity lifestyle intervention (basic and continuity modules) and supported by a 4-channel transfer strategy (institutional relationships, facilitators' workshops, collaborative groupware and programme WEB page). Participation will initially cover nine health departments (7 million inhabitants) through nine coordinating centres located in metropolitan (3.2 million), semi-urban (2.9 million) and rural (0.9 million) areas from which it is expected accessing 25 % of all primary care settings, equivalent to 90 associated centres (1.6-1.8 million people) with an estimate of 0.32 million participants aged 45-75 years at high risk of future development of diabetes. To ascertain sustainability, effect, satisfaction and quality of the translation programme statistical analyses will be performed from both the entire population (facilitators and participants) and a stratified

  15. FIND Tuberculosis Strain Bank: a Resource for Researchers and Developers Working on Tests To Detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Related Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessema, Belay; Nabeta, Pamela; Valli, Eloise; Albertini, Audrey; Collantes, Jimena; Lan, Nguyen Huu; Romancenco, Elena; Tukavdze, Nestani; Denkinger, Claudia M; Dolinger, David L

    2017-04-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB hampers global efforts in the fight against tuberculosis. To enhance the development and evaluation of diagnostic tests quickly and efficiently, well-characterized strains and samples from drug-resistant tuberculosis patients are necessary. In this project, the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND) has focused on the collection, characterization, and storage of such well-characterized reference materials and making them available to researchers and developers. The collection is being conducted at multiple centers in Southeast Asia, South America, Eastern Europe, and soon the sub-Saharan Africa regions. Strains are characterized for their phenotypic resistances and MICs to first-line drugs (FLDs) and second-line drugs (SLDs) using the automated MGIT 960 system following validated procedures and WHO criteria. Analysis of resistance-associated mutations is done by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) using the Illumina NextSeq system. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis and WGS are used to determine strain lineages. All strains are maintained frozen at -80°C ± 10°C as distinct mother and daughter lots. All strains are extensively quality assured. The data presented here represent an analysis of the initial part of the collection. Currently, the bank contains 118 unique strains with extracted genomic DNA and matched sputum, serum, and plasma samples and will be expanded to a minimum of 1,000 unique strains over the next 3 years. Analysis of the current strains by phenotypic resistance testing shows 102 (86.4%), 10 (8.5%), and 6 (5.1%) MDR, XDR, and mono/poly resistant strains, respectively. Two of the strains are resistant to all 11 drugs that were phenotypically tested. WGS mutation analysis revealed FLD resistance-associated mutations in the rpoB, katG, inhA, embB, embA, and pncA genes; SLD resistance in the gyrA, gyr

  16. The comparative study of the ICT collaborative environments in master courses ITC Euromaster and A/E/C University of Stanford

    OpenAIRE

    Klinc, Robert; Istenič Starčič, Andreja

    2007-01-01

    ICT collaborative environments surpasses old practices with drawing learning closer to a real life with interactivity and authenticity of real world problems in learning and consequently reducing de-contextualization in the learning process. Contemporary educational ICT usage in learning processes is student-centred. In 1993 University of Stanford (USA) started an ICT supported distance learning course named Architecture/Engineering/Construction Computer Integrated Global Teamwork Course (AEC...

  17. Identification of risk factors for new-onset sciatica in Japanese workers: findings from the Japan epidemiological research of Occupation-related Back pain study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudaira, Ko; Kawaguchi, Mika; Isomura, Tatsuya; Arisaka, Mayumi; Fujii, Tomoko; Takeshita, Katsushi; Kitagawa, Tomoaki; Miyoshi, Kota; Konishi, Hiroaki

    2013-12-15

    Two-year, prospective cohort data collected for the Japan epidemiological research of Occupation-related Back pain study were used for the analysis. To identify potential risk factors for the development of new-onset sciatica in initially symptom-free Japanese workers with no history of sciatica. Although the associations between individual and occupational factors and cases of new-onset sciatica are established, the effect of psychosocial factors on the development of sciatica has still not been adequately clarified. In total, 5310 participants responded to a self-administered baseline questionnaire (response rate: 86.5%). Furthermore, 3194 (60.2%) completed both 1- and 2-year follow-up questionnaires. The baseline questionnaire assessed individual characteristics, ergonomic work demands, and work-related psychosocial factors. The outcome of interest was new-onset sciatica with or without low back pain during the 2-year follow-up period. Incidence was calculated for participants who reported no low back pain in the preceding year and no history of lumbar radicular pain (sciatica) at baseline. Logistical regression assessed risk factors associated with new-onset sciatica. Of 765 eligible participants, 141 (18.4%) reported a new episode of sciatica during the 2-year follow-up. In crude analysis, significant associations were found between new-onset sciatica and age and obesity. In adjusted analysis, significant associations were found for obesity and mental workload in a qualitative aspect after controlling for age and sex. Consequently, in multivariate analysis with all the potential risk factors, age and obesity remained statistically significant (odds ratios: 1.59, 95% confidence interval: 1.01-2.52; odds ratios: 1.77, 95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.68, respectively). In previously asymptomatic Japanese workers, the risk of developing new-onset sciatica is mediated by individual factors. Our findings suggest that the management of obesity may prevent new

  18. Public stigma against family members of people with mental illness: findings from the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center (GGFRC), Southwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Eshetu; Möller-Leimkühler, Anne Maria; Müller, Norbert; Dehning, Sandra; Froeschl, Guenter; Tesfaye, Markos

    2014-02-21

    Public stigma against family members of people with mental illness is a negative attitude by the public which blame family members for the mental illness of their relatives. Family stigma can result in self social restrictions, delay in treatment seeking and poor quality of life. This study aimed at investigating the degree and correlates of family stigma. A quantitative cross-sectional house to house survey was conducted among 845 randomly selected urban and rural community members in the Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center, Southwest Ethiopia. An interviewer administered and pre-tested questionnaire adapted from other studies was used to measure the degree of family stigma and to determine its correlates. Data entry was done by using EPI-DATA and the analysis was performed using STATA software. Unadjusted and adjusted linear regression analysis was done to identify the correlates of family stigma. Among the total 845 respondents, 81.18% were female. On a range of 1 to 5 score, the mean family stigma score was 2.16 (± 0.49). In a multivariate analysis, rural residents had significantly higher stigma scores (std. β = 0.43, P mental illness increased, the stigma scores decreased significantly. High supernatural explanation of mental illness was significantly correlated with lower stigma among individuals with lower level of exposure to people with mental illness (PWMI). On the other hand, high exposure to PWMI was significantly associated with lower stigma among respondents who had high education. Stigma scores increased with increasing income among respondents who had lower educational status. Our findings revealed moderate level of family stigma. Place of residence, perceived signs and explanations of mental illness were independent correlates of public stigma against family members of people with mental illness. Therefore, mental health communication programs to inform explanations and signs of mental illness need to be implemented.

  19. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-03-02

    Mar 2, 2015 ... Using a critical leadership theory framework, we conducted a qualitative ... or basic science research career (Socio-Behavioral Research, ... AITRP was to develop HIV research leaders at the University of ..... Wellcome-Trust.

  20. Protection of xenon against postoperative oxygen impairment in adults undergoing Stanford Type-A acute aortic dissection surgery: Study protocol for a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Mu; Cheng, Yi; Yang, Yanwei; Pan, Xudong; Lu, Jiakai; Cheng, Weiping

    2017-08-01

    The available evidence shows that hypoxemia after Stanford Type-A acute aortic dissection (AAD) surgery is a frequent cause of several adverse consequences. The pathogenesis of postoperative hypoxemia after AAD surgery is complex, and ischemia/reperfusion and inflammation are likely to be underlying risk factors. Xenon, recognized as an ideal anesthetic and anti-inflammatory treatment, might be a possible treatment for these adverse effects. The trial is a prospective, double-blind, 4-group, parallel, randomized controlled, a signal-center clinical trial. We will recruit 160 adult patients undergoing Stanford type-A AAD surgery. Patients will be allocated a study number and will be randomized on a 1:1:1:1 basis to receive 1 of the 3 treatment options (pulmonary inflated with 50% xenon, 75% xenon, or 100% xenon) or no treatment (control group, pulmonary inflated with 50% nitrogen). The aims of this study are to clarify the lung protection capability of xenon and its possible mechanisms in patients undergoing the Stanford type-A AAD surgery. This trial uses an innovative design to account for the xenon effects of postoperative oxygen impairment, and it also delineates the mechanism for any benefit from xenon. The investigational xenon group is considered a treatment intervention, as it includes 3 groups of pulmonary static inflation with 50%, 75%, and 100% xenon. It is suggested that future trials might define an appropriate concentration of xenon for the best practice intervention.