WorldWideScience

Sample records for stanford researchers explore

  1. Research Training in Medical Informatics: The Stanford Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortliffe, Edward H.; Fagan, Lawrence M.

    1989-01-01

    Stanford University created an interdisciplinary program to train researchers and academic leaders in the field of medical information sciences. The program is described, identifying experiences of interest to people developing such a program. The program's background and history, students, curriculum and philosophy, and lessons learned are…

  2. Collaboration and Community Building in Summer Undergraduate Research Programs in the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevle, R. J.; Watson Nelson, T.; Harris, J. M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In 2012, the School of Earth Sciences (SES) at Stanford University sponsored two summer undergraduate research programs. Here we describe these programs and efforts to build a cohesive research cohort among the programs' diverse participants. The two programs, the Stanford School of Earth Sciences Undergraduate Research (SESUR) Program and Stanford School of Earth Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research in Geoscience and Engineering (SURGE) Program, serve different undergraduate populations and have somewhat different objectives, but both provide students with opportunities to work on strongly mentored yet individualized research projects. In addition to research, enrichment activities co-sponsored by both programs support the development of community within the combined SES summer undergraduate research cohort. Over the course of 6 to 9 months, the SESUR Program engages Stanford undergraduates, primarily rising sophomores and juniors, with opportunities to deeply explore Earth sciences research while learning about diverse areas of inquiry within SES. Now in its eleventh year, the SESUR experience incorporates the breadth of the scientific endeavor: finding an advisor, proposal writing, obtaining funding, conducting research, and presenting results. Goals of the SESUR program include (1) providing a challenging and rewarding research experience for undergraduates who wish to explore the Earth sciences; (2) fostering interdisciplinary study in the Earth sciences among the undergraduate population; and (3) encouraging students to major or minor in the Earth sciences and/or to complete advanced undergraduate research in one of the departments or programs within SES. The SURGE Program, now in its second year, draws high performing students, primarily rising juniors and seniors, from 14 colleges and universities nationwide, including Stanford. Seventy percent of SURGE students are from racial/ethnic backgrounds underrepresented in STEM fields, and approximately one

  3. Research in free-flying robots and flexible manipulators at the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhaus, W. L.; Alder, L. J.; Chen, V. W.; Dickson, W. C.; Ullman, M. A.; Wilson, E.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last ten years, the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory (ARL) has developed a hardware facility in which a number of space robotics issues have been, and continue to be addressed. This paper reviews two of the current ARL research areas: navigation and control of free flying space robots, and modeling and control of extremely flexible space structures.

  4. The Stanford Data Miner: a novel approach for integrating and exploring heterogeneous immunological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebert Janet C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems-level approaches are increasingly common in both murine and human translational studies. These approaches employ multiple high information content assays. As a result, there is a need for tools to integrate heterogeneous types of laboratory and clinical/demographic data, and to allow the exploration of that data by aggregating and/or segregating results based on particular variables (e.g., mean cytokine levels by age and gender. Methods Here we describe the application of standard data warehousing tools to create a novel environment for user-driven upload, integration, and exploration of heterogeneous data. The system presented here currently supports flow cytometry and immunoassays performed in the Stanford Human Immune Monitoring Center, but could be applied more generally. Results Users upload assay results contained in platform-specific spreadsheets of a defined format, and clinical and demographic data in spreadsheets of flexible format. Users then map sample IDs to connect the assay results with the metadata. An OLAP (on-line analytical processing data exploration interface allows filtering and display of various dimensions (e.g., Luminex analytes in rows, treatment group in columns, filtered on a particular study. Statistics such as mean, median, and N can be displayed. The views can be expanded or contracted to aggregate or segregate data at various levels. Individual-level data is accessible with a single click. The result is a user-driven system that permits data integration and exploration in a variety of settings. We show how the system can be used to find gender-specific differences in serum cytokine levels, and compare them across experiments and assay types. Conclusions We have used the tools and techniques of data warehousing, including open-source business intelligence software, to support investigator-driven data integration and mining of diverse immunological data.

  5. The Stanford Data Miner: a novel approach for integrating and exploring heterogeneous immunological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Janet C; Munsil, Wes; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Davis, Mark M; Maecker, Holden T

    2012-03-28

    Systems-level approaches are increasingly common in both murine and human translational studies. These approaches employ multiple high information content assays. As a result, there is a need for tools to integrate heterogeneous types of laboratory and clinical/demographic data, and to allow the exploration of that data by aggregating and/or segregating results based on particular variables (e.g., mean cytokine levels by age and gender). Here we describe the application of standard data warehousing tools to create a novel environment for user-driven upload, integration, and exploration of heterogeneous data. The system presented here currently supports flow cytometry and immunoassays performed in the Stanford Human Immune Monitoring Center, but could be applied more generally. Users upload assay results contained in platform-specific spreadsheets of a defined format, and clinical and demographic data in spreadsheets of flexible format. Users then map sample IDs to connect the assay results with the metadata. An OLAP (on-line analytical processing) data exploration interface allows filtering and display of various dimensions (e.g., Luminex analytes in rows, treatment group in columns, filtered on a particular study). Statistics such as mean, median, and N can be displayed. The views can be expanded or contracted to aggregate or segregate data at various levels. Individual-level data is accessible with a single click. The result is a user-driven system that permits data integration and exploration in a variety of settings. We show how the system can be used to find gender-specific differences in serum cytokine levels, and compare them across experiments and assay types. We have used the tools and techniques of data warehousing, including open-source business intelligence software, to support investigator-driven data integration and mining of diverse immunological data.

  6. Current and Future Research Programs at Stanford's Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madejski, Greg

    2013-12-01

    The Kavli Institute of Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, or KIPAC, at Stanford University, and the LeCosPA Institute at the Taiwan National University were sibling institutions even before their respective official births. The existence of both institutes was to a great extent facilitated by the foresight of Prof. Pisin Chen, current director of LeCosPA, and we fully envision the vibrant on-going collaboration between the two institutes for the years to come. This presentation highlights the current research direction of KIPAC, including the wide range of programs in particle astrophysics and cosmology. Of the on-going projects, the main current effort at KIPAC is the operation of, and the analysis of data from the Large Area Telescope on-board the space-borne Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which is described in more detail in the article by Prof. Kamae in these proceedings. That article focuses on the instrument, and the results gleaned from observations of our own Galaxy. Here, the second part of this article also includes the highlights for astrophysics of jets emanating from the vicinity of black holes, which are prominent gamma-ray sources detected by Fermi: this is the area of research of the article's author.

  7. Evaluation of Parallel Authentic Research-Based Courses in Human Biology on Student Experiences at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Jacob; Annerstedt, Claes; Besier, Thor; Matheson, Gordon O.; Rydmark, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Under a previous grant (2005-08), researchers and teachers at Stanford University (SU) and the University of Gothenburg (GU) co-designed a ten-week interdisciplinary, research-based laboratory course in human biology to be taught online to undergraduate students. Essentials in the subject were taught during the first four weeks of this course.…

  8. New Evaluation Vector through the Stanford Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning Environment (SMILE) for Participatory Action Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul; An, Ji-Young

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews an evaluation vector model driven from a participatory action research leveraging a collective inquiry system named SMILE (Stanford Mobile Inquiry-based Learning Environment). SMILE has been implemented in a diverse set of collective inquiry generation and analysis scenarios including community health care-specific professional development sessions and community-based participatory action research projects. In each scenario, participants are given opportunities to construct inquiries around physical and emotional health-related phenomena in their own community. Participants formulated inquiries as well as potential clinical treatments and hypothetical scenarios to address health concerns or clarify misunderstandings or misdiagnoses often found in their community practices. From medical universities to rural village health promotion organizations, all participatory inquiries and potential solutions can be collected and analyzed. The inquiry and solution sets represent an evaluation vector which helps educators better understand community health issues at a much deeper level. SMILE helps collect problems that are most important and central to their community health concerns. The evaluation vector, consisting participatory and collective inquiries and potential solutions, helps the researchers assess the participants' level of understanding on issues around health concerns and practices while helping the community adequately formulate follow-up action plans. The method used in SMILE requires much further enhancement with machine learning and advanced data visualization.

  9. Stanford's Online Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, John K.

    2013-01-01

    Stanford University (CA) is MOOC Central. While the school may not have launched the first massive open online course (MOOC), its efforts have propelled the concept to the forefront of higher education in a matter of months. Starting with Sebastian Thrun's Introduction to Artificial Intelligence course, which enrolled 160,000 students, Stanford…

  10. Mending the Stanford Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Charles

    1998-01-01

    Describes efforts to reclaim the historical campus plan for Stanford University (California), including preserving views; restoring open space; realigning streets and pedestrian paths; consolidating parking; connecting paths; adding a new shuttle bus, bike lanes, and bike parking; and correcting the haphazard development of athletic and recreation…

  11. A Close Look at Stanford v. Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Update on Law-Related Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Discusses whether the imposition of capital punishment on an individual for a crime committed as a juvenile constitutes cruel and unusual punishment under the Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Explores the crimes of Kevin Stanford and David Allen who were 16 and 17 respectively when they each committed murder. (CMK)

  12. The Stanford how things work project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, Richard; Gruber, Tom; Iwasaki, Yumi

    1994-01-01

    We provide an overview of the Stanford How Things Work (HTW) project, an ongoing integrated collection of research activities in the Knowledge Systems Laboratory at Stanford University. The project is developing technology for representing knowledge about engineered devices in a form that enables the knowledge to be used in multiple systems for multiple reasoning tasks and reasoning methods that enable the represented knowledge to be effectively applied to the performance of the core engineering task of simulating and analyzing device behavior. The central new capabilities currently being developed in the project are automated assistance with model formulation and with verification that a design for an electro-mechanical device satisfies its functional specification.

  13. Reservoir technology - geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fifth annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

    1985-09-01

    The objective is to carry out research on geothermal reservoir engineering techniques useful to the geothermal industry. A parallel objective is the training of geothermal engineers and scientists. The research is focused toward accelerated development of hydrothermal resources through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection technology is a research area receiving special attention. The program is divided into reservoir definition research, modeling of heat extraction from fractured reservoirs, application and testing of new and proven reservoir engineering technology, and technology transfer. (ACR)

  14. 77 FR 59660 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... Stanford University Archaeology Center. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below...

  15. 77 FR 59661 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Stanford University Archaeology... to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Stanford University Archaeology...

  16. Rational Budgeting? The Stanford Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle

    The budget decision making process at Stanford University, California, from 1970 through 1979 was evaluated in relation to the allocation of general funds to 38 academic departments. Using Simon's theory of bounded rationality and an organizational level of analysis, the Stanford decision process was tested for its rationality through…

  17. Stanford Geothermal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Horn

    1999-06-30

    Reliable measurement of steam-water relative permeability functions is of great importance for geothermal reservoir performance simulation. Despite their importance, these functions are poorly known due to the lack of fundamental understanding of steam-water flows, and the difficulty of making direct measurements. The Stanford Geothermal Program has used an X-ray CT (Computer Tomography) scanner to obtain accurate saturation profiles by direct measurement. During the last five years, the authors have carried out experiments with nitrogen-water flow and with steam-water flow, and examined the effects of heat transfer and phase change by comparing these sets of results. In porous rocks, it was found that the steam-water relative permeabilities follow Corey type relationships similar to those in nitrogen-water flow, but that the irreducible gas phase saturation is smaller for steam than for nitrogen. The irreducible saturations represent substantial fractions of the recoverable energy in place yet are hard to determine in the field. Understanding the typical magnitude of irreducible saturations will lead to a much clearer forecast of geothermal field performance. In fracture flow, indirect measurements suggested that the relative permeabilities follow a linear (or ''X-curve'') behavior - but there is still considerable uncertainty in the knowledge of this behavior.

  18. Young Children's Explorations: Young Children's Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jane

    2012-01-01

    "Exploration" is recognised as research behaviour; anecdotally, as an early years' teacher, I witnessed many young children exploring. However, young children's self-initiated explorations are rarely regarded as research by adult researchers and policy-makers. The exclusion of young children's autonomous explorations from recognition as…

  19. Richter quits as director of Stanford accelerator lab

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1998-01-01

    Burt Richter stands down next August as director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre. He will remain at SLAC working on research and science policy issues. Rumours abound about the reasons behind his unexpected departure.

  20. Exploring methods in information literacy research

    CERN Document Server

    Lipu, Suzanne; Lloyd, Annemaree

    2007-01-01

    This book provides an overview of approaches to assist researchers and practitioners to explore ways of undertaking research in the information literacy field. The first chapter provides an introductory overview of research by Dr Kirsty Williamson (author of Research Methods for Students, Academics and Professionals: Information Management and Systems) and this sets the scene for the rest of the chapters where each author explores the key aspects of a specific method and explains how it may be applied in practice. The methods covered include those representing qualitative, quantitative and mix

  1. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  2. Stanford's gene patents hit snags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M

    1982-11-26

    Background information is presented on the preliminary rejection of a 1978 recombinant DNA patent application by Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer. The Patent Office is concerned about the omission of important information from the application, the exclusion of a third collaborator as co-inventor, and the interval between public disclosure and the date of filing. The dispute could lead to a challenge of a related Cohen-Boyer patent issued in 1980, posing a financial threat to Stanford University, which holds the lucrative patent rights, and the University of California, which shares the licensing fees and royalties.

  3. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center selects Verity Ultraseek for public and internal Web Sites

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Verity Inc., a provider of enterprise software has announced the latest version of its powerful, downloadable Verity(R) Ultraseek(R) enterprise search engine is being used by the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, a research facility funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Stanford University (1/2 page).

  4. Advanced Materials for Exploration Task Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, M. B. (Compiler); Murphy, K. L.; Schneider, T.

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Materials for Exploration (AME) Activity in Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC s) Exploration Science and Technology Directorate coordinated activities from 2001 to 2006 to support in-space propulsion technologies for future missions. Working together, materials scientists and mission planners identified materials shortfalls that are limiting the performance of long-term missions. The goal of the AME project was to deliver improved materials in targeted areas to meet technology development milestones of NASA s exploration-dedicated activities. Materials research tasks were targeted in five areas: (1) Thermal management materials, (2) propulsion materials, (3) materials characterization, (4) vehicle health monitoring materials, and (5) structural materials. Selected tasks were scheduled for completion such that these new materials could be incorporated into customer development plans.

  5. 77 FR 59968 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center, Stanford, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Stanford University Archaeology Center... Archaeology Center, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items... affiliated with the cultural items may contact the Stanford University Archaeology Center. DATES...

  6. The early history of Stanford Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patricia P; Herzenberg, Leonore A

    2014-05-01

    From its 1960 beginnings in a pair of windowless Genetics Department laboratories under the Stanford Medical School Dean's Office to its current broad-based program, which joins faculty members from departments across the Medical School, the Stanford Immunology Program has played a central role in shaping both basic and clinical immunology thinking. In this article, we tell the story of the beginnings of this odyssey in a reminiscence-based format that brings the flavor of the time in the words of people who lived and built the history.

  7. Reflections on the revolution at Stanford

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, F.A.

    2009-01-01

    We inquire into the question whether the Aristotelian or classical ideal of science has been realised by the Model Revolution, initiated at Stanford University during the 1950s and spread all around the world of philosophy of science—salute Suppes. The guiding principle of the Model Revolution is: a

  8. Stanford U.: With $7.5M gift, Stanford physics institute to open in 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    Springer, M

    2003-01-01

    Thanks to a recent $7.5 million gift from the Kavli Foundation, construction has resumed on the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford University. It is schedule for completion in 2005 (1 page).

  9. Explorative research on innovative nitrogen recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekert, van M.H.A.; Weijma, J.; Verdoes, N.; Buisonje, de F.E.; Reitsma, B.A.H.; Bulk, van den J.

    2012-01-01

    This report comprises the results of an explorative study on innovative nitrogen recovery from side streams of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the Netherlands. The main objective of the study was to identify promising new technologies for recovery of nitrogen which can be subsequently used as

  10. Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Tani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A review of the following book: Francesca Bregoli, Mediterranean Enlightenment. Livornese Jews, Tuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014, ISBN 9780804791595

  11. History of narcolepsy at Stanford University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, Emmanuel J M

    2014-05-01

    Although narcolepsy was first described in the late nineteenth century in Germany and France, much of the research on this disorder has been conducted at Stanford University, starting with Drs. William C. Dement and Christian Guilleminault in the 1970s. The prevalence of narcolepsy was established, and a canine model discovered. Following the finding in Japan that almost all patients with narcolepsy carry a specific HLA subtype, HLA-DR2, Hugh Mac Devitt, F. Carl Grumet, and Larry Steinman initiated immunological studies, but results were generally negative. Using the narcoleptic canines, Dr. Nishino and I established that stimulants increased wakefulness by stimulating dopaminergic transmission while antidepressants suppress cataplexy via adrenergic reuptake inhibition. A linkage study was initiated with Dr. Grumet in 1988, and after 10 years of work, the canine narcolepsy gene was cloned by in 1999 and identified as the hypocretin (orexin) receptor 2. In 1992, studying African Americans, we also found that DQ0602 rather than DR2 was a better marker for narcolepsy across all ethnic groups. In 2000, Dr. Nishino and I, in collaboration with Dr. Lammers in the Netherlands, found that hypocretin 1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were undetectable in most cases, establishing hypocretin deficiency as the cause of narcolepsy. Pursuing this research, our and Dr. Siegel's group, examining postmortem brains, found that the decreased CSF hypocretin 1 was secondary to the loss the 70,000 neurons producing hypocretin in the hypothalamus. This finding revived the autoimmune hypothesis but attempts at demonstrating immune targeting of hypocretin cells failed until 2013. At this date, Dr. Elisabeth Mellins and I discovered that narcolepsy is characterized by the presence of autoreactive CD4(+) T cells to hypocretin fragments when presented by DQ0602. Following reports that narcolepsy cases were triggered by vaccinations and infections against influenza A 2009 pH1N1, a new

  12. A New Direction for NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Combining Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, B.; Daou, D.; Schmidt, G.; Pendleton, Y.

    2014-04-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on research at the intersection of science and exploration, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and community development. As part of the SSERVI mission, we act as a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdisciplinary, research-focused collaborations. This talk will describe the research efforts of the new nine domestic teams that constitute the U.S. complement of the Institute and how we will engage the international science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships.

  13. Exploring Feminist Research in Journalism and Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Linda; Grunig, Larissa A.

    After outlining feminist theory (conceptualization and characteristics), a study examined attitudes toward issues having to do with feminist scholarship and the fields of journalism and communication, particularly assessing the validity of the conventional wisdom that women are advised against doing feminist research. The subjects were a purposive…

  14. Stanford University's Archimedes Project: Design for Accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Tom, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The Archimedes Project's primary goal is to educate those who will develop the next generation of software and hardware on the obstacles and opportunities that technology presents for people with disabilities. Its research program designs prototypes, explores accessibility problems, and conducts research on relevant scientific issues. (Author/PEN)

  15. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Combining Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, B.; Schmidt, G.; Daou, D.; Pendleton, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on research at the intersection of science andexploration, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and community development. As part of the SSERVI mission, we act as a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdisciplinary, research-focused collaborations. This talk will describe the research efforts of the nine domestic teams that constitute the U.S. complement of the Institute and how we will engage the international science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships.

  16. Searching and Archiving : Exploring Online Search Behaviors of Researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; de Groot, S.; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Dainoff, Marvin J.

    2007-01-01

    Searching for relevant peer-reviewed material is an integral part of corporate and academic researchers. Researchers collect huge amount of information over the years and sometimes struggle organizing it. Based on a study with 30 academic researchers, we explore, in combination, different searching

  17. Exploring a Knowledge-focused Trajectory for Researching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the past twenty years of environmental learning in the South African curriculum in order to consider how one might best research a knowledge focus within the Fundisa for Change national teacher education programme. In exploring this knowledge focus, the paper draws on international literature.

  18. Research Ship Atlantic Explorer Underway Meteorological Data, Quality Controlled

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Research Ship Atlantic Explorer Underway Meteorological Data (delayed ~10 days for quality control) are from the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic...

  19. System Scope for Library Automation and Generalized Information Storage and Retrieval at Stanford University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Glee; And Others

    The scope of a manual-automated system serving the 40 libraries and the teaching and research community of Stanford University is defined. Also defined are the library operations to be supported and the bibliographic information storage and retrieval capabilities to be provided in the system. Two major projects have been working jointly on library…

  20. Utility of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition, with Ethnically Diverse Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Brittany A.; Finch, Maria HernÁndez; Mcintosh, David E.; Rothlisberg, Barbara A.; Finch, W. Holmes

    2014-01-01

    Current research on the use of revisions of intelligence measures with ethnically diverse populations and younger children is limited. The present study investigated the utility of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition (SB5), with an ethnically diverse preschool sample. African American and Caucasian preschoolers, matched on age,…

  1. Evaluating Teacher Education Outcomes: A Study of the Stanford Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling-Hammond, Linda; Newton, Xiaoxia; Wei, Ruth Chung

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers a set of research and assessment strategies used to evaluate programme outcomes in the Stanford Teacher Education Programme (STEP) during a period of programme redesign over 10 years. These strategies include surveys and interviews of students' perceptions of programme elements and their own preparedness, observations of their…

  2. Adaptive research supervision : Exploring expert thesis supervisors' practical knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kleijn, Renske A M; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as adaptivity. In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing

  3. Adaptive Research Supervision: Exploring Expert Thesis Supervisors' Practical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as "adaptivity." In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing expert thesis supervisors about…

  4. Exploring research priorities in landscape architecture: An international Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijering, J.V.; Tobi, H.; Brink, van den A.; Morris, F.A.; Bruns, D.

    2015-01-01

    Many of the world's major challenges require responses that are embedded in landscape planning, design, and management. To date, however, it is unclear which research domains should form the core of a future landscape architecture research agenda. This study explored which domains landscape

  5. SLC status and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, B.

    1989-08-01

    In this presentation, I shall discuss the linear collider program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as it is now, and as we hope to see it evolve over the next few years. Of greatest interest to the high energy accelerator physics community gathered here is the development of the linear collider concept, and so I shall concentrate most of this paper on a discussion of the present status and future evolution of the SLC. I will also briefly discuss the research and development program that we are carrying out aimed at the realization of the next generation of high-energy linear colliders. SLAC had a major colliding-beam storage-ring program as well, including present rings and design studies on future high-luminosity projects, but time constraints preclude a discussion of them. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. How Stanford and Yamaha Cut an Unusual Technological Deal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    1998-01-01

    Stanford University (California) and the Yamaha Corporation have agreed to pool over 400 patents and patent applications, most involving sound synthesis, and to license them as a package along with rights to the trademark, and share the royalties. The deal builds on a 23-year relationship between Stanford and Yamaha, one which is both fruitful and…

  7. Dazzling new light source opens at Stanford synchrotron radiation laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    SPEAR3, the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring, was formally opened at a dedication ceremony at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center on Jan. 29. It incorporates the latest technology to make it competitive with the best synchrotron sources in the world (1/2 page)

  8. Budget cuts force early closure of Stanford collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    in Brief Stanford's B-meson work is coming to an early end.SLACIn early March, California's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) will shut down a collider that produces B mesons. The closure means that the lab's commitment to BaBar - an international collaboration studying the differences between matter and antimatter - will now end seven months early.

  9. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Science and Technology for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Greg; Bailey, Brad; Gibbs, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on research at the intersection of science and exploration, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and development and support of the international community. As part of its mission, SSERVI acts as a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdisciplinary, research-focused collaborations. The nine domestic SSERVI teams that comprise the U.S. complement of the Institute engage with the international science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships. SSERVI represents a close collaboration between science, technology and exploration enabling a deeper, integrated understanding of the Moon and other airless bodies as human exploration moves beyond low Earth orbit. SSERVI centers on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars, with additional aspects of related technology development, including a major focus on human exploration-enabling efforts such as resolving Strategic Knowledge Gaps (SKGs). The Institute focuses on interdisciplinary, exploration-related science focused on airless bodies targeted as potential human destinations. Areas of study represent the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Martian moon sciences encompassing investigations of the surface, interior, exosphere, and near-space environments as well as science uniquely enabled from these bodies. This research profile integrates investigations of plasma physics, geology/geochemistry, technology integration, solar system origins/evolution, regolith geotechnical properties, analogues, volatiles, ISRU and exploration potential of the target bodies. New opportunities for both domestic and international partnerships are continually generated through these research and

  10. Exploring indicators of interdisciplinary research and education success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Gemma; Blanch, Anicet; Blaschke, Alfred Paul; Brouwer, Roy; Bucher, Christian; Farnleitner, Andreas; Fürnkranz-Prskawetz, Alexia; Loucks, Daniel Pete; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Parajka, Juraj; Pfeifer, Norbert; Rechberger, Helmut; Wagner, Wolfgang; Zessner, Matthias; Blöschl, Günter

    2017-04-01

    Interdisciplinary research and education programmes aim to produce groundbreaking research, often on socially relevant topics, and to produce experts with the skills to work across disciplines. However, there are many outstanding questions on the effectiveness of interdisciplinary programmes. Such as whether they produce novel and groundbreaking research, whether interdisciplinary graduates are leading to a more interdisciplinary culture of research and practice in academia and beyond, and whether an interdisciplinary approach can more effectively address issues of societal relevance than a mono-disciplinary approach. The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems at Vienna University of Technology is currently in its eighth year and offers a valuable case study to contribute to understanding interdisciplinary research and education. Ten different research fields are covered by the Programme and because collaborative research takes place both between researchers from different research fields (cross-disciplinary research) and from researchers from the same research field (mono-disciplinary research) we are able to compare the impacts of each research type. We specifically explored three questions: i) whether cross-disciplinary research leads to more innovative scientific findings than mono-disciplinary research, ii) whether cross-disciplinary researchers develop professional skills that benefit their future careers, and iii) whether cross-disciplinary research produces findings of greater societal relevance than mono-disciplinary research. To conduct the evaluation we identified a variety of indicators. Journal impact factors (IF) and citation rates of ISI indexed publications were used to compare scientific innovativeness. Based on these indicators, our findings suggest that cross-disciplinary work is more innovative. The cross-disciplinary work is published in journals with a slightly higher impact factor (mean IF is 2.36) and receives slightly more

  11. A large human centrifuge for exploration and exploitation research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Baeyens, J.P.; Berte, J.; Blanc, S.; ter Braak, L.; Bok, K.; Bos, J.; Boyle, R.; Bravenoer, N.; Eekhoff, M.; Chouker, A.; Clement, G.; Cras, P.; Cross, E.; Cusaud, M.A.; De Angelis, M.; de Dreu, C.; Delavaux, T.; Delfos, R.; Poelma, C.; Denise, P.; Felsenberg, D.; Fong, K.; Fuller, C.; Grillner, S.; Groen, E.; Harlaar, J.; Heer, M.; Heglund, N.; Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Goswami, N.; Hughes-Fulford, M.; Iwase, S.; Karemaker, J.M.; Langdahl, B.; Linarsson, D.; Lüthen, C.; Monici, M.; Mulder, E.; Narici, M.; Norsk, P.; Paloski, W.; Prisk, G.K.; Rutten, M.; Singer, P.; Stegeman, D.; Stephan, A.; Stienen, G.J.M.; Suedfeld, P.; Tesch, P.; Ullrich, O.; van den Berg, R.; Van de Heyning, P.; Delahaye, A.; Veyt, J.; Vico, L.; Woodward, E.; Young, L.R.; Wuyts, F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses concepts regarding the development of an Altered Gravity Platform (AGP) that will serve as a research platform for human space exploration. Space flight causes a multitude of physiological problems, many of which are due to gravity level transitions. Going from Earth’s gravity

  12. Research as a Respectful Practice: An Exploration of the Practice of Respect in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the practice of respect within qualitative research methods. As interpersonal respect plays a significant role in the esteem felt within a relationship, it can also serve to cultivate trust between researchers and their participants in a research study. This article details the findings of a research study examining respect…

  13. Low Gravity Materials Science Research for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Semmes, Edmund B.; Schlagheck, Ronald A.; Bassler, Julie A.; Cook, Mary Beth; Wargo, Michael J.; Sanders, Gerald B.; Marzwell, Neville I.

    2004-01-01

    On January 14, 2004, the President of the United States announced a new vision for the United States civil space program. The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has the responsibility to implement this new vision. The President also created a Presidential Commission 'to obtain recommendations concerning implementation of the new vision for space exploration.' The President's Commission recognized that achieving the exploration objectives would require significant technical innovation, research, and development in focal areas defined as 'enabling technologies.' Among the 17 enabling technologies identified for initial focus were advanced structures; advanced power and propulsion; closed-loop life support and habitability; extravehicular activity system; autonomous systems and robotics; scientific data collection and analysis; biomedical risk mitigation; and planetary in situ resource utilization. The Commission also recommended realignment of NASA Headquarters organizations to support the vision for space exploration. NASA has aggressively responded in its planning to support the vision for space exploration and with the current considerations of the findings and recommendations from the Presidential Commission. This presentation will examine the transformation and realignment activities to support the vision for space exploration that are underway in the microgravity materials science program. The heritage of the microgravity materials science program, in the context of residence within the organizational structure of the Office of Biological and Physical Research, and thematic and sub-discipline based research content areas, will be briefly examined as the starting point for the ongoing transformation. Overviews of future research directions will be presented and the status of organizational restructuring at NASA Headquarters, with respect to influences on the microgravity materials science program, will be discussed

  14. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Merging Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Schmidt, G. K.; Bailey, B. E.; Minafra, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) represents a close collaboration between science, technology and exploration, and was created to enable a deeper understanding of the Moon and other airless bodies. SSERVI is supported jointly by NASA's Science Mission Directorate and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The institute currently focuses on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars, but the institute goals may expand, depending on NASA's needs, in the future. The 9 initial teams, selected in late 2013 and funded from 2014-2019, have expertise across the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Martian moon sciences. Their research includes various aspects of the surface, interior, exosphere, near-space environments, and dynamics of these bodies. NASA anticipates a small number of additional teams to be selected within the next two years, with a Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) likely to be released in 2016. Calls for proposals are issued every 2-3 years to allow overlap between generations of institute teams, but the intent for each team is to provide a stable base of funding for a five year period. SSERVI's mission includes acting as a bridge between several groups, joining together researchers from: 1) scientific and exploration communities, 2) multiple disciplines across a wide range of planetary sciences, and 3) domestic and international communities and partnerships. The SSERVI central office is located at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA. The administrative staff at the central office forms the organizational hub for the domestic and international teams and enables the virtual collaborative environment. Interactions with geographically dispersed teams across the U.S., and global partners, occur easily and frequently in a collaborative virtual environment. This poster will provide an overview of the 9 current US teams and

  15. Exploring the value of qualitative research films in clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toye, Fran; Jenkins, Sue; Seers, Kate; Barker, Karen

    2015-11-27

    Many healthcare professionals use both quantitative and qualitative research to inform their practice. The usual way to access research findings is through peer-reviewed publications. This study aimed to understand the impact on healthcare professionals of watching and discussing a short research based film. The film, 'Struggling to be me' portrays findings from a qualitative synthesis exploring people's experiences of chronic pain, and was delivered as part of an inter-professional postgraduate e-learning module. The innovation of our study is to be the first to explore the impact of qualitative research portrayed through the medium of film in clinical education. All nineteen healthcare professionals enrolled on the course in December 2013 took part in on-line interviews or focus groups. We recorded and transcribed the interviews verbatim and used the methods of Grounded Theory to analyse the interview transcripts. Watching and discussing the film became a stimulus for learning : (a) A glimpse beneath the surface explored a pro-active way of seeing the person behind the pain (b) Pitfalls of the Medical Model recognised the challenge, for both patient and clinician, of 'sitting with' rather than 'fixing' an ill person; (c) Feeling bombarded by despair acknowledged the intense emotions that the clinicians brings to the clinical encounter; (d) Reconstructing the clinical encounter as a shared journey reconstructed the time-constrained clinical encounter as a single step on a shared journey towards healing, rather than fixing. Films portraying qualitative research findings can stimulate a pro-active and dialectic form of knowing. Research-based qualitative films can make qualitative findings accessible and can be a useful resource in clinical training. Our research presents, for the first time, specific learning themes for clinical education.

  16. The Many Features of Stanford's Housing Maintenance Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Explains how Stanford University custom designed its own building maintenance and administration software package: the Housing Operations Maintenance Enterprise Resource (HOMER). Describes how HOMER relieved facility maintenance staff from some archaic systems, and its development and functionality. (GR)

  17. Art in Science Promoting Interest in Research and Exploration (ASPIRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingim, M.; Zevin, D.; Thrall, L.; Croft, S.; Raftery, C.; Shackelford, R.

    2015-11-01

    Led by U.C. Berkeley's Center for Science Education at the Space Sciences Laboratory in partnership with U.C. Berkeley Astronomy, the Lawrence Hall of Science, and the YMCA of the Central Bay Area, Art in Science Promoting Interest in Research and Exploration (ASPIRE) is a NASA EPOESS-funded program mainly for high school students that explores NASA science through art and highlights the need for and uses of art and visualizations in science. ASPIRE's aim is to motivate more diverse young people (especially African Americans) to learn about Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) topics and careers, via 1) Intensive summer workshops; 2) Drop-in after school workshops; 3) Astronomy visualization-focused outreach programming at public venues including a series of free star parties where the students help run the events; and 5) A website and a number of social networking strategies that highlight our youth's artwork.

  18. PFERD Mission: Pluto Flyby Exploration/Research Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Gary; Zayed, Husni; Herring, Jason; Fuehne, Doug; Sutton, Kevin; Sharkey, Mike

    1990-01-01

    The Pluto Flyby Exploration/Research Design (PFERD) mission will consist of a flyby spacecraft to Pluto and its satellite, Charon. The mission lifetime is expected to be 18 years. The Titan 4 with a Centaur upper stage will be utilized to launch the craft into the transfer orbit. The proposal was divided into six main subsystems: (1) scientific instrumentation; (2) command, communications, and control: (3) altitude and articulation control; (4) power and propulsion; (5) structures and thermal control; and (6) mission management and costing. Tradeoff studies were performed to optimize all factors of design, including survivability, performance, cost, and weight. Problems encountered in the design are also presented.

  19. Exploring Identity and Assimilation: Research and Interpretive Poems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol L. Langer

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Through the presentation of traditional qualitative and poetic data, this article explores the experience of a Native American woman coming to terms with her bi-racial identity and issues related to assimilation. Data is presented in three different ways, each with varied implications for qualitative and expressive arts researchers. First, data is presented as an in-depth qualitative interview with interpretive comments. Next, the authors present a research poem that utilizes the subject's exact words in compressed form. This is followed by two interpretative, creative poems that reflect the authors' attempts at capturing the essence of the subject's experience. The strengths and limitations of each of these methods are assessed. The article further discusses the implications of using poems and other expressive arts as data. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs040254

  20. Exploring Heideggerian hermeneutic phenomenology: a perfect fit for midwifery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Maureen; Chapman, Ysanne; Francis, Karen; Taylor, Beverley

    2013-12-01

    Heideggerian hermeneutic phenomenology has been used widely to understand the meaning of lived experiences in health research. For midwifery scholars this approach enables deep understanding of women's and midwives' lived experiences of specific phenomena. However, for beginning researchers this is not a methodology for the faint hearted. It requires a period of deep immersion to come to terms with at times impenetrable language and perplexing concepts. This paper aims to assist midwives to untangle and examine some of the choices they face when they first come to terms with an understanding of this methodology and highlights the methodology's capacity to reveal midwifery authenticity and holistic practice. The illumination of a selection of various concepts underpinning hermeneutic phenomenology will inform midwives considering this methodology as suitable framework for exploring contemporary midwifery phenomena. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploring the promises of intersectionality for advancing women's health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Natalie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women's health research strives to make change. It seeks to produce knowledge that promotes action on the variety of factors that affect women's lives and their health. As part of this general movement, important strides have been made to raise awareness of the health effects of sex and gender. The resultant base of knowledge has been used to inform health research, policy, and practice. Increasingly, however, the need to pay better attention to the inequities among women that are caused by racism, colonialism, ethnocentrism, heterosexism, and able-bodism, is confronting feminist health researchers and activists. Researchers are seeking new conceptual frameworks that can transform the design of research to produce knowledge that captures how systems of discrimination or subordination overlap and "articulate" with one another. An emerging paradigm for women's health research is intersectionality. Intersectionality places an explicit focus on differences among groups and seeks to illuminate various interacting social factors that affect human lives, including social locations, health status, and quality of life. This paper will draw on recently emerging intersectionality research in the Canadian women's health context in order to explore the promises and practical challenges of the processes involved in applying an intersectionality paradigm. We begin with a brief overview of why the need for an intersectionality approach has emerged within the context of women's health research and introduce current thinking about how intersectionality can inform and transform health research more broadly. We then highlight novel Canadian research that is grappling with the challenges in addressing issues of difference and diversity. In the analysis of these examples, we focus on a largely uninvestigated aspect of intersectionality research - the challenges involved in the process of initiating and developing such projects and, in particular, the meaning

  2. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L. [eds.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials.

  3. A LARGE HUMAN CENTRIFUGE FOR EXPLORATION AND EXPLOITATION RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack J.W.A. van Loon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses concepts regarding the development of an Altered Gravity Platform (AGP that will serve as a research platform for human space exploration. Space flight causes a multitude of physiological problems, many of which are due to gravity level transitions. Going from Earth's gravity to microgravity generates fluid shifts, space motion sickness, cardiovascular deconditioning among other changes, and returning to a gravity environment again puts the astronauts under similar stressors. A prolonged stay in microgravity provokes additional deleterious changes such as bone loss, muscle atrophy and loss of coordination or specific psychological stresses. To prepare for future manned space exploration missions, a ground-based research test bed for validating countermeasures against the deleterious effects of g-level transitions is needed. The proposed AGP is a large rotating facility (diameter > 150 m, where gravity levels ranging from 1.1 to 1.5g are generated, covering short episodes or during prolonged stays of weeks or even months. On this platform, facilities are built where a crew of 6 to 8 humans can live autonomously. Adaptation from 1 g to higher g levels can be studied extensively and monitored continuously. Similarly, re-adaptation back to 1 g, after a prolonged period of altered g can also be investigated. Study of the physiological and psychological adaptation to changing g-levels will provide instrumental and predictive knowledge to better define the ultimate countermeasures that are needed for future successful manned space exploration missions to the Moon, Mars and elsewhere. The AGP initiative will allow scientific top experts in Europe and worldwide to investigate the necessary scientific, operational, and engineering inputs required for such space missions. Because so many different physiological systems are involved in adaptation to gravity levels, a multidisciplinary approach is crucial. One of the final and crucial

  4. A qualitative exploration of researcher trauma and researchers' responses to investigating sexual violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Jan; Astbury, Jill; Dartnall, Elizabeth; Limjerwala, Shazneen

    2014-01-01

    Vicarious trauma can be a problem for those who work and research in areas where clients or participants are survivors of sexual violence. The aim of this study was to explore the trauma experiences of sexual violence researchers from different countries, identifying the issues that traumatized them and the protective strategies they found effective. This article reports on a moderated electronic discussion board run for 4 weeks from September to October 2009 and four purposeful interviews. A total of 15 researchers participated, 4 males and 11 females. Institutions and organizations researching in this area should consider researcher safety in project design.

  5. Case study: the Stanford University School of Medicine and its teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Philip A

    2008-09-01

    There is wide variation in the governance and organization of academic health centers (AHCs), often prompted by or associated with changes in leadership. Changes at AHCs are influenced by institutional priorities, economic factors, competing needs, and the personality and performance of leaders. No organizational model has uniform applicability, and it is important for each AHC to learn what works or does not on the basis of its experiences. This case study of the Stanford University School of Medicine and its teaching hospitals--which constitute Stanford's AHC, the Stanford University Medical Center--reflects responses to the consequences of a failed merger of the teaching hospitals and related clinical enterprises with those of the University of California-San Francisco School of Medicine that required a new definition of institutional priorities and directions. These were shaped by a strategic plan that helped define goals and objectives in education, research, patient care, and the necessary financial and administrative underpinnings needed. A governance model was created that made the medical school and its two major affiliated teaching hospitals partners; this arrangement requires collaboration and coordination that is highly dependent on the shared objectives of the institutional leaders involved. The case study provides the background factors and issues that led to these changes, how they were envisioned and implemented, the current status and challenges, and some lessons learned. Although the current model is working, future changes may be needed to respond to internal and external forces and changes in leadership.

  6. Cognitive Development and Down Syndrome: Age-Related Change on the Stanford-Binet Test (Fourth Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzens, Donna; Cuskelly, Monica; Haynes, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Growth models for subtests of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, 4th edition (R. L. Thorndike, E. P. Hagen, & J. M. Sattler, 1986a, 1986b) were developed for individuals with Down syndrome. Models were based on the assessments of 208 individuals who participated in longitudinal and cross-sectional research between 1987 and 2004. Variation…

  7. A research review: exploring the health of Canada's Aboriginal youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Ning

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the current state of health research on Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal youth in Canada. Design. A search of published academic literature on Canadian Aboriginal youth health, including a comprehensive review of both non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal youth research, was conducted using MEDLINE and summarized. Methodology. A MEDLINE search was conducted for articles published over a 10-year period (2000–2010. The search was limited to research articles pertaining to Canadian youth, using various synonyms for “Canada,” “youth,” and “Aboriginal.” Each article was coded according to 4 broad categories: Aboriginal identity, geographic location, research topic (health determinants, health status, health care, and the 12 key determinants of health proposed by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC. Results. Of the 117 articles reviewed, only 34 pertained to Aboriginal youth, while the remaining 83 pertained to non-Aboriginal youth. The results revealed major discrepancies within the current body of research with respect to the geographic representation of Aboriginal youth, with several provinces missing from the literature, including the northern territories. Furthermore, the current research is not reflective of the demographic composition of Aboriginal youth, with an under-representation of Métis and urban Aboriginal youth. Health status of Aboriginal youth has received the most attention, appearing in 79% of the studies reviewed compared with 57% of the non-Aboriginal studies. The number of studies that focus on health determinants and health care is comparable for both groups, with the former accounting for 62 and 64% and the latter comprising 26 and 19% of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal studies, respectively. However, this review reveals several differences with respect to specific focus on health determinants between the two populations. In non-Aboriginal youth studies, all the 12 key determinants of health of PHAC

  8. The Stanford University US-Japan Technology Management Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-07

    This grant established the U.S.-Japan Technology Management Center, Stanford University School of Engineering, as an ongoing center of excellence for...networking, nanotechnologies, MEMS, system-level chip integration, and advanced manufacturing. Our technology management focus embraced industry

  9. Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.; Milovich, Marilyn M.; Moussier, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the coverage of Stanford prison experiment (SPE), including criticisms of the study, in introductory psychology courses through an online survey of introductory psychology instructors (N = 117). Results largely paralleled those of the recently published textbook analyses with ethical issues garnering the most coverage,…

  10. 78 FR 20696 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Research... Exploration and Operations Committee (HEOC) of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to... CONTACT: Dr. Bradley Carpenter, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters...

  11. 78 FR 42805 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration Operations Committee; Research... Exploration and Operations Committee (HEOC) of the NASA Advisory Council (NAC). This Subcommittee reports to... Carpenter, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546...

  12. Methodology in action: exploring action research for Masters studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article focuses on action research as a research design approach for Masters studies in information science and the various research methods that support and assist the research process. In this case, action research acts as a framework to guide the research and allows integration between theory, research and ...

  13. Multiphase flow and phase change in microgravity: Fundamental research and strategic research for exploration of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    2003-01-01

    NASA is preparing to undertake science-driven exploration missions. The NASA Exploration Team's vision is a cascade of stepping stones. The stepping-stone will build the technical capabilities needed for each step with multi-use technologies and capabilities. An Agency-wide technology investment and development program is necessary to implement the vision. The NASA Exploration Team has identified a number of areas where significant advances are needed to overcome all engineering and medical barriers to the expansion of human space exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. Closed-loop life support systems and advanced propulsion and power technologies are among the areas requiring significant advances from the current state-of-the-art. Studies conducted by the National Academy of Science's National Research Council and Workshops organized by NASA have shown that multiphase flow and phase change play a crucial role in many of these advanced technology concepts. Lack of understanding of multiphase flow, phase change, and interfacial phenomena in the microgravity environment has been a major hurdle. An understanding of multiphase flow and phase change in microgravity is, therefore, critical to advancing many technologies needed. Recognizing this, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) has initiated a strategic research thrust to augment the ongoing fundamental research in fluid physics and transport phenomena discipline with research especially aimed at understanding key multiphase flow related issues in propulsion, power, thermal control, and closed-loop advanced life support systems. A plan for integrated theoretical and experimental research that has the highest probability of providing data, predictive tools, and models needed by the systems developers to incorporate highly promising multiphase-based technologies is currently in preparation. This plan is being developed with inputs from scientific community, NASA mission planners and industry personnel

  14. Stanford test called a net breakthrough - data sent at 3,500 times the speed of broadband

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at a Stanford University-affiliated research center have found a way to send data across the Internet more than 3,500 times faster than the typical broadband connection. The technical breakthrough set an Internet speed record too fast to be of use with present-day computers but could open the way for scientists to share and ship massive databases around the world, according to the researchers.

  15. Exploring interprofessional, interagency multimorbidity care: case study based observational research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, Eileen M.; Morgan, Sonya J.; Gray, Ben V.; Macdonald, Lindsay M.; Pullon, Susan R.H.

    2017-01-01

    Background The increase in multimorbidity or co-occurring chronic illnesses is a leading healthcare concern. Patients with multimorbidity require ongoing care from many different professionals and agencies, and often report a lack of integrated care. Objective To explore the daily help-seeking behaviours of patients with multimorbidity, including which health professionals they seek help from, how professionals work together, and perceptions and characteristics of effective interprofessional, interagency multimorbidity care. Design Using a case study observational research design, multiple data sources were assembled for four patients with multimorbidity, identified by two general practitioners in New Zealand. In this paper, two case studies are presented, including the recorded instances of contact and communication between patients and professionals, and between professionals. Professional interactions were categorized as consultation, coordination, or collaboration. Results The two case studies illustrated two female patients with likely similar educational levels, but with different profiles of multimorbidity, social circumstances, and personal capabilities, involving various professionals and agencies. Engagement between professionals showed varying levels of interaction and a lack of clarity about leadership or care coordination. The majority of interactions were one-to-one consultations and rarely involved coordination and collaboration. Patients were rarely included in communications between professionals. Conclusion Cases constructed from multiple data sources illustrate the complexity of day-to-day, interprofessional, interagency multimorbidity care. While consultation is the most frequent mode of professional interaction, targeted coordinated and collaborative interactions (including the patient) are highly effective activities. Greater attention should be given to developing and facilitating these interactions and determining who should lead them. PMID

  16. Using Blogs in Qualitative Educational Research: An Exploration of Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harricharan, Michelle; Bhopal, Kalwant

    2014-01-01

    When compared with wider social research, qualitative educational research has been relatively slow to take up online research methods (ORMs). There is some very notable research in the area but, in general, ORMs have not achieved wide applicability in qualitative educational contexts apart from research that is inherently linked to the Internet,…

  17. From genes to community: exploring translational science in adolescent health research: proceedings from a research symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Addressing complex adolescent health problems such as youth violence and teen pregnancy requires innovative strategies to promote protective social environments, increase healthier behaviors, and reduce the impact of health risk behaviors into adulthood. Multilevel, interdisciplinary, and translational approaches are needed to address these challenges in adolescent health. In May 2012, a group of adolescent health researchers participated in a 1-day research symposium titled "From Genes to Community: Exploring Translational Science in Adolescent Health Research," sponsored by the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) of the University of Pittsburgh and the Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The research symposium offered opportunities for adolescent health researchers to share examples of translational research as well as to identify potential collaborations to promote translational research. This and subsequent issues of Clinical and Translational Science will include papers from this symposium. The studies and reviews presented range from how basic biobehavioral sciences such as functional neuroimaging and decision science can be made relevant for intervention development as well as improving strategies for community-partnered knowledge transfer of cutting-edge research findings to promote adolescent health and well-being. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Research of seafloor topographic analyses for a staged mineral exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M.; Kadoshima, K.; Koizumi, Y.; Yamakawa, T.; Asakawa, E.; Sumi, T.; Kose, M.

    2016-12-01

    J-MARES (Research and Development Partnership for Next Generation Technology of Marine Resources Survey, JAPAN) has been designing a low-cost and high-efficiency exploration system for seafloor hydrothermal massive sulfide (SMS) deposits in "Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program (SIP)" granted by the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan since 2014. We proposed the multi-stage approach, which is designed from the regional scaled to the detail scaled survey stages through semi-detail scaled, focusing a prospective area by seafloor topographic analyses. We applied this method to the area of more than 100km x 100km around Okinawa Trough, including some well-known mineralized deposits. In the regional scale survey, we assume survey areas are more than 100 km x 100km. Then the spatial resolution of topography data should be bigger than 100m. The 500 m resolution data which is interpolated into 250 m resolution was used for extracting depression and performing principal component analysis (PCA) by the wavelength obtained from frequency analysis. As the result, we have successfully extracted the areas having the topographic features quite similar to well-known mineralized deposits. In the semi-local survey stage, we use the topography data obtained by bathymetric survey using multi-narrow beam echo-sounder. The 30m-resolution data was used for extracting depression, relative-large mounds, hills, lineaments as fault, and also for performing frequency analysis. As the result, wavelength as principal component constituting in the target area was extracted by PCA of wavelength obtained from frequency analysis. Therefore, color image was composited by using the second principal component (PC2) to the forth principal component (PC4) in which the continuity of specific wavelength was observed, and consistent with extracted lineaments. In addition, well-known mineralized deposits were discriminated in the same clusters by using clustering from PC2 to PC4.We

  19. Organizational cultural survey of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, an Organizational Survey (OS) was administered at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The OS measured employees' opinions on subjects such as organizational culture, communication, commitment, group cohesion, coordination, safety, environmental issues, and job satisfaction. The result of this work was a quantitative measure of the notion of culture at the SLAC site. This report presents these results and discusses their interpretation.

  20. Exploring the Eastern United States Continental Shelf with the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickson, D.; Pomponi, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology (CIOERT) serves NOAA priorities in three theme areas: exploring the eastern U.S. continental shelf, improving the understanding of coral and sponge ecosystems, and developing advanced underwater technologies. CIOERT focuses on the exploration and research of ecosystems and habitats along frontier regions of the eastern U.S. continental shelf that are of economic, scientific, or cultural importance or of natural hazards concern. One particular focus is supporting ocean exploration and research through the use of advanced underwater technologies and techniques in order to improve the understanding of vulnerable deep and shallow coral and sponge ecosystems. CIOERT expands the scope and efficiency of exploration and research by developing, testing, and applying new and/or innovative uses of existing technologies to ocean exploration and research activities. In addition, CIOERT is dedicated to expanding ocean literacy and building NOAA's technical and scientific workforce through hands-on, at-sea experiences. A recent CIOERT cruise characterized Gulf of Mexico mesophotic and deepwater reef ecosystems off the west Florida shelf, targeting northern Pulley Ridge. This project created and ground-truthed new sonar maps made with an autonomous underwater vehicle; conducted video and photographic transects of benthic habitat and fish using a remotely operated vehicle; and examined the connectivity of fauna from shallow to deep reef ecosystems. CIOERT was established in 2009 by FAU-Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, with University of North Carolina, Wilmington, SRI International, and the University of Miami. The primary NOAA partner is the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research.

  1. International health research monitoring: exploring a scientific and a cooperative approach using participatory action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantler, Tracey; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Miiro, George; Hantrakum, Viriya; Nanvubya, Annet; Ayuo, Elizabeth; Kivaya, Esther; Kidola, Jeremiah; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Parker, Michael; Njuguna, Patricia; Ashley, Elizabeth; Guerin, Philippe J; Lang, Trudie

    2014-02-17

    To evaluate and determine the value of monitoring models developed by the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Research Unit and the East African Consortium for Clinical Research, consider how this can be measured and explore monitors' and investigators' experiences of and views about the nature, purpose and practice of monitoring. A case study approach was used within the context of participatory action research because one of the aims was to guide and improve practice. 34 interviews, five focus groups and observations of monitoring practice were conducted. Fieldwork occurred in the places where the monitoring models are coordinated and applied in Thailand, Cambodia, Uganda and Kenya. Participants included those coordinating the monitoring schemes, monitors, senior investigators and research staff. Transcribed textual data from field notes, interviews and focus groups was imported into a qualitative data software program (NVIVO V. 10) and analysed inductively and thematically by a qualitative researcher. The initial coding framework was reviewed internally and two main categories emerged from the subsequent interrogation of the data. The categories that were identified related to the conceptual framing and nature of monitoring, and the practice of monitoring, including relational factors. Particular emphasis was given to the value of a scientific and cooperative style of monitoring as a means of enhancing data quality, trust and transparency. In terms of practice the primary purpose of monitoring was defined as improving the conduct of health research and increasing the capacity of researchers and trial sites. The models studied utilise internal and network wide expertise to improve the ethics and quality of clinical research. They demonstrate how monitoring can be a scientific and constructive exercise rather than a threatening process. The value of cooperative relations needs to be given more emphasis in monitoring activities, which seek to ensure that research protects

  2. Exploring the value of qualitative research films in clinical education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toye, Fran; Jenkins, Sue; Seers, Kate; Barker, Karen

    2015-01-01

    .... The usual way to access research findings is through peer-reviewed publications. This study aimed to understand the impact on healthcare professionals of watching and discussing a short research based film...

  3. Strategic Research to Enable NASA's Exploration Missions Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    Abstracts are presented from a conference sponsored by the NASA Office of Biological and Physical Research and hosted by NASA Glenn Research Center and the National Center for Microgravity Research on Fluids and Combustion, held in Cleveland, Ohio, June 22-23, 2004. Topics pertained to the behavior of processes and materials in microgravity as well as physiological-biological studies and microgravity effects.

  4. exploring the implementation of inclusive education with research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If you look at/think of your own classroom, how do you deal with all the children ... “active research”. They claim that action research in which definite plans can be set, implemented, and evaluated via an action research cycle, may not be appropriate for ..... Researching reproduction: Reflections on qualitative methodology in.

  5. Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Part of an annual review of mines and mineral resources in the U.S. An overview of nonfuel-mineral exploration in 2000 is presented. Principal exploration target was gold exploration in Latin America, Australia, and the U.S. There was a decrease of 18 percent in the exploration budget for gold as compared with the budget for 1999. Statistical information on nonfuel-mineral exploration worldwide is presented, analyzed, and interpreted.

  6. A Tale of Three Campuses: Planning and Design in Response to the Cultural Heritages at Mills College, the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiene, Karen; Sabbatini, Robert

    2011-01-01

    How do forward-looking institutions with rich landscape and architectural heritages integrate contemporary programming and design? This article explores the evolution of the Mills College campus and compares it with two larger western universities: the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) and Leland Stanford, Jr., University (Stanford…

  7. Exploring the postgraduate research climate and the postgraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By drawing on and distilling the organizational behavior and services marketing literature, more specifically literature pertaining to organizational socialization, organizational culture and climate, role, and the service encounter and service quality, relationships are explored among the aforementioned variables in the context ...

  8. Engaging Scientists and Educators in the IHY: A Case Study of Stanford's Space Weather Monitoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, D. K.; Burress, B.; Hoeksema, T.

    2007-05-01

    The IHY offers unique opportunities to provide education and public outreach programs throughout the world. The Stanford Solar Center has developed a student-focused space weather monitoring program aimed at developing global understanding of the response of Earth's atmosphere to terrestrial and extraterrestrial drivers. Through our educational component, we hope to inspire the next generation of space and Earth scientists and spread the knowledge of our solar system and the exciting process of scientific exploration to the people of the world! Stanford's Solar Center in conjunction with the Space, Telecommunications and Radioscience Laboratory and local educators have developed inexpensive Space Weather Monitor instruments that students around the world can use to track and study solar- and lightning-induced changes to the Earth's ionosphere. Through the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) and the IHY Education and Public Outreach Program, we are deploying these instruments for student use at high school and early university levels. The distribution includes science resources as well as classroom materials and educator support. A centralized database allows collection of, and free access to, world-wide data. Scientists and radio experts serve as mentors to students, and assist them in understanding their data. We will describe the monitor distribution program, focusing particularly on how we are engaging scientists to participate and on the role of educators, plus the resources provided to them, in high schools and universities throughout the world.

  9. Public health law research: exploring law in public health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Jennifer K; Burris, Scott; Hays, Scott

    2012-11-01

    The importance of law in the organization and operation of public health systems has long been a matter of interest to public health lawyers and practitioners, but empirical research on law as a factor in health system performance has been limited in quantity and sophistication. The emergence of Public Health Law Research and Public Health Systems and Services Research within a coordinated effort to strengthen public health research and practice has dramatically changed matters. This article introduces Public Health Law Research as an integral part of Public Health Systems and Services Research, discusses the challenges of integrating the 2 fields, and highlights 2 examples of current research that demonstrate the benefits of an integrated approach to improve the use of law in public health practice.

  10. Human Factors Research for Space Exploration: Measurement, Modeling, and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Allen, Christopher S.; Barshi, Immanuel; Billman, Dorrit; Holden, Kritina L.

    2010-01-01

    As part of NASA's Human Research Program, the Space Human Factors Engineering Project serves as the bridge between Human Factors research and Human Spaceflight applications. Our goal is to be responsive to the operational community while addressing issues at a sufficient level of abstraction to ensure that our tools and solutions generalize beyond the point design. In this panel, representatives from four of our research domains will discuss the challenges they face in solving current problems while also enabling future capabilities.

  11. A researcher's journey: Exploring a sensitive topic with vulnerable women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Christine A; Browne, Jenny; Taylor, Jan; Davis, Deborah

    2017-02-01

    The conduct of research regardless of the subject or methods employed brings responsibilities and challenges. These are greater when dealing with sensitive topics and vulnerable groups and therefore researchers must navigate a range of complex issues and make choices in relation to practical, ethical and philosophical concerns. While literature dealing with research methodologies and research design may assist to some degree, it cannot provide a clear pathway or template as each research project must respond to a unique set of circumstances. We can however, also learn from sharing our stories and critical reflections on our research processes. The purpose of this article is to highlight the practical and methodological issues arising from researching a sensitive topic with vulnerable women experiencing an Assumption of Care. Research involving topics that are deeply personal and private combined with a vulnerable population can be complex and challenging for the researcher. Although some issues were anticipated from the literature, others encountered in this study were unexpected. Special considerations and prerequisites were necessary to build mutual trust and share power with women who had experienced an Assumption of Care at birth. Narrative Inquiry was a good methodological fit for this study as it privileged the voices of women and insisted that their experiences be considered within the context of their lives. Although Narrative Inquiry is a suitable choice for researching sensitive topics with vulnerable women specific considerations are still required to ensure the benefits of this research for both participants and researchers. Family and Community Service (FACS) have now replaced the formerly known Department of Community Services (DoCS) and in consideration of the timing of this study this article uses the terminology as DoCS. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploring Institutional Research Ethics Systems: A Case Study From Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, Adnan A; Ali, Joseph; Hallez, Kristina; White, Tara; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Kass, Nancy E

    The increasing globalization of research drives a need for greater research ethics capacity in low resource countries. Several programs have attempted to expand research ethics capacity by training individuals, but few have focused on broader research ethics systems and institutions. This study describes and applies an institutional research ethics model to assess the institutional research ethics capacity of Makerere University College of Heath Sciences (MakCHS) in 2011. Internal and external stakeholders conducted the assessment of MakCHS using the multidimensional Octagon framework. Five methods were used to collect data on current ethical processes and institutional relationships. MakCHS scored in the mid range on all Octagon domains, with some variation between external and internal assessments. The external Octagon scores suggest that MakCHS's areas of strengths are in identity, structure, relevance, target groups, and working environment; needs are greater in the areas of production, competence, and systems of finance and administration. Discrepancies in external and internal assessment can serve as a useful platform to shape ongoing discussions and strategic efforts. The assessment identified strengths, opportunities, and challenges for institutional research ethics capacity at MakCHS. We believe this systematic approach was helpful in evaluating research ethics needs and provides a benchmark for institutions to measure progress over time.

  13. Research methodologies explored for a paradigm shift in university ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Innovative teaching methods such as collaborative learning, teamwork and mind maps were introduced to teach Computer Science and Statistics courses at tertiary level. This article focuses mainly on the research methods used to research the effectiveness of these teaching methodologies. Soft Systems Methodology ...

  14. Exploring Other Practicum Possibilities: An Action Research Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel B.; Walters, William

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes an action research project undertaken at a teacher education institution in Canada. The action research was implemented in an effort to respond to initial observations related to some practicum limitations. In an effort to seek a "solution" to these limitations, a modified practicum model was piloted with a small…

  15. Reflexively exploring knowledge and power in collaborative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte Ravn; Pedersen, Chistina Hee; Frølunde, Lisbeth

    knowledge forms, knowledge interests and wishes as to the research outcome. In official policy discourse and research practices, a positive picture is often painted of dialogue as a site for mutual learning on the basis of the different knowledge forms that the different participants bring with them...... will be designed in order to stimulate dialogue across different analytical perspectives and empirical research. The analytical perspectives on which facilitation will be based are rooted in social constructionist approaches to dialogic communication theory and action research. The challenges of collaborative...... research stem from the methodological, epistemological and ethical problems and dilemmas that are inherent in collaborative knowledge production and communication and which relate to the inexorable workings of knowledge/power. The problems and dilemmas arise in the meeting between participants’ multiple...

  16. Caught up in power: Exploring discursive frictions in community research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Hanson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the debate around the emancipatory claims of community-based research (CBR and identifies discursive frictions as a pivotal point upon which much of CBR practice revolves. Using a Foucauldian theoretical lens, we suggest that CBR is neither inherently emancipatory nor repressive, but that research outcomes are more often a product of power asymmetries in CBR relationships. To illustrate how power asymmetries in research relationships produce discursive frictions, several studies from our work and the literature are presented. The article provides examples of CBR relationships between the researcher and community members and relationships within the community to illustrate how power asymmetries and discursive frictions in these relationships dynamically influence research outcomes and thus alert researchers to the need to address power asymmetries not just before initiating CBR projects, but during CBR projects as well. We interrogate how power asymmetries and discursive frictions operate and are constructed in CBR in an attempt to highlight how research might be conducted more effectively and ethically. Finally, we indicate that some of the tensions and challenges associated with CBR might be ameliorated by the use of participatory facilitation methodologies, such as photo-voice and story circle discussion groups, that draw attention to power asymmetries and purposefully use more creative participatory tools to restructure power relationships and ultimately address the inequities that exist in the research process. Because CBR is continually caught up in power dynamics, we hope that highlighting some examples might offer an opportunity for increased dialogue and critical reflection on its claims of empowerment and emancipation. Keywords: discursive friction, Foucault, participatory methodologies, power asymmetries, research relationships, emancipatory research

  17. Exploration and discovery: a nolinear approach to research by design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Barnett

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Discover y-based research in landscape architecture requires design strategies that are open-ended and nonlinear, rather than research models that are focused on pre-determined outcomes or objectives. This should not mean a loss of rigour. A nonlinear model of landscape design is proposed, which adapts from scientific enquiry the distinction between the context of discovery and the context of justification. This model permits open-ended investigation by design, and provides a framework for peer review. It also provides a way for researchers to apply discovery based design to practical consultancy.

  18. Reflexively exploring knowledge and power in collaborative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Phillips, Louise Jane; Pedersen, Christina Hee

    research stem from the methodological, epistemological and ethical problems and dilemmas that are inherent in collaborative knowledge production and communication and which relate to the inexorable workings of knowledge/power. The problems and dilemmas arise in the meeting between participants’ multiple....... The realities of dialogic practices are much more complex and fraught with tensions. There are, for instance, tensions between the instrumental use of dialogue to achieve pre-defined research goals, on the one hand, and, on the other hand, dialogue as a basis for co-producing knowledge through processes...... with the complexities and tensions of collaborative research through reflexive analyses of how “dialogue” and “participation” are played out concretely in collaborative research practices. Therefore, the workshop will be designed as a forum in which we go into depth with the different problems, dilemmas, ambivalences...

  19. Explorative Materiality and Knowledge. The Role of Creative Exploration and Artefacts in Design Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Niedderer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Juxtaposing the nature of design and the foundations of research in the traditional science and humanities disciplines puts their differences into sharp relief. The comparison highlights the key characteristics of design – its creative and experiential nature – which any design research must take into account, as well as the theoretical foundations of research. The aim of this article is to develop an understanding of the ontological, epistemological and methodological issues of design research, and to offer a framework that can embrace equally the notions of creativity and experiential knowledge, and of academic rigour. Furthermore,the potential roles of the design process and artefact within research are examined within this theoretical framework, which suggests that design processes and artefacts can – if appropriately framed – play an important partin the research process, facilitating an approach commensurate with the aims ofdesign enquiry. A case study of the Niedderer’s own work serves to illustratethe balance and integration of theory and (creative practice within the research process, and how this integration can enable a multi-layered contribution to the theoretical and practical advancement of the field.

  20. Adult education research: exploring an increasingly fragmented map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Rubenson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of internal developments of adult education as a field of study, and new external conditions for research, this article examines how the configuration of adult education research has been evolving, particularly over the last decade. Our analysis draws on a two-pronged approach: a reading of four seminal articles written by adult education scholars who have conducted bibliometric analyses of selected adult education journals; as well as our own review of 75 articles, covering a one-year period (2012-2013, in five adult education journals that were chosen to provide a greater variety of the field of adult education in terms of their thematic orientation and geographical scope than has been the case in previous reviews. Our findings suggest that the field is facing two main challenges. First, the fragmentation of the map of the territory that was noticed at the end of the 1990s, has continued and seems to have intensified. Second, not only practitioners, but also the policy community voice their disappointment with adult education research, and we note a disconnect between academic adult education research and policy-related research. We provide a couple of speculations as to the future map of adult education as a field of study and point to the danger of shifting the research agenda away from classical adult education concerns about democracy and social rights.

  1. Whatever happened to the third paradigm? Exploring mixed methods research designs in sport and exercise psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Aidan P.; Matthews, James; Kirby, Kate

    2011-01-01

    In the past, quantitative and qualitative approaches to research were portrayed as being incompatible, if not mutually exclusive. More recently, however, researchers have explored the possible complementarity of these approaches through mixed methods research (MMR) the so-called third research paradigm. The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and implications of mixed methods designs for research in sport and exercise psychology. Having sketched the nature and origins of MMR, we h...

  2. Playful Collaborative Exploration: New Research Practice in Participatory Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Johansson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the Participatory Design community as well as the Computer Supported Cooperative Work tradition, a lot of effort has been put into the question of letting field studies inform design. In this paper, we describe how game-like approaches can be used as a way of exploring a practice from a design point of view. Thinking of ethnographic fieldwork as a base for sketching, rather than descriptions, creates openness that invites collaborative authoring. The concept of playful collaborative exploration suggests certain ways of interacting with material from field studies so that it becomes a design material for an open-ended design process. We have carried out field studies, transformed the field material into design material, and set up a design game for working with it together with the people we followed in the field. The design game builds on an idea about the power of narratives and the benefits of constraining rules. We believe that this framework for collaboration opens for playfulness, experimentation, and new design ideas.

  3. NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Building Collaboration Through International Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, K. E.; Schmidt, G. K.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on re-search at the intersection of science and exploration, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and community development. As part of the SSERVI mission, we act as a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdisciplinary, research-focused collaborations. This talk will describe the international partner re-search efforts and how we are engaging the international science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships.

  4. Research explores links between social protection and poverty ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC-supported economists Leonardo Gasparini and Guillermo Cruces are investigating Latin American inequality at Universidad Nacional de La Plata's Centre for Distributive, Labor, and Social Studies (CEDLAS). Their research is contributing to the debate on the role of social protection and growth as driving factors in ...

  5. exploring the implementation of inclusive education with research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Psychology of Education, University of South Africa .... to talk about issues of concern to them – and moreover they felt that the discussion had .... ethical solutions to local and societal problems”. This was the intention of the South African researchers involved in the questionnaire administration and in the focus ...

  6. Exploration of Heterogeneity in Distributed Research Network Drug Safety Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Richard A.; Zeng, Peng; Ryan, Patrick; Gao, Juan; Sonawane, Kalyani; Teeter, Benjamin; Westrich, Kimberly; Dubois, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Distributed data networks representing large diverse populations are an expanding focus of drug safety research. However, interpreting results is difficult when treatment effect estimates vary across datasets (i.e., heterogeneity). In a previous study, risk estimates were generated for selected drugs and potential adverse outcomes. Analyses were…

  7. Exploring the intricacies of contemporary Phd research process ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The process leading to a PhD degree award has evolved over a period of many years to become what it is today. There are important considerations and emphasis continually being placed by the degree awarding authorities on the PhD research process leading to this award. The authors of this communication wish to ...

  8. Exploring Aging Attitudes through a Puppet Making Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteland, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Intergenerational programs often reduce ageism and stereotypical thinking. This author uses a mixed methods case study to investigate how attitudes may change when older adults and children participate in an intergenerational art project. The research question, "Is there a positive correlation in children's attitudes toward older adults and…

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  10. Exploring the assessment of geological observation with design research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, John Y.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the assessment of geological observation through the development and field testing of performance tasks. The study addressed a central challenge in geoscience education: for students to observe the world around them and make real-world connections. Yet, there existed no cohesive research approach for the study of observation in geoscience education. The research goal was to understand the assessment of geological observation. The design research of geological observation encountered the situation where few performance assessments existed and few domain-specific learning theories were available. Design research is suited to inquiries in which a domain of learning is unexplored and the phenomena needs to be supported in the classroom in order to study it. This dissertation addressed one general research question and four subquestions: (RQ) How should geological observation be assessed? (S1) What role did perception play in assessing students' geological observations? (S2) What role did explanation play in assessing students' geological observations? (S3) What role did gestures play in assessing students' geological observations? (S4) Were there performance differences between the first and second trial of the GO Inquire prototype with fourth graders? Students were supported in making geological observations with three performance tasks: GO Inquire stamp task, Cutting task, and Fieldguide task. The data set for this study consisted of student response data, videorecordings, and participant observations from seven field tests across one fourth and one fifth grade class. Three data-analytic methods, qualitative coding, item-difficulty analysis, and non-parametric comparisons, were utilized based on four mixed-method data analysis strategies: typology development, data transformation, extreme case analysis, and data consolidation. Analysis revealed that assessment should take into account the separation of visual from verbal

  11. CLIC/ILC Researchers Explore New Avenues for Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Researchers from CLIC and ILC met for their first common International Workshop on Linear Colliders, which was held in Geneva from 18 to 22 October. Although the talks were mostly scientific and technical, the political message behind them was a breakthrough, as the workshop showed the progress made in unifying the two communities.   The International Workshop on Linear Colliders (IWLC), which was organised by the European Committee for Future Accelerators, hosted by CERN, and held at CERN and the International Conference Centre in Geneva, attracted a large audience of about 500 experts. Although there have been other joint conferences between the CLIC and ILC communities before, they have all been focused on specific technical and/or managerial issues. The IWLC was part of an ongoing effort by CLIC and ILC to provide an environment in which researchers can exchange ideas, inform their peers about their most recent achievements and work together on common issues. Given the possible technical ov...

  12. Exploring Emotions, Aesthetics and Wellbeing in Science Education Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book addresses new research directions focusing on the emotional and aesthetic nature of teaching and learning science informing more general insights about wellbeing. It considers methodological traditions including those informed by philosophy, sociology, psychology and education and how...... they contribute to our understanding of science education. In this collection, the authors provide accounts of the underlying ontological, epistemological, methodological perspectives and theoretical assumptions that inform their work and that of others. Each chapter provides a perspective on the study of emotion......, aesthetics or wellbeing, using empirical examples or a discussion of existing literature to unpack the theoretical and philosophical traditions inherent in those works. This volume offers a diverse range of approaches for anyone interested in researching emotions, aesthetics, or wellbeing. It is ideal...

  13. Samples and data accessibility in research biobanks: an explorative survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Capocasa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biobanks, which contain human biological samples and/or data, provide a crucial contribution to the progress of biomedical research. However, the effective and efficient use of biobank resources depends on their accessibility. In fact, making bio-resources promptly accessible to everybody may increase the benefits for society. Furthermore, optimizing their use and ensuring their quality will promote scientific creativity and, in general, contribute to the progress of bio-medical research. Although this has become a rather common belief, several laboratories are still secretive and continue to withhold samples and data. In this study, we conducted a questionnaire-based survey in order to investigate sample and data accessibility in research biobanks operating all over the world. The survey involved a total of 46 biobanks. Most of them gave permission to access their samples (95.7% and data (85.4%, but free and unconditioned accessibility seemed not to be common practice. The analysis of the guidelines regarding the accessibility to resources of the biobanks that responded to the survey highlights three issues: (i the request for applicants to explain what they would like to do with the resources requested; (ii the role of funding, public or private, in the establishment of fruitful collaborations between biobanks and research labs; (iii the request of co-authorship in order to give access to their data. These results suggest that economic and academic aspects are involved in determining the extent of sample and data sharing stored in biobanks. As a second step of this study, we investigated the reasons behind the high diversity of requirements to access biobank resources. The analysis of informative answers suggested that the different modalities of resource accessibility seem to be largely influenced by both social context and legislation of the countries where the biobanks operate.

  14. FINESSE Spaceward Bound - Teacher Engagement in NASA Science and Exploration Field Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. J. P.; Heldmann, J. L.; Sheely, T.; Karlin, J.; Johnson, S.; Rosemore, A.; Hughes, S.; Nawotniak, S. Kobs; Lim, D. S. S.; Garry, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team of NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for the human and robotic exploration of the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids, and the moons of Mars. The FINESSE science program is infused with leading edge exploration concepts since "science enables exploration and exploration enables science." The FINESSE education and public outreach program leverages the team's field investigations and educational partnerships to share the excitement of lunar, Near Earth Asteroid, and martian moon science and exploration locally, nationally, and internationally. The FINESSE education plan is in line with all of NASA's Science Mission Directorate science education objectives, particularly to enable STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education and leverage efforts through partnerships.

  15. Human Factors Research for Space Exploration: Measurement, Modeling, and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Allen, Christopher S.; Barshi, Immanuel; Billman, Dorrit; Holden, Kritina L.

    2010-01-01

    As part of NASA's Human Research Program, the Space Human Factors Engineering Project serves as the bridge between Human Factors research and Human Spaceflight applications. Our goal is to be responsive to the operational community while addressing issues at a sufficient level of abstraction to ensure that our tools and solutions generalize beyond the point design. In this panel, representatives from four of our research domains will discuss the challenges they face in solving current problems while also enabling future capabilities. Historically, engineering-dominated organizations have tended to view good Human Factors (HF) as a desire rather than a requirement in system design and development. Our field has made significant gains in the past decade, however; the Department of Defense, for example, now recognizes Human-System Integration (HSI), of which HF is a component, as an integral part of their divisions hardware acquisition processes. And our own agency was far more accepting of HF/HSI requirements during the most recent vehicle systems definition than in any prior cycle. Nonetheless, HF subject matter experts at NASA often find themselves in catch up mode... coping with legacy systems (hardware and software) and procedures that were designed with little regard for the human element, and too often with an attitude of we can deal with any operator issues during training. Our challenge, then, is to segregate the true knowledge gaps in Space Human Factors from the prior failures to incorporate best (or even good) HF design principles. Further, we strive to extract the overarching core HF issues from the point-design-specific concerns that capture the operators (and managers) attention. Generally, our approach embraces a 3M approach to Human Factors: Measurement, Modeling, and Mitigation. Our first step is to measure human performance, to move from subjective anecdotes to objective, quantified data. Next we model the phenomenon, using appropriate methods in

  16. [Exploration research on hepatotoxic constituents from Polygonum multiflorum root].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Liu, Ting; Feng, Wei-Hong; Hui, Lian-Qiang; Li, Rao-Rao; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Chen, An-Jia; Li, Chun; Wang, Zhi-Min

    2016-04-01

    By observing the cytotoxic effects of anthraquinones on HepG2 cell and using the precision-cut liver slices technique to authenticate the cytotoxic constituents, the paper aims to explore the material basis of Polygonum multiflorum root to cause liver toxicity. Firstly, MTT method was used to detect the effect of 11 anthraquinone derivatives on HepG2 cell. Then, the clear cytotoxic ingredients were co-cultured with rat liver slices for 6h respectively, and the liver tissue homogenate was prepared. BCA method was used to determine the content of protein in the homogenate and continuous monitoring method was used to monitor the leakage of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamine amino transpeptidase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). The toxic effect of these ingredients on liver tissue was tested by calculating the leakage rate of the monitored enzymes. As a result, rhein, emodin, physcion-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and physcion-8-O-(6'-O-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside showed cytotoxic effects on HepG2 cell and their IC₅₀ values were 71.07, 125.62, 242.27, 402.32 μmol•L⁻¹ respectively, but the other 7 compounds are less toxic and their IC₅₀ values can not be calculated. The precision-cut liver slices tests showed that rhein group of 400 μmol•L⁻¹ concentration significantly increased the leakage rate of ALT, AST and LDH (Pmultiflorum root respectively, which is far from the statutory dose of crude P. multiflorum root (3-6 g) or its processed product (6-12 g). Therefore, the conclusion that anthraquinones are the prime constituents of the hepatotoxicity of P. multiflorum root are still not be proved. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  17. Exploring Butane Hash Oil Use: A Research Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bryan Lee; Stogner, John M; Miller, J Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    The practice of "dabbing" has seen an apparent upswing in popularity in recent months within American drug subcultures. "Dabbing" refers to the use of butane-extracted marijuana products that offer users much higher tetrahydrocannabinol content than flower cannabis through a single dosage process. Though considerably more potent than most marijuana strains in their traditional form, these butane hash oil products and the practice of dabbing are underexplored in the empirical literature, especially in prohibition states. A mixed-methods evaluation of a federally funded treatment program for drug-involved offenders identified a small sample (n = 6) of butane hash oil users and generated focus group interview data on the nature of butane hash oil, the practice of dabbing, and its effects. Findings inform discussion of additional research needed on butane hash oil and its implications for the ongoing marijuana legalization debate, including the diversity of users, routes of administration, and differences between retail/medical and prohibition states.

  18. Further exploration of dissemination bias in qualitative research required to facilitate assessment within qualitative evidence syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Ingrid; Booth, Andrew; Berg, Rigmor C; Lewin, Simon; Glenton, Claire; Munthe-Kaas, Heather M; Noyes, Jane; Schroter, Sara; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2017-08-01

    To conceptualise and discuss dissemination bias in qualitative research. It is likely that the mechanisms leading to dissemination bias in quantitative research, including time lag, language, gray literature, and truncation bias also contribute to dissemination bias in qualitative research. These conceptual considerations have informed the development of a research agenda. Further exploration of dissemination bias in qualitative research is needed, including the extent of non-dissemination and related dissemination bias, and how to assess dissemination bias within qualitative evidence syntheses. We also need to consider the mechanisms through which dissemination bias in qualitative research could occur to explore approaches for reducing it. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of the Psychometric Properties of the New Version of Tehran- Stanford- Binet Intelligence Scale in Children with Dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas Mahvashe-Wernosfaderani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive abilities assessment, is considered to be one of the most complicated and controversial issues in psychological tests. In spite of great usage of new version of Tehran- Stanford- Binet intelligence scale in screening and diagnosis, they have not made so many endeavors to use this valid test in our country and little researches have been conducted to survey psychometric characteristics of mentioned scale. Given the above considerations, the aim of this study is to investigate Tehran-Stanford-Binet intelligence scale psychometric characteristics in dyslectic children. Materials and Methods: In this psychometric study with classical approach, the statistical society was all the students with dyslexia in the elementary schools of Tehran provinces in 1390. The sample size was equal with 120 students with dyslexia who were selected based on purposive sampling. The new version of Tehran-Stanford-Binet intelligence Scale which includes 10 subtests in verbal and nonverbal domains (fluid reasoning, knowledge, quantitative reasoning, visual spatial processing and working memory and eight IQ was used for them. Findings highlight characteristics of this tool is its ability to calculate the combined scores connected to the reading skills. ROC curve methods, kronbach alpha and pearson correlation was used to analyze the data. Results: Result show that SB5 Test has a good reliability and diagnostic validity. It has 98% sensitivity and a desirable potential to identify student with dyslexia (72%. Conclusion: SB5 could be used as an identificationtoal test for dyslexia.

  20. Stanford University: The Building Energy Retrofit Programs. Green Revolving Funds in Action: Case Study Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Stanford University's Energy Retrofit Program was created in 1993 to target resource reduction and conservation focused projects on campus. Fahmida Ahmed, Associate Director of the Department of Sustainability and Energy Management, says that Stanford has been investing in sustainability and energy-efficiency since the late 1970s, longer than many…

  1. The Case for the Stanford-Binet L-M as a Supplemental Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Linda Kreger; Kearney, Katheryn

    1992-01-01

    The Stanford-Binet IV is compared to the original version and criticized for having less power to measure the high end of intelligence and for having norms that discriminate against gifted students. Strengths of the Stanford-Binet L-M are pointed out, and use of both scales for different purposes is recommended. (JDD)

  2. Follow the Money: Engineering at Stanford and UC Berkeley during the Rise of Silicon Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    A comparison of the engineering schools at UC Berkeley and Stanford during the 1940s and 1950s shows that having an excellent academic program is necessary but not sufficient to make a university entrepreneurial (an engine of economic development). Key factors that made Stanford more entrepreneurial than Cal during this period were superior…

  3. Performing Research at University Centers for Academic Development--An Explorative Case Study in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigmar, Martin; Edgren, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    The aim is to explore the absence or presence of, and motives for, research at centers for academic development and to problematize the research situation among academic developers. Boyer's and Healey's theories are used as lenses for the analysis based on the questionnaires that were used for data collection. The conclusion is that research is a…

  4. Exploring Action Research as an Enduring Experience of Professional Development for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Robin Ellen

    2017-01-01

    This study was an inquiry into the influence of action research on teachers' practice and an exploration of the idea that teaching is synonymous with learning. After 14 participants engaged in individual action research projects that were facilitated by the researcher, the qualitative method of narrative inquiry was used to gather data from the…

  5. Addiction Studies: Exploring Students' Attitudes toward Research in a Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Raven; Simons, Lori

    2011-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted to compare addiction studies and community counseling students' attitudes toward research. A survey of 66 addiction studies and 17 community counseling students in graduate programs was used to explore interest and self-efficacy in research and the research training environment. A pre/post test design was used to…

  6. Implementation and evaluation of Stanford Health Care direct-care teledermatology program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh S Pathipati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teledermatology has proven to be an effective means of providing dermatologic care. The existing research has primarily evaluated its usefulness in a consultative model. Few academic centers have evaluated a patient-initiated model, and direct-to-consumer services remain the subject of controversy. Stanford Health Care recently launched a direct-care, patient-initiated teledermatology pilot program. This article evaluates the viability and patient satisfaction with this service. Materials and Methods: During the pilot period, patients were able to seek remote dermatologic care using an eVisit tool in their MyHealth account. Patients initiated the consultation, answered questions regarding their complaint, and uploaded a picture if relevant. A Stanford dermatologist reviewed each eVisit and responded with an assessment and plan. The dermatologist noted whether they were able to make a diagnosis and their level of confidence in it. After the study, 10 patients participated in a focus group to provide feedback on the service. Results: In all, 38 patients sought care during the pilot period. A dermatologist was able to make a diagnosis in 36 of 38 (95% cases, with an average confidence level of 7.9 of 10. The average time to consultation was 0.8 days. Patients indicated high levels of satisfaction with the service although they had suggestions for improvement. Discussion: Patients provided clinically useful images and information in a direct-care teledermatology model. Such services allow dermatology providers to increase access while maintaining high-quality care in an academic medical center. Further research is needed on standalone services that cannot integrate encounters with the patient’s existing medical record.

  7. Non-Dive Activities for Lophelia II 2009 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Non-dive activities reported to the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research for the "Lophelia II" expedition, Aug. 19 through Sept. 12, 2009. Information...

  8. Can You Lengthen Your Life? Researchers Explore How To Stay Healthy Longer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Issues Subscribe June 2016 Print this issue Can You Lengthen Your Life? Researchers Explore How To ... bad habits. People born in the U.S. today can expect to live to an average age of ...

  9. Exploring perceptions and experiences of Bolivian health researchers with research ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Aalborg, Annette; Basagoitia, Armando; Cortes, Jacqueline; Lanza, Oscar; Schwind, Jessica S

    2015-04-01

    In Bolivia, there is increasing interest in incorporating research ethics into study procedures, but there have been inconsistent application of research ethics practices. Minimal data exist regarding the experiences of researchers concerning the ethical conduct of research. A cross-sectional study was administered to Bolivian health leaders with research experience (n = 82) to document their knowledge, perceptions, and experiences of research ethics committees and infrastructure support for research ethics. Results showed that 16% of respondents reported not using ethical guidelines to conduct their research and 66% indicated their institutions did not consistently require ethics approval for research. Barriers and facilitators to incorporate research ethics into practice were outlined. These findings will help inform a comprehensive rights-based research ethics education program in Bolivia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Artificial Intelligence -- Research and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-01

    1975 through 11 April 1976 Stanford Research Institute Projects 3805 and 4763 ARIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE -- RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Edited by Bertram...of " vision by distinguishing features." Object recognition via distinguishing features is performed by looking only for those features that...August 1974). 11. T. D. Garvey, "Perceptual Strategies for Purposive Vision , Technical Note 127, Artificial Intelligence Center, Stanford Research

  11. Work stress and cancer researchers: an exploration of the challenges, experiences and training needs of UK cancer researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, F; Hicks, B; Yarker, J

    2014-07-01

    Work stress is a significant issue for many UK healthcare professionals, in particular those working in the field of oncology. However, there have been very few attempts to explore the challenges, experiences or training needs of researchers working in cancer research. In doing so, we will be better positioned to support and develop these researchers. Eighteen UK oncology researchers from a variety of backgrounds took part in a semi-structured interview. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis identified two overarching themes: logistical research issues (workload, accessing/recruiting participants, finances) and sensitive research issues (emotional demands, professional boundaries, sensitivity around recruitment). One cross-cutting theme, supportive strategies (support and training, coping mechanisms), was seen to influence both logistical and sensitive research issues. While further research is needed to fully understand the causes and impact of work stress on cancer researchers, three specific issues were highlighted: emotional demands are relevant to quantitative and mixed methods researchers as well as those engaged in qualitative research; the researchers' background (experience; clinical/non-clinical) was influential and an exploration of effective coping strategies is required; and there is a clear need for adequate support systems and training to be available, particularly for early career researchers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. An exploration of nursing research perceptions of registered nurses engaging in research activities at a metropolitan hospital in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Gemma; Duggan, Ravani; Boldy, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    To explore perceptions about nursing research of registered nurses (RNs) who were engaged in research activities at a metropolitan hospital in Western Australia. In order to improve RNs' research engagement and promote evidence-based practice, Nurse Research Consultants (NRCs) were appointed jointly by the study hospital and a local university. This joint appointment commenced in 2004 in the hospital's emergency department. Early findings indicated that the NRC role was effective in assisting registered nurses with research activities and hence the NRC role was expanded to all areas of the hospital. However, no formal investigation had been carried out to explore the effect of the NRC role on RNs' engagement with nursing research across the hospital. A qualitative interview process. Ten RN participants from the adult and paediatric wards were interviewed. Audio-recorded data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was undertaken. Four main themes were identified, namely: perceptions of nursing research, perceived enablers, perceived barriers and improving research engagement. There was some overlap with some sub-themes being linked with more than one theme. This appeared to be due to differing levels of research education and research engagement. 6pc some of the RNs that participated in this study were experienced in the conduct of research, finding adequate support from NRCs in the workplace, whilst others experienced barriers limiting their involvement in nursing research activities. These barriers could be reduced with additional education, support, improved communication, time and opportunities to undertake research activities.

  13. Exploring health researchers' perceptions of policymaking in Argentina: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corluka, Adrijana; Hyder, Adnan A; Winch, Peter J; Segura, Elsa

    2014-09-01

    Much of the published research on evidence-informed health policymaking in low- and middle-income countries has focused on policymakers, overlooking the role of health researchers in the research-to-policy process. Through 20 semi-structured, in-depth qualitative interviews conducted with researchers in Argentina's rural northwest and the capital of Buenos Aires, we explore the perspectives, experiences and attitudes of Argentine health researchers regarding the use and impact of health research in policymaking in Argentina. We find that the researcher, and the researcher's function of generating evidence, is nested within a broader complex system that influences the researcher's interaction with policymaking. This system comprises communities of practice, government departments/civil society organizations, bureaucratic processes and political governance and executive leadership. At the individual level, researcher capacity and determinants of research availability also play a role in contributing to evidence-informed policymaking. In addition, we find a recurrent theme around 'lack of trust' and explore the role of trust within a research system, finding that researchers' distrust towards policymakers and even other researchers are linked inextricably to the sociopolitical history of Argentina, which contributes to shaping researchers' identities in opposition to policymakers. For policymakers, national research councils and funders of national health research systems, this article provides a deeper understanding of researchers' perceptions which can help inform and improve programme design when developing interventions to enhance research utilization and develop equitable and rational health policies. For donors and development agencies interested in health research capacity building and achieving development goals, this research demonstrates a need for investment in building research capacity and training health researchers to interact with the public policy

  14. Exploring Forms of Triangulation to Facilitate Collaborative Research Practice: Reflections From a Multidisciplinary Research Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Tiainen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This article contains critical reflections of a multidisciplinary research group studying the human and technological dynamics around some newly offered electronic services in a specific rural area of Finland. For their research, the group adopted ethnography. On facing the challenges of doing ethnographic research in a multidisciplinary setting, the group evolved its own breed of research practice based on multiple forms of triangulation. This implied the use of multiple data sources, methods, theories, and researchers, in different combinations. One of the outcomes of the work is a model for collaborative research. It highlights, among others, the importance of creating a climate for collaboration within the research group and following a process of individual and collaborative writing to achieve the potential benefits of such research. The article also identifies a set of remaining challenges relevant to collaborative research.

  15. To Explore or to Research: Trends in modern age ocean studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. A.; Valette-Silver, N. J.; Lobecker, E.; Skarke, A. D.; Elliott, K.; McDonough, J.

    2013-12-01

    The recommendations of President's Panel Report on Ocean Exploration gave rise to NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration in 2001, and helped establish NOAA as the lead agency for a federal ocean exploration program. The panel defined exploration as discovery through disciplined, diverse observations and recordings of findings including rigorous, systematic observations and documentation of biological, chemical, physical, geological, and archaeological aspects of the ocean in the three dimensions of space and in time. Here we ask the question about the fine line that separates ';Exploration' and ';Research'. We contend that successful exploration aims to establish new lines of knowledge or give rise to new hypothesis as compared to research where primary goal is to prove or disprove an existing hypothesis. However, there can be considerable time lag before a hypothesis can be established after an initial observation. This creates interesting challenges for ocean exploration because instant ';return on investment' can not be readily shown. Strong media and public interest is garnered by far and apart exciting discoveries about new biological species or processes. However, most of the ocean exploration work goes to systematically extract basic information about a previously unknown area. We refer to this activity as baseline characterization in providing information about an area which can support hypothesis generation and further research to prove or disprove this hypothesis. Examples of such successful characterization include OER endeavors in the Gulf of Mexico that spanned over 10 years and it provided baseline characterization in terms of biological diversity and distribution on basin-wide scale. This baseline characterization was also conveniently used by scientists to conduct research on benthic communities to study effects of deep water horizon incident. More recently similar characterization has been attempted by NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer from 2011 - 2013 field

  16. The National Institute of Nursing Research Explores Opportunities in Genetics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Hilary D.; Grady, Patricia A.; Amende, Lynn M.

    1997-01-01

    Genetics offers many opportunities for nursing research. Nurse researchers can contribute in such areas as biological, environmental, and behavioral linkages; genetic determination of physiological responses; and translation of science findings into clinical interventions. (SK)

  17. Exploring Graduate Students' Understanding of Research: Links between Identity and Research Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Karen; Dennis, Barbara; Zhao, Pengfei; Li, Peiwei

    2017-01-01

    We are in an era that calls for increasing "training" in educational research methodologies. When the National Research Council (2004) calls for training in educational research that is "rigorous" and "relevant," the focus strongly emphasizes WHAT should be taught instead of WHO is being engaged in the learning.…

  18. Connecting the Space between Design and Research: Explorations in Participatory Research Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Glenda Amayo; Osborne, Lindy; Mewburn, Inger; Nottingham, Anitra

    2016-01-01

    In this article we offer a single case study using an action research method for gathering and analysing data offering insights valuable to both design and research supervision practice. We do not attempt to generalise from this single case, but offer it as an instance that can improve our understanding of research supervision practice. We…

  19. Exploring the Challenges of Conducting Respectful Research: Seen and Unforeseen Factors within Urban School Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaroo, Julia; Dahya, Negin; Alidina, Shahnaaz

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the significance of conducting respectful research within urban schools, using the example of one large-scale university-school board partnership in northwestern Toronto. The authors, three research assistants on the project, use their experiences within three of the participating schools to interrogate the research approach…

  20. "Casing the Joint": Explorations by the Insider-Researcher Preparing for Work-Based Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to explore factors that impinge on the "insider-researcher" (IR) when undertaking a work-based learning project, which will result in the creation of a context analysis framework. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative, interpretative approach with the IR as central to the research process, together with data from…

  1. Idea Generation and Exploration: Benefits and Limitations of the Policy Delphi Research Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Kathy K.; Hart, Jan K.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers use the policy Delphi method to explore a complex topic with little historical context that requires expert opinion to fully understand underlying issues. The benefit of this research technique is the use of experts who have more timely information than can be gleamed from extant literature. Additionally, those experts place…

  2. Research on the Field of Education Policy: Exploring Different Levels of Approach and Abstraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardes, Jefferson; Tello, César

    2016-01-01

    This paper, of theoretical nature, explores the levels of approach and abstraction of research in the field of education policy: description, analysis and understanding. Such categories were developed based on concepts of Bourdieu's theory and on the grounds of epistemological studies focused on education policy and meta-research. This paper…

  3. Workshop on Research for Space Exploration: Physical Sciences and Process Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a workshop sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division of NASA to define contributions the microgravity research community can provide to advance the human exploration of space. Invited speakers and attendees participated in an exchange of ideas to identify issues of interest in physical sciences and process technologies. This workshop was part of a continuing effort to broaden the contribution of the microgravity research community toward achieving the goals of the space agency in human exploration, as identified in the NASA Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) strategic plan. The Microgravity program is one of NASA'a major links to academic and industrial basic research in the physical and engineering sciences. At present, it supports close to 400 principal investigators, who represent many of the nation's leading researchers in the physical and engineering sciences and biotechnology. The intent of the workshop provided a dialogue between NASA and this large, influential research community, mission planners and industry technical experts with the goal of defining enabling research for the Human Exploration and Development of Space activities to which the microgravity research community can contribute.

  4. Children's Spirituality and Music Learning: Exploring Deeper Resonances with Arts Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Marie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine children's spirituality from the perspective of music learning, using arts based research as a mode of inquiry. Six interrelated themes are chosen to explore the landscape of music and children's spirituality and to evaluate the potential of arts based research to inform the intersections…

  5. Developing Investigative Entry Points: Exploring the Use of Quantitative Methods in English Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraner, Kristin L.; Robbins, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Although many research questions in English education demand the use of qualitative methods, this paper will briefly explore how English education researchers and doctoral students may use statistics and quantitative methods to inform, complement, and/or deepen their inquiries. First, the authors will provide a general overview of the survey areas…

  6. Nurturing the Young Shoots of Talent: Using Action Research for Exploration and Theory Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, Valsa; Pascal, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the outcomes of a set of action research projects carried out by teacher researchers in 14 local education authorities in England, working collaboratively with university tutors, over a period of three years. The common aim of all the projects was to explore practical ways of nurturing the gifts and talents of children aged…

  7. Exploring the Experiences of Faculty-Led Teams in Conducting Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Amundsen, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Action research has been suggested as a useful way to support university faculty to improve teaching and learning. However, there seems to be little knowledge about how faculty (and those who work with them) experience the process of doing action research. In order to explore team members' in-depth experience about what they learned and how they…

  8. Drug Policy and Rationality: An Exploration of the Research-Policy Interface in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Niamh

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study which aimed to explore the extent to which drug policy making in Ireland might be deemed to be a rational, evidence-based process. The research was completed during the first half of 2008, as the National Drug Strategy 2001-2008--which explicitly claimed to have research as one of its main "pillars"--was…

  9. Breeding history of the Stanford colony of narcoleptic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, R; Nishino, S; Dement, W C; Mignot, E

    1998-01-10

    Narcolepsy is a disabling sleep disorder of unknown aetiology. In humans, the disease is mostly sporadic, with a few familial cases having been reported. In 1973 a sporadic case of narcolepsy was reported in a poodle, and in 1975 familial cases of narcolepsy occurred in dobermanns. As with human narcoleptics, these narcoleptic dogs exhibited excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. A colony of narcoleptic dogs was established at Stanford University in 1976 to study the pathophysiology of the disease. Between 1976 and 1995, a total of 669 animals of various breeds were born, of which 487 survived. Dobermanns accounted for 78 per cent of the total. The narcolepsy genotype in dobermanns had no significant influence on puppy mortality rate (numbers of stillborn and survival rate). The sex, maternal parity or the age of the sire or dam had no significant effect. The percentage of stillborn puppies increased from 6.1 per cent in outbred litters to 15.4 per cent in inbred litters (P = 0.10). Birth season also had a significant effect, and the highest survival rate (P = 0.02), and the lowest percentage of stillborn puppies (P = 0.09) occurred between April and June.

  10. Stanford Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall questionnaire in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Benjamin E; Canavan, Jane L; Smith, Cayley J; Ingram, Karen A; Fowler, Ria P; Clark, Amy L; Polkey, Michael I; Man, William D-C

    2012-08-01

    Quantification of daily physical activity is of clinical interest in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Objective measures using activity monitors may take several days to obtain reliable results. The aim of our study was to evaluate the Stanford Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (PAR) against the SenseWear armband (SWA) and compare its validity with three other physical activity questionnaires. 43 COPD patients wore the SWA for 7 days. Patients completed the PAR, Baecke, Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and Zutphen questionnaires. Spearman rank correlation, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curves were used to assess the relationship between the questionnaires and SWA. Assessed by PAR, time spent at ≥3.0 metabolic equivalents (METs) correlated significantly (r=0.54, pactive patients (≥30 min at ≥3.0 METs or a physical activity level (PAL) ≥1.55) and very inactive patients (PAL activity sufficiently accurately to make individual recommendations, it was able to identify COPD patients at extremes of the physical activity spectrum, potentially reducing the number of patients requiring direct measurement.

  11. Exploring the Relevance of Qualitative Research Synthesis to Higher Education Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Claire; Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes the importance of qualitative research synthesis to the field of higher education. It examines seven key texts that undertake synthesis in this field and compares essential features and elements across studies. The authors indicate strengths of the approaches and highlight ways forward for using qualitative research synthesis…

  12. Increasing Research Productivity in Undergraduate Research Experiences: Exploring Predictors of Collaborative Faculty-Student Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Danielle X.; Grineski, Sara E.; Collins, Timothy W.

    2017-01-01

    Little attention has been paid to understanding faculty-student productivity via undergraduate research from the faculty member's perspective. This study examines predictors of faculty-student publications resulting from mentored undergraduate research, including measures of faculty-student collaboration, faculty commitment to undergraduate…

  13. Exploring the Postgraduate Research Climate and the Postgraduate Research Experience: A Conceptual Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, K. K.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to develop a conceptual model aimed at improving the postgraduate research students' experience. Since postgraduate students "vote with their feet" an improved understanding of the postgraduate research service encounter may result in improving the quality of the encounter and so increasing throughput and…

  14. [Exploration of application of clinical research coordinator in acupuncture and moxibustion study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhongqian; Chen, Bo; Guo, Yi; Pan, Xingfang; Guo, Yongming; Chen, Zelin

    2016-07-12

    To explore the application of clinical research coordinator(CRC) in acupuncture and moxibustion study. The present application of CRC in many countries, such as America and Japan, was analyzed, and the critical actions of CRC were summarized. CRCs are crucial party of the clinical research coordinators group (CRCG).It aims to help regulate works among patients, sponsors and researchers with altruism. Now there are problems in clinical acupuncture and moxibustion research management, and the experience of CRC can enhance the efficiency and research level.

  15. HRP Chief Scientist's Office: Conducting Research to Enable Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, J. B.; Fogarty, J.; Vega, L.; Cromwell, R. L.; Haven, C. P.; McFather, J. C.; Savelev, I.

    2017-01-01

    The HRP Chief Scientist's Office sets the scientific agenda for the Human Research Program. As NASA plans for deep space exploration, HRP is conducting research to ensure the health of astronauts, and optimize human performance during extended duration missions. To accomplish this research, HRP solicits for proposals within the U.S., collaborates with agencies both domestically and abroad, and makes optimal use of ISS resources in support of human research. This session will expand on these topics and provide an opportunity for questions and discussion with the HRP Chief Scientist. Presentations in this session will include: NRA solicitations - process improvements and focus for future solicitations, Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration - future directions (MHRPE 2.0), Extramural liaisons - National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Defense (DOD), Standardized Measures for spaceflight, Ground-based Analogs - international collaborations, and International data sharing.

  16. Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. receives architectural and engineering design contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. announced that a subsidiary company won a contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to provide architectural and engineering design services for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) conventional facilities" (1/2 page)

  17. Exploring the use of research evidence in health-enhancing physical activity policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hämäläinen, Riitta-Maija; Aro, Arja R.; van de Goor, Ien

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary teams from six EU member states analysed the use of research evidence and other kinds of evidence in 21 HEPA policies and interviewed 86 key policymakers involved in the policies. Qualitative content analysis was conducted on both policy documents and interview data. Results Research evidence......Background The gaps observed between the use of research evidence and policy have been reported to be based on the different methods of using research evidence in policymaking by researchers and actual policymakers. Some policies and policymaking processes may therefore be particularly well...... informed by research evidence compared to others. The aims of the present article are to explore the use of research evidence in health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) policies, identify when research evidence was used, and find what other types of evidence were employed in HEPA policymaking. Methods...

  18. Exploring evidence-policy linkages in health research plans: A case study from six countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladepo Oladimeji

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complex evidence-policy interface in low and middle income country settings is receiving increasing attention. Future Health Systems (FHS: Innovations for Equity, is a research consortium conducting health systems explorations in six Asian and African countries: Bangladesh, India, China, Afghanistan, Uganda, and Nigeria. The cross-country research consortium provides a unique opportunity to explore the research-policy interface. Three key activities were undertaken during the initial phase of this five-year project. First, key considerations in strengthening evidence-policy linkages in health system research were developed by FHS researchers through workshops and electronic communications. Four key considerations in strengthening evidence-policy linkages are postulated: development context; research characteristics; decision-making processes; and stakeholder engagement. Second, these four considerations were applied to research proposals in each of the six countries to highlight features in the research plans that potentially strengthen the research-policy interface and opportunities for improvement. Finally, the utility of the approach for setting research priorities in health policy and systems research was reflected upon. These three activities yielded interesting findings. First, developmental consideration with four dimensions – poverty, vulnerabilities, capabilities, and health shocks – provides an entry point in examining research-policy interfaces in the six settings. Second, research plans focused upon on the ground realities in specific countries strengthens the interface. Third, focusing on research prioritized by decision-makers, within a politicized health arena, enhances chances of research influencing action. Lastly, early and continued engagement of multiple stakeholders, from local to national levels, is conducive to enhanced communication at the interface. The approach described has four main utilities: first

  19. Exploring the promises of transdisciplinary research : a quantitative study of two climate research programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, S.; Wardenaar, T.; Horlings, Edwin

    Scientists have long since become accustomed to explaining the future value of their work. Nowadays token statements are no longer sufficient. Societal impact must be embedded in the organisation of research. The call for societal impact is most explicitly expressed in and actively shaped by

  20. Exploring Reticence in Research Methods: The Experience of Studying Psychological Research Methods in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, Barbara E.; Robertson, Julia M.

    2017-01-01

    As a fundamental element of any psychology degree, the teaching and learning of research methods is repeatedly brought into sharp focus, and it is often regarded as a real challenge by undergraduate students. The reasons for this are complex, but frequently attributed to an aversion of maths. To gain a more detailed understanding of students'…

  1. Risk factors for postoperative hypoxemia in patients undergoing Stanford A aortic dissection surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yinghua; Xue, Song; Zhu, Hongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to identify the risk factors for postoperative hypoxemia in patients with Stanford A aortic dissection surgery and their relation to clinical outcomes. Methods Clinical records of 186 patients with postoperative hypoxemia in Stanford A aortic dissection were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups by postoperative oxygen fraction (PaO2/FiO2):hypoxemia group (N=92) and non-hypoxemia group (N=94). Results We found that the inci...

  2. [Exploring application of data mining technology in researching composition rules of Tibetan medical formulas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairang, Nanjia; Renzeng, Duojie; Duojie, Cairang; Luosang, Dongzhi; Li, Xianjia

    2012-08-01

    There are thousands of medicinal formulas in the ancient Tibetan medical texts. Researching the composition rules of Tibetan medical formulas is a very important step in the study and practice of Tibetan medicine. In order to explore the composition rules of Tibetan medical formulas this article draws on the research methods utilized in related fields of traditional Chinese medicine adapted to the unique characteristics of Tibetan medicine. This is the first time the utilization of data mining methods has been proposed for the research of Tibetan medical formulas. It is believed that data mining techniques can aid researchers in discovering the composition rules of Tibetan medical formulas in accordance with Tibetan medical theory.

  3. A Primer on Foraging and the Explore/Exploit Trade-Off for Psychiatry Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addicott, M A; Pearson, J M; Sweitzer, M M; Barack, D L; Platt, M L

    2017-09-01

    Foraging is a fundamental behavior, and many types of animals appear to have solved foraging problems using a shared set of mechanisms. Perhaps the most common foraging problem is the choice between exploiting a familiar option for a known reward and exploring unfamiliar options for unknown rewards-the so-called explore/exploit trade-off. This trade-off has been studied extensively in behavioral ecology and computational neuroscience, but is relatively new to the field of psychiatry. Explore/exploit paradigms can offer psychiatry research a new approach to studying motivation, outcome valuation, and effort-related processes, which are disrupted in many mental and emotional disorders. In addition, the explore/exploit trade-off encompasses elements of risk-taking and impulsivity-common behaviors in psychiatric disorders-and provides a novel framework for understanding these behaviors within an ecological context. Here we explain relevant concepts and some common paradigms used to measure explore/exploit decisions in the laboratory, review clinically relevant research on the neurobiology and neuroanatomy of explore/exploit decision making, and discuss how computational psychiatry can benefit from foraging theory.

  4. USER FRUSTRATION IN HIT INTERFACES: EXPLORING PAST HCI RESEARCH FOR A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF CLINICIANS' EXPERIENCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku-Boateng, Gloria A

    2015-01-01

    User frustration research has been one way of looking into clinicians' experience with health information technology use and interaction. In order to understand how clinician frustration with Health Information Technology (HIT) use occurs, there is the need to explore Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) literature that addresses both frustration and HIT use. In the past three decades, HCI frustration research has increased and expanded. Researchers have done a lot of work to understand emotions, end-user frustration and affect. This paper uses a historical literature review approach to review the origins of emotion and frustration research and explore the research question; Does HCI research on frustration provide insights on clinicians' frustration with HIT interfaces? From the literature review HCI research on emotion and frustration provides additional insights that can indeed help explain user frustration in HIT. Different approaches and HCI perspectives also help frame HIT user frustration research as well as inform HIT system design. The paper concludes with a suggested directions on how future design and research may take.

  5. USER FRUSTRATION IN HIT INTERFACES: EXPLORING PAST HCI RESEARCH FOR A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF CLINICIANS’ EXPERIENCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku-Boateng, Gloria A.

    2015-01-01

    User frustration research has been one way of looking into clinicians’ experience with health information technology use and interaction. In order to understand how clinician frustration with Health Information Technology (HIT) use occurs, there is the need to explore Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) literature that addresses both frustration and HIT use. In the past three decades, HCI frustration research has increased and expanded. Researchers have done a lot of work to understand emotions, end-user frustration and affect. This paper uses a historical literature review approach to review the origins of emotion and frustration research and explore the research question; Does HCI research on frustration provide insights on clinicians’ frustration with HIT interfaces? From the literature review HCI research on emotion and frustration provides additional insights that can indeed help explain user frustration in HIT. Different approaches and HCI perspectives also help frame HIT user frustration research as well as inform HIT system design. The paper concludes with a suggested directions on how future design and research may take. PMID:26958238

  6. Towards the Ethical or the Unethical Side?: An Explorative Research of Greek Business Students' Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karassavidou, Eleonora; Glaveli, Niki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to investigate the ethical orientations of undergraduate business students in Greece by exploring the relations among students' internalized code of ethics, anomia and students' judgment related to ethical problem situations within classroom as well as business context. Design/methodology/approach: A…

  7. Exploring host-microbiota interactions : New research approaches to improving metabolic and mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, L. de

    2013-01-01

    The role of our intestinal microbiota reaches far beyond fermentation of indigestible food components. Apart from immunological functions, they have a major impact on our metabolic and perhaps even mental health. Dutch research organization TNO is exploring this exciting field, known as

  8. Qualitative Shadowing as a Research Methodology for Exploring Early Childhood Leadership in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøe, Marit; Hognestad, Karin; Waniganayake, Manjula

    2017-01-01

    This article explores qualitative shadowing as an interpretivist methodology, and explains how two researchers participating simultaneously in data collection using a video recorder, contextual interviews and video-stimulated recall interviews, conducted a qualitative shadowing study at six early childhood centres in Norway. This paper emerged…

  9. Using Arts-Based Research to Explore Peak Experiences in Five Gifted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlin, Steve

    2017-01-01

    During this inquiry, I describe my journey as a beginning arts-based researcher, using this methodological approach to explore the "peak experiences" of five, second-grade gifted students in a general classroom. Concerned with collecting valid data from young children through traditional interviewing techniques, I turned to Arts-Based…

  10. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Exploration 1976-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-09-01

    This report, the first in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in exploration and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  11. Life Course Research Design: Exploring Career Change Experiences of Former School Teachers and Police Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Loene M.; Goodman-Delahunty, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Once associated with lifetime employment, policing and teaching have become increasingly associated with employee attrition. We used a life course research design to explore career turning points and transitions, in the context of preceding and following careers. Former police officers ("n" = 9) and former teachers ("n" = 15)…

  12. Exploration of Textual Interactions in CALL Learning Communities: Emerging Research and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) has greatly enhanced the realm of online social interaction and behavior. In language classrooms, it allows the opportunity for students to enhance their learning experiences. "Exploration of Textual Interactions in CALL Learning Communities: Emerging Research and Opportunities" is an ideal…

  13. Changing Perspectives: Exploring a Pedagogy to Examine Other Perspectives about Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Bev; Mora, Helen A.; Bay, Jacquie L.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how teachers developed and critically evaluated a range of teaching strategies that could support the discussion of a socio-scientific issue (SSI) that had the potential to be controversial. The issue was stem cell research and six New Zealand teachers of senior biology students (grades 12/13) took part in an action research…

  14. Family Myths, Beliefs, and Customs as a Research/Educational Tool to Explore Identity Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, William E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines a qualitative research tool designed to explore personal identity formation as described by Erik Erikson and offers self-reflective and anonymous evaluative comments made by college students after completing this task. Subjects compiled a list of 200 myths, customs, fables, rituals, and beliefs from their family of origin and…

  15. The Influence of Education and Socialization on Radicalization: An Exploration of Theoretical Presumptions and Empirical Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pels, T.V.M.; de Ruyter, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: Research into radicalization does not pay much attention to education. This is remarkable and possibly misses an important influence on the process of radicalization. Therefore this article sets out to explore the relation between education on the one hand and the onset or

  16. Topics from the 20th annual workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering, Stanford University; Stanford Daigaku chinetsu choryuso kogaku waku shoppu ni sanka shite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akasaka, C. [Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-03-15

    The 20th Stanford University geothermal reservoir engineering workshop was held in the Stanford University in the suburbs of San Francisco, State of California, United States, for 3 days from January 24th to 26th in 1995. This workshop has started in 1975, and is held once a year, and has a long history, which is an only workshop named the geothermal reservoir engineering in the world. In the petroleum engineering section of the Stanford University, there is an organization regarding to the geothermal reservoir engineering named the Stanford Geothermal Program, which centering around this workshop manages and operates. Its purpose is a development of an effective utilization technology of geothermal resources, inheritance of technology, and rearing men of ability. Through participating this workshop, in the geothermal reservoir engineering as an interdiscipline part between the earth science and engineering, that there is a plenty of room to be elucidated still left was recognized over again. There are many things to be learned from an abundant experiences and knowledges of the geothermally advanced country. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Cell biology and biotechnology research for exploration of the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellis, N.; North, R.

    Health risks generated by human long exposure to radiation, microgravity, and unknown factors in the planetary environment are the major unresolved issues for human space exploration. A complete characterization of human and other biological systems adaptation processes to long-duration space missions is necessary for the development of countermeasures. The utilization of cell and engineered tissue cultures in space research and exploration complements research in human, animal, and plant subjects. We can bring a small number of humans, animals, or plants to the ISS, Moon, and Mars. However, we can investigate millions of their cells during these missions. Furthermore, many experiments can not be performed on humans, e.g. radiation exposure, cardiac muscle. Cells from critical tissues and tissue constructs per se are excellent subjects for experiments that address underlying mechanisms important to countermeasures. The development of cell tissue engineered for replacement, implantation of biomaterial to induce tissue regeneration (e.g. absorbable collagen matrix for guiding tissue regeneration in periodontal surgery), and immunoisolation (e.g. biopolymer coating on transplanted tissues to ward off immunological rejection) are good examples of cell research and biotechnology applications. NASA Cell Biology and Biotechnology research include Bone/Muscle and Cardiovascular cell culture and tissue engineering; Environmental Health and Life Support Systems; Immune System; Radiation; Gravity Thresholds ; and Advanced Biotechnology Development to increase the understanding of animal and plant cell adaptive behavior when exposed to space, and to advance technologies that facilitates exploration. Cell systems can be used to investigate processes related to food, microbial proliferation, waste management, biofilms and biomaterials. The NASA Cell Science Program has the advantage of conducting research in microgravity based on significantly small resources, and the ability to

  18. EDITORIAL: Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium, Stanford University, California, USA, 28 June-2 July 2010 Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium, Stanford University, California, USA, 28 June-2 July 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Sasha; Sun, Ke-Xun

    2011-05-01

    The international research community interested in the Laser Interferometric Space Antenna (LISA) program meets every two years to exchange scientific and technical information. From 28 June-2 July 2010, Stanford University hosted the 8th International LISA Symposium. The symposium was held on the campus of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Many of the foremost scientific and technological researchers in LISA and gravitational wave theory and detection presented their work and ideas. Over one hundred engineers and graduate students attended the meeting. The leadership from NASA and ESA research centers and programs joined the symposium. A total of 280 delegates participated in the 8th LISA Symposium, and enjoyed the scientific and social programs. The scientific program included 46 invited plenary lectures, 44 parallel talks, and 77 posters, totaling 167 presentations. The one-slide introduction presentation of the posters is a new format in this symposium and allowed graduate students the opportunity to talk in front of a large audience of scientists. The topics covered included LISA Science, LISA Interferometry, LISA PathFinder (LPF), LISA and LPF Data Analysis, Astrophysics, Numerical Relativity, Gravitational Wave Theory, GRS Technologies, Other Space Programs, and Ground Detectors. Large gravitational wave detection efforts, DECIGO, and LIGO were presented, as well as a number of other fundamental physics space experiments, with GP-B and STEP being examples. A public evening lecture was also presented at the symposium. Professor Bernard Schutz from the Albert Einstein Institute gave a general audience, multimedia presentation on `Gravitational waves: Listening to the music of spheres'. For more detailed information about the symposium and many presentation files, please browse through the website: http://www.stanford.edu/group/lisasymposium The Proceedings of the 8th International LISA Symposium are jointly published by Classical and Quantum Gravity

  19. The Determinants of National Funding in Trans-national Joint Research: Exploring the Proximity Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reale, E.; Spinello, A.; Zinilli, A.

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates -using an explorative approach, why policy makers at national level engage in transnational joint research activities and mobilize dedicated financial resources. The research question is: why policy makers (either Governments or Research Funding Organisations-RFOs) in EU28 countries invest in transnational joint research activities beyond the European Framework Programmes, and what are the determinants of different levels of funding engagement? The question is relevant to understand the reasons that generate the existing imbalances within European countries as to the participation in transnational research, which are likely to create peripheries within the ERA, thus undermining the process of European integration. We assume that proximity linked to cognitive, institutional and organizational dimensions can affect the policy decisions about the level of funding (real engagement) joint European research programmes, because the closeness or distance in these dimensions generate similarities that are likely to influence the possibility of decision makers to collaborate in the implementation of research programmes. The paper also explores the existence of any effect of geographical proximity, although it is not supposed to play a role in policy decisions about investment in transnational research programmes. (Author)

  20. The Use of Translational Research Platforms in Clinical and Biomedical Data Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolariki, Konstantina; Avramouli, Antigoni

    2017-01-01

    The rise of precision medicine combined with the variety of biomedical data sources and their heterogeneous nature make the integration and exploration of information that they retain more complicated. In light of these issues, translational research platforms were developed as a promising solution. Research centers have used translational tools for the study of integrated data for hypothesis development and validation, cohort discovery and data-exploration. For this article, we reviewed the literature in order to determine the use of translational research platforms in precision medicine. These tools are used to support scientists in various domains regarding precision medicine research. We identified eight platforms: BRISK, iCOD, iDASH, tranSMART, the recently developed OncDRS, as well as caTRIP, cBio Cancer Portal and G-DOC. The last four platforms explore multidimensional data specifically for cancer research. We focused on tranSMART, for it is the most broadly used platform, since its development in 2012.

  1. A framework to explore the knowledge structure of multidisciplinary research fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Shahadat; Khan, Arif; Baur, Louise A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding emerging areas of a multidisciplinary research field is crucial for researchers, policymakers and other stakeholders. For them a knowledge structure based on longitudinal bibliographic data can be an effective instrument. But with the vast amount of available online information it is often hard to understand the knowledge structure for data. In this paper, we present a novel approach for retrieving online bibliographic data and propose a framework for exploring knowledge structure. We also present several longitudinal analyses to interpret and visualize the last 20 years of published obesity research data.

  2. Towards human exploration of space: The THESEUS review series on immunology research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jean-Pol, Frippiat; Crucian, Brian E; de Quervain, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system occurs during spaceflight and may represent a crew health risk during exploration missions because astronauts are challenged by many stressors. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the biology of immune modulation under spaceflight conditions in order to be able...... to maintain immune homeostasis under such challenges. In the framework of the THESEUS project whose aim was to develop an integrated life sciences research roadmap regarding human space exploration, experts working in the field of space immunology, and related disciplines, established a questionnaire sent...

  3. The Second Life Researcher Toolkit - An Exploration of Inworld Tools, Methods and Approaches for Researching Educational Projects in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschini, Elena

    Academics are beginning to explore the educational potential of Second LifeTM (SL) by setting up inworld educational activities and projects. Given the relative novelty of the use of virtual world environments in higher education many such projects are still at pilot stage. However the initial pilot and experimentation stage will have to be followed by a rigorous evaluation process as for more traditional teaching projects. The chapter addresses issues about SL research tools and research methods. It introduces a "researcher toolkit" that includes: the various stages in the evaluation of SL educational projects and the theoretical framework that can inform such projects; an outline of the inworld tools that can be utilised or customised for academic research purposes; a review of methods for collecting feedback from participants and of the main ethical issues involved in researching virtual world environments; a discussion on the technical skills required to operate a research project in SL. The chapter also offers an indication of the inworld opportunities for the dissemination of SL research findings.

  4. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  5. Exploring multiple intelligences theory in the context of science education: An action research approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnough, Karen Catherine

    2000-10-01

    Since the publication of Frames of Mind: The Theory in Practice, multiple intelligences, theory (Gardner, 1983) has been used by practitioners in a variety of ways to make teaching and learning more meaningful. However, little attention has been focused on exploring the potential of the theory for science teaching and learning. Consequently, this research study was designed to: (1) explore Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences (1983) and its merit for making science teaching and learning more meaningful; (2) provide a forum for teachers to engage in critical self-reflection about their theory and practice in science education; (3) study the process of action research in the context of science education; and (4) describe the effectiveness of collaborative action research as a framework for teacher development and curriculum development. The study reports on the experiences of four teachers (two elementary teachers, one junior high teacher, and one high school teacher) and myself, a university researcher-facilitator, as we participated in a collaborative action research project. The action research group held weekly meetings over a five-month period (January--May, 1999). The inquiry was a qualitative case study (Stake, 1994) that aimed to understand the perspectives of those directly involved. This was achieved by using multiple methods to collect data: audiotaped action research meetings, fieldnotes, semi-structured interviews, journal writing, and concept mapping. All data were analysed on an ongoing basis. Many positive outcomes resulted from the study in areas such as curriculum development, teacher development, and student learning in science. Through the process of action research, research participants became more reflective about their practice and thus, enhanced their pedagogical content knowledge (Shulman, 1987) in science. Students became more engaged in learning science, gained a greater understanding of how they learn, and experienced a

  6. Best research--for what? Best health--for whom? A critical exploration of primary care research using discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Sara E; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2008-06-01

    Health research is fundamental to the development of improved health and healthcare. Despite its importance, and the role of policy in guiding the kind of research that gets addressed, there are very few empirical studies of health research policy. This paper redresses this, exploring the means by which one area of health research policy is shaped, enabled and constrained. We ask: what are the historical, social and political origins of research policy in primary care in England? What are the key discourses that have dominated debate; and what are the tensions between discourses and the implications this raises for practitioners and policymakers? To answer these questions we employed a Foucauldian approach to discourse analysis to explicitly recognise the historical, social and ideological origins of policy texts; and the role of power and knowledge in policy development. We adapted Parker's framework for distinguishing discourses as a means of selecting and analysing 29 key policy documents; 16 narrative interviews with historical and contemporary policy stakeholders; and additional contextual documents. Our analysis involved detailed deconstruction and linking across texts to reveal prevailing storylines, ideologies, power relations, and tensions. Findings show how powerful policy discourses shaped by historical and social forces influence the type of research undertaken, by whom and how. For instance, recent policy has been shaped by discourse associated with the knowledge-based economy that emphasises microscopic 'discovery', exploitation of information and the contribution of highly technological activities to 'UK plc' and has re-positioned primary care research as a strategic resource and 'population laboratory' for clinical research. Such insights challenge apolitical accounts of health research and reveal how health research serves particular interests.

  7. Outcomes from a postgraduate biomedical technology innovation training program: the first 12 years of Stanford Biodesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Todd J; Kurihara, Christine Q; Camarillo, David B; Pietzsch, Jan B; Gorodsky, Julian; Zenios, Stefanos A; Doshi, Rajiv; Shen, Christopher; Kumar, Uday N; Mairal, Anurag; Watkins, Jay; Popp, Richard L; Wang, Paul J; Makower, Josh; Krummel, Thomas M; Yock, Paul G

    2013-09-01

    The Stanford Biodesign Program began in 2001 with a mission of helping to train leaders in biomedical technology innovation. A key feature of the program is a full-time postgraduate fellowship where multidisciplinary teams undergo a process of sourcing clinical needs, inventing solutions and planning for implementation of a business strategy. The program places a priority on needs identification, a formal process of selecting, researching and characterizing needs before beginning the process of inventing. Fellows and students from the program have gone on to careers that emphasize technology innovation across industry and academia. Biodesign trainees have started 26 companies within the program that have raised over $200 million and led to the creation of over 500 new jobs. More importantly, although most of these technologies are still at a very early stage, several projects have received regulatory approval and so far more than 150,000 patients have been treated by technologies invented by our trainees. This paper reviews the initial outcomes of the program and discusses lessons learned and future directions in terms of training priorities.

  8. Human factors research as part of a Mars exploration analogue mission on Devon Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binsted, Kim; Kobrick, Ryan L.; Griofa, Marc Ó.; Bishop, Sheryl; Lapierre, Judith

    2010-06-01

    Human factors research is a critical element of space exploration as it provides insight into a crew's performance, psychology and interpersonal relationships. Understanding the way humans work in space-exploration analogue environments permits the development and testing of countermeasures for and responses to potential hazardous situations, and can thus help improve mission efficiency and safety. Analogue missions, such as the one described here, have plausible mission constraints and operational scenarios, similar to those that a real Mars crew would experience. Long duration analogue studies, such as those being conducted at the Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station (FMARS) on Devon Island, Canada, offer an opportunity to study mission operations and human factors in a semi-realistic environment, and contribute to the design of missions to explore the Moon and Mars. The FMARS XI Long Duration Mission (F-XI LDM) was, at four months, the longest designed analogue Mars mission conducted to date, and thus provides a unique insight into human factors issues for long-duration space exploration. Here, we describe the six human factors studies that took place during F-XI LDM, and give a summary of their results, where available. We also present a meta-study, which examined the impact of the human-factors research itself on crew schedule and workload. Based on this experience, we offer some lessons learnt: some aspects (perceived risk and crew motivation, for example) of analogue missions must be realistic for study results to be valid; human factors studies are time-consuming, and should be fully integrated into crew schedules; and crew-ground communication and collaboration under long-term exploration conditions can present serious challenges.

  9. 76 FR 26254 - NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) Strategic Plan FY 2011-FY 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER... Atmospheric Research (OAR), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice...-FY2015. SUMMARY: NOAA'S Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) is electronically publishing the...

  10. Space Exploration Technologies Developed through Existing and New Research Partnerships Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Mark; Casas, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    The Space Partnership Development Program of NASA has been highly successful in leveraging commercial research investments to the strategic mission and applied research goals of the Agency through industry academic partnerships. This program is currently undergoing an outward-looking transformation towards Agency wide research and discovery goals that leverage partnership contributions to the strategic research needed to demonstrate enabling space exploration technologies encompassing both robotic spacecraft missions and human space flight. New Space Partnership Initiatives with incremental goals and milestones will allow a continuing series of accomplishments to be achieved throughout the duration of each initiative, permit the "lessons learned" and capabilities acquired from previous implementation steps to be incorporated into subsequent phases of the initiatives, and allow adjustments to be made to the implementation of the initiatives as new opportunities or challenges arise. An Agency technological risk reduction roadmap for any required technologies not currently available will identify the initiative focus areas for the development, demonstration and utilization of space resources supporting the production of power, air, and water, structures and shielding materials. This paper examines the successes to date, lessons learned, and programmatic outlook of enabling sustainable exploration and discovery through governmental, industrial, academic, and international partnerships. Previous government and industry technology development programs have demonstrated that a focused research program that appropriately shares the developmental risk can rapidly mature low Technology Readiness Level (TRL) technologies to the demonstration level. This cost effective and timely, reduced time to discovery, partnership approach to the development of needed technological capabilities addresses the dual use requirements by the investing partners. In addition, these partnerships

  11. Strategic Research to Enable NASA's Exploration Missions Conference and Workshop: Poster Session. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    Reports are presented from volume 2 of the conference titled Strategic Research to Enable NASA's Exploration Missions, poster session. Topics included spacecraft fire suppression and fire extinguishing agents,materials flammability, various topics on the effects of microgravity including crystal growth, fluid mechanics, electric particulate suspension, melting and solidification, bubble formation, the sloshing of liquid fuels, biological studies, separation of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide for Mars ISRU.

  12. Changing Perspectives: Exploring a pedagogy to examine other perspectives about stem cell research

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Bev; Mora, Helen A.; Bay, Jacquie L.

    2012-03-01

    This study explores how teachers developed and critically evaluated a range of teaching strategies that could support the discussion of a socio-scientific issue (SSI) that had the potential to be controversial. The issue was stem cell research and six New Zealand teachers of senior biology students (grades 12/13) took part in an action research project that was situational, collaborative and self-evaluative. The focus of the research was to identify communication barriers that interfered with classroom discussion and how teachers could help students cross cultural borders when they discussed SSIs that were outside their life worlds. The barriers to communication were access to relevant science knowledge, religion, language, an inability to question issues and cultural expectations of girls. Teachers trialled and adapted two discussion strategies, 'Drawing the Line' and 'Diamond Ranking' that provided a vehicle for their students to explore and discuss this issue from a range of perspectives. These discussion strategies enabled their students to take part in a dialogue where reciprocal conversation could occur because they had opportunities not only to explore their own perspectives but also other people's viewpoints.

  13. Exploring Researchers in Dialogue: Linguistic and Educational Perspectives on Observational Data from a Sixth Grade Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helg Fottland

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on a collaborative process between two researchers from different backgrounds conducting a joint-venture classroom observation project focusing on language, communication and special education. Focusing on the connection between explorative learning situations and dialogue in relation to children's learning and identity development, the researchers cooperate on all levels in the research process. The article compares findings when approaching data from two different professional traditions, linguistics and education. The main focus is how each of the researchers approaches the data analysis. The combining of approaches in interpreting and writing is also discussed. Narratives and spoken dialogues are vital in this work; transcripts of video material from a primary school classroom are used as illustrations.

  14. From the bench to exploration medicine: NASA life sciences translational research for human exploration and habitation missions

    OpenAIRE

    Alwood, Joshua S.; Ronca, April E.; Mains, Richard C.; Shelhamer, Mark J.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    NASA?s Space Biology and Human Research Program entities have recently spearheaded communications both internally and externally to coordinate the agency?s translational research efforts. In this paper, we strongly advocate for translational research at NASA, provide recent examples of NASA sponsored early-stage translational research, and discuss options for a path forward. Our overall objective is to help in stimulating a collaborative research across multiple disciplines and entities that,...

  15. From the bench to exploration medicine: NASA life sciences translational research for human exploration and habitation missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwood, Joshua S; Ronca, April E; Mains, Richard C; Shelhamer, Mark J; Smith, Jeffrey D; Goodwin, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Space Biology and Human Research Program entities have recently spearheaded communications both internally and externally to coordinate the agency's translational research efforts. In this paper, we strongly advocate for translational research at NASA, provide recent examples of NASA sponsored early-stage translational research, and discuss options for a path forward. Our overall objective is to help in stimulating a collaborative research across multiple disciplines and entities that, working together, will more effectively and more rapidly achieve NASA's goals for human spaceflight.

  16. A research method to explore midwives' views of national maternity service reforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roache, Bridget; Kelly, Jennifer

    2017-10-13

    Priorities of the National Maternity Services Plan (NMSP) are a significant contrast to current standard hospital maternity service provision. This paper demonstrates the applicability of case study methods to explore the views of midwives during a period of midwifery reform. This research aims to highlight key findings and insights surrounding recommended changes facing midwives that can be shared with education providers to incorporate strategies into education programs to ensure contemporary midwifery practice. Exploratory Case Study methodology was employed using ethical processes and designing semi-structured interview questions to explore participants' views. Purposive sampling ensured participants were currently practicing midwives in order to reflect the perspective and intent of this study. Data were analysed and findings presented in categories and subcategories. Case Study methodology enables an in-depth understanding of a phenomenon to be explored within a natural context. The participants of this study formed a single unit of analysis to ensure the research makes a worthwhile contribution to the profession of midwifery. This paper demonstrates that Case Study methodology is a valid research approach to exploring the views of midwives employed in standard care settings during a period of national reform. The rigorous processes and versatility of Case Study methodology ensured a systematic, critical enquiry was undertaken to gain understanding of the views of participants in implementing the NMSP. This understanding is reflective of the real life contexts of midwives to promote understanding and provide a body of knowledge where there is ambiguity and uncertainty. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: Year Three Annual Report 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Yvonne; Schmidt, Greg; Kring, David; Horanyi, Mihaly; Heldmann, Jennifer; Glotch, Timothy; Rivkin, Andy; Farrell, William; Pieters, Carle; Bottke, William; style="text-decoration: none; " href="javascript:void(0); " onClick="displayelement('author_20180000941'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20180000941_show'); toggleEditAbsImage('author_20180000941_hide'); "> style="display:inline; width:12px; height:12px; " src="images/arrow-up.gif" width="12" height="12" border="0" alt="hide" id="author_20180000941_show"> style="width:12px; height:12px; display:none; " src="images/arrow-down.gif" width="12" height="12" border="0" alt="hide" id="author_20180000941_hide">

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is pleased to present the 2016 Annual Report. Each year brings new scientific discoveries, technological breakthroughs, and collaborations. The integration of basic research and development, industry and academic partnerships, plus the leveraging of existing technologies, has further opened a scientific window into human exploration. SSERVI sponsorship by the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) continues to enable the exchange of insights between the human exploration and space science communities, paving a clearer path for future space exploration. SSERVI provides a unique environment for scientists and engineers to interact within multidisciplinary research teams. As a virtual institute, the best teaming arrangements can be made irrespective of the geographical location of individuals or laboratory facilities. The interdisciplinary science that ensues from virtual and in-person interactions, both within the teams and across team lines, provides answers to questions that many times cannot be foreseen. Much of this research would not be accomplished except for the catalyzing, collaborative environment enabled by SSERVI. The SSERVI Central Office, located at NASA Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, California, provides the leadership, guidance and technical support that steers the virtual institute. At the start of 2016, our institute had nine U.S. teams, each mid-way through their five-year funding cycle, plus nine international partnerships. However, by the end of the year we were well into the selection of four new domestic teams, selected through NASA's Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) process, and a new international partnership. Understanding that human and robotic exploration is most successful as an international endeavor, international partnerships collaborate with SSERVI domestic teams on a no-exchange of funds basis

  18. Development and psychometric characteristics of a new domain of the stanford faculty development program instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, Mayowa O

    2014-01-01

    Teacher's attitude domain, a pivotal aspect of clinical teaching, is missing in the Stanford Faculty Development Program Questionnaire (SFDPQ), the most widely used student-based assessment method of clinical teaching skills. This study was conducted to develop and validate the teacher's attitude domain and evaluate the validity and internal consistency reliability of the augmented SFDPQ. Items generated for the new domain included teacher's enthusiasm, sobriety, humility, thoroughness, empathy, and accessibility. The study involved 20 resident doctors assessed once by 64 medical students using the augmented SFDPQ. Construct validity was explored using correlation among the different domains and a global rating scale. Factor analysis was performed. The response rate was 94%. The new domain had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.89, with 1-factor solution explaining 57.1% of its variance. It showed the strongest correlation to the global rating scale (rho = 0.71). The augmented SFDPQ, which had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.93, correlated better (rho = 0.72, p < 0.00001) to the global rating scale than the original SFDPQ (rho = 0.67, p < 0.00001). The new teacher's attitude domain exhibited good internal consistency and construct and factorial validity. It enhanced the content and construct validity of the SFDPQ. The validated construct of the augmented SFDPQ is recommended for design and evaluation of basic and continuing clinical teaching programs. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  19. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal RE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rachel E Rizal,1,* Rishi P Mediratta,1,* James Xie,1 Swetha Kambhampati,1 Kelsey Hills-Evans,1 Tamara Montacute,1 Michael Zhang,1 Catherine Zaw,2 Jimmy He,2 Magali Sanchez,2 Lauren Pischel1 1Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 2Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful service-learning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program’s outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians. Keywords: immunizations, vaccine delivery, vaccinations 

  20. Exploring Ethical and Methodological Issues in Internet-Based Research with Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather T. Battles PhD candidate

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Internet-based research is a relatively new and growing field that presents a number of ethical challenges regarding privacy, confidentiality, and informed consent. In light of a study examining discussions regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine on a publicly viewable Internet message board among primarily American, Australian, and Canadian female adolescents and young adults, the author discusses the methodological and ethical concerns surrounding Internet-based qualitative research with youth. The author first provides some contextual background about the study and issues surrounding the HPV vaccine. She describes her methods of data collection and analysis and provides a summary of the results. The author then explores a number of ethical issues that arise in Internet-based research and examines her own ethical decision-making as informed by existing discussions and guidelines in this area.

  1. Research with School Students: Four Innovative Methods Used to Explore Effective Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Faye Heal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines four research methods we’ve employed to enhance how students from low-income backgrounds engage in research exploring effective teaching. It firstly outlines the need to be innovative, drawing Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, and then moves on to explain two methods that scaffold a semi-structured interview, one child-led classroom tour and finally a creative ‘draw and tell’ approach. It argues that these methods are successful because they disrupt the researcher-participant power imbalance using the following techniques: Familiarity to the student, empowering the student to be an expert, and giving the student choice.

  2. A research view of supply chain management: Developments and topics for exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JR Stock

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There have been advances in the understanding of supply chain management (SCM since its inception in the early-1980s. However, there are still some basic issues of SCM that remain unresolved. Much of the research that has been conducted takes one or more of the following three perspectives: (1 development of methods and techniques to study SCM and its components/processes; (2 developing solutions or answers to specific supply chain-related problems or challenges; and/or (3 measuring the results or outcomes of supply chain strategies and tactics. Each of these three perspectives is briefly examined, with selected examples from the literature cited to illustrate the type of research that has been conducted. Some potential areas of research exploration are presented. The areas examined include: theory development, and SCM processes and functions.

  3. Propulsion Controls and Diagnostics Research in Support of NASA Aeronautics and Exploration Mission Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    The Controls and Dynamics Branch (CDB) at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, is leading and participating in various projects in partnership with other organizations within GRC and across NASA, the U.S. aerospace industry, and academia to develop advanced propulsion controls and diagnostics technologies that will help meet the challenging goals of NASA programs under the Aeronautics Research and Exploration Systems Missions. This paper provides a brief overview of the various CDB tasks in support of the NASA programs. The programmatic structure of the CDB activities is described along with a brief overview of each of the CDB tasks including research objectives, technical challenges, and recent accomplishments. These tasks include active control of propulsion system components, intelligent propulsion diagnostics and control for reliable fault identification and accommodation, distributed engine control, and investigations into unsteady propulsion systems.

  4. Children with chronic lung diseases have cognitive dysfunction as assessed by event-related potential (auditory P300) and Stanford-Binet IQ (SB-IV) test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Terez Boshra; Abd Elmonaem, Mahmoud Tarek; Khalil, Lobna Hamed; Goda, Mona Hamdy; Sanyelbhaa, Hossam; Ramzy, Mourad Alfy

    2016-10-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) in children represents a heterogeneous group of many clinico-pathological entities with risk of adverse impact of chronic or intermittent hypoxia. So far, few researchers have investigated the cognitive function in these children, and the role of auditory P300 in the assessment of their cognitive function has not been investigated yet. This study was designed to assess the cognitive functions among schoolchildren with different chronic pulmonary diseases using both auditory P300 and Stanford-Binet test. This cross-sectional study included 40 school-aged children who were suffering from chronic chest troubles other than asthma and 30 healthy children of similar age, gender and socioeconomic state as a control group. All subjects were evaluated through clinical examination, radiological evaluation and spirometry. Audiological evaluation included (basic otological examination, pure-tone, speech audiometry and immittancemetry). Cognitive function was assessed by auditory P300 and psychological evaluation using Stanford-Binet test (4th edition). Children with chronic lung diseases had significantly lower anthropometric measures compared to healthy controls. They had statistically significant lower IQ scores and delayed P300 latencies denoting lower cognitive abilities. Cognitive dysfunction correlated to severity of disease. P300 latencies were prolonged among hypoxic patients. Cognitive deficits in children with different chronic lung diseases were best detected using both Stanford-Binet test and auditory P300. P300 is an easy objective tool. P300 is affected early with hypoxia and could alarm subtle cognitive dysfunction.

  5. Reminiscing about thesis work with E T Jaynes at Stanford in the 1950s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Frederick W.

    2013-11-01

    work: 'chip here, carve there, cut off here, eliminate this, etc'. When the beautiful Pieta was finished, the young man was heard to say, 'I didn't realize before this that I was so talented'. Experiments by Clauser in 1972 on Bell's inequalities (e.g. [2]) showed them to be correct, and indicated that semi-classical alternatives to quantum electrodynamics were not viable. Working with Stuart Freedman, these were the first experimental tests of the predictions of Bell's theorem, the first observation of quantum entanglement, as well as the first experimental observation of a violation of a Bell inequality. The perturbation formulation of quantum radiation theory has long been rife with vexing infinities. Ed always insisted that only experiment can end an argument, so he and his students had been sensibly exploring semi-classical theory. This was not only because of the serious failings of standard QED, but more importantly because of the fact that (an improved) semi-classical theory was able to predict both spontaneous emission, with the correct Einstein coefficients, and the Lamb shift. These two effects have long been thought only possible in the quantum radiation domain (cf [3]). Ed readily accepted losing his bet with Franken about what experiment had to say about the Lamb shift. What is clear is that this bet of 50 with Peter Franken stimulated so much subsequent research that this bet played an important role in generally furthering the field of quantum optics. How did 'J-C' come to be published as it did in the IEEE [4]? Ed was not well known for the extravagant use of words, rather for paucity, clarity and economy. After about two years of working with Ed, he said to me one day, 'You have enough, write it up'. He also said 'We should publish'. (This was around early 1960). About this same time, I was contacted by someone from a new research lab just starting in Newport Beach, California (called 'Aeroneutronic', a division of Ford), asking if I would come to

  6. 75 FR 30380 - NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research; Fiscal Year 2011 Ocean Exploration of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... be found in the full funding opportunity announcement. Evaluation Criteria for Projects i. Pre..., through interdisciplinary exploration, and to advance and disseminate knowledge of the ocean environment... bold, innovative and interdisciplinary in their approach. NOAA OER anticipates a total of approximately...

  7. The Mela Study: exploring barriers to diabetes research in black and minority ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Gillian A; Chowdhury, Tahseen A; Griffiths, Christopher J; Hood, Rosie K E; Mathews, Christopher; Hitman, Graham A

    2015-01-01

    Black and minority ethnic (BME) groups are particularly susceptible to diabetes and its vascular complications in the United Kingdom and most western societies. To understand potential predisposition and tailor treatments accordingly, there is a real need to engage these groups in diabetes research. Despite this, BME participation in research studies continues to remain low in most countries and this may be a contributory factor to reduced health outcomes and poorer quality of life in these groups. This study explores the barriers BME groups may have towards participation in diabetes research in one area of East London, and includes local recommendations on how to improve this for the future. A questionnaire designed from previously reported exploratory work and piloted in several BME localities was distributed at the East London Bangladeshi Mela and similar cultural and religious events in London, UK. People were asked opportunistically to complete the survey themselves if they understood English, or discuss their responses with an advocate. The purpose of the questionnaire was to understand current local awareness with regards to diabetes, identify specific BME barriers and attitudes towards diabetes research by ethnicity, gender and age, and gain insight into how these barriers may be addressed. Of 1682 people surveyed (16-90 years; median age 40 years), 36.4% were South Asian, 25.9% White, and 11.1% Black and other ethnicities; 26.6% withheld their ethnicity. Over half cited language problems generally (54%) and lack of research awareness (56%) as main barriers to engaging in research. South Asian groups were more likely to cite research as too time consuming (42%) whereas Black groups were more concerned with potential drug side effects in research (39%). Participants expressed a general mistrust of research, and the need for researchers to be honest in their approach. Recommendations for increased participation in South Asian groups centred round both helping

  8. An exploration of social justice intent in photovoice research studies from 2008 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, Marie-Anne; Evans-Agnew, Robin A; Boutain, Doris M

    2014-09-01

    In an age where digital images are omnipresent, the use of participant photography in qualitative research has become accessible and commonplace. Yet, scant attention is paid to the social justice impact of photovoice amongst studies that have used this innovative method as a way to promote social justice. There is a need to review this method to understand its contributions and possibilities. This literature review of photovoice research studies (i) explores whether authors implicitly or explicitly related the methodologies to their aims of promoting social justice (methodology-method fit) and (ii) outlines the social justice research impact of photovoice findings using the framework of social justice awareness, amelioration and transformation. PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO and Web of Science databases were searched from the years 2008-13 using the following keywords: photovoice; photonovella; photovoice and social justice; and photovoice and participatory action research. Of the 30 research studies reviewed, only thirteen identified an underlying methodology guiding the photovoice method. The social justice impacts emphasized were more related to social justice awareness (n = 30) than amelioration (n = 11) or transformation (n = 3). Future researchers using photovoice as a way to promote social justice are encouraged to assess and plan for the social justice impact desired. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. An Exploration of Social Justice Intent in Photovoice Research Studies: From 2008 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, Marie-Anne; Evans-Agnew, Robin A.; Boutain, Doris M.

    2014-01-01

    In an age where digital images are omnipresent, the use of participant photography in qualitative research has become accessible and commonplace. Yet, scant attention is paid to the social justice impact of photovoice among studies that have used this innovative method as a way to promote social justice. There is a need to review this method to understand its contributions and possibilities. This literature review of photovoice research studies 1) explores whether authors implicitly or explicitly related the methodologies to their aims of promoting social justice (methodology-method fit), and 2) outlines the social justice research impact of photovoice findings using the framework of social justice awareness, amelioration, and transformation. PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, and Web of Science databases were searched from the years 2008–2013 using the keywords: photovoice; photonovella; photovoice and social justice; and photovoice and participatory action research. Of the 30 research studies reviewed, only thirteen identified an underlying methodology guiding the photovoice method. The social justice impacts emphasized were more related to social justice awareness (n= 30) than amelioration (n= 11) or transformation (n=3). Future researchers using photovoice as a way to promote social justice are encouraged to assess and plan for the social justice impact desired. PMID:24602185

  10. NASAs Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute- Expanded Goals and More Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G. K.; Daou, D.; Pendleton, Y.; Bailey, B. E.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) has been pursuing international partnerships since its inception as the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI), in order to both leverage the science being done by its domestic member institutions as well as to help lunar science and exploration become a greater global endeavor. The international partners of the Institute have pursued a broad program of lunar science stimulated by scientific partnerships enabled by the SSERVI community. Furthermore, regional partnerships have been formed such as the new pan-European lunar science consortium, which promises both new scientific approaches and mission concepts. International partner membership requires long-term commitment from both the partner and SSERVI, together with tangible and specific plans for scientific interaction that will produce results of mutual benefit to both the institute's U.S. Teams and the international partner. International partners are invited to participate in all aspects of the Institute's activities and programs, on a basis of no exchange of funds. Through these activities, SSERVI researchers and international partners participate in sharing ideas, information, and data arising from their respective research efforts, and contribute to the training of young scientists. This talk will present an overview of the Institute and the international nodes. We will also discuss the various processes to become a SSERVI partner as well as the opportunities available for collaborations with the SSERVI national teams.

  11. Exploring the Potential for a Consolidated Standard for Reporting Guidelines for Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Hannes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consolidating a standard for reporting qualitative research remains a challenging endeavor, given the variety of different paradigms that steer qualitative research as well as the broad range of designs, and techniques for data collection and analysis that one could opt for when conducting qualitative research. Method: A total of 18 experts in qualitative research participated in an argument Delphi approach to explore the arguments that would plead for or against the development and use of reporting guidelines (RGs for qualitative research and to generate opinions on what may need to be considered in the further development or further refinement of RGs for qualitative research. Findings: The potential to increase quality and accountability of qualitative research was identified as one of the core benefits of RGs for different target groups, including students. Experts in our pilot study seem to resist a fixed, extensive list of criteria. They emphasize the importance of flexibility in developing and applying such criteria. Clear-cut RGs may restrict the publication of reports on unusual, innovative, or emerging research approaches. Conclusions: RGs should not be used as a substitute for proper training in qualitative research methods and should not be applied rigidly. Experts feel more comfortable with RGs that allow for an adaptation of criteria, to create a better fit for purpose. The variety in viewpoints between experts for the majority of the topics will most likely complicate future consolidation processes. Design specific RGs should be considered to allow developers to stay true to their own epistemological principles and those of their potential users.

  12. Exploring Best Practices for Research Data Management in Earth Science through Collaborating with University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Branch, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Earth Science research data, its data management, informatics processing and its data curation are valuable in allowing earth scientists to make new discoveries. But how to actively manage these research assets to ensure them safe and secure, accessible and reusable for long term is a big challenge. Nowadays, the data deluge makes this challenge become even more difficult. To address the growing demand for managing earth science data, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) partners with the Library and Technology Services (LTS) of Lehigh University and Purdue University Libraries (PUL) on hosting postdoctoral fellows in data curation activity. This inter-disciplinary fellowship program funded by the SLOAN Foundation innovatively connects university libraries and earth science departments and provides earth science Ph.D.'s opportunities to use their research experiences in earth science and data curation trainings received during their fellowship to explore best practices for research data management in earth science. In the process of exploring best practices for data curation in earth science, the CLIR Data Curation Fellows have accumulated rich experiences and insights on the data management behaviors and needs of earth scientists. Specifically, Ting Wang, the postdoctoral fellow at Lehigh University has worked together with the LTS support team for the College of Arts and Sciences, Web Specialists and the High Performance Computing Team, to assess and meet the data management needs of researchers at the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES). By interviewing the faculty members and graduate students at EES, the fellow has identified a variety of data-related challenges at different research fields of earth science, such as climate, ecology, geochemistry, geomorphology, etc. The investigation findings of the fellow also support the LTS for developing campus infrastructure for long-term data management in the sciences. Likewise

  13. Assessment of Needs for Further Research to Understand the Role of Governments in Supporting Geothermal Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speer, Bethany; Young, Kate

    2017-05-01

    This paper looks at financing barriers to geothermal resource exploration in the United States (U.S.) for electricity generation projects and analyzes why the market is not developing as quickly as foreign geothermal markets or as quickly as other renewable energy technologies in the U.S. Research opportunities and approaches to understanding these discrepancies are discussed, particularly whether government policies and programs are spurring development activities. Further analysis to understand policies, programmatic cost efficiencies, potential project revenues, and other economic impacts are recommended together with the preliminary conclusions.

  14. Trends in sensorimotor research and countermeasures for exploration-class space flights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eShelhamer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Research in the area of sensorimotor and neurovestibular function has played an important role in enabling human space flight. This role, however, is changing. One of the key aspects of sensorimotor function relevant to this role will build on its widespread connections with other physiological and psychological systems in the body. The firm knowledge base in this area can provide a strong platform to explore these interactions, which can also provide for the development of effective and efficient countermeasures to the deleterious effects of space flight.

  15. Exploring the Concept of Learner Autonomy in Cross-Cultural Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nga Thanh Nguyen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This research explores how the concept of learner autonomy is understood and used in Vietnamese higher educational settings. Data were collected through interviews in Vietnamese with four university lecturers in Hanoi, Vietnam and then reported in an English language thesis. The problems confronted by the lecturers were in understanding the concept of learner autonomy, the complexities of translation equivalence for the concept from one language to another, and the impact of culture in interpreting the concept of learner autonomy. The paper concludes with recommendations for educators to be sensitive to cultural and linguistic considerations when transferring concepts from one culture to another.

  16. Exploring the use of Virtual Field Trips with elementary school teachers: A collaborative action research approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jeffrey Lance

    This research examines how elementary school teachers, when supported, use Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) to address the curricula in meaningful ways. I conducted a qualitative study with six teachers, in a collaborative action research context over a six month period. The teachers, five males and one female, all taught either grade five or six and utilized Virtual Field Trips within a variety of curricula areas including science, social studies, music and language arts. In addition, the thesis examines resulting integration of technology into the regular classroom program as a product of the utilization of Virtual Field Trips. The process of collaborative action research was applied as a means of personal and professional growth both for the participants and the researcher/facilitator. By the end of the research study, all participants had learned to integrate Virtual Field Trips into their classroom program, albeit with different levels of success and in different curricula areas. The development of attitudes, skills and knowledge for students and teachers alike was fostered through the participation in Virtual Field Trips. A common concern regarding the utilization of Virtual Field Trips was the time spent locating an appropriate site that met curricula expectations. Participation in the collaborative action research process allowed each teacher to grow professionally, personally and socially. Each participant strongly encouraged the utilization of a long term project with a common area of exploration as a means for positive professional development. Implications and recommendations for future research on the utilization of Virtual Field Trips, as well as the viability of collaborative action research to facilitate teacher development are presented.

  17. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaden, Ute

    2007-12-01

    Research has shown that teachers' skills and knowledge are key determinants of students' opportunities to learn (Haycock, 2003). As highlighted in the National Science Education Standards (National Research Council, 1996) professional development must include experiences that engage teachers in active learning that builds their knowledge, understanding, and ability. The 2004 to 2006 Teacher and Researcher Exploring and Collaborating Professional Development Program (TREC) program funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and implemented by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) targeted well documented shortcomings in professional development by offering two to six weeks field research experiences in the Arctic Region for K-12 teachers as a collaborative approach between scientists and science teachers. This study described the extent of effectiveness of TREC with regard to teachers' abilities to teach science in terms of knowledge, attitudes, and skills and identified program components that were most effective. A mixed methods research design was used requiring the collection and systematic analysis of (1) archival data collected by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS); and (2) participant survey. Data were analyzed and interpreted utilizing descriptive statistics, cross-tabulation and triangulation (Glaser & Strauss, 1967; Lincoln & Guba, 1985). The results of this study provides evidence that TREC was effective as a professional development program in refining science teachers' knowledge, skills, and confidence to teach science effectively, renewed their enthusiasm for teaching and promoted students' learning. Respondents reported that they introduced new topics in their science lessons, incorporated new hands-on activities, gave more emphasis to data collection, integrated more technology, assigned projects based on "real world" problems more frequently, and communicated the excitement of Polar research. The

  18. Research and innovation in the `exploring our world´ project (6-12. The example of `exploring current and historical societies´ in initial teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Estepa Giménez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors present how they research and innovate in Initial Teacher Education programmes throught the `Exploring our world´ project (6-12. Along the article aspects related to the why, what for and how to teach of the curricular project are analysed by means of the example of `Exploring current and historical societies´. Trainees´ productions on this Field of Research are presented, in which they deal with the three afore-mentioned elements throught the design of didactic units that form part, like a portfolio, of the group reseach file.

  19. Stanford-Binet and WAIS IQ Differences and Their Implications for Adults with Intellectual Disability (aka Mental Retardation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Wayne; Miezejeski, Charles; Ryan, Robert; Zigman, Warren; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon; Urv, Tiina

    2010-01-01

    Stanford-Binet and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) IQs were compared for a group of 74 adults with intellectual disability (ID). In every case, WAIS Full Scale IQ was higher than the Stanford-Binet Composite IQ, with a mean difference of 16.7 points. These differences did not appear to be due to the lower minimum possible score for the…

  20. ["Grounded theory" develops medicine. Popular research method for exploring human behavior can discover new connections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulesius, Hans; Barfod, Toke; Ekström, Helene; Håkansson, Anders

    2004-09-30

    Grounded theory (GT) is a popular research method for exploring human behavior. GT was developed by the medical sociologists Glaser and Strauss while they studied dying in hospitals in the 1960s resulting in the book "Awareness of dying". The goal of a GT is to generate conceptual theories by using all types of data but without applying existing theories and hypotheses. GT procedures are mostly inductive as opposed to deductive research where hypotheses are tested. A good GT has a core variable that is a central concept connected to many other concepts explaining the main action in the studied area. A core variable answers the question "What's going on?". Examples of core variables are: "Cutting back after a heart attack"--how people adapt to life after a serious illness; and "Balancing in palliative cancer care"--a process of weighing, shifting, compensating and compromising when treating people with a progressive and incurable illness trajectory.

  1. Exploring qualitative research synthesis: the role of patients' perspectives in health policy design and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Helle Ploug; Draborg, Eva; Kristensen, Finn Børlum

    2011-01-01

    Health systems are placing more and more emphasis on the design and delivery of services that are focused on the patient, and there is a growing interest in patient involvement in health policy research and health technology assessment (HTA). Furthermore, there is a growing research interest in eliciting patients' views, not only on 'what works' for patients but also on the need for intervention and on factors influencing the implementation of particular health technologies, their appropriateness and acceptability. This article focuses on qualitative research synthesis in eliciting patients' perspectives. Its aim is to bring research closer to policy development and decision making, to facilitate better use of research findings for health and welfare, to generate a body of evidence, and to ensure that effective and appropriate information is used in health policy decision design. A variety of synthesizing approaches in qualitative research are explored, such as meta-synthesis, meta-summary, meta-ethnography, and meta-study, focusing especially on methodology. Meta-synthesis and meta-ethnography are probably the most frequently cited approaches in qualitative research synthesis and have perhaps the most developed methodology. The implications of these various synthesizing approaches in relation to health policy and HTA are discussed, and we suggest that meta-synthesis and meta-summary are particularly useful approaches. They have an explicit focus on 'evidence synthesis', fairly clear methodologies, and they are designed to not only present interpretations of the findings but also integrate research findings. Qualitative research synthesis enables researchers to synthesize findings from multiple qualitative studies on patients' perspectives instead of establishing new, expensive, and perhaps redundant studies that might intrude on the lives of patients. Qualitative research synthesis is highly recommended by decision makers and in health policy research and HTA. In

  2. Coverage of the Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Social Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.; Whitehead, George I., III

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with the nature of the coverage in introductory social psychology textbooks of the Stanford prison experiment (SPE), given the many criticisms, especially recently, of the SPE. These criticisms concern both the study's methodology and the situationist explanation of the outcome. Ten textbooks were analyzed for coverage of…

  3. College Writing, Identification, and the Production of Intellectual Property: Voices from the Stanford Study of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Andrea A.; Fishman, Jenn; Liew, Warren M.

    2013-01-01

    When, why, and how do college students come to value their writing as intellectual property? How do their conceptions of intellectual property reflect broader understandings and personal engagements with concepts of authorship, collaboration, identification, and capital? We address these questions based on findings from the Stanford Study of…

  4. The Construct Validity of the Stanford-Binet 5 Measures of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomplun, Mark; Custer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the validity of the measures of verbal and nonverbal working memory on the Stanford-Binet Fifth Edition (SB5). The validity evidence included Rasch-based, criterion-referenced item mapping, correlations with other clinical measures of memory, and prediction of reading and mathematics scores. The item mapping clearly…

  5. An Interview with Elizabeth Hagen: Giftedness, Intelligence and the New Stanford-Binet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Linda Kreger

    1986-01-01

    The interview with Elizabeth Hagen, the co-creator of the Cognitive Abilities Test and a revisor of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test, deals with such issues in gifted education as general intelligence vs. specific abilities, validity of test scores at the preschool level, and misconceptions about retesting gifted students. (Author/CL)

  6. The Stanford Prison Experiment in Introductory Psychology Textbooks: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    The present content analysis examines the coverage of theoretical and methodological problems with the Stanford prison experiment (SPE) in a sample of introductory psychology textbooks. Categories included the interpretation and replication of the study, variance in guard behavior, participant selection bias, the presence of demand characteristics…

  7. Stanford-A acute aortic dissection, inflammation, and metalloproteinases: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifani, Noemi; Proietta, Maria; Tritapepe, Luigi; Di Gioia, Cira; Ferri, Livia; Taurino, Maurizio; Del Porto, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is a life-threatening disease with an incidence of about 2.6-3.6 cases per 100,000/year. Depending on the site of rupture, AAD is classified as Stanford-A when the ascending aortic thoracic tract and/or the arch are involved, and Stanford-B when the descending thoracic aorta and/or aortic abdominal tract are targeted. It was recently shown that inflammatory pathways underlie aortic rupture in both type A and type B Stanford AAD. An immune infiltrate has been found within the middle and outer tunics of dissected aortic specimens. It has also been observed that the recall and activation of macrophages inside the middle tunic are key events in the early phases of AAD. Macrophages are able to release metalloproteinases (MMPs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines which, in turn, give rise to matrix degradation and neoangiogenesis. An imbalance between the production of MMPs and MMP tissue inhibitors is pivotal in the extracellular matrix degradation underlying aortic wall remodelling in dissections occurring both in inherited conditions and in atherosclerosis. Among MMPs, MMP-12 is considered a specific marker of aortic wall disease, whatever the genetic predisposition may be. The aim of this review is, therefore, to take a close look at the immune-inflammatory mechanisms underlying Stanford-A AAD.

  8. Bringing Faith to Campus: Religious and Spiritual Space, Time, and Practice at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin-Neumann, Patricia; Sanders, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    This essay examines how Stanford University, secular in its origins, yet with a church at its center, addresses the religious and spiritual concerns of current students, whether from traditional or innovative religious backgrounds. Identified religious and spiritual needs prompt questions about the balance between the spiritual health and…

  9. The Stanford Medical Youth Science Program: Educational and Science-Related Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical preparatory programs (pipeline programs) have been developed at colleges and universities to better prepare youth for entering science- and health-related careers, but outcomes of such programs have seldom been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a matched cohort study to evaluate the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program's Summer…

  10. Adapting Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program to Hawaii's Multicultural Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Michiyo; Braun, Kathryn L.; Compton, Merlita; Tanoue, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been proven to increase patients' ability to manage distress. We describe how we replicated CDSMP in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) communities. Design and Methods: We used the "track changes" tool to deconstruct CDSMP into its various components…

  11. Team Composition Issues for Future Space Exploration: A Review and Directions for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne T; Brown, Shanique G; Abben, Daniel R; Outland, Neal B

    2015-06-01

    Future space exploration, such as a mission to Mars, will require space crews to live and work in extreme environments unlike those of previous space missions. Extreme conditions such as prolonged confinement, isolation, and expected communication time delays will require that crews have a higher level of interpersonal compatibility and be able to work autonomously, adapting to unforeseen challenges in order to ensure mission success. Team composition, or the configuration of member attributes, is an important consideration for maximizing crewmember well-being and team performance. We conducted an extensive search to find articles about team composition in long-distance space exploration (LDSE)-analogue environments, including a search of databases, specific relevant journals, and by contacting authors who publish in the area. We review the team composition research conducted in analogue environments in terms of two paths through which team composition is likely to be related to LDSE mission success, namely by 1) affecting social integration, and 2) the team processes and emergent states related to team task completion. Suggestions for future research are summarized as: 1) the need to identify ways to foster unit-level social integration within diverse crews; 2) the missed opportunity to use team composition variables as a way to improve team processes, emergent states, and task completion; and 3) the importance of disentangling the effect of specific team composition variables to determine the traits (e.g., personality, values) that are associated with particular risks (e.g., subgrouping) to performance.

  12. Exploring the Gap between Ecosystem Service Research and Management in Development Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Sitas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The gap between science and practice has been highlighted in a number of scientific disciplines, including the newly developing domain of ecosystem service science, posing a challenge for the sustainable management of ecosystem services for human wellbeing. While methods to explore science-practice gaps are developing, testing and revisions of these methods are still needed so as to identify opportunities for mainstreaming ecosystem service science into development policies and practice. We designed and tested an approach to explore the presence and nature of a research-management gap in order to identify ways to close the gap, using a South African case study. Our combining of traditional review processes with stakeholder interviews highlighted that ecosystem services are not explicitly referred to by the majority of ecosystem management-related documents, processes or individuals. Nevertheless, at the local level, our approach unearthed strategic opportunities for bridging the gap in the tourism, disaster management and conservation sectors. We also highlighted the current trend towards transdisciplinary learning networks seen in the region. While we found a gap between the research and management of ecosystem services, a rigorous study thereof, which transcends its mere identification, proved useful in identifying key opportunities and challenges for bridging the gap.

  13. An exploration for research-oriented teaching model in biology teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wanjin; Mo, Morigen; Su, Huimin

    2014-07-01

    Training innovative talents, as one of the major aims for Chinese universities, needs to reform the traditional teaching methods. The research-oriented teaching method has been introduced and its connotation and significance for Chinese university teaching have been discussed for years. However, few practical teaching methods for routine class teaching were proposed. In this paper, a comprehensive and concrete research-oriented teaching model with contents of reference value and evaluation method for class teaching was proposed based on the current teacher-guiding teaching model in China. We proposed that the research-oriented teaching model should include at least seven aspects on: (1) telling the scientific history for the skills to find out scientific questions; (2) replaying the experiments for the skills to solve scientific problems; (3) analyzing experimental data for learning how to draw a conclusion; (4) designing virtual experiments for learning how to construct a proposal; (5) teaching the lesson as the detectives solve the crime for learning the logic in scientific exploration; (6) guiding students how to read and consult the relative references; (7) teaching students differently according to their aptitude and learning ability. In addition, we also discussed how to evaluate the effects of the research-oriented teaching model in examination.

  14. Exploring the Ethics of Observational Research: The Case of an HIV Study in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Alison; Jackson, Ashley; Khoshnood, Kaveh

    2012-01-01

    Observational studies have generally been viewed as incurring minimal risk to participants, resulting in fewer ethical obligations for investigators than intervention studies. In 2004, the lead author (AN) carried out an observational study measuring sexual behavior and the prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), among Tanzanian agricultural plantation residents (results reported elsewhere). This article uses an ethical lens to consider the consequences of the observational study and explore what, if any, effects it had on participants and their community. Using a case study approach, we critically examine three core principles of research ethics-respect for persons/autonomy; beneficence/nonmaleficence; and distributive justice-as manifested in the 2004 observational study. We base our findings on three sources: discussions with plantation residents following presentations of observational research findings; in-depth interviews with key informants; and researcher observations. The observational research team was found to have ensured confidentiality and noncoercive recruitment. Ironically, maintenance of confidentiality and voluntary participation led some participants to doubt study results. Receiving HIV test results was important for participants and contributed to changing community norms about HIV testing. Observational studies may act like de facto intervention studies and thus incur obligations similar to those of intervention studies. We found that ensuring respect for persons may have compromised the principles of beneficence and distributive justice. While in theory these three ethical principles have equal moral force, in practice, researchers may have to prioritize one over the others. Careful community engagement is necessary to promote well-considered ethical decisions.

  15. Exploring the Ethics of Observational Research: The Case of an HIV Study in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Alison; Jackson, Ashley; Khoshnood, Kaveh

    2013-01-01

    Background Observational studies have generally been viewed as incurring minimal risk to participants, resulting in fewer ethical obligations for investigators than intervention studies. In 2004, the lead author (AN) carried out an observational study measuring sexual behavior and the prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), among Tanzanian agricultural plantation residents (results reported elsewhere). This article uses an ethical lens to consider the consequences of the observational study and explore what, if any, effects it had on participants and their community. Methods Using a case study approach, we critically examine three core principles of research ethics—respect for persons/autonomy; beneficence/nonmaleficence; and distributive justice—as manifested in the 2004 observational study. We base our findings on three sources: discussions with plantation residents following presentations of observational research findings; in-depth interviews with key informants; and researcher observations. Results The observational research team was found to have ensured confidentiality and noncoercive recruitment. Ironically, maintenance of confidentiality and voluntary participation led some participants to doubt study results. Receiving HIV test results was important for participants and contributed to changing community norms about HIV testing. Conclusions Observational studies may act like de facto intervention studies and thus incur obligations similar to those of intervention studies. We found that ensuring respect for persons may have compromised the principles of beneficence and distributive justice. While in theory these three ethical principles have equal moral force, in practice, researchers may have to prioritize one over the others. Careful community engagement is necessary to promote well-considered ethical decisions. PMID:24069546

  16. Exploring the Use of Computer Simulations in Unraveling Research and Development Governance Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Mariusz A.; Hester, Patrick T.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding Research and Development (R&D) enterprise relationships and processes at a governance level is not a simple task, but valuable decision-making insight and evaluation capabilities can be gained from their exploration through computer simulations. This paper discusses current Modeling and Simulation (M&S) methods, addressing their applicability to R&D enterprise governance. Specifically, the authors analyze advantages and disadvantages of the four methodologies used most often by M&S practitioners: System Dynamics (SO), Discrete Event Simulation (DES), Agent Based Modeling (ABM), and formal Analytic Methods (AM) for modeling systems at the governance level. Moreover, the paper describes nesting models using a multi-method approach. Guidance is provided to those seeking to employ modeling techniques in an R&D enterprise for the purposes of understanding enterprise governance. Further, an example is modeled and explored for potential insight. The paper concludes with recommendations regarding opportunities for concentration of future work in modeling and simulating R&D governance relationships and processes.

  17. Towards human exploration of space: The THESEUS review series on immunology research priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Crucian, Brian E; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Grimm, Daniela; Montano, Nicola; Praun, Siegfried; Roozendaal, Benno; Schelling, Gustav; Thiel, Manfred; Ullrich, Oliver; Choukèr, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system occurs during spaceflight and may represent a crew health risk during exploration missions because astronauts are challenged by many stressors. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the biology of immune modulation under spaceflight conditions in order to be able to maintain immune homeostasis under such challenges. In the framework of the THESEUS project whose aim was to develop an integrated life sciences research roadmap regarding human space exploration, experts working in the field of space immunology, and related disciplines, established a questionnaire sent to scientists around the world. From the review of collected answers, they deduced a list of key issues and provided several recommendations such as a maximal exploitation of currently available resources on Earth and in space, and to increase increments duration for some ISS crew members to 12 months or longer. These recommendations should contribute to improve our knowledge about spaceflight effects on the immune system and the development of countermeasures that, beyond astronauts, could have a societal impact. PMID:28725745

  18. DataExplore: An Application for General Data Analysis in Research and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Farrell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available DataExplore is an open source desktop application for data analysis and plotting intended for use in both research and education. It is intended primarily for non-programmers who need to do relatively advanced table manipulation methods. Common tasks that might not be familiar to spreadsheet users such as table pivot, merge and join functionality are included as core elements. Creation of new columns using arithmetic expressions and pre-defined functions is possible. Table filtering may be done with simple boolean queries. The other primary feature is rapid dynamic plot creation from selected data. Multiple plots from various selections and data sources can also be composed using a grid layout. It is thus possible to create publication quality plots. A plugin system allows the addition of features with several plugins already available by default. The program is written in Python and is based on the PyData suite of Python libraries.

  19. Gold deposits in metamorphic belts: Overview of current understanding, outstanding problems, future research, and exploration significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, D.I.; Goldfarb, R.J.; Robert, F.; Hart, C.J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Metamorphic belts are complex regions where accretion or collision has added to, or thickened, continental crust. Gold-rich deposits can be formed at all stages of orogen evolution, so that evolving metamorphic belts contain diverse gold deposit types that may be juxtaposed or overprint each other. This partly explains the high level of controversy on the origin of some deposit types, particularly those formed or overprinted/remobilized during the major compressional orogeny that shaped the final geometry of the hosting metamorphic belts. These include gold-dominated orogenic and intrusion-related deposits, but also particularly controversial gold deposits with atypical metal associations. There are a number of outstanding problems for all types of gold deposits in metamorphc belts. These include the following: (1) definitive classifications, (2) unequivocal recognition of fluid and metal sources, (3) understanding of fluid migration and focusing at all scales, (4) resolution of the precise role of granitoid magmatism, (5) precise gold-depositional mechanisms, particularly those producing high gold grades, and (6) understanding of the release of CO2-rich fluids from subducting slabs and subcreted oceanic crust and granitoid magmas at different crustal levels. Research needs to be better coordinated and more integrated, such that detailed fluid-inclusion, trace-element, and isotopic studies of both gold deposits and potential source rocks, using cutting-edge technology, are embedded in a firm geological framework at terrane to deposit scales. Ultimately, four-dimensional models need to be developed, involving high-quality, three-dimensional geological data combined with integrated chemical and fluid-flow modeling, to understand the total history of the hydrothermal systems involved. Such research, particularly that which can predict superior targets visible in data sets available to exploration companies before discovery, has obvious spin-offs for global- to deposit

  20. Increasing specificity of correlate research: exploring correlates of children's lunchtime and after-school physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Rebecca M; Ridley, Kate; Olds, Timothy S; Dollman, James

    2014-01-01

    The lunchtime and after-school contexts are critical windows in a school day for children to be physically active. While numerous studies have investigated correlates of children's habitual physical activity, few have explored correlates of physical activity occurring at lunchtime and after-school from a social-ecological perspective. Exploring correlates that influence physical activity occurring in specific contexts can potentially improve the prediction and understanding of physical activity. Using a context-specific approach, this study investigated correlates of children's lunchtime and after-school physical activity. Cross-sectional data were collected from 423 South Australian children aged 10.0-13.9 years (200 boys; 223 girls) attending 10 different schools. Lunchtime and after-school physical activity was assessed using accelerometers. Correlates were assessed using purposely developed context-specific questionnaires. Correlated Component Regression analysis was conducted to derive correlates of context-specific physical activity and determine the variance explained by prediction equations. The model of boys' lunchtime physical activity contained 6 correlates and explained 25% of the variance. For girls, the model explained 17% variance from 9 correlates. Enjoyment of walking during lunchtime was the strongest correlate for both boys and girls. Boys' and girls' after-school physical activity models explained 20% variance from 14 correlates and 7% variance from the single item correlate, "I do an organised sport or activity after-school because it gets you fit", respectively. Increasing specificity of correlate research has enabled the identification of unique features of, and a more in-depth interpretation of, lunchtime and after-school physical activity behaviour and is a potential strategy for advancing the physical activity correlate research field. The findings of this study could be used to inform and tailor gender-specific public health messages and

  1. A tool for exploring space-time patterns : an animation user research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogao Patrick J

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ever since Dr. John Snow (1813–1854 used a case map to identify water well as the source of a cholera outbreak in London in the 1800s, the use of spatio-temporal maps have become vital tools in a wide range of disease mapping and control initiatives. The increasing use of spatio-temporal maps in these life-threatening sectors warrants that they are accurate, and easy to interpret to enable prompt decision making by health experts. Similar spatio-temporal maps are observed in urban growth and census mapping – all critical aspects a of a country's socio-economic development. In this paper, a user test research was carried out to determine the effectiveness of spatio-temporal maps (animation in exploring geospatial structures encompassing disease, urban and census mapping. Results Three types of animation were used, namely; passive, interactive and inference-based animation, with the key differences between them being on the level of interactivity and complementary domain knowledge that each offers to the user. Passive animation maintains the view only status. The user has no control over its contents and dynamic variables. Interactive animation provides users with the basic media player controls, navigation and orientation tools. Inference-based animation incorporates these interactive capabilities together with a complementary automated intelligent view that alerts users to interesting patterns, trends or anomalies that may be inherent in the data sets. The test focussed on the role of animation passive and interactive capabilities in exploring space-time patterns by engaging test-subjects in thinking aloud evaluation protocol. The test subjects were selected from a geoinformatics (map reading, interpretation and analysis abilities background. Every test-subject used each of the three types of animation and their performances for each session assessed. The results show that interactivity in animation is a preferred

  2. Non-Dive Activities for Expedition to the Deep Slope 2006 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Non-dive activities reported to the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research for the "Expedition to the Deep Slope 2006" expedition, May 7 through June 2, 2006....

  3. Exploration: Past and Future Contributions of the Vertical Lift Community and the Flight Vehicle Research and Technology Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry A.; Aiken, Edwin W.

    2005-01-01

    Fulfillment of the exploration vision will require new cross-mission directorate and multi-technical discipline synergies in order to achieve the necessary long-term sustainability. In part, lessons from the Apollo-era, as well as more recent research efforts, suggest that the aeronautics and specifically the vertical lift research community can and will make significant contributions to the exploration effort. A number of notional concepts and associated technologies for such contributions are outlined.

  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  5. Coordination of International Risk-Reduction Investigations by the Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.; Bogomolov, Valery V.

    2015-01-01

    Effective use of the unique capabilities of the International Space Station (ISS) for risk reduction on future deep space missions involves preliminary work in analog environments to identify and evaluate the most promising techniques, interventions and treatments. This entails a consolidated multinational approach to biomedical research both on ISS and in ground analogs. The Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration (MHRPE) was chartered by the five ISS partners to recommend the best combination of partner investigations on ISS for risk reduction in the relatively short time available for ISS utilization. MHRPE will also make recommendations to funding agencies for appropriate preparatory analog work. In 2011, NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) and the Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) of the Russian Academy of Science, acting for MHRPE, developed a joint US-Russian biomedical program for the 2015 one-year ISS mission (1YM) of American and Russian crewmembers. This was to evaluate the possibilities for multilateral research on ISS. An overlapping list of 16 HRP, 9 IBMP, 3 Japanese, 3 European and 1 Canadian investigations were selected to address risk-reduction goals in 7 categories: Functional Performance, Behavioral Health, Visual Impairment, Metabolism, Physical Capacity, Microbial and Human Factors. MHRPE intends to build on this bilateral foundation to recommend more fully-integrated multilateral investigations on future ISS missions commencing after the 1YM. MHRPE has also endorsed an on-going program of coordinated research on 6-month, one-year and 6-week missions ISS expeditions that is now under consideration by ISS managers. Preparatory work for these missions will require coordinated and collaborative campaigns especially in the psychological and psychosocial areas using analog isolation facilities in Houston, Köln and Moscow, and possibly elsewhere. The multilateral Human Analogs research working group (HANA) is the focal point of those

  6. Is it design or is it inquiry? Exploring technology research in a Filipino school setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazon, Jessamyn Marie Olivares

    My case study explored Filipino secondary students' and teachers' experiences with technology research, project-based pedagogy. The study was conducted to examine the nature of a Technology Research (TR) Curriculum, and how it mediates non-Western students' learning, and interest in technology-based careers. The context for my study is Philippine Science High School's (PSHS) TR program wherein students outline a proposal, design an experiment or a device, and implement their design to address a real world problem. My data sources included semi-structured interviews of 27 students and 2 teachers; participant observations of classroom and group activities, teacher-student consultations, and Science-Technology Fair presentations; TR curriculum documents; and researcher journal logs. My examination of curriculum documents revealed that since the 1960s, the Philippine government has implemented specialized educational programs, such as the PSHS Science/Technology Streaming and TR programs, to support Filipino youth interested in science and technology courses and careers. Data analyses showed that the TR program provided a rich, practical learning environment where 'doing technology design' blended with 'doing science inquiry'. The TR activities enhanced student understanding of science and technology; helped them integrate and apply knowledge and skills learned from other school subjects; encouraged them to be creative, problem-solvers; and helped develop their lifelong learning skills. Students recognized that TR teachers adopted alternative instructional strategies that prompted students to adopt more active roles in their learning. Research findings revealed that student interest in pursuing technology-related careers was supported by their participation in the streaming and the TR programs. Data also showed that Filipino cultural practices mediated student learning, and career decision-making. My research findings suggest that present notions of scientific inquiry

  7. Towards human exploration of space: The THESEUS review series on nutrition and metabolism research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Stein, T Peter; Habold, Caroline; Coxam, Veronique; O' Gorman, Donal; Blanc, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition has multiple roles during space flight from providing sufficient nutrients to meet the metabolic needs of the body and to maintain good health, to the beneficial psychosocial aspects related to the meals. Nutrition is central to the functioning of the body; poor nutrition compromises all the physiological systems. Nutrition is therefore likely to have a key role in counteracting the negative effects of space flight (e.g., radiation, immune deficits, oxidative stress, and bone and muscle loss). As missions increase in duration, any dietary/nutritional deficiencies will become progressively more detrimental. Moreover, it has been recognized that the human diet contains, in addition to essential macronutrients, a complex array of naturally occurring bioactive micronutrients that may confer significant long-term health benefits. It is therefore critical that astronauts be adequately nourished during missions. Problems of nutritional origin are often treatable by simply providing the appropriate nutrients and adequate recommendations. This review highlights six key issues that have been identified as space research priorities in nutrition field: in-flight energy balance; altered feeding behavior; development of metabolic stress; micronutrient deficiency; alteration of gut microflora; and altered fluid and electrolytes balance. For each of these topics, relevance for space exploration, knowledge gaps and proposed investigations are described. Finally, the nutritional questions related to bioastronautics research are very relevant to multiple ground-based-related health issues. The potential spin-offs are both interesting scientifically and potentially of great clinical importance.

  8. Automating CapCom: Pragmatic Operations and Technology Research for Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancey, William J.

    2003-01-01

    During the Apollo program, NASA and the scientific community used terrestrial analog sites for understanding planetary features and for training astronauts to be scientists. More recently, computer scientists and human factors specialists have followed geologists and biologists into the field, learning how science is actually done on expeditions in extreme environments. Research stations have been constructed by the Mars Society in the Arctic and American southwest, providing facilities for hundreds of researchers to investigate how small crews might live and work on Mars. Combining these interests-science, operations, and technology-in Mars analog field expeditions provides tremendous synergy and authenticity to speculations about Mars missions. By relating historical analyses of Apollo and field science, engineers are creating experimental prototypes that provide significant new capabilities, such as a computer system that automates some of the functions of Apollo s CapCom. Thus, analog studies have created a community of practice-a new collaboration between scientists and engineers-so that technology begins with real human needs and works incrementally towards the challenges of the human exploration of Mars.

  9. Exploring �nostalgia� and �imagination� for ubuntu-research: A postfoundational perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian M�ller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is an effort to put some of the paradoxical and confusing concepts of ubuntu on the table. Both the terms �nostalgia� and �imagination� provide us with language that can help us to talk about this complex of ideas and perspectives. On the one hand, the clouds of nostalgia surrounding ubuntu will be acknowledged and used. On the other hand, the difficulties and challenges brought about by nostalgic language have to be explored with imagination. Options for the conducting of empirical research in order to create a thicker understanding, including nostalgic language, will then be discussed. I will firstly reflect on the role of nostalgia as the atmosphere within which concepts of ubuntu find breathing space. Then the two types of nostalgia, namely restorative and reflective nostalgia will be discussed. The choice for reflective nostalgia will be argued and explained and this will hopefully provide an imaginative basis for the development of the research project on such an evasive concept as ubuntu. In conclusion some methodological guidelines, based on the postfoundational approach, will be drawn.

  10. Transcriptional Regulation and Transport of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid in Catharanthus roseus: Exploration of New Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaqi; Cai, Junjun; Wang, Rui; Yang, Shihai

    2016-12-28

    As one of the model medicinal plants for exploration of biochemical pathways and molecular biological questions on complex metabolic pathways, Catharanthus roseus synthesizes more than 100 terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) used for clinical treatment of various diseases and for new drug discovery. Given that extensive studies have revealed the major metabolic pathways and the spatial-temporal biosynthesis of TIA in C. roseus plant, little is known about subcellular and inter-cellular trafficking or long-distance transport of TIA end products or intermediates, as well as their regulation. While these transport processes are indispensable for multi-organelle, -tissue and -cell biosynthesis, storage and their functions, great efforts have been made to explore these dynamic cellular processes. Progress has been made in past decades on transcriptional regulation of TIA biosynthesis by transcription factors as either activators or repressors; recent studies also revealed several transporters involved in subcellular and inter-cellular TIA trafficking. However, many details and the regulatory network for controlling the tissue-or cell-specific biosynthesis, transport and storage of serpentine and ajmalicine in root, catharanthine in leaf and root, vindoline specifically in leaf and vinblastine and vincristine only in green leaf and their biosynthetic intermediates remain to be determined. This review is to summarize the progress made in biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation and transport of TIAs. Based on analysis of organelle, tissue and cell-type specific biosynthesis and progresses in transport and trafficking of similar natural products, the transporters that might be involved in transport of TIAs and their synthetic intermediates are discussed; according to transcriptome analysis and bioinformatic approaches, the transcription factors that might be involved in TIA biosynthesis are analyzed. Further discussion is made on a broad context of transcriptional and

  11. Transcriptional Regulation and Transport of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid in Catharanthus roseus: Exploration of New Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqi Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As one of the model medicinal plants for exploration of biochemical pathways and molecular biological questions on complex metabolic pathways, Catharanthus roseus synthesizes more than 100 terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs used for clinical treatment of various diseases and for new drug discovery. Given that extensive studies have revealed the major metabolic pathways and the spatial-temporal biosynthesis of TIA in C. roseus plant, little is known about subcellular and inter-cellular trafficking or long-distance transport of TIA end products or intermediates, as well as their regulation. While these transport processes are indispensable for multi-organelle, -tissue and -cell biosynthesis, storage and their functions, great efforts have been made to explore these dynamic cellular processes. Progress has been made in past decades on transcriptional regulation of TIA biosynthesis by transcription factors as either activators or repressors; recent studies also revealed several transporters involved in subcellular and inter-cellular TIA trafficking. However, many details and the regulatory network for controlling the tissue-or cell-specific biosynthesis, transport and storage of serpentine and ajmalicine in root, catharanthine in leaf and root, vindoline specifically in leaf and vinblastine and vincristine only in green leaf and their biosynthetic intermediates remain to be determined. This review is to summarize the progress made in biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation and transport of TIAs. Based on analysis of organelle, tissue and cell-type specific biosynthesis and progresses in transport and trafficking of similar natural products, the transporters that might be involved in transport of TIAs and their synthetic intermediates are discussed; according to transcriptome analysis and bioinformatic approaches, the transcription factors that might be involved in TIA biosynthesis are analyzed. Further discussion is made on a broad context of

  12. A geoethical approach to the geological and astrobiological exploration and research of the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Frias, Jesus; Horneck, Gerda; de La Torre Noetzel, Rosa; Rull, Fernando

    Lunar and Mars exploration and research require not only scientific and technological inter-disciplinary cooperation, but also the consideration of budding ethical and scientific integrity issues. COSPAR's planetary protection policy (in coordination with the United Nations Com-mittee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space as well as various other bilateral and multilateral organizations) serves as the consensus standard for biological contamination prevention under the 1967 Outer Space Treaty1 . Space agencies Planetary Protection Policies are mostly consis-tent with the COSPAR policy. Geoethics was formerly promoted in 1991 as a new discipline, involving scientific and societal aspects2 , and its institutionalization was officially established in 2004 with the backing of the Association of Geoscientists for International Development, AGID3 (IUGS/ICSU). Recently, it has been proposed that the integration of geoethical issues in studies on planetary geology and astrobiology would enrich their methodological and con-ceptual character4-6 . The incorporation through geoethics of new questions and approaches associated to the "abiotic world" would involve: 1) extrapolating to space the recently defined and approved IUCN/UNESCO guidelines and recommendations on geodiversity7 as "planetary geodiversity", and 2) widening the classical concept of Planetary Protection, giving an addi-tional "abiotic" dimension to the exploration and research of the Moon and Mars. Given the geological characteristics and planetary evolution of the Moon and Mars, it is obvious that they require tailored geoethical approaches. Some fundamental aspects include, among others: the interrelation with bioethics and organics vs. inorganic contamination in Planetary Protection, the appropriate regulations of some necessary natural disturbances (e.g. on the Moon) dur-ing robotic and manned planetary missions, wilderness/planetary parks8,9 , the correct use of mineralogical and geochemical analytical

  13. The rotation of the Sun: Observations at Stanford. [using the Doppler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, J. M.; Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric rotation rate using the Doppler effect made at the Stanford Solar Observatory since May 1976 are analyzed. Results show that these observations show no daily or long period variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is the same as that of the sunspot and the large-scale magnetic field structures.

  14. Læring skal være sjovt: Aalborg – Stanford t/r

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Konnerup, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    Gennem en 4-dages workshop om hvorledes Problem Based Learning (PBL) kan praktiseres og nytænkes i ikt-medierede sociale læringsmiljøer, blev der diskuteret, idégenereret, grinet og dramatiseret – alt sammen med det formål at få en fælles forståelse af PBL på tværs af universiteter (Stanford/Aalb...

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  16. An Introduction to Education Research Methods: Exploring the Learning Journey of Pre-Service Teachers in a Transnational Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sonia; Hepple, Erika; Tangen, Donna; Comelli, Marlana; Alwi, Amyzar; Shaari, Zaira Abu Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Internationally there is interest in developing the research skills of pre-service teachers as a means of ongoing professional renewal with a distinct need for systematic and longitudinal investigation of student learning. The current study takes a unique perspective by exploring the research learning journey of pre-service teachers participating…

  17. Exploring Pre-Service Teachers' Historical Thinking through the Cooperative Biography: A Design-Based Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Through Design-Based Research (Cobb, et al., 2003), this study explores the intended outcomes and processes of the Cooperative Biography project. This research provides an "iterative analysis" (Cobb, et al., 2003) of how pre-service teachers experienced history while engaged in a Cooperative Biography, in a teacher-education setting.…

  18. A miniature research vessel: A small-scale ocean-exploration demonstration of geophysical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, S. M.; Boston, B.; Sleeper, J. D.; Cameron, M. E.; Togia, H.; Anderson, A.; Sigurdardottir, T. D.; Tree, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Graduate student members of the University of Hawaii Geophysical Society have designed a small-scale model research vessel (R/V) that uses sonar to create 3D maps of a model seafloor in real-time. A pilot project was presented to the public at the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology's (SOEST) Biennial Open House weekend in 2013 and, with financial support from the Society of Exploration Geophysicists and National Science Foundation, was developed into a full exhibit for the same event in 2015. Nearly 8,000 people attended the two-day event, including children and teachers from Hawaii's schools, home school students, community groups, families, and science enthusiasts. Our exhibit demonstrates real-time sonar mapping of a cardboard volcano using a toy size research vessel on a programmable 2-dimensional model ship track suspended above a model seafloor. Ship waypoints were wirelessly sent from a Windows Surface tablet to a large-touchscreen PC that controlled the exhibit. Sound wave travel times were recorded using an ultrasonic emitter/receiver attached to an Arduino microcontroller platform and streamed through a USB connection to the control PC running MatLab, where a 3D model was updated as the ship collected data. Our exhibit demonstrates the practical use of complicated concepts, like wave physics, survey design, and data processing in a way that the youngest elementary students are able to understand. It provides an accessible avenue to learn about sonar mapping, and could easily be adapted to talk about bat and marine mammal echolocation by replacing the model ship and volcano. The exhibit received an overwhelmingly positive response from attendees and incited discussions that covered a broad range of earth science topics.

  19. Employing a Participatory Research Approach to Explore Physical Activity among Older African American Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Sebastião

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Older African American women are particularly vulnerable to unhealthy lifestyle behaviors such as physical inactivity and the resultant chronic diseases and conditions. This study explored older African American women’s perception of physical activity as well as facilitators of and barriers to being physically active in their local environment. Methods. Using a participatory research approach, a total of 7 women aged 65 years and over had their PA level assessed objectively through accelerometry. In addition, physical activity was discussed through the photo-elicitation procedure, which was supplemented by semistructured interviews. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to identify patterns and themes emerging from participants’ interview. Results. Participants exhibited low levels of physical activity and viewed “physical activity” to be a broadly defined, nonspecific construct. Interviews revealed that many participants lack important knowledge about physical activity. A variety of personal, social, and environmental facilitators and barriers were reported by the participants. Conclusion. Efforts should be made towards clarifying information on physical activity in this population in order to help them incorporate physical activity into their routines, overcome barriers, and make use of opportunities to be active.

  20. Total skin electron irradiation in mycosis fungoides: comparison between a modified Christie Hospital translational technique and the Stanford technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacak, Y; Arican, Z; Drumea, K; Rosenblatt, E; Tamir, A; Chetver, L; Stein, M; Bar Deroma, R; Kuten, A

    2002-11-01

    Seventy-one patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) were treated by Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) using either a modified Christie Hospital translational technique (44 pts) or a six dual-field Stanford technique (27 pts). There was no statistical difference in response rate, disease-free survival and overall survival between the two irradiation techniques. However, the Stanford technique was significantly less toxic than the modified Christie Hospital technique.

  1. Exploring Injury Panorama, Consequences, and Recovery among Bus Crash Survivors: A Mixed-Methods Research Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doohan, Isabelle; Björnstig, Ulf; Östlund, Ulrika; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2017-04-01

    increased risk for PTSD). Injury mitigation measures (eg, safer roadside material and anti-lacerative windows) would reduce the consequences of bus crashes. A well-educated rescue team and a compassionate and competent social environment will facilitate recovery. Doohan I , Björnstig U , Östlund U , Saveman BI . Exploring injury panorama, consequences, and recovery among bus crash survivors: a mixed-methods research study. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(2):165-174.

  2. Designing research funding schemes to promote global health equity: An exploration of current practice in health systems research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Bridget; Hyder, Adnan A

    2016-11-23

    International research is an essential means of reducing health disparities between and within countries and should do so as a matter of global justice. Research funders from high-income countries have an obligation of justice to support health research in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) that furthers such objectives. This paper investigates how their current funding schemes are designed to incentivise health systems research in LMICs that promotes health equity. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were performed with 16 grants officers working for 11 funders and organisations that support health systems research: the Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research, Comic Relief, Doris Duke Foundation, European Commission, International Development Research Centre, Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation, Research Council of Norway, Rockefeller Foundation, UK Department of International Development, UK Medical Research Council, and Wellcome Trust. Thematic analysis of the data demonstrates their funding schemes promote health systems research with (up to) five key features that advance health equity: being conducted with worst-off populations, focusing on research topics that advance equitable health systems, having LMIC ownership of the research agenda, strengthening LMIC research capacity, and having an impact on health disparities. The different types of incentives that encouraged proposed projects to have these features are identified and classified by their strength (strong, moderate, weak). It is suggested that research funders ought to create and maintain funding schemes with strong incentives for the features identified above in order to more effectively help reduce global health disparities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Professional identity and the Clinical Research Nurse: A qualitative study exploring issues having an impact on participant recruitment in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkler, Linda; Smith, Victoria; Yiannakou, Yan; Robinson, Lisa

    2017-08-09

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of Clinical Research Nurses, with an emphasis on factors that may have an impact on successful study delivery. The Clinical Research Nurse workforce is pivotal to improving health outcomes through supporting research-active health economies. Investment in research infrastructure has led to nurses and midwives increasingly undertaking extended roles to deliver clinical research. Despite such opportunities, the recruitment of sufficient participants into research studies remains problematic. A growing body of literature is exploring barriers to successful study delivery, indicating the emergence of a caring-recruiting dichotomy in clinical research staff. This qualitative study investigates the experiences of Clinical Research Nurses delivering research in the United Kingdom National Health Service. Four Focus groups (total 19 participants) were conducted in a large North East National Health Service Foundation Trust from November 2015 - February 2016. Thematic analysis identified perceptions of the role in the wider context of professional identity. Role transition, altered relationships and workload complexity, affected participants' practice, leading to inconsistency between core clinical values and perceived identities as research delivery staff. A duty of care as patient advocates contrasted elements of the work reflecting that of salespeople. The emotional labour of approaching patients and unease regarding peer perceptions of the Clinical Research Nurse role, affected the positive aspects of research delivery. Professional-identity and self-concept appear to have an impact on practice in a research delivery role. Further research should explore these issues further, to enlighten the basis on which such feelings are positioned and to work towards practical solutions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Teacher Research: Exploring Teachers' Personal Epistemology through Narrative Lens. A Colombian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casallas, Diego Fernando Ubaque

    2017-01-01

    This narrative inquiry study looked into four teachers' life stories regarding their teaching practice. The study explored teachers' experiences in pre-while and after stages when being observed by an academic supervisor in a binational but non-profit English center in Bogota, Colombia. By attempting to explore the possible forms of teachers'…

  5. Exploring challenges of the reproductive health PhD curriculum: A qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Kohan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enhancing the quality and dynamicity of higher education programs requires continuous evaluation of curriculums. Reproductive health PhD program was established in 2006 in Iran while recommending that its curriculum be evaluated by assessing graduates’ performance in workplace and surveying students, faculty members and managers. This study aimed to explore challenges of the curriculum of reproductive health PhD program. Methods: Employing a qualitative content analysis approach and using purposive and sometimes opportunistic sampling, experiences and viewpoints of 33 graduates and students of reproductive health PhD program, educational managers and reproductive health board members about the curriculum of reproductive health PhD program were collected through individual interviews and notes in 2014-15. Data were transcribed and important expressions were coded. Classification of similar codes led to preliminary categories. Five main categories were extracted by further classifications. Results: The five main categories included inadequacy of course topics and contents, challenges of student education, failure in realizing curriculum goals, long research period, and ambiguity in graduates’ professional status were appeared; each of these included various subcategories. Conclusion: Results showed that the curriculum of reproductive health PhD program required revisions to meet the program’s mission and designing courses such as sexual health and reinforcing the clinical nature of the program were necessary. Moreover, the results emphasized that the establishment of an independent educational department of reproductive health for managing higher education affairs and greater supervision of the reproductive health board on educational affairs was necessary. Furthermore, reproductive health specialists should be employed in different positions to meet society’s reproductive health needs.

  6. Research on Life Science and Life Support Engineering Problems of Manned Deep Space Exploration Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bin; Guo, Linli; Zhang, Zhixian

    2016-07-01

    Space life science and life support engineering are prominent problems in manned deep space exploration mission. Some typical problems are discussed in this paper, including long-term life support problem, physiological effect and defense of varying extraterrestrial environment. The causes of these problems are developed for these problems. To solve these problems, research on space life science and space medical-engineering should be conducted. In the aspect of space life science, the study of space gravity biology should focus on character of physiological effect in long term zero gravity, co-regulation of physiological systems, impact on stem cells in space, etc. The study of space radiation biology should focus on target effect and non-target effect of radiation, carcinogenicity of radiation, spread of radiation damage in life system, etc. The study of basic biology of space life support system should focus on theoretical basis and simulating mode of constructing the life support system, filtration and combination of species, regulation and optimization method of life support system, etc. In the aspect of space medical-engineering, the study of bio-regenerative life support technology should focus on plants cultivation technology, animal-protein production technology, waste treatment technology, etc. The study of varying gravity defense technology should focus on biological and medical measures to defend varying gravity effect, generation and evaluation of artificial gravity, etc. The study of extraterrestrial environment defense technology should focus on risk evaluation of radiation, monitoring and defending of radiation, compound prevention and removal technology of dust, etc. At last, a case of manned lunar base is analyzed, in which the effective schemes of life support system, defense of varying gravity, defense of extraterrestrial environment are advanced respectively. The points in this paper can be used as references for intensive study on key

  7. Explorations: A Research-Based Program Introducing Undergraduates to Diverse Biology Research Topics Taught by Grad Students and Postdocs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sara E.; Khalfan, Waheeda; Bergmann, Dominique; Simoni, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate biology majors are often overwhelmed by and underinformed about the diversity and complexity of biological research that is conducted on research-intensive campuses. We present a program that introduces undergraduates to the diversity and scope of biological research and also provides unique teaching opportunities for graduate…

  8. Exploring Publishing Patterns at a Large Research University: Implications for Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Amos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The research project sought to explore the value of data on publication patterns for decision-making regarding scholarly communications and collection development programs at a research-intensive post-secondary institution, the University of Utah in the United States.Methods – Publication data for prolific University of Utah authors were gathered from Scopus for the year 2009. The availability to University of Utah faculty, staff, and students of the journals in which University of Utah authors published was determined using the University of Utah Libraries’ catalogue; usage was estimated based on publisher-provided download statistics and requests through interlibrary loan; and costs were calculated from invoices, a periodicals directory, and publisher websites and communications. Indicators of value included the cost-per-use of journals to which the University of Utah Libraries subscribed, a comparison of interlibrary loan costs to subscription costs for journals to which the University of Utah Libraries did not subscribe, the relationship between publishing venue and usage, and the relationship between publishing venue and cost-per-use.Results – There were 22 University of Utah authors who published 10 or more articles in 2009. Collectively, these authors produced 275 articles in 162 journals. The University of Utah provided access through library subscriptions to 83% of the journals for which access, usage, and cost data were available, with widely varying usage and at widely varying costs. Cost-per-use and a comparison of interlibrary loan to subscription costs provided evidence of the effectiveness of collection development practices. However, at the individual journal title level, there was little overlap between the various indicators of journal value, with the highest ranked, or most valuable, journals differing depending on the indicator considered. Few of the articles studied appeared in open access journals

  9. Mining the mind research network: a novel framework for exploring large scale, heterogeneous translational neuroscience research data sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Jeremy Bockholt

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A neuroinformatics (NI system is critical to brain imaging research in order to shorten the time between study conception and results. Such a NI system is required to scale well when large numbers of subjects are studied. Further, when multiple sites participate in research projects organizational issues become increasingly difficult. Optimized NI applications mitigate these problems. Additionally, NI software enables coordination across multiple studies, leveraging advantages potentially leading to exponential research discoveries. The web-based, Mind Research Network (MRN, database system has been designed and improved through our experience with 200 research studies and 250 researchers from 7 different institutions. The MRN tools permit the collection, management, reporting and efficient use of large scale, heterogeneous data sources, e.g., multiple institutions, multiple principal investigators, multiple research programs and studies, and multimodal acquisitions. We have collected and analyzed data sets on thousands of research participants and have set up a framework to automatically analyze the data, thereby making efficient, practical data mining of this vast resource possible. This paper presents a comprehensive framework for capturing and analyzing heterogeneous neuroscience research data sources that has been fully optimized for end-users to perform novel data mining.

  10. Use of Academic Social Research by Public Officials: Exploring Preferences and Constraints That Impact on Research Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Adrian; Head, Brian; Povey, Jenny; Ferguson, Michele; Boreham, Paul

    2015-01-01

    While academics can do more to communicate the key messages of their research, the organisational cultures and information infrastructure of policy-related work units also play a large part in influencing the extent of research uptake in government agencies. Data from a large Australian survey (N = 2,084) of policy-related officials in government…

  11. Exploring the Connections between Action Research and Teacher Leadership: A Reflection on Teacher-Leader Research for Confronting New Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkenhauer, Rachel; Hill, Ashley Pennypacker; Dana, Nancy Fichtman; Stukey, Marisa

    2017-01-01

    This reflective article examines the relationship between teachers' engagement in action research and their ability to lead within their schools. As part of "The New Educator's" special issue, "Developing an Inquiry Stance toward Instructional Improvement: Teacher-Leader Action Research," this article demonstrates the…

  12. Higher Education Research in Hong Kong, Japan, China, and Malaysia: Exploring Research Community Cohesion and the Integration of Thematic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Horta, H.; Jung, J.

    2017-01-01

    This article analyzes higher education research published in international higher education journals by researchers from China, Hong Kong, Japan, and Malaysia from 1980 to 2013. It does so based on publication counts, and co-authorship and cross-citation mapping, examining these countries' publication patterns in terms of thematic approach and…

  13. The exploration of reciprocal peer coteaching in a Chinese course : an action research project on language teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    This research study explored the impact of the implementation of reciprocal peer coteaching (RPCoT) on student language teachers’ personal and professional development in the context of a programme of Initial Teacher Education in Ireland, The study expands on existing research focused on surfacing student teachers’ beliefs about language teaching and learning through reflection on learning experiences, in this case the experience of learning a new language as a novice. This study was carried ...

  14. Exploring Graduate Students’ Attitudes towards Team Research and Their Scholarly Productivity: A Survey Guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Tianlan Wei; Alime N Sadikova; Lucy Barnard-Brak; Eugene W. Wang; Dilshod Sodikov

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the attitudinal and motivational factors underlying graduate students’ attitudes towards team research. Guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior, we hypothesize that attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control are three major determinants of graduate students’ intentions to conduct team research. An instrument was developed to measure the influences of these factors on students’ intentions and relevant scholarly productivity. A total of 281 graduate stud...

  15. Exploring Sex and Gender Differences in Sleep Health: A Society for Women's Health Research Report

    OpenAIRE

    Mallampalli, Monica P.; Carter, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous attempts have been made to address sleep disorders in women; however, significant knowledge gaps in research and a lack of awareness among the research community continue to exist. There is a great need for scientists and clinicians to consider sex and gender differences in their sleep research to account for the unique biology of women. To understand the role of sex differences in sleep and the state of women's sleep health research, the Society for Women's Health Research convened ...

  16. High Power Klystrons: Theory and Practice at the Stanford Linear Accelerator CenterPart I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caryotakis, G.

    2004-12-15

    This is Part I of a two-part report on design and manufacturing methods used at SLAC to produce accelerator klystrons. Chapter 1 begins with the history and applications for klystrons, in both of which Stanford University was extensively involved. The remaining chapters review the theory of klystron operation, derive the principal formulae used in their design, and discuss the assumptions that they involve. These formulae are subsequently used in small-signal calculations of the frequency response of a particular klystron, whose performance is also simulated by two different computer codes. The results of calculations and simulations are compared to the actual performance of the klystron.

  17. Materials Research at Stanford University, 1 July 1980-30 June 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    constants of U(VI) aquo complexes with OH and any other ligands present in solution (F , PO4 , CO in our experiments). We have completed critical...both longitudinal and shear wave scanning to sort out more complex residual stress states. The acoustic experiments require the use of samples which are...large enough to yield results at a significant number of scanning points. The easiest complex residual stress state to induce is that in a rolled

  18. Materials Research at Stanford University, 1 July 1979 - 30 June 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    glutamate 5) F-actin 6) lambda-phage DNA . For BPTI and RNase, we have, as previously reported, obtained translational and rotational diffusion coefficients...signed to characterize- th- spectral content of the Grasshopper Monochrom- ator at the new SSRL soft x-ray beam line has also been performed, and the

  19. Exploring Mature-Aged Students’ Motives for Doctoral Study and their Challenges: A Cross Border Research Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabella Sok Kuan Fung

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: It aimed at investigating the motives and challenges of 15 mature-aged doctoral students at two education faculties in Australian and Asian contexts. Background: This cross-border research collaboration investigated the first international higher-research forum between two education faculties in Hong Kong and Australia. Methodology: Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA was used to explore partic-ipants’ self-reported experiences concerning the motivations and challeng-es of 15 mature-aged doctoral students. Contribution: The findings have important implications for global doctoral program de-velopment, international exchange forum organizations, intercultural capaci-ty building, academic enhancement and cross-border research collabora-tion. Findings: From interview data four overarching themes emerged: Taking calculated risks, Determination to succeed, Financial stress, and Balancing life and research. Recommendations for Practitioners: Recommendations include mentoring schemes, greater support for isolated students, and more opportunities for students to complete their PhD by publication. Recommendation for Researchers: More research is needed to investigate mature-aged students’ motives for embarking on study in diverse cultural contexts among different ethnic groups. Impact on Society: This study recognized the merits and potentials of mature students whose research contributes to their societies. Future Research: Future research directions include using multiple case study design, thus exploring diverse aspects of the existing sample in greater depth, as well as tapping into a new sample of students at risk of attrition at both faculties.

  20. "I'm More Confident Now, I Was Really Quiet": Exploring the Potential Benefits of Child-Led Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Anne; Simmons, Catharine; Truscott, Julia

    2017-01-01

    This article explores whether child-led research (CLR) benefits the well-being of the children and young people involved. The article draws upon evaluation data from a pilot CLR programme facilitated by a non-government organisation that supports disadvantaged children, young people and families. Nine participants (aged 10-14 years old)…

  1. Ex Ante Research Explored: Numbers, Types and Use of Ex Ante Policy Studies by the Dutch Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarhuis, Carolien Maria Klein; Smit, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Ex ante research can contribute to evidence-informed policies. In this article, we explore numbers and types of ex ante studies as well as their use. First, we took stock of a potentially wide range of ex ante studies published by the Dutch government between 2005 and 2011, applying a systematic approach. Though unevenly distributed across…

  2. An Exploration of the Influence of Instructional Technologies on Faculty Motivation and Teaching Innovation on a Research Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, S. J., III

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how the introduction of instructional technologies has influenced the motivational attitudes of higher education faculty at research-oriented institutions with respect to their teaching responsibilities. This was a qualitative study using case-study methodology and involved multiple (4)…

  3. Memoir as a Form of Auto-Ethnographic Research for Exploring the Practice of Transnational Higher Education in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Joy Denise

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that memoir, as a form of auto-ethnographic research, is an appropriate method for exploring the complexities and singularities in the practice of western educational practitioners who are immersed in the social reality of offshore higher education institutions, such as those in Mainland China. I illustrate this proposition…

  4. Of Responsible Research--Exploring the Science-Society Dialogue in Undergraduate Training within the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria Strecht; Quintanilha, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    We explore the integration of societal issues in undergraduate training within the life sciences. Skills in thinking about science, scientific knowledge production and the place of science in society are crucial in the context of the idea of responsible research and innovation. This idea became institutionalized and it is currently well-present in…

  5. Matching the dosimetry characteristics of a dual-field Stanford technique to a customized single-field Stanford technique for total skin electron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Agostinelli, Alfred G; Wilson, Lynn D; Nath, Ravinder

    2004-07-01

    To compare the dosimetry characteristics of a customized single-field and a matching dual-field electron beam for total skin electron therapy (TSET) within the framework of the Stanford technique. To examine and quantify its impact on patient dosimetry. Two characteristically different electron beams were used for TSET employing the Stanford technique: a single-field beam created from a pencil beam of electrons passing through 7 meters of air and a dual-field beam created from two heavily scattered electron beams directed at oblique angles to patients. The dosimetry characteristics of the two beams were measured by using ionization chambers, radiographic films, and thermal luminescent detectors. The impact of beam characteristic on patient dosimetry was quantified on both anthromorphic phantoms and on patients. Treatment protocols aimed at matching the patient dose between the two systems were established on the basis of these and other measurements. The dual-field beam was matched to the single-field beam, resulting in approximately the same mean energy (approximately 4.0 MeV) and most probable energy (approximately 4.5 MeV) at their respective treatment source-to-patient-surface distance (SSD). The depth dose curves on the beam axis were nearly identical for both beams. X-ray contamination on the beam axis was 0.43% for the dual-field beam, slightly higher than that (0.4%) of the single-field beam. The beam uniformity, however, was quite different: the dual-field beam was more uniform in the vertical direction but was worse in the lateral direction compared to the single-field beam. For a TSET treatment using the Stanford technique, the composite depth dose curves were nearly identically at the level of beam axis: with an effective depth of maximum buildup (d(max)) at approximately 1 mm below the skin surface and the depth to 80% depth dose at around 6 mm. The overall X-ray contamination was approximately 1.0% and 1.2% for the single-field and dual-field system

  6. Research Opportunities Supporting the Vision for Space Exploration from the Transformation of the Former Microgravity Materials Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Szofran, Frank; Bassler, Julie A.; Schlagheck, Ronald A.; Cook, Mary Beth

    2005-01-01

    The Microgravity Materials Science Program established a strong research capability through partnerships between NASA and the scientific research community. With the announcement of the vision for space exploration, additional emphasis in strategic materials science areas was necessary. The President's Commission recognized that achieving its exploration objectives would require significant technical innovation, research, and development in focal areas defined as "enabling technologies." Among the 17 enabling technologies identified for initial focus were: advanced structures, advanced power and propulsion; closed-loop life support and habitability; extravehicular activity systems; autonomous systems and robotics; scientific data collection and analysis, biomedical risk mitigation; and planetary in situ resource utilization. Mission success may depend upon use of local resources to fabricate a replacement part to repair a critical system. Future propulsion systems will require materials with a wide range of mechanical, thermophysical, and thermochemical properties, many of them well beyond capabilities of today's materials systems. Materials challenges have also been identified by experts working to develop advanced life support systems. In responding to the vision for space exploration, the Microgravity Materials Science Program aggressively transformed its research portfolio and focused materials science areas of emphasis to include space radiation shielding; in situ fabrication and repair for life support systems; in situ resource utilization for life support consumables; and advanced materials for exploration, including materials science for space propulsion systems and for life support systems. The purpose of this paper is to inform the scientific community of these new research directions and opportunities to utilize their materials science expertise and capabilities to support the vision for space exploration.

  7. Spring Research Festival Theme Explores Host­–Microbe Interactions | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer The 18th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF) will take place May 5–8 at the NCI Campus at Frederick and Fort Detrick.  This is the second year that the event is sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), an interagency committee made up of various research entities located within Fort Detrick. Theme

  8. To Explore the Research and Development Competence and School-to-Work Transition for Hospitality Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wen-Hwa; Chen, Chieh-Ying

    2017-01-01

    This research focuses on the research and development competence and school-to-work transition on occupation selection for hospitality students with the use of social cognitive career theory. The positive attitude construct is the most identifiable for the research and development competences. For the school-to-work constructs, the most…

  9. Exploring Ethical Issues Associated with Using Online Surveys in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lynne D.; Allen, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used in educational research, yet little attention has focused on ethical issues associated with their use in educational settings. Here, we draw on the broader literature to discuss 5 key ethical issues in the context of educational survey research: dual teacher/researcher roles; informed consent; use of…

  10. Letters to those who Dare Feel: Using Reflective Letter-Writing to Explore the Emotionality of Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Using reflective letter-writing as a method of generating data, a group of four researchers embarked on a collaborative autoethnographic inquiry into the emotional dimensions of researching social aspects of HIV & AIDS. In this article, we use the medium of a narrative dialogue to represent and re-examine our reflective letter-writing method. The dialogue draws attention to key features of reflective letter-writing as a collaborative autoethnographic research method and, in so doing, highlights and explores the nature, potential significance, and challenges of this method. Our discussion points to the value of a collaborative process of reflective letter-writing as a way for researchers to access and portray emotional aspects of their research experience, to deepen their engagement with these emotional dimensions, and to gain insight into their own and others' lived research experiences.

  11. Compact High-Power Widely Tunable Mid-IR Light Source for Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Los Gatos Research, Inc. (LGR) and Professor Martin Fejer and his group at Stanford University propose to develop and demonstrate a compact, monolithic, efficient,...

  12. TCGA4U: A Web-Based Genomic Analysis Platform To Explore And Mine TCGA Genomic Data For Translational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenzhen; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale human cancer genomics projects, such as TCGA, generated large genomics data for further study. Exploring and mining these data to obtain meaningful analysis results can help researchers find potential genomics alterations that intervene the development and metastasis of tumors. We developed a web-based gene analysis platform, named TCGA4U, which used statistics methods and models to help translational investigators explore, mine and visualize human cancer genomic characteristic information from the TCGA datasets. Furthermore, through Gene Ontology (GO) annotation and clinical data integration, the genomic data were transformed into biological process, molecular function, cellular component and survival curves to help researchers identify potential driver genes. Clinical researchers without expertise in data analysis will benefit from such a user-friendly genomic analysis platform.

  13. Exploring the ResearchGate score as an academic metric: reflections and implications for practice

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a response to the paper ‘A critical look at the ResearchGate score as a measure of scientific reputation’. Following up on arguments presented by the authors, which argue that the ResearchGate score is irreproducible and dependent upon Journal Impact Factors, a small-scale exploratory analysis of ResearchGate scores was undertaken to examine correlations between ResearchGate score and profile metrics. The importance of the Journal Impact Factor in determining ResearchGate ...

  14. National Freshman Attitudes Report, 2013: Exploring College Readiness among Entering Freshmen. Eighth Annual National Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Levitz, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    This annual report goes beyond the usual metrics of standardized test scores and high school transcripts to explore a wide range of non-cognitive attitudes that influence college readiness, such as students' levels of self-discipline and confidence in their abilities. The report is based on student survey responses drawn from a sizable national…

  15. Beyond Individual Differences: Exploring School Effects on SAT® Scores. Research Report No. 2004-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Howard T.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the complex, hierarchical relationship among school characteristics, individual differences in academic achievement, extracurricular activities, and socioeconomic background on performance on the SAT Reasoning Test™ verbal and mathematical sections. Using multilevel structural equation models (SEMs) with latent means, data from…

  16. Exploring the Best Practices of Nursing Research Councils in Magnet® Organizations: Findings From a Qualitative Research Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jennifer; Lindauer, Cathleen; Parks, Joyce; Scala, Elizabeth

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this descriptive qualitative study was to identify best practices of nursing research councils (NRCs) at Magnet®-designated hospitals. Nursing research (NR) is essential, adding to the body of nursing knowledge. Applying NR to the bedside improves care, enhances patient safety, and is an imperative for nursing leaders. We interviewed NR designees at 26 Magnet-recognized hospitals about the structure and function of their NRCs and used structural coding to identify best practices. Most organizations link NR and evidence-based practice. Council membership includes leadership and clinical nurses. Councils conduct scientific reviews for nursing studies, supporting nurse principal investigators. Tracking and reporting of NR vary widely and are challenging. Councils provide education, sponsor research days, and collaborate interprofessionally, including with academic partners. Findings from this study demonstrate the need to create formal processes to track and report NR and to develop outcome-focused NR education.

  17. The motivation of health professionals to explore research evidence in their practice: An intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Winch, Sarah; Holzhauser, Kerri; De Vries, Sue

    2006-12-01

    To assess the impact of multifaceted clinically focused educational strategies that concentrated on introducing dementia care research evidence on health professionals' awareness and inclination to use research findings in their future practice. The promise of evidence-based practice is slow to materialize with the limitations of adopting research findings in practice readily identifiable. A pre- and post-test quasi experimental design. The study involved the administration of: a pretest (baseline), an intervention phase, and a post-test survey, the same research utilization survey. TOOL: The Edmonton Research Orientation Survey (EROS), a self-report tool that asks participants about their attitudes toward research and about their potential to use research findings, was used to determine health professionals' orientation to research. The introduction of dementia care research evidence through multifaceted clinically focused educational strategies to improve practice. This was achieved through a resource team comprising a Clinical Nurse Consultant, as a leader and resource of localized evidence-based knowledge in aged care; an experienced Registered Nurse to support the introduction of strategies and a further experienced educator and clinician to reinforce the importance of evidence in change. Across all the four subscales that are measured in the Edmonton Research Orientation Survey, statistical analysis by independent samples t-test identified that there was no significant change between the before and after measurements. Successful integration of changes based on evidence does not necessarily mean that staff become more aware or are more inclined to use research findings in future to address problems.

  18. How Do Scientists Define Openness? Exploring the Relationship Between Open Science Policies and Research Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Nadine; Leonelli, Sabina; Weckowska, Dagmara; Castle, David; Dupré, John

    2016-06-01

    This article documents how biomedical researchers in the United Kingdom understand and enact the idea of "openness." This is of particular interest to researchers and science policy worldwide in view of the recent adoption of pioneering policies on Open Science and Open Access by the U.K. government-policies whose impact on and implications for research practice are in need of urgent evaluation, so as to decide on their eventual implementation elsewhere. This study is based on 22 in-depth interviews with U.K. researchers in systems biology, synthetic biology, and bioinformatics, which were conducted between September 2013 and February 2014. Through an analysis of the interview transcripts, we identify seven core themes that characterize researchers' understanding of openness in science and nine factors that shape the practice of openness in research. Our findings highlight the implications that Open Science policies can have for research processes and outcomes and provide recommendations for enhancing their content, effectiveness, and implementation.

  19. Extent, Awareness and Perception of Dissemination Bias in Qualitative Research: An Explorative Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Ingrid; Glenton, Claire; Lewin, Simon; Berg, Rigmor C; Noyes, Jane; Booth, Andrew; Marusic, Ana; Malicki, Mario; Munthe-Kaas, Heather M; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research findings are increasingly used to inform decision-making. Research has indicated that not all quantitative research on the effects of interventions is disseminated or published. The extent to which qualitative researchers also systematically underreport or fail to publish certain types of research findings, and the impact this may have, has received little attention. A survey was delivered online to gather data regarding non-dissemination and dissemination bias in qualitative research. We invited relevant stakeholders through our professional networks, authors of qualitative research identified through a systematic literature search, and further via snowball sampling. 1032 people took part in the survey of whom 859 participants identified as researchers, 133 as editors and 682 as peer reviewers. 68.1% of the researchers said that they had conducted at least one qualitative study that they had not published in a peer-reviewed journal. The main reasons for non-dissemination were that a publication was still intended (35.7%), resource constraints (35.4%), and that the authors gave up after the paper was rejected by one or more journals (32.5%). A majority of the editors and peer reviewers "(strongly) agreed" that the main reasons for rejecting a manuscript of a qualitative study were inadequate study quality (59.5%; 68.5%) and inadequate reporting quality (59.1%; 57.5%). Of 800 respondents, 83.1% "(strongly) agreed" that non-dissemination and possible resulting dissemination bias might undermine the willingness of funders to support qualitative research. 72.6% and 71.2%, respectively, "(strongly) agreed" that non-dissemination might lead to inappropriate health policy and health care. The proportion of non-dissemination in qualitative research is substantial. Researchers, editors and peer reviewers play an important role in this. Non-dissemination and resulting dissemination bias may impact on health care research, practice and policy. More

  20. Validation of the Italian version of the Stanford Presenteeism Scale in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicolini, Giancarlo; Della Pelle, Carlo; Cerratti, Francesca; Franza, Marcello; Flacco, Maria E

    2016-07-01

    To ascertain the validity and reliability of the Italian version of the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6). Presenteeism has been associated with a work productivity reduction, a lower quality of work and an increased risk of developing health disorders. It is particularly high among nurses and needs valid tools to be assessed. A validation study was carried out from July to September 2014. A three-section tool, made of a demographic form, the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6) and the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) was administered to a sample of nurses, enrolled in three Italian hospitals. Cronbach's α for the entire sample (229 nurses) was found to be 0.72. A significant negative correlation between SPS and perceived stress scores evidenced the external validity. The factor analysis showed a two-component solution, accounting for 71.2% of the variance. The confirmatory factor analysis showed an adequate fit. The Italian SPS-6 is a valid and reliable tool for workplace surveys. Since the validity and reliability of SPS-6 has been confirmed for the Italian version, we have now a valid tool that can measure the levels of presenteeism among Italian nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Observations on the Stanford 4800 KG gravity wave detector with a cosmic ray monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, B. E.

    1986-09-01

    The group at Stanford University has constructed a 4800 kg cryogenic detector which is the most sensitive detector for gravitational radiation successfully operated to date. In this dissertation data are presented from the 1985 run of 36.8 days aggregate collection time. Over the full bandwidth of approximately 13 Hz, the optimum detector noise temperature was found to be 8 mK when the system was operated at 4.3 K. An actual filter was implemented over a 5 Hz bandwidth which yielded the filtered noise temperature of 15 mK. Filtering over the entire bandwidth and operation of a dilution refrigerator at 1 K should lower the noise temperature to below 3 mK. The rate of events whose signal temperature exceeded 0.6 K was found to be higher than that for a similar run in 1981, partly due to greater general activity in the laboratory. A preliminary coincidence experiment was conducted between the Stanford detector and a room temperature detector in Guangzhou, China. In a total of 9.38 days of simultaneous data collection the number of coincidences observed was entirely consistent with random statistics. In the second half of this dissertation, the effect of cosmic rays on a gravity wave bar detector is considered. A one-dimensional thermoacoustic model is used to predict the size of the signal. Measurable effects are restricted to rarer events which may easily be vetoed as gravity wave candidates.

  2. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Rachel E; Mediratta, Rishi P; Xie, James; Kambhampati, Swetha; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Montacute, Tamara; Zhang, Michael; Zaw, Catherine; He, Jimmy; Sanchez, Magali; Pischel, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful servicelearning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program's outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians.

  3. Reconstructing, Investigating the Reliability and Validity and Scoring the Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Saleh Sedghpour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to reconstruct determining validity, and score The Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test fourth edition (SDRT4 in the sixth grade students. Methods: The population of the study was all sixth grades of the 19 educational districts from Tehran, 571 students (255 boys and 316 girls were selected by using a random multi-cluster sampling. The data were analyzed. The techniques were item analysis (difficulty index, discriminative index, and loop techniques. Validity, translation validity, content validity, and construct validity (factorial analysis, and reliability (Kuder-Richardson. Results: The exploratory factor analysis determined five factors: declarative knowledge, inferential knowledge, procedural knowledge and visualization knowledge. The reliability of the Stanford diagnostic Reading Test’s subtests by computing the Kuder-Richardson coefficient were 0.778, 0.732 and 0.748 for comprehension subtest, vocabulary subtest and scanning subtest in order. Discussion: By considering the results of present study, SDRT4 has good reliability and validity and can appropriately diagnose the reading disabled students in the sixth grade.

  4. Exploring sex and gender differences in sleep health: a Society for Women's Health Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallampalli, Monica P; Carter, Christine L

    2014-07-01

    Previous attempts have been made to address sleep disorders in women; however, significant knowledge gaps in research and a lack of awareness among the research community continue to exist. There is a great need for scientists and clinicians to consider sex and gender differences in their sleep research to account for the unique biology of women. To understand the role of sex differences in sleep and the state of women's sleep health research, the Society for Women's Health Research convened an interdisciplinary expert panel of well-established sleep researchers and clinicians for a roundtable meeting. Focused discussions on basic and clinical research along with a focus on specific challenges facing women with sleep-related problems and effective therapies led to the identification of knowledge gaps and the development of research-related recommendations. Additionally, sex differences in sleep disorders were noted and discussed in the context of underlying hormonal differences. Differences in sleep behavior and sleep disorders may not only be driven by biological factors but also by gender differences in the way women and men report symptoms. Progress has been made in identifying sex and gender differences in many areas of sleep, but major research gaps in the areas of epidemiology, sleep regulation, sleep quality, diagnosis, and treatment need to be addressed. Identifying the underlying nature of sex and gender differences in sleep research has potential to accelerate improved care for both men and women facilitating better diagnosis, treatment, and ultimately prevention of sleep disorders and related comorbid conditions.

  5. Exploring knowledge processes based on teacher research in a school-university research network of a master's program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof dr Theo Bergen; prof dr Douwe Beijaard; dr Frank Cornelissen; Dr. Jacqueline van Swet

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of five participants in a school-university research network in a Dutch master's program. Outcomes indicate that use of existing network structures in master's programs is complex, but could be a promising avenue for creating succesful school-university

  6. Knowledge in process? Exploring barriers between epidemiological research and local health policy development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Goede Joyce

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Netherlands municipalities are legally required to draw up a Local Health Policy Memorandum every four years. This policy memorandum should be based on (local epidemiological research as performed by the Regional Health Services. However, it is largely unknown if and in what way epidemiological research is used during local policy development. As part of a larger study on knowledge utilization at the local level in The Netherlands, an analytical framework on the use of epidemiological research in local health policy development in the Netherlands is presented here. Method Based on a literature search and a short inventory on experiences from Regional Health Services, we made a description of existing research utilization models and concepts about research utilization. Subsequently we mapped different barriers in research transmission. Results The interaction model is regarded as the main explanatory model. It acknowledges the interactive and incremental nature of policy development, which takes place in a context and includes diversity within the groups of researchers and policymakers. This fits well in the dynamic and complex setting of local Dutch health policy. For the conceptual framework we propose a network approach, in which we "extend" the interaction model. We not only focus on the one-to-one relation between an individual researcher and policymaker but include interactions between several actors participating in the research and policy process. In this model interaction between actors in the research and the policy network is expected to improve research utilization. Interaction can obstruct or promote four clusters of barriers between research and policy: expectations, transfer issues, acceptance, and interpretation. These elements of interactions and barriers provide an actual explanation of research utilization. Research utilization itself can be measured on the individual level of actors and on a policy

  7. A new US-UK diagnostic project: mood elevation and depression in first-year undergraduates at Oxford and Stanford universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, R A; Wang, P W; Ketter, T A; Goodwin, G M

    2008-07-01

    To investigate differences in prevalence of mood elevation, distress and depression among first-year undergraduates at Oxford and Stanford universities. An online survey was sent to Oxford and Stanford first-year undergraduate students for two consecutive years in the winter of 2005 and 2006. Students completed a survey that assessed mood symptoms and medication use. Both universities had similar rates of distress by General Health Questionnaire (Oxford - 42.4%; Stanford - 38.3%), depression by Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (Oxford - 6.2%; Stanford - 6.6%), and psychotropic and non-psychotropic medication usage (psychotropic: Oxford - 1.5%; Stanford 3.5%; nonpsychotropic: Oxford - 13.3%; Stanford - 18%). Oxford had higher rates of mood elevation by Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) (Oxford - 4%; Stanford - 1.7%). Oxford and Stanford students have similar rates of mood distress, depression and general medication usage. Students at Oxford have a higher prevalence of MDQ scores that possibly indicate a bipolar disorder, while Stanford students are prescribed more psychotropics.

  8. Exploring the Role of Information Professionals in Improving Research Reproducibility:A Case Study in Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, A.; West, J.

    2016-12-01

    The validity of Geosciences research is of great significance to general public and policy-makers. In an earlier study, we surveyed 136 faculty and graduate students in geosciences. The result indicated that nearly 80% of respondents who had ever reproduced a published study had failed at least one time in reproducing, suggesting a general lack of research reproducibility in geosciences. Although there is much enthusiasm for creation of technologies such as workflow system, literate programming, and cloud-based system to facilitate reproducibility, much less emphasis has been placed on the information services essential for meaningful use of these tools. Library and Information Science (LIS) has a rich tradition of providing customized service for research communities. LIS professionals such as academic librarians have made strong contribution to resources locating, software recommending, data curation, metadata guidance, project management, submission review and author training. In particular, university libraries have been actively developing tools and offering guidelines, consultations, and trainings on Data Management Plan (DMP) required by National Science Foundation (NSF). And effective data management is a significant first step towards reproducible research. Hereby we argue that LIS professionals may be well-positioned to assist researchers to make their research reproducible. In this study, we aim to answer the question: how can LIS professionals assist geoscience researchers in making their research capable of being reproduced? We first synthesize different definitions of "reproducibility" and provide a conceptual framework of "reproducibility" in geosciences to resolve some of the misunderstandings around related terminology. Using a case study approach, we then examine 1) university librarians' technical skills, domain knowledge, professional activities, together with their awareness of, readiness for, and attitudes towards research reproducibility and

  9. Exploring willingness of elder Chinese in Houston to participate in clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan R. Thornton

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: The barriers and facilitators to research participation confirmed previous research among Asians. Our participant TIMRS scores were consistent with decreased levels of trust observed in the original TIMRS study for African Americans as compared and lower than Whites. Employing strategies that utilize language concordant staff who build trust with participants may aid in recruiting elder Chinese, especially if the research is personally relevant to those being recruited.

  10. Ectopic pregnancy: exploration of its global research architecture using density-equalising mapping and socioeconomic benchmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Kollascheck, Jana; Quarcoo, David; Bendels, Michael H; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Louwen, Frank; Jaque, Jenny M; David A. Groneberg

    2017-01-01

    Objective About 2% of all pregnancies are complicated by the implantation of the zygote outside the uterine cavity and termed ectopic pregnancy. Whereas a multitude of guidelines exists and related research is constantly growing, no thorough assessment of the global research architecture has been performed yet. Hence, we aim to assess the associated scientific activities in relation to geographical and chronological developments, existing research networks and socioeconomic parameters. Design...

  11. Exploring new ways of working using virtual research environments in library and information science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Lassi, Monica; Olson, Nasrine

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present current and ongoing research investigating new ways of working across geographic distances and time within library and information science (LIS). Design/methodology/approach: A total of four studies were conducted focusing on: the design of a virtual...... research environment (VRE) to facilitate the sharing of data collection instruments among students, researchers and professionals; new ways professionals and researchers can collaborate; collaborative decision making in the context of purchasing a library management system; and collaboration among LIS...

  12. RESEARCH AREA 7.1: Exploring the Systematics of Controlling Quantum Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    which utilizes conductance dependence upon molecular conformation as well as destructive quantum interference . We perform electron transport...explores light-driven electron transport through cross-conjugated molecules with different numbers of alkenyl groups. In the framework of coherent quantum ...Hsu, L.-Y.; Li, E.-Y.; Rabitz, H. Nano Lett., 2013, 13, 5020]. We investigate destructive quantum interference with tunneling and conductance

  13. Research teaching in learning disability nursing: Exploring the views of student and registered learning disability nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northway, Ruth; Parker, Michelle; James, Neil; Davies, Lynsey; Johnson, Kaye; Wilson, Sally

    2015-12-01

    Whilst there is a need to develop the research base within learning disability nursing it is also significant that currently there is little published data as to how research is taught to this group of nurses. To increase understanding of how research is currently taught to learning disability nurses within the UK. A survey design was used. The research was undertaken at a conference held in the UK in March 2014. 310 learning disability nurses attending the conference of which 212 completed the free text question. This comprised student nurses (n=158), registered nurses working in practice settings (n=25) and registered nurses working in educational institutions (n=24). Five participants did not specify their background. Participants were invited to complete a questionnaire that included a free text question regarding the teaching of research to learning disability nurses: it is the responses to this question that are reported in this paper. Responses were transcribed and thematically analysed. Eight themes emerged: Teaching approach--the good and the bad; finding the right level; right from the start; we need more time; generic versus specialist; there's not enough; getting research into practice; and what should we focus on? Variations exist in terms of the timing of research education, the teaching approaches used, and hence the quality of student experience. Of particular concern is the apparent gap between research teaching and the use of research in practice, and the reported lack of support for research within practice settings. However, enthusiasm for research is evident and hence recommendations are made both to enhance teaching and to strengthen links with practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The evolving professional identity of the clinical research nurse: A qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunhunny, Swapna; Salmon, Debra

    2017-12-01

    To examine the perspectives of CRNs in the UK on their professional role identity, in order to inform the professional practice of Clinical Research Nursing. Clinical research nurses (CRN) make a significant contribution to healthcare research within the UK and internationally. However, lack of clarity about their role, and scope of practice renders their contribution within the profession and in the minds of the wider public invisible. This has implications in terms of promoting the role nurses play not only in terms of recruitment, retention, and care of research participants but also as research leaders of the future. Exploratory qualitative design using thematic analysis conducted within a realist paradigm. Participants viewed the positive aspects of their identity 'as agents of change' who were fundamental to the clinical research process. Resourcefulness and the ability to guide members of the research team were valued as key to job satisfaction. Successful navigation through the complexity of advice, support, management and leadership tasks related to their role in caring for research patients were role affirming and generated a sense of pride. However, lack of recognition, clarity of the role and career development opportunities within an identified structure undermined the CRN identity and optimism about progression in the future. Participants reported feeling invisible to colleagues within the clinical community, isolated and excluded from wider nursing groups. The study describes UK CRN practice, highlighting the positive benefits and challenges associated with the role, including the need to support professional and career development to maximise their research contribution. This study provides nurses, health care and research organisations and academic nursing educators with a broadened understanding of the professional role, identity and context of clinical research nursing practice in the United Kingdom, with recommendations to improve its

  15. Protecting and expanding the richness and diversity of life, an ethic for astrobiology research and space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Richard O.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing search for life on other worlds and the prospects of eventual human exploration of the Moon and Mars indicate the need for new ethical guidelines to direct our actions as we search and how we respond if we discover microbial life on other worlds. Here we review how life on other worlds presents a novel question in environmental ethics. We propose a principle of protecting and expanding the richness and diversity of life as the basis of an ethic for astrobiology research and space exploration. There are immediate implications for the operational policies governing how we conduct the search for life on Mars and how we plan for human exploration throughout the Solar System.

  16. Reproducibility of the acute rejection diagnosis in human cardiac allografts. The Stanford Classification and the International Grading System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Nielsen, B

    1993-01-01

    Transplantation has become an accepted treatment of many cardiac end-stage diseases. Acute cellular rejection accounts for 15% to 20% of all graft failures. The first grading system of acute cellular rejection, the Stanford Classification, was introduced in 1979, and since then many other grading...... systems have evolved. Most recently, the International Grading System was introduced in The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. In this study the interobserver reproducibility of both the Stanford Classification and the International Grading System is evaluated using Kappa statistics. Three...... observers evaluated 168 endomyocardial biopsy specimens according to the Stanford Classification and 100 endomyocardial biopsy specimens according to the International Grading System. The evaluation was carried out blindly. Kappa values of 54.1% and 51.5%, respectively, were obtained, both significantly...

  17. Using CBPR Methods in College Health Research: Exploring Excessive Alcohol Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmer, Sandra M.; Barton, Barbara A.; Liefeld, Julie; Montauti, Sara; Santos, Stephanie; Richard, Melissa; Hnath, Laura; Pelletier, Kara; Lalanne, Jude

    2016-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a collaborative methodology that uniquely involves stakeholders in all stages of the research process. CBPR has been widely utilized in the field of public health, but not widely employed with college populations. This study utilized CBPR methods within a college community to gain insight into…

  18. Exploring misunderstanding in collaborative research between a world power and a developing country

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bresciani, Marilee J

    2008-01-01

    ...). For example, it may be clear to cross-cultural principal investigators, who sign on for a research project, what the research study will entail, however, the expectations may not be clear as to the extent or nature of the collaboration, and as to the scope of how the project's success will be identified by joint program administrators who may f...

  19. Exploring Electrochromics: A Series of Eye-Catching Experiments to Introduce Students to Multidisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Leo J.; Wolf, Steven; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2014-01-01

    Introducing students to a multidisciplinary research laboratory presents challenges in terms of learning specific technical skills and concepts but also with respect to integrating different technical elements to form a coherent picture of the research. Here we present a multidisciplinary series of experiments we have developed in the Electronic,…

  20. Exploring the "Age Question" in Research on Young Migrants in Southeast Asia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.C. Huijsmans (Roy)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractRecent years have seen a blossoming of research on children and young people as migrants in the Southeast Asian context. This article takes the form of a stock-taking exercise of this rapidly growing new field of research. Yet, it also asks “what’s new?” thereby contrasting and comparing

  1. Open Science Strategies in Research Policies: A Comparative Exploration of Canada, the US and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasthiotakis, Helen; Kretz, Andrew; Sá, Creso

    2015-01-01

    Several movements have emerged related to the general idea of promoting "openness" in science. Research councils are key institutions in bringing about changes proposed by these movements, as sponsors and facilitators of research. In this paper we identify the approaches used in Canada, the US and the UK to advance open science, as a…

  2. Pedagogies of Black Eldership: Exploring the Impact of Intergenerational Contact on Youth Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozenski, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the interactions between a collective of self-described "African American," "multiracial," and "African immigrant" high school youth researchers, and two African American community elders. Drawing from a year-long critical ethnographic study of the youth research collective, the author documents…

  3. Exploring the visual landscape : advances in physiognomic landscape research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, S.; Lammeren, van R.J.A.; Hoeven, van der F.

    2011-01-01

    The book is the second volume in the Research in Urbanism Series of IOS Press and is about the combination of landscape research and planning, visual perception and Geographic Information Science. It offers clues for visual landscape assessment of spaces in cities, parks and rural areas. In that

  4. Exploring Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Approaches to Business Communication Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope-Ruark, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    With our core focus on teaching and scholarship, business communication teacher-scholars are well placed to become leaders in the international Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) movement. In this article, SoTL is defined and contextualized, three SoTL research approaches are introduced, and disciplinary research projects are suggested. A…

  5. Liquid Modernity: Exploring the Research Contract Nexus within Contemporary Scottish Political Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holligan, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This paper contributes to our understanding of a supposed free-market in research, where knowledge-transfer is to government, which then brokers the evidence into professional fields. Education research contracts are put out to tender by Scottish Government and a constellation of factors constructing this phenomenon has epistemological and…

  6. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-03-02

    Mar 2, 2017 ... In summary, this study explored the perceptions and experiences of nurse educators' use of HFS in teaching, as its acceptability by educators as a teaching strategy is important for effective use. Methods. Research design. A descriptive, qualitative case study design was utilised to explore nursing.

  7. Extent, Awareness and Perception of Dissemination Bias in Qualitative Research: An Explorative Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Toews

    Full Text Available Qualitative research findings are increasingly used to inform decision-making. Research has indicated that not all quantitative research on the effects of interventions is disseminated or published. The extent to which qualitative researchers also systematically underreport or fail to publish certain types of research findings, and the impact this may have, has received little attention.A survey was delivered online to gather data regarding non-dissemination and dissemination bias in qualitative research. We invited relevant stakeholders through our professional networks, authors of qualitative research identified through a systematic literature search, and further via snowball sampling.1032 people took part in the survey of whom 859 participants identified as researchers, 133 as editors and 682 as peer reviewers. 68.1% of the researchers said that they had conducted at least one qualitative study that they had not published in a peer-reviewed journal. The main reasons for non-dissemination were that a publication was still intended (35.7%, resource constraints (35.4%, and that the authors gave up after the paper was rejected by one or more journals (32.5%. A majority of the editors and peer reviewers "(strongly agreed" that the main reasons for rejecting a manuscript of a qualitative study were inadequate study quality (59.5%; 68.5% and inadequate reporting quality (59.1%; 57.5%. Of 800 respondents, 83.1% "(strongly agreed" that non-dissemination and possible resulting dissemination bias might undermine the willingness of funders to support qualitative research. 72.6% and 71.2%, respectively, "(strongly agreed" that non-dissemination might lead to inappropriate health policy and health care.The proportion of non-dissemination in qualitative research is substantial. Researchers, editors and peer reviewers play an important role in this. Non-dissemination and resulting dissemination bias may impact on health care research, practice and policy

  8. Exploring health systems research and its influence on policy processes in low income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shamsuzzoha B

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interface between research and policymaking in low-income countries is highly complex. The ability of health systems research to influence policy processes in such settings face numerous challenges. Successful analysis of the research-policy interface in these settings requires understanding of contextual factors as well as key influences on the interface. Future Health Systems (FHS: Innovations for Equity is a consortium conducting research in six countries in Asia and Africa. One of the three cross-country research themes of the consortium is analysis of the relationship between research (evidence and policy making, especially their impact on the poor; insights gained in the initial conceptual phase of FHS activities can inform the global knowledge pool on this subject. Discussion This paper provides a review of the research-policy interface in low-income countries and proposes a conceptual framework, followed by directions for empirical approaches. First, four developmental perspectives are considered: social institutional factors; virtual versus grassroots realities; science-society relationships; and construction of social arrangements. Building on these developmental perspectives three research-policy interface entry points are identified: 1. Recognizing policy as complex processes; 2. Engaging key stakeholders: decision-makers, providers, scientists, and communities; and 3. Enhancing accountability. A conceptual framework with three entry points to the research-policy interface – policy processes; stakeholder interests, values, and power; and accountability – within a context provided by four developmental perspectives is proposed. Potential empirical approaches to the research-policy interface are then reviewed. Finally, the value of such innovative empirical analysis is considered. Conclusion The purpose of this paper is to provide the background, conceptual framework, and key research directions for

  9. Multiple triangulation and collaborative research using qualitative methods to explore decision making in pre-hospital emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Maxine; O'Hara, Rachel; Hirst, Enid; Weyman, Andrew; Turner, Janette; Mason, Suzanne; Quinn, Tom; Shewan, Jane; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2017-01-24

    Paramedics make important and increasingly complex decisions at scene about patient care. Patient safety implications of influences on decision making in the pre-hospital setting were previously under-researched. Cutting edge perspectives advocate exploring the whole system rather than individual influences on patient safety. Ethnography (the study of people and cultures) has been acknowledged as a suitable method for identifying health care issues as they occur within the natural context. In this paper we compare multiple methods used in a multi-site, qualitative study that aimed to identify system influences on decision making. The study was conducted in three NHS Ambulance Trusts in England and involved researchers from each Trust working alongside academic researchers. Exploratory interviews with key informants e.g. managers (n = 16) and document review provided contextual information. Between October 2012 and July 2013 researchers observed 34 paramedic shifts and ten paramedics provided additional accounts via audio-recorded 'digital diaries' (155 events). Three staff focus groups (total n = 21) and three service user focus groups (total n = 23) explored a range of experiences and perceptions. Data collection and analysis was carried out by academic and ambulance service researchers as well as service users. Workshops were held at each site to elicit feedback on the findings and facilitate prioritisation of issues identified. The use of a multi-method qualitative approach allowed cross-validation of important issues for ambulance service staff and service users. A key factor in successful implementation of the study was establishing good working relationships with academic and ambulance service teams. Enrolling at least one research lead at each site facilitated the recruitment process as well as study progress. Active involvement with the study allowed ambulance service researchers and service users to gain a better understanding of the research

  10. Multiple triangulation and collaborative research using qualitative methods to explore decision making in pre-hospital emergency care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paramedics make important and increasingly complex decisions at scene about patient care. Patient safety implications of influences on decision making in the pre-hospital setting were previously under-researched. Cutting edge perspectives advocate exploring the whole system rather than individual influences on patient safety. Ethnography (the study of people and cultures has been acknowledged as a suitable method for identifying health care issues as they occur within the natural context. In this paper we compare multiple methods used in a multi-site, qualitative study that aimed to identify system influences on decision making. Methods The study was conducted in three NHS Ambulance Trusts in England and involved researchers from each Trust working alongside academic researchers. Exploratory interviews with key informants e.g. managers (n = 16 and document review provided contextual information. Between October 2012 and July 2013 researchers observed 34 paramedic shifts and ten paramedics provided additional accounts via audio-recorded ‘digital diaries’ (155 events. Three staff focus groups (total n = 21 and three service user focus groups (total n = 23 explored a range of experiences and perceptions. Data collection and analysis was carried out by academic and ambulance service researchers as well as service users. Workshops were held at each site to elicit feedback on the findings and facilitate prioritisation of issues identified. Results The use of a multi-method qualitative approach allowed cross-validation of important issues for ambulance service staff and service users. A key factor in successful implementation of the study was establishing good working relationships with academic and ambulance service teams. Enrolling at least one research lead at each site facilitated the recruitment process as well as study progress. Active involvement with the study allowed ambulance service researchers and service

  11. Exploring Ricoeur's hermeneutic theory of interpretation as a method of analysing research texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geanellos, R

    2000-06-01

    Increasingly, researchers use hermeneutic philosophy to inform the conduct of interpretive research. Congruence between the philosophical foundations of a study, and the methodological processes through which study findings are actualised, obliges hermeneutic researchers to use (or develop) hermeneutic approaches to research interviewing and textual analysis. Paul Ricoeur's theory of interpretation provides one approach through which researchers using hermeneutics can achieve congruence between philosophy, methodology and method. Ricoeur's theory of interpretation acknowledges the interrelationship between epistemology (interpretation) and ontology (interpreter). Also, Ricoeur notes the way interpretation moves forward from naive understanding, where the interpreter has a superficial grasp of the whole of the text, to deeper understanding, where the interpreter understands the parts of the text in relation to the whole and the whole of the text in relation to its parts (the hermeneutic circle). In this way, Ricoeur's theory of interpretation provides researchers with a method of developing intersubjective knowledge. Through exposition of the concepts of Ricoeur's theory, which include distanciation, appropriation, explanation and understanding, guess, and validation, a hermeneutic approach to textual analysis is presented, discussed and critiqued. Examples from nursing research are also used to demonstrate points under discussion. It is suggested that, in conjunction with Gadamer's hermeneutic of understanding, Ricoeur's theory of interpretation warrants consideration as a method of textual analysis.

  12. Expanding the Horizon: A Journey to Explore and Share Effective Geoscience Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Indian Natural Resource Science and Engineering Program (INRSEP) has worked diligently over the past 40 + years to ensure the success of Tribal, Indigenous and Underrepresented undergraduate and graduate students in geoscience and natural resources fields of study. Central to this success has been the development of cultural relevant research opportunities directed by Tribal people. The research experiences have been initiated to address culturally relevant challenges on Tribal and non-Tribal lands. It has become critically important to ensure students have multiple research experiences across North America as well as throughout the continent. The INRSEP community has found creating and maintaining relationships with organizations like the Geoscience Alliance, Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MSPHD's) and the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) program has greatly improved the success of students matriculating to graduate STEM programs. These relationships also serve an immense capacity in tracking students, promoting best practices in research development and assessing outcomes. The presentation will highlight lessons learned on how to 1) Develop a diverse cohort or 'community' of student researchers; 2) Evolve intergenerational mentoring processes and outcomes; 3) Tether to related research and programs; and Foster the broader impact of geoscience research and outcomes.

  13. “Thanks for Using Me”: An Exploration of Exit Strategy in Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary James Morrison MSc

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines, through a synthesis of the literature and excerpts from a qualitative case study, the concept of exit strategy, specifically its relation to vulnerable populations (e.g., overweight adolescent boys and potential impact on the researcher-participant relationship. The quality and duration of the researcher-participant relationship, along with rapport and trust building, are potential indicators for negotiated closure (i.e., exit strategy. Reframing this relationship as “participant-researcher” resituates vulnerable participants as foremost in such relationships. Given what is potentially at stake for participants in qualitative research, there is a moral and ethical imperative to enter into the dialogue of closure. Otherwise, participants may unwittingly serve as a means to an end, that is, as objects in the enterprise of qualitative research. Researchers, research supervisors, and human subject ethics committees are urged to establish protocols to guide how research relationships are ended within the context of qualitative methods, particularly with respect to vulnerable populations.

  14. Soundscape research put into practice: The exploration of soundwalks in the city of Bern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweers Britta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibilities and broader communal impact of applied ethnomusicological work related to soundscape research in a university-based context. Focusing on a seminar in which the findings of urban soundscape research in the city of Bern (Switzerland were transformed into six different sound tours, the article analyses the different strategies and layers of impact within the broader community.

  15. Exploring the integration of the biomedical research component in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schravendijk, C; März, R; Garcia-Seoane, J

    2013-06-01

    A task force of MEDINE (Thematic Network on Medical Education in Europe) organized a survey of European Medical Schools. To investigate the link between education and biomedical research in the medical curriculum questioning university staff responsible for the curriculum. The survey was online between 10/2006 and 3/2007. Answers pertained to the situation in the academic year 2005/06. Ninety-one medical schools/faculties in 26 countries participated, but response rates to some questions were lower due to incomplete responses. In undergraduate programs, 3/4 of the schools offer research courses and in 2/3 students can do research themselves. However, in most schools, fewer than 10% students choose this option. In about half the medical schools writing a thesis is a requirement for graduation, although the term "thesis" is interpreted broadly. Color map analysis revealed the link between medical education and biomedical research: about 25% of the medical schools had little emphasis on research in their undergraduate curriculum. We identified the curriculum elements most suitable to improve the link between medical education and research for the initial stage (years 1-3) as literature search techniques, statistics and epidemiology, while for the advanced stage (years 4-6), writing a thesis was most relevant.

  16. Development of a qualitative exploratory case study research method to explore sustained delivery of cognitive services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaae, Susanne; Søndergaard, Birthe; Haugbølle, Lotte Stig; Traulsen, Janine Morgall

    2010-02-01

    To develop, apply and evaluate a new research method to establish relationships between structural and process elements of the provision of cognitive services. In-depth knowledge about how local organisational structural elements of community pharmacies shape the implementation process of cognitive services is needed to develop targeted quality assurance systems to ensure that the services are continuously provided to the patients who need them. The first publicly reimbursed cognitive service in Denmark, the Inhaler Technique Assessment Service (ITAS) is used as the case. The research method was developed at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen and later applied to seven community pharmacies geographically spread around Denmark. A pilot study as well as a subsequent literature review was conducted to determine which structure-process elements to focus on in the research method as well as to select appropriate theories and methods. The developed research method was a qualitative exploratory multi-case study, that was based on method triangulation of field observations, semi-structured interviews, group interviews as well as collection of documentary material. The three main themes of the research method were: the administration of tasks, leadership style and professional values. We integrated the organisational theories of Mintzberg, Bolman and Deal as well as Sørensen to support and clarify the data collection process and analyses. A cross-case analysis and an exploratory contextual analysis relating the leadership style of the pharmacy owner to the ITAS provision were applied to the collected data. The developed qualitative exploratory multi-case study research method was satisfactory with regard to achieving nuanced and in-depth results of some relationships between structural and process elements of provision of cognitive services. The research method can be considered an important supplement to the existing literature on the

  17. Knowledge management and informatics considerations for comparative effectiveness research: a case-driven exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embi, Peter J; Hebert, Courtney; Gordillo, Gayle; Kelleher, Kelly; Payne, Philip R O

    2013-08-01

    As clinical data are increasingly collected and stored electronically, their potential use for comparative effectiveness research (CER) grows. Despite this promise, challenges face those wishing to leverage such data. In this paper we aim to enumerate some of the knowledge management and informatics issues common to such data reuse. After reviewing the current state of knowledge regarding biomedical informatics challenges and best practices related to CER, we then present 2 research projects at our institution. We analyze these and highlight several common themes and challenges related to the conduct of CER studies. Finally, we represent these emergent themes. The informatics challenges commonly encountered by those conducting CER studies include issues related to data information and knowledge management (eg, data reuse, data preparation) as well as those related to people and organizational issues (eg, sociotechnical factors and organizational factors). Examples of these are described in further detail and a formal framework for describing these findings is presented. Significant challenges face researchers attempting to use often diverse and heterogeneous datasets for CER. These challenges must be understood in order to be dealt with successfully and can often be overcome with the appropriate use of informatics best practices. Many research and policy questions remain to be answered in order to realize the full potential of the increasingly electronic clinical data available for such research.

  18. Exploring research cultures through internationalization at home for doctoral students in Hong Kong and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Doris; Carlson, Elisabeth; Kwong, Enid E Y; Idvall, Ewa; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-12-01

    Cultural skills are fundamental to developing global academic scholars. Internationalization at home can facilitate the acquisition of these skills without students having to go abroad. However, research on the effect of internationalization of higher education is scarce, despite apparent benefits to incorporating cultural sensitivity in research. Further, little is known about the role information and communication technology plays. In this pilot study, we describe the experience of doctoral students with an internationalization-at-home program, and its impact on developing an understanding about different research cultures. Eight doctoral nursing students from Sweden and Hong Kong participated in five webinars as "critical friends". The study followed a descriptive, qualitative design. The results demonstrated that students observed cultural differences in others' research training programs. However, while cultural differences reinforced friendship among local peers, they challenged engagement with critical friends. Challenges led to the perception of one another not as critical friends but as "distant" friends. We discuss the possible reasons for these outcomes, and emphasize a need to nurture connectivity and common goals. This would prepare students to identify, translate, and recognize cultural differences to help develop knowledge of diverse research cultures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Introducing the Situational Q-sort to Crisis Practice and Research: Exploring best practices and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Freberg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Crisis communicators face many obstacles while engaging with impacted audiences during a crisis.  Communicators must determine when, how, and where to disseminate effective crisis messages. Most research on crisis communication message strategies has involved experiments, content analysis of published media (traditional and social through monitoring platforms, interviews, and questionnaires. However, the recently developed Riverside Situational Q-sort (RSQ; Funder et al., 2012; Sherman, Nave, & Funder, 2010 provides a novel method for quantifying subjective impressions of any situation. The RSQ as a methodology provides a window of opportunity for researchers as well as an effective tool for practitioners for determining what messages are most effective for a given situation. This paper provides an overview of the crisis communication methodologies already implemented, discussion related to preliminary results using the RSQ (Freberg, Saling, & Freberg, 2013, and best practices and implications for practitioners and researchers to note when implementing this method in their crisis message strategies.

  20. Exploring Risky Youth Experiences: Popular Theatre as a Participatory, Performative Research Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Conrad

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses a Popular Theatre project with a group of high school drama students in a rural Alberta community. As a research method, Popular Theatre draws on traditions in participatory research and performance ethnography. In our project, entitled “Life in the Sticks,” based on students' initial claims that their issues were determined by their rural environment, Popular Theatre was a way to collectively draw out, represent and question their experiences through theatrical means. Our process helped students re-examine their beliefs and helped me reframe the notion “at-risk” to include the perceptions of youth. Popular Theatre is shown to be an effective pedagogical tool and research method in the new insights and critical understandings it yielded..

  1. Exploring Graduate Students’ Attitudes towards Team Research and Their Scholarly Productivity: A Survey Guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianlan Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the attitudinal and motivational factors underlying graduate students’ attitudes towards team research. Guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior, we hypothesize that attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control are three major determinants of graduate students’ intentions to conduct team research. An instrument was developed to measure the influences of these factors on students’ intentions and relevant scholarly productivity. A total of 281 graduate students from a large, comprehensive university in the southwest United States participated in the survey. Descriptive statistics reveal that around two-thirds of graduate students have no co-authored manuscripts submitted for publication since they started graduate school. Factor analyses validated the factor structure of the instrument, and the results of Structural Equation Modeling show that (a graduate students’ attitudes towards team research have a positive correlation with their attitudes towards individual research; (b attitude towards team research, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control, along with students’ discipline/major areas and classification, account for 58% of the variance in the intention to conduct team research; and (c subjective norm appears to be the most influential factor in the model, followed by attitude; while perceived behavioral control is not of much importance. These findings provide implications for academic departments and programs to promote graduate students’ team research. Specifically, creating a climate for collaborative research in academic programs/disciplines/universities may work jointly with enhancing students’ appraisals of such collaborations.

  2. Exploring idealism in palliative nursing care through reflective practice and action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Bev; Bulmer, Beth; Hill, Loretta; Luxford, Catherine; McFarlane, Jenny; Reed, Juanne; Stirling, Kate

    2002-07-01

    This article describes a qualitative research project using a combination of action research and reflective practice. Six experienced registered nurses identified their tendency towards idealism in their palliative nursing practice, which they defined as the tendency to expect to be 100% effective all of the time in their work. Participants collaborated in generating and evaluating an action plan to recognize and manage the negative effects of idealism in their work expectations and behaviours. Participants expressed positive changes in their practice, based on adjusting their responses to their idealistic tendencies towards perfectionism.

  3. A fence barrier method of leading edge cell capture for explorative biochemical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Lucas J; Murray, Rachael Z; Thompson, Erik W; Leavesley, David I

    2017-09-03

    The scratch or wound-healing assay is used ubiquitously for investigating re-epithelialisation and has already revealed the importance of cells comprising the leading edge of healing epithelial wounds. However it is currently limited to studying the effect of known biochemical agents on the tissue of choice. Here we present an adaptation that extends the utility of this model to encompass the collection of cells from the leading edge of migrating epithelial sheets making available explorative biochemical analyses. The method is scalable and does not require expensive apparatus, making it suitable for large and small laboratories alike. We detail the application of our method and exemplify proof of principle data derived from primary human keratinocyte cultures.

  4. An Emerging Role for Numerical Modelling in Wildfire Behavior Research: Explorations, Explanations, and Hypothesis Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, R.; Winterkamp, J.; Canfield, J.; Sauer, J.; Dupuy, J. L.; Finney, M.; Hoffman, C.; Parsons, R.; Pimont, F.; Sieg, C.; Forthofer, J.

    2014-12-01

    The human capacity for altering the water cycle has been well documented and given the expected change due to population, income growth, biofuels, climate, and associated land use change, there remains great uncertainty in both the degree of increased pressure on land and water resources and in our ability to adapt to these changes. Alleviating regional shortages in water supply can be carried out in a spatial hierarchy through i) direct trade of water between all regions, ii) development of infrastructure to improve water availability within regions (e.g. impounding rivers), iii) via inter-basin hydrological transfer between neighboring regions and, iv) via virtual water trade. These adaptation strategies can be managed via market trade in water and commodities to identify those strategies most likely to be adopted. This work combines the physically-based University of New Hampshire Water Balance Model (WBM) with the macro-scale Purdue University Simplified International Model of agricultural Prices Land use and the Environment (SIMPLE) to explore the interaction of supply and demand for fresh water globally. In this work we use a newly developed grid cell-based version of SIMPLE to achieve a more direct connection between the two modeling paradigms of physically-based models with optimization-driven approaches characteristic of economic models. We explore questions related to the global and regional impact of water scarcity and water surplus on the ability of regions to adapt to future change. Allowing for a variety of adaptation strategies such as direct trade of water and expanding the built water infrastructure, as well as indirect trade in commodities, will reduce overall global water stress and, in some regions, significantly reduce their vulnerability to these future changes.

  5. Experiments in advanced control concepts for space robotics - An overview of the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollars, M. G.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Alexander, H. L.; Morse, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford University Aerospace Robotics Laboratory is actively developing and experimentally testing advanced robot control strategies for space robotic applications. Early experiments focused on control of very lightweight one-link manipulators and other flexible structures. The results are being extended to position and force control of mini-manipulators attached to flexible manipulators and multilink manipulators with flexible drive trains. Experimental results show that end-point sensing and careful dynamic modeling or adaptive control are key to the success of these control strategies. Free-flying space robot simulators that operate on an air cushion table have been built to test control strategies in which the dynamics of the base of the robot and the payload are important.

  6. Saw-tooth Instability Studies At The Stanford Linear Collider Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Podobedov, B V

    2000-01-01

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blowup in quadrupole or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of our instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional we had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency (10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. We have also employed the state-of the art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of our streak camera experiments we have quantitatively described the p...

  7. The Sound Games: Introducing Gamification into Stanford's Orientation on Emergency Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Viveta; Stromberg, Andrew Q; Rosston, Peter

    2017-09-18

    Point-of-care ultrasound is a critical component of graduate medical training in emergency medicine. Innovation in ultrasound teaching methods is greatly needed to keep up with a changing medical landscape. A field-wide trend promoting simulation and technology-enhanced learning is underway in an effort to improve patient care, as well as patient safety. In an effort to both motivate students and increase their skill retention, training methods are shifting towards a friendly competition model and are gaining popularity nationwide. In line with this emerging trend, Stanford incorporated the Sound Games - an educational ultrasound event with a distinctly competitive thread - within its existing two-day point-of-care ultrasound orientation course for emergency medicine interns. In this study, we demonstrate successful implementation of the orientation program, significant learning gains in participants, and overall student satisfaction with the course.

  8. Computer Science researchers explore virtualization potential for high-end computing

    OpenAIRE

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Dimitrios Nikolopoulos, associate professor of computer science, and Godmar Back, assistant professor of computer science, both at Virginia Tech, have received a National Science Foundation (NSF) - Computer Science Research (CSR) grant of $300,000 for their Virtualization Technologies for Application-Specific Operating Systems (VT ASOS) project.

  9. Exploring Informed Consent and Dissent through Children's Participation in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Roseanna; Loveridge, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Involving children and young people in educational research has been foundational in developing and understanding theories of learning, and understanding child development. Attempts to identify children's perspectives on policies and practices that directly affect them in educational settings have resulted in an increase in the involvement of…

  10. Expanding the Conversation: Further Explorations into Indigenous Environmental Science Education Theory, Research, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowan, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Indigenous environmental science education is a diverse, dynamic, and rapidly expanding field of research, theory, and practice. This article highlights, challenges, and expands upon key areas of discussion presented by Mack et al. (Cult Stud Sci Educ 7, "2012") as part of the forum on their article "Effective Practices for Creating…

  11. Teaching Self-Disclosure through an Activity Exploring Disclosure Research and Online Dating Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nicole Marie; Hastings, Sally O.

    2013-01-01

    Most interpersonal communication course textbooks include a section or chapter on the topic of self-disclosure. Students are normally introduced to elements of self-disclosure, such as a definition, functions, or reasons for self-disclosure, risks of self-disclosure, and the role of self-disclosure in relationships. Historically, research on…

  12. Exploring the feasibility and synergistic value of the One Health approach in clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba Currea, Gloria Cristina; Sørensen, Tina Møller; Holm, Anne

    2015-01-01

    observational study of diagnostic pathways in humanand canine patients with suspected urinary tract infection as a means to assess the feasibility and synergistic value ofsetting up One Health clinical research projects and interventions. Methods/design: A prospective observational study will compare different...

  13. Considering Interest and Action: Analyzing Types of Questions Explored by Researcher-Practitioner Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Karen D.; Martinez, Martha I.; Clinton, Chelsea; Díaz, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Researcher-practitioner partnerships have gained increasing prominence within education in recent years, yet scholarship on partnerships and tools to guide partnerships' work remain in their infancy. Drawing on our own work in a partnership as well as analysis of abstracts for the 41 partnerships funded by the Institute of Education Sciences and…

  14. Data Mining and Domain Knowledge: An Exploration of Methods to Advance Medical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Kelley M.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers in the medical domain consider the double-blind placebo controlled clinical trial the gold standard. The data for these clinical trials are collected for a specifically defined hypothesis and there is very little in the realm of secondary data analyses conducted. The underlying purpose of this work is to demonstrate the value and…

  15. Exploration tools for drug discovery and beyond: applying SciFinder to interdisciplinary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldeman, Margaret; Vieira, Barbara; Winer, Fred; Knutsen, Lars J S

    2005-06-01

    Chemists have long recognized the value of online databases for surveying the literature of their field. Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) databases covering almost a century's worth of journal articles and patent documents are among the best known and widely used for searching information on compounds. Today's research presents a new challenge, however, as the boundaries of chemistry and biological sciences overlap increasingly. This trend is especially true in the drug discovery field where published findings relating to both chemical and biological entities and their interactions are examined. CAS has expanded its resources to meet the requirements of the new, interdisciplinary challenges faced by today's researchers. This is evident both in the content of CAS databases, which have been expanded to include more biology-related information, and in the technology of the search tools now available to researchers on their desktop. It is the integration of content and search-and-retrieval technology that enables new insights to be made in the vast body of accumulated information. CAS's SciFinder is a widely used research tool for this purpose.

  16. Exploring Mindfulness and Meditation for the Elementary Classroom: Intersections across Current Multidisciplinary Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routhier-Martin, Kayli; Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth; Blanch, Norine

    2017-01-01

    Mindfulness and meditation programs, and their associated benefits for education, can be examined within three related disciplines: psychology, elementary education, and exceptional education. A review of psychology research provides evidence that meditation and mindfulness work to balance the often negative effects of students' social-emotional…

  17. Exploring the Role of Executive Functioning Measures for Social Competence Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichter, Janine P.; Christ, Shawn E.; Herzog, Melissa J.; O'Donnell, Rose M.; O'Connor, Karen V.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous research groups have consistently called for increased rigor within the evaluation of social programming to better understand pivotal factors to treatment outcomes. The underwhelming data on the essential features of social competence programs for students with behavior challenges may, in part, be attributed to the manner by which…

  18. Activating the Sociological Imagination to Explore the Boundaries of Resilience Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderPlaat, Madine

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the field of resilience research, especially as it relates to children and youth, has been well ensconced in the discipline of psychology. Sociologists, when they do engage with the concept, tend to do so at the level of the community. In recent years, an increasing number of scholars have called for a construction of resilience and…

  19. Exploring a Science Teacher's Uncertainty with Integrating Engineering Design: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, Brenda M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines a fifth grade science teacher's attempts at integrating engineering design using the construct of uncertainty. Collaborative action research served as a supportive mechanism to uncover and confront the teacher's uncertainties. Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews, reflections, classroom observations, lesson…

  20. Exploring Market and Competitive Intelligence Research as a Source for Enhancing Innovation Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the role of Competitive and Market Intelligence (CI/MI) Research as a potential source for improving the innovation capability of Small and Medium Enterprises (SME's) leading to successful new product/services/processes/capabilities development (Cooper & Edgett, 2002). This report highlights the…

  1. X-Gliders: Exploring Flight Research with Experimental Gliders. Educational Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This brief discusses X-gliders and flight research with experimental gliders. In this activity, designed for grades K-4, students will learn how to change the flight characteristics of a glider using scientific inquiry methods. Glider plans and a template are included. (MVL)

  2. Reconnecting with Your Passion: An Action Research Study Exploring Humanities and Professional Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Melissa J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was two-fold. The first purpose was to examine the process of how nurses engaged in a professional development program that drew upon reading and creative writing related to their lives and work as nurses. Secondly, this study examined the nurses' perspectives on how their involvement in the process…

  3. Island Explorations: Discovering Effects of Environmental Research-Based Lab Activities on Analytical Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasik, Janice Hall; LeCaptain, Dale; Murphy, Sarah; Martin, Mary; Knight, Rachel M.; Harke, Maureen A.; Burke, Ryan; Beck, Kara; Acevedo-Polakovich, I. David

    2014-01-01

    Motivating students in analytical chemistry can be challenging, in part because of the complexity and breadth of topics involved. Some methods that help encourage students and convey real-world relevancy of the material include incorporating environmental issues, research-based lab experiments, and service learning projects. In this paper, we…

  4. Ectopic pregnancy: exploration of its global research architecture using density-equalising mapping and socioeconomic benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Kollascheck, Jana; Quarcoo, David; Bendels, Michael H; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Louwen, Frank; Jaque, Jenny M; Groneberg, David A

    2017-10-11

    About 2% of all pregnancies are complicated by the implantation of the zygote outside the uterine cavity and termed ectopic pregnancy. Whereas a multitude of guidelines exists and related research is constantly growing, no thorough assessment of the global research architecture has been performed yet. Hence, we aim to assess the associated scientific activities in relation to geographical and chronological developments, existing research networks and socioeconomic parameters. Retrospective, descriptive study. On the basis of the NewQIS platform, scientometric methods were combined with novel visualising techniques such as density-equalising mapping to assess the scientific output on ectopic pregnancy. Using the Web of Science, we identified all related entries from 1900 to 2012. 8040 publications were analysed. The USA and the UK were dominating the field in regard to overall research activity (2612 and 723 publications), overall citation numbers and country-specific H-Indices (US: 80, UK: 42). Comparison to economic power of the most productive countries demonstrated that Israel invested more resources in ectopic pregnancy-related research than other nations (853.41 ectopic pregnancy-specific publications per 1000 billlion US$ gross domestic product (GDP)), followed by the UK (269.97). Relation to the GDP per capita index revealed 49.3 ectopic pregnancy-specific publications per US$1000 GDP per capita for the USA in contrast to 17.31 for the UK. Semiqualitative indices such as country-specific citation rates ranked Switzerland first (24.7 citations per ectopic pregnancy-specific publication), followed by the Scandinavian countries Finland and Sweden. Low-income countries did not exhibit significant research activities. This is the first in-depth analysis of global ectopic pregnancy research since 1900. It offers unique insights into the global scientific landscape. Besides the USA and the UK, Scandinavian countries and Switzerland can also be regarded as leading

  5. Exploring risk communication - results of a research project focussed on effectiveness evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Junier, Sandra; Mostert, Erik

    2016-04-01

    The need for effective science communication and outreach efforts is widely acknowledged in the academic community. In the field of Disaster Risk Reduction, the importance of communication is clearly stressed, e.g. in the newly adopted Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 (under the 1st priority of action: understanding disaster risk). Consequently, we see increasing risk communication activities. However, the effectiveness of these activities is rarely evaluated. To address this gap, several research activities were conducted in the context of the Marie Curie Initial Training Network "Changes", the results of which we will present and discuss. First, results of a literature review show, among others, that research on effectiveness is mainly focussed on the assessment of users' needs and their ability to understand the content, rather than on the final impact of the risk communication efforts. Moreover, lab-environment research is more often undertaken than assessment of real communication efforts. Second, a comparison between perceptions of risk managers and the general public of risk communication in a French Alps Valley highlighted a gap between the two groups in terms of amount of information needed (who wants more), the important topics to address (what) and the media to use (how). Third, interviews with developers of smartphone applications for disseminating avalanche risk information showed a variety of current practices and the absence of measurements of real their effectiveness. However, our analysis allowed identifying good practices that can be an inspiration for risk communication related to other hazards. Fourth, an exhibition has been set up following a collaborative approached based on stakeholder engagement. Using a pre/post-test design, the immediate impact of the exhibition, which aimed at increasing the risk awareness of the population (Ubaye Valley, France), was measured. The data obtained suggests that visiting the exhibition

  6. Dosimetric characterization and optimization of a customized Stanford total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luĉić, Felipe; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Caprile, Paola; Zelada, Gabriel; Goset, Karen

    2013-09-06

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) has been used as a treatment for mycosis fungoides. Our center has implemented a modified Stanford technique with six pairs of 6 MeV adjacent electron beams, incident perpendicularly on the patient who remains lying on a translational platform, at 200 cm from the source. The purpose of this study is to perform a dosimetric characterization of this technique and to investigate its optimization in terms of energy characteristics, extension, and uniformity of the treatment field. In order to improve the homogeneity of the distribution, a custom-made polyester filter of variable thickness and a uniform PMMA degrader plate were used. It was found that the characteristics of a 9 MeV beam with an 8 mm thick degrader were similar to those of the 6 MeV beam without filter, but with an increased surface dose. The combination of the degrader and the polyester filter improved the uniformity of the distribution along the dual field (180cm long), increasing the dose at the borders of field by 43%. The optimum angles for the pair of beams were ± 27°. This configuration avoided displacement of the patient, and reduced the treatment time and the positioning problems related to the abutting superior and inferior fields. Dose distributions in the transversal plane were measured for the six incidences of the Stanford technique with film dosimetry in an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom. This was performed for the optimized treatment and compared with the previously implemented technique. The comparison showed an increased superficial dose and improved uniformity of the 85% isodose curve coverage for the optimized technique.

  7. PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating: Science Education from the Poles to the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, K. M.; Warburton, J.; Owens, R.; Warnick, W. K.

    2008-12-01

    PolarTREC--Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, a program of the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS), is a National Science Foundation (NSF)--funded International Polar Year (IPY) project in which K-12 educators participate in hands-on field experiences, working closely with IPY scientists as a pathway to improving science education. PolarTREC has developed a successful internet-based platform for teachers and researchers to interact and share their diverse experiences and expertise by creating interdisciplinary educational tools including online journals and forums, real-time Internet seminars, lesson plans, activities, audio, and other educational resources that address a broad range of scientific topics. These highly relevant, adaptable, and accessible resources are available to educators across the globe and have connected thousands of students and citizens to the excitement of polar science. By fostering the integration of research and education and infusing education with the thrill of discovery, PolarTREC will produce a legacy of long-term teacher-researcher collaborations and increased student knowledge of and interest in the polar regions well beyond the IPY time period. Educator and student feedback from preliminary evaluations has shown that PolarTREC's comprehensive program activities have many positive impacts on educators and their ability to teach science concepts and improve their teaching methods. Additionally, K-12 students polled in interest surveys showed significant changes in key areas including amount of time spent in school exploring research activities, importance of understanding science for future work, importance of understanding the polar regions as a person in today's world, as well as increased self-reported knowledge and interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics content areas. PolarTREC provides a tested approach and a clear route for researcher participation in the education community

  8. Still in My Mind: An Exploration of Practice-led Experimental Research in Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda L. Croft

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The author, an Indigenous woman of mixed heritage, aGurindji/Malgnin/Mudpurra person on her father’s side discusses her practice-led research project, Still in My Mind: Gurindji Experience, Location and Visuality. This project draws inspiration from the words of revered Gurindji elder Vincent Lingiari, profoundly reiterating a deep commitment to his Gurindji/Malgnin peoples and their homelands on Wave Hill in the Northern Territory.

  9. Your Genes, Your Choices: Exploring the Issues Raised by Genetic Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.

    1999-05-31

    Your Genes, Your Choices provides accurate information about the ethical, legal, and social implications of the Human Genome Project and genetic research in an easy-to-read style and format. Each chapter in the book begins with a brief vignette, which introduces an issue within a human story, and raises a question for the reader to think about as the basic science and information are presented in the rest of the chapter.

  10. Human Research Program: Long Duration, Exploration-Class Mission Training Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshi, Immanuel; Dempsey, Donna L.

    2016-01-01

    This is a presentation to the International Training Control Board that oversees astronaut training for ISS. The presentation explains the structure of HRP, the training-related work happening under the different program elements, and discusses in detail the research plan for the Training Risk under SHFHSHFE. The group includes the crew training leads for all the space agencies involved in ISS: Japan, Europe, Russia, Canada, and the US.

  11. Exploring Game Transfer Phenomena: a multimodal research approach for investigating video games' effects

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz de Gortari, AB

    2015-01-01

    Video games are evolving and are becoming ever more immersive. Consequently, it is necessary to understand their effects on gamers’ psychological wellbeing. The impact on cognition, affect and behaviour has mostly been investigated separately and sometimes from narrow approaches that limit the understanding of the video games’ effects. This thesis investigates the effects of playing video games from a novel, multimodal and broad research approach that is termed "Game Transfer Phenomena" (GTP)...

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research. 108 September 2017, Vol. 9, No. 3 AJHPE. Methods. This is a qualitative descriptive study that explored nursing students' experiences. ..... Challenges and lessons learned. Clin. Simulation Nursing 2013;9(5):e157-e162. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecns.2011.11.011. 12. Creswell JW. Research Design. 4th ed.

  13. Human Research Program (HRP) Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintron, Nitza; Dutson, Eric; Friedl, Karl; Hyman, William; Jemison, Mae; Klonoff, David

    2009-01-01

    The SRP believes strongly that regularly performed in-flight crew assessments are needed in order to identify a change in health status before a medical condition becomes clinically apparent. It is this early recognition in change that constitutes the foundation of the "occupational health model" expounded in the HRP Requirements Document as a key component of the HRP risk mitigation strategy that will enable its objective of "prevention and mitigation of human health and performance risks". A regular crew status examination of physiological and clinical performance is needed. This can be accomplished through instrumented monitoring of routine embedded tasks. The SRP recommends addition of a new gap to address this action under Category 3.0 Mitigate the Risk. This new gap is closely associated with Task 4.19 which addresses the lack of adequate biomedical monitoring capabilities for performing periodic clinical status evaluations and contingency medical monitoring. A corollary to these gaps is the critical emphasis on preventive medicine, not only during pre- and post-flight phases of a mission as is the current practice, but continued into the in-flight phases of exploration class missions.

  14. Conceptual Design of Korea Aerospace Research Institute Lunar Explorer Dynamic Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Young Rew

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In lunar explorer development program, computer simulator is necessary to provide virtual environments that vehicle confronts in lunar transfer, orbit, and landing missions, and to analyze dynamic behavior of the spacecraft under these environments. Objective of simulation differs depending on its application in spacecraft development cycle. Scope of use cases considered in this paper includes simulation of software based, processor and/or hardware in the loop, and support of ground-based flight test of developed vehicle. These use cases represent early phase in development cycle but reusability of modeling results in the next design phase is considered in defining requirements. A simulator architecture in which simulator platform is located in the middle and modules for modeling, analyzing, and three dimensional visualizing are connected to that platform is suggested. Baseline concepts and requirements for simulator development are described. Result of trade study for selecting simulation platform and approaches of defining other simulator components are summarized. Finally, characters of lunar elevation map data which is necessary for lunar terrain generation is described.

  15. Utility of an abbreviated version of the stanford-binet intelligence scales (5th ed.) in estimating 'full scale' IQ for young children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Conal; O'Connell, Helen; Lillis, Mary; Tarpey, Sarah Louise; O'Reilly, Gary

    2017-12-28

    The fifth edition of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence scales allows 'full scale' IQ (FSIQ) to be estimated using an abridged version of the test-the abbreviated battery IQ (ABIQ). Set within a public early intervention team service, the current cross-sectional study investigated the utility of the ABIQ in estimating FSIQ for 40 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) aged 3-5 years. A strong ABIQ-FSIQ association was yielded (r = 0.89; r2  = 0.808) and the ABIQ did not over-estimate mean FSIQ above a clinically-relevant threshold; however, clinically significant over-estimation occurred in 17.5% of individual cases. While the findings provide support for the utility of the ABIQ in estimating FSIQ for young children with ASD, caution relating to the over-estimation of FSIQ is warranted. Careful clinical judgment-ideally based on examination of previous cognitive assessment results (if available), thorough interactional observations, and close multi-disciplinary consultation-is necessary to determine the applicability of the ABIQ to individual cases. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. We investigated the utility of a shortened version of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales in estimating IQ for 40 young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings provide qualified support for the instrument: acceptably accurate IQ estimation was achieved for most cases; but not so for a sizeable minority (17.5%). Careful clinical judgment is necessary to determine the applicability of the ABIQ to individual cases. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A Validity Study of the K-ABC, the WISC-R, and the Stanford-Binet with Nonreferred Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zins, Joseph E.; Barnett, David W.

    1984-01-01

    Reports findings about the relationship between the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC), the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R), and the Stanford-Binet for 40 children with no known impairments. The overall results suggested some support for the use of the K-ABC as a measure of intelligence. (BH)

  17. MOOCs and the AI-Stanford Like Courses: Two Successful and Distinct Course Formats for Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C. Osvaldo

    2012-01-01

    Open online courses (OOC) with a massive number of students have represented an important development for online education in the past years. A course on artificial intelligence, CS221, at the University of Stanford was offered in the fall of 2011 free and online which attracted 160,000 registered students. It was one of three offered as an…

  18. Analysis of the intellectual structure of human space exploration research using a bibliometric approach: Focus on human related factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tai Sik; Lee, Yoon-Sun; Lee, Jaeho; Chang, Byung Chul

    2018-02-01

    Human space exploration (HSE) is an interdisciplinary field composed of a range of subjects that have developed dramatically over the last few decades. This paper investigates the intellectual structure of HSE research with a focus on human related factors. A bibliometric approach with quantitative analytical techniques is applied to study the development and growth of the research. This study retrieves 1921 papers on HSE related to human factors from the year 1990 to the year 2016 from Web of Science and constructs a critical citation network composed of 336 papers. Edge-betweenness-based clustering is used to classify the citation network into twelve distinct research clusters based on four research themes: "biological risks from space radiation," "health and performance during long-duration spaceflight," "program and in-situ resources for HSE missions," and "habitat and life support systems in the space environment." These research themes are also similar to the classification results of a co-occurrence analysis on keywords for a total of 1921 papers. Papers with high centrality scores are identified as important papers in terms of knowledge flow. Moreover, the intermediary role of papers in exchanging knowledge between HSE sub-areas is identified using brokerage analysis. The key-route main path highlights the theoretical development trajectories. Due to the recent dramatic increase in investment by international governments and the private sector, the theoretical development trajectories of key research themes have been expanding from furthering scientific and technical knowledge to include various social and economic issues, thus encouraging massive public participation. This study contributes to an understanding of research trends and popular issues in the field of HSE by introducing a powerful way of determining major research themes and development trajectories. This study will help researchers seek the underlying knowledge diffusion flow from multifaceted

  19. DNA Damage Response and Radiosensitivity of Immune Cells from Subjects Undergoing Confinement in the NASA Human Exploration Research Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Villanueva, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) represents an analog for simulation of isolation, confinement and remote conditions of mission exploration scenarios. HERA aims at investigating team performance and cooperation, reaction to stress, signs of early depression, anxiety and anger and their impact on human health. HERA is a collaborative project involving experts in different fields. Not only psychological but also clinical biomarkers of stress, e.g. adrenaline has been measured. It is known that stress hormones induce DNA strand breaks thus, within this project, my tasks was to determine the level of DNA strand breaks as well as expression of genes involved in DNA damage response in immune cells obtained from HERA subjects. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the cells to ex vivo radiation was also assessed.

  20. Integrating movement ecology with biodiversity research - exploring new avenues to address spatiotemporal biodiversity dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeltsch, Florian; Bonte, Dries; Pe'er, Guy; Reineking, Björn; Leimgruber, Peter; Balkenhol, Niko; Schröder, Boris; Buchmann, Carsten M; Mueller, Thomas; Blaum, Niels; Zurell, Damaris; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin; Wiegand, Thorsten; Eccard, Jana A; Hofer, Heribert; Reeg, Jette; Eggers, Ute; Bauer, Silke

    2013-01-01

    Movement of organisms is one of the key mechanisms shaping biodiversity, e.g. the distribution of genes, individuals and species in space and time. Recent technological and conceptual advances have improved our ability to assess the causes and consequences of individual movement, and led to the emergence of the new field of 'movement ecology'. Here, we outline how movement ecology can contribute to the broad field of biodiversity research, i.e. the study of processes and patterns of life among and across different scales, from genes to ecosystems, and we propose a conceptual framework linking these hitherto largely separated fields of research. Our framework builds on the concept of movement ecology for individuals, and demonstrates its importance for linking individual organismal movement with biodiversity. First, organismal movements can provide 'mobile links' between habitats or ecosystems, thereby connecting resources, genes, and processes among otherwise separate locations. Understanding these mobile links and their impact on biodiversity will be facilitated by movement ecology, because mobile links can be created by different modes of movement (i.e., foraging, dispersal, migration) that relate to different spatiotemporal scales and have differential effects on biodiversity. Second, organismal movements can also mediate coexistence in communities, through 'equalizing' and 'stabilizing' mechanisms. This novel integrated framework provides a conceptual starting point for a better understanding of biodiversity dynamics in light of individual movement and space-use behavior across spatiotemporal scales. By illustrating this framework with examples, we argue that the integration of movement ecology and biodiversity research will also enhance our ability to conserve diversity at the genetic, species, and ecosystem levels.

  1. Exploring community pharmacists' experiences of surveying patients for drug utilization research purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisk, Pia; Bergman, Ulrika; Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    , and dispensing pharmacists suitable for conducting them. When regular dispensing staff perform the survey interviews as a part of the drug dispensing process, additional resources to manage the immediate increase in work load have to be considered. Otherwise, data quality may be compromised.......Background Patient self-reported data are important in drug utilization research, but often logistically difficult to collect. During 2006–2012, 72 Swedish community pharmacies regularly collected such data through structured survey interviews at the pharmacy counter, performed by the dispensing...

  2. Social Media in Greek K-12 education: A research model that explores teachers’ behavioral intention

    OpenAIRE

    Georgakainas, Babis; Zaharias, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade we have witnessed a rapid growth of Web 2.0 technologies and especially the so-called online social media. Many people, from every age group but especially teenagers, participate in online communities, making new friends and exhibiting themselves and their interests in a huge international audience. It is extremely important for educational practitioners and researchers to successfully incorporate the dynamics of web 2.0 and social media in their practices. This is espe...

  3. Exploring cost-benefit analysis of research, development and innovation infrastructures: an evaluation framework

    CERN Document Server

    Florio, Massimo; Pancotti, Chiara; Sirtori, Emanuela; Vignetti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results and the lessons learned on how to apply ex-ante CBQ for major RDI infrastructures by a team of economists and scientists at the University of Milan and CSIL during a three-year research project supported by a EIBURS grant of the European Investment Bank Institute. Albeit the comprehensive conceptual framework presented in the paper builds on principles firmly rooted in CBA tradition, their application to the RDI sector is still in its infancy. So far, the model has been applied on two cases in physics involving particle accelerators (the Large Hadron Collider, LHC, at CERN and the National Centre for Oncological Treatment, CNAO, in Italy).

  4. Exploring an Unknown Territory: "Sleeping Beauties" in the Nursing Research Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokol, Peter; Blažun Vošner, Helena; Vermeulen, Joeri

    Sleeping Beauties (SBs) are publications that are scarcely cited in the years immediately following publication but then suddenly become highly cited later. Such publications have unique citation patterns and can reveal important developments in the field in which they appear. No holistic analysis of nursing SBs has been done yet. The aim of this study was to identify and analyze the SB phenomenon in the nursing research literature. The corpus for the nursing SB identification was harvested from the Web of Science Core Collection (Thomas Reuters) for the period 1934-2015. Citation histories of 212,239 publications were screened. From those, 3,209 publications with more than 100 citations were selected for analysis. We used our own software and applied the van Raan (2004) and Baumgartner (2010) criteria for SBs-a 5-year sleeping period with at most 10 citations during that time, an average of at least five citations per year after the first 10 years, with at least 100 citations in total. The knowledge context for SBs was determined using citing papers. All citing papers were analyzed with the help of VOSviewer software. Nine publications were identified as SBs (prevalence of 0.004%). The length of sleep duration ranged from 5 to 10 years (M = 6.8, SD = 2.0), depth of sleep ranged from 0.2 to 0.8 citations (M = 0.6, SD = 0.2), and awake intensity ranged from 6.4 to 15.0 citations (M = 11.0, SD = 3.8). The average number of citations to SBs was 229. Most nursing SBs were produced in the United States (n = 8) from top institutions in journals with high-impact factors. Nursing SBs covered topics including resilience, sampling in qualitative research, metasynthesis, postoperative pain in children, dementia rating scales, care of patients with Alzheimer's disease, nursing theory related to fatigue mechanisms in cancer patients, and family participation during resuscitation. Nursing SBs were cited by authors from a large number of institutions and countries; the number of

  5. Exploring innovation through open networks: A review and initial research questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Ye

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The open innovation strategy as an emerging approach towards innovation is beginning to receive attention from organisations and researchers. Open innovation signifies opening up of internal R&D by leveraging inflow and outflow of knowledge. Open network is one mechanism of open innovation, which brings solvers from different domains to work on problems posted by seekers. Since solvers and seekers serve as the foundation for the realisation of the open innovation strategy, such understanding is imperative to encourage participation and realise benefits from open networks. This article investigates the potential factors that can promote solvers' and seekers' participation in open networks.

  6. An exploration of role model influence on adult nursing students' professional development: A phenomenological research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felstead, Ian S; Springett, Kate

    2016-02-01

    Patients' expectations of being cared for by a nurse who is caring, competent, and professional are particularly pertinent in current health and social care practice. The current drive for NHS values-based recruitment serves to strengthen this. How nursing students' development of professionalism is shaped is not fully known, though it is acknowledged that their practice experience strongly shapes behaviour. This study (in 2013-14) explored twelve adult nursing students' lived experiences of role modelling through an interpretive phenomenological analysis approach, aiming to understand the impact on their development as professional practitioners. Clinical nurses influenced student development consistently. Some students reported that their experiences allowed them to learn how not to behave in practice; a productive learning experience despite content. Students also felt senior staff influence on their development to be strong, citing 'leading by example.' The impact of patients on student professional development was also a key finding. Through analysing information gained, identifying and educating practice-based mentors who are ready, willing, and able to role model professional attributes appear crucial to developing professionalism in nursing students. Those involved in nurse education, whether service providers or universities, may wish to acknowledge the influence of clinical nurse behaviour observed by students both independent of and in direct relation to care delivery and the impact on student nurse professional development. A corollary relates to how students should be guided and briefed/debriefed to work with a staff to ensure their exposure to a variety of practice behaviours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research. Phase II - Volume I; Truss Braced Wing Design Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.; Allen, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the Truss Braced Wing (TBW) work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team, consisting of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, Georgia Tech, Virginia Tech, NextGen Aeronautics, and Microcraft. A multi-disciplinary optimization (MDO) environment defined the geometry that was further refined for the updated SUGAR High TBW configuration. Airfoil shapes were tested in the NASA TCT facility, and an aeroelastic model was tested in the NASA TDT facility. Flutter suppression was successfully demonstrated using control laws derived from test system ID data and analysis models. Aeroelastic impacts for the TBW design are manageable and smaller than assumed in Phase I. Flutter analysis of TBW designs need to include pre-load and large displacement non-linear effects to obtain a reasonable match to test data. With the updated performance and sizing, fuel burn and energy use is reduced by 54% compared to the SUGAR Free current technology Baseline (Goal 60%). Use of the unducted fan version of the engine reduces fuel burn and energy by 56% compared to the Baseline. Technology development roadmaps were updated, and an airport compatibility analysis established feasibility of a folding wing aircraft at existing airports.

  8. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research: Phase 2. Volume 2; Hybrid Electric Design Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the hybrid electric concept design, analysis, and modeling work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team, consisting of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech.Performance and sizing tasks were conducted for hybrid electric versions of a conventional tube-and-wing aircraft and a hybrid wing body. The high wing Truss Braced Wing (TBW) SUGAR Volt was updated based on results from the TBW work (documented separately) and new engine performance models. Energy cost and acoustic analyses were conducted and technology roadmaps were updated for hybrid electric and battery technology. NOx emissions were calculated for landing and takeoff (LTO) and cruise. NPSS models were developed for hybrid electric components and tested using an integrated analysis of superconducting and non-superconducting hybrid electric engines. The hybrid electric SUGAR Volt was shown to produce significant emissions and fuel burn reductions beyond those achieved by the conventionally powered SUGAR High and was able to meet the NASA goals for fuel burn. Total energy utilization was not decreased but reduced energy cost can be achieved for some scenarios. The team was not able to identify a technology development path to meet NASA's noise goals

  9. A diaper bank and home visiting partnership: Initial exploration of research and policy questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Lois S; Condon, Eileen M; Deng, Shirley Z; Ordway, Monica Roosa; Marchesseault, Crista; Miller, Andrea; Alfano, Janet Stolfi; Weir, Alison M

    2017-12-13

    The cost of diapering an infant can place a significant financial strain on families living in poverty. Partnerships between diaper banks and home visiting programs for young families may offer an innovative solution to expanding the reach and impact of diaper banks in low-income communities. The purpose of this pilot study was to uncover preliminary information about the functions of diaper distribution through home visiting programs, and to inform future research and policy questions regarding diaper distribution to families in need. In this descriptive qualitative pilot study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 6 home visitors from Minding the Baby ® (MTB), a home visiting intervention for young parents. MTB clinicians routinely distribute diapers in partnership with The Diaper Bank in Connecticut. We used directed content analysis to code and analyze interview transcripts. These preliminary findings indicate that partnerships between home visiting programs and diaper banks may benefit families by improving diaper access, reducing stigma, and fostering trusting relationships with home visitors. Home visiting program benefits including engagement or re-engagement with families may need to be balanced with potential effects on clinical and therapeutic relationships. Recommendations for next steps in research and related policy questions are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Contextual Exploration of a New Family Caregiver Support Concept for Geriatric Settings Using a Participatory Health Research Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorant, Elisabeth; Krieger, Theresia

    2017-11-28

    Family caregivers are the backbone of the long-term care support system within the home environment. Comprehensive caregiver support programs require collaboration and coordination within the system. A new public health concept, Vade Mecum, aims to harmonize and professionalize family caregiver support initiatives in geriatric care settings in the Euregion Maas-Rhine. Exploration of the new concept recently started in Germany to gain in-depth insight into current support and the needs of the geriatric care team and family caregivers. Within the context of an exploratory qualitative study, a participatory health research (PHR) strategy was applied to make optimal use of experience and knowledge from the system. Care professionals, engaged as co-researchers, were responsible for decisions about the research question, data collection methods and procedures of engaging family caregivers. A research team representing all professions within the geriatric department was formed. Research objectives were formulated and an appropriate mix of qualitative data collection methods consisting of interviews, focus groups and story-telling was chosen. Needs and expectations of the new concept, and practical solutions for involving family caregivers were discussed. A PHR strategy resulted in initiating a qualitative study in a geriatric care setting carried out by care professionals from the department. Knowledge was generated in a co-creative manner, and co-researchers were empowered. A comprehensive understanding of the system serves as a starting point for advancement of the new family caregiver concept.

  11. PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating: Science Education from the Poles to the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, W. K.; Breen, K.; Warburton, J.; Fischer, K.; Wiggins, H.; Owens, R.; Polly, B.; Wade, B.; Buxbaum, T.

    2007-12-01

    PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating is a three-year (2007-2009) teacher professional development program celebrating the International Polar Year (IPY) that advances polar science education by bringing K-12 educators and polar researchers together in hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctic. Currently in its second year, the program fosters the integration of research and education to produce a legacy of long-term teacher-researcher collaborations, improved teacher content knowledge through experiences in scientific inquiry, and broad public interest and engagement in polar science. Through PolarTREC, over 40 U.S. teachers will spend two to six weeks in the Arctic or Antarctic, working closely with researchers in the field as an integral part of the science team. Research projects focus on a wide range of IPY science themed topics such as sea-ice dynamics, terrestrial ecology, marine biology, atmospheric chemistry, and long-term climate change. While in the field, teachers and researchers will communicate extensively with their colleagues, communities, and hundreds of students of all ages across the globe, using a variety of tools including satellite phones, online journals, podcasts and interactive "Live from IPY" calls and web-based seminars. The online outreach elements of the project convey these experiences to a broad audience far beyond the classrooms of the PolarTREC teachers. In addition to field research experiences, PolarTREC will support teacher professional development and a sustained community of teachers, scientists, and the public through workshops, Internet seminars, an e-mail listserve, and teacher peer groups. To learn more about PolarTREC visit the website at: http://www.polartrec.com or contact info@polartrec.com or 907-474-1600. PolarTREC is funded by NSF and managed by the Arctic Research Consortium of the US (ARCUS).

  12. From ENSEMBLES to CORDEX: exploring the progress for hydrological impact research for the upper Danube basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanzel, Philipp; Kling, Harald

    2017-04-01

    EURO-CORDEX Regional Climate Model (RCM) data are available as result of the latest initiative of the climate modelling community to provide ever improved simulations of past and future climate in Europe. The spatial resolution of the climate models increased from 25 x 25 km in the previous coordinated initiative, ENSEMBLES, to 12 x 12 km in the CORDEX EUR-11 simulations. This higher spatial resolution might yield improved representation of the historic climate, especially in complex mountainous terrain, improving applicability in impact studies. CORDEX scenario simulations are based on Representative Concentration Pathways, while ENSEMBLES applied the SRES greenhouse gas emission scenarios. The new emission scenarios might lead to different projections of future climate. In this contribution we explore these two dimensions of development from ENSEMBLES to CORDEX - representation of the past and projections for the future - in the context of a hydrological climate change impact study for the Danube River. We replicated previous hydrological simulations that used ENSEMBLES data of 21 RCM simulations under SRES A1B emission scenario as meteorological input data (Kling et al. 2012), and now applied CORDEX EUR-11 data of 16 RCM simulations under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 emission scenarios. The climate variables precipitation and temperature were used to drive a monthly hydrological model of the upper Danube basin upstream of Vienna (100,000 km2). RCM data was bias corrected and downscaled to the scale of hydrological model units. Results with CORDEX data were compared with results with ENSEMBLES data, analysing both the driving meteorological input and the resulting discharge projections. Results with CORDEX data show no general improvement in the accuracy of representing historic climatic features, despite the increase in spatial model resolution. The tendency of ENSEMBLES scenario projections of increasing precipitation in winter and decreasing precipitation in summer is

  13. Exploring the Potential of the iPad and Xbox Kinect for Cognitive Science Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolle, Camarin E; Voytek, Bradley; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have validated consumer-facing hardware platforms as efficient, cost-effective, and accessible data collection instruments. However, there are few reports that have assessed the reliability of these platforms as assessment tools compared with traditional data collection platforms. Here we evaluated performance on a spatial attention paradigm obtained by our standard in-lab data collection platform, the personal computer (PC), and compared performance with that of two widely adopted, consumer technology devices: the Apple (Cupertino, CA) iPad(®) 2 and Microsoft (Redmond, WA) Xbox(®) Kinect(®). The task assessed spatial attention, a fundamental ability that we use to navigate the complex sensory input we face daily in order to effectively engage in goal-directed activities. Participants were presented with a central spatial cue indicating where on the screen a stimulus would appear. We manipulated spatial cueing such that, on a given trial, the cue presented one of four levels of information indicating the upcoming target location. Based on previous research, we hypothesized that as information of the cued spatial area decreased (i.e., larger area of possible target location) there would be a parametric decrease in performance, as revealed by slower response times and lower accuracies. Identical paradigm parameters were used for each of the three platforms, and testing was performed in a single session with a counterbalanced design. We found that performance on the Kinect and iPad showed a stronger parametric effect across the cued-information levels than that on the PC. Our results suggest that not only can the Kinect and iPad be reliably used as assessment tools to yield research-quality behavioral data, but that these platforms exploit mechanics that could be useful in building more interactive, and therefore effective, cognitive assessment and training designs. We include a discussion on the possible contributing factors to the differential

  14. From outer space to Earth-The social significance of isolated and confined environment research in human space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Koji; Tachibana, Shoichi; Inoue, Natsuhiko

    2017-11-01

    Human space exploration requires massive budgets every fiscal year. Especially under severe financial constraint conditions, governments are forced to justify to society why spending so much tax revenue for human space exploration is worth the cost. The value of human space exploration might be estimated in many ways, but its social significance and cost-effectiveness are two key ways to gauge that worth. Since these measures should be applied country by country because sociopolitical conditions differ in each country and must be taken into consideration, the study on the social significance of human space exploration must take the coloration of a case-study. This paper, focusing on the case of Japan with surveying Japanese literary and national documents as well as taking its sociopolitical conditions into account, examines the social significance of human space exploration. First, we give an overview of the circumstances surrounding Japan's human space exploration program. Derived from the statements of such relevant parties as scholars, journalists, policy makers, and astronauts, this overview indicates that the main concerns about human space exploration in Japan are its social significance and cost-effectiveness (Section 1). Next, an overview of behavioral science-an essential field for human space exploration (referred to in this paper as space behavioral science) that provides support for astronauts-is presented from the perspective of stress research in isolated and confined environments (Section 2). We then give two examples of where such knowledge from space behavioral science research has been applied to terrestrial isolated and confined environments. One is JAXA's support in 2009 for people who were vulnerable to infection by a new strain of flu and accordingly placed in an isolated and confined facility under the Infectious Disease Law and the Quarantine Law. The other is NASA's support in 2010 for Chilean mine workers who were trapped 700 m

  15. Agent-based modeling as a research method for exploring joint decision making in organizations – a distributed cognition perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Svend Erik

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an agent-based model to explore aspects of decision making in organizations from a distributed cognition perspective. Within distributed cognition research cognition is conceptualized as a process that takes place - not only within individuals’ minds but also between them...... decision making and distributed cognition......., as they interact with each other. This means that the interactions between individuals impact both the outcome of the decision process and the individuals’ cognition, which in turn will impact their subsequent decisions. The paper outlines how this dynamic and complex task can be modeled taking into account...

  16. Research Exploring Physical Activity in Care Homes (REACH): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Anne; Airlie, Jennifer; Birch, Karen; Cicero, Robert; Cundill, Bonnie; Ellwood, Alison; Godfrey, Mary; Graham, Liz; Green, John; Hulme, Claire; Lawton, Rebecca; McLellan, Vicki; McMaster, Nicola; Farrin, Amanda

    2017-04-19

    As life expectancy increases and the number of older people, particularly those aged 85 years and over, expands there is an increase in demand for long-term care. A large proportion of people in a care home setting spend most of their time sedentary, and this is one of the leading preventable causes of death. Encouraging residents to engage in more physical activity could deliver benefits in terms of physical and psychological health, and quality of life. This study is the final stage of a programme of research to develop and preliminarily test an evidence-based intervention designed to enhance opportunities for movement amongst care home residents, thereby increasing levels of physical activity. This is a cluster randomised feasibility trial, aiming to recruit at least 8-12 residents at each of 12 residential care homes across Yorkshire, UK. Care homes will be randomly allocated on a 1:1 basis to receive either the intervention alongside usual care, or to continue to provide usual care alone. Assessment will be undertaken with participating residents at baseline (prior to care home randomisation) and at 3, 6, and 9 months post-randomisation. Data relating to changes in physical activity, physical function, level of cognitive impairment, mood, perceived health and wellbeing, and quality of life will be collected. Data at the level of the home will also be collected and will include staff experience of care, and changes in the numbers and types of adverse events residents experience (for example, hospital admissions, falls). Details of National Health Service (NHS) usage will be collected to inform the economic analysis. An embedded process evaluation will obtain information to test out the theory of change underpinning the intervention and its acceptability to staff and residents. This feasibility trial with embedded process evaluation and collection of health economic data will allow us to undertake detailed feasibility work to inform a future large-scale trial

  17. Exploring arts-based knowledge translation: sharing research findings through performing the patterns, rehearsing the results, staging the synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Kendra; Schultz, Annette S H

    2014-04-01

    Cultivation of knowledge translation (KT) strategies that actively engage health professionals in critical reflection of their practice and research-based evidence are imperative to address the research-practice gap. While research-based evidence is exponentially growing, our ability to facilitate uptake by nurses and other health professionals has not kept pace. Innovative approaches that extend epistemological bias beyond a singular standpoint of postpositivism, such as the utilization of arts-based methods, expand the possibility to address the complexities of context, engage audience members, promote dissemination within communities of practice, and foster new audiences interested in research findings. In this paper, we address the importance of adopting a social constructivist epistemological stance to facilitate knowledge translation to diverse audiences, explore various arts-based knowledge translation (ABKT) strategies, and open a dialogue concerning evaluative tenets of ABKT. ABKT utilizes various art forms to disseminate research knowledge to diverse audiences and promote evidence-informed practice. ABKT initiatives translate knowledge not based upon a linear model, which views knowledge as an objective entity, but rather operate from the premise that knowledge is socially situated, which demands acknowledging and engaging the learner within their context. Theatre, dance, photography, and poetry are art forms that are commonly used to communicate research findings to diverse audiences. Given the emerging interest and importance of utilizing this KT strategy situated within a social constructivist epistemology, potential challenges and plausible evaluative criteria specific to ABKT are presented. ABKT is an emerging KT strategy that is grounded in social constructivist epistemological tenets, and holds potential for meaningfully sharing new research knowledge with diverse audiences. ABKT is an innovative and synergistic approach to traditional

  18. Rethinking poverty, power and privilege: A feminist post-structuralist research exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thérèse Hulme

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I described how the use of feminist methodology and post-structuralist analyses of the experiences of women in a poor ‘Coloured’ community in my research led to new understandings of the experiences of poverty and privilege. I discovered the relevance of Foucault’s historical analysis of the operation of ‘pastoral power’ through the narratives of women from the Scottsville community. Historical and current accounts of so-called ‘Coloured’ women’s subjugation and categorisation are reminders of how it came about that ‘being Coloured’ became associated in South Africa with shame and with ‘knowing one’s place’. Feminist post-structuralist analyses made visible the conditions that created practices of injustice in poor women’s lives whilst, at the same time, creating conditions of privilege for me. Justice-making in Scottsville therefore started with a radical rethinking of the terms by which people’s marginalisation took place and, consequently also of the terms of ‘just’ cross-cultural engagements.

  19. Exploring Pre-Service Science Teacher Methods and Strategies for the Driving Questions in Research Inquiry: From Consulting an Instructor to Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Miraç

    2016-01-01

    An important stage in any research inquiry is the development of research questions that need to be answered. The strategies to develop research questions should be defined and described, but few studies have considered this process in greater detail. This study explores pre-service science teachers' research questions and the strategies they can…

  20. Kennedy: Future Academic Research Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The president of Stanford University discusses his views on problems facing research universities, including research secrecy, ethics, and economics of proprietary knowledge generated in the university, faculty conflict of interest, place of humanities in a society driven by technology, and decline of government support for academic research.…

  1. Research and Technology Development to Advance Environmental Monitoring, Food Systems, and Habitat Design for Exploration Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.; Perchonek, M. H.; Ott, C. M.; Kaiser, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    Exploration missions will carry crews far beyond the relatively safe environs of cis-lunar space. Such trips will have little or no opportunity for resupply or rapid aborts and will be of a duration that far exceeds our experience to date. The challenges this imposes on the requirements of systems that monitor the life support and provide food and shelter for the crew are the focus of much research within the Human Research Program. Making all of these technologies robust and reliable enough for multi-year missions with little or no ability to run for home calls for a thorough understanding of the risks and impacts of failure. The way we currently monitor for microbial contamination of water, air, and surfaces, by sampling and growing cultures on nutrient media, must be reconsidered for exploration missions which have limited capacity for consumables. Likewise, the shelf life of food must be increased so that the nutrients required to keep the crewmembers healthy do not degrade over the life of the mission. Improved formulations, preservation, packaging, and storage technologies are all being investigated for ways slow this process or replace stowed food with key food items grown fresh in situ. Ensuring that the mass and volume of a spacecraft are used to maximum efficiency calls for infusing human factors into the design from its inception to increase efficiency, improve performance, and retain robustness toward operational realities. Integrating the human system with the spacecraft systems is the focus of many lines of investigation.

  2. Health aspects of Arctic exploration--Alaska's medical history based on the research files of Dr. Robert Fortuine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Robert Fortuine provided basic medical care to Alaska Native people, chronicled the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration and through a number of influential publications, was the first to thoroughly document and analyse Alaska's Medical History. This overview of his published work will provide the reader with a detailed overview, so that they can begin to explore Dr. Fortuine's many published works in more detail. This review will explore Alaska's Medical History and the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration through the research files and the 10 most significant publications of Dr. Robert Fortuine. Review of Dr. Fortuine's major works and the master bibliography has over 3,000 references and 81 subjects. The master bibliography is a merger of 55 separate bibliographies, which provides a wealth of bibliographic information. This paper will describe his 10 most significant publications, 2 of which began as a journal issue. Dr. Fortuine was a prolific writer throughout his career, publishing 134 articles and books. He wrote papers and books on Alaska's medical history, tuberculosis and health care delivery from Russian-America through the Public Health Service efforts in the territory and then the State of Alaska. The master bibliography has over 3,000 references and 81 subjects. This list has a significant number of entries for tuberculosis with almost one-third of the entries including this heading. Others dwell on the history of "pre-contact" health, the history of Alaska Native health care, the history of the Alaska Department of Health, especially the tuberculosis programme, the role of the US Public Health Service and traditional medicine. He completely reviewed every Governors' and the US Surgeon General's reports in regard to Alaska content. This paper describes his 10 most significant publications. Robert Fortuine's published works offer a wealth of information and insight into Alaska's Medical History and the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration. As is

  3. Health aspects of Arctic exploration – Alaska's medical history based on the research files of Dr. Robert Fortuine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Murray

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background . Robert Fortuine provided basic medical care to Alaska Native people, chronicled the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration and through a number of influential publications, was the first to thoroughly document and analyse Alaska's Medical History. This overview of his published work will provide the reader with a detailed overview, so that they can begin to explore Dr. Fortuine's many published works in more detail. Objective . This review will explore Alaska's Medical History and the Health Aspects of Arctic Exploration through the research files and the 10 most significant publications of Dr. Robert Fortuine. Design . Review of Dr. Fortuine's major works and the master bibliography has over 3,000 references and 81 subjects. The master bibliography is a merger of 55 separate bibliographies, which provides a wealth of bibliographic information. This paper will describe his 10 most significant publications, 2 of which began as a journal issue. Results . Dr. Fortuine was a prolific writer throughout his career, publishing 134 articles and books. He wrote papers and books on Alaska's medical history, tuberculosis and health care delivery from Russian–America through the Public Health Service efforts in the territory and then the State of Alaska. The master bibliography has over 3,000 references and 81 subjects. This list has a significant number of entries for tuberculosis with almost one-third of the entries including this heading. Others dwell on the history of “pre-contact” health, the history of Alaska Native health care, the history of the Alaska Department of Health, especially the tuberculosis programme, the role of the US Public Health Service and traditional medicine. He completely reviewed every Governors’ and the US Surgeon General's reports in regard to Alaska content. This paper describes his 10 most significant publications. Conclusions . Robert Fortuine's published works offer a wealth of information and insight

  4. Effects of university affiliation and "school spirit" on color preferences: Berkeley versus Stanford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Karen B; Poggesi, Rosa M; Palmer, Stephen E

    2011-06-01

    The ecological valence theory (EVT) posits that preference for a color is determined by people's average affective response to everything associated with it (Palmer & Schloss, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107, 8877-8882, 2010). The EVT thus implies the existence of sociocultural effects: Color preference should increase with positive feelings (or decrease with negative feelings) toward an institution strongly associated with a color. We tested this prediction by measuring undergraduates' color preferences at two rival universities, Berkeley and Stanford, to determine whether students liked their university's colors better than their rivals did. Students not only preferred their own colors more than their rivals did, but the degree of their preference increased with self-rated positive affect ("school spirit") for their university. These results support the EVT's claim that color preference is caused by learned affective responses to associated objects and institutions, because it is unlikely that students choose their university or develop their degree of school spirit on the basis of preexisting color preferences.

  5. The development of seismic guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggins, R.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the development of Seismic Guidelines for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Although structures have always been built conservatively, SLAC management decided to review and update their seismic guidelines. SLAC is about mid-way between the epicenters of the 8.3 Richter magnitude 1906 San Francisco and the 7.2 Loma Prieta Earthquakes. The west end of the two mile long electron/positron particle accelerator lies a half mile from the large San Andreas Fault. Suggestions for seismic planning processes were solicited from local computer manufacturing firms, universities, and federal laboratories. A Committee of the various stakeholders in SLAC`s seismic planning retained an internationally known Seismic Planning Consultant and reviewed relevant standards and drafted Guidelines. A panel of seismic experts was convened to help define the hazard, site response spectra, probabilistic analysis of shaking, and near field effects. The Facility`s structures were assigned to seismic classes of importance, and an initial assessment of a sample of a dozen buildings conducted. This assessment resulted in emergency repairs to one structure, and provided a {open_quotes}reality basis{close_quotes} for establishing the final Guidelines and Administrative Procedures, and a program to evaluate remaining buildings, shielding walls, tunnels, and other special structures.

  6. Development of robots for rehabilitation therapy: the Palo Alto VA/Stanford experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgar, C G; Lum, P S; Shor, P C; Machiel Van der Loos, H F

    2000-01-01

    For over 25 years, personal assistant robots for severely disabled individuals have been in development. More recently, using robots to deliver rehabilitation therapy has been proposed. This paper summarizes the development and clinical testing of three mechatronic systems for post-stroke therapy conducted at the VA Palo Alto in collaboration with Stanford University. We describe the philosophy and experiences that guided their evolution. Unique to the Palo Alto approach is provision for bimanual, mirror-image, patient-controlled therapeutic exercise. Proof-of-concept was established with a 2-degree-of-freedom (DOF) elbow/forearm manipulator. Tests of a second-generation therapy robot producing planar forearm movements in 19 hemiplegic and control subjects confirmed the validity and reliability of interaction forces during mechanically assisted upper-limb movements. Clinical trials comparing 3-D robot-assisted therapy to traditional therapy in 21 chronic stroke subjects showed significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer (FM) measure of motor recovery in the robot group, which exceeded improvements in the control group.

  7. The Impact of Postgraduate Health Technology Innovation Training: Outcomes of the Stanford Biodesign Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, James; Hellman, Eva; Denend, Lyn; Rait, Douglas; Venook, Ross; Lucian, Linda; Azagury, Dan; Yock, Paul G; Brinton, Todd J

    2017-05-01

    Stanford Biodesign launched its Innovation Fellowship in 2001 as a first-of-its kind postgraduate training experience for teaching biomedical technology innovators a need-driven process for developing medical technologies and delivering them to patients. Since then, many design-oriented educational programs have been initiated, yet the impact of this type of training remains poorly understood. This study measures the career focus, leadership trajectory, and productivity of 114 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship alumni based on survey data and public career information. It also compares alumni on certain publicly available metrics to finalists interviewed but not selected. Overall, 60% of alumni are employed in health technology in contrast to 35% of finalists interviewed but not selected. On leadership, 72% of alumni hold managerial or higher positions compared to 48% of the finalist group. A total of 67% of alumni reported that the fellowship had been "extremely beneficial" on their careers. As a measure of technology translation, more than 440,000 patients have been reached with technologies developed directly out of the Biodesign Innovation Fellowship, with another 1,000,000+ aided by solutions initiated by alumni after their training. This study suggests a positive impact of the fellowship program on the career focus, leadership, and productivity of its alumni.

  8. [Clinical practice and thoughts on the strategy of root reconstruction for Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C S; Li, J; Lai, H

    2017-04-01

    The strategy of root reconstruction for Stanford type A aortic dissection (AAD) includes resection of the intimal tear site, correction of concomitant aortic valve dysfunction and amendment of coronary lesion. Supracommissural tube graft replacement is a well-adopted and convenient procedure for most patients, although its application is limited when distinct sinus expansion and severe intimal damage is present. Composite valve conduit replacement (Bentall procedure) is suitable for patients with overt sinus damage. However, a fraction of patients with functional aortic valve will be unnecessarily put into risks for prosthetic complications. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSRR), which includes aortic root remodeling (Yacoub procedure) and reimplantation (David procedure) techniques, has the advantage of retaining autologous aortic valve while guaranteeing resection of damaged vessel segments.The Yacoub procedure is relatively convenient but harbors long-term risk for annulus expansion, while the David procedure demonstrates long-term benefit but may be too demanding to be operated in emergent scenario as AAD. The last decade has witnessed worldwide endeavors to investigate the treatment strategy for aortic root, especially the VSRR approach. The preliminary results are encouraging and demonstrating improvements for both mid- and long-term outcomes of AAD, which enables standardized and personalized surgical management for these patients.

  9. Exploring teachers' beliefs and knowledge about scientific inquiry and the nature of science: A collaborative action research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Xavier Eric

    Science curriculum reform goals espouse the need to foster and support the development of scientific literacy in students. Two critical goals of scientific literacy are students' engagement in, and developing more realistic conceptions about scientific inquiry (SI) and the nature of science (NOS). In order to promote the learning of these curriculum emphases, teachers themselves must possess beliefs and knowledge supportive of them. Collaborative action research is a viable form of curriculum and teacher development that can be used to support teachers in developing the requisite beliefs and knowledge that can promote these scientific literacy goals. This research study used a collective case study methodology to describe and interpret the views and actions of four teachers participating in a collaborative action research project. I explored the teachers' SI and NOS views throughout the project as they investigated ideas and theories, critically examined their current curricular practice, and implemented and reflected on these modified curricular practices. By the end of the research study, all participants had uniquely augmented their understanding of SI and NOS. The participants were better able to provide explanatory depth to some SI and NOS ideas; however, specific belief revision with respect to SI and NOS ideas was nominal. Furthermore, their idealized action research plans were not implemented to the extent that they were planned. Explanations for these findings include: impact of significant past educational experiences, prior understanding of SI and NOS, depth of content and pedagogical content knowledge of the discipline, and institutional and instructional constraints. Nonetheless, through participation in the collaborative action research process, the teachers developed professionally, personally, and socially. They identified many positive outcomes from participating in a collaborative action research project; however, they espoused constraints to

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This model involves the allocation of nursing students to a qualified professional nurse who, in the course of ... who qualified in general nursing and midwifery at a rural hospital in. Lesotho. Eight professional .... research that explored the experiences and perceptions of healthcare workers in clinical environments about the ...

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Communities provide the reality of social and health challenges and therefore provide the platform for learning and exploring their authentic challenges.[1] Community-university partnerships are thus intended to bring together academic researchers and communities, share power, establish trust, foster co-learning, enhance ...

  12. Exploring access to end of life care for ethnic minorities with end stage kidney disease through recruitment in action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Emma; Randhawa, Gurch; Brown, Edwina; Da Silva Gane, Maria; Stoves, John; Warwick, Graham; Akhtar, Tahira; Magee, Regina; Sharman, Sue; Farrington, Ken

    2016-07-11

    Variation in provision of palliative care in kidney services and practitioner concerns to provide equitable access led to the development of this study which focussed on the perspectives of South Asian patients and their care providers. As people with a South Asian background experience a higher risk of Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) and end stage kidney failure (ESKF) compared to the majority population but wait longer for a transplant, there is a need for end of life care to be accessible for this group of patients. Furthermore because non English speakers and people at end of life are often excluded from research there is a dearth of research evidence with which to inform service improvement. This paper aims to explore issues relating to the process of recruitment of patients for a research project which contribute to our understanding of access to end of life care for ethnic minority patients in the kidney setting. The study employed an action research methodology with interviews and focus groups to capture and reflect on the process of engaging with South Asian patients about end of life care. Researchers and kidney care clinicians on four NHS sites in the UK recruited South Asian patients with ESKF who were requiring end of life care to take part in individual interviews; and other clinicians who provided care to South Asian kidney patients at end of life to take part in focus groups exploring end of life care issues. In action research planning, action and evaluation are interlinked and data were analysed with emergent themes fed back to care providers through the research cycle. Reflections on the process of patient recruitment generated focus group discussions about access which were analysed thematically and reported here. Sixteen patients were recruited to interview and 45 different care providers took part in 14 focus groups across the sites. The process of recruiting patients to interview and subsequent focus group data highlighted some of the key issues

  13. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate Projects at Glenn Research Center for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Glenn Research Center Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR)/(STTR) technologies into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs and projects. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this useful. Introduction Incorporating Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-developed technology into NASA projects is important, especially given the Agency's limited resources for technology development. The SBIR program's original intention was for technologies that had completed Phase II to be ready for integration into NASA programs, however, in many cases there is a gap between Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) 5 and 6 that needs to be closed. After SBIR Phase II projects are completed, the technology is evaluated against various parameters and a TRL rating is assigned. Most programs tend to adopt more mature technologies-at least TRL 6 to reduce the risk to the mission rather than adopt TRLs between 3 and 5 because those technologies are perceived as too risky. The gap between TRLs 5 and 6 is often called the "Valley of Death" (Figure 1), and historically it has been difficult to close because of a lack of funding support from programs. Several papers have already suggested remedies on how to close the gap (Refs. 1 to 4).

  14. The Jupyter/IPython architecture: a unified view of computational research, from interactive exploration to communication and publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan-Kelley, M.; Perez, F.; Granger, B.; Kluyver, T.; Ivanov, P.; Frederic, J.; Bussonnier, M.

    2014-12-01

    IPython has provided terminal-based tools for interactive computing in Python since 2001. The notebook document format and multi-process architecture introduced in 2011 have expanded the applicable scope of IPython into teaching, presenting, and sharing computational work, in addition to interactive exploration. The new architecture also allows users to work in any language, with implementations in Python, R, Julia, Haskell, and several other languages. The language agnostic parts of IPython have been renamed to Jupyter, to better capture the notion that a cross-language design can encapsulate commonalities present in computational research regardless of the programming language being used. This architecture offers components like the web-based Notebook interface, that supports rich documents that combine code and computational results with text narratives, mathematics, images, video and any media that a modern browser can display. This interface can be used not only in research, but also for publication and education, as notebooks can be converted to a variety of output formats, including HTML and PDF. Recent developments in the Jupyter project include a multi-user environment for hosting notebooks for a class or research group, a live collaboration notebook via Google Docs, and better support for languages other than Python.

  15. Social Media Technology and Public Health in Ontario: Findings from a Planning Meeting Exploring Current Practices and Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Richard; McMurray, Josephine; Regan, Sandra; Kothari, Anita; Donelle, Lorie; McBride, Susan; Sobel, Annette; Hall, Jodi; Fraser, Robert; Foisey, Lyndsay

    2017-01-01

    In the province of Ontario, many of the public health units (PHUs) now possess and use social media as part of their daily health promotion and communication operations. To explore this topic, a planning meeting was held to generate deeper insights toward the use of these forms of technology for preventative services delivery. The planning meeting was held with 50 participants, comprising representatives from 20 of the 36 PHUs in Ontario, interested academics, students and government representatives. A nominal group technique (NGT) was used to build consensus related to future research needs, as related to public health and social media. Participants generated a range of insights around the use of social media, including the need for: leadership buy-in and resource allocation; social media policy and governance structure; performance measurement and evaluation; practices related to engagement with program recipients and addressing the lack of resources faced by many health units. Future research priorities were also generated, related to evaluating the cost-benefit of social media activities and understanding behaviour change implications. Further research is needed to evaluate the functionality, leadership and competency requirements and impact(s) of these new forms of health communication technology within public health service delivery. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  16. [The relationship between preoperative renal failure and severe postoperative hypoxemia of patients received surgical procedures for Stanford A aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X D; Ju, F; Liu, N; Zheng, J; Sun, L Z; Zheng, S H

    2016-08-01

    To study the relationship between renal failure and severe postoperative hypoxemia of patients received surgical procedure for Stanford A aortic dissection. Clinical data of 411 consecutive patients from January 2014 to April 2015, who received surgical procedure for Stanford A aortic dissection in Department of Cardiovascular Surgery of Beijing Anzhen Hospital, were collected retrospectively. The appearance of severe postoperative hypoxemia was recorded in all the cases. All the data about potential prognostic factors was put into the database and analyzed by univariate and multivariate Logistic regression respectively. Severe postoperative hypoxemia (PO2/FiO2hypoxemia showed no statistical significance. However, the influence of preoperative serum creatinine showed statistical significance (OR=1.009, 95%CI: 1.000 to 1.018, P=0.048). The preoperative creatinine clearance rate of patients has no direct relationship with severe postoperative hypoxemia. But the preoperative serum creatinine could be regarded as an independent predictor of severe postoperative hypoxemia.

  17. A Tropical Marine Microbial Natural Products Geobibliography as an Example of Desktop Exploration of Current Research Using Web Visualisation Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Evans-Illidge

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial marine biodiscovery is a recent scientific endeavour developing at a time when information and other technologies are also undergoing great technical strides. Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind ™, ArcGIS Explorer ™ and Google Earth ™. Overlaying custom information upon these tools is within the hands of every scientist and more and more scientific organisations are making data available that can also be integrated into these global visualisation tools. The integrated global view that these tools enable provides a powerful desktop exploration tool. Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth ™ and additional ancillary global data sets. The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

  18. NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research'sOkeanos Explorer Program 2014 Discoveries - U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin and Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobecker, E.; McKenna, L.; Sowers, D.; Elliott, K.; Kennedy, B.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA ShipOkeanos Explorer, the only U.S. federal vessel dedicated to global ocean exploration, made several important discoveries in U.S. waters of the North Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico during the 2014 field season. Based on input received from a broad group ofmarine scientists and resource managers, over 100,000 square kilometers of seafloor and associated water column were systematically explored using advanced mapping sonars. 39 ROV diveswere conducted, leading to new discoveries that will further ourunderstanding of biologic, geologic, and underwater-cultural heritage secrets hidden withinthe oceans. In the Atlantic, season highlights include completion of a multi-year submarine canyons mapping effort of the continental shelf break from North Carolina to the U.S.-Canada maritime border;new information on the ephemerality of recently discovered and geographically extensive cold water seeps; and continued exploration of the New England Seamount chain; and mapping of two potential historically significant World War II wreck sites. In the Gulf of Mexico, season highlights includecompletion of a multi-year mapping effort of the West Florida Escarpment providing new insight into submarine landslides and detachment zones;the discovery of at least two asphalt volcanoes, or 'tar lilies'; range extensions of deep-sea corals; discovery of two potential new species of crinoids; identification of at least 300 potential cold water seeps; and ROV exploration of three historically significant19th century shipwrecks. In both regions, high-resolution mapping led to new insight into the geological context in which deep sea corals develop,while ROV dives provided valuable observations of deep sea coral habitats and their associated organisms, and chemosynthetic habitats. All mapping and ROV data is freely available to the public in usable data formats and maintained in national geophysical and oceanographic data archives.

  19. From transformative learning to social change? Using action research to explore and improve informal complaints management in an NHS trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anki Odelius

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of complaints from patients and/or carers concerning aspects of care has increased over time. Yet, in spite of a growing body of national and international literature on healthcare complaints, there is a lack of knowledge around how nurses and midwives manage informal complaints at ward level, or staff needs in relation to this. Aim: Using an action research approach with mixed methods, four phases and four cycles, the aim was to explore informal complaints management by nurses and midwives at ward level. We discuss the action research process primarily in connection with learning and service change, drawing from the qualitative data in this paper. Findings: The analysis of the collected qualitative data resulted in three main themes, related to the complexities of complaints and complaints management, staff support needs and the existing ambiguous complaints systems, which are hard for staff and service users to negotiate. The action research approach facilitated learning and change in participants in relation to complaints management, in the collaborating trust. Conclusions: The extant body of research on complaints does not sufficiently recognise the complexity of complaints and informal complaints management, or the complaints systems that are in place. Needs-based staff training can help support staff to manage informal complaints more effectively. Implications for practice: • There needs to be recognition of the complexities involved in complaints management • Complaints systems need to be clearer for the benefit of service users and staff • Staff need training and support that is tailored to their needs to improve their response to complaints, leading to a better patient experience • Limited interventions, informed by staff needs, can lead to change and act as a catalyst for a wider change in informal complaints management

  20. Saw-tooth instability studies at the Stanford Linear Collider damping rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podobedov, B.

    1999-12-14

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch, and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blow-up in quadruple or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of the instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional the authors had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency ({approximately}10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. The authors have also employed a state-of-the-art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of the streak camera experiments the authors have quantitatively described the phase space of unstable bunches. The authors have found the radial structure of the instability mode and established that it only displaces a few percent of the beam particles. In another series of experiments the authors have correlated the instability signals from the beams before the extraction from the damping rings with their trajectories in the linac downstream. This showed that the instability results in a significant transverse beam jitter in the linac which compromises the damping ring performance as an injector. In addition, the authors have studied the instability behavior under the broad range of stored beam parameters using both passive observation and driven excitation. These measurements revealed unexpected beam behavior significantly above the instability threshold. Finally, the authors performed several low current experiments to estimate the damping ring vacuum chamber impedance.

  1. The Stanford Medical Youth Science Program: educational and science-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Casey; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Biomedical preparatory programs (pipeline programs) have been developed at colleges and universities to better prepare youth for entering science- and health-related careers, but outcomes of such programs have seldom been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a matched cohort study to evaluate the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program's Summer Residential Program (SRP), a 25-year-old university-based biomedical pipeline program that reaches out to low-income and underrepresented ethnic minority high school students. Five annual surveys were used to assess educational outcomes and science-related experience among 96 SRP participants and a comparison group of 192 youth who applied but were not selected to participate in the SRP, using ~2:1 matching on sociodemographic and academic background to control for potential confounders. SRP participants were more likely than the comparison group to enter college (100.0 vs. 84.4 %, p = 0.002), and both of these matriculation rates were more than double the statewide average (40.8 %). In most areas of science-related experience, SRP participants reported significantly more experience (>twofold odds) than the comparison group at 1 year of follow-up, but these differences did not persist after 2-4 years. The comparison group reported substantially more participation in science or college preparatory programs, more academic role models, and less personal adversity than SRP participants, which likely influenced these findings toward the null hypothesis. SRP applicants, irrespective of whether selected for participation, had significantly better educational outcomes than population averages. Short-term science-related experience was better among SRP participants, although longer-term outcomes were similar, most likely due to college and science-related opportunities among the comparison group. We discuss implications for future evaluations of other biomedical pipeline programs.

  2. Exploration of the impacts of distributed-site Research Experiences for Undergraduates using pre-/post- student interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, H.; Hubenthal, M.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    The benefits for student participants of undergraduate research opportunities have been well documented. However, advancements in information and communications technologies (ICT) and cultural shifts around online education and virtual peer-to-peer interaction have lead to new models in which to structure such experiences. Currently, these ICT-enabled Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) programs connect geographically distributed interns in supportive e-learning communities while maintaining a traditional local mentoring arrangement. To document and explore the effects of distributed REU Sites in more depth, six interns from such a program, the Incorporated Research Institution for Seismology (IRIS) REU, were selected at random and asked to be interviewed about the REU experience. The primary targets of the interviews are to understand the mentor/mentee relationships, feeling of support and development and value of near-peer and far-peer relationships throughout their internship in a distributed REU program, and whether they receive the training necessary to gain confidence as a researcher. We also examine the various communication technologies as well as best practices and strategies that can increase intern connectedness. Pre-internship interviews were conducted in-person at the start of the centralized internship orientation week, while post-internship interviews were virtual (e.g. video chat with Skype or Google Hangout). These semi-structured interviews have full audio recordings and subsequent transcriptions. An additional, virtual follow-up interview will be conducted next spring after the interns have an opportunity to attend and present their research at a national conference (e.g., AGU). Interview material will be analyzed through a process of coding, sorting, local integration, and inclusive integration. Results will also be triangulated with pre- and post- survey data both from participants and other survey data from previous years of the IRIS

  3. Transitioning a Fundamental Research Program to Align with the NASA Exploration Initiative-Perspectives from Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.; Kohl, Fred J.

    2004-01-01

    A new Vision for Space Exploration was announced earlier this year by U.S. President George W. Bush. NASA has evaluated on-going programs for strategic alignment with this vision. The evaluation proceeded at a rapid pace and is resulting in changes to the scope and focus of experimental research that will be conducted in support of the new vision. The existing network of researchers in the physical sciences - a highly capable, independent, and loosely knitted community - typically have shared conclusions derived from their work within appropriate discipline-specific peer reviewed journals and publications. The initial result of introducing this Vision for Space Exploration has been to shift research focus from a broad coverage of numerous, widely varying topics into a research program focused on a nearly-singular set of supporting research objectives to enable advances in space exploration. Two of these traditional physical science research disciplines, Combustion Science and Fluid Physics, are implementing a course adjustment from a portfolio dominated by "Fundamental Science Research" to one focused nearly exclusively on supporting the Exploration Vision. Underlying scientific and engineering competencies and infrastructure of the Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics disciplines do provide essential research capabilities to support the contemporary thrusts of human life support, radiation countermeasures, human health, low gravity research for propulsion and materials and, ultimately, research conducted on the Moon and Mars. A perspective on how these two research disciplines responded to the course change will be presented. The relevance to the new NASA direction is provided, while demonstrating through two examples how the prior investment in fundamental research is being brought to bear on solving the issues confronting the successful implementation of the exploration goals.

  4. "So Often They Do Not Get Recruited": Exploring Service User and Staff Perspectives on Participation in Learning Disability Research and the Barriers That Inhibit It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Bradley; Tomlins, Rose; Bancroft, Ann; Ogi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The importance of making research participation accessible for people with learning disabilities is emphasised in government and NHS research strategies. This evaluation explored the realities of this goal from the perceptions of people with learning disabilities and clinicians within an NHS learning disability service. People with learning…

  5. There Is Another Choice: An Exploration of Integrating Formative Assessment in a Chinese High School Chemistry Classroom through Collaborative Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xinying; Buck, Gayle A.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored integrating formative assessment to a Chinese high school chemistry classroom, where the extremely high-stakes testing and Confucian-heritage culture constituted a particular context, through a collaborative action research. One researcher worked with a high school chemistry teacher in China to integrate formative assessment…

  6. Healthy universities--time for action: a qualitative research study exploring the potential for a national programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooris, Mark; Doherty, Sharon

    2010-03-01

    Despite the absence of national or international steers, there is within England growing interest in the Healthy University approach. This article introduces Healthy Universities; reports on a qualitative study exploring the potential for a national programme contributing to health, well-being and sustainable development; and concludes with reflections and recommendations. The study used questionnaires and interviews with key informants from English higher education institutions and national stakeholder organizations. The findings confirmed that higher education offers significant potential to impact positively on the health and well-being of students, staff and wider communities through education, research, knowledge exchange and institutional practice. There was strong support for extending the healthy settings approach beyond schools and further education, through a National Healthy Higher Education Programme that provides a whole system Healthy University Framework. Informants argued that although there are important public health drivers, it will also be necessary to show how a Healthy Universities can help achieve core business objectives and contribute to related agendas such as sustainability. Two models were discussed: an accreditation scheme with externally assessed standardized achievement criteria; and a flexible and light-touch framework focusing on change-related processes and utilizing self-assessment. While highlighting the appeal of league tables, many informants feared that a top-down approach could backfire, generating resistance and resulting in minimal compliance. In contrast, the majority felt that a process-focused aspirational model would be more likely to win hearts and minds and facilitate system-level change. Key recommendations relate to national programme development, research and evaluation and international collaboration and networking.

  7. Smartphones and Cognition: A Review of Research Exploring the Links between Mobile Technology Habits and Cognitive Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Chein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available While smartphones and related mobile technologies are recognized as flexible and powerful tools that, when used prudently, can augment human cognition, there is also a growing perception that habitual involvement with these devices may have a negative and lasting impact on users’ ability to think, remember, pay attention, and regulate emotion. The present review considers an intensifying, though still limited, area of research exploring the potential cognitive impacts of smartphone-related habits, and seeks to determine in which domains of functioning there is accruing evidence of a significant relationship between smartphone technology and cognitive performance, and in which domains the scientific literature is not yet mature enough to endorse any firm conclusions. We focus our review primarily on three facets of cognition that are clearly implicated in public discourse regarding the impacts of mobile technology – attention, memory, and delay of gratification – and then consider evidence regarding the broader relationships between smartphone habits and everyday cognitive functioning. Along the way, we highlight compelling findings, discuss limitations with respect to empirical methodology and interpretation, and offer suggestions for how the field might progress toward a more coherent and robust area of scientific inquiry.

  8. Smartphones and Cognition: A Review of Research Exploring the Links between Mobile Technology Habits and Cognitive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, Henry H.; Sherman, Lauren E.; Chein, Jason M.

    2017-01-01

    While smartphones and related mobile technologies are recognized as flexible and powerful tools that, when used prudently, can augment human cognition, there is also a growing perception that habitual involvement with these devices may have a negative and lasting impact on users’ ability to think, remember, pay attention, and regulate emotion. The present review considers an intensifying, though still limited, area of research exploring the potential cognitive impacts of smartphone-related habits, and seeks to determine in which domains of functioning there is accruing evidence of a significant relationship between smartphone technology and cognitive performance, and in which domains the scientific literature is not yet mature enough to endorse any firm conclusions. We focus our review primarily on three facets of cognition that are clearly implicated in public discourse regarding the impacts of mobile technology – attention, memory, and delay of gratification – and then consider evidence regarding the broader relationships between smartphone habits and everyday cognitive functioning. Along the way, we highlight compelling findings, discuss limitations with respect to empirical methodology and interpretation, and offer suggestions for how the field might progress toward a more coherent and robust area of scientific inquiry. PMID:28487665

  9. Smartphones and Cognition: A Review of Research Exploring the Links between Mobile Technology Habits and Cognitive Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, Henry H; Sherman, Lauren E; Chein, Jason M

    2017-01-01

    While smartphones and related mobile technologies are recognized as flexible and powerful tools that, when used prudently, can augment human cognition, there is also a growing perception that habitual involvement with these devices may have a negative and lasting impact on users' ability to think, remember, pay attention, and regulate emotion. The present review considers an intensifying, though still limited, area of research exploring the potential cognitive impacts of smartphone-related habits, and seeks to determine in which domains of functioning there is accruing evidence of a significant relationship between smartphone technology and cognitive performance, and in which domains the scientific literature is not yet mature enough to endorse any firm conclusions. We focus our review primarily on three facets of cognition that are clearly implicated in public discourse regarding the impacts of mobile technology - attention, memory, and delay of gratification - and then consider evidence regarding the broader relationships between smartphone habits and everyday cognitive functioning. Along the way, we highlight compelling findings, discuss limitations with respect to empirical methodology and interpretation, and offer suggestions for how the field might progress toward a more coherent and robust area of scientific inquiry.

  10. Of responsible research-Exploring the science-society dialogue in undergraduate training within the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Maria Strecht; Quintanilha, Alexandre

    2017-01-02

    We explore the integration of societal issues in undergraduate training within the life sciences. Skills in thinking about science, scientific knowledge production and the place of science in society are crucial in the context of the idea of responsible research and innovation. This idea became institutionalized and it is currently well-present in the scientific agenda. Developing abilities in this regard seems particularly relevant to training in the life sciences, as new developments in this area somehow evoke the involvement of all of us citizens, our engagement to debate and take part in processes of change. The present analysis draws from the implementation of a curricular unit focused on science-society dialogue, an optional course included in the Biochemistry Degree study plan offered at the University of Porto. This curricular unit was designed to be mostly an exploratory activity for the students, enabling them to undertake in-depth study in areas/topics of their specific interest. Mapping topics from students' final papers provided a means of analysis and became a useful tool in the exploratory collaborative construction of the course. We discuss both the relevance and the opportunity of thinking and questioning the science-society dialogue. As part of undergraduate training, this pedagogical practice was deemed successful. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):46-52, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Organization of the 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop by Stanford University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Hogan, Mark [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Essentially all we know today and will learn in the future about the fundamental nature of matter is derived from probing it with directed beams of particles such as electrons, protons, neutrons, heavy ions, and photons. The resulting ability to “see” the building blocks of matter has had an immense impact on society and our standard of living. Over the last century, particle accelerators have changed the way we look at nature and the universe we live in and have become an integral part of the Nation’s technical infrastructure. Today, particle accelerators are essential tools of modern science and technology. The cost and capabilities of accelerators would be greatly enhanced by breakthroughs in acceleration methods and technology. For the last 32 years, the Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) Workshop has acted as the focal point for discussion and development of the most promising acceleration physics and technology. It is a particularly effective forum where the discussion is leveraged and promoted by the unique and demanding feature of the AAC Workshop: the working group structure, in which participants are asked to consider their contributions in terms of even larger problems to be solved. The 16th Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC2014) Workshop was organized by Stanford University from July 13 - 18, 2014 at the Dolce Hays Mansion in San Jose, California. The conference had a record 282 attendees including 62 students. Attendees came from 11 countries representing 66 different institutions. The workshop format consisted of plenary sessions in the morning with topical leaders from around the world presenting the latest breakthroughs to the entire workshop. In the late morning and afternoons attendees broke out into eight different working groups for more detailed presentations and discussions that were summarized on the final day of the workshop. In addition, there were student tutorial presentations on two afternoons to provide in depth education and

  12. Saw-tooth instability studies at the Stanford Linear Collider damping rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobedov, Boris Vyacheslavovich

    2000-08-01

    Saw-tooth instability occurs during high current operation in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) damping rings. This instability is single bunch and it can be cast as a longitudinal microwave instability. It is caused by the beam interaction with short range wakefields in the ring vacuum chamber. The saw-tooth instability manifests itself in the periodic blowup in quadrupole or higher moments in the longitudinal beam distribution. Most of our instability studies have been experimental. Since the measurements of coherent particle motion within a short ultrarelativistic beam are largely unconventional we had to develop some original diagnostics. These includes, for example, the down-conversion of the high frequency (10 GHz) broad-band beam position monitor (BPM) signals. We have also employed the state-of the art Hamamatsu streak camera that is capable of resolving the longitudinal beam distribution with sub-picosecond accuracy. As a result of our streak camera experiments we have quantitatively described the phase space of unstable bunches. We have found the radial structure of the instability mode and established that it only displaces a few percent of the beam particles. In another series of experiments we have correlated the instability signals from the beams before the extraction from the damping rings with their trajectories in the linac downstream. This showed that the instability results in a significant transverse beam jitter in the linac which compromises the damping ring performance as an injector. In addition, we have studied the instability behavior under the broad range of stored beam parameters using both passive and driven excitation. These measurements revealed unexpected beam behavior significantly above the instability threshold. Finally we performed several low current experiments to estimate the damping ring vacuum chamber impedance. We also present some analytical results regarding the instability and compare them to the observations. In

  13. Constraints on spatially oscillating sub-mm forces from the Stanford Optically Levitated Microsphere Experiment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, I.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2017-11-01

    A recent analysis by one of the authors [L. Perivolaropoulos, Phys. Rev. D 95, 084050 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevD.95.084050] has indicated the presence of a 2 σ signal of spatially oscillating new force residuals in the torsion balance data of the Washington experiment. We extend that study and analyze the data of the Stanford Optically Levitated Microsphere Experiment (SOLME) [A. D. Rider et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 101101 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.101101] (kindly provided by A. D. Rider et al.) searching for sub-mm spatially oscillating new force signals. We find a statistically significant oscillating signal for a force residual of the form F (z )=α cos (2/π λ z +c ) where z is the distance between the macroscopic interacting masses (levitated microsphere and cantilever). The best fit parameter values are α =(1.1 ±0.4 )×10-17N , λ =(35.2 ±0.6 ) μ m . Monte Carlo simulation of the SOLME data under the assumption of zero force residuals has indicated that the statistical significance of this signal is at about 2 σ level. The improvement of the χ2 fit compared to the null hypothesis (zero residual force) corresponds to Δ χ2=13.1 . There are indications that this previously unnoticed signal is indeed in the data but is most probably induced by a systematic effect caused by diffraction of non-Gaussian tails of the laser beam. Thus the amplitude of this detected signal can only be useful as an upper bound to the amplitude of new spatially oscillating forces on sub-mm scales. In the context of gravitational origin of the signal emerging from a fundamental modification of the Newtonian potential of the form Veff(r )=-G M/r (1 +αOcos (2/π λ r +θ ))≡VN(r )+Vosc(r ) , we evaluate the source integral of the oscillating macroscopically induced force. If the origin of the SOLME oscillating signal is systematic, the parameter αO is bounded as αOchameleon oscillating potentials etc.).

  14. Characterizing potential earthquake signals on the Stanford-USGS ultra-low frequency electromagnetic (ULFEM) array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, L.; Connor, D.; McPhee, D. K.; Glen, J. M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Anomalous ultra-low frequency (0.01-10 Hz) electromagnetic signals have been reported prior to and during M ≥ 6.0 earthquakes in a variety of places around the world, most notably prior to the 1989 Ms 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake in California. Stanford University, in conjunction with the USGS and UC Berkeley, has maintained five ULFEM recording stations along the San Andreas Fault. We are searching our ULFEM data for anomalous signals before earthquakes. Previous reports of possible ULFEM precursors, or their absence following exhaustive searches of available data, define a crude distance-magnitude relationship with larger-closer earthquakes capable of producing detectable precursors. No earthquakes exceeding this distance-magnitude relationship have yet occurred within 500 km of our network; therefore our study is as yet mostly an attempt to develop appropriate methodologies. We examined 40 Hz EM data around the arrival time of the largest/closest earthquakes to our array, focusing on co-shaking signals and pulsations as have been described preceding the 10/31/2007 Alum Rock M 5.4 earthquake. For the three stations in the Bay Area, our search included data from when the BART electric train was operating and also dormant. We observed co-shaking signals at stations between 10-40 km from the epicenters of earthquakes with varying magnitudes (M 2.6-M 6.0). A search of data in the week prior to the Alum Rock earthquake on our closest station (41 km from the epicenter) has thus far identified pulsations of similar duration and polarity as those identified by other workers on a station 2 km from the epicenter (~9 km from the hypocenter). The amplitudes of the majority of the pulsations identified in this study are within several standard deviations of background noise levels and are otherwise not distinguishable from other signals of similar frequency in the time series. To establish and maintain the integrity of the data recorded from the stations in our array, a

  15. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate Projects for 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2017-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) projects. Other Government and commercial projects managers can also find this useful. Space Transportation; Life Support and Habitation Systems; Extra-Vehicular Activity; High EfficiencySpace Power; Human Exploration and Operations Mission,

  16. The Longhorn Array Database (LAD: An Open-Source, MIAME compliant implementation of the Stanford Microarray Database (SMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Vishwanath R

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The power of microarray analysis can be realized only if data is systematically archived and linked to biological annotations as well as analysis algorithms. Description The Longhorn Array Database (LAD is a MIAME compliant microarray database that operates on PostgreSQL and Linux. It is a fully open source version of the Stanford Microarray Database (SMD, one of the largest microarray databases. LAD is available at http://www.longhornarraydatabase.org Conclusions Our development of LAD provides a simple, free, open, reliable and proven solution for storage and analysis of two-color microarray data.

  17. Sir Stanford Cade KBE CB FRCS (1895-1973): a pioneer in the modern treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbury, Gerald; Ellis, Harold

    2009-02-01

    Stanford Cade, born in Tsarist Russia, trained in Medicine first in Brussels and then in London at King's College and Westminster Hospital. His potential as a brilliant clinician was recognized by his appointment to the surgical staff at Westminster at the early age of 29. Here he was one of the first in the UK to use radium in the treatment of a wide variety of tumours. His interests covered the broad spectrum of malignant diseases including the head and neck, breast, bone and soft tissues. He was an early exponent of the multidisciplinary approach to the management of cancer.

  18. Current Research Developments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on the Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) X-ray Concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Erin; Okajima, T.; Gendreau, K.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Jalota, L.; Soong, Y.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    2013-04-01

    NICER is a proposed NASA Explorer Mission of Opportunity and will study the extreme gravitational, electromagnetic, and nuclear physics of neutron stars. Observations will be performed by an X-ray timing and spectroscopy instrument on board the International Space Station (ISS) with launch scheduled for late 2016. NICER consists of grazing incident optics coupled with silicon drift detectors that will provide high throughput photon collection with relatively low background. The optical system consists of 56 X-ray optics, each of which comprise of 24 individual concentrators made from thin aluminum shells with epoxy replicated gold surface. These specialized concentrators focus incident X-rays allowing for small detectors thus increasing the signal to noise while minimizing mass and fabrication cost. The concentrators have three distinct design differences from traditional thin foil epoxy replicated imaging optics. Firstly, the concentrators use only a single reflection and therefore have degraded imaging resolution for extended sources. They also have a full shell structure to further improve the effective area to mass ratio and a curved axial profile to improve resolution and hence concentration at a short focal length. NICER is the second project using these style concentrators, the first of which was the X-ray Advanced Concepts Testbed (XACT) sounding rocket payload (expected to launch in December 2013). The fabrication of the NICER optics began in spring 2012 and were tested using a collimated X-ray beam in summer 2012. In the following months, the concentrators’ fabrication method has been improved and adapted from the method used with XACT. X-ray measurements have been made to characterize the concentrators by calculating half power diameters, off-axis performance, and effective area measurements. These have been compared to ray tracing and theoretical calculations. Here we report the performance to date with comparisons to the theoretical calculations as

  19. Original research: Giving sexual assault survivors time to decide: an exploration of the use and effects of the nonreport option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffron, Laurie Cook; Busch-Armendariz, Noël Bridget; Vohra, Shetal S; Johnson, Regina Jones; Camp, Victoria

    2014-03-01

    Forensic nurses, sexual assault nurse examiners (SANEs), and victim advocates have long recognized the trauma of sexual assault crimes and the significance of survivors' decisions around reporting these crimes to law enforcement agencies. Until recently, survivors who didn't report the crime were not entitled to a free medical forensic examination. In a significant policy shift, the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 provided an additional decision option with regard to the medical examination for survivors of sexual assault. This provision, referred to here as the nonreport option, was established to offer survivors a full range of reporting options and to ensure exemplary health care, with evidence collection as an important secondary goal. This study sought to examine the implementation of the nonreport option in Texas; explore its impact on SANEs, survivors, and the criminal justice system; and identify strengths and challenges of the nonreport process. A mixed-method approach was used that included qualitative interviews with 79 professionals who regularly respond to sexual assault crimes, a Web-based survey questionnaire of such professionals that yielded 131 completed surveys, and a review of existing data. The step-by-step process involved in a nonreport case was described, and findings in three descriptive areas emerged: confidentiality processes, storage and shipment of evidence, and the use of the nonreport option. Beneficial effects of the nonreport option were identified in five areas: the role of SANEs, the impact on survivors, collaborative relationships, collateral crimes, and anonymous reporting strategies. Seven areas of remaining dilemmas were also identified. Findings indicate that the nonreport option has had a considerable positive impact on SANEs, survivors of sexual assault, and the criminal justice system. But challenges remain if this option is to be fully utilized in the future; further research

  20. Mars Exploration Student Data Teams: Building Foundations and Influencing Students to Pursue STEM Careers through Experiences with Authentic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, D.; Grigsby, B.; Murchie, S. L.; Buczkowski, D.; Seelos, K. D.; Nair, H.; McGovern, A.; Morgan, F.; Viviano, C. E.; Goudge, T. A.; Thompson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Student Data Teams (MESDT) immerses diverse teams of high school and undergraduate students in an authentic research Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) based experience and allows students to be direct participants in the scientific process by working with scientists to analyze data sets from NASA's Mars program, specifically from the CRISM instrument. MESDT was created by Arizona State University's Mars Education Program, and is funded through NASA's Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars or CRISM, an instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Students work with teacher mentors and CRISM team members to analyze data, develop hypotheses, conduct research, submit proposals, critique and revise work. All students begin the program with basic Mars curriculum lessons developed by the MESDT education team. This foundation enables the program to be inclusive of all students. Teachers have reported that populations of students with diverse academic needs and abilities have been successful in this program. The use of technology in the classroom allows the MESDT program to successfully reach a nationwide audience and funding provided by NASA's CRISM instrument allows students to participate free of charge. Recent changes to the program incorporate a partnership with United States Geological Survey (USGS) and a CRISM sponsored competitive scholarship for two teams of students to present their work at the annual USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting. Returning MESDT teachers have attributed an increase in student enrollment and interest to this scholarship opportunity. The 2013 USGS Planetary Mappers Meeting was held in Washington DC which provided an opportunity for the students to meet with their Senators at the US Capitol to explain the science work they had done throughout the year as well as the impact that the program had had on their goals for the future. This opportunity extended to the students by the

  1. SPEAR3 Workshop: Making the Scientific Case: Report from Workshop held at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, May 29-30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, S.

    1998-08-13

    As part of the planning process for the proposed upgrade to the SPEAR electron storage ring, SSRL, the SSRL Users Organization and the SSRL faculty sponsored a 1 1/2 day workshop on May 29-30 1997. The goal was to assess and document the impact of SPEAR3 on current and future science and technology research programs of the users of SSRL. The hard and soft x-ray beams produced at SSRL are used in a number of different scientific and technological disciplines. The workshop was organized by defining a set of areas of science and technology covering the basic activities at SSRL and inviting key people from outside Stanford to work with the SSRL faculty and staff in a set of topical groups on estimating the impact of SPEAR3 on their respective fields and developing a vision of the future opportunities. This report documents those scientific and technological opportunities and provides written summaries of the discussions. The report is organized with a brief technical description of SPEAR3 and planned beam line upgrades (which summarizes material presented to the workshop participants prior to the breakout sessions) following this executive summary. More detailed information from the topical working groups then follows. Finally, an appendix provides a list of workshop participants and a copy of the workshop agenda as well as some more detailed information on the SPEAR3 lattice and machine.

  2. Stratification of Highest-Risk Patients with Chronic Skin Ulcers in a Stanford Retrospective Cohort Includes Diabetes, Need for Systemic Antibiotics, and Albumin Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Amir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic nonsurgical skin wounds such as venous stasis and diabetic ulcers have been associated with a number of comorbid conditions; however, the strength of these associations has not been compared. We utilized the Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment (STRIDE system to identify a cohort of 637 patients with chronic skin ulcers. Preliminary analysis ( showed that 49.7% of the patients had a poor prognosis such as amputation or a nonhealing ulcer for at least a year. Factors significantly associated ( with these outcomes included diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, and need for systemic antibiotics. Patients with poor outcomes also tended to have lower hemoglobin levels (, higher WBC levels (, and lower albumin levels (. On multivariate analysis, however, only diabetes mellitus (OR 5.87, 1.36–25.3, need for systemic antibiotics (OR 3.88, 1.06–14.2, and albumin levels (0.20 per unit, 0.07–0.60 remained significant independent predictors of poor wound-healing outcomes. These data identify patients at the highest risk for poor wound-healing and who may benefit the most from more aggressive wound care and treatment.

  3. [Spiral CT and MRT of the operated Stanford-type-A aortic dissection: its course and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, T; Abu-Ramadan, D; Pauleit, D; Hofer, U; Likungu, J; Preusse, K; Layer, G; Schild, H

    1998-02-01

    To demonstrate normal postoperative spiral CT and MRI findings and typical complications in patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection. 24 patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection were followed up by spiral CT and MRI (0.5 Tesla). Presence of persistent dissection, progressive or new dissection, proximal and distal anastomosis, periprosthetic space, supraaortic vessels, thrombosis and dilatation of the true and false lumen were evaluated. The following postoperative complications were seen: three pseudoaneurysms which developed at the proximal anastomoses of the Dacron prosthesis in two cases and at the insertion site of the reimplanted left coronary artery after implantation of a composite graft (Bentall procedure) in one case; one re-dissection; one perforation of the false lumen; periprosthetic flow in one patient after surgical repair of type A dissection by the graft inclusion technique; progressive dilatation of the false lumen in 4 cases; dilatation of the aortic root in a Marfan patient after replacement of the ascending aorta. Precise knowledge of the surgical technique performed is crucial to accurate postoperative imaging evaluation. MRI is the method of choice in the postoperative follow-up of clinically stable patients with aortic dissections.

  4. Exploring the Use of Emoji as a Visual Research Method for Eliciting Young Children's Voices in Childhood Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fane, Jennifer; MacDougall, Colin; Jovanovic, Jessie; Redmond, Gerry; Gibbs, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Recognition of the need to move from research "on" children to research "with" children has prompted significant theoretical and methodological debate as to how young children can be positioned as active participants in the research process. Visual research methods such as drawing, photography, and videography have received…

  5. Outcomes in Child Health: Exploring the Use of Social Media to Engage Parents in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Michele P; Shave, Kassi; Fernandes, Ricardo M; Scott, Shannon D; Hartling, Lisa

    2017-03-16

    With the rapid growth of technology and its improved accessibility globally, social media is gaining an increasingly important role in health care. Patients are frequently engaging with social media to access information, share content, and interact with others in online health communities. However, the use of social media as a stakeholder engagement strategy has been minimally explored, and effective methods for involving participants in research on the identification of patient-centered outcomes remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the process of using social media to engage parents in identifying patient-centered outcomes, using acute respiratory infections in children as an example to gauge feasibility. We conducted a process evaluation of a two-phase Web-based strategy to engage parents in research on patient-centered outcomes. In the first phase, we developed a website and study-specific Facebook and Twitter accounts to recruit parents to complete a Web-based survey identifying patient-centered outcomes. In the second phase, we used Facebook to host discussion with parents based on the survey results. The reach of social media as an engagement strategy and the characteristics of the population recruited were assessed. During the first phase, there were 5027 visits to the survey site, 110 participants completed the survey, 553 unique users visited the study website (675 visits), the Facebook page received 104 likes, and the Twitter account gained 52 followers over the 14-week study period. Most survey respondents identified Facebook (51.8%, 57/110) or a friend (45.5%, 50/110) as their source of referral. It was found that 70.0% (77/110) of respondents resided in Canada, in urban centers (92.7%, 102/110), and 88.2% (97/110) had a college or university degree or higher. The median year of birth was 1978 and 90.0% (99/110) were female. Most survey responses (88.2%, 97/110) were completed during the first month of the study. In the second phase, 4

  6. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into NASA Programs Associated With the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  7. Using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis in a Mixed Methods Research Design to Explore Music in the Lives of Mature Age Amateur Keyboard Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) in a mixed methods research design with reference to five recent publications about music in the lives of mature age amateur keyboard players. It explores the links between IPA and the data-gathering methods of "Rivers of Musical Experience",…

  8. Seeking to understand: using generic qualitative research to explore access to medicines and pharmacy services among resettled refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Kim; Ostini, Remo; Martini, Nataly; Kairuz, Therese

    2016-06-01

    Introduction There are challenges associated with selecting a qualitative research approach. In a field abundant with terminology and theories, it may be difficult for a pharmacist to know where and how to begin a qualitative research journey. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into generic qualitative research and to describe the journey of data collection of a novice qualitative researcher in the quest to answer her research question: 'What are the barriers to accessing medicines and pharmacy services for resettled refugees in Queensland, Australia?' Methodology Generic qualitative research draws on the strengths of one or more qualitative approaches. The aim is to draw out participants' ideas about things that are 'outside themselves'; rather than focussing on their inner feelings the research seeks to understand a phenomenon, a process, or the perspectives of participants. Sampling is designed to obtain a broad range of opinions about events and experiences and data collection includes interviews, questionnaires or surveys; thematic analysis is often used to analyse data. When to use Generic qualitative research provides an opportunity to develop research designs that fit researchers' epistemological stance and discipline, with research choices, including methodology and methods, being informed by the research question. Limitations Generic qualitative research is one of many methodologies that may be used to answer a research question and there is a paucity of literature about how to do it well. There is also debate about its validity as a qualitative methodology.

  9. Exploring of New Models of Research Pedagogy: Time to Let Go of Master-Apprentice Style Supervision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Scott; Grant, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    While the time-honoured one-to-one supervisory model of higher research degree training has its advantages, recent research suggests that the model also has significant drawbacks, including its hierarchical nature. Nevertheless, this pedagogical model remains the default for higher research pedagogy. Using the discipline of music as a case study,…

  10. "It's an Amazing Learning Curve to Be Part of the Project": Exploring Academic Identity in Collaborative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, Brenda; Ndebele, Clever; Winberg, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into the role of academic identity within collaborative research in higher education in South Africa. The study was informed by the literature on academic identities, collaborative research and communities of practice. It was located within a multi-site study, with involvement of researcher collaborators…

  11. Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Third annual report for the period October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

    1983-09-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs; radon reservoir engineering; well test analysis and bench scale experiments; field applications; workshop, seminars, and technical information; reinjection technology; and seismic monitoring of vapor/liquid interfaces. (MHR)

  12. Footprint of Sandia's August 15 2016 Informal Idea Exploration Session on "Towards an Engineering and Applied Science of Research".

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleming Lindsley, Elizabeth S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heffelfinger, Grant S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Narayanamurti, Venkatesh [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Schneider, Rick [glo USA, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Starkweather, Lynne M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ting, Christina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yajima, Rieko [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Bauer, Travis L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Coltrin, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guy, Donald W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Wendell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mareda, John F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turnley, Jessica Glicken [Galisteo Consulting Group, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    On August 15, 2016, Sandia hosted a visit by Professor Venkatesh Narayanamurti. Prof Narayanamurti (Benjamin Peirce Research Professor of Technology and Public Policy at Harvard, Board Member of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, former Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Harvard, former Dean of Engineering at UC Santa Barbara, and former Vice President of Division 1000 at Sandia). During the visit, a small, informal, all-day idea exploration session on "Towards an Engineering and Applied Science of Research" was conducted. This document is a brief synopsis or "footprint" of the presentations and discussions at this Idea Exploration Session. The intent of this document is to stimulate further discussion about pathways Sandia can take to improve its Research practices.

  13. Does Research Information Meet the Needs of Stakeholders? Exploring Evidence Selection in the Global Management of Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Helen R.; Wilcox, Andrew; Stewart, Gavin B.; Randall, Nicola P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored factors affecting information selection by international stakeholders working with invasive species. Despite differences in information requirements between groups, all stakeholders demonstrated a clear preference for free, easily accessible online information, and predominantly used internet search engines and specialist…

  14. Exploring Generational Identity in the Professional Lives of African-American Women: A Participatory Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the professional lives of African-American women in relation to their affiliations to a generation. Relationships between race, gender, generation, and class are explored. This study builds on the work of generational theorists and feminist scholars, and seeks to understand the experiences of African-American women in an…

  15. Postoperative follow-up of Stanford type A aortic dissections with Spiral-CT and MRI: Normal imaging findings and typical complications; Spiral-CT und MRT der operierten Stanford Typ A-Aortendissektion: Verlauf und Komplikationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Pauleit, D.; Hofer, U.; Preusse, K.; Layer, G.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Abu-Ramadan, D.; Likungu, J. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Herz- und Gefaesschirurgie

    1998-02-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate normal postoperative Spiral-CT and MRI findings and typical complications in patients with aortic repair after Stanford type A aortic dissection. Results: The following postoperative complications were seen: Three pseudoaneurysms which developed at the proximal anastomoses of the Dacron prosthesis in two cases and at the insertion site of the reimplanted left coronary artery after implantation of a composite graft (Bentall procedure) in one case; one re-dissection; one perforation of the false lumen; periprostethic flow in one patient after surgical repair of type A dissection by the graft inclusion technique; progressive dilatation of the false lumen in 4 cases; dilatation of the aortic root in a Marfan patient after replacement of the ascending aorta. Conclusion: Precise knowledge of the surgical technique performed is crucial to accurate postoperative imaging evaluation. MRI is the method of choice in the postoperative follow-up of clinically stable patients with aortic dissections. (orig./AJ) [Deutsch] Ziel: Darstellung der verschiedenen Operationsverfahren bei der Stanford Typ A-Dissektion mit ihren typischen Aspekten in Spiral-CT und MRT sowie ihren spezifischen Komplikationen. Ergebnisse: Folgende postoperative Komplikationen traten auf: Drei Pseudoaneurysmen, die zweimal von der proximalen Anastomose des Aorta-ascendens-Ersatzes sowie einmal von der Insertionsstelle der reimplantierten linken Koronararterie (Operation nach Bentall) ausgingen; eine Re-Dissektion; eine gedeckte Perforation des falschen Lumens; periprothetischer Fluss nach Anwendung der Graft-Inclusion-Technik; progrediente Dilatation des falschen Lumens in 4 Faellen; aneurysmatische Erweiterung des originaeren Aortenbulbus bei einem Marfan-Patienten nach suprakoronarem Aorta-ascendens-Ersatz. Schlussfolgerung: Bei der postoperativen Verlaufskontrolle von Patienten mit Aortendissektionen mittels Spiral-CT und MRT sind Kenntnisse der verschiedenen Operationsverfahren mit

  16. Using Virtual and In-Person Engagement Opportunities to Connect K-12 Students, Teachers, and the Public With NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P.; Foxworth, S.; Luckey, M. K.; McInturff, B.; Mosie, A.; Runco, S.; Todd, N.; Willis, K. J.; Zeigler, R.

    2017-01-01

    Engaging K-12 students, teachers, and the public with NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) assets provides an extraordinary opportunity to connect audiences with authentic aspects unique to our nation's space program. NASA ARES has effectively engaged audiences with 1) Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) experts, 2) NASA specialized facilities, and 3) NASA astromaterial samples through both virtual and in-person engagement opportunities. These engagement opportunities help connect local and national audiences with STEM role models, promote the exciting work being facilitated through NASA's Science Mission Directorate, and expose our next generation of scientific explorers to science they may be inspired to pursue as a future STEM career.

  17. Exploring researchers' experiences of working with a researcher-driven, population-specific community advisory board in a South African schizophrenia genomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Megan M; Susser, Ezra; de Vries, Jantina; Baldinger, Adam; Sibeko, Goodman; Mndini, Michael M; Mqulwana, Sibonile G; Ntola, Odwa A; Ramesar, Raj S; Stein, Dan J

    2015-07-02

    Community engagement within biomedical research is broadly defined as a collaborative relationship between a research team and a group of individuals targeted for research. A Community Advisory Board (CAB) is one mechanism of engaging the community. Within genomics research CABs may be particularly relevant due to the potential implications of research findings drawn from individual participants on the larger communities they represent. Within such research, CABs seek to meet instrumental goals such as protecting research participants and their community from research-related risks, as well as intrinsic goals such as promoting the respect of participants and their community. However, successful community engagement depends on the degree to which CABs legitimately represent and engage with communities targeted for research. Currently, there is little literature describing the use of CABs in genomics research taking place in developing countries, and even less in the field of genomics research relating to mental illness. The aim of this article is to describe and consider the contributions made by a researcher-driven, population-specific CAB in a genomics of schizophrenia research project taking place in South Africa, from the perspective of the research team. Four broad discussion topics emerged during the CAB meetings namely: 1) informed consent procedures, 2) recruitment strategies, 3) patient illness beliefs and stigma experiences, and 4) specific ethical concerns relating to the project. The authors consider these discussions in terms of their contributions to instrumental and intrinsic goals of community engagement. The CAB gave valuable input on the consent processes and materials, recruitment strategies and suggested ways of minimizing the potential for stigma and discrimination. All of these contributions were of an instrumental nature, and helped improve the way in which the research took place. In addition, and perhaps more importantly, the CAB made a

  18. La introducción de la escala de inteligencia de Stanford-Binet en el Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Aunque las primeras estrategias para evaluar la habilidad intelectual encuentran antecedentes milenarios en la antigua China, los intentos de medición en el periodo moderno comienzan con el psicólogo inglés Francis Galton en la década de 1880, mediante la aplicación de medidas fisiológicas para estimar el talento humano. A comienzos del siglo XX, los psicólogos franceses Alfred Binet y Théodore Simon construyeron las primeras escalas métricas para estimar la inteligencia de los niños. Estas fueron modificadas posteriormente en los Estados Unidos por Lewis Terman, quien publicó la revisión más conocida e influyente. En América Latina y otras regiones las adaptaciones locales se dieron en la misma época. En Paraguay, el test Stanford-Binet fue introducido en el decenio de 1920 por el maestro Ramón Indalecio Cardozo. Este no se limitó a una reproducción acrítica, sino que realizó algunas modificaciones para adaptarlo a las condiciones locales y mejorar la confiabilidad cultural de las pruebas. Este artículo estudia la introducción del test Stanford-Binet al contexto general de la educación paraguaya y los ajustes que llevó a cabo Cardozo. Para conseguirlo, se procede a una revisión de fuentes primarias y secundarias, colocando las ideas y los conceptos en el debido contexto histórico. También contribuye a ampliar otros trabajos anteriores centrados en la obra de este autor y en la psicología durante el periodo pre-universitario paraguayo. ABSTRACT: Although the first strategies to evaluate the human intellectual skills find millennial precedents in the ancient China, the attempts of measurement in the modern period began with the English psychologist Francis Galton in the decade of 1880, applying physiological measurements to estimate the human talent. At the beginning of the XXth century, the French psychologists Alfred Binet and Théodore Simon constructed the first metric scales to calculate children

  19. [Thoraco-abdominal aortic replacement in chronic phase in a patient with temporary paraplegia after Stanford B acute dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Goro; Hata, Masaki; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2013-07-01

    A 42-year-old man underwent was performed with thoraco-abdominal aneurysm replacement accompaniedy with reconstruction of abdominal branches and intercostal arteries. Eighteen months before, he had suffered from Stanford already been cured with paraplegia on being type B acute aortic dissection combined with paraplegia. When paraplegia had been occurred, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was had been performed promptly, and 4 days later, neurologic deficit was disappeared in 1 day. During the thoraco-abdominal aortic operation, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was performed done again. After the operation, paraplegia did was not occurred and he did not feel somewhat wrong with his legs. He was discharged from hospital on foot by himself. This case showed the efficacy of cerebral spinal fluid drainage for not only both with the prevention but also and treatment of paraplegia.

  20. Illustrating the use of concepts from the discipline of policy studies in energy research : An explorative literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, T.; Coenen, Frans; van den Berg, Maya

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing challenges the energy sector faces, energy policy strategies and instruments are becoming ever more relevant. The discipline of policy studies might offer relevant concepts to enrich multidisciplinary energy research. The main research question of this article is: How can

  1. Exploring the Types of SMEs Which Could use Blogs as a Marketing Tool: a Proposed Future Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Phaik Harn Chua

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Blogs appear to be gaining momentum as a marketing tool which can be used by organisations for such strategies and processes as branding, managing reputation, developing customer trust and loyalty, niche marketing, gathering marketing intelligence and promoting their online presence. There has been limited academic research in this area, and most significantly concerning the types of small and medium enterprises (SMEs for which blogs might have potential as a marketing tool. In an attempt to address the knowledge gap, this paper presents a future research agenda (in the form of research questions which can guide the eBusiness research community in conducting much needed studies in this area. This paper is particularly novel in that it aims to demonstrate how the heterogeneity of SMEs and their specific business uses of eBusiness technology such as blogs can form the central plank of a future research agenda. This is important because the existing eBusiness literature tends to treat eBusiness collectively rather than focusing on the specific business uses of different eBusiness technologies, and to treat SMEs as a homogeneous group. The paper concludes with a discussion of how this research agenda can form the basis of studies which use a range of different research methods, and how this "big picture" agenda approach might help the eBusiness research community build theory which better explains SME adoption and use of eBusiness.

  2. Going Places: Exploring the Impact of Intra-Sectoral Mobility on Research Productivity and Communication Behaviors in Japanese Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Hugo; Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact of intra-sectoral mobility of academics on research productivity and R&D information exchange dynamics in Japan. The analysis shows intra-sectoral mobility impacting positively both research productivity and information exchange dynamics, but that this effect--except for information exchange with peers based…

  3. Exploring Multiple Spaces and Practices: A Note on the Use of Ethnography in Research in Library and Information Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Hanna; Hanell, Fredrik; Lindh, Karolina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, there has been a growing interest in ethnographic research within the field of library and Information studies. Although ethnography has been used by information researchers for studying a wide variety of phenomena, discussions concerning methodological developments and directions, as well as ethnography's wider…

  4. Moving Archival Practices Upstream: An Exploration of the Life Cycle of Ecological Sensing Data in Collaborative Field Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jullian C. Wallis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The success of eScience research depends not only upon effective collaboration between scientists and technologists but also upon the active involvement of data archivists. Archivists rarely receive scientific data until findings are published, by which time important information about their origins, context, and provenance may be lost. Research reported here addresses the life cycle of data from collaborative ecological research with embedded networked sensing technologies. A better understanding of these processes will enable archivists to participate in earlier stages of the life cycle and to improve curation of these types of scientific data. Evidence from our interview study and field research yields a nine-stage life cycle. Among the findings are the cumulative effect of decisions made at each stage of the life cycle; the balance of decision-making between scientific and technology research partners; and the loss of certain types of data that may be essential to later interpretation.

  5. Introduction to high-energy physics and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clearwater, S.

    1983-03-01

    The type of research done at SLAC is called High Energy Physics, or Particle Physics. This is basic research in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Basic research is research for the sake of learning something. Any practical application cannot be predicted, the understanding is the end in itself. Interactions are how particles behave toward one another, for example some particles attract one another while others repel and still others ignore each other. Interactions of elementary particles are studied to reveal the underlying structure of the universe.

  6. Social media analytics and research testbed (SMART: Exploring spatiotemporal patterns of human dynamics with geo-targeted social media messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiue-An Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The multilevel model of meme diffusion conceptualizes how mediated messages diffuse over time and space. As a pilot application of implementing the meme diffusion, we developed the social media analytics and research testbed to monitor Twitter messages and track the diffusion of information in and across different cities and geographic regions. Social media analytics and research testbed is an online geo-targeted search and analytics tool, including an automatic data processing procedure at the backend and an interactive frontend user interface. Social media analytics and research testbed is initially designed to facilitate (1 searching and geo-locating tweet topics and terms in different cities and geographic regions; (2 filtering noise from raw data (such as removing redundant retweets and using machine learning methods to improve precision; (3 analyzing social media data from a spatiotemporal perspective; and (4 visualizing social media data in diagnostic ways (such as weekly and monthly trends, trend maps, top media, top retweets, top mentions, or top hashtags. Social media analytics and research testbed provides researchers and domain experts with a tool that can efficiently facilitate the refinement, formalization, and testing of research hypotheses or questions. Three case studies (flu outbreaks, Ebola epidemic, and marijuana legalization are introduced to illustrate how the predictions of meme diffusion can be examined and to demonstrate the potentials and key functions of social media analytics and research testbed.

  7. Assessing Giftedness in Children: Comparing the Accuracy of Three Shortened Measures of Intelligence to the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, Fifth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Jocelyn H.; McIntosh, David E.; Dixon, Felicia; Williams, Tasha; Youman, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the accuracy of three shortened measures of intelligence: the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability, Third Edition Brief Intellectual Ability (WJ III COG BIA) score; the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, Fifth Edition Abbreviated IQ (SB5 ABIQ); and the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test IQ Composite (K-BIT) in predicting…

  8. Psychological Evaluation of Preschool Children: Or Can Learning Disabilities be Evaluated in the Preschool Child Using the Stanford-Binet as a Screening Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Pearl; Graf, Mercedes

    Tested with the Stanford-Binet Scale of Intelligence were 70 children, aged 3- to 5-years with IQ's from 75 to 145, to determine whether the test could serve as a diagnostic tool for identifying learning disabilities (LD) in preschool children. It was hypothesized that LD children would have a basal age no more than two levels below chronological…

  9. Complicating Culture and Difference: Situating Asian American Youth Identities in Lisa Yee's "Millicent Min," "Girl Genius" and "Stanford Wong Flunks Big-Time"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This review situates how culture, difference, and identity are discursively constructed in "Millicent Min, Girl Genius" and "Stanford Wong Flunks Big-Time," two award-winning books written by critically acclaimed Asian American author Lisa Yee. Using contextual literacy approaches, the characters, cultural motifs, and physical settings in these…

  10. Efficiency of Screening Procedures for Assigning Levels of the Stanford Achievement Test (Eighth Edition) to Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the efficiency of over 5,000 reading and mathematics screening tests specifically developed for assigning levels of the Stanford Achievement Test, 8th edition (SAT-8), to deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Analysis found the screening tests more effective in assigning student levels for some SAT-8 subtests than for others. (DB)

  11. Reflections from a Creative Community-Based Participatory Research Project Exploring Health and Body Image with First Nations Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Shea PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In Canada, Aboriginal peoples often experience a multitude of inequalities when compared with the general population, particularly in relation to health (e.g., increased incidence of diabetes. These inequalities are rooted in a negative history of colonization. Decolonizing methodologies recognize these realities and aim to shift the focus from communities being researched to being collaborative partners in the research process. This article describes a qualitative community-based participatory research project focused on health and body image with First Nations girls in a Tribal Council region in Western Canada. We discuss our project design and the incorporation of creative methods (e.g., photovoice to foster integration and collaboration as related to decolonizing methodology principles. This article is both descriptive and reflective as it summarizes our project and discusses lessons learned from the process, integrating evaluations from the participating girls as well as our reflections as researchers.

  12. Exploring Graduate Students’ Attitudes towards Team Research and Their Scholarly Productivity: A Survey Guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tianlan Wei; Alime N Sadikova; Lucy Barnard-Brak; Eugene W. Wang; Dilshod Sodikov

    2015-01-01

    ...’ attitudes towards team research. Guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior, we hypothesize that attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control are three major determinants of graduate students...

  13. The use of metaphors in Narrative Research in exploring and describing experiences of adolescent male orphans affected by HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanita Loubser

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article relates to the primary study which aimed at addressing uncertainties about the type and nature of the relationship between the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS and adolescent male orphans affected by this disease and all its aspects, such as poverty, exposure to crime and stigmatisation, and the lack of parental figures – more specifically, the absence of the father figure. Subsequently, this study aimed at dissecting the orphan’s life experiences in the midst of HIV and AIDS and explored ways in which these experiences influence his sexual and power relations with women and his role as future father and husband in the absence of a father figure (or male role model. Moreover, the researcher explored ways in which these past and future narratives influence or affect the male orphan’s view of and relationship with God, or whether it is rather this view of and relationship with God that influence and affect his relationship with his past narrative and writing of his future narratives. Research methods from the qualitative and case study research design and, more specifically, from postfoundational practical theology and narrative therapy, were employed in exploring the above issues. With the use of the metaphor of Tree of Life and the David narrative, the researcher journeyed with the co-researchers in the construction of a preferred alternative narrative, which in turn functions as a guiding metaphor for aspiring to the future and living their lives in a preferred and satisfying manner. Therefore this article explains the use of these metaphors during the seven movements of Postfoundational Practical Theology and shows how these metaphors succeeded in assisting the co-researchers with externalising aspects of their problem-saturated narratives, identifying unique outcomes amidst these narratives, and developing alternative narratives that serve as a vehicle for change and creating

  14. New insights from practice – exploring online channel management strategies and the use of social media as market research tool

    OpenAIRE

    Klaus, Philipp "Phil"

    2017-01-01

    The concept of online customer experiences, and in particular the role of social media in online customer behavior has recently received great interest from academia, business and market researchers alike. Despite the belief that social media, imbedded in a corresponding online channel strategy, can be the key to successfully track and analyze consumer behavior, most of the research focuses solely on the consumer rather than the companies' strategic viewpoint. This study investigates current ...

  15. Congenital toxoplasmosis: an in-depth density-equalizing mapping analysis to explore its global research architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Handl, Vanessa; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Jaque, Jenny; Groneberg, Jan David Alexander

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Toxoplasmosis endangers the unborn child if its infectious agent--toxoplasma gondii--is transmitted transplacentally during pregnancy. Although this condition occurs in all parts of the world and represents a major public health burden, no detailed knowledge on the global research architecture of congenital toxoplasmosis is available thus far. Hence, it was the aim of this study to assess the related global research activity over the past 110 years. METHODS: We employed the New...

  16. Social media analytics and research testbed (SMART): Exploring spatiotemporal patterns of human dynamics with geo-targeted social media messages

    OpenAIRE

    Jiue-An Yang; Ming-Hsiang Tsou; Chin-Te Jung; Christopher Allen; Brian H Spitzberg; Jean Mark Gawron; Su-Yeon Han

    2016-01-01

    The multilevel model of meme diffusion conceptualizes how mediated messages diffuse over time and space. As a pilot application of implementing the meme diffusion, we developed the social media analytics and research testbed to monitor Twitter messages and track the diffusion of information in and across different cities and geographic regions. Social media analytics and research testbed is an online geo-targeted search and analytics tool, including an automatic data processing procedure at t...

  17. WAS LUXURY LITTLE RESEARCHED? AN EXPLORATION OF STUDIES AND RESEARCH TRENDS IN THE AREA OF MARKETING OF LUXURY GOODS, BEFORE 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca CIORNEA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The first questions that all scientists address when approaching a new domain are related to how well studied is the field, who and what has studied. The answers help them establish their personal areas of interest and contribution. Thus in order to help the authors concerned with the luxury domain we decided to conduct a secondary marketing research and the main purpose was to identify the studies and the trends in research in the area of marketing of luxury goods and their degree of approach, before 2005. The present study is only a part of a complex research that approaches the entire evolution in luxury research field, but due to space limitation papers were separated in two: the evolution before 2005 and the evolution after 2005. Unique by its theme, this paper is intended to be ambitious by analysing all the luxury materials to which had access the authors The results confirmed the previous statement of some authors that luxury was little researched comparing to other domains.

  18. Front-of-pack nutrition labelling in New Zealand: an exploration of stakeholder views about research and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signal, Louise; Lanumata, Tolotea; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Gorton, Delvina

    2012-04-01

    Front-of-pack (FOP) labels are identified as a way to encourage healthy food choices and good nutrition, factors critical in promoting health. New Zealand and Australia are currently considering policy on front-of-pack labels. This research aimed to identify the challenges associated with implementing a front-of-pack nutrition labelling policy in New Zealand and with designing research to determine its likely effect. A strategic sample of key stakeholders with knowledge of food labelling from New Zealand and Australia participated in the research. The 17 participants included five food industry representatives, six policy makers, and six representatives of non-governmental organisations. Several key themes emerged including support for front-of-pack labels from key food industry, policy and NGO stakeholders because of potential for better informed consumers, changes in consumer behaviour and reduction in chronic disease. Barriers to front-of-pack labelling included limited evidence upon which to make decisions, lack of agreement on the label format, and the clash of values between 'profit driven' industry and public health. There is a high level of agreement about the need for real-life research on the effectiveness of FOP labelling. The introduction of consistent, comprehensive front-of-pack nutrition labelling in New Zealand has the potential to assist in the effort to promote healthy eating. This research suggests agreement on front-of-pack labels may not be easy to achieve.

  19. Exploring areas of consensus and conflict around values underpinning public involvement in health and social care research: a modified Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snape, D; Kirkham, J; Preston, J; Popay, J; Britten, N; Collins, M; Froggatt, K; Gibson, A; Lobban, F; Wyatt, K; Jacoby, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is growing interest in the potential benefits of public involvement (PI) in health and social care research. However, there has been little examination of values underpinning PI or how these values might differ for different groups with an interest in PI in the research process. We aimed to explore areas of consensus and conflict around normative, substantive and process-related values underpinning PI. Design Mixed method, three-phase, modified Delphi study, conducted as part of a larger multiphase project. Setting The UK health and social care research community. Participants Stakeholders in PI in research, defined as: clinical and non-clinical academics, members of the public, research managers, commissioners and funders; identified via research networks, online searches and a literature review. Results We identified high levels of consensus for many normative, substantive and process-related issues. However, there were also areas of conflict in relation to issues of bias and representativeness, and around whether the purpose of PI in health and social care research is to bring about service change or generate new knowledge. There were large differences by group in the percentages endorsing the ethical justification for PI and the argument that PI equalises power imbalances. With regard to practical implementation of PI, research support infrastructures were reported as lacking. Participants reported shortcomings in the uptake and practice of PI. Embedding PI practice and evaluation in research study designs was seen as fundamental to strengthening the evidence base. Conclusions Our findings highlight the extent to which PI is already embedded in research. However, they also highlight a need for ‘best practice’ standards to assist research teams to understand, implement and evaluate PI. These findings have been used in developing a Public Involvement Impact Assessment Framework (PiiAF), which offers guidance to researchers and members of the

  20. Geoelectrical exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Said Barseem

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sinai development is a goal of successive governments in Egypt. The present study is a geoelectrical exploration to find appropriate solutions of the problems affecting the land of a Research Station in Southeast Al Qantara. This research station is one of the Desert Research Center stations to facilitate the development of desert land for agriculture by introducing applied research. It suffers from some problems which can be summarized in the shortage of irrigation water and water logging. The appropriate solutions of these problems have been delineated by the results of 1D and 2D geoelectrical measurements. Electrical resistivity (ER revealed the subsurface sedimentary sequences and extension of subsurface layers in the horizontal and vertical directions, especially, the water bearing layer. Additionally it helped to choose the most suitable places to drill productive wells with a good condition.

  1. Exploring Constructivist Social Learning Practices in Aiding Russian-Speaking Teachers to Learn Estonian: An Action Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilo, Tatjana; Kutsar, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Based on appreciative inquiry and threshold concepts from an intercultural learning perspective, the article makes insights into the constructivist social learning practice of Estonian language learning amongst Russian-speaking teachers in Estonia. The application of educational action research methodology, more specifically that of Bridget…

  2. Exploring Students' Articulation of Value in a Social Research Methods Class: Towards a Phenomenography of Value Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglietti, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study describes journalism students' value making of social research methods, such as sampling, data gathering strategies and quantitative and qualitative data analysis, by using a mixed-­method approach to analyze 260 written reflection assignments. In their reflections, 26 student participants assessed the value of their new knowledge of…

  3. Exploring the Determinants of Language Barriers in Health Care (LBHC): Toward a Research Agenda for the Language Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalowitz, Norman; Kehayia, Eva

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in language barriers in health care (LBHC)--interest, that is, in how the quality of health care service delivery might be compromised when patients and health care providers do not share the same first language. This article discusses LBHC as an emerging research area that provides valuable opportunities for researchers…

  4. Hawaii Student / Teacher Astronomy Research program (HI STAR): 10 years of high school students exploring the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Geoffrey; Armstrong, James; Nassir, Michael A.; Kaichi, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    For the past decade, the Hawaii Student / Teacher Astronomy Research program (HI STAR) at UH Manoa’s Institute for Astronomy has trained astronomy-enthusiastic high school students in research, data analysis and science presentation skills. Every summer, a selected group of 8th-to-12th-grade students attend a week-long residential astronomy "camp" in Honolulu, Hawaii. The students experience the profession of astronomy by learning scientific skills such as imaging and spectroscopy, data-reduction, and data analysis. The week culminates with presention of a research project guided by professional astronomer mentors. During the following six months, each student continues to work with a mentor to complete a research project for submission to their local science fair. From 2012 - 2015, ~80% of students completed their long-term projects. Many have performed well; in each of 2015 and 2016, 5 alumni progressed to the International Science and Engineering Fair. Here we present the current structure of HI STAR and plans for the future.

  5. A call for research exploring social media influences on mothers' child feeding practices and childhood obesity risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doub, Allison E; Small, Meg; Birch, Leann L

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest in leveraging social media to prevent childhood obesity, however, the evidence base for how social media currently influences related behaviors and how interventions could be developed for these platforms is lacking. This commentary calls for research on the extent to which mothers use social media to learn about child feeding practices and the mechanisms through which social media influences their child feeding practices. Such formative research could be applied to the development and dissemination of evidence-based childhood obesity prevention programs that utilize social media. Mothers are identified as a uniquely important target audience for social media-based interventions because of their proximal influence on children's eating behavior and their high engagement with social media platforms. Understanding mothers' current behaviors, interests, and needs as they relate to their social media use and child feeding practices is an integral first step in the development of interventions that aim to engage mothers for obesity prevention. This commentary highlights the importance of mothers for childhood obesity prevention; discusses theoretical and analytic frameworks that can inform research on social media and mothers' child feeding practices; provides evidence that social media is an emerging context for social influences on mothers' attitudes and behaviors in which food is a salient topic; and suggests directions for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Congenital toxoplasmosis: an in-depth density-equalizing mapping analysis to explore its global research architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Handl, Vanessa; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Jaque, Jenny; Groneberg, David A

    2015-12-21

    Toxoplasmosis endangers the unborn child if its infectious agent--toxoplasma gondii--is transmitted transplacentally during pregnancy. Although this condition occurs in all parts of the world and represents a major public health burden, no detailed knowledge on the global research architecture of congenital toxoplasmosis is available thus far. Hence, it was the aim of this study to assess the related global research activity over the past 110 years. We employed the NewQIS platform, which combines established scientometric and socioeconomic analysis tools with novel visualizing techniques such as density equalizing mapping projections. In the Web of Science, 13,044 congenital toxoplasmosis-related items published between 1900 and 2012 were identified. These were issued by 26,483 authors originating from 125 countries. The US was the dominating nation (38.7 % of total scientific output), followed by France (10.9 %) and Great Britain (9.2 %). The US also led the ranking in regards to semi-qualitative parameters (total citations, country-specific h-indices and citation rates). When research activity was related to economic figures, the ratio of total toxoplasmosis publications to the total GDP listed Switzerland first with an average of 589.35 toxoplasmosis-related publications per GDP in 1000 Bio US-$, followed by France (545.16), the UK (486.13) and Brazil (431.84) and the US (311.11). The relation of toxoplasmosis-specific publications to the economic power indicator GDP per capita in 1000 US-$ revealed that the US was ranked first with 97.65 toxoplasmosis-related publications/GDP per capita in 1000 US-$, followed by Brazil (85.95). Subject area analysis indicated a relative shortage of studies that addressed pharmacological or public health aspects of congenital toxoplasmosis. This study is the first in-depth approach to sketch a global picture of the congenital toxoplasmosis research architecture. In contrast to other fields of biomedical research, not only high

  7. Innovative Research Design Exploring the Effects of Physical Activity and Genetics on Cognitive Performance in Community-Based Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etnier, Jennifer L; Labban, Jeffrey D; Karper, William B; Wideman, Laurie; Piepmeier, Aaron T; Shih, Chia-Hao; Castellano, Michael; Williams, Lauren M; Park, Se-Yun; Henrich, Vincent C; Dudley, William N; Rulison, Kelli L

    2015-10-01

    Physical activity is predictive of better cognitive performance and lower risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) is a susceptibility gene for AD with the e4 allele being associated with a greater risk of AD. Cross-sectional and prospective research shows that physical activity is predictive of better cognitive performance for those at greater genetic risk for AD. However, the moderating role of APOE on the effects of a physical activity intervention on cognitive performance has not been examined. The purpose of this manuscript is to justify the need for such research and to describe the design, methods, and recruitment tactics used in the conductance of a study designed to provide insight as to the extent to which cognitive benefits resulting from an 8-month physical activity program are differentiated by APOE e4 status. The effectiveness of the recruitment strategies and the feasibility of recruiting APOE e4 carriers are discussed.

  8. Research of spectral characteristics of ubiquinone solution and explore of the solvent effect on the experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, Elvira O.; Gorbunova, Elena V.; Korotaev, Valery V.

    2016-04-01

    This work is dedicated to the research of the clinical diagnosis method of determining the antioxidant status of the human body. The existing methods for determining the level of antioxidants in connection with biological functions of the human antioxidant system were studied. Antioxidants in the human body, in the form of solutions were chosen as a research objects. The technique of experimental studies of ubiquinone solutions in oil and alcohol by spectroscopic method was offered. The experimental results connected with the optical density and color characteristics confirm the possibility of applying the clinical diagnosis method of estimation antioxidant balance. Also, it was found that this method can be applicable to the quality control of medicines for treating diseases provoked by oxidative stress, which means that this method may be developed not only for using in the clinic.

  9. Exploring intentions of physician-scientist trainees: factors influencing MD and MD/PhD interest in research careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Jennifer M; Daye, Dania; Schmidt, Mary Lou; Conlon, Claudia Morrissey; Kim, Hajwa; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Payne, Aimee S; Riddle, Megan; Madera, Sharline; Adami, Alexander J; Winter, Kate Quinn

    2017-07-11

    Prior studies have described the career paths of physician-scientist candidates after graduation, but the factors that influence career choices at the candidate stage remain unclear. Additionally, previous work has focused on MD/PhDs, despite many physician-scientists being MDs. This study sought to identify career sector intentions, important factors in career selection, and experienced and predicted obstacles to career success that influence the career choices of MD candidates, MD candidates with research-intense career intentions (MD-RI), and MD/PhD candidates. A 70-question survey was administered to students at 5 academic medical centers with Medical Scientist Training Programs (MSTPs) and Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) from the NIH. Data were analyzed using bivariate or multivariate analyses. More MD/PhD and MD-RI candidates anticipated or had experienced obstacles related to balancing academic and family responsibilities and to balancing clinical, research, and education responsibilities, whereas more MD candidates indicated experienced and predicted obstacles related to loan repayment. MD/PhD candidates expressed higher interest in basic and translational research compared to MD-RI candidates, who indicated more interest in clinical research. Overall, MD-RI candidates displayed a profile distinct from both MD/PhD and MD candidates. MD/PhD and MD-RI candidates experience obstacles that influence their intentions to pursue academic medical careers from the earliest training stage, obstacles which differ from those of their MD peers. The differences between the aspirations of and challenges facing MD, MD-RI and MD/PhD candidates present opportunities for training programs to target curricula and support services to ensure the career development of successful physician-scientists.

  10. Social determinants of health and health equity policy research: exploring the use, misuse, and nonuse of policy analysis theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embrett, Mark G; Randall, G E

    2014-05-01

    Despite a dramatic growth in SDH/HE (social determinants of health/health equity) public policy research and demonstrated government interest in promoting equity in health policies, health inequities are actually growing among some populations and there is little evidence that "healthy public policies" are being adopted and implemented. Moreover, these issues are typically failing to even reach governments' policy agendas, which is a critical step towards serious debate and the identification of policy options. This systematic review pursues three main objectives. First, is to identify barriers to SDH/HE issues reaching the government policy agenda. Second, to evaluate the characteristics of peer-reviewed research articles that utilize common policy analysis theories. And third, to determine the extent to which the SDH/HE literature utilizes common policy analysis theories. Our systematic review, conducted in June 2012, identified 6200 SDH/HE related articles in the peer-reviewed literature; however, only seven articles explicitly used a commonly recognized policy analysis theory to inform their analysis. Our analysis revealed that the SDH/HE policy literature appears to be focused on advocacy rather than analysis and that the use of policy analysis theory is extremely limited. Our results also suggest that when such theories are incorporated into an analysis they are often not comprehensively employed. We propose explanations for this non-use and misuse of policy analysis theory, and conclude that researchers may have greater influence in helping to get SDH/HE issues onto government policy agendas if they gain a greater understanding of the policy process and the value of incorporating policy analysis theories into their research. Using a policy analysis lens to help identify why healthy public policies are typically not being adopted is an important step towards moving beyond advocacy to understanding and addressing some of the political barriers to reforms

  11. Exploring the characteristics, global distribution and reasons for retraction of published articles involving human research participants: a literature survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guowei; Kamel, Mariam; Jin, Yanling; Xu, Michael Kuan; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Samaan, Zainab; Levine, Mitchell Ah; Thabane, Lehana

    2018-01-01

    Article retraction is a measure taken by journals or authors where there is evidence of research misconduct or error, redundancy, plagiarism or unethical research. Recently, the retraction of scientific publications has been on the rise. In this survey, we aimed to describe the characteristics and distribution of retracted articles and the reasons for retractions. We searched retracted articles on the PubMed database and Retraction Watch website from 1980 to February 2016. The primary outcomes were the characteristics and distribution of retracted articles and the reasons for retractions. The secondary outcomes included how article retractions were handled by journals and how to improve the journal practices toward article retractions. We included 1,339 retracted articles. Most retracted articles had six authors or fewer. Article retraction was most common in the USA (26%), Japan (11%) and Germany (10%). The main reasons for article retraction were misconduct (51%, n = 685) and error (14%, n = 193). There were 66% (n = 889) of retracted articles having male senior or corresponding authors. Of the articles retracted after August 2010, 63% (n = 567) retractions were reported on Retraction Watch. Large discrepancies were observed in the ways that different journals handled article retractions. For instance, articles were completely withdrawn from some journals, while in others, articles were still available with no indication of retraction. Likewise, some retraction notices included a detailed account of the events that led to article retraction, while others only consisted of a statement indicating the article retraction. The characteristics, geographic distribution and reasons for retraction of published articles involving human research participants were examined in this survey. More efforts are needed to improve the consistency and transparency of journal practices toward article retractions.

  12. Mapas cognitivos e a pesquisa organizacional: explorando aspectos metodológicos Cognitive maps and organizational research: exploring methodological issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Virgílio Bittencourt Bastos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A intersecção entre as ciências da cognição e os estudos organizacionais criou um campo emergente de pesquisa denominado cognição organizacional. Tal campo se apóia em uma visão de organização como processos socialmente construídos que, de forma recorrente, articulam atores em interação. Assim, grande ênfase é dada ao papel das cognições dos atores como mediadoras de importantes processos e produtos organizacionais, em seus diferentes níveis. Os mapas cognitivos, nesse domínio, têm sido crescentemente utilizados como ferramentas para representar estruturas e processos cognitivos que ajudam a compreender decisões e ações que configuram uma organização. O presente texto, apoiado em uma revisão da literatura, após localizar as tendências no campo que justificam o uso dos mapas cognitivos, procura caracterizá-los, especialmente no tocante às decisões metodológicas que configuram seus diferentes tipos. Como conclusão, discutem-se os limites e potencialidades dos mapas cognitivos como ferramentas de pesquisa de processos organizacionais.The intersection between cognitive sciences and organizational studies has created a new field of research called organizational cognition. Research in this field is based on a view of organizational processes as the result of social constructions - the exchange and articulation of ideas among those involved in the organization. Thus, a great emphasis is given to the role of the actor's cognitions, which mediate important organizational processes and products. Cognitive maps have been increasingly used in this domain as tools to represent the cognitive structures and processes that help to understand the decisions and actions that define an organization. The present text first identifies the research objectives that justify the use of cognitive maps, then characterizes these tools based on the methodological issues that differentiate among various approaches. The third and final topic

  13. Exploring the differences between pet and non-pet owners: Implications for human-animal interaction research and policy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Saunders

    Full Text Available There is conflicting evidence about whether living with pets results in better mental and physical health outcomes, with the majority of the empirical research evidence being inconclusive due to methodological limitations. We briefly review the research evidence, including the hypothesized mechanisms through which pet ownership may influence health outcomes. This study examines how pet and non-pet owners differ across a variety of socio-demographic and health measures, which has implications for the proper interpretation of a large number of correlational studies that attempt to draw causal attributions. We use a large, population-based survey from California administered in 2003 (n = 42,044 and find that pet owners and non-pet owners differ across many traits, including gender, age, race/ethnicity, living arrangements, and income. We include a discussion about how the factors associated with the selection into the pet ownership group are related to a range of mental and physical health outcomes. Finally, we provide guidance on how to properly model the effects of pet ownership on health to accurately estimate this relationship in the general population.

  14. The VIPER project (Visualization Integration Platform for Exploration Research): a biologically inspired autonomous reconfigurable robotic platform for diverse unstructured environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Oliver J.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-09-01

    Over the last decade the world has seen numerous autonomous vehicle programs. Wheels and track designs are the basis for many of these vehicles. This is primarily due to four main reasons: a vast preexisting knowledge base for these designs, energy efficiency of power sources, scalability of actuators, and the lack of control systems technologies for handling alternate highly complex distributed systems. Though large efforts seek to improve the mobility of these vehicles, many limitations still exist for these systems within unstructured environments, e.g. limited mobility within industrial and nuclear accident sites where existing plant configurations have been extensively changed. These unstructured operational environments include missions for exploration, reconnaissance, and emergency recovery of objects within reconfigured or collapsed structures, e.g. bombed buildings. More importantly, these environments present a clear and present danger for direct human interactions during the initial phases of recovery operations. Clearly, the current classes of autonomous vehicles are incapable of performing in these environments. Thus the next generation of designs must include highly reconfigurable and flexible autonomous robotic platforms. This new breed of autonomous vehicles will be both highly flexible and environmentally adaptable. Presented in this paper is one of the most successful designs from nature, the snake-eel-worm (SEW). This design implements shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators which allow for scaling of the robotic SEW designs from sub-micron scale to heavy industrial implementations without major conceptual redesigns as required in traditional hydraulic, pneumatic, or motor driven systems. Autonomous vehicles based on the SEW design posses the ability to easily move between air based environments and fluid based environments with limited or no reconfiguration. Under a SEW designed vehicle, one not only achieves vastly improved maneuverability within a

  15. The first colliders: AdA, VEP-1 and Princeton-Stanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-07-11

    The idea of exploring collisions in the center-of-mass system to fully exploit the energy of the accelerated particles had been given serious consideration by the Norwegian engineer and inventor Rolf Wideröe, who had applied for a patent on the idea in 1943 (and got the patent in 1953 [1]) after considering the kinematic advantage of keeping the center of mass at rest to produce larger momentum transfers. Describing this advantage G.K.O’Neill, one of the collider pioneers, wrote in 1956 [2]: “…as accelerators of higher and higher energy are built, their usefulness is limited by the fact that the energy available for creating new particles is measured in the center-of-mass system of the target nucleon and the bombarding particle. In the relativistic limit, this energy rises only as the square root of the accelerator energy. However, if two particles of equal energy traveling in opposite directions could be made to collide, the available energy would be twice the whole energy of one particle...” Therefore, no kinetic energy is wasted by the motion of the center of mass of the system, and the available reaction energy ER = 2Ebeam (while a particle with the same energy Ebeam colliding with another particle of the mass m at rest produces only ER = (2Ebeam m)½ in the extreme relativistic case.) One can also add that the colliders are “cleaner” machines with respect to the fixed target ones since the colliding beams do not interact with the target materials. The other advantage is that it is much easier to organize collisions of beams composed of matter-antimatter particles, like in electron-positron and proton-antiproton colliders.

  16. Risk factors of pre-operational aortic rupture in acute and subacute Stanford type A aortic dissection patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo-Dong; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Jiang; Wang, Jun; Lu, Fang-Lin; Han, Lin; Xu, Zhi-Yun

    2017-12-01

    Aortic rupture is one of the main causes of early death in acute and subacute Stanford type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) patients. This study aimed to analyze potential risk factors for pre-operational aortic rupture in ATAAD patients. We retrospectively reviewed aortic dissection cases treated between May 2013 and May 2016 in Changhai Hospital, Shanghai. A total of 329 patients with ATAAD were included in the final analysis, and 31 patients died of aortic rupture before surgery. Clinical data on basic characteristics, clinical presentation, and biochemical measurements for all 329 patients were analyzed. The in-hospital aortic rupture rate was 9.4% (31/329), and the rupture accounted for 47% (31/66) of all in-hospital deaths of ATAAD patients. Patients who experienced rupture were significantly older (P0.7 ng/mL (OR: 9.28; 95% CI, 1.72-50.06; P=0.010), and D-dimer level ≥10 µg/mL (OR: 13.37; 95% CI, 2.18-81.97; P=0.005). Aortic rupture accounted for 47% of all in-hospital deaths among patient with ATAAD. Shock, pain requiring medication, a troponin level >0.7 ng/mL and a D-dimer level ≥10 µg/mL are independent risk factors for aortic rupture in these patients.

  17. The Stanford-ReSurge Burn Scar Contracture Scale for Neck: Development and Initial Validation for Burn Scar Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lawrence; Puri, Vinita; Dangol, Mohan Krishna; Mannan, Iftekhar Ibne; Khundkar, Shafquat Hussain; Le Thua, Trung-Hau; Muguti, Godfrey; Rai, Shankar Man; Karanas, Yvonne; Chang, James

    2016-11-01

    Burn contractures can cause significant disability, particularly in patients in resource-limited settings. However, a gap exists in our ability to measure outcomes in patients with burn contractures of the neck. The objective of this study was to develop and validate the Stanford-ReSurge Burn Scar Contracture Scale-Neck to longitudinally assess functional status and measure functional improvement following contracture release of the neck. A literature review was performed to identify scales used in neck assessment and burn assessment. Items were then removed from the pool based on redundancy, feasibility, cultural appropriateness, and applicability to patients in international resource-limited environments. Remaining items were administered to patients with burn contracture of the neck. The initial literature review found 33 scales that were combined to create an initial pool of 714 items, which was first reduced to 40 items. Feedback from field testing then yielded a 20-item outcome tool to assess appearance, activities of daily living, somatosensation, satisfaction, and range of motion, with a floor of 20 and a ceiling score of 100 points. Preliminary testing with 10 patients showed an average preoperative score of 58 points and an average 1-month postoperative score of 42 points. The authors have created an outcome tool for measuring functional status following burn contracture release of the neck, which can easily be implemented in resource-limited settings where the burden of burn injuries and morbidities is disproportionately high. Ongoing work includes a multicountry study to evaluate validity and reliability.

  18. Transcarotid Artery Endovascular Reconstruction of the Aortic Arch by Modified Bifurcated Stent Graft for Stanford Type A Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old man with Stanford type B dissection underwent his first endovascular repair (EVAR in April 2004 by Talent thoracic stent graft. He had an uncomplicated recovery and maintained good blood pressure control. However, a new retrograde dissection appeared in September 2004. The new dissection involved his aortic arch and ascending thoracic aorta to the opening of the coronary arteries. To reconstruct the aortic arch, bypasses between the right common carotid artery (RCCA, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery were performed before endovascular repair. A modified bifurcated Talent stent graft was deployed from the RCCA to the ascending thoracic aorta with a long limb in the innominate artery and a short limb in the aortic arch. A further two pieces of graft were deployed via the common femoral artery. The ascending thoracic aorta and aortic arch were reconstructed completely by the bifurcated stent graft. The final angiography confirmed that there was good stent graft configuration, normal blood flow, and stable haemodynamics. No endoleak or other major complications were encountered. This result indicated that it is possible to reconstruct the aortic arch with a bifurcated stent graft and could be a new endovascular repair model for complex thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection.

  19. Explorative research of methods for discrete space/time simulation integrated with the event-based approach and agent concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuhong; de By, Rolf; Augustijn, Ellen-Wien

    2006-10-01

    Geographic Information Science (GIS) has provided the methodological and technical supports for modeling and simulation in the geographical domain. However, research methods on building complex simulations in which agents behave and interact in discrete time and space are lacking. The existing simulation systems/software are application-oriented and do not provide a theoretical (conceptual) view. The simulation theories and methods that exist do not incorporate spatial issues, which are the key to linking GIS with simulation theory and practice. This paper introduces a method for developing a conceptual theoretical framework for a spatial simulation system which can potentially be integrated with GIS. Firstly, based on classical discrete event simulation and fresh agent technology, a simulation theory is proposed, which is represented by a conceptual simulation model using UML-based visual syntax. In this theoretical framework, spatial issues including spatial setting, spatial constraints, spatial effects and spatial awareness are emphasized. Next, a testing scenario in the microscopic traffic simulation domain is set up to examine the feasibility of the simulation philosophy. Finally, the method is evaluated from the aspects of feasibility, uncertainty and applicability.

  20. Multi-omics Frontiers in Algal Research: Techniques and Progress to Explore Biofuels in the Postgenomics World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vineeta; Karthikaichamy, Anbarasu; Das, Debasish; Noronha, Santosh; Wangikar, Pramod P; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2016-07-01

    Current momentum of microalgal research rests extensively in tapping the potential of multi-omics methodologies in regard to sustainable biofuels. Microalgal biomass is fermented to bioethanol; while lipids, particularly triacylglycerides (TAGs), are transesterified to biodiesels. Biodiesel has emerged as an ideal biofuel candidate; hence, its commercialization and use are increasingly being emphasized. Abiotic stresses exaggerate TAG accumulation, but the precise mechanisms are yet to be known. More recently, comprehensive multi-omics studies in microalgae have emerged from the biofuel perspective. Genomics and transcriptomics of microalgae have provided crucial leads and basic understanding toward lipid biosynthesis. Proteomics and metabolomics are now complementing "algal omics" and offer precise functional insights into the attendant static and dynamic physiological contexts. Indeed, the field has progressed from shotgun to targeted approaches. Notably, targeted proteomics studies in microalga are not yet reported. Several multi-omics tools and technologies that may be used to dig deeper into the microalgal physiology are examined and highlighted in this review. The article therefore aims to both introduce various available high-throughput biotechnologies and applications of "omics" in microalgae, and enlists a compendium of the emerging cutting edge literature. We suggest that a strategic and thoughtful combination of data streams from different omics platforms can provide a system-wide overview. The algal omics warrants closer attention in the future, with a view to technical, economic, and societal impacts that are anticipated in the current postgenomics era.