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Sample records for standard opioid treatment

  1. 42 CFR 8.12 - Federal opioid treatment standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal opioid treatment standards. 8.12 Section 8.12 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS... and administration decisions shall be made by a program physician familiar with the most up-to-date...

  2. Real-world treatment patterns and opioid use in chronic low back pain patients initiating duloxetine versus standard of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews JS

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Scott Andrews,1 Ning Wu,2 Shih-Yin Chen,2 Xia Yu,2 Xiaomei Peng,1 Diego Novick1 1Global Health Outcomes, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Evidera, Lexington, MA, USA Abstract: To describe the use of pain medications in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP after initiating duloxetine or standard of care (SOC [muscle relaxants, gabapentin, pregabalin, venlafaxine, and tricyclic antidepressants] for pain management, pharmacy and medical claims from Surveillance Data, Inc (SDI Health were analyzed. Adult patients with CLBP who initiated duloxetine or SOC between November 2010 and April 2011 were identified. Treatment initiation was defined as no pill coverage for duloxetine or SOC in the previous 90 days. Included patients had no opioid use in the 90 days before initiation. Propensity score matching was used to select patients with similar baseline demographic and clinical characteristics for duloxetine and SOC cohorts. Compliance with index medication was assessed via medication possession ratio (MPR and proportion of days covered (PDC for 6 months after initiation. The proportion of patients receiving opioids and days on opioids after index date were assessed, and regression models were estimated to compare opioid use between cohorts. A total of 766 patients initiated duloxetine and 6,206 patients initiated SOC. After matching, 743 patients were selected for the duloxetine (mean age 57 years; female 74% and SOC (mean age 57 years; female 75% cohorts, respectively. Of the duloxetine cohort, 92% started on or below recommended daily dose (≤60 mg. The duloxetine cohort had significantly higher MPR (0.78 versus [vs] 0.60 and PDC (0.50 vs 0.31, were less likely to use opioids (45% vs 61%, and had fewer days on opioids (median 0 vs 7 days than the SOC cohort (all P < 0.001. After adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics, the duloxetine cohort initiated opioids later than the SOC cohort (hazard ratio 0.77, 95

  3. Day treatment versus enhanced standard methadone services for opioid-dependent patients: a comparison of clinical efficacy and cost.

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    Avants, S K; Margolin, A; Sindelar, J L; Rounsaville, B J; Schottenfeld, R; Stine, S; Cooney, N L; Rosenheck, R A; Li, S H; Kosten, T R

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the differential efficacy and relative costs of two intensities of adjunctive psychosocial services--a day treatment program and enhanced standard care--for the treatment of opioid-dependent patients maintained on methadone hydrochloride. A 12-week randomized clinical trial with 6-month follow-up was conducted in a community-based methadone maintenance program. Of the 308 patients who met inclusion criteria, 291 began treatment (day treatment program: N=145; enhanced standard care: N=146), and 237 completed treatment (82% of those assigned to the day treatment program and 81% of those receiving enhanced standard care). Two hundred twenty of the patients participated in the 6-month follow-up (75% of those in the day treatment program and 73% of those in enhanced standard care provided a follow-up urine sample for screening). Both interventions were 12 weeks in duration, manual-guided, and provided by master's-level clinicians. The day treatment was an intensive, 25-hour-per-week program. The enhanced standard care was standard methadone maintenance plus a weekly skills training group and referral to on- and off-site services. Outcome measures included twice weekly urine toxicology screens, severity of addiction-related problems, prevalence of HIV risk behaviors, and program costs. Although the cost of the day treatment program was significantly higher, there was no significant difference in the two groups' use of either opiates or cocaine. Over the course of treatment, drug use, drug-related problems, and HIV risk behaviors decreased significantly for patients assigned to both treatment intensities. Improvements were maintained at follow-up. Providing an intensive day treatment program to unemployed, inner-city methadone patients was not cost-effective relative to a program of enhanced methadone maintenance services, which produced comparable outcomes at less than half the cost.

  4. Illicit Opioid Intoxication: Diagnosis and Treatment

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    A. Fareed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid intoxications and overdose are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Opioid overdose may occur in the setting of intravenous or intranasal heroin use, illicit use of diverted opioid medications, intentional or accidental misuse of prescription pain medications, or iatrogenic overdose. In this review, we focused on the epidemiology of illict opioid use in the United States and on the mechanism of action of opioid drugs. We also described the signs and symptoms, and diagnoses of intoxication and overdose. Lastly, we updated the reader about the most recent recommendations for treatment and prevention of opioid intoxications and overdose.

  5. 42 CFR 8.11 - Opioid treatment program certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 823(g)(1)) to dispense opioid drugs in the treatment of opioid addiction. An OTP... opioid addiction. (2) To obtain certification from SAMHSA, an OTP must meet the Federal opioid treatment... governmental entities to regulate the use of opioid drugs in the treatment of opioid addiction. The provisions...

  6. Using behavioral economics to predict opioid use during prescription opioid dependence treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Shoptaw, Steven J; Bickel, Warren K; Ling, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Research grounded in behavioral economics has previously linked addictive behavior to disrupted decision-making and reward-processing, but these principles have not been examined in prescription opioid addiction, which is currently a major public health problem. This study examined whether pre-treatment drug reinforcement value predicted opioid use during outpatient treatment of prescription opioid addiction. Secondary analyses examined participants with prescription opioid dependence who received 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone and counseling in a multi-site clinical trial (N=353). Baseline measures assessed opioid source and indices of drug reinforcement value, including the total amount and proportion of income spent on drugs. Weekly urine drug screens measured opioid use. Obtaining opioids from doctors was associated with lower pre-treatment drug spending, while obtaining opioids from dealers/patients was associated with greater spending. Controlling for demographics, opioid use history, and opioid source frequency, patients who spent a greater total amount (OR=1.30, peconomic resources to drugs, reflects propensity for continued opioid use during treatment among individuals with prescription opioid addiction. Future studies should examine disrupted decision-making and reward-processing in prescription opioid users more directly and test whether reinforcer pathology can be remediated in this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Craving and subsequent opioid use among opioid dependent patients who initiate treatment with buprenorphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Strong, David R.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have directly assessed associations between craving and subsequent opioid use among treated patients. Our objective was to prospectively evaluate the relative utility of two craving questionnaires to predict opioid use among opioid dependent patients in treatment. Method Opioid dependent patients (n=147) initiating buprenorphine treatment were assessed for three months. Craving was measured using: 1) the Desires for Drug Questionnaire (DDQ) and 2) the Penn Alcohol-Craving Scale adapted for opioid craving (PCS) for this study. Multi-level logistic regression models estimated the effects of craving on the likelihood of opioid use after adjusting for gender, age, ethnicity, education, opioid of choice, frequency of use, pain and depression. In these analyses craving assessed at time t was entered as a time-varying predictor of opioid use at time t+1. Results In adjusted regression models, a 1-point increase in PCS scores (on a 7-point scale) was associated with a significant increase in the odds of opioid use at the subsequent assessment (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.08; 1.49, p .05) or DDQ control (OR = 0.97, 95%CI 0.85; 1.11, p > .05) scores. Conclusion Self-reported craving for opioids was associated with subsequent lapse to opioid use among a cohort of patients treated with buprenorphine. PMID:24521036

  8. Medication-Assisted Treatment For Opioid Addiction in Opioid Treatment Programs. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkler, Emily; Vallejos Bartlett, Catalina; Brooks, Margaret; Gilbert, Johnatnan Max; Henderson, Randi; Shuman, Deborah, J.

    2005-01-01

    TIP 43 provides best-practice guidelines for medication-assisted treatment of opioid addiction in opioid treatment programs (OTPs). The primary intended audience for this volume is substance abuse treatment providers and administrators who work in OTPs. Recommendations in the TIP are based on both an analysis of current research and determinations…

  9. [Management of opioid maintenance treatments when analgesic treatments are required].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprevote, Vincent; Geoffroy, Pierre A; Rolland, Benjamin; Leheup, Benoît F; Di Patrizio, Paolo; Cottencin, Olivier; Schwan, Raymund

    2013-01-01

    Opioid maintenance treatments (OMT) reduce illicit opiate use and its associated risks. They are often prescribed on a long-term basis. Physiological changes induced by long-term OMT may cause hyperalgesia and cross-tolerance to opioid agonists, which suggests that the dosage of analgesic treatment should be modified in cases of acute pain, especially when an opioid-based analgesia is required. When treatment with analgesics is necessary, OMT must be maintained, except in exceptional cases. If a split-dosing schedule is temporarily employed during OMT, the daily dosage should not be increased for analgesic purposes. Analgesic treatment must be managed differently in case of treatment with buprenorphine or methadone. With buprenorphine, non-opioid analgesics should be introduced first, if possible. If this strategy is inefficient or contraindicated, a temporary or definitive switch to methadone should be considered. In the case of methadone-based OMT, opioid analgesics should be added directly and the dosage should be adapted according to the level of pain reported by the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Pain, opioids, and sleep: implications for restless legs syndrome treatment.

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    Trenkwalder, Claudia; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Högl, Birgit

    2017-03-01

    Opioid receptor agonists are known to relieve restless legs syndrome (RLS) symptoms, including both sensory and motor events, as well as improving sleep. The mechanisms of action of opioids in RLS are still a matter of speculation. The mechanisms by which endogenous opioids contribute to the pathophysiology of this polygenetic disorder, in which there are a number of variants, including developmental factors, remains unknown. A summary of the cellular mode of action of morphine and its (partial) antagonist naloxone via α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors and the involvement of dendritic spine activation is described. By targeting pain and its consequences, opioids are the first-line treatment in many diseases and conditions with both acute and chronic pain and have thus been used in both acute and chronic pain conditions over the last 40 years. Addiction, dependence, and tolerability of opioids show a wide variability interindividually, as the response to opioids is influenced by a complex combination of genetic, molecular, and phenotypic factors. Although several trials have now addressed opioid treatment in RLS, hyperalgesia as a complication of long-term opioid treatment, or opioid-opioid interaction have not received much attention so far. Therapeutic opioids may act not only on opioid receptors but also via histamine or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. In patients with RLS, one of the few studies investigating opioid bindings found that possible brain regions involved in the severity of RLS symptoms are similar to those known to be involved in chronic pain, such as the medial pain system (medial thalamus, amygdala, caudate nucleus, anterior cingulate gyrus, insular cortex, and orbitofrontal cortex). The results of this diprenorphine positron emission tomography study suggested that the more severe the RLS, the greater the release of endogenous opioids. Since 1993, when the first small controlled study was performed with

  11. Long-term outcomes from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Griffin, Margaret L; Provost, Scott E; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; McDermott, Katherine A; Srisarajivakul, Emily N; Dodd, Dorian R; Dreifuss, Jessica A; McHugh, R Kathryn; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2015-05-01

    Despite the growing prevalence of prescription opioid dependence, longitudinal studies have not examined long-term treatment response. The current study examined outcomes over 42 months in the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS). POATS was a multi-site clinical trial lasting up to 9 months, examining different durations of buprenorphine-naloxone plus standard medical management for prescription opioid dependence, with participants randomized to receive or not receive additional opioid drug counseling. A subset of participants (N=375 of 653) enrolled in a follow-up study. Telephone interviews were administered approximately 18, 30, and 42 months after main-trial enrollment. Comparison of baseline characteristics by follow-up participation suggested few differences. At Month 42, much improvement was seen: 31.7% were abstinent from opioids and not on agonist therapy; 29.4% were receiving opioid agonist therapy, but met no symptom criteria for current opioid dependence; 7.5% were using illicit opioids while on agonist therapy; and the remaining 31.4% were using opioids without agonist therapy. Participants reporting a lifetime history of heroin use at baseline were more likely to meet DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence at Month 42 (OR=4.56, 95% CI=1.29-16.04, popioid abstinence. Eight percent (n=27/338) used heroin for the first time during follow-up; 10.1% reported first-time injection heroin use. Long-term outcomes for those dependent on prescription opioids demonstrated clear improvement from baseline. However, a subset exhibited a worsening course, by initiating heroin use and/or injection opioid use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Substitution treatment for opioid addicts in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlach Ralf

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After a long and controversial debate methadone maintenance treatment (MMT was first introduced in Germany in 1987. The number of patients in MMT – first low because of strict admission criteria – increased considerably since the 1990s up to some 65,000 at the end of 2006. In Germany each general practitioner (GP, who has completed an additional training in addiction medicine, is allowed to prescribe substitution drugs to opioid dependent patients. Currently 2,700 GPs prescribe substitution drugs. Psychosocial care should be made available to all MMT patients. Results The results of research studies and practical experiences clearly indicate that patients benefit substantially from MMT with improvements in physical and psychological health. MMT proves successful in attaining high retention rates (65 % to 85 % in the first years, up to 50 % after more than seven years and plays a major role in accessing and maintaining ongoing medical treatment for HIV and hepatitis. MMT is also seen as a vital factor in the process of social re-integration and it contributes to the reduction of drug related harms such as mortality and morbidity and to the prevention of infectious diseases. Some 10 % of MMT patients become drug-free in the long run. Methadone is the most commonly prescribed substitution medication in Germany, although buprenorphine is attaining rising importance. Access to MMT in rural areas is very patchy and still constitutes a problem. There are only few employment opportunities for patients participating in MMT, although regular employment is considered unanimously as a positive factor of treatment success. Substitution treatment in German prisons is heterogeneous in access and treatment modalities. Access is very patchy and the number of inmates in treatment is limited. Nevertheless, substitution treatment plays a substantial part in the health care system provided to drug users in Germany. Conclusion In Germany, a

  13. Substitution treatment for opioid addicts in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Ingo Ilja; Stöver, Heino; Gerlach, Ralf

    2007-02-02

    After a long and controversial debate methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) was first introduced in Germany in 1987. The number of patients in MMT--first low because of strict admission criteria--increased considerably since the 1990s up to some 65,000 at the end of 2006. In Germany each general practitioner (GP), who has completed an additional training in addiction medicine, is allowed to prescribe substitution drugs to opioid dependent patients. Currently 2,700 GPs prescribe substitution drugs. Psychosocial care should be made available to all MMT patients. The results of research studies and practical experiences clearly indicate that patients benefit substantially from MMT with improvements in physical and psychological health. MMT proves successful in attaining high retention rates (65% to 85% in the first years, up to 50% after more than seven years) and plays a major role in accessing and maintaining ongoing medical treatment for HIV and hepatitis. MMT is also seen as a vital factor in the process of social re-integration and it contributes to the reduction of drug related harms such as mortality and morbidity and to the prevention of infectious diseases. Some 10% of MMT patients become drug-free in the long run. Methadone is the most commonly prescribed substitution medication in Germany, although buprenorphine is attaining rising importance. Access to MMT in rural areas is very patchy and still constitutes a problem. There are only few employment opportunities for patients participating in MMT, although regular employment is considered unanimously as a positive factor of treatment success. Substitution treatment in German prisons is heterogeneous in access and treatment modalities. Access is very patchy and the number of inmates in treatment is limited. Nevertheless, substitution treatment plays a substantial part in the health care system provided to drug users in Germany. In Germany, a history of substitution treatment spanning 20 years has meanwhile

  14. Comparison of craving for opioid in opioid-dependent individuals and people under methadone maintenance treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azita Chehri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methadone Maintenance Therapy (MMT is the most important treatment for opioid -dependency recurrence. The aim of this study was to compare the craving level in opioid-dependent individuals and people under methadone maintenance therapy. Methods: In this case – control study, 120 men with opioid dependency were selected through cluster sampling method. They were divided into two groups, 60 people in opioid-dependent group and 60 people in MMT group. Both groups were matched for age, sex, marital status, education, duration of opioid dependency and method of consumption. Then, they completed INCAS Substance Abuse Profile (ISAP, opiate withdrawal symptoms checklist, self–report of craving, Desire for Drug Questionnaire (DDQ, Obsessive Compulsive Drug Use Scale (OCDUS and visual cue-induced craving questionnaire. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15 using t-test and ANOVA. Results: Mean craving for drug significantly was lower in MMT group comparing opioid-dependent group (P<0.01. Conclusion: Methadone Maintenance Therapy decreased the craving for drugs and substances This can have an important role in relapse prevention.

  15. Long term substitution treatment (maintenance treatment of opioid dependent persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirl, Charlotte

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Health political background: Methadone substitution treatment in Germany is introduced in 1988 in the framework of a scientific pilot study in North Rhein Westphalia. Recent statistics show that by now a broad offer of substitution treatment exists. From 1 June 2002 to 31 December 2003 113,000 substitution treatments have been recorded as being started of which around 56,000 have been recorded as ongoing treatments by 1 December 2003. Scientific background: Substitution treatment (treatment of opioid-dependent persons using substitution substances is one part of addiction treatment. Its goals are harm reduction and the stabilisation of opioid dependent persons. Integration of opioid-dependent persons in a treatment-setting, reduction of consumption of psychoactive substances, reduction of risk behaviour (primarily related to infectious diseases, decrease of mortality and improvements concerning the social, psychic and physic situation are seen as a success of substitution treatment as maintenance therapy. Research questions: The aim of this HTA report is to investigate which indicators can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of substitution treatment. Based on these indicators an evaluation of the medical, social and economical benefit of substitution treatment - also in relation to abstinence oriented treatment - is carried out. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in 31 international databases which yielded 2451 articles with publication date between 1995 and February 2005. Results: After a twofold selection process 32 publications were included for assessment and 276 publications were used as background literature. Despite serious restrictions due to selection bias and dropout in most studies focusing on substitution treatment, reduction of consumption of illegal opioids, reduction of risk behaviour, criminal behaviour, mortality and incidence of HIV can be seen as an empirically proven success of substitution treatment

  16. Methadone, Buprenorphine, and Naltrexone for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnant Women.

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    Tran, Tran H; Griffin, Brooke L; Stone, Rebecca H; Vest, Kathleen M; Todd, Timothy J

    2017-07-01

    Pregnant women with opioid use disorder can be treated with methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone to reduce opioid use and improve retention to treatment. In this review, we compare the pregnancy outcomes of methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone in clinical trials and discuss the potential behavioral and developmental effects of these agents seen in offspring in animal studies. Important clinical considerations in the management of opioid use disorder in pregnant women and their infants are also discussed. Outside of pregnancy, buprenorphine is used in combination with naloxone to reduce opioid abuse and diversion. During pregnancy, however, the use of buprenorphine as a single agent is preferred to prevent prenatal naloxone exposure. Both methadone and buprenorphine are widely used to treat opioid use disorder; however, compared with methadone, buprenorphine is associated with shorter treatment duration, less medication needed to treat neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) symptoms, and shorter hospitalizations for neonates. Despite being the standard of care, medication-assisted treatment with methadone or buprenorphine is still underused, making it apparent that more options are necessary. Naltrexone is not a first-line treatment primarily because both detoxification and an opioid-free period are required. More research is needed to determine naltrexone safety and benefits in pregnant women. Animal studies suggest that changes in pain sensitivity, developmental processes, and behavioral responses may occur in children born to mothers receiving methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone and is an area that warrants future studies. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  17. Methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld1, Kelly M Standifer21Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, Department of Physiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: Constipation is a significant problem related to opioid medications used to manage pain. This review attempts to outline the latest findings related to the therapeutic usefulness of a μ opioid receptor antagonist, methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation. The review highlights methylnaltrexone bromide (RelistorTM; Progenics/Wyeth a quaternary derivative of naltrexone, which was recently approved in the United States, Europe and Canada. The Food and Drug Administration in the United States approved a subcutaneous injection for the treatment of opioid bowel dysfunction in patients with advanced illness who are receiving palliative care and when laxative therapy has been insufficient. Methylnaltrexone is a peripherally restricted, μ opioid receptor antagonist that accelerates oral–cecal transit in patients with opioidinduced constipation without reversing the analgesic effects of morphine or inducing symptoms of opioid withdrawal. An analysis of the mechanism of action and the potential benefits of using methylnaltrexone is based on data from published basic research and recent clinical studies.Keywords: methylnaltrexone, constipation, opioid

  18. Ibogaine Detoxification Transitions Opioid and Cocaine Abusers Between Dependence and Abstinence: Clinical Observations and Treatment Outcomes

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    Deborah C. Mash

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibogaine may be effective for transitioning opioid and cocaine dependent individuals to sobriety. American and European self-help groups provided public testimonials that ibogaine alleviated drug craving and opioid withdrawal symptoms after only a single dose administration. Preclinical studies in animal models of addiction have provided proof-of-concept evidence in support of these claims. However, the purported therapeutic benefits of ibogaine are based on anecdotal reports from a small series of case reports that used retrospective recruitment procedures. We reviewed clinical results from an open label case series (N = 191 of human volunteers seeking to detoxify from opioids or cocaine with medical monitoring during inpatient treatment. Whole blood was assayed to obtain pharmacokinetic measures to determine the metabolism and clearance of ibogaine. Clinical safety data and adverse events (AEs were studied in male and female subjects. There were no significant adverse events following administration of ibogaine in a dose range that was shown to be effective for blocking opioid withdrawal symptoms in this study. We used multi-dimensional craving questionnaires during inpatient detoxification to test if ibogaine was effective in diminishing heroin and cocaine cravings. Participants also completed standardized questionnaires about their health and mood before and after ibogaine treatment, and at program discharge. One-month follow-up data were reviewed where available to determine if ibogaine’s effects on drug craving would persist outside of an inpatient setting. We report here that ibogaine therapy administered in a safe dose range diminishes opioid withdrawal symptoms and reduces drug cravings. Pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence include detoxification, narcotic antagonists and long-term opioid maintenance therapy. Our results support product development of single oral dose administration of ibogaine for the treatment of opioid

  19. Usefulness of the Brief Pain Inventory in Patients with Opioid Addiction Receiving Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

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    Dennis, Brittany B; Roshanov, Pavel S; Bawor, Monica; Paul, James; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Plater, Carolyn; Pare, Guillame; Marsh, David C; Worster, Andrew; Desai, Dipika; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is implicated as a risk factor for illicit opioid use among patients with opioid addiction treated with methadone. However, there exists conflicting evidence that supports and refutes this claim. These discrepancies may stem from the large variability in pain measurement reported across studies. We aim to determine the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients reporting pain and evaluate the prognostic value of different pain classification measures in a sample of opioid addiction patients. Multi-center prospective cohort study. Methadone maintenance treatment facilities for managing patients with opioid addiction. This study includes participants from the Genetics of Opioid Addiction (GENOA) prospective cohort study. We assessed the prognostic value of different pain measures for predicting opioid relapse. Pain measures include the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and patients' response to a direct pain question all study participants were asked from the GENOA case report form (CRF) "are you currently experiencing or have been diagnosed with chronic pain?" Performance characteristics of the GENOA CRF pain measure was estimated with sensitivity and specificity using the BPI as the gold standard reference. Prognostic value was assessed using pain classification as the primary independent variable in an adjusted analysis using 1) the percentage of positive opioid urine screens and 2) high-risk opioid use (= 50% positive opioid urine screens) as the dependent variables in a linear and logistic regression analyses, respectively. Among participants eligible for inclusion (n = 444) the BPI was found to be highly sensitive, classifying a large number of GENOA participants with pain (n = 281 of the 297 classified with pain, 94.6%) in comparison to the GENOA CRF (n = 154 of 297 classified with pain, 51.8%). Participants concordantly classified as having pain according to the GENOA CRF and BPI were found to have an estimated 7.79% increase in positive

  20. Buprenorphine implants in medical treatment of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavoustie, Steven; Frost, Michael; Snyder, Ole; Owen, Joel; Darwish, Mona; Dammerman, Ryan; Sanjurjo, Victoria

    2017-08-01

    Opioid use disorder is a chronic, relapsing disease that encompasses use of both prescription opioids and heroin and is associated with a high annual rate of overdose deaths. Medical treatment has proven more successful than placebo treatment or psychosocial intervention, and the partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and κ-opioid receptor antagonist buprenorphine is similar in efficacy to methadone while offering lower risk of respiratory depression. However, frequent dosing requirements and potential for misuse and drug diversion contribute to significant complications with treatment adherence for available formulations. Areas covered: This review describes the development of and preliminary data from clinical trials of an implantable buprenorphine formulation. Efficacy and safety data from comparative studies with other administrations of buprenorphine, including tablets and sublingual film, will be described. Key premises of the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy program for safely administering buprenorphine implants, which all prescribing physicians must complete, are also discussed. Expert commentary: Long-acting implantable drug formulations that offer consistent drug delivery and lower risk of misuse, diversion, or accidental pediatric exposure over traditional formulations represent a promising development for the effective treatment of opioid use disorder.

  1. The Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study: What have we learned.

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    Weiss, Roger D; Rao, Vinod

    2017-04-01

    The multi-site Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS), conducted by the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network, was the largest clinical trial yet conducted with patients dependent upon prescription opioids (N=653). In addition to main trial results, the study yielded numerous secondary analyses, and included a 3.5-year follow-up study, the first of its kind with this population. This paper reviews key findings from POATS and its follow-up study. The paper summarizes the POATS design, main outcomes, predictors of outcome, subgroup analyses, the predictive power of early treatment response, and the long-term follow-up study. POATS examined combinations of buprenorphine-naloxone of varying duration and counseling of varying intensity. The primary outcome analysis showed no overall benefit to adding drug counseling to buprenorphine-naloxone and weekly medical management. Only 7% of patients achieved a successful outcome (abstinence or near-abstinence from opioids) during a 4-week taper and 8-week follow-up; by comparison, 49% of patients achieved success while subsequently stabilized on buprenorphine-naloxone. Long-term follow-up results were more encouraging, with higher abstinence rates than in the main trial. Patients receiving opioid agonist treatment at the time of follow-up were more likely to have better outcomes, though a sizeable number of patients succeeded without agonist treatment. Some patients initiated risky use patterns, including heroin use and drug injection. A limitation of the long-term follow-up study was the low follow-up rate. POATS was the first large-scale study of the treatment of prescription opioid dependence; its findings can influence both treatment guidelines and future studies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Impact of Opioid Treatment on Regional Gastrointestinal Transit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Nilsson, Matias; Brock, Christina

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To employ an experimental model of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in healthy human volunteers, and evaluate the impact ofopioid treatment compared to placebo on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and motility assessed by questionnaires and regional GItransit times using the 3...

  3. The Successful Treatment of Opioid Withdrawal-Induced Refractory Muscle Spasms with 5-HTP in a Patient Intolerant to Clonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dais, Jennifer; Khosia, Ankur; Doulatram, Gulshan

    2015-01-01

    Instituting drug holidays for chronic opioid using patients is becoming commonplace for pain practitioners initiating procedures such as intrathecal pump or spinal cord stimulator trials. As such, pain practitioners need to be adept in their management of acute opioid withdrawal. Successfully weaning an opioid dependent patient off of chronic opioids requires a thorough knowledge of the available adjuvants to assist in this process. However, that selection can become exhausted by adjuvant side effects or by ineffective attenuation of opioid withdrawal symptoms. In that case, novel drugs, or novel application of currently available medications must be sought after to assist in the drug holiday. We present a case in which refractory muscle spasms secondary to opioid withdrawal were successfully treated with an over-the-counter supplement that is not typically used for the attenuation of opioid withdrawal symptoms. In a patient intolerant to the side effects of clonidine, we were able to successfully wean chronic opiates by treating refractory muscle spasms with the serotonin precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP). We hypothesize that our success with this medication gives further credence to the role of serotonin in opioid withdrawal somatic symptomatology, and supports the need for future research to clarify the role of serotonin precursors or serotonin modulating drugs as potential alternatives in those unable to follow standard treatment protocols.

  4. A new and novel treatment of opioid dependence: nigella sativa 500 mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangi, S.; Ahmed, S.P.; Channa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Opioid dependence is one of the major social and psychiatric problem of society. Unfortunately there is no non opiate treatment available. For centuries man has used plants for their healing proprieties. These plants play a fundamental part in all treatment modalities, both ancient and modern. This study was conducted to find non opiate treatment for opiate withdrawal. Total 35 known addicts of opiates were included in the study. This study was based on DSM IV criteria for opioid dependence. This study demonstrates that non opioid treatment for opioid addiction decreases the withdrawal effects significantly. It further demonstrates that there are no changes in physiological parameters of subjects during treatment (BP, Pulse rate etc.). There is increased appetite but no significant weight gain in the subjects. Non opioid drug Nigella sativa is effective in long term treatment of opioid dependence. It not merely cures the opioid dependence but also cures the infections and weakness from which majority of addicts suffer. (author)

  5. A comprehensive multimodal pain treatment reduces opioid consumption after multilevel spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Benny; Thomsen, Berit A

    2013-01-01

    and postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) treatment protocol would improve pain treatment in this population. METHODS: A new regimen with acetaminophen, NSAIDs, gabapentin, S-ketamine, dexamethasone, ondansetron and epidural local anesthetic infusion or patient controlled analgesia with morphine, was introduced......PURPOSE: Major spine surgery with multilevel instrumentation is followed by large amount of opioid consumption, significant pain and difficult mobilization in a population of predominantly chronic pain patients. This case-control study investigated if a standardized comprehensive pain...... and dizziness on POD 1-6. CONCLUSIONS: In this study of patients scheduled for multilevel spine surgery, it was demonstrated that compared to a historic group of patients receiving usual care, a comprehensive and standardized multimodal pain and PONV protocol significantly reduced opioid consumption, improved...

  6. Psychotropic drugs in opioid addicts on methadone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, G N

    1976-07-01

    Psychotropic drug treatment of persons on methadone maintenance is discussed. Patients with clear target symptoms, such as anxiety, depression, or psychosis responded just as non-opioid addicts would to the major psychotropic agents. The minor tranquilizers are felt to be of doubtful value, and subject to abuse. Sleep disturbances cannot be treated by the usual means, as the drugs needed again are abused. However, chlorpromazine shows some promise here. Methods of drug delivery and goals of treatment must be adapted to the realities of this patient-group's characteristics, particularly anti-social traits, poor motivation and unreliability. Psychotropic drugs are unlikely to be of aid in multiple drug abusers, personality and character disorders, and opioid withdrawal. Four case histories are presented.

  7. Novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies for treatment of opioid-induced neonatal abstinence syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    McLemore, Gabrielle L.; Lewis, Tamorah; Jones, Catherine H.; Gauda, Estelle B.

    2012-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription drugs, in general, and opioids, in particular, is a national epidemic, resulting in enormous addiction rates, healthcare expenditures, and overdose deaths. Prescription opioids are overly prescribed, illegally trafficked, and frequently abused, all of which have created a new opioid addiction pathway, adding to the number of opioid-dependent newborns requiring treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), and contributing to challenges in effective care...

  8. Clinical utility of naloxegol in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Heather C; Atayee, Rabia S; Edmonds, Kyle P; Buckholz, Gary T

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are a class of medications frequently used for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, exerting their desired effects at central opioid receptors. Agonism at peripherally located opioid receptors, however, leads to opioid-induced constipation (OIC), one of the most frequent and debilitating side effects of prolonged opioid use. Insufficient relief of OIC with lifestyle modification and traditional laxative treatments may lead to decreased compliance with opioid regimens and undertreated pain. Peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORAs) offer the reversal of OIC without loss of central pain relief. Until recently, PAMORAs were restricted to subcutaneous route or to narrow patient populations. Naloxegol is the first orally dosed PAMORA indicated for the treatment of OIC in noncancer patients. Studies have suggested its efficacy in patients failing traditional constipation treatments; however, insufficient evidence exists to establish its role in primary prevention of OIC at this time.

  9. Contingency management for tobacco smoking during opioid addiction treatment: a randomised pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscough, Tom Stephen; Brose, Leonie S; Strang, John; McNeill, Ann

    2017-09-01

    Smoking rates among individuals in treatment for opioid addiction are close to five times that of the general public. Moreover, drug-addicted smokers have a premature mortality rate four times greater than drug-addicted non-smokers. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether contingency management (CM) can be successfully added to evidence-based stop smoking treatment in individuals undergoing treatment for opioid addiction and assess preliminary evidence for its impact. Forty tobacco smokers currently undergoing treatment for opioid addiction. Escalating with reset CM as an adjunct to standard smoking cessation treatment. Financial incentives will be administered over a 5-week period for either biochemically verified abstinence from smoking or attendance at the clinic. Participants will be randomised to conditions stratified on current levels of smoking (high or low). To assess whether a CM intervention can be successfully added to standard stop smoking services treatment, in patients undergoing outpatient treatment for opioid addiction. This will be measured as the number of people completing the 5 weeks of the intervention. Ethics approval for the study was granted on the 16 June 2016 by the London-city and east (reference 16/LO/0990) ethics committee. The pilot study was retrospectively registered on clincaltrials.gov in January 2017 (ID: NCT03015597). A SPIRIT checklist and figure are available for this protocol. It is planned that the results of this study will be published in an academic journal. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Age differences in heroin and prescription opioid abuse among enrolees into opioid treatment programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Chunki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the United States, among those entering opioid treatment programs (OTPs, prescription opioid (PO abusers tend to be younger than heroin users. Admissions of older persons to OTPs have been increasing, and it is important to understand typical patterns of use among those older enrolees. Methods To disentangle the effect of age on recent heroin and PO abuse 29,114 enrolees into 85 OTPs were surveyed across 34 states from 2005-2009. OTPs where PO use was prevalent were oversampled. Results Mean age was 34; 28% used heroin only. Younger enrolees had increased odds of using POs relative to using heroin only but mixed model analysis showed that much of the total variability in type of use was attributed to variation in age between OTPs rather than within OTPs. Conclusions Organizational and cultural phenomena (e.g., OTP characteristics must be examined to better understand the context of individual characteristics (e.g., age. If nesting of enrolees within OTPs is ignored, then associations that primarily operate at the OTP level may be misinterpreted as exclusively dependent on individuals.

  11. [Contingency management in opioid substitution treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specka, M; Böning, A; Scherbaum, N

    2011-07-01

    The majority of opiate-dependent patients in substitution treatment show additional substance-related disorders. Concomitant use of heroin, alcohol, benzodiazepines or cocaine compromises treatment success. Concomitant drug use may be treated by using contingency management (CM) which is based on learning theory. In CM, abstinence from drugs, as verified by drug screenings, is reinforced directly and contingently. Reinforcers used in CM studies with substituted patients were, amongst others, vouchers and take-home privileges. Studies in the USA show a medium average effect of CM on drug consumption rates and abstinence. The effects decrease markedly after the end of the intervention. We discuss whether CM is applicable within the German substitution treatment system and how it can be combined with other interventions such as selective detoxification treatments or cognitive-behavioural programmes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Novel approaches for the treatment of psychostimulant and opioid abuse - focus on opioid receptor-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Chris P; Husbands, Stephen M

    2014-11-01

    Psychostimulant and opioid addiction are poorly treated. The majority of abstinent users relapse back to drug-taking within a year of abstinence, making 'anti-relapse' therapies the focus of much current research. There are two fundamental challenges to developing novel treatments for drug addiction. First, there are three key stimuli that precipitate relapse back to drug-taking: stress, presentation of drug-conditioned cue, taking a small dose of drug. The most successful novel treatment would be effective against all three stimuli. Second, a large number of drug users are poly-drug users: taking more than one drug of abuse at a time. The ideal anti-addiction treatment would, therefore, be effective against all classes of drugs of abuse. In this review, the authors discuss the clinical need and animal models used to uncover potential novel treatments. There is a very broad range of potential treatment approaches and targets currently being examined as potential anti-relapse therapies. These broadly fit into two categories: 'memory-based' and 'receptor-based' and the authors discuss the key targets here within. Opioid receptors and ligands have been widely studied, and research into how different opioid subtypes affect behaviours related to addiction (reward, dysphoria, motivation) suggests that they are tractable targets as anti-relapse treatments. Regarding opioid ligands as novel 'anti-relapse' medication targets, research suggests that a 'non-selective' approach to targeting opioid receptors will be the most effective.

  13. Successful Treatment of Opioid-Refractory Cancer Pain with Short-Course, Low-Dose Ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldfogel, Julie M; Nesbit, Suzanne; Cohen, Steven P; Dy, Sydney M

    2016-12-01

    Opioids remain the mainstay of treatment for severe cancer pain, but up to 20% of patients have persistent or refractory pain despite rapid and aggressive opioid titration, or develop refractory pain after long-term opioid use. In these scenarios, alternative agents and mechanisms for analgesia should be considered. This case report describes a 28-year-old man with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer with severe, intractable pain despite high-dose opioids including methadone and a hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). After treatment with short-course, low-dose ketamine, his opioid requirements decreased by 99% and pain ratings by 50%, with the majority of this decrease occurring in the first 48 hours. As this patient's pain and opioid regimen escalated, he likely experienced some component of central sensitization and hyperalgesia. Administration of ketamine reduced opioid consumption by 99% and potentially "reset" neuronal hyperexcitability and reduced pain signaling, allowing for improved pain control.

  14. Willingness to pay for opioid agonist treatment among opioid dependent people who inject drugs in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Iuliia; Mazhnaya, Alyona; Marcus, Ruthanne; Bojko, Martha J; Madden, Lynn; Filippovich, Sergii; Dvoriak, Sergii; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-07-01

    In the context of decreasing external and limited Ukrainian governmental funding for opioid agonist treatments (OAT) for opioid dependent people who inject drugs in Ukraine, information on sustainable financial models is needed. Data on 855 opioid dependent people who inject drugs (PWID) were drawn from a cross-sectional nationwide survey of 1613 PWID. They comprised 434 participants who were receiving OAT and 421 who were on OAT in the past or have never been on OAT and were interested in receiving the treatment. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with willingness-to-pay (WTP) for OAT, stratified by OAT experience. Variation in the price which respondents were willing to pay for OAT and its effect on their monthly income among PWID with different OAT experience were assessed as a continuous variable using one-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis test. Overall, 378 (44%) expressed WTP for OAT. Factors independently associated with WTP differed by OAT experience. Among those using OAT, independent predictors of WTP included: city (Dnipro - aOR=1.9; 95%CI=1.1-4.8 and Lviv - (aOR=2.2; 95%CI=1.1-4.8) compared to those elsewhere in Ukraine), higher income (aOR=1.8; 95%CI=1.2-2.7) and receiving psychosocial counseling (aOR=1.8; 95%CI=1.2-2.7). Among those who had previously been on OAT, positive attitude towards OAT (aOR=1.3; 95%CI=1.1-1.6) and family support of OAT (aOR=2.5; 95%CI=1.1-5.7) were independently associated with WTP. Among PWID who had never been on OAT, being male (aOR=2.2; 95%CI=1.1-4.2), younger age (aOR=1.9; 95%CI=1.2-3.2), higher income (aOR=2.0; 95%CI=1.2-3.4) and previous unsuccessful attempts to enter OAT (aOR=2.3; 95%CI=1.1-4.7) were independently associated with WTP. PWID were willing to commit a large percentage of their monthly income for OAT, which, however, varied significantly based on OAT experience: current OAT: 37% of monthly income, previous OAT: 53%, and never OAT: 60% (p-value=0.0009). WTP for OAT was

  15. Clinical utility of naloxegol in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruner HC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Heather C Bruner,1 Rabia S Atayee,2 Kyle P Edmonds,3 Gary T Buckholz3 1Scripps Health and University of California San Diego, Joint Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship, San Diego, CA, USA; 2University of California San Diego, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, La Jolla, CA, USA; 3Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, Doris A Howell Palliative Care Service, La Jolla, CA, USA Abstract: Opioids are a class of medications frequently used for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, exerting their desired effects at central opioid receptors. Agonism at peripherally located opioid receptors, however, leads to opioid-induced constipation (OIC, one of the most frequent and debilitating side effects of prolonged opioid use. Insufficient relief of OIC with lifestyle modification and traditional laxative treatments may lead to decreased compliance with opioid regimens and undertreated pain. Peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORAs offer the reversal of OIC without loss of central pain relief. Until recently, PAMORAs were restricted to subcutaneous route or to narrow patient populations. Naloxegol is the first orally dosed PAMORA indicated for the treatment of OIC in noncancer patients. Studies have suggested its efficacy in patients failing traditional constipation treatments; however, insufficient evidence exists to establish its role in primary prevention of OIC at this time. Keywords: opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, chronic pain, peripherally-acting mu-opioid antagonist, bowel care, OIC, OIBD 

  16. Methadone versus buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid abuse in pregnancy: science and stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Amber M

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increase in rates of opioid abuse during pregnancy. This clinical challenge has been met with debate regarding whether or not illicit and prescription opioid-dependent individuals require different treatment approaches; whether detoxification is preferable to maintenance; and the efficacy of methadone versus buprenorphine as treatment options during pregnancy. The clinical recommendations resulting from these discussions are frequently influenced by the comparative stigma attached to heroin abuse and methadone maintenance versus prescription opioid abuse and maintenance treatment with buprenorphine. While some studies have suggested that a subset of individuals who abuse prescription opioids may have different characteristics than heroin users, there is currently no evidence to suggest that buprenorphine is better suited to treatment of prescription opioid abuse than methadone. Similarly, despite its perennial popularity, there is no evidence to recommend detoxification as an efficacious approach to treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. While increased access to treatment is important, particularly in rural areas, there are multiple medical and psychosocial reasons to recommend comprehensive substance abuse treatment for pregnant women suffering from substance use disorders rather than office-based provision of maintenance medication. Both methadone and buprenorphine are important treatment options for opioid abuse during pregnancy. Methadone may still remain the preferred treatment choice for some women who require higher doses for stabilization, have a higher risk of treatment discontinuation, or who have had unsuccessful treatment attempts with buprenorphine. As treatment providers, we should advocate to expand available treatment options for pregnant women in all States.

  17. Trends in Opioid Use Disorder Diagnoses and Medication Treatment Among Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiner, Brian; Leonard Westgate, Christine; Bernardy, Nancy C; Schnurr, Paula P; Watts, Bradley V

    2017-01-01

    Despite long-standing interest in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and opioid use disorder comorbidity, there is a paucity of data on the prevalence of opioid use disorder in patients with PTSD. Therefore, there is limited understanding of the use of medications for opioid use disorder in this population. We determined the prevalence of diagnosed opioid use disorder and use of medications for opioid use disorder in a large cohort of patients with PTSD. We obtained administrative and pharmacy data for veterans who initiated PTSD treatment in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) between 2004 and 2013 (N = 731,520). We identified those with a comorbid opioid use disorder diagnosis (2.7%; n = 19,998) and determined whether they received a medication for opioid use disorder in the year following their initial clinical PTSD diagnosis (29.6%; n = 5,913). Using logistic regression, we determined the predictors of receipt of opioid use disorder medications. Comorbid opioid use disorder diagnoses increased from 2.5% in 2004 to 3.4% in 2013. Patients with comorbid opioid use disorder used more health services and had more comorbidities than other patients with PTSD. Among patients with PTSD and comorbid opioid use disorder, use of medications for opioid use disorder increased from 22.6% to 35.1% during the same time period. Growth in the use of buprenorphine (2.0% to 22.7%) was accompanied by relative decline in use of methadone (19.3% to 12.7%). Patients who received buprenorphine were younger and more likely to be rural, White, and married. Patients who received methadone were older, urban, unmarried, from racial and ethnic minorities, and more likely to see substance abuse specialists. While use of naltrexone increased (2.8% to 8.6%), most (87%) patients who received naltrexone also had an alcohol use disorder. Controlling for patient factors, there was a substantial increase in the use of buprenorphine, a substantial decrease in the use of methadone, and no change

  18. The Impact of Opioid Treatment on Regional Gastrointestinal Transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Jakob L; Nilsson, Matias; Brock, Christina; Sandberg, Thomas H; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-04-30

    To employ an experimental model of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in healthy human volunteers, and evaluate the impact ofopioid treatment compared to placebo on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and motility assessed by questionnaires and regional GItransit times using the 3-dimensional (3D)-Transit system. Twenty-five healthy males were randomly assigned to oxycodone or placebo for 5 days in a double blind, crossover design. AdverseGI effects were measured with the bowel function index, gastrointestinal symptom rating scale, patient assessment of constipationsymptom questionnaire, and Bristol stool form scale. Regional GI transit times were determined using the 3D-Transit system, and segmental transit times in the colon were determined using a custom Matlab(®) graphical user interface. GI symptom scores increased significantly across all applied GI questionnaires during opioid treatment. Oxycodone increased median total GI transit time from 22.2 to 43.9 hours (P transit times in the cecum and ascending colon from 5.7 to 9.9 hours (P = 0.012), rectosigmoid colon transit from 2.7 to 9.0 hours (P = 0.044), and colorectal transit time from 18.6 to 38.6 hours (P= 0.001). No associations between questionnaire scores and segmental transit times were detected. Self-assessed GI adverse effects and increased GI transit times in different segments were induced during oxycodone treatment. This detailed information about segmental changes in motility has great potential for future interventional head-to-head trials of different laxative regimes for prevention and treatment of constipation.

  19. Pharmacogenetic analysis of opioid dependence treatment dose and dropout rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Richard C; Li, James; Doyle, Glenn A; Gilbert, Alex; Dechairo, Bryan M; Berrettini, Wade H

    2018-01-01

    Currently, no pharmacogenetic tests for selecting an opioid-dependence pharmacotherapy have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Determine the effects of variants in 11 genes on dropout rate and dose in patients receiving methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00315341). Variants in six pharmacokinetic genes (CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A4) and five pharmacodynamic genes (HTR2A, OPRM1, ADRA2A, COMT, SLC6A4) were genotyped in samples from a 24-week, randomized, open-label trial of methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone for the treatment of opioid dependence (n = 764; 68.7% male). Genotypes were then used to determine the metabolism phenotype for each pharmacokinetic gene. Phenotypes or genotypes for each gene were analyzed for association with dropout rate and mean dose. Genotype for 5-HTTLPR in the SLC6A4 gene was nominally associated with dropout rate when the methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone groups were combined. When the most significant variants associated with dropout rate were analyzed using pairwise analyses, SLC6A4 (5-HTTLPR) and COMT (Val158Met; rs4860) had nominally significant associations with dropout rate in methadone patients. None of the genes analyzed in the study was associated with mean dose of methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. This study suggests that functional polymorphisms related to synaptic dopamine or serotonin levels may predict dropout rates during methadone treatment. Patients with the S/S genotype at 5-HTTLPR in SLC6A4 or the Val/Val genotype at Val158Met in COMT may require additional treatment to improve their chances of completing addiction treatment. Replication in other methadone patient populations will be necessary to ensure the validity of these findings.

  20. Consumer attitudes about opioid addiction treatment: a focus group study in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohler, Nancy L; Weiss, Linda; Egan, James E; López, Carolina M; Favaro, Jamie; Cordero, Robert; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2013-01-01

    To develop effective programs for people who are opioid dependent and to impact the opioid epidemic in New York City, it is crucial to monitor attitudes about opioid addiction treatments among opioid users who have experienced barriers to engagement and retention in addiction treatment. The authors conducted a qualitative study using focus groups. Six focus groups in three needle exchanges in New York City were audio recorded, transcribed, and systematically coded. The authors report on the main themes related to the study objectives. Participants of each needle exchange who were opioid dependent and had some knowledge of both methadone and buprenorphine were eligible. There were four main findings. Participants felt the following: 1) buprenorphine is an appropriate option for those heroin users who are motivated to stop using, 2) they have less control over their addiction treatment with methadone than they would have with buprenorphine, 3) buprenorphine treatment is not accessible to many New York City residents who would benefit from this treatment, and 4) lack of access to buprenorphine treatment is a cause of treatment-related diversion. Both methadone maintenance and buprenorphine treatment opportunities are necessary to address the diverse treatment needs of opioid-dependent people in New York City. However, the current medical model of buprenorphine treatment may be too restrictive for some opioid-dependent people and may be contributing to the use of illicit buprenorphine. New models to deliver buprenorphine treatment may address these problems.

  1. Use of opioid analgesics in the treatment of cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caraceni, Augusto; Hanks, Geoffrey; Kaasa, Stein

    2012-01-01

    Here we provide the updated version of the guidelines of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) on the use of opioids for the treatment of cancer pain. The update was undertaken by the European Palliative Care Research Collaborative. Previous EAPC guidelines were reviewed and compared...... with other currently available guidelines, and consensus recommendations were created by formal international expert panel. The content of the guidelines was defined according to several topics, each of which was assigned to collaborators who developed systematic literature reviews with a common methodology....... The recommendations were developed by a writing committee that combined the evidence derived from the systematic reviews with the panellists' evaluations in a co-authored process, and were endorsed by the EAPC Board of Directors. The guidelines are presented as a list of 16 evidence-based recommendations developed...

  2. Effects of combining opioids and clinically available NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijdelaar, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis concerns the effects of combining opioids with clinically available NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of acute and chronic pain. There are a number of problems with the use of opioids, such as, the development of tolerance/hyperalgesia, the reduced effectiveness in (central)

  3. Differences between opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, Asbjørn; Jensen, Rasmus D.; Nielsen, Lecia M.

    2013-01-01

    to morphine. Although this approach is recognized as cost-effective in most cases there is solid evidence that, on an individual patient basis, opioids are not all equal. Therefore it is important to have an armamentarium of strong analgesics in clinical practice to ensure a personalized approach in patients...... who do not respond to standard treatment. In this review we highlight differences between opioids in human studies from a pharmacological, experimental, clinical and health economics point of view. We provide evidence that individuals respond differently to opioids, and that general differences......Clinical studies comparing the response and side effects of various opioids have not been able to show robust differences between drugs. Hence, recommendations of the regulatory authorities have been driven by costs with a general tendency in many countries to restrict physician's use of opioids...

  4. Pain volatility and prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2015-12-01

    The combination of prescription opioid dependence and chronic pain is increasingly prevalent and hazardous to public health. Variability in pain may explain poor prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in persons with chronic pain. This study examined pain trajectories and pain volatility in patients with chronic pain receiving treatment for prescription opioid addiction. We conducted secondary analyses of adults with chronic pain (n = 149) who received buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) and counseling for 12 weeks in an outpatient, multisite clinical trial. Good treatment outcome was defined as urine-verified abstinence from opioids at treatment endpoint (Week 12) and during at least 2 of the previous 3 weeks. Pain severity significantly declined over time during treatment (b = -0.36, p opioid dependence. Patients with greater volatility in subjective pain during treatment have increased risk of returning to opioid use by the conclusion of an intensive treatment with BUP/NLX and counseling. Future research should examine underlying mechanisms of pain volatility and identify related therapeutic targets to optimize interventions for prescription opioid addiction and co-occurring chronic pain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. A Case of Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Caused by Opioid Treatment for Nonmalignant Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Tabuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 42-year-old male patient with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. He suffered from general fatigue and erectile dysfunction after the treatment with transdermal fentanyl for chronic pain by traffic injury. Endocrine examinations and hormone stimulating tests showed that he had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed no abnormal findings, and he had no past history of accounting for acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Therefore, his hypogonadism was diagnosed to be caused by opioid treatment. Although opioid-induced endocrine dysfunctions are not widely recognized, this case suggests that we should consider the possibility of endocrine dysfunctions in patients with opioid treatment.

  6. Inhibition of GABAergic Neurotransmission by HIV-1 Tat and Opioid Treatment in the Striatum Involves μ-opioid Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changqing Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is considered a chronic disease with high prevalence of mild forms of neurocognitive impairments, also referred to as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. Although opiate drug use can exacerbate HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal damage, it remains unknown how and to what extent opioids interact with Tat on the GABAergic system. We conducted whole-cell recordings in mouse striatal slices and examined the effects of HIV-1 Tat in the presence and absence of morphine (1 μM and damgo (1 μM on GABAergic neurotransmission. Results indicated a decrease in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs and miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs by Tat (5 – 50 nM in a concentration-dependent manner. The significant Tat-induced decrease in IPSCs was abolished when removing extracellular and/or intracellular calcium. Treatment with morphine or damgo alone significantly decreased the frequency, but not amplitude of IPSCs. Interestingly, morphine but not damgo indicated an additional downregulation of the mean frequency of mIPSCs in combination with Tat. Pretreatment with naloxone (1 μM and CTAP (1 μM prevented the Tat-induced decrease in sIPSCs frequency but only naloxone prevented the combined Tat and morphine effect on mIPSCs frequency. Results indicate a Tat- or opioid-induced decrease in GABAergic neurotransmission via µ-opioid receptors with combined Tat and morphine effects involving additional opioid receptor-related mechanisms. Exploring the interactions between Tat and opioids on the GABAergic system may help to guide future research on HAND in the context of opiate drug use.

  7. Long-term evaluation of opioid treatment in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaomei; Robinson, Rebecca L; Mease, Philip; Kroenke, Kurt; Williams, David A; Chen, Yi; Faries, Douglas; Wohlreich, Madelaine; McCarberg, Bill; Hann, Danette

    2015-01-01

    In a 12-month observational study, we evaluated the effect of opioid use on the outcomes in 1700 adult patients with fibromyalgia. Data were evaluated using propensity score matching after patients were divided into cohorts based on their baseline medication use: (1) taking an opioid (concurrent use of tramadol was permitted); (2) taking tramadol (but no opioids); and (3) not taking opioids or tramadol. Changes in outcomes were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory for severity and pain-related interference (BPI-S, BPI-I), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Patient Health Questionnaire for depression (PHQ-8), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7), and economic factors. Time-to-opioid or tramadol discontinuation was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Compared with the opioid cohort, the nonopioid cohort demonstrated significantly greater reductions (PFIQ, PHQ-8, SDS, and ISI; the tramadol cohort compared with the opioid group showed greater reductions on FIQ and ISI. Reductions in BPI-S and GAD-7 did not differ significantly among cohorts. Compared with the opioid cohort, patients in the tramadol cohort had fewer outpatient visits to health care providers. Few significant differences were found between the tramadol and nonopioid cohorts across outcomes. Although pain severity was reduced over time in all cohorts, opioid users showed less improvement in pain-related interference with daily living, functioning, depression, and insomnia. Overall, the findings show little support for the long-term use of opioid medications in patients with fibromyalgia given the poorer outcomes across multiple assessment domains associated with this cohort.

  8. Sex work involvement among women with long-term opioid injection drug dependence who enter opioid agonist treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Kirsten; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Guh, Daphne; Marsh, David C; Brissette, Suzanne; Schechter, Martin T

    2012-01-25

    Substitution with opioid-agonists (e.g., methadone) has shown to be an effective treatment for chronic long-term opioid dependency. Survival sex work, very common among injection drug users, has been associated with poor Opioid Agonist Treatment (OAT) engagement, retention and response. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine factors associated with engaging in sex work among long-term opioid dependent women receiving OAT. Data from a randomized controlled trial, the North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI), conducted in Vancouver and Montreal (Canada) between 2005-2008, was analyzed. The NAOMI study compared the effectiveness of oral methadone to injectable diacetylmorphine or injectable hydromorphone, the last two on a double blind basis, over 12 months. A research team, independent of the clinic services, obtained outcome evaluations at baseline and follow-up (3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months). A total 53.6% of women reported engaging in sex work in at least one of the research visits. At treatment initiation, women who were younger and had fewer years of education were more likely to be engaged in sex work. The multivariate logistic generalized estimating equation regression analysis determined that psychological symptoms, and high illicit heroin and cocaine use correlated with women's involvement in sex work during the study period. After entering OAT, women using injection drugs and engaging in sex work represent a particularly vulnerable group showing poorer psychological health and a higher use of heroin and cocaine compared to women not engaging in sex work. These factors must be taken into consideration in the planning and provision of OAT in order to improve treatment outcomes. NCT00175357.

  9. Sex work involvement among women with long-term opioid injection drug dependence who enter opioid agonist treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchand Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substitution with opioid-agonists (e.g., methadone has shown to be an effective treatment for chronic long-term opioid dependency. Survival sex work, very common among injection drug users, has been associated with poor Opioid Agonist Treatment (OAT engagement, retention and response. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine factors associated with engaging in sex work among long-term opioid dependent women receiving OAT. Methods Data from a randomized controlled trial, the North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI, conducted in Vancouver and Montreal (Canada between 2005-2008, was analyzed. The NAOMI study compared the effectiveness of oral methadone to injectable diacetylmorphine or injectable hydromorphone, the last two on a double blind basis, over 12 months. A research team, independent of the clinic services, obtained outcome evaluations at baseline and follow-up (3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. Results A total 53.6% of women reported engaging in sex work in at least one of the research visits. At treatment initiation, women who were younger and had fewer years of education were more likely to be engaged in sex work. The multivariate logistic generalized estimating equation regression analysis determined that psychological symptoms, and high illicit heroin and cocaine use correlated with women's involvement in sex work during the study period. Conclusions After entering OAT, women using injection drugs and engaging in sex work represent a particularly vulnerable group showing poorer psychological health and a higher use of heroin and cocaine compared to women not engaging in sex work. These factors must be taken into consideration in the planning and provision of OAT in order to improve treatment outcomes. Trial Registration NCT00175357.

  10. Genetic influence on methadone treatment outcomes in patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment for opioid addiction: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaan Z

    2014-08-01

    medical comorbidities. BDNF rs6265 and DRD2 rs1799978 were the common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected for the feasibility study. Discussion: This study met our predetermined feasibility criteria; recruitment, response rates, and genetic testing were feasible; treatment duration was sufficient for follow up; and the prevalence of comorbid conditions indicated the need for reliable psychiatric and chronic pain measures. The study strengths included effective collaboration with clinics and the generalizability of sample population. Key learning points show the need for assessment of treatment outcomes on multiple domains, implementation of follow up, and the development of standardized training for the study clinical staff. Keywords: genetics, substitute opioid therapy, treatment response, risk factors

  11. Assessment and Treatment of Abuse Risk in Opioid Prescribing for Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N. Jamison

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid analgesics provide effective treatment for noncancer pain, but many physicians have concerns about adverse effects, tolerance, and addiction. Misuse of opioids is prominent in patients with chronic back pain and early recognition of misuse risk could help physicians offer adequate patient care while implementing appropriate levels of monitoring to reduce aberrant drug-related behaviors. In this review, we discuss opioid abuse and misuse issues that often arise in the treatment of patients with chronic back pain and present an overview of assessment and treatment strategies that can be effective in improving compliance with the use of prescription opioids for pain. Many persons with chronic back pain have significant medical, psychiatric and substance use comorbidities that affect treatment decisions and a comprehensive evaluation that includes a detailed history, physical, and mental health evaluation is essential. Although there is no “gold standard” for opioid misuse risk assessment, several validated measures have been shown to be useful. Controlled substance agreements, regular urine drug screens, and interventions such as motivational counseling have been shown to help improve patient compliance with opioids and to minimize aberrant drug-related behavior. Finally, we discuss the future of abuse-deterrent opioids and other potential strategies for back pain management.

  12. Evolving paradigms in the treatment of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Brock, Christina; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Nilsson, Matias; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2015-11-01

    In recent years prescription of opioids has increased significantly. Although effective in pain management, bothersome gastrointestinal adverse effects are experienced by a substantial proportion of opioid-treated patients. This can lead to difficulties with therapy and subsequently inadequate pain relief. Collectively referred to as opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, these adverse effects are the result of binding of exogenous opioids to opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. This leads to disturbance of three important gastrointestinal functions: motility, coordination of sphincter function and secretion. In the clinic this manifests in a wide range of symptoms such as reflux, bloating, abdominal cramping, hard, dry stools, and incomplete evacuation, although the most known adverse effect is opioid-induced constipation. Traditional treatment with laxatives is often insufficient, but in recent years a number of novel pharmacological approaches have been introduced. In this review the pathophysiology, symptomatology and prevalence of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction is presented along with the benefits and caveats of a suggested consensus definition for opioid-induced constipation. Finally, traditional treatment is appraised and compared with the latest pharmacological developments. In conclusion, opioid antagonists restricted to the periphery show promising results, but use of different definitions and outcome measures complicate comparison. However, an international working group has recently suggested a consensus definition for opioid-induced constipation and relevant outcome measures have also been proposed. If investigators within this field adapt the suggested consensus and include symptoms related to dysfunction of the upper gut, it will ease comparison and be a step forward in future research.

  13. Naloxegol in opioid-induced constipation: a new paradigm in the treatment of a common problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Stephanie C; Bruner, Heather C

    2017-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) imposes a significant burden for patients taking pain medications, often resulting in decreased quality of life. Treatment of OIC with traditional medications for functional constipation can be incompletely effective, leading to nonadherence with opioid treatment and undertreated pain. An emerging class of medications that counteract the adverse effects of opioids in the gastrointestinal tract while preserving central nervous system-based pain relief may represent a paradigm shift in the prevention and treatment of OIC. One of these medications, naloxegol, is a once-daily, oral opioid antagonist that is effective, well-tolerated, and approved for treatment of OIC in patients with noncancer pain. More studies are needed to demonstrate this same utility in patients with cancer-related pain.

  14. National Institute on Drug Abuse International Program: improving opioid use disorder treatment through international research training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Steven W; McCormally, Judy

    2018-07-01

    For more than 25 years, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has supported research-training programs, establishing a global research network and expanding the knowledge base on substance use disorders. International research to inform approaches to opioid addiction is particularly important and relevant to the United States, where opioid misuse, addiction, and overdose constitute an emerging public health crisis. This article summarizes the NIDA International Program and illustrates its impact by reviewing recent articles about treatment approaches for opioid use disorders (OUD). Studies in several countries have demonstrated the effectiveness of physician office-based opioid substitution therapies. Other research has demonstrated the effectiveness of different formulations and doses of the opioid antagonist naltrexone, as well as different approaches to providing naloxone to treat opioid overdose. Continuing research into implementation of evidence-based treatment in international settings with limited resources is applicable to US regions that face similar structural, legal, and fiscal constraints. The current review describes international research on OUD treatment and opioid overdose, most coauthored by former NIDA fellows. The findings from outside the United States have important implications for best practices domestically and in other countries that are experiencing increases in OUD prevalence and related overdose deaths.

  15. Demographic Trends of Adults in New York City Opioid Treatment Programs--An Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Benjamin; Polydorou, Soteri; Ferris, Rosie; Blaum, Caroline S; Ross, Stephen; McNeely, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The population of adults accessing opioid treatment is growing older, but exact estimates vary widely, and little is known about the characteristics of the aging treatment population. Further, there has been little research regarding the epidemiology, healt h status, and functional impairments in this population. To determine the utilization of opioid treatment services by older adults in New York City. This study used administrative data from New York State licensed drug treatment programs to examine overall age trends and characteristics of older adults in opioid treatment programs in New York City from 1996 to 2012. We found significant increases in utilization of opioid treatment programs by older adults in New York City. By 2012, those aged 50-59 made up the largest age group in opioid treatment programs. Among older adults there were notable shifts in demographic background including gender and ethnicity, and an increase in self-reported impairments. More research is needed to fully understand the specific characteristics and needs of older adults with opioid dependence.

  16. Adding an Internet-delivered treatment to an efficacious treatment package for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Darren R; Landes, Reid D; Jackson, Lisa; Marsch, Lisa A; Mancino, Michael J; Chopra, Mohit P; Bickel, Warren K

    2014-12-01

    To examine the benefit of adding an Internet-delivered behavior therapy to a buprenorphine medication program and voucher-based motivational incentives. A block-randomized, unblinded, parallel, 12-week treatment trial was conducted with 170 opioid-dependent adult patients (mean age = 34.3 years; 54.1% male; 95.3% White). Participants received an Internet-based community reinforcement approach intervention plus contingency management (CRA+) and buprenorphine or contingency management alone (CM-alone) plus buprenorphine. The primary outcomes, measured over the course of treatment, were longest continuous abstinence, total abstinence, and days retained in treatment. Compared to those receiving CM-alone, CRA+ recipients exhibited, on average, 9.7 total days more of abstinence (95% confidence interval [CI = 2.3, 17.2]) and had a reduced hazard of dropping out of treatment (hazard ratio = 0.47; 95% CI [0.26, 0.85]). Prior treatment for opioid dependence significantly moderated the additional improvement of CRA+ for longest continuous days of abstinence. These results provide further evidence that an Internet-based CRA+ treatment is efficacious and adds clinical benefits to a contingency management/medication based program for opioid dependence.

  17. Long-term opioid treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain: unproven efficacy and neglected safety?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kissin I

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Igor Kissin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Background: For the past 30 years, opioids have been used to treat chronic nonmalignant pain. This study tests the following hypotheses: (1 there is no strong evidence-based foundation for the conclusion that long-term opioid treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain is effective; and (2 the main problem associated with the safety of such treatment – assessment of the risk of addiction – has been neglected. Methods: Scientometric analysis of the articles representing clinical research in this area was performed to assess (1 the quality of presented evidence (type of study; and (2 the duration of the treatment phase. The sufficiency of representation of addiction was assessed by counting the number of articles that represent (1 editorials; (2 articles in the top specialty journals; and (3 articles with titles clearly indicating that the addiction-related safety is involved (topic-in-title articles. Results: Not a single randomized controlled trial with opioid treatment lasting >3 months was found. All studies with a duration of opioid treatment ≥6 months (n = 16 were conducted without a proper control group. Such studies cannot provide the consistent good-quality evidence necessary for a strong clinical recommendation. There were profound differences in the number of addiction articles related specifically to chronic nonmalignant pain patients and to opioid addiction in general. An inadequate number of chronic pain-related publications were observed with all three types of counted articles: editorials, articles in the top specialty journals, and topic-in-title articles. Conclusion: There is no strong evidence-based foundation for the conclusion that long-term opioid treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain is effective. The above identified signs indicating neglect of addiction associated with the

  18. Functional Family Therapy (FFT) for Young People in Treatment for Non-opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of FFT on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use.......The main aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of FFT on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use....

  19. Pain and Opioid Addiction: A Systematic Review and Evaluation of Pain Measurement in Patients with Opioid Dependence on Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, B B; Bawor, M; Paul, J; Plater, C; Pare, G; Worster, A; Varenbut, M; Daiter, J; Marsh, D C; Desai, D; Thabane, L; Samaan, Z

    2016-01-01

    ROC curve was 0.67 and the Pearson χ(2) was 37.3; (paddiction medicine is at a lack of consensus as to the real effect of chronic pain on treatment response among opioid dependent patients. Whether it be the lack of a single "gold standard" measurement of response, or a lack of consistent measurement of pain, it is difficult to summarize and compare the results of these relatively small investigations. In comparison to the BPI, use of the simple self-reported pain has lower sensitivity for identifying patients with pain, suggesting the inconsistencies in these studies may result from differences in pain measurement. Future validation studies of pain measurement are required to address the predictive value of self-reported pain.

  20. A Multi-site, Two-Phase, Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS): Rationale, Design, and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D.; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Provost, Scott E.; Huang, Zhen; Jacobs, Petra; Hasson, Albert; Lindblad, Robert; Connery, Hilary Smith; Prather, Kristi; Ling, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network launched the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS) in response to rising rates of prescription opioid dependence and gaps in understanding the optimal course of treatment for this population. POATS employed a multi-site, two-phase adaptive, sequential treatment design to approximate clinical practice. The study took place at 10 community treatment programs around the United States. Participants included men and women age ≥18 who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Edition criteria for dependence upon prescription opioids, with physiologic features; those with a prominent history of heroin use (according to pre-specified criteria) were excluded. All participants received buprenorphine/naloxone (bup/nx). Phase 1 consisted of 4 weeks of bup/nx treatment, including a 14-day dose taper, with 8 weeks of follow-up. Phase 1 participants were monitored for treatment response during these 12 weeks. Those who relapsed to opioid use, as defined by pre-specified criteria, were invited to enter Phase 2; Phase 2 consisted of 12 weeks of bup/nx stabilization treatment, followed by a 4-week taper and 8 weeks of post-treatment follow-up. Participants were randomized at the beginning of Phase 1 to receive bup/nx, paired with either Standard Medical Management (SMM) or Enhanced Medical Management (EMM; defined as SMM plus individual drug counseling). Eligible participants entering Phase 2 were re-randomized to either EMM or SMM. POATS was developed to determine what benefit, if any, EMM offers over SMM in short-term and longer-term treatment paradigm. This paper describes the rationale and design of the study. PMID:20116457

  1. Opioid substitution treatment and heroin dependent adolescents: reductions in heroin use and treatment retention over twelve months.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, Bobby P

    2018-05-04

    Opioid dependence is a major health concern across the world and does also occur in adolescents. While opioid substitution treatment (OST) has been thoroughly evaluated in adult populations, very few studies have examined its use in adolescents. There are concerns that OST is underutilised in adolescents with heroin dependence. We sought to measure changes in drug use among adolescents receiving OST and also to examine treatment attrition during the first 12 months of this treatment.

  2. The current status of opioid maintenance treatment in France: a survey of physicians, patients, and out-of-treatment opioid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benyamina A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Amine Benyamina National Institute for Medical Research (INSERM U-669, Hôpital Universitaire Paul Brousse, 94804 Villejuif, France Aim: Project Access France was a national survey designed to provide real-world observations on the status of opioid dependence treatment in France. Methods: The views of physicians (n=100, patients (n=130, and out-of-treatment opioid users (n=33 were collected via interviews and questionnaires. Results: Physicians reported being moderately satisfied with treatment programs in their area (rating 6.9 out of 10. Most physicians (82% reported being concerned about misuse and diversion of medication-assisted treatment (MAT medications and 50% identified psychosocial/behavioral counseling as the key change that would most improve patient care. Among patients, the mean number of previous MAT episodes was low (1.5; 78% reported that it was easy to access a doctor to undergo MAT; 14% reported regularly or sometimes using heroin; misuse and diversion were reported in 15% and 39% of patients, respectively; and 57% of patients were not receiving psychosocial help. Out-of-treatment opioid users reported using drugs on a regular basis (42% regularly used heroin and cited 'not wanting to give up drugs completely' as the most frequent reason for staying out of MAT. Conclusion: This survey highlights a number of positive features of the open-access, GP-based treatment model for opioid dependence in France. Challenges remain with regard to continued misuse/diversion of MAT medications and limited patient access to psychosocial support. Keywords: opioid maintenance treatment, medication-assisted treatment, buprenorphine, methadone, buprenorphine–naloxone, France

  3. Prescription drug monitoring program data tracking of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in integrated dual diagnosis care involving injectable naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Ayesha; Whiteman, Aaron; Bell, Richard L; Greene, Marion S; Engleman, Eric A; Chambers, R Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Fourfold increases in opioid prescribing and dispensations over 2 decades in the U.S. has paralleled increases in opioid addictions and overdoses, requiring new preventative, diagnostic, and treatment strategies. This study examines Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) tracking as a novel measure of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in a university-affiliated integrated mental health-addiction treatment clinic. Repeated measure parametrics examined PDMP and urine drug screening (UDS) data before and after first injection for all patients (N = 68) who received at least one long-acting naltrexone injection (380 mg/IM) according to diagnostic groupings of having either (i) alcohol (control); (ii) opioid; or (iii) combined alcohol and opioid use disorders. There were no group differences post-injection in treatment days, injections delivered, or treatment service encounters. UDS and PDMP measures of opioid exposures were greater in opioid compared to alcohol-only patients. Post-first injection, UDS's positive for opioids declined (p opioid prescriptions (p Opioid patients without alcohol disorders showed the best outcomes with 50% to 80% reductions in PDMP-measures of opioids, down to levels of alcohol-only patients. This study shows PDMP utility for measuring opioid addiction treatment outcomes, supporting the routine use of PDMPs in clinical and research settings. These findings demonstrate that opioid addiction in patients with complex addictions and mental illnesses comorbidities can show effective treatment responses as measured by PDMP tracking of decreases in opioid prescriptions to those patients. (Am J Addict 2016;25:557-564). © 2016 The Authors. The American Journal on Addictions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP).

  4. Naloxegol in opioid-induced constipation: a new paradigm in the treatment of a common problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon SC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie C Yoon,1 Heather C Bruner2 1Scripps Health and University of California San Diego, Joint Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship, San Diego, 2Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, Doris A. Howell Palliative Care Service, La Jolla, CA, USA Abstract: Opioid-induced constipation (OIC imposes a significant burden for patients taking pain medications, often resulting in decreased quality of life. Treatment of OIC with traditional medications for functional constipation can be incompletely effective, leading to nonadherence with opioid treatment and undertreated pain. An emerging class of medications that counteract the adverse effects of opioids in the gastrointestinal tract while preserving central nervous system-based pain relief may represent a paradigm shift in the prevention and treatment of OIC. One of these medications, naloxegol, is a once-daily, oral opioid antagonist that is effective, well-tolerated, and approved for treatment of OIC in patients with noncancer pain. More studies are needed to demonstrate this same utility in patients with cancer-related pain. Keywords: opioid-induced constipation, chronic pain, bowel care, peripherally acting mu-opioid-receptor antagonist, OIBD

  5. Predictors of attrition with buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in opioid dependent youth☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Diane; Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Carmody, Thomas; Woody, George E.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Poole, Sabrina A.; Potter, Jennifer; Fishman, Marc; Bogenschutz, Michael; Patkar, Ashwin; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2012-01-01

    Background In opioid dependent youth there is substantial attrition from medication-assisted treatment. If youth at risk for attrition can be identified at treatment entry or early in treatment, they can be targeted for interventions to help retain them in treatment. Methods Opioid dependent adolescents and young adults (n=152), aged 15–21, were randomized to 12 weeks (BUP, n=74) or 2 weeks of detoxification (DETOX, n=78) with buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal), both in combination with 12 weeks of psychosocial treatment. Baseline and early treatment related predictors of treatment attrition were identified in each group using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results In the DETOX group 36% left between weeks 2 and 4, at the end of the dose taper, while in the BUP group only 8% left by week 4. In the BUP group, early adherence to Bup/Nal, early opioid negative urines, use of any medications in the month prior to treatment entry, and lifetime non-heroin opioid use were associated with retention while prior 30-day hallucinogen use was associated with attrition. In the DETOX group, only use of sleep medications was associated with retention although not an independent predictor. A broad range of other pre-treatment characteristics was unrelated to attrition. Conclusions Prompt attention to those with early non-adherence to medication or an early opioid positive urine, markers available in the first 2 weeks of treatment, may improve treatment retention. Extended Bup/ Nal treatment appeared effective in improving treatment retention for youth with opioid dependence across a wide range of demographics, and pre-treatment clinical characteristics. PMID:22626890

  6. Predictors of attrition with buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in opioid dependent youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Diane; Subramaniam, Geetha A; Carmody, Thomas; Woody, George E; Minhajuddin, Abu; Poole, Sabrina A; Potter, Jennifer; Fishman, Marc; Bogenschutz, Michael; Patkar, Ashwin; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2012-09-01

    In opioid dependent youth there is substantial attrition from medication-assisted treatment. If youth at risk for attrition can be identified at treatment entry or early in treatment, they can be targeted for interventions to help retain them in treatment. Opioid dependent adolescents and young adults (n=152), aged 15-21, were randomized to 12 weeks (BUP, n=74) or 2 weeks of detoxification (DETOX, n=78) with buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal), both in combination with 12 weeks of psychosocial treatment. Baseline and early treatment related predictors of treatment attrition were identified in each group using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. In the DETOX group 36% left between weeks 2 and 4, at the end of the dose taper, while in the BUP group only 8% left by week 4. In the BUP group, early adherence to Bup/Nal, early opioid negative urines, use of any medications in the month prior to treatment entry, and lifetime non-heroin opioid use were associated with retention while prior 30-day hallucinogen use was associated with attrition. In the DETOX group, only use of sleep medications was associated with retention although not an independent predictor. A broad range of other pre-treatment characteristics was unrelated to attrition. Prompt attention to those with early non-adherence to medication or an early opioid positive urine, markers available in the first 2 weeks of treatment, may improve treatment retention. Extended Bup/Nal treatment appeared effective in improving treatment retention for youth with opioid dependence across a wide range of demographics, and pre-treatment clinical characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Opioid antagonist naltrexone for the treatment of pathological gambling in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Domenico; Plastino, Massimiliano; Colica, Carmela; Bosco, Francesca; Arianna, Spanò; Vecchio, Antonino; Galati, Francesco; Cristiano, Dario; Consoli, Arturo; Consoli, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Pathological gambling (PG) is a potential complication related to the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD) with dopamine agonists (DA). The cause of this disorder is unknown, but altered dopamine neurotransmission may be involved. We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of the opioid antagonist naltrexone in the treatment of PG in PD. Our cases included 3 patients with PD who developed PG after DA treatment. Pathological gambling did not improve after reduction or discontinuation of DA. These patients responded poorly to serotonin reuptake inhibitors, whereas treatment with opioid antagonist naltrexone resulted in the remission of PG. Naltrexone treatment was well tolerated. In one patient, higher dose of naltrexone resulted in hepatic abnormalities, which resolved after dosage reduction. The opioid antagonist naltrexone could be an effective option for the treatment of PG in PD.

  8. Baclofen for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN32121581

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi-Abhari Seyed Ali

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results of preclinical studies suggest that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen may be useful in treatment of opioid dependence. This study was aimed at assessing the possible efficacy of baclofen for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Methods A total of 40 opioid-dependent patients were detoxified and randomly assigned to receive baclofen (60 mg/day or placebo in a 12-week, double blind, parallel-group trial. Primary outcome measure was retention in treatment. Secondary outcome measures included opioids and alcohol use according to urinalysis and self-report ratings, intensity of opioid craving assessed with a visual analogue scale, opioid withdrawal symptoms as measured by the Short Opiate Withdrawal Scale and depression scores on the Hamilton inventory. Results Treatment retention was significantly higher in the baclofen group. Baclofen also showed a significant superiority over placebo in terms of opiate withdrawal syndrome and depressive symptoms. Non-significant, but generally favorable responses were seen in the baclofen group with other outcome measures including intensity of opioid craving and self-reported opioid and alcohol use. However, no significant difference was seen in the rates of opioid-positive urine tests. Additionally, the drug side effects of the two groups were not significantly different. Conclusion The results support further study of baclofen in the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence.

  9. Reconciling Patient Safety and Epistemic Humility: An Ethical Use of Opioid Treatment Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anita

    2017-05-01

    In this issue of the Hastings Center Report, Joshua Rager and Peter Schwartz suggest using opioid treatment agreements as public health monitoring tools to inform patients about "the requirements entailed by undergoing opioid therapy," rather than as contractual agreements to alter patients' individual behavior or to benefit them directly. Because Rager and Schwartz's argument presents suspected OTA violations as a justification to stop providing opioids yet does not highlight the broader epistemic and systemic context within which clinicians prescribe these medications, their proposal may perpetuate a climate of distrust and stigmatization without correcting systemic factors that may have placed patients and others at risk in the first place. Given the context of epistemic uncertainty regarding opioid safety and efficacy, insufficient training for opioid prescribers, and inadequate patient education, I propose replacing OTAs, which have a narrow focus on patient behaviors, with opioid treatment plans, which would promote mutual, collaborative, and shared decision-making on the most appropriate pain management program. An OTP can be ethically justified as a tool to prevent and treat iatrogenic addiction under a specific paradigm-one that adopts a default position of professional epistemic humility and holds all collaborative parties accountable in chronic pain management. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  10. Buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction: opportunities, challenges and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Shorter, Daryl; Kosten, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    Buprenorphine follows the success of methadone as another milestone in the history of treatment for opioid addiction. Buprenorphine can be used in an office-based setting where it is clearly effective, highly accepted by patients and has a favorable safety profile and less abuse potential. However, the adoption of buprenorphine treatment has been slow in the USA. This article first reviews the history of medication-assisted opioid addiction treatment and the current epidemic opioid addiction, followed by a review of the efficacy, pharmacology and clinical prescription of buprenorphine in office-based care. We then explore the possible barriers in using buprenorphine and the ways to overcome these barriers, including new formulations, educational programs and policy regulations that strike a balance between accessibility and reducing diversion. Buprenorphine can align addiction treatment with treatments for other chronic medical illnesses. However, preventing diversion will require graduate and continuing medical education and integrated care models for delivery of buprenorphine to those in need.

  11. The impact of chronic pain on opioid addiction treatment: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brittany B; Bawor, Monica; Paul, James; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Plater, Carolyn; Pare, Guillaume; Marsh, David C; Worster, Andrew; Desai, Dipika; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2015-04-16

    The consequences of opioid relapse among patients being treated with opioid substitution treatment (OST) are serious and can result in abnormal cardiovascular function, overdose, and mortality. Chronic pain is a major risk factor for opioid relapse within the addiction treatment setting. There exist a number of opioid maintenance therapies including methadone, buprenorphine, naltrexone, and levomethadyl acetate (LAAM), of which the mediating effects of pain on treatment attrition, substance use behavior, and social functioning may differ across therapies. We aim to 1) evaluate the impact of pain on the treatment outcomes of addiction patients being managed with OST and 2) identify the most recently published opioid maintenance treatment guidelines from the United States, Canada, and the UK to determine how the evidence is being translated into clinical practice. The authors will search Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ProQuest Dissertations and theses Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and the National Institutes for Health Clinical Trials Registry. We will search www. gov and the National Institute for Care and Excellence (NICE) databases to identify the most recently published OST guidelines. All screening and data extraction will be completed in duplicate. Provided the data are suitable, we will perform a multiple treatment comparison using Bayesian meta-analytic methods to produce summary statistics estimating the effect of chronic pain on all OSTs. Our primary outcome is substance use behavior, which includes opioid and non-opioid substance use. We will also evaluate secondary endpoints such as treatment retention, general physical health, intervention adherence, personal and social functioning, as well as psychiatric symptoms. This review will capture the experience of treatment

  12. Medicaid Coverage for Methadone Maintenance and Use of Opioid Agonist Therapy in Specialty Addiction Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloner, Brendan; Stoller, Kenneth B; Barry, Colleen L

    2016-06-01

    This study examined differences in opioid agonist therapy (OAT) utilization among Medicaid-enrolled adults receiving public-sector opioid use disorder treatment in states with Medicaid coverage of methadone maintenance, states with block grant funding only, and states without public coverage of methadone. Person-level treatment admission data, which included information on reason for treatment and use of OAT from 36 states were linked to state-level Medicaid policies collected in a 50-state survey. Probabilities of OAT use among Medicaid enrollees in opioid addiction treatment were calculated, with adjustment for demographic characteristics and patterns of substance use. In adjusted analysis, 45.0% of Medicaid-enrolled individuals in opioid addiction treatment in states with Medicaid coverage for methadone maintenance used OAT, compared with 30.1% in states with block grant coverage only and 17.0% in states with no coverage. Differences were widest in nonintensive outpatient settings. Medicaid methadone maintenance coverage is critical for encouraging OAT among individuals with opioid use disorders.

  13. Opioid Use Disorder Induces Oxidative Stress and Inflammation: The Attenuating Effect of Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Salarian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Frequent use of opioids produces reactive oxygen species, upregulates inflammatory factors, and contributes to opiate dependence. In this study, we examined perturbations of plasma oxidative and inflammatory markers in patients with opioid use disorder in two phases. In the first phase, we compared the oxidative status in patients with opioid use disorders and in healthy controls; and in the second phase, we examined oxidative changes before and after methadone maintenance treatment.Method: To explore whether oxidative changes were associated with opioid use disorder, we compared plasma oxidative and inflammatory markers in patients with opioid use disorder and in smoking and non-smoking healthy participants. All participants completed measures of catalase (CAT, glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, and TNF-α at baseline. Baseline measures were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test. In the second phase, to explore oxidative changes during transition from opium use to methadone, blood and urine samples of patients with opioid use disorder were re-evaluated on Days 3, 7, and 14 after methadone therapy. Repeated measures analysis was used to determine the relative contribution of intervention to changes in CAT, GSH, MDA, SOD, MMP-9, and TNF-α level over time.Results: We observed lower SOD and catalase activities, and higher TNF-α and MMP-9 level in patients compared to the two comparison groups. Opioids exacerbated the oxidative imbalance and superimposed the underlying oxidative injury in smoker comparison group. Methadone therapy was associated with lower MMP-9 and TNF-α level, and higher SOD and catalase activities two weeks after therapy; showing an improvement in oxidative profile.Conclusion: This was an investigation indicating an oxidative imbalance before methadone therapy and during early days of transition from opium use to methadone. Being aware of redox status is

  14. Pharmacogenomics and Patient Treatment Parameters to Opioid Treatment in Chronic Pain: A Focus on Morphine, Oxycodone, Tramadol, and Fentanyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Renae A; Hotham, Elizabeth; Hall, Catherine; Williams, Marie; Suppiah, Vijayaprakash

    2017-12-01

    Opioids are one of the most commonly prescribed medicines for chronic pain. However, their use for chronic pain has been controversial. The objective of this literature review was to identify the role of genetic polymorphisms on patient treatment parameters (opioid dose requirements, response, and adverse effects) for opioids used in malignant and nonmalignant chronic pain. The opioids that this review focuses on are codeine, morphine, oxycodone, tramadol, and fentanyl. A literature search of databases Medline and Embase was carried out, and studies up to April 2016 were included in this review. Studies were included based on a combination of key words: chronic pain and related terms, pharmacogenetics and related terms, and opioids and related terms. Among the 1,408 individual papers retrieved from the search in Medline and Embase, 32 original articles were included in this review, with none related to codeine. The 32 papers reported various study designs, opioids, and polymorphisms being studied for associations with treatment outcomes. This literature review reveals that variants in ABCB1, OPRM1, and COMT have been replicated for opioid dosing and variants in ABCB1 have been replicated for both treatment response and adverse effects. Currently, there are few validated studies to form a strong evidence base to support pharmacogenomics testing when initiating opioid therapy. However, the field of pharmacogenomics in chronic pain is likely to expand over the coming years, with the increasing number of treatment options available and larger cohorts being assembled in order to identify true associations. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Treatment utilization among persons with opioid use disorder in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Zhu, He; Swartz, Marvin S

    2016-12-01

    The United States is experiencing an opioid overdose epidemic. Treatment use data from diverse racial/ethnic groups with opioid use disorder (OUD) are needed to inform treatment expansion efforts. We examined demographic characteristics and behavioral health of persons aged ≥12 years that met criteria for past-year OUD (n=6,125) in the 2005-2013 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (N=503,101). We determined the prevalence and correlates of past-year use of alcohol/drug use treatment and opioid-specific treatment to inform efforts for improving OUD treatment. Among persons with OUD, 81.93% had prescription (Rx) OUD only, 9.75% had heroin use disorder (HUD) only, and 8.32% had Rx OUD+HUD. Persons with Rx OUD+HUD tended to be white, adults aged 18-49, males, or uninsured. The majority (80.09%) of persons with OUD had another substance use disorder (SUD), and major depressive episode (MDE) was common (28.74%). Of persons with OUD, 26.19% used any alcohol or drug use treatment, and 19.44% used opioid-specific treatment. Adolescents, the uninsured, blacks, native-Hawaiians/Pacific-Islanders/Asian-Americans, persons with Rx OUD only, and persons without MDE or SUD particularly underutilized opioid-specific treatment. Among alcohol/drug use treatment users, self-help group and outpatient rehabilitation treatment were commonly used services. Most people with OUD report no use of OUD treatment. Multifaceted interventions, including efforts to access insurance coverage, are required to change attitudes and knowledge towards addiction treatment in order to develop a supportive culture and infrastructure to enable treatment-seeking. Outreach efforts could target adolescents, minority groups, and the uninsured to improve access to treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Moderate- vs high-dose methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, E C; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A; Stitzer, M L

    1999-03-17

    Methadone hydrochloride treatment is the most common pharmacological intervention for opioid dependence, and recent interest has focused on expanding methadone treatment availability beyond traditional specially licensed clinics. However, despite recommendations regarding effective dosing of methadone, controlled clinical trials of higher-dose methadone have not been conducted. To compare the relative clinical efficacy of moderate- vs high-dose methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence. A 40-week randomized, double-blind clinical trial starting in June 1992 and ending in October 1995. Outpatient substance abuse treatment research clinic at the Johns Hopkins University Bayview Campus, Baltimore, Md. One hundred ninety-two eligible clinic patients. Daily oral methadone hydrochloride in the dose range of 40 to 50 mg (n = 97) or 80 to 100 mg (n = 95), with concurrent substance abuse counseling. Opioid-positive urinalysis results and retention in treatment. By intent-to-treat analysis through week 30 patients in the high-dose group had significantly lower rates of opioid-positive urine samples compared with patients in the moderate-dose group (53.0% [95% confidence interval [CI], 46.9%-59.2%] vs 61.9% [95% CI, 55.9%-68.0%]; P = .047. These differences persisted during withdrawal from methadone. Through day 210 no significant difference was evident between dose groups in treatment retention (high-dose group mean retention, 159 days; moderate-dose group mean retention, 157 days). Nineteen (33%) of 57 patients in the high-dose group and 11 (20%) of 54 patients in the moderate-dose group completed detoxification. Both moderate- and high-dose methadone treatment resulted in decreased illicit opioid use during methadone maintenance and detoxification. The high-dose group had significantly greater decreases in illicit opioid use.

  17. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Margaret; Brown, Nancy J.; Moon, Mary A.; Schuman, Deborah J.; Thomas, Josephine; Wright, Denise L.

    2004-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) addresses the clinical use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts…

  18. Buprenorphine – an attractive opioid with underutilized potential in treatment of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna IK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ish K Khanna, Sivaram PillarisettiNeuroPn Therapeutics, Alpharetta, GA, USAAbstract: Despite proven clinical utility, buprenorphine has not been used widely for the treatment of chronic pain. Questions about “ceiling effect” or bell-shaped curve observed for analgesia in preclinical studies and potential withdrawal issues on combining with marketed µ-agonists continue to hinder progress in expanding full potential of buprenorphine in the treatment of cancer and noncancer pain. Mounting evidence from clinical studies and conclusions drawn by a panel of experts strongly support superior safety and efficacy profile of buprenorphine vs marketed opioids. No ceiling on analgesic effect has been reported in clinical studies. The receptor pharmacology and pharmacokinetics profile of buprenorphine is complex but unique and contributes to its distinct safety and efficacy. The buprenorphine pharmacology also allows it to be combined with other µ-receptor opioids for additivity in efficacy. Transdermal delivery products of buprenorphine have been preferred choices for the management of pain but new delivery options are under investigation for the treatment of both opioid dependence and chronic pain.Keywords: buprenorphine, opioids, opioid dependence, partial agonist, hyperalgesia, neuropathic pain

  19. When human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment goals conflict with guideline-based opioid prescribing: A qualitative study of HIV treatment providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starrels, Joanna L; Peyser, Deena; Haughton, Lorlette; Fox, Aaron; Merlin, Jessica S; Arnsten, Julia H; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have a high prevalence of chronic pain and opioid use, making HIV care a critical setting for improving the safety of opioid prescribing. Little is known about HIV treatment providers' perspectives about opioid prescribing to patients with chronic pain. The authors administered a questionnaire and conducted semistructured telephone interviews with 18 HIV treatment providers (infectious disease specialists, general internists, family medicine physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) in Bronx, NY. Open-ended interview questions focused on providers' experiences, beliefs, and attitudes about opioid prescribing and about the use of guideline-based opioid prescribing practices (conservative prescribing, and monitoring for and responding to misuse). Transcripts were thematically analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. Eighteen HIV treatment providers included 13 physicians, four nurse practitioners, and one physician assistant. They were 62% female, 56% white, and practiced as HIV treatment providers for a mean of 14.6 years. Most reported always or almost always using opioid treatment agreements (56%) and urine drug testing (61%) with their patients on long-term opioid therapy. HIV treatment providers tended to view opioid prescribing for chronic pain within the "HIV paradigm," a set of priorities and principles defined by three key themes: (1) primacy of HIV goals, (2) familiarity with substance use, and (3) the clinician as ally. The HIV paradigm sometimes supported, and sometimes conflicted with, guideline-based opioid prescribing practices. For HIV treatment providers, perceived alignment with the HIV paradigm determined whether and how guideline-based opioid prescribing practices were adopted. For example, the primacy of HIV goals superseded conservative opioid prescribing when providers prescribed opioids with the goal of retaining patients in HIV care. These findings highlight

  20. Experiences of burnout among drug counselors in a large opioid treatment program: A qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitel, Mark; Oberleitner, Lindsay; Muthulingam, Dharushana; Oberleitner, David; Madden, Lynn M; Marcus, Ruthanne; Eller, Anthony; Bono, Madeline H; Barry, Declan T

    2018-03-09

    Little is known about possible experiences of burnout among drug counselors in opioid treatment programs that are scaling up capacity to address the current opioid treatment gap. Participants in this quality improvement study were 31 drug counselors employed by large opioid treatment programs whose treatment capacities were expanding. Experiences of burnout and approaches for managing and/or preventing burnout were examined using individual semi-structured interviews, which were audiotaped, transcribed, and systematically coded by a multidisciplinary team using grounded theory. Rates of reported burnout (in response to an open-ended question) were lower than expected, with approximately 26% of participants reporting burnout. Counselor descriptions of burnout included cognitive, affective, behavioral, and physiological symptoms; and job-related demands were identified as a frequent cause. Participants described both self-initiated (e.g., engaging in pleasurable activities, exercising, taking breaks during workday) and system-supported strategies for managing or preventing burnout (e.g., availing of supervision and paid time off). Counselors provided recommendations for system-level changes to attenuate counselor risk of burnout (e.g., increased staff-wide encounters, improved communication, accessible paid time off, and increased clinical supervision). Findings suggest that drug counselor burnout is not inevitable, even in opioid treatment program settings whose treatment capacities are expanding. Organizations might benefit from routinely assessing counselor feedback about burnout and implementing feasible recommendations to attenuate burnout and promote work engagement.

  1. Opioid antagonists for pharmacological treatment of gambling disorder: Are they relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Spiers, Andrew; Caillet, Pascal; Bruneau, Mélanie; Challet-Bouju, Gaëlle; Grall-Bronnec, Marie

    2017-07-18

    Background: To date, no drugs have been approved for gambling disorder. Numerous publications have described the value of opioid antagonists. Indeed, the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathway has been suggested as the underlying cause of reward-seeking behaviour, and it is modulated by the opioid system. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the relevance of opioid antagonists for treating GD. Method A systematic literature review was conducted. A search of the PubMed electronic database, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Systematic Review Database without any limits was performed. Results: There is little information concerning the effects of opioid antagonists on GD. The total search with "nalmefene and gambling" without any limits revealed only 11 articles. The search with "naltrexone and gambling" without any limits generated 47 articles. Nevertheless, the best available data support the use of opioid antagonists, particularly in individuals with a history of alcohol use disorder or strong gambling urges. Conclusion: Future trials are still needed. Indeed, opioid antagonists effectiveness has been investigated in only a limited number of patients, clinical trials do not reflect the heterogeneity of GD and there is little knowledge of the predictive factors of response to treatments. Moreover, differential affinity to nalmefene for kappa receptors may be associated with a particular effect in a yet to be defined addiction phenotype. Head to head comparisons between naltrexone and nalmefene would be helpful in combining with other medication or psychotherapy. The identification of subgroups of patients that are more likely to benefit from opioid antagonists should be a goal. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Volatility and change in chronic pain severity predict outcomes of treatment for prescription opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2017-07-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP-NLX) can be used to manage prescription opioid addiction among persons with chronic pain, but post-treatment relapse is common and difficult to predict. This study estimated whether changes in pain over time and pain volatility during BUP-NLX maintenance would predict opioid use during the taper BUP-NLX taper. Secondary analysis of a multi-site clinical trial for prescription opioid addiction, using data obtained during a 12-week BUP-NLX stabilization and 4-week BUP-NLX taper. Community clinics affiliated with a national clinical trials network in 10 US cities. Subjects with chronic pain who entered the BUP-NLX taper phase (n = 125) with enrollment occurring from June 2006 to July 2009 (52% male, 88% Caucasian, 31% married). Outcomes were weekly biologically verified and self-reported opioid use from the 4-week taper phase. Predictors were estimates of baseline severity, rate of change and volatility in pain from weekly self-reports during the 12-week maintenance phase. Controlling for baseline pain and treatment condition, increased pain [odds ratio (OR) = 2.38, P = 0.02] and greater pain volatility (OR = 2.43, P = 0.04) predicted greater odds of positive opioid urine screen during BUP-NLX taper. Increased pain (IRR = 1.40, P = 0.04) and greater pain volatility [incidence-rate ratio (IRR) = 1.66, P = 0.009] also predicted greater frequency of self-reported opioid use. Adults with chronic pain receiving out-patient treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP-NLX) for prescription opioid addiction have an elevated risk for opioid use when tapering off maintenance treatment. Those with relative persistence in pain over time and greater volatility in pain during treatment are less likely to sustain abstinence during BUP-NLX taper. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment for opioid and other substance use during infertility treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Tricia E

    2017-08-01

    Opioid use and misuse have reached epidemic proportions in the United States, especially in women of childbearing age, some of whom seek infertility treatments. Substance use is much more common than many of the conditions routinely screened for during the preconception period, and it can have devastating consequences for the woman and her family. Substance use can worsen infertility, complicate pregnancy, increase medical problems, and lead to psychosocial difficulties for the woman and her family. The reproductive endocrinologist thus has an ethical and medical duty to screen for substance use, provide initial counseling, and refer to specialized treatment as needed. This article provides an overview of screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), a public health approach shown to be effective in ameliorating the harms of substance use. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dextromethorphan attenuated inflammation and combined opioid use in humans undergoing methadone maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiou-Lan; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Tao, Pao-Luh; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Po See; Lee, I Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies show that proinflammatory cytokines might be related to the development of opioid dependence (physiological, psychological, or both). In a double-blind, randomly stratified clinical trial investigating whether add-on dextromethorphan (60-120 mg/day) attenuated inflammation and the combined use of opioids in heroin-dependent patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment, we evaluated whether inflammation is related to the progression of opioid dependence. All participants (107 heroin-dependent patients and 84 nondependent healthy controls) were recruited from National Cheng Kung University Hospital. Their plasma cytokine levels were measured to evaluate the effect of add-on dextromethorphan. Plasma TNF-α and IL-8 levels were significantly higher in long-term heroin-dependent patients than in healthy controls (p dextromethorphan. Moreover, both tolerance to methadone and the combined use of opioids were significantly (p dextromethorphan. We conclude that dextromethorphan might be a feasible adjuvant therapeutic for attenuating inflammation and inhibiting methadone tolerance and combined opioid use in heroin-dependent patients.

  5. Development of a brief tool for monitoring aberrant behaviours among patients receiving long-term opioid therapy: The Opioid-Related Behaviours In Treatment (ORBIT) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larance, Briony; Bruno, Raimondo; Lintzeris, Nicholas; Degenhardt, Louisa; Black, Emma; Brown, Amanda; Nielsen, Suzanne; Dunlop, Adrian; Holland, Rohan; Cohen, Milton; Mattick, Richard P

    2016-02-01

    Early identification of problems is essential in minimising the unintended consequences of opioid therapy. This study aimed to develop a brief scale that identifies and quantifies recent aberrant behaviour among diverse patient populations receiving long-term opioid treatment. 40 scale items were generated via literature review and expert panel (N=19) and tested in surveys of: (i) N=41 key experts, and (ii) N=426 patients prescribed opioids >3 months (222 pain patients and 204 opioid substitution therapy (OST) patients). We employed item and scale psychometrics (exploratory factor analyses, confirmatory factor analyses and item-response theory statistics) to refine items to a brief scale. Following removal of problematic items (poor retest-reliability or wording, semantic redundancy, differential item functioning, collinearity or rarity) iterative factor analytic procedures identified a 10-item unifactorial scale with good model fit in the total sample (N=426; CFI=0.981, TLI=0.975, RMSEA=0.057), and among pain (CFI=0.969, TLI=0.960, RMSEA=0.062) and OST subgroups (CFI=0.989, TFI=0.986, RMSEA=0.051). The 10 items provided good discrimination between groups, demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability (ICC 0.80, 95% CI 0.60-0.89; Cronbach's alpha=0.89), were moderately correlated with related constructs, including opioid dependence (SDS), depression and stress (DASS subscales) and Social Relationships and Environment domains of the WHO-QoL, and had strong face validity among advising clinicians. The Opioid-Related Behaviours In Treatment (ORBIT) scale is brief, reliable and validated for use in diverse patient groups receiving opioids. The ORBIT has potential applications as a checklist to prompt clinical discussions and as a tool to quantify aberrant behaviour and assess change over time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) for Young People in Treatment for Non-opioid Drug Abuse:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Rasmussen, Pernille; Andersen, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    The main objectives of this review are to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of MDFT on drug abuse reduction for young people (aged 11-21 years) in treatment for non-opioid drug abuse, and if possible to examine moderators of drug abuse reduction effects, specifically analysing whether...

  7. Buprenorphine Implants for Treatment of Opioid Dependence: Randomized Comparison to Placebo and Sublingual Buprenorphine/Naloxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Richard N.; Ling, Walter; Casadonte, Paul; Vocci, Frank; Bailey, Genie L.; Kampman, Kyle; Patkar, Ashwin; Chavoustie, Steven; Blasey, Christine; Sigmon, Stacey; Beebe, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate safety and efficacy of buprenorphine implants (BI) versus placebo implants (PI) for the treatment of opioid dependence. A secondary aim compared BI to open-label sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets (BNX). Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects received either 4 buprenorphine implants (80 mg/implant) (n=114), 4 placebo implants (n=54), or open-label BNX (12–16 mg/d) (n=119). Setting 20 addiction treatment centers. Participants Adult outpatients (ages 18 to 65) with DSM-IV-TR opioid dependence. Measurements The primary efficacy endpoint was the percent of urine samples negative for opioids collected from weeks 1 to 24, examined as a cumulative distribution function (CDF). Findings The BI CDF was significantly different from placebo (P<.0001). Mean (95% CI) proportions of urines negative for opioids were: BI: 31.2% (25.3, 37.1) and PI: 13.4% (8.3, 18.6). BI subjects had a higher study completion rate relative to placebo (64% vs. 26%, P<.0001), lower clinician-rated (P<.0001) and patient-rated (P<.0001) withdrawal, lower patient-ratings of craving (P<.0001), and better subjects’ (P=.031) and clinicians’ (P=.022) global ratings of improvement. BI also resulted in significantly lower cocaine use (P=.0016). Minor implant-site reactions were comparable in the buprenorphine (27.2% [31/114]) and placebo groups (25.9% [14/54]). BI were non-inferior to BNX on percent urines negative for opioids [mean (95% CI): 33.5 (27.3, 39.6); CI for the difference of proportions, (−10.7, 6.2)]. Conclusions Compared with placebo, buprenorphine implants result in significantly less frequent opioid use, and are non-inferior to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets. PMID:23919595

  8. Primary healthcare-based integrated care with opioid agonist treatment: First experience from Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Olga; Dvoriak, Sergey; Pykalo, Iryna; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-04-01

    Ukraine's HIV epidemic is concentrated among people who inject drugs (PWID), however, coverage with opioid agonist therapies (OATs) available mostly at specialty addiction clinics is extremely low. OAT integrated into primary healthcare clinics (PHCs) provides an opportunity for integrating comprehensive healthcare services and scaling up OAT. A pilot study of PHC-based integrated care for drug users conducted in two Ukrainian cities between 2014 and 2016 included three sub-studies: 1) cross-sectional treatment site preference assessment among current OAT patients (N=755); 2) observational cohort of 107 PWID who continued the standard of care versus transition of stabilized and newly enrolled PWID into PHC-based integrated care; and 3) pre/post analysis of attitudes toward PWID and HIV patients by PHC staff (N=26). Among 755 OAT patients, 53.5% preferred receiving OAT at PHCs, which was independently correlated with convenience, trust in physician, and treatment with methadone (vs. buprenorphine). In 107 PWID observed over 6 months, retention in treatment was high: 89% in PWID continuing OAT in specialty addiction treatment settings (standard of care) vs 94% in PWID transitioning to PHCs; and 80% among PWID newly initiating OAT in PHCs. Overall, satisfaction with treatment, subjective self-perception of well-being, and trust in physician significantly increased in patients prescribed OAT in PHCs. Among PHC staff, attitudes towards PWID and HIV patients significantly improved over time. OAT can be successfully integrated into primary care in low and middle-income countries and improves outcomes in both patients and clinicians while potentially scaling-up OAT for PWID. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Medicaid Coverage of Methadone Maintenance and the Use of Opioid Agonist Therapy Among Pregnant Women in Specialty Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachhuber, Marcus A; Mehta, Pooja K; Faherty, Laura J; Saloner, Brendan

    2017-12-01

    Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) is the standard of care for pregnant women with opioid use disorder (OUD). Medicaid coverage policies may strongly influence OAT use in this group. To examine the association between Medicaid coverage of methadone maintenance and planned use of OAT in the publicly funded treatment system. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of treatment admissions in 30 states extracted from the Treatment Episode Data Set (2013 and 2014). Medicaid-insured pregnant women with OUD (n=3354 treatment admissions). The main outcome measure was planned use of OAT on admission. The main exposure was state Medicaid coverage of methadone maintenance. Using multivariable logistic regression models adjusting for sociodemographic, substance use, and treatment characteristics, we compared the probability of planned OAT use in states with Medicaid coverage of methadone maintenance versus states without coverage. A total of 71% of pregnant women admitted to OUD treatment were 18-29 years old, 85% were white non-Hispanic, and 56% used heroin. Overall, 74% of admissions occurred in the 18 states with Medicaid coverage of methadone maintenance and 53% of admissions involved planned use of OAT. Compared with states without Medicaid coverage of methadone maintenance, admissions in states with coverage were significantly more likely to involve planned OAT use (adjusted difference: 32.9 percentage points, 95% confidence interval, 19.2-46.7). Including methadone maintenance in the Medicaid benefit is essential to increasing OAT among pregnant women with OUD and should be considered a key policy strategy to enhance outcomes for mothers and newborns.

  10. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid detoxification from opioid dependence under general anaesthesia versus standard methadone tapering : abstinence rates and withdrawal distress experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Paul F M; Koning, Jeroen P F; Heinen, Nadia; Laheij, Robert J F; van Cauter, R M Victory; De Jong, Cor A J

    The aim of this work was to study abstinence rates and withdrawal effects of rapid detoxification of opioid-dependents under general anaesthesia (RD-GA) compared to standard methadone tapering (SMT) using a prospective clinical trial with a follow-up of 3 months, as a preliminary study at the

  12. Rapid detoxification from opioid dependence under general anaesthesia versus standard methadone tapering: abstinence rates and withdrawal distress experiences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, P.F.M.; Koning, J.P.; Heinen, N.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Cauter, R.M.V. van; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study abstinence rates and withdrawal effects of rapid detoxification of opioid-dependents under general anaesthesia (RD-GA) compared to standard methadone tapering (SMT) using a prospective clinical trial with a follow-up of 3 months, as a preliminary study at the

  13. Prevalence, Diagnosis, and Treatment Rates of Mood Disorders among Opioid Users under Criminal Justice Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaba, Mary; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Wooditch, Alese; Kiss, Marissa; Murphy, Amy; Kumari, Suneeta; Taxman, Faye; Altice, Frederick; Lawson, William B; Springer, Sandra A

    2018-01-15

    Individuals involved in the criminal justice system have disproportionately high rates of psychiatric disorders when compared to the general U.S. If left untreated, the likelihood of subsequent arrest increases and risk for adverse health consequences is great, particularly among opioid users. To explore the prevalence, characteristics, and treatment of mood disorders among justice involved opioid-dependent populations. The current study enrolled 258 treatment-seeking opioid-dependent individuals under community-based criminal justice supervision (e.g., probation, parole) screened from the larger parent study, Project STRIDE, a seek/test/treat randomized control trial (RCT) examining HIV and opioid use treatment. During baseline, individuals were screened for depression using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and screened for bipolar disorder using the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ) tool. Overall, 78 (30%) participants screened positive for moderate to severe depression and 54 (21%) screened positive for bipolar disorder. Participants self-reported mood disorders at higher rates than they screened positive for these conditions. Participants screening positive for these conditions experienced significantly greater family, legal, and medical problems on the Addiction Severity Index-Lite (ASI-Lite) than those who did not screen positive. Incidence of a lifetime suicide attempt was found to be associated with a positive screen for both mood disorders. Prescribed psychotropic treatment utilization was similar among those who screened positive for depression or bipolar disorder with approximately 38% reporting taking medication. Findings suggest universal mood disorder screening to improve comprehensive psychiatric care and treatment of opioid-dependent justice-involved individuals.

  14. Needs assessment and treatment compliance at state opioid substitution treatment programes in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piralishvili, G; Gamkrelidze, I; Nikolaishvili, N; Chavchanidze, M

    2013-01-01

    conduct needs assessments and treatment compliance evaluations in MMT and Suboxone Substitution State Programs in Georgia (Republic of). 506 patients (2 females) were surveyed (92% on Methadone, 8% on Suboxone) from 6 Tbilisi and 4 regional State Programs in 2011 November. Mean age - 40±8,56 (22-65) year; 254 (51.4%) were in treatment for 1-3 year. Evaluation was carried out on the base of structured self-questionnaire that covers demographics, drug use history, general drug use trends, psychotherapeutic sessions' acceptance and open label question regarding treatment challenges and satisfaction. 305 (60.3%) attended individual and 57 (11.3%) group psychotherapy sessions with 50.79% attending once/month or rare. The main reason given for therapy non-attendance - no needs for it (29.48%); the main drugs before admission - heroin (80.04%), buprenorphine (53.49%); Main drugs used in Georgia nowadays - desomorphine ("crocodile"), alcohol and marihuana. Commonly used drugs by program patients (136 positive answers) - alcohol-13.62%, marihuana-10.39%, pregabalin - 8.17%, opioids- 6.62% (mostly-"crocodile"), home-made stimulants-6.23%, sedatives -5.45%. 55.4% are extremely satisfied with treatment, 82.4% - with program staff. Patients' main wishes- free of charge programs (46.4%) and provide take-home doses (22.07%). Methadone and Suboxone ST are being well accepted in Georgia and appear to be reducing illegal opioid use. However, the psychotherapeutic sessions' attendance is very low.

  15. Opioid Maintenance Treatment--A Call for a Joint European Quality Care Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Laura; Unger, Annemarie; Moser, Laura; Fischer, Gabriele; Jagsch, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this exploratory analysis of European Quality Audit of Opioid Treatment data was to identify areas of improvement for current opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) approaches. Factors facilitating treatment entry, retention and refusal were compared between 8 European countries and between OMT patient (OMT-P) and active opioid user (AOU) sample groups. Both groups were divided into those who had never had OMT before (un-experienced OMT-P (n = 573) and AOU (n = 360)) and those who had been maintained at least once prior to this investigation (experienced OMT-P (n = 746) and AOU (n = 377)). The European comparison showed that motives for starting OMT vary distinctly between countries (p ≤ 0.001). Transnationally, experienced AOU reported concerns about their ability to follow treatment rules and negative treatment experiences as decisive reasons for staying out of OMT. Greater flexibility, less pressure to reduce their treatment dose and greater treatment structure were ranked significantly higher by experienced compared to un-experienced OMT-P as factors that might facilitate treatment retention (p ≤ 0.05). Increasing awareness of potential shortcomings of OMT delivery systems is crucial to optimally match treatment approaches to patient needs and also to reduce the considerable economic burden of addiction to society. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Extended vs Short-term Buprenorphine-Naloxone for Treatment of Opioid-Addicted Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, George E.; Poole, Sabrina A.; Subramaniam, Geetha; Dugosh, Karen; Bogenschutz, Michael; Abbott, Patrick; Patkar, Ashwin; Publicker, Mark; McCain, Karen; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Forman, Robert; Vetter, Victoria; McNicholas, Laura; Blaine, Jack; Lynch, Kevin G.; Fudala, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Context The usual treatment for opioid-addicted youth is detoxification and counseling. Extended medication-assisted therapy may be more helpful. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of continuing buprenorphine-naloxone for 12 weeks vs detoxification for opioid-addicted youth. Design, Setting, and Patients Clinical trial at 6 community programs from July 2003 to December 2006 including 152 patients aged 15 to 21 years who were randomized to 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone or a 14-day taper (detox). Interventions Patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to week 12; patients in the detox group were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to day 14. All were offered weekly individual and group counseling. Main Outcome Measure Opioid-positive urine test result at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Results The number of patients younger than 18 years was too small to analyze separately, but overall, patients in the detox group had higher proportions of opioid-positive urine test results at weeks 4 and 8 but not at week 12 ( χ22 = 4.93, P = .09). At week 4, 59 detox patients had positive results (61%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 47%-75%) vs 58 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (26%; 95% CI = 14%-38%). At week 8, 53 detox patients had positive results (54%; 95% CI = 38%-70%) vs 52 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (23%; 95% CI = 11%-35%). At week 12, 53 detox patients had positive results (51%; 95% CI = 35%-67%) vs 49 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (43%; 95% CI = 29%-57%). By week 12, 16 of 78 detox patients (20.5%) remained in treatment vs 52 of 74 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (70%; χ12 = 32.90, P < .001). During weeks 1 through 12, patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group reported less opioid use ( χ12 = 18.45, P < .001), less injecting ( χ12 = 6.00, P = .01), and less nonstudy addiction treatment ( χ12 = 25.82, P < .001). High levels of opioid use

  17. Time-dependent regional brain distribution of methadone and naltrexone in the treatment of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklezgi, Belin G; Pamreddy, Annapurna; Baijnath, Sooraj; Kruger, Hendrik G; Naicker, Tricia; Gopal, Nirmala D; Govender, Thavendran

    2018-02-14

    Opioid addiction is a serious public health concern with severe health and social implications; therefore, extensive therapeutic efforts are required to keep users drug free. The two main pharmacological interventions, in the treatment of addiction, involve management with methadone an mu (μ)-opioid agonist and treatment with naltrexone, μ-opioid, kappa (κ)-opioid and delta (δ)-opioid antagonist. MET and NAL are believed to help individuals to derive maximum benefit from treatment and undergo a full recovery. The aim of this study was to determine the localization and distribution of MET and NAL, over a 24-hour period in rodent brain, in order to investigate the differences in their respective regional brain distributions. This would provide a better understanding of the role of each individual drug in the treatment of addiction, especially NAL, whose efficacy is controversial. Tissue distribution was determined by using mass spectrometric imaging (MSI), in combination with quantification via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. MSI image analysis showed that MET was highly localized in the striatal and hippocampal regions, including the nucleus caudate, putamen and the upper cortex. NAL was distributed with high intensities in the mesocorticolimbic system including areas of the cortex, caudate putamen and ventral pallidum regions. Our results demonstrate that MET and NAL are highly localized in the brain regions with a high density of μ-receptors, the primary sites of heroin binding. These areas are strongly implicated in the development of addiction and are the major pathways that mediate brain stimulation during reward. © 2018 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  18. Opioid Addiction and Abuse in Primary Care Practice: A Comparison of Methadone and Buprenorphine as Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhomme, Jean; Shim, Ruth S.; Gooden, Richard; Tyus, Dawn; Rust, George

    2014-01-01

    Opioid abuse and addiction have increased in frequency in the United States over the past 20 years. In 2009, an estimated 5.3 million persons used opioid medications nonmedically within the past month, 200 000 used heroin, and approximately 9.6% of African Americans used an illicit drug. Racial and ethnic minorities experience disparities in availability and access to mental health care, including substance use disorders. Primary care practitioners are often called upon to differentiate between appropriate, medically indicated opioid use in pain management vs inappropriate abuse or addiction. Racial and ethnic minority populations tend to favor primary care treatment settings over specialty mental health settings. Recent therapeutic advances allow patients requiring specialized treatment for opioid abuse and addiction to be managed in primary care settings. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 enables qualified physicians with readily available short-term training to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting, potentially making primary care physicians active partners in the diagnosis and treatment of opioid use disorders. Methadone and buprenorphine are effective opioid replacement agents for maintenance and/or detoxification of opioid-addicted individuals. However, restrictive federal regulations and stigmatization of opioid addiction and treatment have limited the availability of methadone. The opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine/naloxone combination has proven an effective alternative. This article reviews the literature on differences between buprenorphine and methadone regarding availability, efficacy, safety, side-effects, and dosing, identifying resources for enhancing the effectiveness of medication-assisted recovery through coordination with behavioral/psychological counseling, embedded in the context of recovery-oriented systems of care. PMID:23092049

  19. Cost-effectiveness of emergency department-initiated treatment for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Susan H; Fiellin, David A; Chawarski, Marek C; Owens, Patricia H; Pantalon, Michael V; Hawk, Kathryn; Bernstein, Steven L; O'Connor, Patrick G; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2017-11-01

    In a recent randomized trial, patients with opioid dependence receiving brief intervention, emergency department (ED)-initiated buprenorphine and ongoing follow-up in primary care with buprenorphine (buprenorphine) were twice as likely to be engaged in addiction treatment compared with referral to community-based treatment (referral) or brief intervention and referral (brief intervention). Our aim was to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of these three methods of intervening on opioid dependence in the ED. Measured health-care use was converted to dollar values. We considered a health-care system perspective and constructed cost-effectiveness acceptability curves that indicate the probability each treatment is cost-effective under different thresholds of willingness-to-pay for outcomes studied. An urban ED in the United States. Opioid-dependent patients aged 18 years or older. Self-reported 30-day assessment data were used to construct cost-effectiveness acceptability curves for patient engagement in formal addiction treatment at 30 days and the number of days illicit opioid-free in the past week. Considering only health-care system costs, cost-effectiveness acceptability curves indicate that at all positive willingness-to-pay values, ED-initiated buprenorphine treatment was more cost-effective than brief intervention or referral. For example, at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $1000 for 30-day treatment engagement, we are 79% certain ED-initiated buprenorphine is most cost-effective compared with other studied treatments. Similar results were found for days illicit opioid-free in the past week. Results were robust to secondary analyses that included patients with missing cost data, included crime and patient time costs in the numerator, and to changes in unit price estimates. In the United States, emergency department-initiated buprenorphine intervention for patients with opioid dependence provides high value compared with referral to community

  20. The Impact of Early Substance Use Disorder Treatment Response on Treatment Outcomes Among Pregnant Women With Primary Opioid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuten, Michelle; Fitzsimons, Heather; Hochheimer, Martin; Jones, Hendree E; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2018-03-13

    This study examined the impact of early patient response on treatment utilization and substance use among pregnant participants enrolled in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. Treatment responders (TRs) and treatment nonresponders (TNRs) were compared on pretreatment and treatment measures. Regression models predicted treatment utilization and substance use. TR participants attended more treatment and had lower rates of substance use relative to TNR participants. Regression models for treatment utilization and substance use were significant. Maternal estimated gestational age (EGA) and baseline cocaine use were negatively associated with treatment attendance. Medication-assisted treatment, early treatment response, and baseline SUD treatment were positively associated with treatment attendance. Maternal EGA was negatively associated with counseling attendance; early treatment response was positively associated with counseling attendance. Predictors of any substance use at 1 month were maternal education, EGA, early treatment nonresponse, and baseline cocaine use. The single predictor of any substance use at 2 months was early treatment nonresponse. Predictors of opioid use at 1 month were maternal education, EGA, early treatment nonresponse, and baseline SUD treatment. Predictors of opioid use at 2 months were early treatment nonresponse, and baseline cocaine and marijuana use. Predictors of cocaine use at 1 month were early treatment nonresponse, baseline cocaine use, and baseline SUD treatment. Predictors of cocaine use at 2 months were early treatment nonresponse and baseline cocaine use. Early treatment response predicts more favorable maternal treatment utilization and substance use outcomes. Treatment providers should implement interventions to maximize patient early response to treatment.

  1. Stigma associated with medication treatment for young adults with opioid use disorder: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadland, Scott E; Park, Tae Woo; Bagley, Sarah M

    2018-05-07

    Opioid-related overdose deaths have risen sharply among young adults. Despite this increase, access to evidence-based medication for opioid agonist treatment (OAT) for youth remains low. Among older adults, barriers to OAT include the paucity of buprenorphine-waivered prescribers and low rates of prescribing among waivered physicians. We have increasingly found in our clinical practice significant stigma related to using OAT to treat addiction for young adults. In this series, we describe three cases of young adults who faced significant stigma related to their treatment. The first case is a young male with a history of significant trauma and a severe opioid use disorder. He started buprenorphine and has found a job, stayed abstinent, and began a healthy relationship. At each step in his recovery, he has faced resistance to taking medication from other treatment providers, directors of sober houses, and his parents. The second case is a young woman who presented to a substance use treatment program after a relapse. She was unable to restart buprenorphine despite our calling to ask that it be restarted. Ultimately, she left against medical advice and was stabilized as an outpatient on buprenorphine. The final case is a young woman who stopped buprenorphine after being told she was "not sober" while attending 12-step group but restarted after conversations with her clinical team. In each case, the patient has continued their medication treatment and are stable. Opioid-related deaths continue to rise among all age groups, including young adults. Stigma related to medication treatment can be a substantial barrier for many young adult patients but there are concrete steps that providers and communities can take to address this stigma.

  2. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.J. de; Laheij, R.J.F.; Krabbe, P.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Aim  Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  3. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Cor A J; Laheij, Robert J F; Krabbe, Paul F M

    AIM: Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  4. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.J. de; Laheij, R.J.F.; Krabbe, P.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  5. Undertreatment of pain and low use of opioids in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, César Amescua; Santos Garcia, Joao Batista; Rosario Berenguel Cook, María Del; Colimon, Frantz; Flores Cantisani, José Alberto; Guerrero, Carlos; Rocío Guillén Núnez, María Del; Hernández Castro, John Jairo; Kraychete, Durval Campos; Lara-Solares, Argelia; Lech, Osvandré; Rico Pazos, María Antonieta; Gallegos, Manuel Sempértegui; Marcondes, Lizandra Pattaro

    2018-05-01

    Pain is highly prevalent among the adult Latin American population. However, many patients with moderate to severe pain do not have access to effective pain management with opioids due to limited access to healthcare, overuse of nonopioid analgesics, regulatory barriers and lack of appropriate information about opioids. There is scarce training on use of opioids among physicians and other healthcare providers, which leads to misconceptions, mainly related to a fear of prescribing opioids. Although opioids are safe and effective drugs for the treatment of moderate to severe chronic pain, the use of opioids in Latin American nations is clearly below standards compared with developed countries.

  6. From political controversy to a technical problem? Fifteen years of opioid substitution treatment in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selin, Jani; Hakkarainen, Pekka; Partanen, Airi; Tammi, Tuukka; Tigerstedt, Christoffer

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the article is to analyze changes in opioid substitution treatments (OST) in Finland. OST spread in Finland in the late 1990s and early 2000s (Phase 1). Since then, OST has become an integrated part of Finnish drug policy and is provided in various substance abuse treatment units as well as in municipal health centers (Phase 2). The paper analyses the policy around the implementation of opioid substitution treatment in Finland, focusing on identifying the key factors and the relations between them that have contributed to the implementation of OST in Finland. OST has become accepted in Finland during the past ten years as a crucial element of a harm reduction strategy. Present incentives behind this development are not as clearly related to drug-specific policies as in the late 1990s; rather, they stem from both the restructuring of health care services (e.g. cost-effectiveness) and the strengthening of the medical or technico-administrative approach to the development of OST. Since the early 2000s, the development of substitution treatment in Finland has not taken place under explicit drug-political guidance, but largely as a result of many differing intended and unintended effects. One of the unintended effects is the fact that buprenorphine has replaced heroin as the most commonly misused opioid in Finland. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention in opioid Dependence Treatment &Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Findings: therapy compliance, retention in treatment, decrease in somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and increase in health was significantly in both combination of psychological intervention method than the Naltroxan group. Mindfulness-based on relapse prevention was more effective than CBT relapse prevention in decreasing of, social dysfunction, relapse prevention, increase of therapy compliance, and health. Results: Mindfulness based relapse prevention was superior to CBT and Naltroxan and considerably increased effectiveness of opioid relapse prevention therapy.

  8. Efficacy of extended-release tramadol for treatment of prescription opioid withdrawal: A two-phase randomized controlled trial*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Siegel, Anthony; Campbell, Charles; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tramadol is an atypical analgesic with monoamine and modest mu opioid agonist activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate: 1) the efficacy of extended-release (ER) tramadol in treating prescription opioid withdrawal and 2) whether cessation of ER tramadol produces opioid withdrawal. Methods Prescription opioid users with current opioid dependence and observed withdrawal participated in this inpatient, two-phase double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. In Phase 1 (days 1-7), participants were randomly assigned to matched oral placebo or ER tramadol (200 or 600 mg daily). In Phase 2 (days 8-13), all participants underwent double blind crossover to placebo. Breakthrough withdrawal medications were available for all subjects. Enrollment continued until 12 completers/group was achieved. Results Use of breakthrough withdrawal medication differed significantly (popioid withdrawal. Mild opioid withdrawal occurred after cessation of treatment with 600 mg tramadol. These data support the continued investigation of tramadol as a treatment for opioid withdrawal. PMID:23755929

  9. Efficacy of extended-release tramadol for treatment of prescription opioid withdrawal: a two-phase randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A; Siegel, Anthony; Campbell, Charles; Walsh, Sharon L

    2013-11-01

    Tramadol is an atypical analgesic with monoamine and modest mu opioid agonist activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate: (1) the efficacy of extended-release (ER) tramadol in treating prescription opioid withdrawal and (2) whether cessation of ER tramadol produces opioid withdrawal. Prescription opioid users with current opioid dependence and observed withdrawal participated in this inpatient, two-phase double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. In Phase 1 (days 1-7), participants were randomly assigned to matched oral placebo or ER tramadol (200 or 600 mg daily). In Phase 2 (days 8-13), all participants underwent double blind crossover to placebo. Breakthrough withdrawal medications were available for all subjects. Enrollment continued until 12 completers/group was achieved. Use of breakthrough withdrawal medication differed significantly (popioid withdrawal. Mild opioid withdrawal occurred after cessation of treatment with 600 mg tramadol. These data support the continued investigation of tramadol as a treatment for opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Systematic Review on the Use of Psychosocial Interventions in Conjunction With Medications for the Treatment of Opioid Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugosh, Karen; Abraham, Amanda; Seymour, Brittany; McLoyd, Keli; Chalk, Mady; Festinger, David

    2016-01-01

    Opioid use and overdose rates have risen to epidemic levels in the United States during the past decade. Fortunately, there are effective medications (ie, methadone, buprenorphine, and oral and injectable naltrexone) available for the treatment of opioid addiction. Each of these medications is approved for use in conjunction with psychosocial treatment; however, there is a dearth of empirical research on the optimal psychosocial interventions to use with these medications. In this systematic review, we outline and discuss the findings of 3 prominent prior reviews and 27 recent publications of empirical studies on this topic. The most widely studied psychosocial interventions examined in conjunction with medications for opioid addiction were contingency management and cognitive behavioral therapy, with the majority focusing on methadone treatment. The results generally support the efficacy of providing psychosocial interventions in combination with medications to treat opioid addictions, although the incremental utility varied across studies, outcomes, medications, and interventions. The review highlights significant gaps in the literature and provides areas for future research. Given the enormity of the current opioid problem in the United States, it is critical to gain a better understanding of the most effective ways to deliver psychosocial treatments in conjunction with these medications to improve the health and well-being of individuals suffering from opioid addiction.

  11. Perceived stigma and social support in treatment for pharmaceutical opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sasha; Campbell, Gabrielle; Larance, Briony; Murnion, Bridin; Nielsen, Suzanne

    2018-02-01

    The dramatic increase in pharmaceutical opioid (PO) use in high-income countries is a growing public health concern. Stigma and social support are important as they may influence treatment uptake and outcomes, yet few studies exist regarding perceived stigma and social support among people with PO dependence. The aims of the study are to: (i) compare characteristics of those with PO dependence from iatrogenic and non-iatrogenic causes; (ii) document perceived stigma and its correlates in people in treatment for PO dependence; and (iii) examine correlates of social support in people in treatment for PO dependence. This prospective cohort study included (n = 108) PO-dependent people referred from treatment services. Telephone interviews were conducted at baseline, 3, 12 and 24 months. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine correlations. Mean age was 41 (SD = 10.5). Half (n = 56, 52%) were female. Two in five met the criteria for iatrogenic dependence (n = 41, 38%), with iatrogenic dependence associated with chronic pain, and no history of injection or heroin use. One quarter of study subjects reported past month unsanctioned opioid use (n = 25, 23%). Being married/de facto or female was associated with higher levels of perceived stigma. Unsanctioned opioid use, iatrogenic dependence and mental health conditions were associated with lower social support. Stigma affects all people in treatment. Those who are married/de facto and female may benefit from interventions to address stigma. The association of low social support with poorer mental health and ongoing substance use indicate that treatment could focus more on this area. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  12. Traditional Chinese and Indian medicine in the treatment of opioid-dependence: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Doosti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, the current literatures on the use of herbs and herbal preparations of Traditional Chinese and Indian Medicine for the treatment of opioid addiction were reviewed. Methods: Search was done in databases such as Pub Med, Science Direct, Scopus, Springer Link, and Google Scholar. Results: Among 18 retrieved studies, 3 studies were about asafetida extract, an approved preparation for ameliorating drug abstinence in China. Chinese preparations including Composite Dong Yuan Gao, Qingjunyin and TJ-97 (a water extract of dai-bofu-to as well as Indian ones, Mentate and Shilajit, were reported to have positive effects against opioid withdrawal, dependence, and tolerance. Moreover, Levo-tetrahydropalmatine and L-Stepholidine, in addition to extracts of Caulis Sinomenii and Sinomenium acutum showed similar effects. Banxia Houpu Decoction, Fu-Yuan pellet, Jinniu capsules, Qingjunyin, Tai-Kang-Ning capsule, and Xuan Xia Qudu Jiaonang (WeiniCom from Chinese preparations, showed anti-addiction effects in randomized, double-blind and, in some studies, multicenter clinical trials. Conclusion: Traditional herbal preparations of China and India have anti-addiction effects with less adverse effects than alpha2-adrenergic or opioid agonists.

  13. Transdermal opioid patches for pain treatment in ancient Greece

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian Paul; Hansen, Steen Honore'; Bartels, Else M.

    2012-01-01

    that OVDO can be useful for treating extreme pain and swellings, forming one of the best eye salves. Olympic Victor's Dark Ointment, an opium-based treatment, forms a "patch" when applied externally as an ointment, because it quickly dries to cover a localized region but still retains its elastic properties......Pain treatment in ancient Greece, and through the middle ages in Europe, was to a great extent based on the expertise of the Greek physician Galen (c. 129-200 A.D.). Galen makes particular reference to "Olympic Victor's Dark Ointment" (OVDO), which is listed with a number of collyria. Galen states...... abilities in terms of drug delivery, which could be transferred to modern medicine. Indeed, this may lead to a better choice of morphine use and controlled management in individual patient cases, taking both pain relief and anti-inflammatory aspects into account....

  14. Impact of Chronic Pain on Treatment Prognosis for Patients with Opioid Use Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany B. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background While a number of pharmacological interventions exist for the treatment of opioid use disorder, evidence evaluating the effect of pain on substance use behavior, attrition rate, and physical or mental health among these therapies has not been well established. We aim to evaluate these effects using evidence gathered from a systematic review of studies evaluating chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP in patients with opioid use disorder. Methods We searched the Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ProQuest Dissertations and theses Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and National Institutes for Health Clinical Trials Registry databases to identify articles evaluating the impact of pain on addiction treatment outcomes for patients maintained on opioid agonist therapy. Results Upon screening 3,540 articles, 14 studies with a combined sample of 3,128 patients fulfilled the review inclusion criteria. Results from the meta-analysis suggest that pain has no effect on illicit opioid consumption [pooled odds ratio (pOR: 0.70, 95%CI 0.41–1.17; I 2 = 0.0] but a protective effect for reducing illicit non-opioid substance use (pOR: 0.57, 95%CI 0.41–0.79; I 2 = 0.0. Studies evaluating illicit opioid consumption using other measures demonstrate pain to increase the risk for opioid abuse. Pain is significantly associated with the presence of psychiatric disorders (pOR: 2.18; 95%CI 1.6, 2.9; I 2 = 0.0%. Conclusion CNCP may increase risk for continued opioid abuse and poor psychiatric functioning. Qualitative synthesis of the findings suggests that major methodological differences in the design and measurement of pain and treatment response outcomes are likely impacting the effect estimates.

  15. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy Compared to the Usual Opioid Dependence Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Saeed; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharraee, Banafsheh; Noroozi, Alireza; Habibi, Mojtaba; Bowen, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of mindfulness-based group therapy (MBGT) compared to the usual opioid dependence treatment (TAU).Thirty outpatients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for opioid dependence from Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS) were randomly assigned into experimental (Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy) and control groups (the Usual Treatment).The experimental group undertook eight weeks of intervention, but the control group received the usual treatment according to the INCAS program. The Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and the Addiction Sevier Index (ASI) were administered at pre-treatment and post-treatment assessment periods. Thirteen patients from the experimental group and 15 from the control group completed post-test assessments. The results of MANCOVA revealed an increase in mean scores in observing, describing, acting with awareness, non-judging, non-reacting, and decrease in mean scores of alcohol and opium in MBGT patient group. The effectiveness of MBGT, compared to the usual treatment, was discussed in this paper as a selective protocol in the health care setting for substance use disorders.

  16. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy Compared to the Usual Opioid Dependence Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Imani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: This study investigated the effectiveness of mindfulness-based group therapy (MBGT compared to the usual opioid dependence treatment (TAU.Thirty outpatients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for opioid dependence from Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS were randomly assigned into experimental (Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy and control groups (the Usual Treatment.The experimental group undertook eight weeks of intervention, but the control group received the usual treatment according to the INCAS program.  Methods:The Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ and the Addiction Sevier Index (ASI were administered at pre-treatment and post-treatment assessment periods. Thirteen patients from the experimental group and 15 from the control group completed post-test assessments. Results:The results of MANCOVA revealed an increase in mean scores in observing, describing, acting with awareness, non-judging, non-reacting, and decrease in mean scores of alcohol and opium in MBGT patient group. Conclusion:The effectiveness of MBGT, compared to the usual treatment, was discussed in this paper as a selective protocol in the health care setting for substance use disorders.

  17. Opioid adjuvant strategy: improving opioid effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihel, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Opioid analgesics continue to be the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment of moderate to severe pain. Many patients, particularly those suffering from chronic pain, require chronic high-dose analgesic therapy. Achieving clinical efficacy and tolerability of such treatment regimens is hampered by the appearance of opioid-induced side effects such as tolerance, hyperalgesia and withdrawal syndrome. Among the therapeutic options to improve the opioid effectiveness, this current review focuses on strategies combining opioids to other drugs that can modulate opioid-mediated effects. We will discuss about experimental evidences reported for several potential opioid adjuvants, including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, 5-HT7 agonists, sigma-1 antagonists, I2-R ligands, cholecystokinin antagonists, neuropeptide FF-R antagonists and toll-like receptor 4 antagonists.

  18. Provider and patient perspectives on opioids and alternative treatments for managing chronic pain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Lauren S; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; DeBar, Lynn L; Elder, Charles; Deyo, Richard A

    2017-03-24

    Current literature describes the limits and pitfalls of using opioid pharmacotherapy for chronic pain and the importance of identifying alternatives. The objective of this study was to identify the practical issues patients and providers face when accessing alternatives to opioids, and how multiple parties view these issues. Qualitative data were gathered to evaluate the outcomes of acupuncture and chiropractic (A/C) services for chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) using structured interview guides among patients with CMP (n = 90) and primary care providers (PCPs) (n = 25) purposively sampled from a managed care health care system as well as from contracted community A/C providers (n = 14). Focus groups and interviews were conducted patients with CMP with varying histories of A/C use. Plan PCPs and contracted A/C providers took part in individual interviews. All participants were asked about their experiences managing chronic pain and experience with and/or attitudes about A/C treatment. Audio recordings were transcribed and thematically coded. A summarized version of the focus group/interview guides is included in the Additional file 1. We identified four themes around opioid use: (1) attitudes toward use of opioids to manage chronic pain; (2) the limited alternative options for chronic pain management; (3) the potential of A/C care as a tool to help manage pain; and (4) the complex system around chronic pain management. Despite widespread dissatisfaction with opioid medications for pain management, many practical barriers challenged access to other options. Most of the participants' perceived A/C care as helpful for short term pain relief. We identified that problems with timing, expectations, and plan coverage limited A/C care potential for pain relief treatment. These results suggest that education about realistic expectations for chronic pain management and therapy options, as well as making A/C care more easily accessible, might lead to more

  19. State-Targeted Funding and Technical Assistance to Increase Access to Medication Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Amanda J; Andrews, Christina M; Grogan, Colleen M; Pollack, Harold A; D'Aunno, Thomas; Humphreys, Keith; Friedmann, Peter D

    2018-04-01

    As the United States grapples with an opioid epidemic, expanding access to effective treatment for opioid use disorder is a major public health priority. Identifying effective policy tools that can be used to expand access to care is critically important. This article examines the relationship between state-targeted funding and technical assistance and adoption of three medications for treating opioid use disorder: oral naltrexone, injectable naltrexone, and buprenorphine. This study draws from the 2013-2014 wave of the National Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey, a nationally representative, longitudinal study of substance use disorder treatment programs. The sample includes data from 695 treatment programs (85.5% response rate) and representatives from single-state agencies in 49 states and Washington, D.C. (98% response rate). Logistic regression was used to examine the relationships of single-state agency targeted funding and technical assistance to availability of opioid use disorder medications among treatment programs. State-targeted funding was associated with increased program-level adoption of oral naltrexone (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=3.14, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.49-6.60, p=.004) and buprenorphine (AOR=2.47, 95% CI=1.31-4.67, p=.006). Buprenorphine adoption was also correlated with state technical assistance to support medication provision (AOR=1.18, 95% CI=1.00-1.39, p=.049). State-targeted funding for medications may be a viable policy lever for increasing access to opioid use disorder medications. Given the historically low rates of opioid use disorder medication adoption in treatment programs, single-state agency targeted funding is a potentially important tool to reduce mortality and morbidity associated with opioid disorders and misuse.

  20. Is there a role for opioids in the treatment of fibromyalgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey O; Guymer, Emma K; Ngian, Gene-Siew

    2016-05-01

    The use of opioids for chronic pain has increased significantly due to a combination of the high patient burden of pain and the more widespread availability of a range of long-acting opioid preparations. This increased opioid use has translated into the care of many patients with fibromyalgia. The pain mechanism in fibromyalgia is complex but does not seem to involve disturbance of opioid analgesic functions. Hence, there is general concern about the harms in the absence of benefits of opioids in this setting. There is no evidence that pure opioids are effective in fibromyalgia but there is some evidence that opioids with additional actions on the norepinephrine-related pain modulatory pathways, such as tramadol, can be clinically useful in some patients. Novel actions of low-dose opioid antagonists may lead to better understanding of the role of opioid function in fibromyalgia.

  1. Factors associated with contingency management adoption among opioid treatment providers receiving a comprehensive implementation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Sara J; Kelly, Lourah M; Kang, Augustine W; Escobar, Katherine I; Squires, Daniel D

    2018-03-29

    Contingency management (CM) is an evidence-based behavioral intervention for opioid use disorders (OUDs); however, CM adoption in OUD treatment centers remains low due to barriers at patient, provider, and organizational levels. In a recent trial, OUD treatment providers who received the Science to Service Laboratory (SSL), a multilevel implementation strategy developed by a federally funded addiction training center, had significantly greater odds of CM adoption than providers who received training as usual. This study examined whether CM adoption frequency varied as a function of provider sociodemographic characteristics (i.e., age, race/ethnicity, licensure) and perceived barriers to adoption (i.e., patient-, provider-, organization-level) among providers receiving the SSL in an opioid treatment program. Thirty-nine providers (67% female, 77% non-Hispanic white, 72% with specialty licensure, M age = 42 [SD = 11.46]) received the SSL, which consisted of didactic training, performance feedback, specialized training of internal change champions, and external coaching. Providers completed a comprehensive baseline assessment and reported on their adoption of CM biweekly for 52 weeks. Providers reported using CM an average of nine 2-week intervals (SD = 6.35). Hierarchical multiple regression found that providers identifying as younger, non-Hispanic white, and without addiction-related licensure all had higher levels of CM adoption frequency. Higher perceived patient-level barriers predicted lower levels of CM adoption frequency, whereas provider- and organization-level barriers were not significant predictors. The significant effect of age on CM adoption frequency was consistent with prior research on predictors of evidence-based practice adoption, whereas the effect of licensure was counter to prior research. The finding that CM adoption frequency was lower among racially/ethnically diverse providers was not expected and suggests that the SSL may require adaptation

  2. Inhibition of GABAergic Neurotransmission by HIV-1 Tat and Opioid Treatment in the Striatum Involves ?-Opioid Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Changqing; Fitting, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Due to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is considered a chronic disease with high prevalence of mild forms of neurocognitive impairments, also referred to as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although opiate drug use can exacerbate HIV-1 Tat-induced neuronal damage, it remains unknown how and to what extent opioids interact with Tat on the GABAergic system. We conducted whole-cell recordings in mouse striatal slices and examined...

  3. Clinically significant drug–drug interactions involving opioid analgesics used for pain treatment in patients with cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotlinska-Lemieszek A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aleksandra Kotlinska-Lemieszek,1 Pål Klepstad,2,3,6 Dagny Faksvåg Haugen2,4,5 1Palliative Medicine Chair and Department, University Hospital of the Lord’s Transfiguration, Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland; 2European Palliative Care Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,Trondheim, Norway; 3Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; 4Regional Centre of Excellence for Palliative Care, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; 5Department of Clinical Medicine K1, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 6Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Background: Opioids are the most frequently used drugs to treat pain in cancer patients. In some patients, however, opioids can cause adverse effects and drug–drug interactions. No advice concerning the combination of opioids and other drugs is given in the current European guidelines. Objective: To identify studies that report clinically significant drug–drug interactions involving opioids used for pain treatment in adult cancer patients. Design and data sources: Systematic review with searches in Embase, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the start of the databases (Embase from 1980 through January 2014. In addition, reference lists of relevant full-text papers were hand-searched. Results: Of 901 retrieved papers, 112 were considered as potentially eligible. After full-text reading, 17 were included in the final analysis, together with 15 papers identified through hand-searching of reference lists. All of the 32 included publications were case reports or case series. Clinical manifestations of drug–drug interactions involving opioids were grouped as follows: 1 sedation and respiratory depression, 2 other central nervous system symptoms, 3 impairment of pain

  4. Choice between delayed food and immediate opioids in rats: treatment effects and individual differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panlilio, Leigh V; Secci, Maria E; Schindler, Charles W; Bradberry, Charles W

    2017-11-01

    Addiction involves maladaptive choice behavior in which immediate drug effects are valued more than delayed nondrug rewards. To model this behavior and extend our earlier work with the prescription opioid oxycodone, we allowed rats to choose between immediate intravenous delivery of the short-acting opioid remifentanil and delayed delivery of highly palatable food pellets. Treatment drugs were tested on a baseline where remifentanil was preferred over food. Treatment with a high dose of the opioid antagonist naltrexone decreased but did not reverse the preference for remifentanil. Treatment with the serotonin 5-HT 2C agonist lorcaserin decreased remifentanil and food self-administration nonselectively. Across conditions in which the alternative to delayed food was either a moderate dose of oxycodone, a moderate or high dose of remifentanil, a smaller more immediate delivery of food, or timeout with no primary reinforcement, choice was determined by both the length of the delay and the nature of the alternative option. Delayed food was discounted most steeply when the alternative was a high dose of remifentanil, which was preferred over food when food was delayed by 30 s or more. Within-subject comparisons showed no evidence for trait-like impulsivity or sensitivity to delay across these conditions. Choice was determined more by the current contingencies of reinforcement than by innate individual differences. This finding suggests that people might develop steep delay-discounting functions because of the contingencies in their environment, and it supports the use of contingency management to enhance the relative value of delayed nondrug reinforcers.

  5. Opioid treatment and hypoalbuminemia are associated with increased hospitalisation rates in chronic pancreatitis outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Søren S; Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Broberg, Marie C H; Madzak, Adnan; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a complex and debilitating disease with high resource utilisation. Prospective data on hospital admission rates and associated risk factors are scarce. We investigated hospitalisation rates, causes of hospitalisations and associated risk factors in CP outpatients. This was a prospective cohort study comprising 170 patients with CP. The primary outcome was time to first pancreatitis related hospitalisation and secondary outcomes were the annual hospitalisation frequency (hospitalisation burden) and causes of hospitalisations. A number of clinical and demographic parameters, including pain pattern and severity, opioid use and parameters related to the nutritional state, were analysed for their association with hospitalisation rates. Of the 170 patients, 57 (33.5%) were hospitalised during the follow-up period (median 11.4 months [IQR 3.8-26.4]). The cumulative hospitalisation incidence was 7.6% (95% CI; 4.5-12.2) after 30 days and 28.8% (95% CI; 22.2-35.7) after 1 year. Eighteen of the hospitalised patients (32%) had three or more admissions per year. High dose opioid treatment (>100 mg per day) (Hazard Ratio 3.1 [95% CI; 1.1-8.5]; P = 0.03) and hypoalbuminemia (risk factors for hospitalisation. The most frequent causes of hospitalisations were pain exacerbation (40%) and common bile duct stenosis (28%). One-third of CP outpatients account for the majority of hospital admissions and associated risk factors are high dose opioid treatment and hypoalbuminemia. This information should be implemented in outpatient monitoring strategies to identify risk patients and improve treatment. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Healthcare utilization in adults with opioid dependence receiving extended release naltrexone compared to treatment as usual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, William E; Wilson, Donna; Rathlev, Niels; Lee, Joshua D; Gordon, Michael; Nunes, Edward V; O'Brien, Charles P; Friedmann, Peter D

    2018-02-01

    Opioid use disorders have reached epidemic proportions, with overdose now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. Extended release naltrexone (XR-NTX) has emerged as a medication treatment that reduces opioid use and craving. However, the effect of XR-NTX therapy on acute healthcare utilization, including emergency department visits and inpatient hospitalizations, remains uncertain. The objective of the current study is to evaluate hospital-based healthcare resource utilization in adults involved in the criminal justice system with a history of opioid use disorder randomized to XR-NTX therapy compared with treatment as usual (TAU) during a 6-month treatment phase and 12months post-treatment follow up. This retrospective exploratory analysis uses data collected in a published randomized trial. Comparisons of the number of emergency department visits and hospital admissions (for drug detox, psychiatric care and other medical reasons) were performed using chi square tests for any admission and negative binomial models for number of admissions. Of the 308 participants randomized, 96% had utilization data (76% complete 6months, 67% complete follow up). No significant differences were seen in overall healthcare utilization (IRR=0.88, 95%CI 0.63-1.23, p=0.45), or substance use-related drug detox hospitalizations (IRR=0.83, 95%CI 0.32-2.16, p=0.71). Despite having more participants report chronic medical problems at baseline (43% vs. 32%, p=0.05), those receiving XR-NTX generally experienced equivalent or lower rates of healthcare utilization compared to TAU. The XR-NTX group had significantly lower medical/surgical related hospital admissions (IRR=0.55, 95%CI 0.30-1.00, p=0.05) during the course of the entire study. XR-NTX did not significantly increase rates of healthcare utilization compared to TAU. Provider concerns regarding healthcare utilization should not preclude the consideration of XR-NTX as therapy for opioid use disorders. Copyright © 2018

  7. Radioreceptor opioid assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.J.; Chang, K.-J.

    1981-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay is described for assaying opioid drugs in biological fluids. The method enables the assay of total opioid activity, being specific for opioids as a class but lacking specificity within the class. A radio-iodinated opioid and the liquid test sample are incubated with an opiate receptor material. The percentage inhibition of the binding of the radio-iodinated compound to the opiate receptor is calculated and the opioid activity of the test liquid determined from a standard curve. Examples of preparing radio-iodinated opioids and assaying opioid activity are given. A test kit for the assay is described. Compared to other methods, this assay is cheap, easy and rapid. (U.K.)

  8. Opioid analgesics and heroin: Examining drug misuse trends among a sample of drug treatment clients in Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Grant A; Walker, Robert; Cole, Jennifer; Logan, T K

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to mitigate Kentucky's prescription drug misuse, legislative intervention efforts were introduced in 2012 and 2013 to better regulate pain clinics, prescribed use of opioid analgesics, and to expand the monitoring of opioid prescriptions. The focus of this paper is primarily on opioid analgesics and heroin and the relationship of use/misuse patterns of these drugs to state drug policy initiatives. A secondary data analysis of drug treatment clients (N=52,360) was conducted to project illicit drug use trends in Kentucky. This study describes temporal and geographic trends of self-reported illicit drug use among individuals in state-funded treatment in Kentucky between fiscal year 2010 and fiscal year 2013. Significant reductions in the prevalence of illicit opioid use, declined from fiscal year 2010 to fiscal year 2013 (p<.01, CI=-.298 to -.215). However, heroin use rates significantly increased over the years studied, suggesting there may be a transition from prescription opioids to heroin (p<.01, CI=.143 to .178). The analysis suggests these trends may continue. Findings suggest Kentucky's legislative efforts were effective in reducing illicit prescription opioid use, but heroin use has increased. One possible explanation for this relationship is that as prescription opioids became more difficult to obtain, users turned to heroin as a substitute. The finding of rising heroin use suggests a need for further policy initiatives to reduce heroin use, but the potential effectiveness of this policy remains unclear. Understanding trends may help to guide future policy efforts and pain management treatment strategies to where they might have their greatest impact. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Opioid Painkiller Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mental Health Services Administration Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction: Facts for Families and Friends Opioid Overdose Prevention ... Abuse Drugs, Brains, and Behavior: The Science of Addiction Opioid and Pain Management CMEs/CEs Prescription Drugs U.S. ...

  10. Induction of synaptic long-term potentiation after opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drdla, Ruth; Gassner, Matthias; Gingl, Ewald; Sandkühler, Jürgen

    2009-07-10

    mu-Opioid receptor (MOR) agonists represent the gold standard for the treatment of severe pain but may paradoxically also enhance pain sensitivity, that is, lead to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). We show that abrupt withdrawal from MOR agonists induces long-term potentiation (LTP) at the first synapse in pain pathways. Induction of opioid withdrawal LTP requires postsynaptic activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and a rise of postsynaptic calcium concentrations. In contrast, the acute depression by opioids is induced presynaptically at these synapses. Withdrawal LTP can be prevented by tapered withdrawal and shares pharmacology and signal transduction pathways with OIH. These findings provide a previously unrecognized target to selectively combat pro-nociceptive effects of opioids without compromising opioid analgesia.

  11. Treatment of opioid overdose in a physician-based prehospital EMS: frequency and long-term prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina Skafte; Nielsen, Søren Louman; Siersma, Volkert Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Prehospital treatment of opioid overdose accounts for a significant proportion of the workload of the emergency system in most major cities. Treatment consists of basic life support and administering naloxone. In our physician-manned mobile emergency care unit (MECU), most patients are released...

  12. Opioid dependence - management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Matthew

    2010-08-01

    Addiction to opioids, or opioid dependence, encompasses the biopsychosocial dysfunction seen in illicit heroin injectors, as well as aberrant behaviours in patients prescribed opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. To outline the management of opioid dependence using opioid pharmacotherapy as part of a comprehensive chronic illness management strategy. The same principles and skills general practitioners employ in chronic illness management underpin the care of patients with opioid dependence. Opioid pharmacotherapy, with the substitution medications methadone and buprenorphine, is an effective management of opioid dependence. Training and regulatory requirements for prescribing opioid pharmacotherapies vary between jurisdictions, but this treatment should be within the scope of most Australian GPs.

  13. Opioid Addiction: Social Problems Associated and Implications of Both Current and Possible Future Treatments, including Polymeric Therapeutics for Giving Up the Habit of Opioid Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benéitez, M Cristina; Gil-Alegre, M Esther

    2017-01-01

    Detoxification programmes seek to implement the most secure and compassionate ways of withdrawing from opiates so that the inevitable withdrawal symptoms and other complications are minimized. Once detoxification has been achieved, the next stage is to enable the patient to overcome his or her drug addiction by ensuring consumption is permanently and completely abandoned, only after which can the subject be regarded as fully recovered. A systematic search on the common databases of relevant papers published until 2016 inclusive. Our study of the available oral treatments for opioid dependence has revealed that no current treatment can actually claim to be fully effective. These treatments require daily oral administration and, consequently, regular visits to dispensaries, which in most cases results in a lack of patient compliance, which causes fluctuations in drug plasma levels. We then reviewed alternative treatments in the available scientific literature on polymeric sustained release formulations. Research has been done not only on release systems for detoxification but also on release systems for giving up the habit of taking opioids. These efforts have obtained the recent authorization of polymeric systems for use in patients that could help them to reduce their craving for drugs.

  14. Opioid Addiction: Social Problems Associated and Implications of Both Current and Possible Future Treatments, including Polymeric Therapeutics for Giving Up the Habit of Opioid Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Benéitez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Detoxification programmes seek to implement the most secure and compassionate ways of withdrawing from opiates so that the inevitable withdrawal symptoms and other complications are minimized. Once detoxification has been achieved, the next stage is to enable the patient to overcome his or her drug addiction by ensuring consumption is permanently and completely abandoned, only after which can the subject be regarded as fully recovered. Methods. A systematic search on the common databases of relevant papers published until 2016 inclusive. Results and Conclusion. Our study of the available oral treatments for opioid dependence has revealed that no current treatment can actually claim to be fully effective. These treatments require daily oral administration and, consequently, regular visits to dispensaries, which in most cases results in a lack of patient compliance, which causes fluctuations in drug plasma levels. We then reviewed alternative treatments in the available scientific literature on polymeric sustained release formulations. Research has been done not only on release systems for detoxification but also on release systems for giving up the habit of taking opioids. These efforts have obtained the recent authorization of polymeric systems for use in patients that could help them to reduce their craving for drugs.

  15. Understanding the etiology of prescription opioid abuse: implications for prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigg, Khary K; Murphy, John W

    2013-07-01

    Although studies on the initiation of substance abuse abound, the body of literature on prescription opioid abuse (POA) etiology is small. Little is known about why and how the onset of POA occurs, especially among high-risk populations. In this study we aimed to fill this important knowledge gap by exploring the POA initiation experiences of 90 prescription opioid abusers currently in treatment and their narrative accounts of the circumstances surrounding their POA onset. This research was conducted within a storyline framework, which operates on the premise that the path to drug abuse represents a biography or a process rather than a static condition. Audiotapes of in-depth interviews were transcribed, coded, and thematically analyzed. Analyses revealed the presence of four trajectories leading to POA. This study adds to the limited research on POA etiology by not only illuminating the psychosocial factors that contribute to POA onset, but also by situating initiation experiences within broader life processes. The study findings provide crucial insights to policymakers and interventionists in identifying who is at risk for POA, and more important, when and how to intervene most efficaciously.

  16. Opioid intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... easily result in intoxication. The provider prescribes a sleep medicine (sedative) in addition to the opioid. The provider ... an opioid with certain other drugs, such as sleep medicines or alcohol Taking the opioid in ways not ...

  17. Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) as an agonist opioid treatment in Spain: a budgetary impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Raga, José; González Saiz, Francisco; Pascual, César; Casado, Miguel A; Sabater Torres, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the economic impact of buprenorphine/naloxone (B/N) as an agonist opioid treatment for opiate dependence. A budgetary impact analysis model was designed to calculate the annual costs (drugs and associated costs) to the Spanish National Healthcare System of methadone versus B/N. Data for the model were obtained from official databases and expert panel opinion. It was estimated that 86,017 patients would be in an agonist opioid treatment program each of the 3 years of the study. No increase in the number of patients is expected with the introduction of B/N combination. The budgetary impact (drugs and associated costs) for agonist opiate treatment in the first year of the study would be 89.53 million EUR. In the first year of B/N use, the budgetary impact would rise by 4.39 million EUR (4.6% of the total impact), with an incremental cost of 0.79 million EUR (0.9% of the total impact). The budgetary increase would be 0.6% (0.48 million EUR increase) and 0.6% (0.49 million EUR increase) in the second and third years of use, respectively. The mean cost per patient in the first year with and without B/N would be EUR 1,050 and 1,041, respectively. The most influential variables in the sensitivity analysis were logistics and production costs of methadone and the percentage use of B/N. With an additional cost of only EUR 9 per patient, B/N is an efficient addition to the therapeutic arsenal in the drug treatment of opiate dependence, particularly when considering clinical aspects of novel pharmacotherapy. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The impact of comorbid psychiatric disorders on methadone maintenance treatment in opioid use disorder: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosic T

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tea Rosic,1 Leen Naji,2 Monica Bawor,3 Brittany B Dennis,3 Carolyn Plater,4 David C Marsh,5 Lehana Thabane,6–8 Zainab Samaan6–11 1St Joseph’s Healthcare, 2Michael G DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 3St George’s University of London, London, UK; 4Canadian Addiction Treatment Centre, Richmond Hill, 5Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sudbury, 6Biostatistics Unit, Research Institute, St Joseph’s Healthcare, 7Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, 8Peter Boris Centre for Addictions Research, 9Mood Disorders Research Unit, St Joseph’s Healthcare, 10Population Genomics Program, Chanchlani Research Centre, 11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Objective: There is a significant interindividual variability in treatment outcomes in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT for opioid use disorder (OUD. This prospective cohort study examines the impact of comorbid psychiatric disorders on continued illicit opioid use in patients receiving MMT for OUD. Methods: Data were collected from 935 patients receiving MMT in outpatient clinics between June 2011 and June 2015. Using linear regression analysis, we evaluated the impact of having a comorbid psychiatric disorder on continued illicit opioid use during MMT, adjusting for important confounders. The main outcome measure was percentage of opioid-positive urine screens for 6 months. We conducted a subgroup analysis to determine the influence of specific comorbid psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders, on continued illicit opioid use. Results: Approximately 80% of participants had at least one comorbid psychiatric disorder in addition to OUD, and 42% of participants had a comorbid substance use disorder. There was no significant association between having a psychiatric comorbidity and continuing opioid use (P=0.248. Results from subgroup analysis

  19. Definition, diagnosis and treatment strategies for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction-Recommendations of the Nordic Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Asbjørn M; Munkholm, Pia; Simrén, Magnus; Breivik, Harald; Kongsgaard, Ulf E; Hatlebakk, Jan G; Agreus, Lars; Friedrichsen, Maria; Christrup, Lona L

    2016-04-01

    Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) is an increasing problem due to the common use of opioids for pain worldwide. It manifests with different symptoms, such as dry mouth, gastro-oesophageal reflux, vomiting, bloating, abdominal pain, anorexia, hard stools, constipation and incomplete evacuation. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is one of its many symptoms and probably the most prevalent. The current review describes the pathophysiology, clinical implications and treatment of OIBD. The Nordic Working Group was formed to provide input for Scandinavian specialists in multiple, relevant areas. Seven main topics with associated statements were defined. The working plan provided a structured format for systematic reviews and included instructions on how to evaluate the level of evidence according to the GRADE guidelines. The quality of evidence supporting the different statements was rated as high, moderate or low. At a second meeting, the group discussed and voted on each section with recommendations (weak and strong) for the statements. The literature review supported the fact that opioid receptors are expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract. When blocked by exogenous opioids, there are changes in motility, secretion and absorption of fluids, and sphincter function that are reflected in clinical symptoms. The group supported a recent consensus statement for OIC, which takes into account the change in bowel habits for at least one week rather than focusing on the frequency of bowel movements. Many patients with pain receive opioid therapy and concomitant constipation is associated with increased morbidity and utilization of healthcare resources. Opioid treatment for acute postoperative pain will prolong the postoperative ileus and should also be considered in this context. There are no available tools to assess OIBD, but many rating scales have been developed to assess constipation, and a few specifically address OIC. A clinical treatment strategy for OIBD

  20. A randomized pilot clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of Community Reinforcement and Family Training for Treatment Retention (CRAFT-T) for improving outcomes for patients completing opioid detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Gregory S; Slesnick, Natasha; Winhusen, Theresa M; Lewis, Daniel F; Guo, Xiamei; Somoza, Eugene

    2014-05-01

    Detoxification with psychosocial counseling remains a standard opioid-use disorder treatment practice but is associated with poor outcomes. This study tested the efficacy of a newly developed psychosocial intervention, Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training for Treatment Retention (CRAFT-T), relative to psychosocial treatment as usual (TAU), for improving treatment outcomes. A randomized, 14-week trial with follow-up visits at 6 and 9 months post-randomization conducted at two substance use disorder (SUD) treatment programs. Opioid-dependent adults (i.e., identified patient - IP) enrolled in a residential buprenorphine-detoxification program and their identified concerned significant other (CSO) was randomized to CRAFT-T (n=28 dyads) or TAU (n=24 dyads). CRAFT-T consisted of two sessions with the IP and CSO together and 10 with the CSO alone, over 14 weeks. TAU for the CSOs was primarily educational and referral to self-help. All IPs received treatment as usually provided by the SUD program in which they were enrolled. The primary outcome was time to first IP drop from treatment lasting 30 days or more. Opioid and other drug use were key secondary outcomes. CRAFT-T resulted in a moderate but non-significant effect on treatment retention (p=0.058, hazard ratio=0.57). When the CSO was parental family, CRAFT-T had a large and significant effect on treatment retention (pCRAFT-T had a significant positive effect on IP opioid and other drug use (pCRAFT-T is a promising treatment for opioid use disorder but replication is needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Membranes for use in the Transdermal Treatment of Nicotine Addiction and Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audra L. Stinchcomb

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal systems are attractive methods of drug administration specifically when treating patients for drug addiction. Current systems however are deficient in therapies that allow variable flux values of drug, such as nicotine for smoking cessation or complex dosing regimens using clonidine when treating opioid withdrawal symptoms. Through the use of functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT membranes, drug delivery to the skin can be controlled by applying a small electrical bias to create a programmable drug delivery system. Clearly, a transdermal patch system that can be tailored to an individual’s needs will increase patient compliance as well as provide much more efficient therapy. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the applicability of using carbon nanotube membranes in transdermal systems for treatment of drug abuse.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Membranes for use in the Transdermal Treatment of Nicotine Addiction and Opioid Withdrawal Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline L. Strasinger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transdermal systems are attractive methods of drug administration specifically when treating patients for drug addiction. Current systems however are deficient in therapies that allow variable flux values of drug, such as nicotine for smoking cessation or complex dosing regimens using clonidine when treating opioid withdrawal symptoms. Through the use of functionalized carbon nanotube (CNT membranes, drug delivery to the skin can be controlled by applying a small electrical bias to create a programmable drug delivery system. Clearly, a transdermal patch system that can be tailored to an individual's needs will increase patient compliance as well as provide much more efficient therapy. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the applicability of using carbon nanotube membranes in transdermal systems for treatment of drug abuse.

  3. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Non-Opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Knudsen, Anne-Sofie Due; Svendsen, Majken

    2015-01-01

    ), Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT), and Psychoeducational Therapy (PET)). RESULTS Our main objective was to evaluate the current evidence on the effect of CBT on abstinence and drug use reduction for young people in outpatient treatment for non-opioid drug use. Seven randomised trials, involving 953......, and PET ) with respect to reduction in young people’s drug use. The evidence drawn from this systematic review is based on seven included studies analysed in two separate analyses, depending on whether the intervention was CBT with an add-on component such as motivational interviewing (four studies......) or CBT without an add-on component (three studies). The seven studies are very different in terms of their findings regarding the effects of CBT interventions compared to other interventions (ACRA, CBOP (+ACC), DHPE, FFT, IT, MDFT, and PET ) on young people’s drug use. Therefore, the overall conclusion...

  4. Predictors of buprenorphine treatment success of opioid dependence in two Baltimore City grassroots recovery programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, April Joy; Mendelson, Tamar; Agus, Deborah

    2017-10-01

    Despite evidence for the efficacy of buprenorphine treatment in primary care, few studies have identified factors associated with treatment success, nor have such factors been evaluated in community settings. Identifying correlates of treatment success can facilitate the development of treatment models tailored for distinct populations, including low-income communities of color. The current study examined client-level socio-demographic factors associated with treatment success in community-based buprenorphine programs serving vulnerable populations. Data were abstracted from client records for participants (N=445) who met DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence and sought treatment at one of Behavioral Health Leadership Institute's two community-based recovery programs in Baltimore City from 2010 to 2015. Logistic regression estimated the odds ratios of treatment success (defined as retention in treatment for ≥90days) by sociodemographic predictors including age, race, gender, housing, legal issues and incarceration. The odds of being retained in treatment ≥90days increased with age (5% increase with each year of age; pfactors. Clients who reported unstable housing had a 41% decreased odds of remaining in treatment for 90 or more days compared to clients who lived independently at intake. Treatment success did not significantly differ by several other client-level characteristics including gender, race, employment, legal issues and incarceration. In vulnerable populations, the age factor appears sufficiently significant to justify creating models formulated for younger populations. The data also support attention to housing needs for people in treatment. Findings from this paper can inform future research and program development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Betty; Saxon, Andrew J.; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The “Medication-Assisted Therapy for Opioid Addiction” session was chaired by Dr. Betty Tai and had three presenters. The presenters (and their topics) were: Dr. Andrew J. Saxon (Methadone and Buprenorphine for Treatment of Opioid Addiction and HIV Risk Reduction), Dr. Walter Ling (Opioid Antagonist Treatment for Opioid Addiction), and Dr. Betty Tai (Chronic Care Model for Substance Use Disorder).

  6. Extended vs short-term buprenorphine-naloxone for treatment of opioid-addicted youth: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, George E; Poole, Sabrina A; Subramaniam, Geetha; Dugosh, Karen; Bogenschutz, Michael; Abbott, Patrick; Patkar, Ashwin; Publicker, Mark; McCain, Karen; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Forman, Robert; Vetter, Victoria; McNicholas, Laura; Blaine, Jack; Lynch, Kevin G; Fudala, Paul

    2008-11-05

    The usual treatment for opioid-addicted youth is detoxification and counseling. Extended medication-assisted therapy may be more helpful. To evaluate the efficacy of continuing buprenorphine-naloxone for 12 weeks vs detoxification for opioid-addicted youth. Clinical trial at 6 community programs from July 2003 to December 2006 including 152 patients aged 15 to 21 years who were randomized to 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone or a 14-day taper (detox). Patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to week 12; patients in the detox group were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to day 14. All were offered weekly individual and group counseling. Opioid-positive urine test result at weeks 4, 8, and 12. The number of patients younger than 18 years was too small to analyze separately, but overall, patients in the detox group had higher proportions of opioid-positive urine test results at weeks 4 and 8 but not at week 12 (chi(2)(2) = 4.93, P = .09). At week 4, 59 detox patients had positive results (61%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 47%-75%) vs 58 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (26%; 95% CI = 14%-38%). At week 8, 53 detox patients had positive results (54%; 95% CI = 38%-70%) vs 52 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (23%; 95% CI = 11%-35%). At week 12, 53 detox patients had positive results (51%; 95% CI = 35%-67%) vs 49 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (43%; 95% CI = 29%-57%). By week 12, 16 of 78 detox patients (20.5%) remained in treatment vs 52 of 74 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (70%; chi(2)(1) = 32.90, P < .001). During weeks 1 through 12, patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group reported less opioid use (chi(2)(1) = 18.45, P < .001), less injecting (chi(2)(1) = 6.00, P = .01), and less nonstudy addiction treatment (chi(2)(1) = 25.82, P < .001). High levels of opioid use occurred in both groups at follow-up. Four of 83 patients who tested

  7. Perceptions of Harm and Reasons for Misuse of Prescription Opioid Drugs and Reasons for Not Seeking Treatment for Physical or Emotional Pain Among a Sample of College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenne, Deric R; Hamilton, Kelsey; Birmingham, Lauren; Oglesby, Willie H; Fischbein, Rebecca L; Delahanty, Douglas L

    2017-01-02

    Since the early 1990s, the United States has seen a significant increase in the prevalence of prescription opioid misuse. Despite benefits prescription opioids provide, misuse can be fatal. The current study was designed to investigate the prevalence of prescription opioid misuse, perceived harm of misuse, and reasons for misuse for physical or emotional pain instead of seeking professional medical or mental health treatment. Survey data were collected in the fall of 2013 via an online survey to a random sample of 668 students from a public Midwestern university. Lifetime prevalence of prescription opioid misuse was 9.5%. Misusers of prescription opioid drugs generally reported lower ratings of perceived harm as compared to individuals not reporting misuse of prescription opioid drugs. Primary reasons for misuse of prescription opioid drugs was to relieve pain (33.9%), "to feel good/get high" (23.2%) and experimentation (21.4%). Lifetime misuse of a prescription opioid drug for physical or emotional pain was reported by 8.1% and 2.2% of respondents, respectively. Primary reasons for misuse for physical pain included because pain was temporary, immediate relief was needed, and no health insurance/financial resources. Primary reasons for misuse for emotional pain included not wanting others to find out, embarrassment and fear. Conclusions/Importance: Reasons for misuse of prescription opioid drugs vary by type of prescription opioid drug. Reasons for not seeking treatment that ultimately lead to misuse, vary by type of pain being treated and may be important considerations in the effort to stem the misuse of prescription opioid drugs among college students.

  8. Methadone for the treatment of Prescription Opioids Dependence. A retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Pablo; Ezzeldin, Mohamed; Bruguera, Pol; Pérez, Ana; Mansilla, Sara; Fàbrega, Marina; Lligoña, Anna; Mondón, Sílvia; Balcells, Mercè

    2016-06-14

    Prescription opioids (PO) addiction is increasing to an epidemic level. Few studies exist regarding its treatment. Although buprenorphine has been the mainstay so far, other treatment options might be considered, such as methadone. We conducted a retrospective assessment of all patients admitted to a psychiatry ward for PO detoxification using methadone between 2010 and 2013. The assessment and description was carried out during a 3-month follow-up period after their discharge. Although this is a retrospective chart review, our exploration included sociodemographic and treatment variables in addition to the abstinence rates for the whole sample. Eleven patients were included, mostly women (81.8%), with a median age of 50 years. The median duration of dependence was 8 years. Dependence on other substances and psychiatric comorbidities were high. Eight patients were monitored during three months. Of these, 7 (87.5%) were abstinent after that period. The results suggest that methadone deserves further exploration as a potentially efficacious treatment option for PO dependence.

  9. Prescription opioid use among addictions treatment patients: nonmedical use for pain relief vs. other forms of nonmedical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Amy S B; Eisenberg, Anna; Whiteside, Lauren; Price, Amanda; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Ilgen, Mark A

    2013-03-01

    Differences between those who engage in nonmedical prescription opioid use for reasons other than pain relief and those who engage in nonmedical use for reasons related to pain only are not well understood. Adults in a residential treatment program participated in a cross-sectional self-report survey. Participants reported whether they used opioids for reasons other than pain relief (e.g., help sleep, improve mood, or relieve stress). Within those with past-month nonmedical opioid use (n=238), logistic regression tested differences between those who reported use for reasons other than pain relief and those who did not. Nonmedical use of opioids for reasons other than pain relief was more common (66%) than nonmedical use for pain relief only (34%), and those who used for reasons other than pain relief were more likely to report heavy use (43% vs. 11%). Nonmedical use for reasons other than pain relief was associated with having a prior overdose (odds ratio [OR]=2.54, 95% CI: 1.36-4.74) and use of heroin (OR=4.08, 95% CI: 1.89-8.79), barbiturates (OR=6.44, 95% CI: 1.47, 28.11), and other sedatives (OR=5.80, 95% CI: 2.61, 12.87). Individuals who reported nonmedical use for reasons other than pain relief had greater depressive symptoms (13.1 vs. 10.5) and greater pain medication expectancies across all three domains (pleasure/social enhancement, pain reduction, negative experience reduction). Among patients in addictions treatment, individuals who report nonmedical use of prescription opioids for reasons other than pain relief represent an important clinical sub-group with greater substance use severity and poorer mental health functioning. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. High variability of TB, HIV, hepatitis C treatment and opioid substitution therapy among prisoners in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jana; Schmidt, Daniel; Kollan, Christian; Lehmann, Marc; Bremer, Viviane; Zimmermann, Ruth

    2017-10-25

    In Germany, medical care of prisoners is completely separated from extramural health care. The extent and quality of medical care among prisoners in Germany are therefore largely unknown. We performed a secondary data analysis of pharmacy sales data for tuberculosis (TB), HIV, hepatitis C (HCV) and opioid substitution treatment (OST) delivered to prisons in 11 federal states (FS) in Germany between 01/2012 and 03/2013. The aims of this study were to assess (i) the treatment availability for the selected diseases and OST in German prisons, (ii) the proportion of prisoners treated per FS and overall for TB, HIV, HCV and OST during the study period. Substances unique to or typically used for the treatment of each disease were defined as marker substances with defined daily doses (DDD). For each marker substance we assessed the cumulative number of DDD, the average daily number of DDD (DDD d ) and average treatment prevalence per day in percent (adTP). Accordingly, the DDD d represents one person treated per day and the adTP means the proportion of prisoners treated per day. We compared the adTP of the diseases with previously measured prevalences. We obtained data from pharmacies supplying prisons in 11 of 16 German FS. Of the included prisons, 41% were supplied with medicines for TB, 71% for HIV and 58% for HCV and OST. Twice as many delivered marker substances for TB were indicated for the continuation phase and chemoprevention than the intensive phase. The HIV adTP ranged from 0.06% to 0.94%, HCV adTP ranged from 0.03% to 0.59% and OST adTP ranged from 0% to 7.90%. The overall adTP for the respective treatment was 0.39% for HIV, 0.12% for HCV and 2.18% for OST. According to our findings treatment rates for TB were consistent with the expected TB prevalence, at least in Berlin. HIV treatment seems to be offered to an adequate proportion of estimated infected prisoners. In contrast, the HCV treatment prevalence was low. High variation among FS in provision of all

  11. Medications for addiction treatment: an opportunity for prescribing clinicians to facilitate remission from alcohol and opioid use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Woo; Friedmann, Peter D

    2014-10-01

    Substance use disorders are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Medications for the treatment of substance use disorders are effective yet underutilized. This article reviews recent literature examining medications used for the treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders. The neurobehavioral rationale for medication treatment and the most common ways medications work in the treatment of substance use disorders are discussed. Finally, the medications and the evidence behind their effectiveness are briefly reviewed. Physicians and other prescribing clinicians should take an active role in facilitating remission and recovery from substance use disorders by prescribing these effective medications with brief medical management counseling.

  12. Opioid antagonists with minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M

    2017-05-29

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of long-term substitution treatment. To assess the effects of opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal. Comparators were placebo as well as more established approaches to detoxification, such as tapered doses of methadone, adrenergic agonists, buprenorphine and symptomatic medications. We updated our searches of the following databases to December 2016: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Science. We also searched two trials registers and checked the reference lists of included studies for further references to relevant studies. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials along with prospective controlled cohort studies comparing opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation versus other approaches or different opioid antagonist regimens for withdrawal in opioid-dependent participants. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Ten studies (6 randomised controlled trials and 4 prospective cohort studies, involving 955 participants) met the inclusion criteria for the review. We considered 7 of the 10 studies to be at high risk of bias in at least one of the domains we assessed.Nine studies compared an opioid antagonist-adrenergic agonist combination versus a treatment regimen based primarily on an alpha 2 -adrenergic agonist (clonidine or lofexidine). Other comparisons (placebo, tapered doses of methadone, buprenorphine) made by included studies were too diverse for any meaningful analysis. This review therefore focuses on the nine studies comparing an opioid antagonist (naltrexone or naloxone) plus clonidine or lofexidine versus treatment primarily based on clonidine or lofexidine.Five studies took place in an inpatient setting, two studies were in outpatients with day care, two used day care only for the first day of opioid antagonist administration, and one study described the setting as outpatient

  13. Health service utilisation by people living with chronic non-cancer pain: findings from the Pain and Opioids IN Treatment (POINT) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Suzanne; Campbell, Gabrielle; Peacock, Amy; Smith, Kimberly; Bruno, Raimondo; Hall, Wayne; Cohen, Milton; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2016-11-01

    Objective The aims of the present study were to describe the use, and barriers to the use, of non-medication pain therapies and to identify the demographic and clinical correlates of different non-opioid pain treatments. Methods The study was performed on a cohort (n=1514) of people prescribed pharmaceutical opioids for chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP). Participants reported lifetime and past month use of healthcare services, mental and physical health, pain characteristics, current oral morphine equivalent daily doses and financial and access barriers to healthcare services. Results Participants reported the use of non-opioid pain treatments, both before and after commencing opioid therapy. Services accessed most in the past month were complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs; 41%), physiotherapy (16%) and medical and/or pain specialists (15%). Higher opioid dose was associated with increased financial and access barriers to non-opioid treatment. Multivariate analyses indicated being younger, female and having private health insurance were the factors most commonly associated with accessing non-opioid treatments. Conclusions Patients on long-term opioid therapy report using multiple types of pain treatments. High rates of CAM use are concerning given limited evidence of efficacy for some therapies and the low-income status of most people with CNCP. Financial and insurance barriers highlight the importance of considering how different types of treatments are paid for and subsidised. What is known about the topic? Given concerns regarding long-term efficacy, adverse side-effects and risk of misuse and dependence, prescribing guidelines recommend caution in prescribing pharmaceutical opioids in cases of CNCP, typically advising a multidisciplinary approach to treatment. There is a range of evidence supporting different (non-drug) treatment approaches for CNCP to reduce pain severity and increase functioning. However, little is known about the non-opioid treatments

  14. Use of opioid substitution therapies in the treatment of opioid use disorder: results of a UK cost-effectiveness modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, James; Yi, Yunni; Wright, Antony; Brown, Jim; Maria Madrigal, Ana; Dunlop, William C N

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) vs no opioid substitution therapy (OST) for the treatment of opioid use disorder, from the UK National Health Service (NHS)/personal social services (PSS) and societal perspectives over 1 year. Cost-effectiveness of OST vs no OST was evaluated by first replicating and then expanding an existing UK health technology assessment model. The expanded model included the impact of OST on infection rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Versus no OST, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for BMT and MMT were £13,923 and £14,206 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), respectively, from a NHS/PSS perspective. When total costs (NHS/PSS and societal) are considered, there are substantial savings associated with adopting OST; these savings are in excess of £14,032 for BMT vs no OST and £17,174 for MMT vs no OST over 1 year. This is primarily driven by a reduction in victim costs. OST treatment also impacted other aspects of criminality and healthcare resource use. The model's 1-year timeframe means long-term costs and benefits, and the influence of changes over time are not captured. OST can be considered cost-effective vs no OST from the UK NHS/PSS perspective, with a cost per QALY well below the UK's willingness-to-pay threshold. There were only small differences between BMT and MMT. The availability of two or more cost-effective options is beneficial to retaining patients in OST programs. From a societal perspective, OST is estimated to save over £14,032 and £17,174 per year for BMT and MMT vs no OST, respectively, due to savings in victim costs. Further work is required to fully quantify the clinical and health economic impacts of different OST formulations and their societal impact over the long-term.

  15. Pharmaceutical Formulation Facilities as Sources of Opioids and Other Pharmaceuticals to Wastewater Treatment Plant Effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Facilities involved in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products are an under-investigated source of pharmaceuticals to the environment. Between 2004 and 2009, 35 to 38 effluent samples were collected from each of three wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in New York and analyzed for seven pharmaceuticals including opioids and muscle relaxants. Two WWTPs (NY2 and NY3) receive substantial flows (>20% of plant flow) from pharmaceutical formulation facilities (PFF) and one (NY1) receives no PFF flow. Samples of effluents from 23 WWTPs across the United States were analyzed once for these pharmaceuticals as part of a national survey. Maximum pharmaceutical effluent concentrations for the national survey and NY1 effluent samples were generally effluent had median concentrations ranging from 3.4 to >400 μg/L. Maximum concentrations of oxycodone (1700 μg/L) and metaxalone (3800 μg/L) in samples from NY3 effluent exceeded 1000 μg/L. Three pharmaceuticals (butalbital, carisoprodol, and oxycodone) in samples of NY2 effluent had median concentrations ranging from 2 to 11 μg/L. These findings suggest that current manufacturing practices at these PFFs can result in pharmaceuticals concentrations from 10 to 1000 times higher than those typically found in WWTP effluents. PMID:20521847

  16. Methadone, commonly used as maintenance medication for outpatient treatment of opioid dependence, kills leukemia cells and overcomes chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Alt, Andreas; Miltner, Erich

    2008-08-01

    The therapeutic opioid drug methadone (d,l-methadone hydrochloride) is the most commonly used maintenance medication for outpatient treatment of opioid dependence. In our study, we found that methadone is also a potent inducer of cell death in leukemia cells and we clarified the unknown mechanism of methadone-induced cell killing in leukemia cells. Methadone inhibited proliferation in leukemia cells and induced cell death through apoptosis induction and activated apoptosis pathways through the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, down-regulation of Bcl-x(L) and X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, methadone induced cell death not only in anticancer drug-sensitive and apoptosis-sensitive leukemia cells but also in doxorubicin-resistant, multidrug-resistant, and apoptosis-resistant leukemia cells, which anticancer drugs commonly used in conventional therapies of leukemias failed to kill. Depending on caspase activation, methadone overcomes doxorubicin resistance, multidrug resistance, and apoptosis resistance in leukemia cells through activation of mitochondria. In contrast to leukemia cells, nonleukemic peripheral blood lymphocytes survived after methadone treatment. These findings show that methadone kills leukemia cells and breaks chemoresistance and apoptosis resistance. Our results suggest that methadone is a promising therapeutic approach not only for patients with opioid dependence but also for patients with leukemias and provide the foundation for new strategies using methadone as an additional anticancer drug in leukemia therapy, especially when conventional therapies are less effective.

  17. Large variation in measures used to assess outcomes of opioid dependence treatment: A systematic review of longitudinal observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiessing, Lucas; Ferri, Marica; Darke, Shane; Simon, Roland; Griffiths, Paul

    2017-10-02

    Treatment outcomes for drug users are critical for informing policy and therapeutic practice. The coherence of outcomes, changes and drug use measures from observational studies on opioid use treatment were reviewed. Systematic review of the literature for longitudinal observational studies, from 1980 through November 2015, in all languages, with data on treated opioid users, using Pubmed, the Cochrane Library and additional strategies (e.g. Pubmed function 'related citations' and checking reference lists of eligible studies). Twenty-seven studies were included (11 countries, 85 publications, recruitment 1962-2009). Baseline n was >65 686 and median follow-up 34.5 months (21 studies) or 51.4 person-months (10 studies). Eight outcome domains were identified: 'drug use' (21/27 studies), 'crime' (13), 'health' (13), 'treatment-related' outcomes (16), 'social functioning' (13), 'harms' (8), 'mortality' (13) and 'economic estimates' (2 studies). All studies using drug use outcomes included a binary (abstinence) category in at least one measure. Studies typically reported outcomes on less than half (on average 3.7 or 46%) of the eight outcome domains, while the average was 5.1 (64%) in seven studies initiated since 2000. Wide variation exists in outcome measures found in longitudinal observational studies of treatment of opioid users. This reduces replicability of studies and suggests a lack of common expectations on treatment success. Future studies should consider using all or most of eight outcome domains identified (excluding economic analyses if unfeasible), non-binary measures and amount/value of drugs used and consensus meetings with joint ownership of scientific, treatment and patient communities. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  18. Co-morbid pain and opioid addiction: long term effect of opioid maintenance on acute pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholtz, Amy; Gonzalez, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Medication assisted treatment for opioid dependence alters the pain experience. This study will evaluate changes pain sensitivity and tolerance with opioid treatments; and duration of this effect after treatment cessation. 120 Individuals with chronic pain were recruited in 4 groups (N = 30): 1-methadone for opioid addiction; 2-buprenorphine for opioid addiction; 3-history of opioid maintenance treatment for opioid addiction but with prolonged abstinence (M = 121 weeks; SD = 23.3); and 4-opioid naïve controls. Participants completed a psychological assessment and a cold water task including, time to first pain (sensitivity) and time to stopping the pain task (tolerance). Data analysis used survival analyses. A Kaplan-Meier-Cox survival analysis showed group differences for both pain sensitivity (log rank = 15.50; p opioid maintenance resulted in differing pain sensitivity compared to opioid naïve (p's opioid maintenance compared to active methadone patients (p opioid naïve control group participants (p's opioid abstinence increased (R = .37; p opioid maintenance, there appears to be long-term differences in pain sensitivity that do not resolve with discontinuation of opioid maintenance. Although pain sensitivity does not change, pain tolerance does improve after opioid maintenance cessation. Implications for treating co-morbid opioid addiction and pain (acute and chronic) are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Study of the Effectiveness of Olanzapine as a Maintenance Treatment in Opioid Dependents, a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azarekhsh Mokri

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this research, researchers want to study the effectiveness of Olanzapine on reduction of substance abuse relapse among people who are dependent to opioid material, merely. Method: A randomized clinical trial was designed. The population was opioid dependence subjects (only men that were diagnosed based on DSM-IV TR criteria, and referred to national center of addiction studies clinic. Detoxification was done by using of Clonidine, Clonazepam, Disiklomin, and NSAIDS within7 through 10 days. In second stage, the Patients who were referred to the clinic those men who had satisfied criterions selected. Demographic forms, testimonial certificate, Addiction Severity Index, Beck Depression Questionnaire, Zung Self report anxiety test administered among selected sample. Sample divided to two groups (placebo and Olanzapine the research last for 8 weeks. Results: the results showed that addiction severity reduced in both groups, but there was not significant difference in reduction of addiction severity between two groups. There was significant difference in depression and anxiety among mean scores of base line and follow up in both groups but there was not significant difference between two groups in follow up measures. Conclusion: Altogether, the results did not confirm the effectiveness of Olanzapine on maintenance treatment of opioid dependence.

  20. Kappa opioid receptor antagonism and chronic antidepressant treatment have beneficial activities on social interactions and grooming deficits during heroin abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanne, L; Ayranci, G; Filliol, D; Gavériaux-Ruff, C; Befort, K; Kieffer, B L; Lutz, P-E

    2017-07-01

    Addiction is a chronic brain disorder that progressively invades all aspects of personal life. Accordingly, addiction to opiates severely impairs interpersonal relationships, and the resulting social isolation strongly contributes to the severity and chronicity of the disease. Uncovering new therapeutic strategies that address this aspect of addiction is therefore of great clinical relevance. We recently established a mouse model of heroin addiction in which, following chronic heroin exposure, 'abstinent' mice progressively develop a strong and long-lasting social avoidance phenotype. Here, we explored and compared the efficacy of two pharmacological interventions in this mouse model. Because clinical studies indicate some efficacy of antidepressants on emotional dysfunction associated with addiction, we first used a chronic 4-week treatment with the serotonergic antidepressant fluoxetine, as a reference. In addition, considering prodepressant effects recently associated with kappa opioid receptor signaling, we also investigated the kappa opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine (norBNI). Finally, we assessed whether fluoxetine and norBNI could reverse abstinence-induced social avoidance after it has established. Altogether, our results show that two interspaced norBNI administrations are sufficient both to prevent and to reverse social impairment in heroin abstinent animals. Therefore, kappa opioid receptor antagonism may represent a useful approach to alleviate social dysfunction in addicted individuals. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Very early disengagement and subsequent re-engagement in primary care Office Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) with buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Weinstein, Zoe M; Cheng, Debbie M; Quinn, Emily; Kim, Hyunjoong; Labelle, Colleen; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2017-08-01

    Patients with opioid use disorder often require multiple treatment attempts before achieving stable recovery. Rates of disengagement from buprenorphine are highest in the first month of treatment and termination of buprenorphine therapy results in return to use rates as high as 90%. To better characterize these at-risk patients, this study aims to describe: 1) the frequency and characteristics of patients with very early disengagement (≤1month) from Office Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) with buprenorphine and 2) the frequency and characteristics of patients who re-engage in care at this same OBOT clinic within 2years, among the subset of very early disengagers. This is a retrospective cohort study of adult patients enrolled in a large urban OBOT program. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and the proportion of patients with very early (≤1month) disengagement and their re-engagement. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify patient characteristics associated with the outcomes of very early disengagement and re-engagement. Potential predictors included: sex, age, race/ethnicity, education, employment, opioid use history, prior substance use treatments, urine drug testing, and psychiatric diagnoses. Overall, very early disengagement was unusual, with only 8.4% (104/1234) of patients disengaging within the first month. Among the subset of very early disengagers with 2years of follow-up, the proportion who re-engaged with this OBOT program in the subsequent 2years was 11.9% (10/84). Urine drug test positive for opiates within the first month (AOR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.02-3.93) was associated with increased odds of very early disengagement. Transferring from another buprenorphine prescriber (AOR: 0.09, 95% CI: 0.01-0.70) was associated with decreased odds of very early disengagement. No characteristics were significantly associated with re-engagement. Early disengagement is uncommon; however, continued opioid use appeared to

  2. Examining the role of mu opioid receptor endocytosis in the beneficial and side-effects of prolonged opioid use: From a symposium on new concepts in mu-opioid pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Whistler, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid drugs remain the gold standard for the treatment of severe pain, both acute/post-surgical and chronic. However, the utility of opioid drugs for the treatment of chronic pain is compromised by the development of analgesic tolerance which, in turn, leads to dose-escalation and increased likelihood of dangerous side effects, including dependence. Consequently, there remains resistance among clinicians and the general population to using opiates for pain management because of risk of “addi...

  3. Training opioid addiction treatment providers to adopt contingency management: A prospective pilot trial of a comprehensive implementation science approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Sara J; Squires, Daniel D; Strong, David R; Barnett, Nancy P; Monti, Peter M; Petry, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    Few prospective studies have evaluated theory-driven approaches to the implementation of evidence-based opioid treatment. This study compared the effectiveness of an implementation model (Science to Service Laboratory; SSL) to training as usual (TAU) in promoting the adoption of contingency management across a multisite opioid addiction treatment program. We also examined whether the SSL affected putative mediators of contingency management adoption (perceived innovation characteristics and organizational readiness to change). Sixty treatment providers (39 SSL, 21 TAU) from 15 geographically diverse satellite clinics (7 SSL, 8 TAU) participated in the 12-month study. Both conditions received didactic contingency management training and those in the predetermined experimental region received 9 months of SSL-enhanced training. Contingency management adoption was monitored biweekly, whereas putative mediators were measured at baseline, 3 months, and 12 months. Relative to providers in the TAU region, treatment providers in the SSL region had comparable likelihood of contingency management adoption in the first 20 weeks of the study, and then significantly higher likelihood of adoption (odds ratios = 2.4-13.5) for the remainder of the study. SSL providers also reported higher levels of one perceived innovation characteristic (Observability) and one aspect of organizational readiness to change (Adequacy of Training Resources), although there was no evidence that the SSL affected these putative mediators over time. Results of this study indicate that a fully powered randomized trial of the SSL is warranted. Considerations for a future evaluation are discussed.

  4. Test of a workforce development intervention to expand opioid use disorder treatment pharmacotherapy prescribers: protocol for a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Molfenter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overdoses due to non-medical use of prescription opioids and other opiates have become the leading cause of accidental deaths in the USA. Buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone are key evidence-based pharmacotherapies available to addiction treatment providers to address opioid use disorder (OUD and prevent overdose deaths. Treatment organizations’ efforts to provide these pharmacotherapies have, however, been stymied by limited success in recruiting providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants to prescribe these medications. Historically, the addiction treatment field has not attracted physicians, and many barriers to implementing OUD pharmacotherapy exist, ranging from lack of confidence in treating OUD patients to concerns regarding reimbursement. Throughout the USA, the prevalence of OUD far exceeds the capacity of the OUD pharmacotherapy treatment system. Poor access to OUD pharmacotherapy prescribers has become a workforce development need for the addiction treatment field and a significant health issue. Methods This cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT is designed to increase buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone treatment capacity for OUD. The implementation intervention to be tested is a bundle of OUD pharmacotherapy capacity building practices called the Prescriber Recruitment Bundle (PRB, which was developed and piloted in a previous statewide buprenorphine implementation study. For this cluster RCT, organizational sites will be recruited and then randomized into one of two arms: (1 control, with treatment as usual and access to a website with PRB resources, or (2 intervention, with organizations implementing the PRB using the Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment organizational change model over a 24-month intervention period and a 10-month sustainability period. The primary treatment outcomes for each organizational site are self-reported monthly counts of

  5. Test of a workforce development intervention to expand opioid use disorder treatment pharmacotherapy prescribers: protocol for a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfenter, Todd; Knudsen, Hannah K; Brown, Randy; Jacobson, Nora; Horst, Julie; Van Etten, Mark; Kim, Jee-Seon; Haram, Eric; Collier, Elizabeth; Starr, Sanford; Toy, Alexander; Madden, Lynn

    2017-11-15

    Overdoses due to non-medical use of prescription opioids and other opiates have become the leading cause of accidental deaths in the USA. Buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone are key evidence-based pharmacotherapies available to addiction treatment providers to address opioid use disorder (OUD) and prevent overdose deaths. Treatment organizations' efforts to provide these pharmacotherapies have, however, been stymied by limited success in recruiting providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) to prescribe these medications. Historically, the addiction treatment field has not attracted physicians, and many barriers to implementing OUD pharmacotherapy exist, ranging from lack of confidence in treating OUD patients to concerns regarding reimbursement. Throughout the USA, the prevalence of OUD far exceeds the capacity of the OUD pharmacotherapy treatment system. Poor access to OUD pharmacotherapy prescribers has become a workforce development need for the addiction treatment field and a significant health issue. This cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) is designed to increase buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone treatment capacity for OUD. The implementation intervention to be tested is a bundle of OUD pharmacotherapy capacity building practices called the Prescriber Recruitment Bundle (PRB), which was developed and piloted in a previous statewide buprenorphine implementation study. For this cluster RCT, organizational sites will be recruited and then randomized into one of two arms: (1) control, with treatment as usual and access to a website with PRB resources, or (2) intervention, with organizations implementing the PRB using the Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment organizational change model over a 24-month intervention period and a 10-month sustainability period. The primary treatment outcomes for each organizational site are self-reported monthly counts of buprenorphine slots, extended

  6. Help, Resources and Information: National Opioids Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Search Help, Resources and Information National Opioids Crisis Search Search Need Help? Call the National Helpline ... HHS 5-POINT STRATEGY TO COMBAT THE OPIOIDS CRISIS BETTER ADDICTION PREVENTION, TREATMENT, AND RECOVERY SERVICES BETTER ...

  7. 24 CFR 35.1335 - Standard treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Lead-Paint Hazard Evaluation and Hazard Reduction Activities § 35.1335 Standard treatments. Standard..., such as metal coil stock, plastic, polyurethane, or linoleum. (c) Correcting dust-generating conditions... examination shall be performed in accordance with § 35.1340 at the conclusion of any lead hazard reduction...

  8. Relapse to opioid use in opioid-dependent individuals released from compulsory drug detention centres compared with those from voluntary methadone treatment centres in Malaysia: a two-arm, prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegman, Martin P; Altice, Frederick L; Kaur, Sangeeth; Rajandaran, Vanesa; Osornprasop, Sutayut; Wilson, David; Wilson, David P; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2017-02-01

    Detention of people who use drugs into compulsory drug detention centres (CDDCs) is common throughout East and Southeast Asia. Evidence-based pharmacological therapies for treating substance use disorders, such as opioid agonist treatments with methadone, are generally unavailable in these settings. We used a unique opportunity where CDDCs coexisted with voluntary drug treatment centres (VTCs) providing methadone in Malaysia to compare the timing and occurrence of opioid relapse (measured using urine drug testing) in individuals transitioning from CDDCs versus methadone maintenance in VTCs. We did a parallel, two-arm, prospective observational study of opioid-dependent individuals aged 18 years and older who were treated in Malaysia in the Klang Valley in two settings: CDDCs and VTCs. We used sequential sampling to recruit individuals. Assessed individuals in CDDCs were required to participate in services such as counselling sessions and manual labour. Assessed individuals in VTCs could voluntarily access many of the components available in CDDCs, in addition to methadone therapy. We undertook urinary drug tests and behavioural interviews to assess individuals at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-release. The primary outcome was time to opioid relapse post-release in the community confirmed by urinary drug testing in individuals who had undergone baseline interviewing and at least one urine drug test (our analytic sample). Relapse rates between the groups were compared using time-to-event methods. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02698098). Between July 17, 2012, and August 21, 2014, we screened 168 CDDC attendees and 113 VTC inpatients; of these, 89 from CDDCs and 95 from VTCs were included in our analytic sample. The baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. In unadjusted analyses, CDDC participants had significantly more rapid relapse to opioid use post-release compared with VTC participants (median time to relapse

  9. Diagnostic Performance of Self-Assessment for Constipation in Patients With Long-Term Opioid Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafelski, Sascha; Bellin, Felicitas; Denke, Claudia; Beutlhauser, Torsten; Fritzsche, Thomas; West, Christina; Schäfer, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Constipation is a prevalent comorbidity affecting ∼50% of patients with long-term opioid therapy. In clinical routine different diagnostic instruments are in use to identify patients under risk. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of an 11-item Likert scale for constipation used as a self-assessment in opioid-treated patients. This trial was conducted as a retrospective cohort study in Berlin, Germany. Patients with long-term opioid therapy treated in 2 university-affiliated outpatient pain facilities at the Charité hospital were included from January 2013 to August 2013. Constipation was rated in a self-assessment using a numeric rating scale from 0 to 10 (Con-NRS) and compared with results from a structured assessment based on ROME-III criteria. Altogether, 171 patients were included. Incidence of constipation was 49% of patients. The receiver-operating characteristic of Con-NRS achieved an area under the curve of 0.814 (AUC 95% confidence interval 0.748-0.880, P < 0.001). Con-NRS ≥ 1 achieved sensitivity and specificity of 79.7% and 77.2%, respectively. The positive predictive value and the negative predictive value were 70.3% and 81.6%, respectively. Overall diagnostic performance of a concise 11-item Likert scale for constipation was moderate. Although patients with long-term opioid therapy are familiar with numeric rating scales, a significant number of patients with constipation were not identified. The instrument may be additionally useful to facilitate individualized therapeutic decision making and to control therapeutic success when measured repetitively.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment for opioid-dependent youth: data from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Daniel; Glick, Henry A; Yang, Jianing; Subramaniam, Geetha A; Poole, Sabrina A; Woody, George E

    2010-09-01

    The objective is to estimate cost, net social cost and cost-effectiveness in a clinical trial of extended buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP) treatment versus brief detoxification treatment in opioid-dependent youth. Economic evaluation of a clinical trial conducted at six community out-patient treatment programs from July 2003 to December 2006, who were randomized to 12 weeks of BUP or a 14-day taper (DETOX). BUP patients were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to zero at the end of week 12. DETOX patients were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to zero on day 14. All were offered twice-weekly drug counseling. 152 patients aged 15-21 years. Data were collected prospectively during the 12-week treatment and at follow-up interviews at months 6, 9 and 12. The 12-week out-patient study treatment cost was $1514 (P DETOX. One-year total direct medical cost was only $83 higher for BUP (P = 0.97). The cost-effectiveness ratio of BUP relative to DETOX was $1376 in terms of 1-year direct medical cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and $25,049 in terms of out-patient treatment program cost per QALY. The acceptability curve suggests that the cost-effectiveness ratio of BUP relative to DETOX has an 86% chance of being accepted as cost-effective for a threshold of $100,000 per QALY. Extended BUP treatment relative to brief detoxification is cost effective in the US health-care system for the outpatient treatment of opioid-dependent youth.

  11. Targinact--opioid pain relief without constipation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Targinact (Napp Pharmaceuticals Ltd) is a modified-release combination product containing the strong opioid oxycodone plus the opioid antagonist naloxone. It is licensed for "severe pain, which can be adequately managed only with opioid analgesics".1 The summary of product characteristics (SPC) states that "naloxone is added to counteract opioid-induced constipation by blocking the action of oxycodone at opioid receptors locally in the gut". Advertising for the product claims "better pain relief", "superior GI [gastrointestinal] tolerability" and "improved quality of life" "compared to previous treatment in a clinical practice study (n=7836)". Here we consider whether Targinact offers advantages over using strong opioids plus laxatives where required.

  12. Changing patterns in opioid addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule, Beth; Brands, Bruna; Li, Selina; Catz-Biro, Laura

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate the clinical observation that the number of individuals seeking opioid detoxification from oxycodone was increasing at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto, Ont; and to identify the characteristics of individuals seeking opioid detoxification at CAMH. DESIGN Retrospective analysis of patient health records. SETTING Medical Withdrawal Management Service at CAMH. PARTICIPANTS All patients admitted for opioid detoxification between January 2000 and December 2004. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of opioid detoxification admissions each year; type, dose, and source of opioids; comorbid problems and symptoms. RESULTS There were 571 opioid detoxification admissions during the 5-year study period. The number of admissions increased steadily over the 5 years; in particular, the number of admissions related to controlled-release oxycodone increased substantially (3.8%, 8.3%, 20.8%, 30.6%, and 55.4% of the total opioid admissions in 2000 to 2004, respectively; χ42= 105.5, P < .001). The rates of admissions involving heroin remained low and stable. Use of controlled-release oxycodone was associated with considerably higher doses than use of other prescription opioids was. Physician prescriptions were the source of the prescription opioids for a large percentage of patients, particularly for older patients. Prescription opioid users reported considerable comorbid substance use problems, pain, and psychiatric symptoms. CONCLUSION This study has demonstrated a significant rise in the number of individuals seeking treatment at CAMH for controlled-release oxycodone addiction. The substantial comorbid pain, psychiatric symptoms, and other psychoactive substance use problems in these patients, coupled with the finding that prescriptions were an important source of opioids, highlight the clinical complexities encountered in the treatment of these individuals. Further research examining these complexities and the many possible

  13. Comparison of tincture of opium and methadone to control opioid withdrawal in a Thai treatment centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittiwutikarn, Jaroon; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M; Bochner, Felix; Somogyi, Andrew A; Foster, David J R

    2004-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of oral tincture of opium (TOP) and methadone to control opioid withdrawal in patients in northern Thailand. Methods Open label, parallel group study in an inpatient facility compared 15 former heroin users receiving methadone 5–20 mg 12 hourly with 15 former opium smokers receiving TOP (3.33–10 mg morphine equivalents 12 hourly). At 0, 1, 3 and 8 h, blood, withdrawal scores and subjective opioid effects were collected. Results There was a reciprocal association between withdrawal scores/direct subjective opioid effects and plasma (R)-methadone, but not plasma morphine, concentrations. Withdrawal scores at the time of dosing were higher in the TOP patients (9.1 ± 3) than in the methadone patients (4.5 ± 4.6) and in the TOP patients were significantly (P = 0.001) attenuated at 3 and 8 h. Conclusions At the doses used, TOP was inferior to methadone in suppressing withdrawal. It could prove to be a cost effective and valuable drug, but only after dose size and frequency are further investigated. PMID:15521902

  14. Prescription Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy in a primary care setting struggles with opioid addiction. 4,5,6 Once addicted, it can be ... of drug overdose deaths involving methadone and other opioid analgesics in West Virginia. Addiction 2009;104(9):1541-8. Dunn KM, Saunders ...

  15. Opioid Use in Fibromyalgia Is Associated with Negative Health Related Measures in a Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Fitzcharles

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As pain is the cardinal symptom of fibromyalgia (FM, strategies directed towards pain relief are an integral component of treatment. Opioid medications comprise a category of pharmacologic treatments which have impact on pain in various conditions with best evidence for acute pain relief. Although opioid therapy other than tramadol has never been formally tested for treatment of pain in FM, these agents are commonly used by patients. We have examined the effect of opioid treatments in patients diagnosed with FM and followed longitudinally in a multidisciplinary pain center over a period of 2 years. In this first study reporting on health related measures and opioid use in FM, opioid users had poorer symptoms and functional and occupational status compared to nonusers. Although opioid users may originally have had more severe symptoms at the onset of disease, we have no evidence that these agents improved status beyond standard care and may even have contributed to a less favourable outcome. Only a formal study of opioid use in FM will clarify this issue, but until then physicians must be vigilant regarding the multiple adverse consequences of opioid therapy.

  16. Ketamine as an Adjunct to Opioids for Acute Pain in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Karen J; McAllister, Kelly B; Ray, Meredith; Heitz, Corey

    2017-06-01

    This study had five objectives: 1) to measure and compare total opioid use and number of opioid doses in patients treated with opioids versus ketamine in conjunction with opioids; 2) to measure pain scores up to 2 hours after presentation in the ED patient with pain, comparing standard opioid pain control to ketamine in conjunction with opioids; 3) to compare patient satisfaction with pain control using opioids alone versus ketamine in conjunction with opioids; 4) to monitor and compare side effects in patients treated with opioids versus ketamine in conjunction with opioids; and 5) to identify effect variation between different subgroups of patients, with the purpose of focusing future research. We hypothesized that low-dose ketamine, compared to placebo, as an adjunctive treatment to opioids would result in better pain control over 2 hours and greater patient satisfaction with pain control; further, this protocol will result in a lower opioid dosage over 2 hours. This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial at a single academic emergency department evaluating the use of ketamine versus placebo in conjunction with opioids for moderate to severe pain. Subjects with a continued high level of pain after an initial dose of opioid analgesia were randomized to receive either 0.1 mg/kg ketamine or placebo prior to protocol-based dosing of additional opioid analgesia, if required. Over 120 minutes, subjects were assessed for pain level (0-10), satisfaction with pain control (0-4), side effects, sedation level, and need for additional pain medication. Total opioid dose, including the initial dose, was compared between groups. Sixty-three subjects were randomized to the placebo group and 53 to the ketamine group. No significant differences were found in demographics between the groups. Patients receiving ketamine reported lower pain scores over 120 minutes than patients receiving placebo (p = 0.015). Total opioid dose was lower in the ketamine group

  17. The association between nicotine dependence and physical health among people receiving injectable diacetylmorphine or hydromorphone for the treatment of chronic opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Palis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People with chronic opioid use disorder often present to treatment with individual and structural vulnerabilities and remain at risk of reporting adverse health outcomes. This risk is greatly compounded by tobacco smoking, which is highly prevalent among people with chronic opioid use disorder. Despite the known burden of tobacco smoking on health, the relationship between nicotine dependence and health has not been studied among those receiving injectable opioid agonist treatment. As such, the present study aims to explore the association between nicotine dependence and physical health among participants of the Study to Assess Longer-Term Opioid Medication Effectiveness (SALOME at baseline and six-months. Methods: SALOME was a double-blind phase III clinical trial testing the non-inferiority of injectable hydromorphone to injectable diacetylmorphine for chronic opioid use disorder. Participants reporting tobacco smoking were included in a linear regression analysis of physical health at baseline (before receiving treatment and at six-months. Results: At baseline, nicotine dependence score, lifetime history of emotional, physical, or sexual abuse and prior month safe injection site access were independently and significantly associated with physical health. At six-months nicotine dependence score was the only variable that maintained this significant and independent association with physical health. Conclusions: Findings indicate that after six-months, the injectable treatment effectively brought equity to patients' physical health status, yet the association with nicotine dependence remained. Findings could inform whether the provision of treatment for nicotine dependence should be made a priority in settings where injectable opioid agonist treatment is delivered to achieve improvements in overall physical health in this population.

  18. Psychiatric Co-Morbidities in Pregnant Women with Opioid Use Disorders: Prevalence, Impact, and Implications for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaudo, Camila L; Andraka-Christou, Barbara; Allgood, Kacy

    2017-01-01

    This review seeks to investigate three questions: What is the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric diagnoses among pregnant women with opioid use disorder (OUD)? How do comorbid psychiatric illnesses impact pregnant women with OUD? And how do comorbid psychiatric illnesses affect the ability of pregnant women with OUD to adhere to and complete OUD treatment? Based on this literature review, 25-33% of pregnant women with OUD have a psychiatric comorbidity, with depression and anxiety being especially common. However, of the 17 studies reviewed only 5 have prevalence rates of dual diagnosis in pregnant women with OUD as their primary outcome measures, their N's were typically small, methods for determining psychiatric diagnosis were variable, and many of the studies were undertaken with women presenting for treatment which carries with its implicit selection bias. Of the women enrolled in treatment programs for SUD, those with psychiatric comorbidity were more likely to have impaired psychological and family/social functioning than those without psychiatric comorbidity. Greater severity of comorbid psychiatric illness appears to predict poorer adherence to treatment, but more research is needed to clarify this relationship with the psychiatric illness is less severe. While cooccurrence of psychiatric disorders in pregnant women with opioid use disorder appears to be common, large population-based studies with validated diagnostic tools and longitudinal assessments are needed to obtain definitive rates and characteristics of cooccurring illnesses. Integrated prenatal, addiction, and psychiatric treatment in a setting that provides social support to pregnant patients with OUD is most effective in maintaining women in treatment. More research is still needed to identify optimal treatment settings, therapy modalities, and medication management for dually diagnosed pregnant women with OUD.

  19. Development of an integrated cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety and opioid use disorder: Study protocol and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, R Kathryn; Votaw, Victoria R; Barlow, David H; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Greenfield, Shelly F; Weiss, Roger D

    2017-09-01

    Opioid use disorder is a highly disabling psychiatric disorder, and is associated with both significant functional disruption and risk for negative health outcomes such as infectious disease and fatal overdose. Even among those who receive evidence-based pharmacotherapy for opioid use disorder, many drop out of treatment or relapse, highlighting the importance of novel treatment strategies for this population. Over 60% of those with opioid use disorder also meet diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder; however, efficacious treatments for this common co-occurrence have not be established. This manuscript describes the rationale and methods for a behavioral treatment development study designed to develop and test an integrated cognitive-behavioral therapy for those with co-occurring opioid use disorder and anxiety disorders. The aims of the study are (1) to develop and pilot test a new manualized cognitive behavioral therapy for co-occurring opioid use disorder and anxiety disorders, (2) to test the efficacy of this treatment relative to an active comparison treatment that targets opioid use disorder alone, and (3) to investigate the role of stress reactivity in both prognosis and recovery from opioid use disorder and anxiety disorders. Our overarching aim is to investigate whether this new treatment improves both anxiety and opioid use disorder outcomes relative to standard treatment. Identifying optimal treatment strategies for this population are needed to improve outcomes among those with this highly disabling and life-threatening disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A placebo-controlled trial of dextromethorphan as an adjunct in opioid-dependent patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I Hui; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-02-25

    Low-dose dextromethorphan (DM) might have anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic effects mechanistically remote from an NMDA receptor. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled 12 week study, we investigated whether add-on dextromethorphan reduced cytokine levels and benefitted opioid-dependent patients undergoing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT). Patients were randomly assigned to a group: DM60 (60mg/day dextromethorphan; n = 65), DM120 (120mg/day dextromethorphan; n = 65), or placebo (n = 66). Primary outcomes were the methadone dose required, plasma morphine level, and retention in treatment. Plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor-β1, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were examined during weeks 0, 1, 4, 8, and 12. Multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used to examine the therapeutic effect. After 12 weeks, the DM60 group had significantly longer treatment retention and lower plasma morphine levels than did the placebo group. Plasma TNF-α was significantly decreased in the DM60 group compared to the placebo group. However, changes in plasma cytokine levels, BDNF levels, and the methadone dose required in the three groups were not significantly different. We provide evidence-decreased concomitant heroin use-of low-dose add-on DM's efficacy for treating opioid-dependent patients undergoing MMT. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  1. Challenges to implementing opioid substitution therapy in Ukrainian prisons: Personnel attitudes toward addiction, treatment, and people with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonsky, Maxim; Azbel, Lyuba; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Taxman, Faye S; Grishaev, Evgeny; Dvoryak, Sergey; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-03-01

    Ukraine is experiencing one of the most volatile HIV epidemics globally, fueled primarily by people who inject drugs (PWIDs), and a parallel incarceration epidemic. Opioid substitution therapy (OST) is internationally recognized as one of the most effective forms of treatment for opioid dependence and is among the most effective HIV prevention strategies available, yet efforts to adopt it in Ukraine's Criminal Justice System (CJS) have been thwarted. To understand the reluctance of the Ukrainian CJS to adopt OST despite the overwhelming evidence pointing to its health benefits and improved criminal justice outcomes, we conducted the first survey of Ukrainian prison administrative, medical and custodial staff (N=243) attitudes towards addiction in general, OST, and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in representative regions of Ukraine. Results revealed that Ukrainian CJS workers' attitudes toward OST, PLWHA, and drug addiction were universally negative, but differed substantially along geographic and occupational lines. Whereas geographic and cultural proximity to the European Union drove positive attitudes in the west, in the southern region we observed an identifiability effect, as workers who worked directly with prisoners held the most positive attitudes. We also found that knowledge mediated the effect of drug intolerance on OST attitudes. In Ukraine, adoption of OST is more influenced by myths, biases and ideological prejudices than by existing scientific evidence. By elucidating existing attitudes among CJS personnel, this study will help to direct subsequent interventions to address the barriers to implementing evidence-based HIV prevention treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determinants of successful chronic hepatitis C case finding among patients receiving opioid maintenance treatment in a primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Oliver; Seidenberg, André; Rosemann, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Injection drug users are at high risk for chronic hepatitis C virus infection (CHC). Opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) offers a unique opportunity to screen for CHC. This study proposed the hypothesis that a general practitioner (GP) with special interest in addiction medicine can achieve CHC screening rates comparable to specialized centres and aimed to investigate determinants for a successful CHC case finding in a primary care setting. Retrospective medical record analysis of 387 patients who received opioid maintenance therapy between 1 January 2002 and 31 May 2008 in a general practice in Zurich, Switzerland. Successful CHC assessment was defined as performance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) serology with consecutive polymerase chain reaction-based RNA and genotype recordings. The association between screening success and patient characteristics was assessed using multiple logistic regression. findings: Median (interquartile range) age and duration of OMT of the 387 (268 males) patients was 38.5 (33.6-44.5) years and 34 (11.3-68.0) months, respectively. Fourteen patients (3.6%) denied HCV testing and informed consent about screening was missing in 13 patients (3.4%). In 327 of 360 patients (90.8%) with informed consent a successful CHC assessment has been performed. Screening for HCV antibodies was positive in 136 cases (41.6%) and in 86 of them (63.2%) a CHC was present. The duration of OMT was an independent determinant of a successful CHC assessment. In addicted patients a high CHC assessment rate in a primary care setting in Switzerland is feasible and opioid substitution provides an optimal framework.

  3. A multicenter, primary-care-based, open-label study to assess the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules using a standardized conversion guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Pixton, Glenn C; Berke, Robert; Calkins, Anne; Goli, Veeraindar

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the conversion of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to extended-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (MSN) using a standardized conversion guide. This open-label, single-arm study was conducted in 157 primary care centers in the United States. A total of 684 opioid-experienced adults with chronic moderate-to-severe pain were converted to oral administration of MSN from transdermal fentanyl and oral formulations of hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and other morphine products using a standardized conversion guide. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a stable MSN dose within a 6-week titration phase. Secondary endpoints included duration of time to stable dose, number of titration steps, safety and efficacy measures, and investigator assessment of conversion guide utility. Of the 684 patients, 51.3% were converted to a stable dose of MSN (95% confidence interval: 47.5%, 55.1%). The mean (standard deviation) number of days to stable dose was 20 (8.94), and number of titration steps to stable dose was 2.4 (1.37). The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate and consistent with opioid therapy. Mean pain scores at stable dose decreased from baseline. Investigators were generally satisfied with the conversion guide and, in 94% of cases, reported they would use it again. Conversion to MSN treatment using the standardized MSN conversion guide was an attainable goal in approximately half of the population of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain. Investigators found the guide to be a useful tool to assist conversion of opioid-experienced patients to MSN.

  4. Effectiveness of social work intervention with a systematic approach to improve general health in opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheb G

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ghoncheh Raheb,1,2 Esmat Khaleghi,1 Amir Moghanibashi-Mansourieh,1 Ali Farhoudian,2 Robab Teymouri3 1Department of Social Work, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Substance Abuse and Dependence Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran Purpose: This study takes a systematic approach to investigate the effect of social work intervention aimed at increasing general health among opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers. Patients and methods: This is an experimental plan (pretest to posttest with a control group; the study sample included 60 patients with drug dependencies undergoing treatment in addiction treatment centers. These patients were randomly assigned as case (30 and control (30 groups. The case group was subjected to intervention over ten sessions, whereas the control group received no intervention. Both groups then passed through a posttest, while a follow-up was conducted after 4 months. Data were obtained via a General Health Questionnaire. Results: A covariance analysis test and independent and dependent t-test results indicated that a social work intervention adopting systematic approach was effective in increasing the general health of drug-addicted patients under treatment. Conclusion: Thus, the nature of the presence of social workers in addiction treatment centers has been effective and can have a significant influence by reducing anxiety and insomnia and somatic symptoms, improving patients’ self-understanding and self-recognition, and enhancing social functioning. Keywords: social work, intervention, systematic approach, general health, opioid addicts

  5. Association Between Facility-Level Utilization of Non-pharmacologic Chronic Pain Treatment and Subsequent Initiation of Long-Term Opioid Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Evan P; Nolan, Charlotte; Kerns, Robert D; Ho, P Michael; Frank, Joseph W

    2018-05-01

    Expert guidelines recommend non-pharmacologic treatments and non-opioid medications for chronic pain and recommend against initiating long-term opioid therapy (LTOT). We examined whether veterans with incident chronic pain receiving care at facilities with greater utilization of non-pharmacologic treatments and non-opioid medications are less likely to initiate LTOT. Retrospective cohort study PARTICIPANTS: Veterans receiving primary care from a Veterans Health Administration facility with incident chronic pain between 1/1/2010 and 12/31/2015 based on either of 2 criteria: (1) persistent moderate-to-severe patient-reported pain and (2) diagnoses "likely to represent" chronic pain. The independent variable was facility-level utilization of pain-related treatment modalities (non-pharmacologic, non-opioid medications, LTOT) in the prior calendar year. The dependent variable was patient-level initiation of LTOT (≥ 90 days within 365 days) in the subsequent year, adjusting for patient characteristics. Among 1,094,569 veterans with incident chronic pain from 2010 to 2015, there was wide facility-level variation in utilization of 10 pain-related treatment modalities, including initiation of LTOT (median, 16%; range, 5-32%). Veterans receiving care at facilities with greater utilization of non-pharmacologic treatments were less likely to initiate LTOT in the year following incident chronic pain. Conversely, veterans receiving care at facilities with greater non-opioid and opioid medication utilization were more likely to initiate LTOT; this association was strongest for past year facility-level LTOT initiation (adjusted rate ratio, 2.10; 95% confidence interval, 2.06-2.15, top vs. bottom quartile of facility-level LTOT initiation in prior calendar year). Facility-level utilization patterns of non-pharmacologic, non-opioid, and opioid treatments for chronic pain are associated with subsequent patient-level initiation of LTOT among veterans with incident chronic pain

  6. Experience of adjunctive cannabis use for chronic non-cancer pain: findings from the Pain and Opioids IN Treatment (POINT) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Lintzeris, Nicholas; Campbell, Gabrielle; Bruno, Raimondo; Cohen, Milton; Farrell, Michael; Hall, Wayne D

    2015-02-01

    There is increasing debate about cannabis use for medical purposes, including for symptomatic treatment of chronic pain. We investigated patterns and correlates of cannabis use in a large community sample of people who had been prescribed opioids for chronic non-cancer pain. The POINT study included 1514 people in Australia who had been prescribed pharmaceutical opioids for chronic non-cancer pain. Data on cannabis use, ICD-10 cannabis use disorder and cannabis use for pain were collected. We explored associations between demographic, pain and other patient characteristics and cannabis use for pain. One in six (16%) had used cannabis for pain relief, 6% in the previous month. A quarter reported that they would use it for pain relief if they had access. Those using cannabis for pain on average were younger, reported greater pain severity, greater interference from and poorer coping with pain, and more days out of role in the past year. They had been prescribed opioids for longer, were on higher opioid doses, and were more likely to be non-adherent with their opioid use. Those using cannabis for pain had higher pain interference after controlling for reported pain severity. Almost half (43%) of the sample had ever used cannabis for recreational purposes, and 12% of the entire cohort met criteria for an ICD-10 cannabis use disorder. Cannabis use for pain relief purposes appears common among people living with chronic non-cancer pain, and users report greater pain relief in combination with opioids than when opioids are used alone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) National Practice Guideline for the Use of Medications in the Treatment of Addiction Involving Opioid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampman, Kyle; Jarvis, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control have recently described opioid use and resultant deaths as an epidemic. At this point in time, treating this disease well with medication requires skill and time that are not generally available to primary care doctors in most practice models. Suboptimal treatment has likely contributed to expansion of the epidemic and concerns for unethical practices. At the same time, access to competent treatment is profoundly restricted because few physicians are willing and able to provide it. This "Practice Guideline" was developed to assist in the evaluation and treatment of opioid use disorder, and in the hope that, using this tool, more physicians will be able to provide effective treatment. Although there are existing guidelines for the treatment of opioid use disorder, none have included all of the medications used at present for its treatment. Moreover, few of the existing guidelines address the needs of special populations such as pregnant women, individuals with co-occurring psychiatric disorders, individuals with pain, adolescents, or individuals involved in the criminal justice system. This Practice Guideline was developed using the RAND Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method (RAM) - a process that combines scientific evidence and clinical knowledge to determine the appropriateness of a set of clinical procedures. The RAM is a deliberate approach encompassing review of existing guidelines, literature reviews, appropriateness ratings, necessity reviews, and document development. For this project, American Society of Addiction Medicine selected an independent committee to oversee guideline development and to assist in writing. American Society of Addiction Medicine's Quality Improvement Council oversaw the selection process for the independent development committee. Recommendations included in the guideline encompass a broad range of topics, starting with the initial evaluation of the

  8. Family Behavior Therapy (FBT) for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maia; Saidj, Madina; Kowalski, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    -control. FBT is designed to accommodate diverse populations of youth with a variety of behavioral, cultural and individual preferences. FBT incorporates behavioral theory (reduction of undesired behavior by manipulating external reinforcement), structural family theory (in which the structure of the family...... for non-opioid drug use; • have used experimental, quasi-experimental or non-randomized controlled designs; • have reported at least one eligible outcome variable measuring abstinence, reduction of drug use, family functioning, education or vocational involvement, retention, risk behavior or any other...

  9. Opioid Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathing rate nausea, vomiting constipation physical agitation poor decision making abandoning responsibilities slurred speech sleeping more or less than normal mood swings euphoria (feeling high) irritability depression lowered motivation anxiety attacks. Symptoms of opioid overdose An overdose ...

  10. Opioid Overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 03/10/2016 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  11. Preference for brand-name buprenorphine is related to severity of addiction among outpatients in opioid maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Philippe; Messaadi, Nassir; Perault-Pochat, Marie-Christine; Gagey, Stéphanie; Brabant, Yann; Ingrand, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As a form of opioid maintenance treatment, high-dose buprenorphine is increasingly being used in the United States. On the French market since 1996, it is the most commonly prescribed and frequently employed opioid maintenance treatment. For unknown reasons, the brand-name form is used far more often than the generic form (76-24%). The objective was to show that the patients' levels of addiction were differentiated according to the form of buprenorphine currently being used and to their previous experience of a different form. An observational study in 9 sites throughout France used self-assessment questionnaires filled out in retail pharmacies by all patients to whom their prescribed buprenorphine treatment was being delivered. The 151 canvassed pharmacies solicited 879 patients, of whom 724 completed the questionnaires. Participants were statistically similar to non-participants. The patients using the brand-name form subsequent to experience with the generic form exhibited a more elevated addiction severity index and a higher dosage than brand-name form users with no experience of a different form. Compared to generic users, their doses were higher, their was addiction more severe, and their alcohol consumption was more excessive; they were also more likely to make daily use of psychotropic substances. However, the level of misuse or illicit consumption was similar between these groups. Preferring the brand-name buprenorphine form to the generic form is associated with a higher level of severe addiction, a more frequent need for daily psychotropics, and excessive drinking; but the study was unable to show a causal link.

  12. The World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for the Biological Treatment of Substance Use and Related Disorders. Part 2: Opioid dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soyka, Michael; Kranzler, Henry R.; van den Brink, Wim; Krystal, John; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Kasper, Siegfried

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To develop evidence-based practice guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of opioid abuse and dependence. Methods. An international task force of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) developed these practice guidelines after a systematic review of the

  13. Reasons for opioid use among patients with dependence on prescription opioids: the role of chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Griffin, Margaret L; McHugh, R Kathryn; Haller, Deborah; Jacobs, Petra; Gardin, John; Fischer, Dan; Rosen, Kristen D

    2014-08-01

    The number of individuals seeking treatment for prescription opioid dependence has increased dramatically, fostering a need for research on this population. The aim of this study was to examine reasons for prescription opioid use among 653 participants with and without chronic pain, enrolled in the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study, a randomized controlled trial of treatment for prescription opioid dependence. Participants identified initial and current reasons for opioid use. Participants with chronic pain were more likely to report pain as their primary initial reason for use; avoiding withdrawal was rated as the most important reason for current use in both groups. Participants with chronic pain rated using opioids to cope with physical pain as more important, and using opioids in response to social interactions and craving as less important, than those without chronic pain. Results highlight the importance of physical pain as a reason for opioid use among patients with chronic pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intentional intrathecal opioid detoxification in 3 patients: characterization of the intrathecal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tracy P; Lonergan, Daniel F; Todd, R David; Martin, Peter R

    2013-04-01

    Intrathecal (IT) drug delivery systems for patients with chronic non-malignant pain are intended to improve pain and quality of life and reduce side effects of systemic use. A subset of patients may have escalating pain, functional decline, and/or intolerable side effects even as IT opioid doses are increased. Discontinuation of IT medications may represent a viable treatment option but strategies to accomplish this are needed. Three patients with intrathecal drug delivery systems (IDDS), inadequate pain control, and declining functionality underwent abrupt IT opioid cessation. This was accomplished through a standardized protocol with symptom-triggered administration of clonidine and buprenorphine, monitored using the clinical opiate withdrawal scale. Symptoms of IT withdrawal were similar in all patients and included diuresis, agitation, hyperalgesia, mild diarrhea, yawning, and taste and smell aversion. Hypertension and tachycardia were effectively controlled by clonidine administration. Classic symptoms of withdrawal, such as piloerection, chills, severe diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, myoclonus, and mydriasis, were not noted. At 2 to 3 months follow-up, patients reported decreased, but ongoing pain, with improvements in functional capacity and quality of life. This preliminary work demonstrates the safety of abrupt IT opioid cessation utilizing standardized inpatient withdrawal protocols. To our knowledge, these are among the first reported cases of intentional, controlled IT opioid cessation without initiation of an opioid bridge: self-reported pain scores, functional capacity, and quality of life improved. The IT opioid withdrawal syndrome is characterized based upon our observations and a review of the literature. © 2012 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  15. Early Phase in the Development of Cannabidiol as a Treatment for Addiction: Opioid Relapse Takes Initial Center Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Yasmin L; Yoon, Michelle; Manini, Alex F; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Ostman, Maria; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2015-10-01

    Multiple cannabinoids derived from the marijuana plant have potential therapeutic benefits but most have not been well investigated, despite the widespread legalization of medical marijuana in the USA and other countries. Therapeutic indications will depend on determinations as to which of the multiple cannabinoids, and other biologically active chemicals that are present in the marijuana plant, can be developed to treat specific symptoms and/or diseases. Such insights are particularly critical for addiction disorders, where different phytocannabinoids appear to induce opposing actions that can confound the development of treatment interventions. Whereas Δ(9)-tetracannabinol has been well documented to be rewarding and to enhance sensitivity to other drugs, cannabidiol (CBD), in contrast, appears to have low reinforcing properties with limited abuse potential and to inhibit drug-seeking behavior. Other considerations such as CBD's anxiolytic properties and minimal adverse side effects also support its potential viability as a treatment option for a variety of symptoms associated with drug addiction. However, significant research is still needed as CBD investigations published to date primarily relate to its effects on opioid drugs, and CBD's efficacy at different phases of the abuse cycle for different classes of addictive substances remain largely understudied. Our paper provides an overview of preclinical animal and human clinical investigations, and presents preliminary clinical data that collectively sets a strong foundation in support of the further exploration of CBD as a therapeutic intervention against opioid relapse. As the legal landscape for medical marijuana unfolds, it is important to distinguish it from "medical CBD" and other specific cannabinoids, that can more appropriately be used to maximize the medicinal potential of the marijuana plant.

  16. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioids and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jennifer A; Opper, Susan E; Agarwal, Sonali; Fibuch, Eugene E

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are among the oldest known and most widely used analgesics. The application of opioids has expanded over the last few decades, especially in the treatment of chronic non-malignant pain. This upsurge in opioid use has been accompanied by the increasingly recognized occurrence of opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This may arise after exposure to enteral, parenteral, or neuraxial opioids. Opioid-associated endocrinopathy consists primarily of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction and may manifest with symptoms of hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, and other hormonal disturbances. Additionally, opioid related endocrine dysfunction may be coupled with such disorders as osteoporosis and mood disturbances including depression. Undesirable changes in pain sensitivity such as opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and reduced potency of opioid analgesia may also be potential consequences of chronic opioid consumption. Few studies to date have been able to establish what degree of opioid exposure, in terms of dose or duration of therapy, may predispose patients to opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This article will review the currently available literature concerning opioid-associated endocrinopathy and will provide recommendations for the evaluation, monitoring, and management of opioid-associated endocrinopathy and its other accompanying undesired effects.

  17. High Rates of Tramadol Use among Treatment-Seeking Adolescents in Malmö, Sweden: A Study of Hair Analysis of Nonmedical Prescription Opioid Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin O. Olsson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nonmedical prescription opioid use (NMPOU is a growing problem and tramadol has been suggested as an emerging problem in young treatment-seeking individuals. The aim of the present study was to investigate, through hair analysis, NMPOU in this group and, specifically, tramadol use. Methods. In a study including 73 treatment-seeking adolescents and young adults at an outpatient facility for young substance users, hair specimens could be obtained from 59 subjects. Data were extracted on sociodemographic background variables and psychiatric diagnoses through MINI interviews. Results. In hair analysis, tramadol was by far the most prevalent opioid detected. Thirty-two percent screened positive for opioids, and of those, all but one were positive for tramadol. Ninety-eight percent reported problematic cannabis use. Significantly more opioid-positive patients also screened positive for other (noncannabis drugs, compared to nonopioid users. Sixty-four percent fulfilled criteria of DSM-IV psychiatric disorders, other than substance use disorders according to MINI. Fifty-three percent met the symptom criteria count of ADHD above cut-off level. Conclusion. In the present setting, tramadol, along with high rates of cannabis use, may represent a novel pattern of substance use among young treatment-seeking subjects with problematic substance use and high rates of concurrent psychiatric problems.

  18. Effectiveness of social work intervention with a systematic approach to improve general health in opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheb, Ghoncheh; Khaleghi, Esmat; Moghanibashi-Mansourieh, Amir; Farhoudian, Ali; Teymouri, Robab

    2016-01-01

    This study takes a systematic approach to investigate the effect of social work intervention aimed at increasing general health among opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers. This is an experimental plan (pretest to posttest with a control group); the study sample included 60 patients with drug dependencies undergoing treatment in addiction treatment centers. These patients were randomly assigned as case (30) and control (30) groups. The case group was subjected to intervention over ten sessions, whereas the control group received no intervention. Both groups then passed through a posttest, while a follow-up was conducted after 4 months. Data were obtained via a General Health Questionnaire. A covariance analysis test and independent and dependent t -test results indicated that a social work intervention adopting systematic approach was effective in increasing the general health of drug-addicted patients under treatment. Thus, the nature of the presence of social workers in addiction treatment centers has been effective and can have a significant influence by reducing anxiety and insomnia and somatic symptoms, improving patients' self-understanding and self-recognition, and enhancing social functioning.

  19. Can reinforcement-based interventions to reduce drug use successfully be adapted to routine opioid maintenance treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Specka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Comorbid substance related disorders are a major health problem for patients in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT. It was investigated whether a reinforcement scheme adapted to the regulatory and financial restrictions of routine treatment reduces concomitant drug use. METHODS: OMT patients from 7 clinics who were using cocaine, benzodiazepines, heroin or amphetamines were randomly allocated to either treatment as usual (n = 64 or treatment with an additional escalating reinforcement scheme (n = 72 in which a patient's number of weekly take-home dosages was increased after 1, 4, 8 and 12 consecutive weeks with drug-free urine specimens. Trial duration was 26 weeks. RESULTS: Completion rates were 64% for controls and 62.5% in the experimental group. Mean number of drug-free weeks was 11.3 (SD 8.5 for the control group and 9.8 (8.9 for the experimental group (p = 0.30. CONCLUSION: The intervention was not effective compared to routine treatment. Additional features might be necessary to achieve an effect, e.g. a higher frequency of urine sampling or use of other reinforcers. It has to be further investigated how interventions which have been proven effective in experimental studies can successfully be adapted to routine care conditions.

  20. The feasibility of employing a home healthcare model for education and treatment of opioid overdose using a naloxone auto-injector in a private practice pain medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragovich, Anthony; Brason, Fred; Beltran, Thomas; McCoart, Amy; Plunkett, Anthony R

    2018-04-18

    The purpose of this study was to determine if employing a home healthcare model for education and treatment of opioid overdose using Evzio® (Naloxone)* auto-injector in a private practice pain clinic. A prospective survey was used to determine the feasibility of integrating a naloxone auto-injector within the patient's home with a home care training model. Twenty moderate or high-risk patients were enrolled from our chronic pain clinic. Patients who were moderate or high risk completed an evaluation survey. The naloxone auto-injector was dispensed to all patients meeting criteria. The treating provider after prescribing the naloxone auto-injector then consulted home health per standard clinical practice. All patients had home health consulted to perform overdose identification and rescue training. A Cochran's Q test was conducted to examine differences in patient knowledge pre and post training. The post training test was done 2-4 weeks later. Forty subjects enrolled after meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria. Twenty withdrew because their insurance declined coverage for the naloxone auto-injector. Those completing home health showed a statistically significant difference in their ability to correctly identify the steps needed to effectively respond to an overdose p = 0.03 Discussion: Preliminary evidence would suggest training on overdose symptom recognition and proper use of prescription naloxone for treatment in the home setting by home health staff would prove more beneficial than the clinic setting, but feasibility was hindered by unaffordable costs related to insurance coverage limitations.

  1. Opioid and GABAB receptors differentially couple to an adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A downstream effector after chronic morphine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Elizabeth Bagley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are intensely addictive, and cessation of their chronic use is associated with a highly aversive withdrawal syndrome. A cellular hallmark of withdrawal is an opioid sensitive protein kinase A-dependent increase in GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1 currents in periaqueductal gray (PAG neurons. Elevated GAT-1 activity directly increases GABAergic neuronal excitability and synaptic GABA release, which will enhance GABAergic inhibition of PAG output neurons. This reduced activity of PAG output neurons to several brain regions, including the hypothalamus and medulla, contributes to many of the PAG-mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen reduces some of the PAG mediated signs of opioid withdrawal. Like the opioid receptors the GABAB receptor is a Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptor. This suggests it could be modulating GAT-1 activity in PAG neurons through its inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway. Opioid modulation of the GAT-1 activity can be detected by changes in the reversal potential of opioid membrane currents. We found that when opioids are reducing the GAT-1 cation conductance and increasing the GIRK conductance the opioid agonist reversal potential is much more negative than Ek. Using this approach for GABAB receptors we show that the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, does not couple to inhibition of GAT-1 currents during opioid withdrawal. It is possible this differential signaling of the two Gi/Go coupled G-protein coupled receptors is due to the strong compartmentalization of the GABAB receptor that does not favor signaling to the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A/GAT-1 pathway. This highlights the importance of studying the effects of G-protein coupled receptors in native tissue with endogenous G-protein coupled receptors and the full complement of relevant proteins and signaling molecules. This study suggests that baclofen reduces opioid withdrawal symptoms through a non-GAT-1

  2. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-09-08

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment.

  3. Discovery of endogenous opioid systems: what it has meant for the clinician's understanding of pain and its treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Jane C; Sullivan, Mark D

    2017-12-01

    Before the discovery of the endogenous opioid system in the 1970s, opioids were understood only through the lens of opioid drug effects. Opium produced sleep, pain relief, and addiction. Once a variety of opioids had been extracted from opium, and still others synthesized chemically, it became clear that there must be endogenous receptors to explain differential drug effects. So, the search was on to identify the receptors, and subsequently their endogenous ligands. Even then, the consequential ways in which the endogenous opioid system influences the way we respond to the environment and survive took time to unravel. Today's understanding extends far beyond simply accepting pain relief and addiction as separate processes, to the realization that the endogenous opioid system achieves constant adjustments between punishment (pain) and reward in communicating areas of the brain previously thought to subserve separate functions. The system also plays a crucial role in socialization. Taken together, these 2 lines of research have led to new insights into why the endogenous opioid system is so important in terms of evolution, individual survival and day-to-day function, and how important it is to consider opioid medications within the context of these critical natural functions.

  4. Feasibility of applying the life history calendar in a population of chronic opioid users to identify patterns of drug use and addiction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikowski, Jill; Marchand, Kirsten; Palis, Heather; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering patterns of drug use and treatment access is essential to improving treatment for opioid dependence. The life history calendar (LHC) could be a valuable instrument for capturing time-sensitive data on lifetime patterns of drug use and addiction treatment. This study describes the methodology applied when collecting data using the LHC in a sample of individuals with long-term opioid dependence and aims to identify specific factors that impact the feasibility of administering the LHC interview. In this study, the LHC allowed important events such as births, intimate relationships, housing, or incarcerations to become reference points for recalling details surrounding drug use and treatment access. The paper concludes that the administration of the LHC was a resource-intensive process and required special attention to interviewer training and experience with the study population. These factors should be considered and integrated into study plans by researchers using the LHC in addiction research.

  5. Standardization of prostate brachytherapy treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ove, Roger; Wallner, Kent; Badiozamani, Kas; Korjsseon, Tammy; Sutlief, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Whereas custom-designed plans are the norm for prostate brachytherapy, the relationship between linear prostate dimensions and volume calls into question the routine need for customized treatment planning. With the goal of streamlining the treatment-planning process, we have compared the treatment margins (TMs) achieved with one standard plan applied to patients with a wide range of prostate volumes. Methods and Materials: Preimplant transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images of 50 unselected University of Washington patients with T1-T2 cancer and a prostate volume between 20 cc and 50 cc were studied. Patients were arbitrarily grouped into categories of 20-30 cc, 30-40 cc, and 40-50 cc. A standard 19-needle plan was devised for patients in the 30- to 40-cc range, using an arbitrary minimum margin of 5 mm around the gross tumor volume (GTV), making use of inverse planning technology to achieve 100% coverage of the target volume with accentuation of dose at the periphery and sparing of the central region. The idealized plan was applied to each patient's TRUS study. The distances (TMs) between the prostatic edge (GTV) and treated volume (TV) were determined perpendicular to the prostatic margin. Results: Averaged over the entire patient group, the ratio of thickness to width was 1.4, whereas the ratio of length to width was 1.3. These values were fairly constant over the range of volumes, emphasizing that the prostate retains its general shape as volume increases. The idealized standard plan was overlaid on the ultrasound images of the 17 patients in the 30- to 40-cc group and the V100, the percentage of target volume receiving 100% or more of the prescription dose, was 98% or greater for 15 of the 17 patients. The lateral and posterior TMs fell within a narrow range, most being within 2 mm of the idealized 5-mm TM. To estimate whether a 10-cc volume-interval stratification was reasonable, the standard plan generated from the 30- to 40-cc prostate model was

  6. Opioid-free anaesthesia in three dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. White

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Opioid-free anaesthesia (OFA is a relatively new and growing field in human medicine. There are multiple motivations behind this emerging practice with the recognition of several serious potential opioid-related adverse effects including opioid induced hyperalgesia, opioid tolerance and immunomodulatory effects of opioids. Opioids have long been the mainstay of veterinary anaesthesia and pain management practice. The feasibility of OFA in veterinary patients is presented here. A case series of three dogs that underwent OFA for canine ovariohysterectomy is reported. The authors conclude OFA is possible in veterinary medicine; however the move away from the familiar effects of opioids perioperatively is challenging. Gaining experience with these types of protocols for standard procedures in healthy animals, such as neutering, will provide the anaesthetist with the building blocks for more invasive surgeries.

  7. [Family typology and deterioration related to opioids use, in a methadone treatment patients group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Fernández, M; Torrado Val, E; Marcos Sierra, J A

    2010-01-01

    In this article the familiar functioning of subjects addict to opioids included in a maintenance programme with methadone will be analyzed, trying to identify whether belonging to one type of family (family typology) or another, according to Olson's Familiar Functioning Model, is related to the level of deterioration or severity of addiction of the different areas associated to consumption . The sample is composed by 69 subjects (N=69) users of the Servicio de Atención a las Drogodependencias (SAD) in Centro de Servicios Sociales Comunitarios del Ayuntamiento de Alcalá de Guadaíra (Seville). In order to evaluate the functioning and the family typology of these subjects the Escala de Cohesión y Adaptación Familiar--CAF-1--Spanish version of FACES III was used. In order to evaluate the level of deterioration, the Spanish version of the 5th edition of the personal, clinical semistructured interview Addiction Severity Index--ASI4--was applied. The results indicate that the subjects included in balanced families present more addiction severity in two dimensions of the ASI: Alcohol and Employment/Support and are, moreover, the ones that take greater doses of methadone.

  8. A multicenter, primary-care-based, open-label study to assess the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules using a standardized conversion guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setnik B

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Setnik,1 Carl L Roland,1 Kenneth W Sommerville,1,2 Glenn C Pixton,1 Robert Berke,3,4 Anne Calkins,5 Veeraindar Goli1,2 1Pfizer Inc, 2Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3Family Health Medical Services PLLC, Mayville, 4Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, 5New York Spine & Wellness Center, Syracuse, NY, USA Objective: To evaluate the conversion of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to extended-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (MSN using a standardized conversion guide. Methods: This open-label, single-arm study was conducted in 157 primary care centers in the United States. A total of 684 opioid-experienced adults with chronic moderate-to-severe pain were converted to oral administration of MSN from transdermal fentanyl and oral formulations of hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and other morphine products using a standardized conversion guide. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a stable MSN dose within a 6-week titration phase. Secondary endpoints included duration of time to stable dose, number of titration steps, safety and efficacy measures, and investigator assessment of conversion guide utility. Results: Of the 684 patients, 51.3% were converted to a stable dose of MSN (95% confidence interval: 47.5%, 55.1%. The mean (standard deviation number of days to stable dose was 20 (8.94, and number of titration steps to stable dose was 2.4 (1.37. The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate and consistent with opioid therapy. Mean pain scores at stable dose decreased from baseline. Investigators were generally satisfied with the conversion guide and, in 94% of cases, reported they would use it again. Conclusion: Conversion to MSN treatment using the standardized MSN conversion guide was an attainable goal in approximately half of the population of

  9. Possible evidence for re-regulation of HPA axis and brain reward systems over time in treatment in prescription opioid-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, Scott C; Harris, Jonathan D; Bixler, Edward O; Taylor, Megan; Muelly, Emilie; Deneke, Erin; Thompson, Kenneth W; Meyer, Roger E

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence for a neuroadaptive model underlying vulnerability to relapse in opioid dependence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical measures hypothesized to mirror elements of allostatic dysregulation in patients dependent on prescription opioids at 2 time points after withdrawal, compared with healthy control participants. Recently withdrawn (n = 7) prescription opioid-dependent patients were compared with the patients in supervised residential care for 2 to 3 months (extended care; n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 7) using drug cue reactivity, affect-modulated startle response tasks, salivary cortisol, and 8 days of sleep actigraphy. Prefrontal cortex was monitored with functional near-infrared spectroscopy during the cue reactivity task. Startle response results indicated reduced hedonic response to natural rewards among patients recently withdrawn from opioids relative to extended care patients. The recently withdrawn patients showed increased activation to pill stimuli in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex relative to extended care patients. Cortisol levels were elevated among recently withdrawn patients and intermediate for extended care relative to healthy controls. Actigraphy indicated disturbed sleep between recently withdrawn patients and extended care patients; extended care patients were similar to controls. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation to drug and natural reward cues, startle responses to natural reward cues, day-time cortisol levels, time in bed, and total time spent sleeping were all correlated with the number of days since last drug use (ie, time in supervised residential treatment). These results suggest possible re-regulation of dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and brain reward systems in prescription opioid-dependent patients over the drug-free period in residential treatment.

  10. Motives for nonmedical use of prescription opioids among high school seniors in the United States: self-treatment and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Sean Esteban; Boyd, Carol J; Cranford, James A; Teter, Christian J

    2009-08-01

    To assess motives for nonmedical use of prescription opioids among US high school seniors and examine associations between motives for nonmedical use and other substance use behaviors. Nationally representative samples of US high school seniors (modal age 18 years) were surveyed during the spring of their senior year via self-administered questionnaires. Data were collected in public and private high schools. The sample consisted of 5 cohorts (2002-2006) of 12 441 high school seniors. Self-reports of motives for nonmedical use of prescription opioids and substance use behaviors. More than 1 in every 10 high school seniors reported nonmedical use of prescription opioids and 45% of past-year nonmedical users reported "to relieve physical pain" as an important motivation. The odds of heavy drinking and other drug use were lower among nonmedical users of prescription opioids motivated only by pain relief compared with nonmedical users who reported pain relief and other motives and those who reported non-pain relief motives only. The odds of medical use of prescription opioids were lower among nonmedical users who reported only non-pain relief motives compared with other types of nonmedical users. The findings indicate motives should be considered when working with adolescents who report nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Future efforts are needed to identify adolescents who may need appropriate pain management and those at increased risk for prescription opioid abuse.

  11. Review of Opioid Pharmacogenetics and Considerations for Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu Obeng, Aniwaa; Hamadeh, Issam; Smith, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Opioid analgesics are the standards of care for the treatment of moderate to severe nociceptive pain, particularly in the setting of cancer and surgery. Their analgesic properties mainly emanate from stimulation of the μ receptors, which are encoded by the OPRM1 gene. Hepatic metabolism represents the major route of elimination, which, for some opioids, namely codeine and tramadol, is necessary for their bioactivation into more potent analgesics. The highly polymorphic nature of the genes coding for phase I and phase II enzymes (pharmacokinetics genes) that are involved in the metabolism and bioactivation of opioids suggests a potential interindividual variation in their disposition and, most likely, response. In fact, such an association has been substantiated in several pharmacokinetic studies described in this review, in which drug exposure and/or metabolism differed significantly based on the presence of polymorphisms in these pharmacokinetics genes. Furthermore, in some studies, the observed variability in drug exposure translated into differences in the incidence of opioid-related adverse effects, particularly nausea, vomiting, constipation, and respiratory depression. Although the influence of polymorphisms in pharmacokinetics genes, as well as pharmacodynamics genes (OPRM1 and COMT) on response to opioids has been a subject of intense research, the results have been somehow conflicting, with some evidence insinuating for a potential role for OPRM1. The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines provide CYP2D6-guided therapeutic recommendations to individualize treatment with tramadol and codeine. However, implementation guidelines for other opioids, which are more commonly used in real-world settings for pain management, are currently lacking. Hence, further studies are warranted to bridge this gap in our knowledge base and ultimately ascertain the role of pharmacogenetic markers as predictors of response to opioid analgesics. © 2017

  12. The Role of Program Directors in Treatment Practices: The Case of Methadone Dose Patterns in U.S. Outpatient Opioid Agonist Treatment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Jemima A; Shiu-Yee, Karen; D'Aunno, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    To describe changes in characteristics of directors of outpatient opioid agonist treatment (OAT) programs, and to examine the association between directors' characteristics and low methadone dosage. Repeated cross-sectional surveys of OAT programs in the United States from 1995 to 2011. We used generalized linear regression models to examine associations between directors' characteristics and methadone dose, adjusting for program and patient factors. Data were collected through telephone surveys of program directors. The proportion of OAT programs with an African American director declined over time, from 29 percent in 1995 to 16 percent in 2011. The median percentage of patients in each program receiving role in explaining variations in methadone dosage across programs and patients. Further research should investigate the causal pathways through which directors' characteristics affect treatment practices. This may lead to new, multifaceted managerial interventions to improve patient outcomes. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  13. Palonosetron and hydroxyzine pre-treatment reduces the objective signs of experimentally-induced acute opioid withdrawal in humans: a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlendson, Matthew J; D'Arcy, Nicole; Encisco, Ellen M; Yu, Jeffrey J; Rincon-Cruz, Lorena; Peltz, Gary; Clark, J David; Chu, Larry F

    2017-01-01

    Treatments for reducing opioid withdrawal are limited and prone to problematic side effects. Laboratory studies, clinical observations, and limited human trial data suggest 5-HT3-receptor antagonists and antihistamines may be effective. This double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled study employing an acute physical dependence model evaluated whether (i) treatment with a 5-HT3-receptor antagonist (palonosetron) would reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms, and (ii) co-administration of an antihistamine (hydroxyzine) would enhance any treatment effect. At timepoint T = 0, healthy (non-opioid dependent, non-substance abuser) male volunteers (N = 10) were pre-treated with either a) placebo, b) palonosetron IV (0.75 mg), or c) palonosetron IV (0.75 mg) and hydroxyzine PO (100 mg) in a crossover study design. This was followed at T = 30 by intravenous morphine (10 mg/70kg). At T = 165, 10 mg/70kg naloxone IV was given to precipitate opioid withdrawal. The objective opioid withdrawal score (OOWS) and subjective opioid withdrawal score (SOWS) were determined 5 and 15 minutes after naloxone administration (T = 170, 180, respectively). Baseline measurements were recorded at T = -30 and T = -15. Comparison of average baseline OOWS scores with OOWS scores obtained 15 minutes after naloxone was significant (p = 0.0001). Scores from 15 minutes post-naloxone infusion showed significant differences in OOWS scores between treatment groups: placebo, 3.7 ± 2.4; palonosetron, 1.5 ± 0.97; and palonosetron with hydroxyzine, 0.2 ± 0.1333. Pretreatment with palonosetron significantly reduced many signs of experimentally-induced opioid withdrawal. Co-administration with hydroxyzine further reduced opioid withdrawal severity. These results suggest that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, alone or in combination with an antihistamine, may be useful in the treatment of opioid withdrawal.

  14. Current standard treatment for pediatric glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Saito, Ryuta; Kanamori, Masayuki; Yamashita, Yoji; Tominaga, Teiji

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we selected three representative disorders among pediatric gliomas and reviewed standard treatments for these diseases. The formation of this rare disease is involved with BRAF mutation as well as cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma. Radical resection is not recommended as initial therapy due to high morbidity. Despite its good tumor control, radiotherapy is not a standard therapy due to neuroendocrine and neurocognitive dysfunction. Several papers have reported the effectiveness of platinum-based chemotherapy, which is a useful for induction therapy. Recent progress in molecular analyses has suggested that some markers might be used for staging ependymoma. While total resection is considered to be strongly correlated with patients' survival, the majority of recurrence occurs in the primary site. Despite many clinical trials, chemotherapeutic agents were not found to be effective for this disease. Since whole brain radiation cannot prevent dissemination, local radiation is recommended for adjuvant therapy. The prognosis of this disease is still dismal, and median survival time is within 1 year. Although clinical trials have been conducted to assess the efficacy of chemotherapy prior to, concomitantly with, or after radiotherapy, an effective regimen has not yet been established. Therefore, only conventional local radiotherapy is the standard regimen for this disease. A new therapeutic approach, such as convection-enhanced drug delivery, would be required for improved outcomes in patients with this disease. (author)

  15. Opioid Substitution Treatment Planning in a Disaster Context: Perspectives from Emergency Management and Health Professionals in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Blake

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST is a harm reduction strategy enabling opiate consumers to avoid withdrawal symptoms and maintain health and wellbeing. Some research shows that within a disaster context service disruptions and infrastructure damage affect OST services, including problems with accessibility, dosing, and scripts. Currently little is known about planning for OST in the reduction and response phases of a disaster. This study aimed to identify the views of three professional groups working in Aotearoa/New Zealand about OST provision following a disaster. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 service workers, health professionals, and emergency managers in OST and disaster planning fields. Thematic analysis of transcripts identified three key themes, namely “health and wellbeing”, “developing an emergency management plan”, and “stock, dose verification, and scripts” which led to an overarching concept of “service continuity in OST preparedness planning”. Participants viewed service continuity as essential for reducing physical and psychological distress for OST clients, their families, and wider communities. Alcohol and drug and OST health professionals understood the specific needs of clients, while emergency managers discussed the need for sufficient preparedness planning to minimise harm. It is concluded that OST preparedness planning must be multidisciplinary, flexible, and inclusive.

  16. Risks and realities: dyadic interaction between 6-month-old infants and their mothers in opioid maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfi, Monica; Smith, Lars; Waal, Helge; Sundet, Jon Martin

    2011-12-01

    A number of studies point to methadone exposure in utero as a possible risk factor in the developing mother-infant relationship in the first year of life. This study is part of a larger, national follow-up of 38 infants prenatally exposed to methadone or buprenorphine and 36 comparison, low-risk infants. The aim of the present paper is to assess the quality of mother-infant relationship when the infants are 6 months old. Videotaped mother-infant interactions were rated in a global scale (NICHD). Maternal and infant contributions collapsed into the variables "infant style" and "maternal style" showed that the only factor making significant contribution to the outcome measure "dyadic mutuality" was maternal style. The importance of group membership (exposed versus non-exposed), was reduced when controlling for maternal drug use prior to opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), maternal depression and parenting stress as well as infants' developmental status and sensory-integrative functions. This suggests that prediction of dyadic mutuality should be based on individual characteristics rather than group characteristics. These results support previous research findings that methadone and buprenorphine use per se does not have direct influence on the quality of early mother-infant relationship, but tailored follow-up procedures targeting drug-free pregnancies and parenting support are beneficial for women in OMT and their children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Opioid Substitution Treatment Planning in a Disaster Context: Perspectives from Emergency Management and Health Professionals in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Denise; Lyons, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST) is a harm reduction strategy enabling opiate consumers to avoid withdrawal symptoms and maintain health and wellbeing. Some research shows that within a disaster context service disruptions and infrastructure damage affect OST services, including problems with accessibility, dosing, and scripts. Currently little is known about planning for OST in the reduction and response phases of a disaster. This study aimed to identify the views of three professional groups working in Aotearoa/New Zealand about OST provision following a disaster. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 service workers, health professionals, and emergency managers in OST and disaster planning fields. Thematic analysis of transcripts identified three key themes, namely “health and wellbeing”, “developing an emergency management plan”, and “stock, dose verification, and scripts” which led to an overarching concept of “service continuity in OST preparedness planning”. Participants viewed service continuity as essential for reducing physical and psychological distress for OST clients, their families, and wider communities. Alcohol and drug and OST health professionals understood the specific needs of clients, while emergency managers discussed the need for sufficient preparedness planning to minimise harm. It is concluded that OST preparedness planning must be multidisciplinary, flexible, and inclusive. PMID:27834915

  18. Trends and disparities in receipt of pharmacotherapy among pregnant women in publically funded treatment programs for opioid use disorder in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Vanessa L; Hand, Dennis J; MacAfee, Lauren; Abatemarco, Diane J; Terplan, Mishka

    2018-06-01

    To describe differences in geographic, demographic, treatment, and substance use characteristics by pharmacotherapy receipt among pregnant women entering publically funded treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD) in the United States. 1996 to 2014 Treatment Episode Data Set-Admissions data from pregnant admissions with OUD, defined as reporting opioids as the primary substance of use leading to the treatment episode, were analyzed for this cross-sectional study. The proportion of all pregnant admissions with OUD who received pharmacotherapy was calculated by year and U.S. census region. Trends across time were assessed using the Cochrane-Armitage Trend test. Associations between demographic, substance use, and treatment characteristics and pharmacotherapy receipt were assessed using Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression. The proportion of pregnant admissions where opioids were the primary substance of use increased from 16.9% to 41.6% during the study period, while the proportion of pregnant admissions with OUD who received pharmacotherapy remained relatively unchanged at around 50%. Overall, pharmacotherapy recipients were generally older and white, more likely to receive treatment in an outpatient setting, be self-referred, and report heroin as the primary substance, daily substance use, and intravenous drug use, and less likely to have a co-occurring psychiatric problem compared to those who did not receive pharmacotherapy. Regional differences in pharmacotherapy utilization exist; the South consistently had the fewest pregnant admissions with OUD receiving pharmacotherapy. Although the proportion of pregnant admissions to substance use treatment centers with OUD has increased since the mid-1990s, the proportion receiving pharmacotherapy has not changed. Significant variations in pharmacotherapy utilization exist by geography and demographic, substance use and treatment characteristics. Utilization of pharmacotherapy at publically funded

  19. GRK2 Constitutively Governs Peripheral Delta Opioid Receptor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Doyle Brackley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Opioids remain the standard for analgesic care; however, adverse effects of systemic treatments contraindicate long-term administration. While most clinical opioids target mu opioid receptors (MOR, those that target the delta class (DOR also demonstrate analgesic efficacy. Furthermore, peripherally restrictive opioids represent an attractive direction for analgesia. However, opioid receptors including DOR are analgesically incompetent in the absence of inflammation. Here, we report that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 naively associates with plasma membrane DOR in peripheral sensory neurons to inhibit analgesic agonist efficacy. This interaction prevents optimal Gβ subunit association with the receptor, thereby reducing DOR activity. Importantly, bradykinin stimulates GRK2 movement away from DOR and onto Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP. protein kinase C (PKC-dependent RKIP phosphorylation induces GRK2 sequestration, restoring DOR functionality in sensory neurons. Together, these results expand the known function of GRK2, identifying a non-internalizing role to maintain peripheral DOR in an analgesically incompetent state.

  20. The effect of bundling medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction with mHealth: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, David H; Landucci, Gina; McTavish, Fiona; Kornfield, Rachel; Johnson, Roberta A; Mares, Marie-Louise; Westergaard, Ryan P; Quanbeck, Andrew; Alagoz, Esra; Pe-Romashko, Klaren; Thomas, Chantelle; Shah, Dhavan

    2016-12-12

    Opioid dependence has devastating and increasingly widespread consequences and costs, and the most common outcome of treatment is early relapse. People who inject opioids are also at disproportionate risk for contracting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). This study tests an approach that has been shown to improve recovery rates: medication along with other supportive services (medication-assisted treatment, or MAT) against MAT combined with a smartphone innovation called A-CHESS (MAT + A-CHESS). This unblinded study will randomly assign 440 patients to receive MAT + A-CHESS or MAT alone. Eligible patients will meet criteria for having an opioid use disorder of at least moderate severity and will be taking methadone, injectable naltrexone, or buprenorphine. Patients with A-CHESS will have smartphones for 16 months; all patients will be followed for 24 months. The primary outcome is the difference between patients in the two arms in percentage of days using illicit opioids during the 24-month intervention. Secondary outcomes are differences between patients receiving MAT + A-CHESS versus MAT in other substance use, quality of life, retention in treatment, health service use, and, related to HIV and HCV, screening and testing rates, medication adherence, risk behaviors, and links to care. We will also examine mediators and moderators of the effects of MAT + A-CHESS. We will measure variables at baseline and months 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24. At each point, patients will respond to a 20- to 30-min phone survey; urine screens will be collected at baseline and up to twice a month thereafter. We will use mixed-effects to evaluate the primary and secondary outcomes, with baseline scores functioning as covariates, treatment condition as a between-subject factor, and the outcomes reflecting scores for a given assessment at the six time points. Separate analyses will be conducted for each outcome. A-CHESS has been shown to

  1. Oral cryotherapy reduces mucositis and opioid use after myeloablative therapy--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svanberg, Anncarin; Birgegård, Gunnar; Ohrn, Kerstin

    2007-10-01

    Mucositis is a major complication in myeloablative therapy, which often necessitates advanced pharmacological pain treatment, including i.v. opioids. Attempts to prevent oral mucositis have included oral cryotherapy, which has been shown to reduce mucositis, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning the effect of oral cryotherapy on opioid use by reducing the mucositis for patients treated with myeloablative therapy before bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The aim of the present study was to evaluate if oral cryotherapy could delay or alleviate the development of mucositis and thereby reduce the number of days with i.v. opioids among patients who receive myeloablative therapy before BMT. Eighty patients 18 years and older, scheduled for BMT, were included consecutively and randomised to oral cryotherapy or standard oral care. A stratified randomisation was used with regard to type of transplantation. Intensity of pain, severity of mucositis and use of opioids were recorded using pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, mucositis index scores and medical and nursing charts. This study showed that patients receiving oral cryotherapy had less pronounced mucositis and significantly fewer days with i.v. opioids than the control group. In the autologous setting, cryotherapy patients also needed significantly lower total dose of opioids. Oral cryotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated therapy to alleviate mucositis and consequently reduce the number of days with i.v. opioids among patients treated with myeloablative therapy before BMT.

  2. A text-mining analysis of the public's reactions to the opioid crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Glowacki, Joseph B; Wilcox, Gary B

    2017-07-19

    Opioid abuse has become an epidemic in the United States. On August 25, 2016, the former Surgeon General of the United States sent an open letter to care providers asking for their help with combatting this growing health crisis. Social media forums such as Twitter allow for open discussions among the public and up-to-date exchanges of information about timely topics such as opioids. Therefore, the goal of the current study is to identify the public's reactions to the opioid epidemic by identifying the most popular topics tweeted by users. A text miner, algorithmic-driven statistical program was used to capture 73,235 original tweets and retweets posted within a 2-month time span 15 (August 15, 2016, through October 15, 2016). All tweets contained references to "opioids," "turnthetide," or similar keywords. The sets of tweets were then analyzed to identify the most prevalent topics. The most discussed topics had to do with public figures addressing opioid abuse, creating better treatment options for teen addicts, using marijuana as an alternative for managing pain, holding foreign and domestic drug makers accountable for the epidemic, promoting the "Rx for Change" campaign, addressing double standards in the perceptions and treatment of black and white opioid users, and advertising opioid recovery programs. Twitter allows users to find current information, voice their concerns, and share calls for action in response to the opioid epidemic. Monitoring the conversations about opioids that are taking place on social media forums such as Twitter can help public health officials and care providers better understand how the public is responding to this health crisis.

  3. Assessment of the use of oral fluid as a matrix for drug monitoring in patients undergoing treatment for opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Frank; Fey, Elizabeth; Borg, Damon; Stripp, Richard; Getto, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Drug testing is an important clinical tool that is available to physicians who are assessing the effectiveness of drug treatment as well as patient compliance to the administered program. While urine has traditionally been the matrix of choice for drug monitoring, oral fluid, a filtrate of the blood, has shown great promise as an alternative matrix for such applications. Oral fluid collection can be accomplished without the need for highly trained medical staff through the use of a simple, noninvasive oral fluid collection device, which obtains an adequate sample in only a few minutes. There has been a significant amount of research performed on the use of oral fluid for forensic toxicology application; however, more studies assessing the use of oral fluid drug testing are required to validate its ability to achieve clinical drug monitoring goals. Testing for various drugs in oral fluid may yield a different result when compared to the same drugs in urine, requiring an assessment of the utility of oral fluid for such practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the application of oral fluid drug testing in patients undergoing buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. A retrospective analysis of drug testing results obtained from 6,928 patients (4,560 unobserved urine collections and 2,368 observed oral fluid collections) monitored for heroin metabolite, amphetamine, benzodiazepines, buprenorphine, tetrahydrocannabinol, cocaine, codeine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, and oxymorphone was completed. Results of this statistical exercise indicated that patients undergoing observed oral fluid collection tested positive more frequently than those unobserved urine collections for several illicit drugs and prescription medications targeted. Oral fluid was shown to detect illicit drug use as well as noncompliance in this patient population under the studied conditions more often than the urine specimens.

  4. Overdose prevention in injecting opioid users: The role of substance abuse treatment and training programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sarasa-Renedo

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that preventive programs would benefit from accounting for linguistic and educational limitations and from participation in every treatment episode. Comprehensiveness and broad coverage of such programs could help to maximize their impact.

  5. Standards of analgesic treatment versus hospital practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lewandowska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pain remedying is a fundamental patient law. Modern medicine is acknowledging the mechanism and the warp of pain, commanding more efficient therapeutic means allowing to control the pain.  Multidirectional pain therapy uses variable techniques and medicines which enables to maximize the analgesic effect during the reduction of side effects of each method. Objective: Evaluation of applying standards of analgesic treatment in hospital practice. Material and methods: There were 100 people with severe pain who underwent surgical and orthopedic treatment, as well as, the ones with chronic pain, staying in neurological ward who took part in the examination. Choice of examined patients was random and embraced hospitals patients in the Podkarpackie voivodeship with “Szpital bez Bólu” (eng.: Hospital without pain certificate.  Examined group comprised of : 57% of women and 44% of men, living in rural (56% and urban (44% area. Research methods used in the examinations, were diagnostic opinion poll, records analysis and pain measurements. Results: 42 % of patients can feel the pain intermittently, 37% is not able to estimate how often do pain ailments occur, however, 21% of people suffer from chronic pain ailments. Patients have estimated their pain as follows: severe (26%, difficult to determine (20%, shooting (16%, burning (15%, radiating (10%, dull (8%, stinging (3% and the one which appears when touched (2%. Having estimated the pain intensity, 53% of respondents claimed that they feel medium pain intensity and 33% claimed to have felt great pain. Nurses in the post-op (54% and anesthesiologist (26% are the one, to inform patient about possibilities and eventual methods of post-operative pain management. Conclusions: Pain limits physical functioning of patient. Five-stage scales included in the examination, were VAS and VRS which are sufficient in prophylaxis and pain alleviation but not entirely readable and understandable for all

  6. A Motion Videogame for Opioid Relapse Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abroms, Lorien C; Leavitt, Leah E; Van Alstyne, Judy M; Schindler-Ruwisch, Jennifer M; Fishman, Marc J; Greenberg, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a body motion-activated videogame, targeting the prevention of opioid relapse among youth in the context of outpatient treatment. Participants attended four weekly gameplay sessions. Surveys were conducted at baseline and following each week's gameplay and assessed satisfaction with gameplay, craving intensity, and self-efficacy to refuse opioids. Participants expressed a high level of satisfaction with the videogame throughout the 4 weeks and agreed with the statement that they would be more likely to attend treatment sessions if the game was present (mean=4.6; standard deviation [SD]=0.7) and would recommend the videogame to other people in treatment (mean=4.2; SD=0.8). All participants recommended playing the videogame as part of treatment at least weekly, with a third recommending playing daily. Self-reported cravings declined over the 4-week period from baseline (mean=12.7; SD=8.4) to Week 4 (mean=9.8; SD=8.3), although the decline was not significant. Although participants stated that they liked the game, one-third of participants had dropped out of the study by the fourth session of gameplay. Preliminary evidence indicates that a motion videogame for addiction recovery may be feasible and acceptable within the context of outpatient treatment, although additional efforts are needed to keep youth in treatment. Future studies are needed to assess the impact of the game on long-term abstinence, treatment adherence, and engagement.

  7. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for NonOpioid Drug Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized trials...

  8. Opioid-use disorder among patients on long-term opioid therapy: impact of final DSM-5 diagnostic criteria on prevalence and correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Joseph A Boscarino,1 Stuart N Hoffman,1 John J Han2 1Center for Health Research, 2Department of Pain Medicine, Geisinger Clinic, Danville, PA, USAAims: Previously, we estimated the prevalence and risk factors for prescription opioid-use disorder among outpatients on opioid therapy using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5 and DSM-4 criteria. However, at the time, the DSM-5 criteria were not finalized. In the current study, we analyzed these data using the final DSM-5 criteria and compared these results.Methods: Using electronic records from a large US health care system, we identified outpatients receiving five or more prescription orders for opioid therapy in the past 12 months for noncancer pain (mean prescription orders =10.72; standard deviation =4.96. In 2008, we completed diagnostic interviews with 705 of these patients using the DSM-4 criteria. In the current study, we reassessed these results using the final DSM-5 criteria.Results: The lifetime prevalence of DSM-5 opioid-use disorders using the final DSM-5 criteria was 58.7% for no or few symptoms (<2, 28.1% for mild symptoms (2–3, 9.7% for moderate symptoms (4–5, and 3.5% for severe symptoms (six or more. Thus, the lifetime prevalence of “any” prescription opioid-use disorder in this cohort was 41.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] =37.6–45.0. A comparison to the DSM-4 criteria indicated that the majority of patients with lifetime DSM-4 opioid dependence were now classified as having mild opioid-use disorder, based on the DSM-5 criteria (53.6%; 95% CI =44.1–62.8. In ordinal logistic regression predicting no/few, mild, moderate, and severe opioid-use disorder, the best predictors were age <65 years, current pain impairment, trouble sleeping, suicidal thoughts, anxiety disorders, illicit drug use, and history of substance abuse treatment.Conclusion: Given the final DSM-5 criteria, including the elimination of tolerance and withdrawal, inclusion of

  9. A Preliminary Study of Sexual Dysfunction in Male Opioid-Dependants under Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoudeh Babakhanian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sexual dysfunction is one of the prevalent problems of opiate-dependent patients. The current preliminarily study examines sexual dysfunction in a group of opiate-dependent patients before and after 6 months of MMT. Methods: The current study is a cross-sectional study. The numbers of 30 opiate-dependent patients were selected of Cheraghiyan clinic in Damghan, Iran. Demographics questionnaire and the International Index of Erectile Function were administered before and after treatment. Results: Erectile function showed an increase and intercourse satisfactions completely improved. Sexual desire and overall satisfaction increased, showing slight improvement while orgasmic function increased showing no improvement. Discussion: The findings revealed the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and improvement of some component in patients after treatment. Future studies are needed to explore the roles of other factors.

  10. A Case of Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Caused by Opioid Treatment for Nonmalignant Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Tabuchi, Yukiko; Yasuda, Tetsuyuki; Kaneto, Hideaki; Kitamura, Tetsuhiro; Kozawa, Junji; Otsuki, Michio; Imagawa, Akihisa; Nakae, Aya; Matsuda, Youichi; Uematsu, Hironobu; Mashimo, Takashi; Shibata, Masahiko; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of 42-year-old male patient with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. He suffered from general fatigue and erectile dysfunction after the treatment with transdermal fentanyl for chronic pain by traffic injury. Endocrine examinations and hormone stimulating tests showed that he had hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormal findings, and he had no past history of accounting for acquired hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Therefore, his hypog...

  11. Factors associated with dropout among patients in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) and predictors of re-entry. A national registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukten, Anne; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Waal, Helge; Clausen, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Retention in treatment is often highlighted as one of the key indicators of success in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT). To identify factors associated with long-term retention in opioid maintenance treatment and to analyse predictors of subsequent treatment episodes. Treatment retention and re-entry were examined for a national cohort of patients admitted to OMT in Norway in the period 1997-2003. Multivariate Cox regression models were used to investigate factors associated with treatment dropout 18months after treatment entry. The 18month retention rate among patients admitted to OMT in Norway (n=2431) was 65.8% (n=1599). Dropout from OMT within 18months was associated with younger age (HR 0.97 [0.96-0.98]), high levels of general pre-treatment criminal offences (HR 1.66 [1.32-2.09]) and having drug-related offences during the 30days prior to dropout (HR 1.80 [1.36-2.38]). Of the patients who dropped out (n=832), 42.7% (n=355) were re-engaged in subsequent treatment episodes. Pre-treatment criminal offences were associated with increased odds for treatment re-entry, whereas being younger and having drug-related offences during the first OMT episode were associated with lower odds for re-engagement in OMT. Gender was not associated with treatment dropout and re-entry. High levels of pre-treatment criminal offences and drug offences during the 30days prior to dropout were associated with treatment dropout. Efforts to increase support services to these patients may contribute to higher rates of retention in OMT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Opioid tapering in patients with prescription opioid use disorder: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kehua; Jia, Peng; Bhargava, Swati; Zhang, Yong; Reza, Taslima; Peng, Yuan Bo; Wang, Gary G

    2017-10-01

    Opioid use disorder (OUD) refers to a maladaptive pattern of opioid use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress. OUD causes, and vice versa, misuses and abuse of opioid medications. Clinicians face daily challenges to treat patients with prescription opioid use disorder. An evidence-based management for people who are already addicted to opioids has been identified as the national priority in the US; however, options are limited in clinical practices. In this study, we aimed to explore the success rate and important adjuvant medications in the medication assisted treatment with temporary use of methadone for opioid discontinuation in patients with prescription OUD. This is a retrospective chart review performed at a private physician office for physical medicine and rehabilitation. We reviewed all medical records dated between December 1st, 2011 and August 30th, 2016. The initial evaluation of the included patients (N=140) was completed between December 1st, 2011 and December 31st, 2014. They all have concumittant prescription OUD and chronic non-cancer pain. The patients (87 female and 53 male) were 46.7±12.7 years old, and had a history of opioid use of 7.7±6.1 years. All patients received the comprehensive opioid taper treatments (including interventional pain management techniques, psychotherapy, acupuncture, physical modalities and exercises, and adjuvant medications) on top of the medication assisted treatment using methadone (transient use). Opioid tapering was considered successful when no opioid medication was used in the last patient visit. The 140 patients had pain of 9.6±8.4 years with 8/10 intensity before treatment which decreased after treatment in all comparisons (pOUD. For patients with OUD, indefinite opioid maintenance treatment may not be necessary. Considering the ethical values of autonomy, nonmaleficence, and beneficence, clinicians should provide patients with OUD the option of opioid tapering. Copyright © 2017

  13. Definition, diagnosis and treatment strategies for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction - Recommendations of the Nordic Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Munkholm, Pia; Simrén, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    by exogenous opioids, there are changes in motility, secretion and absorption of fluids, and sphincter function that are reflected in clinical symptoms. The group supported a recent consensus statement for OIC, which takes into account the change in bowel habits for at least one week rather than focusing...

  14. Social and structural barriers for adherence to methadone maintenance treatment among Vietnamese opioid dependence patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Nguyen, Long Hoang; Tran, Tung Thanh; Latkin, Carl A

    2018-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) services may reduce the risk of HIV transmission if patients completely adhere to the treatment. Identifying adherence patterns and potential related factors is vital for the sustainability of MMT program in Vietnam. This study examined social and structural factors associated with adherence to MMT among patients in different service delivery models. A total of 510 patients at three MMT clinics in Hanoi were interviewed. Measures of self-reported adherence included the number of missed doses in the past 7 days and the level of adherence in the past 30 days using a visual analog scale (VAS) scoring from 0 (non-adherence) to 100 (perfect adherence). Multivariate regressions were employed to identify factors associated with non-adherence to MMT. A total of 17.7% of participants reported incomplete MMT adherence in the last 30 days and 8.3% reported missing a dose in the last seven days, respectively. Living with HIV/AIDS, poor self-care and usual activities, and disclosure of health issues to spouses or intimate partners were associated with non-adherence. Those patients with pain or depression were more likely to report better adherence. Disclosing health status to spouse/partner increased the risk of incomplete adherence, while disclosing to friends reduced the number of missed dose in the last seven days. Patients attending clinics with comprehensive services had a lower VAS score of adherence compared to those enrolling in clinics with only MMT and general health care. Sustaining the compliance of patients to MMT is principal in the rapid expansion of this service in Vietnam. It is necessary to address the complexity of health care demands of drug users, their difficulties to be rehabilitated into workforce and society, and the stigmatization to maximize the outcomes of MMT program.

  15. Physician Introduction to Opioids for Pain Among Patients with Opioid Dependence and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I.; Herman, Debra S.; Kettavong, Malyna; Alford, Daniel; Anderson, Bradley J.; Stein, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This study determined the frequency of reporting being introduced to opioids by a physician among opioid dependent patients. Cross-sectional analyses were performed using baseline data from a cohort of opioid addicts seeking treatment with buprenorphine. The primary outcome was response to the question: “Who introduced you to opiates?” Covariates included sociodemographics, depression, pain, current and prior substance use. Of 140 participants, 29% reported that they had been introduced to opioids by a physician. Of those who were introduced to opioids by a physician, all indicated that they had initially used opioids for pain, versus only 11% of those who did not report being introduced to opioids by a physician (p<0.01). There was no difference in current pain (78% vs. 85%, p=0.29), however participants who were introduced to opioids by a physician were more likely to have chronic pain (63% vs. 43%, p=0.04). A substantial proportion of individuals with opioid dependence seeking treatment may have been introduced to opioids by a physician. PMID:20727704

  16. Healthy Adult Male Facial Skin Surface Lipid Pheromone p.o. to Treat Opioid Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-20

    Opioid Addiction; Opioid Abuse, Continuous Use; Opioid Use; Opioid-Related Disorders; Paternal Pheromone Deficiency; Opioid Dependence; Opioid Abuse; Opioid-use Disorder; Opioid Intoxication; Opioid Abuse, Episodic

  17. The prescription opioid epidemic: an overview for anesthesiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Asim; Juurlink, David N

    2016-01-01

    The objectives for preparing this article were to review the historical context and epidemiology surrounding the North American prescription opioid crisis, to summarize the evidence regarding the benefits and harms of long-term opioid therapy for non-cancer pain, and to outline ways in which anesthesiologists may help ameliorate the problem. We searched PubMed, Google Scholar, and EMBASE™ for relevant articles using various search terms, including pain, opioid epidemic, history of opioid use, perioperative care, and addiction. Related citations were further explored and searched depending on the specific subtopic of interest. In the 1980s and early 1990s, opioids were infrequently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Thereafter, however, physicians were gradually inculcated with the message that long-term opioid therapy was a safe and effective treatment option for patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Pharmaceutical companies supported this growing movement and employed aggressive and sometimes misleading marketing strategies for new opioid formulations. As a result, the practice of prescribing opioids flourished in the late 1990s. The surge in prescribing opioids was accompanied by a marked increase in opioid-related morbidity and mortality. This change in practice transpired despite the absence of randomized trials showing clinically significant benefit from the long-term use of opioids. Subsequently, however, a large and growing body of evidence has emerged quantifying the harms associated with long-term opioid therapy. Anesthesiologists widely prescribe opioids for acute and chronic pain; yet, as a group, they may be largely unaware of the current state of this growing epidemic and what role they can play to rectify this problem. Anesthesiologists are well positioned to take a leadership role in the management of postoperative discharge opioid therapy in an effort to curb the overutilization of opioids. Furthermore, anesthesiologists who regularly

  18. The evolution of chronic opioid therapy and recognizing addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, Akiva M; Berkowitz, Oren; Renner, John A

    2015-05-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most common complaints in the United States. Opioids have become a frequently prescribed treatment for patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. Concurrently, opioid use disorders have risen to epidemic levels. Studies investigating iatrogenic opioid addiction have been of limited quality. Aberrant drug-related behaviors may be warning signs of impending addiction. Proper screening and close monitoring are essential for managing patients on opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain.

  19. Opioid Therapy for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell K Portenoy

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term administration of an opioid drug for chronic nonmalignant pain continues to be controversial, but is no longer uniformly rejected by pain specialists. This is true despite concerns that the regulatory agencies that oversee physician prescribing of opioid drugs continue to stigmatize the practice. The changing clinical perspective has been driven, in part, by widespread acknowledgement of the remarkably favourable outcomes achieved during opioid treatment of cancer pain. These outcomes contrast starkly with popular teaching about chronic opioid therapy and affirm the potential for prolonged efficacy, tolerable side effects, enhanced function associated with improved comfort and minimal risk of aberrant drug-related behaviours consistent with addiction. A large anecdotal experience in populations with nonmalignant pain suggests that these patients are more heterogeneous and that opioid therapy will greatly benefit some and will contribute to negative outcomes for others. The few controlled clinical trials that have been performed support the safety and efficacy of opioid therapy, but have been too limited to ensure generalization to the clinical setting. A critical review of the medical literature pertaining to chronic pain, opioid pharmacology and addiction medicine can clarify misconceptions about opioid therapy and provide a foundation for patient selection and drug administration. The available data support the view that opioids are no panacea for chronic pain, but should be considered in carefully selected patients using clinically derived guidelines that stress a structured approach and ongoing monitoring of efficacy, adverse effects, functional outcomes and the occurrence of aberrant drug-related behaviours.

  20. Key components of a service model providing early childhood support for women attending opioid treatment clinics: an Australian state health service review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Susan R; Schmied, Virginia; Nicholls, Daniel; Dahlen, Hannah

    2012-09-01

    To report the findings of a service review--specifically the strategy to provide early childhood services 'on site' at opioid treatment clinics to address access difficulties. Child and family health nurses are skilled in the assessment and support of families during early childhood. However, women with a history of substance abuse are often cautious when engaging with universal and other health services, with the result that the infant may miss recommended developmental screening and early referral to improve health outcomes. In 2006, an internal review was undertaken of the integration of early childhood and parenting services at opioid treatment clinics in a large Area Health Service of New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative study design, using semi-structured interview questions was used. Data were collected via six focus groups (4-15 participants in each group) and individual interview of child and family health nurses, nurse unit managers and clinical staff (n=58). Three key components of a model for providing early childhood support in collaboration with opioid treatment services were identified. First, the importance of building a trusting relationship between the woman and the child and family health nurses, second, maintaining continuity of care and a multidisciplinary/multiagency approach, and finally the importance of staff education, support and professional development. The provision of early childhood and parenting services on site, as part of a multidisciplinary 'one stop shop' approach to service delivery was a clear recommendation of the review. Reduction of access difficulties to specialised early childhood support is of benefit to clients, community health services attempting to provide a service to this difficult to reach population and to drug and alcohol services seeking to provide a high level of holistic care for clients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Opioid prescriptions for pain and epidemic of overdose death: can the dramatic reduction in anesthesia mortality serve as an example?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kissin I

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Igor Kissin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: The annual number of US deaths from prescription-opioid overdose quadrupled between 1999 and 2010 and in 2010 alone reached 16,651. Deaths from opioid overdose have now surpassed the historic death toll from another drug-related epidemic – anesthesia mortality. In 1954, Beecher and Todd published reliable data on anesthesia-related mortality in the US, estimating the annual number of deaths to be nearly 5,000. Presently anesthesia/anesthetics are reported as the underlying cause in approximately 34 deaths in the US annually. This spectacular decline in anesthesia-related mortality could serve as an example for attempts to curb the epidemic of opioid overdose death. The main reason that led to the dramatic decline in anesthesia-related mortality is the context in which anesthetics are used. It includes training of the anesthesia providers, the introduction of specific standards of patient safety, and anesthesia monitoring. I suggest that the introduction of a similar multifactorial proper context for the use of opioids in the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain might be the same “game changer” it was for safety in anesthesia. Keywords: chronic pain, addiction, opioid-use disorder, treatment compliance, apprenticeship, metrics of opioid effectiveness, aberrant opioid-related behavior

  2. Evaluating eating behavior treatments by FDA standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janet eTomiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral treatments for obesity are not evaluated by the same criteria as pharmaceutical drugs, even though treatments such as low-calorie dieting are widely prescribed, require the patients’ time and investment, and may have risks. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA has a procedure for evaluating drugs, in which drugmakers must answer the following questions: (1 Is the treatment safe? (2 How dangerous is the condition the intervention is treating? (3 Is the treatment effective? (4 Is the treatment safe and effective for large numbers of people? We argue that using this framework to evaluate behavioral interventions could help identify unanswered research questions on their efficacy and effectiveness, and we use the example of low-calorie dieting to illustrate how FDA criteria might be applied in the context of behavioral medicine.

  3. Comparing methadone and buprenorphine maintenance with methadone-assisted withdrawal for the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund IO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ingunn O Lund1, Heather Fitzsimons2, Michelle Tuten2, Margaret S Chisolm2, Kevin E O’Grady3, Hendrée E Jones2,41SERAF-Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; 3Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD; 4Substance Abuse Treatment Evaluations and Interventions Research Program, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USAAbstract: Pregnancy can motivate opioid-dependent women to seek substance abuse treatment. Research has demonstrated that although prenatal exposure to buprenorphine results in less severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS relative to prenatal methadone exposure, the maternal and other neonatal outcomes are similar for the two medications. Maternal and neonatal outcomes for opioid-dependent pregnant women receiving these medications have not been systematically compared with methadone-assisted withdrawal. The present study provides an initial assessment of the relative efficacy of both methadone and buprenorphine maintenance versus methadone-assisted withdrawal in terms of neonatal and maternal delivery outcomes. Data were derived from (1 the MOTHER (Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research study at the Johns Hopkins University Bayview Medical Center (JHBMC, or (2 retrospective records review of women who underwent methadone-assisted withdrawal at the JHBMC during the time period in which participants were enrolled in the MOTHER study. Compared with the methadone maintenance group, the methadone-assisted withdrawal group had a significantly lower mean NAS peak score (Means = 13.7 vs 7.0; P = 0.002, required a significantly lower mean amount of morphine to treat NAS (Means = 82.8 vs 0.2; P < 0.001, had significantly fewer days medicated for NAS (Means = 31.5 vs 3.9; P < 0.001, and remained in the hospital for a significantly fewer number of

  4. Prescription opioid abuse, pain and addiction: clinical issues and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Walter; Mooney, Larissa; Hillhouse, Maureen

    2011-05-01

    Prescription opioid misuse in the USA has increased over threefold since 1990 to epidemic proportions, with substantial increases in prescription opioid use also reported in other countries, such as Australia and New Zealand. The broad availability of prescription pain medications, coupled with public misconceptions about their safety and addictive potential, have contributed to the recent surge in non-medical use of prescription opioids and corresponding increases in treatment admissions for problems related to opioid misuse. Given competing pressures faced by physicians to both diagnose and treat pain syndromes and identify individuals at risk for addictive disorders, the use of opioids in the treatment of pain poses a significant clinical challenge. This paper reviews the interaction between pain and opioid addiction with a focus on clinical management issues, including risk factors for opioid dependence in patients with chronic pain and the use of assessment tools to identify and monitor at-risk individuals. Treatment options for opioid dependence and pain are reviewed, including the use of the partial µ agonist buprenorphine in the management of concurrent pain and opioid addiction. Physicians should strive to find a reasonable balance between minimising potential adverse effects of opioid medications without diminishing legitimate access to opioids for analgesia. The article discusses the need to identify methods for minimising risks and negative consequences associated with opioid analgesics and poses research directions, including the development of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations, genetic risk factors for opioid dependence and opioid-induced hyperalgesia as a potential target for medication therapy. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  5. Tolerance and withdrawal from prolonged opioid use in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Willson, Douglas F; Berger, John; Harrison, Rick; Meert, Kathleen L; Zimmerman, Jerry; Carcillo, Joseph; Newth, Christopher J L; Prodhan, Parthak; Dean, J Michael; Nicholson, Carol

    2010-05-01

    After prolonged opioid exposure, children develop opioid-induced hyperalgesia, tolerance, and withdrawal. Strategies for prevention and management should be based on the mechanisms of opioid tolerance and withdrawal. Relevant manuscripts published in the English language were searched in Medline by using search terms "opioid," "opiate," "sedation," "analgesia," "child," "infant-newborn," "tolerance," "dependency," "withdrawal," "analgesic," "receptor," and "individual opioid drugs." Clinical and preclinical studies were reviewed for data synthesis. Mechanisms of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance suggest important drug- and patient-related risk factors that lead to tolerance and withdrawal. Opioid tolerance occurs earlier in the younger age groups, develops commonly during critical illness, and results more frequently from prolonged intravenous infusions of short-acting opioids. Treatment options include slowly tapering opioid doses, switching to longer-acting opioids, or specifically treating the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Novel therapies may also include blocking the mechanisms of opioid tolerance, which would enhance the safety and effectiveness of opioid analgesia. Opioid tolerance and withdrawal occur frequently in critically ill children. Novel insights into opioid receptor physiology and cellular biochemical changes will inform scientific approaches for the use of opioid analgesia and the prevention of opioid tolerance and withdrawal.

  6. The Future of Opioid Agonist Therapies in Ukraine: A Qualitative Assessment of Multilevel Barriers and Ways Forward to Promote Retention in Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojko, Martha J; Mazhnaya, Alyona; Marcus, Ruthanne; Makarenko, Iuliia; Islam, Zahedul; Filippovych, Sergey; Dvoriak, Sergii; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-07-01

    Opioid agonist therapies (OAT) to treat opioid addiction in people who inject drugs (PWID) began in Ukraine in 2004. Scale-up of OAT, however, has been hampered by both low enrollment and high attrition. To better understand the factors influencing OAT retention among PWID in Ukraine, qualitative data from 199 PWIDs were collected during 25 focus groups conducted in five Ukrainian cities from February to April 2013. The experiences of PWID who were currently or previously on OAT or currently trying to access OAT were analyzed to identify entry and retention barriers encountered. Transcribed data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Individual beliefs about OAT, particularly misaligned treatment goals between clients and providers, influenced PWID's treatment seeking behaviors. Multiple programmatic and structural issues, including inconvenient hours and treatment site locations, complicated dosing regimens, inflexible medication dispensing guidelines, and mistreatment by clinic and medical staff also strongly influenced OAT retention. Findings suggest the need for both programmatic and policy-level structural changes such as revising legal regulations covering OAT dispensing, formalizing prescription dosing policies and making OAT more available through other sites, including primary care settings as a way to improve treatment retention. Quality improvement interventions that target treatment settings could also be deployed to overcome healthcare delivery barriers. Additional patient education and medical professional development around establishing realistic treatment goals as well as community awareness campaigns that address the myths and fears associated with OAT can be leveraged to overcome individual, family and community-level barriers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Women who abuse prescription opioids: findings from the Addiction Severity Index-Multimedia Version Connect prescription opioid database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Traci C; Grimes Serrano, Jill M; Licari, Andrea; Budman, Simon H; Butler, Stephen F

    2009-07-01

    Evidence suggests gender differences in abuse of prescription opioids. This study aimed to describe characteristics of women who abuse prescription opioids in a treatment-seeking sample and to contrast gender differences among prescription opioid abusers. Data collected November 2005 to April 2008 derived from the Addiction Severity Index Multimedia Version Connect (ASI-MV Connect) database. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression examined correlates of prescription opioid abuse stratified by gender. 29,906 assessments from 220 treatment centers were included, of which 12.8% (N=3821) reported past month prescription opioid abuse. Women were more likely than men to report use of any prescription opioid (29.8% females vs. 21.1% males, phistory of drug overdose. Men-specific correlates were age screen and identify those at highest risk of prescription opioid abuse. Prevention and intervention efforts with a gender-specific approach are warranted.

  8. Increases in self-reported fentanyl use among a population entering drug treatment: The need for systematic surveillance of illicitly manufactured opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Theodore J; Ellis, Matthew S; Kasper, Zachary A

    2017-08-01

    Recent reports indicate a sharp increase in fentanyl-related overdose deaths across the United States, much of which is likely related to the introduction of cheap, illicitly manufactured fentanyl derivatives. In this study, we sought to estimate the magnitude of illicit fentanyl use from 2012 to 2016 using a national opioid abuse surveillance system. The study program surveyed 10,900 individuals entering substance abuse treatment for opioid use disorder, with participants asked to endorse past month 'use to get high' of fentanyl drugs, stratified by identifiable (i.e., branded) fentanyl formulations or a 'type unknown' drug alleged to contain fentanyl. Total past-month fentanyl-use rose modestly from 2012 to 2016. While use of known fentanyl products remained relatively stable (mean=10.9%; P=0.25), endorsements of 'unknown' fentanyl products nearly doubled from 9% in 2013 to 15.1% by 2016 (Pfentanyl use shows that recent increases in fentanyl use seem to be due almost entirely to 'unknown' fentanyl presumed to be illicitly manufactured. Given that it is difficult to assess the extent to which fentanyl may have been substituted for another drug (i.e., oxycodone, alprazolam, etc.) or was used as a heroin admixture, our data likely represent an underestimation of the full magnitude of illicit fentanyl abuse. As such, this growing public health problem requires immediate attention and more systematic efforts to identify and track its abuse. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Obturator Neuromodulation with Laparoscopic Placement of an Obturator Lead for the Treatment of Intractable Opioid Dependent Chronic Pelvic Pain due to Obturator Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Richard P

    2018-05-12

    Chronic pelvic pain(CPP) is a common condition in women that can have a devastating effect on quality of life. Some of the most severe forms of CPP are related to peripheral nerve injuries causing persistent neuropathic pain. This is a case of a young woman with severe opioid dependent chronic pelvic and right groin pain due to obturator neuralgia. She had failed a multitude of treatments including multiple medications, manual physical therapy, nerve blocks, surgical neurolysis and spinal cord stimulation without significant benefit. She underwent a trial of peripheral neuromodulation of the obturator nerve with laparoscopic placement of a quadripolar lead. During the 6-day trial she had almost complete relief of her pain; therefore, she underwent permanent implantation of an intermittent pulse generator. Over the next 6 months she was completely weaned completely off her chronic opioids. At 23 months post implantation, she had essentially no pain and is no longer on any analgesic, antidepressant or membrane stabilizing medications. Peripheral Neuromodulation has the potential to alleviate pain and significantly improve quality of life in women with longstanding neuropathic chronic pelvic pain who have failed multimodal conservative therapy. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Opioid-Induced Glial Activation: Mechanisms of Activation and Implications for Opioid Analgesia, Dependence, and Reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Hutchinson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will introduce the concept of toll-like receptor (TLR–mediated glial activation as central to all of the following: neuropathic pain, compromised acute opioid analgesia, and unwanted opioid side effects (tolerance, dependence, and reward. Attenuation of glial activation has previously been demonstrated both to alleviate exaggerated pain states induced by experimental pain models and to reduce the development of opioid tolerance. Here we demonstrate that selective acute antagonism of TLR4 results in reversal of neuropathic pain as well as potentiation of opioid analgesia. Attenuating central nervous system glial activation was also found to reduce the development of opioid dependence, and opioid reward at a behavioral (conditioned place preference and neurochemical (nucleus accumbens microdialysis of morphine-induced elevations in dopamine level of analysis. Moreover, a novel antagonism of TLR4 by (+- and (˗-isomer opioid antagonists has now been characterized, and both antiallodynic and morphine analgesia potentiating activity shown. Opioid agonists were found to also possess TLR4 agonistic activity, predictive of glial activation. Targeting glial activation is a novel and as yet clinically unexploited method for treatment of neuropathic pain. Moreover, these data indicate that attenuation of glial activation, by general or selective TLR antagonistic mechanisms, may also be a clinical method for separating the beneficial (analgesia and unwanted (tolerance, dependence, and reward actions of opioids, thereby improving the safety and efficacy of their use.

  11. Opioids, pain, the brain, and hyperkatifeia: a framework for the rational use of opioids for pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurman, Joseph; Koob, George F; Gutstein, Howard B

    2010-07-01

    Opioids have relieved more human suffering than any other medication, but their use is still fraught with significant concerns of misuse, abuse, and addiction. This theoretical article explores the hypothesis that opioid misuse in the context of pain management produces a hypersensitivity to emotional distress, termed hyperkatifeia. In the misuse of opioids, neural substrates that mediate positive emotional states (brain reward systems) are compromised, and substrates mediating negative emotional states (brain stress systems) are enhanced. A reflection and early marker of such a nonhomeostatic state may be the development of opioid-induced hyperkatifeia, defined as the increased intensity of the constellation of negative emotional/motivational symptoms and signs observed during withdrawal from drugs of abuse (derived from the Greek "katifeia" for dejection or negative emotional state) and is most likely to occur in subjects in whom the opioid produces a break with homeostasis and less likely to occur when the opioid is restoring homeostasis, such as in effective pain treatment. When the opioid appropriately relieves pain, opponent processes are not engaged. However, if the opioid is administered in excess of need because of overdose, pharmacokinetic variables, or treating an individual without pain, then the body will react to that perturbation by engaging opponent processes in the domains of both pain (hyperalgesia) and negative emotional states (hyperkatifeia). Repeated engagement of opponent processes without time for the brain's emotional systems to reestablish homeostasis will further drive changes in emotional processes that may produce opioid abuse or addiction, particularly in individuals with genetic or environmental vulnerability.

  12. Buprenorphine for managing opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M; Mbewe, Dalitso

    2017-02-21

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of substitution treatment. To assess the effects of buprenorphine versus tapered doses of methadone, alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists, symptomatic medications or placebo, or different buprenorphine regimens for managing opioid withdrawal, in terms of the intensity of the withdrawal syndrome experienced, duration and completion of treatment, and adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 11, 2016), MEDLINE (1946 to December week 1, 2016), Embase (to 22 December 2016), PsycINFO (1806 to December week 3, 2016), and the Web of Science (to 22 December 2016) and handsearched the reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials of interventions using buprenorphine to modify the signs and symptoms of withdrawal in participants who were primarily opioid dependent. Comparison interventions involved reducing doses of methadone, alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists (clonidine or lofexidine), symptomatic medications or placebo, and different buprenorphine-based regimens. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 27 studies involving 3048 participants. The main comparators were clonidine or lofexidine (14 studies). Six studies compared buprenorphine versus methadone, and seven compared different rates of buprenorphine dose reduction. We assessed 12 studies as being at high risk of bias in at least one of seven domains of methodological quality. Six of these studies compared buprenorphine with clonidine or lofexidine and two with methadone; the other four studies compared different rates of buprenorphine dose reduction.For the comparison of buprenorphine and methadone in tapered doses, meta-analysis was not possible for the outcomes of intensity of withdrawal or adverse effects. However, information reported by the individual studies was suggestive of buprenorphine and methadone having similar capacity to

  13. Long-term course of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Evans, Elizabeth; Grella, Christine; Ling, Walter; Anglin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Opioid addiction is associated with excess mortality, morbidities, and other adverse conditions. Guided by a life-course framework, we review the literature on the long-term course of opioid addiction in terms of use trajectories, transitions, and turning points, as well as other factors that facilitate recovery from addiction. Most long-term follow-up studies are based on heroin addicts recruited from treatment settings (mostly methadone maintenance treatment), many of whom are referred by the criminal justice system. Cumulative evidence indicates that opioid addiction is a chronic disorder with frequent relapses. Longer treatment retention is associated with a greater likelihood of abstinence, whereas incarceration is negatively related to subsequent abstinence. Over the long term, the mortality rate of opioid addicts (overdose being the most common cause) is about 6 to 20 times greater than that of the general population; among those who remain alive, the prevalence of stable abstinence from opioid use is low (less than 30% after 10-30 years of observation), and many continue to use alcohol and other drugs after ceasing to use opioids. Histories of sexual or physical abuse and comorbid mental disorders are associated with the persistence of opioid use, whereas family and social support, as well as employment, facilitates recovery. Maintaining opioid abstinence for at least five years substantially increases the likelihood of future stable abstinence. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment options (buprenorphine and naltrexone) include depot formulations offering longer duration of medication; their impact on the long-term course of opioid addiction remains to be assessed.

  14. 77 FR 44695 - Revised Meeting Notice: Leadership Meeting on Maternal, Fetal, and Infant Opioid Exposure and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... maternal prescription drug abuse and dependence and resulting increases in opioid exposed babies with NAS and possibly other consequences. Misuse and abuse of, and dependence upon, prescription opioid drugs... access treatment through family medicine and gynecological practitioners, and specialty treatment...

  15. Past-year Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Opioid Prescriptions and Self-reported Opioid Use in an Emergency Department Population With Opioid Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Kathryn; D'Onofrio, Gail; Fiellin, David A; Chawarski, Marek C; O'Connor, Patrick G; Owens, Patricia H; Pantalon, Michael V; Bernstein, Steven L

    2017-11-22

    Despite increasing reliance on prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) as a response to the opioid epidemic, the relationship between aberrant drug-related behaviors captured by the PDMP and opioid use disorder is incompletely understood. How PDMP data should guide emergency department (ED) assessment has not been studied. The objective was to evaluate a relationship between PDMP opioid prescription records and self-reported nonmedical opioid use of prescription opioids in a cohort of opioid-dependent ED patients enrolled in a treatment trial. PDMP opioid prescription records during 1 year prior to study enrollment on 329 adults meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV criteria for opioid dependence entering a randomized clinical trial in a large, urban ED were cross-tabulated with data on 30-day nonmedical prescription opioid use self-report. The association among these two types of data was assessed by the Goodman and Kruskal's gamma; a logistic regression was used to explore characteristics of participants who had PDMP record of opioid prescriptions. During 1 year prior to study enrollment, 118 of 329 (36%) patients had at least one opioid prescription (range = 1-51) in our states' PDMP. Patients who reported ≥15 of 30 days of nonmedical prescription opioid use were more likely to have at least four PDMP opioid prescriptions (20/38; 53%) than patients reporting 1 to 14 days (14/38, 37%) or zero days of nonmedical prescription opioid use (4/38, 11%; p = 0.002). Female sex and having health insurance were significantly more represented in the PDMP (p Medicine.

  16. Computational opioid prescribing: a novel application of clinical pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Oscar A; Linares, Annemarie L

    2011-01-01

    We implemented a pharmacokinetics-based mathematical modeling technique using algebra to assist prescribers with point-of-care opioid dosing. We call this technique computational opioid prescribing (COP). Because population pharmacokinetic parameter values are needed to estimate drug dosing regimen designs for individual patients using COP, and those values are not readily available to prescribers because they exist scattered in the vast pharmacology literature, we estimated the population pharmacokinetic parameter values for 12 commonly prescribed opioids from various sources using the bootstrap resampling technique. Our results show that opioid dosing regimen design, evaluation, and modification is feasible using COP. We conclude that COP is a new technique for the quantitative assessment of opioid dosing regimen design evaluation and adjustment, which may help prescribers to manage acute and chronic pain at the point-of-care. Potential benefits include opioid dose optimization and minimization of adverse opioid drug events, leading to potential improvement in patient treatment outcomes and safety.

  17. Calculation of Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) Treatment Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    examples of calculations of treatment standards including for High Concentration Selenium Wastes Using Data Submitted by Chemical Waste Management (CWM) and Antimony Using Data Submitted by Chemical Waste Management and Data Obtained From Rollins.

  18. Neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Szarvas, Szilvia

    2012-02-03

    When intrathecal and epidural opioids are administered, pruritus occurs as an unwanted and troublesome side effect. The reported incidence varies between 30% and 100%. The exact mechanisms of neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus remain unclear. Postulated mechanisms include the presence of an "itch center" in the central nervous system, medullary dorsal horn activation, and antagonism of inhibitory transmitters. The treatment of intrathecal opioid-induced pruritus remains a challenge. Many pharmacological therapies, including antihistamines, 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists, opiate-antagonists, propofol, nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs, and droperidol, have been studied. In this review, we will summarize pathophysiological and pharmacological advances that will improve understanding and ultimately the management of this troublesome problem.

  19. Does exposure to opioid substitution treatment in prison reduce the risk of death after release? A national prospective observational study in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, John; Stillwell, Garry; Jones, Hayley; Cooper, Alisha; Eastwood, Brian; Farrell, Michael; Lowden, Tim; Maddalena, Nino; Metcalfe, Chris; Shaw, Jenny; Hickman, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    People with opioid use disorder (OUD) in prison face an acute risk of death after release. We estimated whether prison-based opioid substitution treatment (OST) reduces this risk. Prospective observational cohort study using prison health care, national community drug misuse treatment and deaths registers. Recruitment at 39 adult prisons in England (32 male; seven female) accounting for 95% of OST treatment in England during study planning. Adult prisoners diagnosed with OUD (recruited: September 2010-August 2013; first release: September 2010; last release: October 2014; follow-up to February 2016; n = 15 141 in the risk set). At release, participants were classified as OST exposed (n = 8645) or OST unexposed (n = 6496). The OST unexposed group did not receive OST, or had been withdrawn, or had a low dose. Primary outcome: all-cause mortality (ACM) in the first 4 weeks. drug-related poisoning (DRP) deaths in the first 4 weeks; ACM and DRP mortality after 4 weeks to 1 year; admission to community drug misuse treatment in the first 4 weeks. Unadjusted and adjusted Cox regression models (covariates: sex, age, drug injecting, problem alcohol use, use of benzodiazepines, cocaine, prison transfer and admission to community treatment), tested difference in mortality rates and community treatment uptake. During the first 4 weeks after prison release there were 24 ACM deaths: six in the OST exposed group and 18 in the OST unexposed group [mortality rate 0.93 per 100 person-years (py) versus 3.67 per 100 py; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.25; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.10-0.64]. There were 18 DRP deaths: OST exposed group mortality rate 0.47 per 100 py versus 3.06 per 100 py in the OST unexposed group (HR = 0.15; 95% CI = 0.04-0.53). There was no group difference in mortality risk after the first month. The OST exposed group was more likely to enter drug misuse treatment in the first month post-release (odds ratio 2.47, 95% CI = 2.31-2.65). The OST

  20. Genetics Home Reference: opioid addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Opioid addiction Opioid addiction Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Opioid addiction is a long-lasting (chronic) disease that can ...

  1. Trans-identity - the Standards of Diagnostics and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessmann H.-V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available German Society for Sexual Research, Academy of Sexual Medicine and Society of Sexology formulated standards for evaluation and treatment of transsexuals. The creation of the standards involved Sophinette Becker, Hartmut A. G. Bosinski, Ulrich Clement, Wolf Eicher, Thomas M. Goerlich, Uwe Hartmann, Götz Kockott, Dieter Langer, Wilhelm E. Preuss, Gunter Schmidt, Alfred Springer, Reinhard Wille. Since 1980, the Federal Republic of Germany has a law on transsexualism, which regulates the right of the individual to change the sex. However, until now there were no specifically defined standards of assessment and treatment of transsexuals. For the first time, in 1979 Harry Benjamin invited the International Medical Association of Germany to revise the standards of medical care for gender dysphoria. The following standards of assessment and treatment of transsexuals have been developed at a conference convened by the German Society for Research Expert Committee under the leadership of Sophinette Becker. The review of currently valid standards for evaluation and treatment of transgender is the subject of this article

  2. The gut-brain interaction in opioid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarali, Hamid I; Dewey, William L

    2017-12-01

    The prevailing opioid crisis has necessitated the need to understand mechanisms leading to addiction and tolerance, the major contributors to overdose and death and to develop strategies for developing drugs for pain treatment that lack abuse liability and side-effects. Opioids are commonly used for treatment of pain and symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. The significant effect of opioids in the gut, both acute and chronic, includes persistent constipation and paradoxically may also worsen pain symptoms. Recent work has suggested a significant role of the gastrointestinal microbiome in behavioral responses to opioids, including the development of tolerance to its pain-relieving effects. In this review, we present current concepts of gut-brain interaction in analgesic tolerance to opioids and suggest that peripheral mechanisms emanating from the gut can profoundly affect central control of opioid function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evolution: Its Treatment in K-12 State Science Curriculum Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, L. S.

    2001-12-01

    State standards are the basis upon which states and local schools build curricula. Usually taking the form of lists of what students are expected to learn at specified grades or clusters of grades, they influence statewide examinations, textbooks, teacher education and credentialing, and other areas in which states typically exercise control over local curriculum development. State science standards vary very widely in overall quality.1,2 This is especially true in their treatment of evolution, both in the life sciences and to a somewhat lesser extent in geology and astronomy. Not surprisingly, a detailed evaluation of the treatment of evolution in state science standards3 has evoked considerably more public interest than the preceding studies of overall quality. We here consider the following questions: What constitutes a good treatment of evolution in science standards and how does one evaluate the standards? Which states have done well, and which less well? What nonscientific influences have been brought to bear on standards, for what reasons, and by whom? What strategies have been used to obscure or distort the role of evolution as the central organizing principle of the historical sciences? What are the effects of such distortions on students' overall understanding of science? What can the scientific community do to assure the publication of good science standards and to counteract attacks on good science teaching? 1. Lerner, L. S., State Science Standards: An Appraisal of Science Standards in 36 States, The Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, Washington, D.C., March 1998. 2. Lerner, L. S. et al ., The State of State Standards 2000, ibid., January 2000. 3. Lerner, L. S., Good Science, Bad Science: Teaching Evolution In the States, ibid., September 2000.

  4. Relative efficacy of cash versus vouchers in engaging opioid substitution treatment clients in survey-based research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, Libby; Islam, M Mofizul; Day, Carolyn Ann

    2013-04-01

    Concerns that cash payments to people who inject drugs (PWID) to reimburse research participation will facilitate illicit drug purchases have led some ethical authorities to mandate department store/supermarket vouchers as research reimbursement. To examine the relative efficacy of the two forms of reimbursement in engaging PWID in research, clients of two public opioid substitution therapy clinics were invited to participate in a 20-30 min, anonymous and confidential interview about alcohol consumption on two separate occasions, 4 months apart. Under the crossover design, at Time 1, clients of Clinic 1 were offered $A20 cash as reimbursement, while clients of Clinic 2 were offered an $A20 voucher; at Time 2, the form of reimbursement was reversed. Using clinic records to determine the denominator (number of clients dosed), we found that compared with clients offered a voucher, a significantly higher proportion of clients who were offered cash participated in the survey (58% (139/241) vs 74% (186/252); χ(2)=14.27; p=0.0002). At first participation, respondents most commonly reported planning to purchase food/drinks/groceries (68%), cigarettes (21%) and transport/fuel (11%) with their payments, with those reimbursed in cash more likely to report planning to fund transport/fuel (19% vs 1%; ppayment. Results demonstrate that modest cash payments enhanced recruitment of this group, an important consideration given the challenges of delineating the parameters of a population defined by illegal activity, seemingly without promoting excessive additional drug use.

  5. Opioids in Cancer Pain: Right or Privilege?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Leanne K; Imam, Syed N; Braun, Ursula K

    2017-09-01

    Opioid analgesia is a mainstay of the treatment of cancer pain. Treatment of pain in patients with cancer with an ongoing substance abuse disorder can be difficult. We report the ethical challenges of treating a patient with cancer with a concomitant substance abuse disorder in an outpatient palliative care setting. We present an analysis of ethical considerations for the palliative care physician and strategies to aid in the successful treatment of such patients. We argue that there are select patients with cancer for whom exclusion from treatment with opioid therapy is warranted if their health is endangered by prescription of these medications.

  6. Progress in standards for nuclear air and gas treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchsted, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    Standardization in nuclear air and gas treatment spans a period of more than 25 years, starting with military specifications for HEPA filters and filter media, and now progressing to the development of a formal code analogous to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Whereas the current standard for components and installation of nuclear air cleaning systems is limited to safety related facilities for nuclear power plants, the proposed code will cover all types of critical ventilation and air and gas treatment installations for all types of nuclear facilities

  7. The proposed combustion standards and DOE thermal treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFee, J.; Hinman, M.B.; Eaton, D.; NcNeel, K.

    1997-01-01

    Under the provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA) concerning emission of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the proposed Revised Standards for Hazardous Waste Combustors on April 19, 1996 (EPA, 1996). These standards would apply to the existing Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive and mixed waste incinerators, and may be applied to several developing alternatives to incineration. The DOE has reviewed the basis for these regulations and prepared extensive comments to present concerns about the bases and implications of the standards. DOE is now discussing compliance options with the EPA for regulation of radioactive and mixed waste thermal treatment systems

  8. Gender and racial/ethnic differences in addiction severity, HIV risk, and quality of life among adults in opioid detoxification: results from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Burchett

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Li-Tzy Wu1,2, Walter Ling3, Bruce Burchett1, Dan G Blazer1,2, Jack Shostak2, George E Woody41Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, 2Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3David Geffen School of Medicine, NPI/Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania and Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA, USAPurpose: Detoxification often serves as an initial contact for treatment and represents an opportunity for engaging patients in aftercare to prevent relapse. However, there is limited information concerning clinical profiles of individuals seeking detoxification, and the opportunity to engage patients in detoxification for aftercare often is missed. This study examined clinical profiles of a geographically diverse sample of opioid-dependent adults in detoxification to discern the treatment needs of a growing number of women and whites with opioid addiction and to inform interventions aimed at improving use of aftercare or rehabilitation.Methods: The sample included 343 opioid-dependent patients enrolled in two national multisite studies of the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN001-002. Patients were recruited from 12 addiction treatment programs across the nation. Gender and racial/ethnic differences in addiction severity, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV risk, and quality of life were examined.Results: Women and whites were more likely than men and African Americans to have greater psychiatric and family/social relationship problems and report poorer health-related quality of life and functioning. Whites and Hispanics exhibited higher levels of total HIV risk scores and risky injection drug use scores than African Americans, and Hispanics showed a higher level of unprotected sexual behaviors than whites. African Americans were

  9. 40 CFR 268.44 - Variance from a treatment standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... complete petition may be requested as needed to send to affected states and Regional Offices. (e) The... provide an opportunity for public comment. The final decision on a variance from a treatment standard will... than) the concentrations necessary to minimize short- and long-term threats to human health and the...

  10. Compliance with standard treatment guidelines in the management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Hypertension is a leading lifestyle disease and major cause of morbidity and mortality in South Africa, and globally. Standard Treatment Guidelines are issued in this country to assist healthcare workers in the diagnosis and management there of. Considering the debilitating effects caused by hypertension, the ...

  11. Utilization of standard treatment guidelines (STG) at primary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Standard Treatment Guideline (STG) is an essential structural resource component for quality of care in health facilities. In Tanzania less information is available on STG availability, prescriber's awareness and adherence to its use in line with WHO recommendations. Methods: A cross sectional descriptive study ...

  12. [The costs of new drugs compared to current standard treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujeyl, Mariam; Schlegel, Claudia; Gundert-Remy, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Until AMNOG came into effect Germany had free pricing of new drugs. Our exemplary work investigates the costs of new drugs that were licensed in the two years prior to AMNOG, and compares them to the costs of standard treatment that has been used in pivotal trials. Also, the important components of pharmaceutical prices will be illustrated. We retrospectively analysed the European Public Assessment Reports of proprietary medicinal products that the European Medicinal Agency initially approved in 2009 and 2010 and that were tested against an active control in at least one pivotal trial. If the standard treatment was a generic, the average pharmacy retail price of new drugs was 7.4 times (median 7.1) higher than that of standard treatment. If the standard treatment was an originator drug the average price was 1.4 times (median 1.2) higher than that of the new drug. There was no clear correlation of an increase in costs for new drugs and their "grade of innovation" as rated according to the criteria of Fricke. Our study shows that prices of new drugs must be linked to the evidence of comparative benefit; since German drug pricing is complex, cost saving effects obtained thereby will depend on a range of other rules and decisions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. The Impact of Saffron on Symptoms of Withdrawal Syndrome in Patients Undergoing Maintenance Treatment for Opioid Addiction in Sabzevar Parish in 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nemat Shahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Drug dependence is one of the serious problems around the world. Saffron is one of those beneficial medicinal plants which is embedded with a similar mechanism to methadone (e.g., inhibition of serotonin reuptake. Thus, it can be helpful in reducing the withdrawal symptoms. The aim of this study was to reduce the daily dose of methadone usage and reduce its side effects using saffron in the form of medicinal supplements. Methodology. This study was categorized as a clinical trial. Accordingly, 44 clients of addiction treatment centers in Sabzevar parish were randomly selected to participate in this study in 2016–2017. While the experimental group was treated with methadone syrup and self-made saffron capsules, the control group received methadone syrup and placebo capsules. Results. The results showed that the use of saffron and methadone alleviated the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome (p<0.001. Conclusion. Having reviewed the research participants, it was indicated that the introduction of saffron alleviated the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome in patients undergoing maintenance treatment for opioid addiction. Thus, it seems rational to make use of saffron in combination with methadone in order to alleviate the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome.

  14. A case of rhabdomyolysis associated with severe opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangahar, Deepali

    2015-08-01

    While the risk of opioid overdose is widely accepted, the dangers of opioid withdrawal are far less clearly defined. The purpose of this publication is to provide evidence against the erroneous clinical dictum that opioid withdrawal is never life-threatening. This case report (N = 1) illustrates an unfortunate, common scenario of a man abusing prescription opioids and heroin. His attempt at self-detoxification with buprenorphine-naloxone resulted in life-threatening opioid withdrawal. A detailed account of each day of his withdrawal period was documented by patient and family report and review of all medical records. The patient was contacted three months after hospitalization to verify information and determine progress in treatment and abstinence from drugs and alcohol. A review of the literature was completed on severe cases of precipitated and spontaneous opioid withdrawal followed by a discussion of the significance as it relates to this case. Given the widespread use of prescription opioids and opioid maintenance treatment, physicians should be aware of the complications of acute opioid withdrawal and should be equipped to treat these complications. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  15. Effect of electroacupuncture on opioid consumption in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Charlie CL

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is common and has been increasingly managed by opioid medications, of which the long-term efficacy is unknown. Furthermore, there is evidence that long-term use of opioids is associated with reduced pain control, declining physical function and quality of life, and could hinder the goals of integrated pain management. Electroacupuncture (EA has been shown to be effective in reducing postoperative opioid consumption. Limited evidence suggests that acupuncture could assist patients with chronic pain to reduce their requirements for opioids. The proposed research aims to assess if EA is an effective adjunct therapy to standard pain and medication management in reducing opioids use by patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods In this multicentre, randomised, sham-acupuncture controlled, three-arm clinical trial, 316 patients regularly taking opioids for pain control and meeting the defined selection criteria will be recruited from pain management centres and clinics of primary care providers in Victoria, Australia. After a four-week run-in period, the participants are randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups to receive EA, sham EA or no-EA with a ratio of 2:1:1. All participants receive routine pain medication management delivered and supervised by the trial medical doctors. Twelve sessions of semi-structured EA or sham EA treatment are delivered over 10 weeks. Upon completion of the acupuncture treatment period, there is a 12-week follow-up. In total, participants are involved in the trial for 26 weeks. Outcome measures of opioid and non-opioid medication consumption, pain scores and opioid-related adverse events are documented throughout the study. Quality of life, depression, function, and attitude to pain medications are also assessed. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will determine whether EA is of significant clinical value in assisting the management of

  16. Treating opioid dependence. Growing implications for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2004-02-09

    Almost 3 million Americans have abused heroin. The most effective treatment for this concerning epidemic is opioid replacement therapy. Although, from a historical perspective, acceptance of this therapy has been slow, growing evidence supports its efficacy. There are 3 approved medications for opioid maintenance therapy: methadone hydrochloride, levomethadyl acetate, and buprenorphine hydrochloride. Each has unique characteristics that determine its suitability for an individual patient. Cardiac arrhythmias have been reported with methadone and levomethadyl, but not with buprenorphine. Due to concerns about cardiac risk, levomethadyl use has declined and the product may ultimately be discontinued. These recent safety concerns, specifics about opioid detoxification and maintenance, and new federal initiatives were studied. Opioid detoxification has a role in both preventing acute withdrawal and maintaining long-term abstinence. Although only a minority of eligible patients are engaged in treatment, opioid maintenance therapy appears to offer the greatest public health benefits. There is growing interest in expanding treatment into primary care, allowing opioid addiction to be managed like other chronic illnesses. This model has gained wide acceptance in Europe and is now being implemented in the United States. The recent Drug Addiction Treatment Act enables qualified physicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting. Mainstreaming opioid addiction treatment has many advantages; its success will depend on resolution of ethical and delivery system issues as well as improved and expanded training of physicians in addiction medicine.

  17. Is this ?complicated? opioid withdrawal?

    OpenAIRE

    Parkar, S.R.; Seethalakshmi, R; Adarkar, S; Kharawala, S

    2006-01-01

    Seven patients with opioid dependence admitted in the de-addiction centre for detoxification developed convulsions and delirium during the withdrawal phase. After ruling out all other possible causes of these complications, opioid withdrawal seemed to emerge as the most likely explanation. The unpredictability of the course of opioid dependence and withdrawal needs to be considered when treating patients with opioid dependence.

  18. Experience of the use of Ketamine to manage opioid withdrawal in an addicted woman: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanne, Laurence; Nicot, Chloe; Lang, Jean-Philippe; Bertschy, Gilles; Salvat, Eric

    2016-11-10

    Opioids are good painkillers, but many patients treated with opioids as painkillers developed a secondary addiction. These patients need to stop misusing opioids, but the mild-to-severe clinical symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal risk increasing their existing pain. In such cases, ketamine, which is used by anaesthetists and pain physicians to reduce opioid medication, may be an effective agent for managing opioid withdrawal. We describe the case of a woman who developed a severe secondary addiction to opioids in the context of lombo-sciatic pain. She presented a severe opioid addiction, and her physicians refused to prescribe such high doses of opioid treatment (oxycontin® extended-release 120 mg daily, oxycodone 60 mg daily, and acetaminophen/codeine 300 mg/25 mg 6 times per day). To assist her with her opioid withdrawal which risked increasing her existing pain, she received 1 mg/kg ketamine oral solution, and two days after ketamine initiation her opioid treatment was gradually reduced. The patient dramatically reduced the dosage of opioid painkillers and ketamine was withdrawn without any withdrawal symptoms. Ketamine displays many interesting qualities for dealing with all symptoms relating to opioid withdrawal. Accordingly, it could be used instead of many psychotropic treatments, which interact with each other, to help with opioid withdrawal. However, the literature describes addiction to ketamine. All in all, although potentially addictive, ketamine could be a good candidate for the pharmacological management of opioid withdrawal.

  19. Possible Opioid Shopping and its Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexander M; Weatherby, Lisa B; Cepeda, M Soledad; Bradford, Daniel; Yuan, Yingli

    2017-11-01

    We created an operational definition of possible opioid shopping in US commercial health insurance data and examined its correlates. The population consisted of 264,204 treatment courses in persons with a fill for an opioid or diuretic prescription in 2012 and a second within 18 months. We examined counts of prescribers and pharmacies and the numbers of fills and overlaps for ability to discriminate courses of opioids from diuretics, which were a negative control. The most discriminatory measure, indicating possible shopping behavior, was cross-tabulated against other prescriptions filled and diagnoses as found in insurance claims. The associations between claims characteristics and shopping behavior were assessed in a logistic regression. A definition that classified possible "moderate" or "extensive" shopping when a person obtained drug through at least 3 practices and at least 3 pharmacies over 18 months was highly discriminatory between opioid and diuretic treatment. Overlaps between fills and number of fills did not improve the discrimination. Data from insurance claims strongly predicted moderate-to-extensive levels of possible shopping (c=0.82). Prominent among 20 significant predictors were: state of residence; amount of opioid dispensed; self-payment; use of nonspecialist prescribers; high use of anxiolytics, hypnotics, psychostimulants, and antipsychotics; and use of both immediate release and extended-release or long-acting opioids. The use of ≥3 prescribing practices and ≥3 dispensing pharmacies over 18 months sharply discriminated courses of opioid treatment from courses of diuretics. This pattern of fills was additionally associated with the numbers of nonspecialist and self-paid fills, the total morphine milligram equivalents dispensed, and heavier use of drugs for anxiety, sleep, attention, and psychosis.

  20. Medications Development for Opioid Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S. Stevens; Banks, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe methods for preclinical evaluation of candidate medications to treat opioid abuse and dependence. Our perspective is founded on the propositions that (1) drug self-administration procedures provide the most direct method for assessment of medication effects, (2) procedures that assess choice between opioid and nondrug reinforcers are especially useful, and (3) the states of opioid dependence and withdrawal profoundly influence both opioid reinforcement and the effects of candidate medications. Effects of opioid medications on opioid choice in nondependent and opioid-dependent subjects are reviewed. Various nonopioid medications have also been examined, but none yet have been identified that safely and reliably reduce opioid choice. Future research will focus on (1) strategies for increasing safety and/or effectiveness of opioid medications, and (2) continued development of nonopioids such as inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes or inhibitors of opioid-induced glial activation. PMID:23125072

  1. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: management of opioid-induced constipation by peripheral opioid receptor antagonists: prevention or withdrawal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic action of opioid analgesics is compromised by peripheral adverse effects among which opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is the most disabling, with a prevalence reported to vary between 15 and 90 %. Although OIC is usually treated with laxatives, there is insufficient clinical evidence that laxatives are efficacious in this indication. In contrast, there is ample evidence from double- blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trials that peripheral opioid receptor antagonists (PORAs) counteract OIC. This specific treatment modality is currently based on subcutaneous methylnaltrexone for the interruption of OIC in patients with advanced illness, and a fixed combination of oral prolonged-release naloxone with prolonged-release oxycodone for the prevention of OIC in the treatment of non-cancer and cancer pain. Both drugs counteract OIC while the analgesic effect of opioids remains unabated. The clinical studies show that more than 50 % of the patients with constipation under opioid therapy may benefit from the use of PORAs, while PORA-resistant patients are likely to suffer from non-opioid-induced constipation, the prevalence of which increases with age. While the addition of naloxone to oxycodone seems to act by preventing OIC, the intermittent dosing of methylnaltrexone every other day seems to stimulate defaecation by provoking an intestinal withdrawal response. The availability of PORAs provides a novel opportunity to specifically control OIC and other peripheral adverse effects of opioid analgesics (e.g., urinary retention and pruritus). The continuous dosing of a PORA has the advantage of few adverse effects, while intermittent dosing of a PORA can be associated with abdominal cramp-like pain.

  2. Addiction to opioids in chronic pain patients: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-01-01

    , incidence and prevalence of addiction in opioid treated pain patients, screening tools for assessing opioid addiction in chronic pain patients and recommendations regarding addiction problems in national and international guidelines for opioid treatment in cancer patients and chronic non-malignant pain...... patients. The review indicates that the prevalence of addiction varied from 0% up to 50% in chronic non-malignant pain patients, and from 0% to 7.7% in cancer patients depending of the subpopulation studied and the criteria used. The risk of addiction has to be considered when initiating long-term opioid...... long-term opioid treatment, and specialised treatment facilities for pain management or addiction medicine should be consulted in these cases....

  3. Critical issues on opioids in chronic non-cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Sjøgren, Per; Bruera, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    -related quality of life (SF-36), use of the health care system, functional capabilities, satisfaction with medical pain treatment and regular or continuous use of medications. Participants reporting pain were divided into opioid and non-opioid users. The analyses were adjusted for age, gender, concomitant use...

  4. Opioid withdrawal suppression efficacy of oral dronabinol in opioid dependent humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A; Elayi, Samy Claude; Walsh, Sharon L

    2016-07-01

    The cannabinoid (CB) system is a rational novel target for treating opioid dependence, a significant public health problem around the world. This proof-of-concept study examined the potential efficacy of a CB1 receptor partial agonist, dronabinol, in relieving signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Twelve opioid dependent adults participated in this 5-week, inpatient, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Volunteers were maintained on double-blind oxycodone (30mg oral, four times/day) and participated in a training session followed by 7 experimental sessions, each testing a single oral test dose (placebo, oxycodone 30 and 60mg, dronabinol 5, 10, 20, and 30mg [decreased from 40mg]). Placebo was substituted for oxycodone maintenance doses for 21h before each session in order to produce measurable opioid withdrawal. Outcomes included observer- and participant-ratings of opioid agonist, opioid withdrawal and psychomotor/cognitive performance. Oxycodone produced prototypic opioid agonist effects (i.e. suppressing withdrawal and increasing subjective effects indicative of abuse liability). Dronabinol 5 and 10mg produced effects most similar to placebo, while the 20 and 30mg doses produced modest signals of withdrawal suppression that were accompanied by dose-related increases in high, sedation, bad effects, feelings of heart racing, and tachycardia. Dronabinol was not liked more than placebo, showed some impairment in cognitive performance, and was identified as marijuana with increasing dose. CB1 receptor activation is a reasonable strategy to pursue for the treatment of opioid withdrawal; however, dronabinol is not a likely candidate given its modest withdrawal suppression effects of limited duration and previously reported tachycardia during opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hiperalgesia Inducida por Opioides

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Salazar, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Los opioides producen analgesia a través de un efecto inhibitorio sobre el sistema nociceptivo principalmente. Hasta la fecha, los opioides siguen siendo los analgésicos más potentes para el manejo de dolor moderado a severo. La Asociación Internacional del Estudio del Dolor (IASP, en inglés) define hiperalgesia como "un aumento de la respuesta a un estímulo que normalmente es doloroso". En contraste, está bien establecido que la terapia crónica con opioides se asocia con el desarrollo de ...

  6. Comment on "a comparison of buprenorphine + naloxone to buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Robert G; Gevertz, Susan G

    2013-01-01

    In a recent article, Lund et al sought to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of various treatment regimens for opioid dependence during pregnancy.1 In their background, discussion the authors state that "In the United States buprenorphine plus naloxone [Suboxone(®)] … has been the preferred form of prescribed buprenorphine due to its reduced abuse liability relative to buprenorphine alone [Subutex(®)]." This claim is certainly consistent with the view of the firm that has manufactured and sold both products, Reckitt Benckiser. In September of 2011, the company announced that it was "… discontinuing distribution and sale of Subutex(®) tablets as we believe that mono product (product containing buprenorphine alone with no naloxone) creates a greater risk of misuse, abuse and diversion …".2 Supporting evidence for the alleged "reduced abuse liability" appears to be lacking, however, and evidence cannot be located in the two references cited by Dr. Lund and his co-authors, which in fact are silent on the subject of abuse potential.3,4 In contrast, it has been reported that the transition to buprenorphine/naloxone from the mono formulation has been associated with "… no reduction in injection risk behaviors among IDUs."5.

  7. Comment on “A Comparison of Buprenorphine + Naloxone to Buprenorphine and Methadone in the Treatment of Opioid Dependence during Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Newman M.D., M.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent article, Lund et al sought to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of various treatment regimens for opioid dependence during pregnancy. 1 In their background, discussion the authors state that “In the United States buprenorphine plus naloxone [Suboxone®] … has been the preferred form of prescribed buprenorphine due to its reduced abuse liability relative to buprenorphine alone [Subutex®].” This claim is certainly consistent with the view of the firm that has manufactured and sold both products, Reckitt Benckiser. In September of 2011, the company announced that it was “… discontinuing distribution and sale of Subutex® tablets as we believe that mono product (product containing buprenorphine alone with no naloxone creates a greater risk of misuse, abuse and diversion …”. 2 Supporting evidence for the alleged “reduced abuse liability” appears to be lacking, however, and evidence cannot be located in the two references cited by Dr. Lund and his co-authors, which in fact are silent on the subject of abuse potential. 3 , 4 In contrast, it has been reported that the transition to buprenorphine/naloxone from the mono formulation has been associated with “… no reduction in injection risk behaviors among IDUs.” 5

  8. Standardized Treatment of Neonatal Status Epilepticus Improves Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mandy L; Malloy, Katherine M; Lawson, Sheena N; Rose, Rebecca S; Buss, William F; Mietzsch, Ulrike

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to decrease practice variation in treatment of neonatal status epilepticus by implementing a standardized protocol. Our primary goal was to achieve 80% adherence to the algorithm within 12 months. Secondary outcome measures included serum phenobarbital concentrations, number of patients progressing from seizures to status epilepticus, and length of hospital stay. Data collection occurred for 6 months prior and 12 months following protocol implementation. Adherence of 80% within 12 months was partially achieved in patients diagnosed in our hospital; in pretreated patients, adherence was not achieved. Maximum phenobarbital concentrations were decreased (56.8 vs 41.0 µg/mL), fewer patients progressed from seizures to status epilepticus (46% vs 36%), and hospital length of stay decreased by 9.7 days in survivors. In conclusion, standardized, protocol-driven treatment of neonatal status epilepticus improves consistency and short-term outcome. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  10. Effectiveness of Relapse Prevention Cognitive-Behavioral Model in Opioid-Dependent Patients Participating in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaei, Tahereh; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Ghazitabatabae, Mahmoud; Moeeni, Maryam; Rajati, Fatemeh; M Razzaghi, Emran

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a relapse prevention cognitive-behavioral model, based on Marlatt treatment approach, in Opioid-dependent patients participating in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) in Iran. The study consisted of 92 individuals treated with methadone in Iranian National Center of Addiction Studies (INCAS). Participants were randomized into two groups: educational intervention group (N=46) and control group (N=46). The intervention was comprised of 10 weekly 90 minute sessions, done during a period of 2.5 months based on the most high risk situations determined using Inventory Drug Taking Situation instrument. Relapse was defined as not showing up for MMT, drug use for at least 5 continuous days, and a positive urinary morphine test. While, only 36.4% of the intervention group relapsed into drug use, 63.6% of the control group relapsed. The result of the logistic regressions showed that the odd ratio of the variable of intervention program for the entire follow up period was 0.43 (P<0.01). Further, the odd ratio of this variable in one month, three months, and 195 days after the therapy were 0.48 (P<.03), 0.31 (P<.02), and 0.13 (P<.02) respectively that revealed that on average, the probability of relapse among individuals in the intervention group was lower than patients in control group. Relapse prevention model based on Marlatt treatment approach has an effective role in decreasing relapse rate. This model can be introduced as a complementary therapy in patients treated with methadone maintenance.

  11. Primary care for opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannelli P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Mannelli,1 Li-Tzy Wu1–41Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, 3Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, 4Center for Child and Family Policy, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USARecent reports on prescription opioid misuse and abuse have described unprecedented peaks of a national crisis and the only answer is to expand prevention and treatment, including different levels of care.1 Nonetheless, concerns remain about the ability of busy primary care settings to manage problem opioid users along with other patients. In particular, proposed extensions of buprenorphine treatment, a critically effective intervention for opioid use disorder (OUD, are cautiously considered due to the potential risk of misuse or abuse.2 General practitioners are already facing this burden daily in the treatment of chronic pain, and expert supervision and treatment model adjustment are needed to help improve outcomes. Approximately 20% of patients in primary care have noncancer pain symptoms, with most of them receiving opioid prescriptions by their physicians, and their number is increasing.3 Pain diagnoses are comparable in severity to those of tertiary centers and are complicated by significant psychiatric comorbidity, with a measurable lifetime risk of developing OUD.4,5 Some primary care physicians report frustration about opioid abuse and diversion by their patients; support from pain specialists would improve their competence, the quality f their performance, and the ability to identify patients at risk of opioid misuse.6 Thus, buprenorphine treatment should not be adding to a complex clinical scenario. To this end, the promising models of care emphasize the integration of medical with psychological and pharmacological expertise for the management of OUD. 

  12. Observational study to calculate addictive risk to opioids: a validation study of a predictive algorithm to evaluate opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenton A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ashley Brenton,1 Steven Richeimer,2,3 Maneesh Sharma,4 Chee Lee,1 Svetlana Kantorovich,1 John Blanchard,1 Brian Meshkin1 1Proove Biosciences, Irvine, CA, 2Keck school of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 3Departments of Anesthesiology and Psychiatry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 4Interventional Pain Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: Opioid abuse in chronic pain patients is a major public health issue, with rapidly increasing addiction rates and deaths from unintentional overdose more than quadrupling since 1999. Purpose: This study seeks to determine the predictability of aberrant behavior to opioids using a comprehensive scoring algorithm incorporating phenotypic risk factors and neuroscience-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Patients and methods: The Proove Opioid Risk (POR algorithm determines the predictability of aberrant behavior to opioids using a comprehensive scoring algorithm incorporating phenotypic risk factors and neuroscience-associated SNPs. In a validation study with 258 subjects with diagnosed opioid use disorder (OUD and 650 controls who reported using opioids, the POR successfully categorized patients at high and moderate risks of opioid misuse or abuse with 95.7% sensitivity. Regardless of changes in the prevalence of opioid misuse or abuse, the sensitivity of POR remained >95%. Conclusion: The POR correctly stratifies patients into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories to appropriately identify patients at need for additional guidance, monitoring, or treatment changes. Keywords: opioid use disorder, addiction, personalized medicine, pharmacogenetics, genetic testing, predictive algorithm

  13. Benzodiazepines and Opioid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  14. Opioid Summaries by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  15. Opioid Overdose Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  16. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.

  17. Predictors of dropout in an outpatient treatment for problem drinkers including cognitive-behavioral therapy and the opioid antagonist naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuoristo-Myllys, Salla; Lahti, Jari; Alho, Hannu; Julkunen, Juhani

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated predictors of dropout in an outpatient treatment program for problem drinking that included individual cognitive-behavioral therapy combined with naltrexone. Specifically, we investigated whether sociodemographic factors, severity of alcohol dependence, history of problem drinking, or intensity of alcohol craving assessed at the beginning of the treatment predicted dropout from an outpatient program among a sample of 372 patients (65% male). We also investigated whether the effectiveness of the treatment (the change in alcohol consumption and symptoms of alcohol craving) or adherence to naltrexone was related to dropout. Predictors of dropout were investigated using an analysis of covariance with the number of attended treatment sessions as an independent variable. Our results demonstrated that the treatment entry factors predictive of dropout were younger age, lower severity of alcohol dependence, better ability to resist and control alcohol use, and lower obsession with alcohol. In addition, those who dropped out were more likely to begin the program by abstaining from alcohol and had lower adherence to naltrexone use than those who completed the program. The length of stay for treatment was not related to change in alcohol consumption. Patients with less severe alcohol-related problems may lack motivation for treatment, specifically cognitive-behavioral therapy and naltrexone. These patients may benefit more from less intensive treatments.

  18. [Current standards in the treatment of gastric cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Ulrich; Lordick, Florian

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic resection is established in the treatment of early gastric cancer. More advanced gastric cancer requires gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Perioperative chemotherapy improves overall survival in locally advanced gastric cancer representing a standard of care. Locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction can alternatively be treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy. In metastatic disease, systemic chemotherapy improves survival, quality of life and symptom control. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy should be used together with first-line chemotherapy in HER2 positive gastric cancer patients. Second- and third-line therapy is now well established. The anti-VEGFR2 antibody Ramucirumab improves survival in second line treatment both as a monotherapy and in combination with paclitaxel and represents a novel treatment option. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Managing Opioid Addiction Risk in Plastic Surgery during the Perioperative Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demsey, Daniel; Carr, Nicholas J; Clarke, Hance; Vipler, Sharon

    2017-10-01

    Opioid addiction is a public health crisis that affects all areas of medicine. Large numbers of the population across all racial and economic demographics misuse prescription opioids and use illicit opioids. The current understanding is that opioid misuse is a disease that requires treatment, and is not an issue of choice or character. Use of opioid medication is a necessary part of postoperative analgesia, but many physicians are unsure of how to do this safely given the risk of patients developing an opioid misuse disorder. This review gives an update of the current state of the opioid crisis, explains how current surgeons' prescribing practices are contributing to it, and gives recommendations on how to use opioid medication safely in the perioperative period.

  20. Social-skills and parental training plus standard treatment versus standard treatment for children with ADHD - the randomised SOSTRA trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Storebø, Ole Jakob; Gluud, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of social-skills training and parental training programme for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Methods We conducted a randomized two-armed, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority trial consisting of social-skills training plus...... parental training and standard treatment versus standard treatment alone. A sample size calculation showed at least 52 children should be included for the trial with follow up three and six months after randomization. The primary outcome measure was ADHD symptoms and secondary outcomes were social skills...... and emotional competences. Results 56 children (39 boys, 17 girls, mean age 10.4 years, SD 1.31) with ADHD were randomized, 28 to the experimental group and 27 to the control group. Mixed-model analyses with repeated measures showed that the time course (y = a + bt + ct2) of ADHD symptoms (p = 0.40), social...

  1. Effect of a standardized treatment regime for infection after osteosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebrekers, Pien; Leenen, Luke P H; Hoekstra, Meriam; Hietbrink, Falco

    2017-03-09

    Infection after osteosynthesis is an important complication with significant morbidity and even mortality. These infections are often caused by biofilm-producing bacteria. Treatment algorithms dictate an aggressive approach with surgical debridement and antibiotic treatment. The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of such an aggressive standardized treatment regime with implant retention for acute, existing regime consisted of implant retention, thorough surgical debridement, and immediate antibiotic combination therapy with rifampicin. The primary outcome was success. Success was defined as consolidation of the fracture and resolved symptoms of infection. Culture and susceptibility testing were performed to identify bacteria and resistance patterns. Univariate analysis was conducted on patient-related factors in association with primary success and antibiotic resistance. Forty-nine patients were included for analysis. The primary success rate was 63% and overall success rate 88%. Factors negatively associated with primary success were the following: Gustilo classification (P = 0.023), higher number of debridements needed (P = 0.015), inability of primary closure (P = 0.017), and subsequent application of vacuum therapy (P = 0.030). Adherence to the treatment regime was positively related to primary success (P = 0.034). The described treatment protocol results in high success rates, comparable with success rates achieved in staged exchange in prosthetic joint infection treatment.

  2. Are Prescription Opioids Driving the Opioid Crisis? Assumptions vs Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Mark Edmund

    2018-04-01

    Sharp increases in opioid prescriptions, and associated increases in overdose deaths in the 2000s, evoked widespread calls to change perceptions of opioid analgesics. Medical literature discussions of opioid analgesics began emphasizing patient and public health hazards. Repetitive exposure to this information may influence physician assumptions. While highly consequential to patients with pain whose function and quality of life may benefit from opioid analgesics, current assumptions about prescription opioid analgesics, including their role in the ongoing opioid overdose epidemic, have not been scrutinized. Information was obtained by searching PubMed, governmental agency websites, and conference proceedings. Opioid analgesic prescribing and associated overdose deaths both peaked around 2011 and are in long-term decline; the sharp overdose increase recorded in 2014 was driven by illicit fentanyl and heroin. Nonmethadone prescription opioid analgesic deaths, in the absence of co-ingested benzodiazepines, alcohol, or other central nervous system/respiratory depressants, are infrequent. Within five years of initial prescription opioid misuse, 3.6% initiate heroin use. The United States consumes 80% of the world opioid supply, but opioid access is nonexistent for 80% and severely restricted for 4.1% of the global population. Many current assumptions about opioid analgesics are ill-founded. Illicit fentanyl and heroin, not opioid prescribing, now fuel the current opioid overdose epidemic. National discussion has often neglected the potentially devastating effects of uncontrolled chronic pain. Opioid analgesic prescribing and related overdoses are in decline, at great cost to patients with pain who have benefited or may benefit from, but cannot access, opioid analgesic therapy.

  3. Biased Agonism of Endogenous Opioid Peptides at the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Georgina L; Lane, J Robert; Coudrat, Thomas; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell

    2015-08-01

    Biased agonism is having a major impact on modern drug discovery, and describes the ability of distinct G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands to activate different cell signaling pathways, and to result in different physiologic outcomes. To date, most studies of biased agonism have focused on synthetic molecules targeting various GPCRs; however, many of these receptors have multiple endogenous ligands, suggesting that "natural" bias may be an unappreciated feature of these GPCRs. The μ-opioid receptor (MOP) is activated by numerous endogenous opioid peptides, remains an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain, and exhibits biased agonism in response to synthetic opiates. The aim of this study was to rigorously assess the potential for biased agonism in the actions of endogenous opioids at the MOP in a common cellular background, and compare these to the effects of the agonist d-Ala2-N-MePhe4-Gly-ol enkephalin (DAMGO). We investigated activation of G proteins, inhibition of cAMP production, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 phosphorylation, β-arrestin 1/2 recruitment, and MOP trafficking, and applied a novel analytical method to quantify biased agonism. Although many endogenous opioids displayed signaling profiles similar to that of DAMGO, α-neoendorphin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, and the putatively endogenous peptide endomorphin-1 displayed particularly distinct bias profiles. These may represent examples of natural bias if it can be shown that they have different signaling properties and physiologic effects in vivo compared with other endogenous opioids. Understanding how endogenous opioids control physiologic processes through biased agonism can reveal vital information required to enable the design of biased opioids with improved pharmacological profiles and treat diseases involving dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  4. Non-analgesic effects of opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Kurita, Geana Paula; Kendall, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Opioids constitute the basis for pharmacological treatment of moderate to severe pain in cancer pain and non-cancer pain patients. Their action is mediated by the activation of opioid receptors, which integrates the pain modulation system with other effects in the central nervous system including...... groups: no effects or worsening of cognitive function in cancer pain patients and no effect or improvements in the chronic non-cancer pain patients, however, due to methodological limitations and a huge variety of designs definite conclusions are difficult to draw from the studies. In studies of higher...

  5. A Longitudinal Study on Substance Use and Related Problems in Women in Opioid Maintenance Treatment from Pregnancy to Four Years after Giving Birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingunn O. Lund

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Women in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT have a past characterized by drug abuse, which is a challenging start for parenthood. Studies of mothers in OMT are typically limited to pregnancy and early infancy. Knowledge about how they cope with substance use and related problems in the years following birth is therefore important. The aims of the study were to examine changes in mothers’ substance use, psychological problems, and other challenges; from one to four years after their children were born, and describe kindergarten attendance and prevalence and type of child protective services involvement when the children were four years old. Method A four-year prospective cohort study of mothers in OMT. The European severity index was used to map substance use and related problems during the third trimester of pregnancy, one and four years after birth. Results At the four-year follow-up, use of illegal substances remained low (4% and use of legal substances (39% was similar to the one-year follow-up. The proportion of women with psychological problems was significantly higher than at one-year follow-up (69 vs. 39%, P = .009. At age four, most children (89% attended kindergarten, and the child protective services were following 73% of the families, mostly with voluntary measures. Conclusion Mothers in OMT cope well with substance use over time, given access to sufficient support. The findings imply that a preventive governmental strategy with close support of mother and child, have a positive impact contributing to making OMT and motherhood more compatible.

  6. Changes in quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) and addiction severity index (ASI) among participants in opioid substitution treatment (OST) in low and middle income countries: an international systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feelemyer, Jonathan P; Jarlais, Don C Des; Arasteh, Kamyar; Phillips, Benjamin W; Hagan, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Opioid substitution treatment (OST) can increase quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) and reduce addiction severity index (ASI) scores among participants over time. OST program participants have noted that improvement in quality of life is one of the most important variables to their reduction in drug use. However, there is little systematic understanding of WHOQOL-BREF and ASI domain changes among OST participants in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Utilizing PRISMA guidelines we conducted a systematic literature search to identify OST program studies documenting changes in WHOQOL-BREF or ASI domains for participants in buprenorphine or methadone programs in LMIC. Standardized mean differences for baseline and follow-up domain scores were compared along with relationships between domain scores, OST dosage, and length of follow-up. There were 13 OST program studies with 1801 participants from five countries eligible for inclusion in the review. Overall, statistically significant changes were noted in all four WHOQOL-BREF domain and four of the seven ASI domain scores (drug, psychological, legal, and family) documented in studies. Dosage of pharmacologic medication and length of follow-up did not affect changes in domain scores. WHOQOL-BREF and ASI domain scoring is a useful tool in measuring overall quality of life and levels of addiction among OST participants. Coupled with measurements of blood-borne infection, drug use, relapse, and overdose, WHOQOL-BREF and ASI represent equally important tools for evaluating the effects of OST over time and should be further developed as integrated tools in the evaluation of participants in LMIC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Management of constipation in palliative care patients undergoing opioid therapy: is polyethylene glycol an option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Stefan; Klaschik, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of laxative use for treatment of constipation in patients receiving opioid therapy, with special attention to polyethylene glycol 3350/electrolyte solution (PEG-ES). Computerized data from 206 patients were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subgroups were analyzed using confirmatory statistics. Constipation occurred in 42.7 percent of patients. Laxatives were administered to 74.3 percent of these patients using a standardized step scheme, with good results in 78.4 percent. As a therapy for constipation, the combined administration of PEG-ES, sodium picosulphate, and liquid paraffin proved most effective, although statistical analysis yielded no significance. Early use of PEG-ES using a step scheme holds promise for treatment of opioid-related constipation in palliative care patients, although further investigation is warranted.

  8. Dopamine and μ-opioid receptor dysregulation in the brains of binge-eating female rats - possible relevance in the psychopathology and treatment of binge-eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, David J; Hallam, Michelle; Prow, Michael; Gosden, Jane; Cheetham, Sharon; Choi, Yong K; Tarazi, Frank; Hutson, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Adult, female rats given irregular, limited access to chocolate develop binge-eating behaviour with normal bodyweight and compulsive/perseverative and impulsive behaviours similar to those in binge-eating disorder. We investigated whether (a) dysregulated central nervous system dopaminergic and opioidergic systems are part of the psychopathology of binge-eating and (b) these neurotransmitter systems may mediate the actions of drugs ameliorating binge-eating disorder psychopathology. Binge-eating produced a 39% reduction of striatal D 1 receptors with 22% and 23% reductions in medial and lateral caudate putamen and a 22% increase of striatal μ-opioid receptors. There was no change in D 1 receptor density in nucleus accumbens, medial prefrontal cortex or dorsolateral frontal cortex, striatal D 2 receptors and dopamine reuptake transporter sites, or μ-opioid receptors in frontal cortex. There were no changes in ligand affinities. The concentrations of monoamines, metabolites and estimates of dopamine (dopamine/dihydroxyphenylacetic acid ratio) and serotonin/5-hydroxyindolacetic acid ratio turnover rates were unchanged in striatum and frontal cortex. However, turnover of dopamine and serotonin in the hypothalamus was increased ~20% and ~15%, respectively. Striatal transmission via D 1 receptors is decreased in binge-eating rats while μ-opioid receptor signalling may be increased. These changes are consistent with the attenuation of binge-eating by lisdexamfetamine, which increases catecholaminergic neurotransmission, and nalmefene, a μ-opioid antagonist.

  9. Comorbid Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Opioid Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rikinkumar S; Elmaadawi, Ahmed; Nasr, Suhayl; Haskin, John

    2017-09-03

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is predominant amongst individuals addicted to opioids and obscures the course of illness and the treatment outcome. We report the case of a patient with major depressive disorder and opioid dependence, who experienced post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms during a recent visit to the inpatient unit. The similarity of symptoms between post-traumatic stress disorder and opioid dependence is so high that, sometimes, it is a challenge to differentiate between these conditions. Since opioid withdrawal symptoms mimic hyper vigilance, this results in an exaggeration of the response of patients with post-traumatic stress disorder. This comorbidity is associated with worse health outcomes, as its pathophysiology involves a common neurobiological circuit. Opioid substitution therapy and psychotherapeutic medications in combination with evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy devised for individuals with comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder and opioid dependence may improve treatment outcomes in this population. Therefore, we conclude that the screening for post-traumatic stress disorder in the opioid-abusing population is crucial. To understand the underlying mechanisms for this comorbidity and to improve the treatment response, further research should be encouraged.

  10. DMTO: a realistic ontology for standard diabetes mellitus treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sappagh, Shaker; Kwak, Daehan; Ali, Farman; Kwak, Kyung-Sup

    2018-02-06

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex problem. A clinical decision support system (CDSS) based on massive and distributed electronic health record data can facilitate the automation of this process and enhance its accuracy. The most important component of any CDSS is its knowledge base. This knowledge base can be formulated using ontologies. The formal description logic of ontology supports the inference of hidden knowledge. Building a complete, coherent, consistent, interoperable, and sharable ontology is a challenge. This paper introduces the first version of the newly constructed Diabetes Mellitus Treatment Ontology (DMTO) as a basis for shared-semantics, domain-specific, standard, machine-readable, and interoperable knowledge relevant to T2DM treatment. It is a comprehensive ontology and provides the highest coverage and the most complete picture of coded knowledge about T2DM patients' current conditions, previous profiles, and T2DM-related aspects, including complications, symptoms, lab tests, interactions, treatment plan (TP) frameworks, and glucose-related diseases and medications. It adheres to the design principles recommended by the Open Biomedical Ontologies Foundry and is based on ontological realism that follows the principles of the Basic Formal Ontology and the Ontology for General Medical Science. DMTO is implemented under Protégé 5.0 in Web Ontology Language (OWL) 2 format and is publicly available through the National Center for Biomedical Ontology's BioPortal at http://bioportal.bioontology.org/ontologies/DMTO . The current version of DMTO includes more than 10,700 classes, 277 relations, 39,425 annotations, 214 semantic rules, and 62,974 axioms. We provide proof of concept for this approach to modeling TPs. The ontology is able to collect and analyze most features of T2DM as well as customize chronic TPs with the most appropriate drugs, foods, and physical exercises. DMTO is ready to be used as a knowledge base for

  11. Opioid system and human emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Tuominen, Lauri

    2017-04-10

    Emotions are states of vigilant readiness that guide human and animal behaviour during survival-salient situations. Categorical models of emotions posit neurally and physiologically distinct basic human emotions (anger, fear, disgust, happiness, sadness and surprise) that govern different survival functions. Opioid receptors are expressed abundantly in the mammalian emotion circuit, and the opioid system modulates a variety of functions related to arousal and motivation. Yet, its specific contribution to different basic emotions has remained poorly understood. Here, we review how the endogenous opioid system and particularly the μ receptor contribute to emotional processing in humans. Activation of the endogenous opioid system is consistently associated with both pleasant and unpleasant emotions. In general, exogenous opioid agonists facilitate approach-oriented emotions (anger, pleasure) and inhibit avoidance-oriented emotions (fear, sadness). Opioids also modulate social bonding and affiliative behaviour, and prolonged opioid abuse may render both social bonding and emotion recognition circuits dysfunctional. However, there is no clear evidence that the opioid system is able to affect the emotions associated with surprise and disgust. Taken together, the opioid systems contribute to a wide array of positive and negative emotions through their general ability to modulate the approach versus avoidance motivation associated with specific emotions. Because of the protective effects of opioid system-mediated prosociality and positive mood, the opioid system may constitute an important factor contributing to psychological and psychosomatic resilience. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. 76 FR 34147 - Land Disposal Restrictions: Revision of the Treatment Standards for Carbamate Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... numeric concentration limits or methods of treatment that substantially diminish the hazardous waste's... methods), reinstated the LDR treatment standards expressed as numerical concentration limits for 32... treatment methods and numeric concentration limits provides maximum flexibility in the choice of treatment...

  13. Pain Therapy Guided by Purpose and Perspective in Light of the Opioid Epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amie L. Severino

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Prescription opioid misuse is an ongoing and escalating epidemic. Although these pharmacological agents are highly effective analgesics prescribed for different types of pain, opioids also induce euphoria, leading to increasing diversion and misuse. Opioid use and related mortalities have developed in spite of initial claims that OxyContin, one of the first opioids prescribed in the USA, was not addictive in the presence of pain. These claims allayed the fears of clinicians and contributed to an increase in the number of prescriptions, quantity of drugs manufactured, and the unforeseen diversion of these drugs for non-medical uses. Understanding the history of opioid drug development, the widespread marketing campaign for opioids, the immense financial incentive behind the treatment of pain, and vulnerable socioeconomic and physical demographics for opioid misuse give perspective on the current epidemic as an American-born problem that has expanded to global significance. In light of the current worldwide opioid epidemic, it is imperative that novel opioids are developed to treat pain without inducing the euphoria that fosters physical dependence and addiction. We describe insights from preclinical findings on the properties of opioid drugs that offer insights into improving abuse-deterrent formulations. One finding is that the ability of some agonists to activate one pathway over another, or agonist bias, can predict whether several novel opioid compounds bear promise in treating pain without causing reward among other off-target effects. In addition, we outline how the pharmacokinetic profile of each opioid contributes to their potential for misuse and discuss the emergence of mixed agonists as a promising pipeline of opioid-based analgesics. These insights from preclinical findings can be used to more effectively identify opioids that treat pain without causing physical dependence and subsequent opioid abuse.

  14. Pain Therapy Guided by Purpose and Perspective in Light of the Opioid Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Amie L.; Shadfar, Arash; Hakimian, Joshua K.; Crane, Oliver; Singh, Ganeev; Heinzerling, Keith; Walwyn, Wendy M.

    2018-01-01

    Prescription opioid misuse is an ongoing and escalating epidemic. Although these pharmacological agents are highly effective analgesics prescribed for different types of pain, opioids also induce euphoria, leading to increasing diversion and misuse. Opioid use and related mortalities have developed in spite of initial claims that OxyContin, one of the first opioids prescribed in the USA, was not addictive in the presence of pain. These claims allayed the fears of clinicians and contributed to an increase in the number of prescriptions, quantity of drugs manufactured, and the unforeseen diversion of these drugs for non-medical uses. Understanding the history of opioid drug development, the widespread marketing campaign for opioids, the immense financial incentive behind the treatment of pain, and vulnerable socioeconomic and physical demographics for opioid misuse give perspective on the current epidemic as an American-born problem that has expanded to global significance. In light of the current worldwide opioid epidemic, it is imperative that novel opioids are developed to treat pain without inducing the euphoria that fosters physical dependence and addiction. We describe insights from preclinical findings on the properties of opioid drugs that offer insights into improving abuse-deterrent formulations. One finding is that the ability of some agonists to activate one pathway over another, or agonist bias, can predict whether several novel opioid compounds bear promise in treating pain without causing reward among other off-target effects. In addition, we outline how the pharmacokinetic profile of each opioid contributes to their potential for misuse and discuss the emergence of mixed agonists as a promising pipeline of opioid-based analgesics. These insights from preclinical findings can be used to more effectively identify opioids that treat pain without causing physical dependence and subsequent opioid abuse. PMID:29740351

  15. Predictors of long-term opioid use among chronic nonmalignant pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carrinna; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    , socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. Data analysis is ongoing. Conclusions: It is expected that this study will serve as a significant supplement of existing knowledge in the area of opioid consumption among CNP patients in Denmark. In a future perspective of prevention and health promotion......Aims: 1) To determine the distribution and determinants of opioid use among chronic nonmalignant pain(CNP) patients. 2) To identify the patient, treatment and socioeconomic characteristics as determinants for potential risk groups. We hypothesized that CNP patient who use opioids for more than 1...... product using the ATC codes N02AA01-N02AX06. Patients were then classified as either opioid use for more than 1 year(group A), as opioid use for more than 6 months but less than 1 year(group B) and opioid use equal to or less than 6 months(group C). Results: The quantity of sold opioids has been...

  16. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  17. Pharmacogenomics-guided policy in opioid use disorder (OUD management: An ethnically-diverse case-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earl B. Ettienne

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Opioid use disorder (OUD is characterized by a problematic pattern of opioid use leading to clinically-significant impairment or distress. Opioid agonist treatment is an integral component of OUD management, and buprenorphine is often utilized in OUD management due to strong clinical evidence for efficacy. However, interindividual genetic differences in buprenorphine metabolism may result in variable treatment response, leaving some patients undertreated and at increased risk for relapse. Clinical pharmacogenomics studies the effect that inherited genetic variations have on drug response. Our objective is to demonstrate the impact of pharmacogenetic testing on OUD management outcomes. Methods: We analyzed a patient who reported discomfort at daily buprenorphine dose of 24mg, which was a mandated daily maximum by the pharmacy benefits manager. Regular urine screenings were conducted to detect the presence of unauthorized substances, and pharmacogenetic testing was used to determine the appropriate dose of buprenorphine for OUD management. Results: At the 24mg buprenorphine daily dose, the patient had multiple relapses with unauthorized substances. Pharmacogenetic testing revealed that the patient exhibited a cytochrome P450 3A4 ultrarapid metabolizer phenotype, which necessitated a higher than recommended daily dose of buprenorphine (32mg for adequate OUD management. The patient exhibited a reduction in the number of relapses on the pharmacogenetic-based dose recommendation compared to standard dosing. Conclusion: Pharmacogenomic testing as clinical decision support helped to individualize OUD management. Collaboration by key stakeholders is essential to establishing pharmacogenetic testing as standard of care in OUD management. Keywords: Opioid use disorder, Opioid agonist treatment, Buprenorphine, Pharmacogenomics, Policy

  18. Healthcare resource use and costs of opioid-induced constipation among non-cancer and cancer patients on opioid therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Jens; Christensen, Helene Nordahl; Ibsen, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    -based cohort study including patients ≥18 years of age initiating ≥4 weeks opioid therapy (1998–2012) in Denmark. A measure of OIC was constructed based on data from Danish national health registries, and defined as ≥1 diagnosis of constipation, diverticulitis, mega colon, ileus/subileus, abdominal pain....../acute abdomen or haemorrhoids and/or ≥2 subsequent prescription issues of laxatives. Total healthcare resource utilization and costs (including pharmacy dispense, inpatient-, outpatient-, emergency room- and primary care) were estimated according to OIC status, opioid treatment dosage and length, gender, age...... characteristics of non-cancer OIC patients showed a higher frequency of strong opioid treatment (69% versus 41%), long-term opioid treatment (1189 days versus 584 days), advanced age (73 years versus 61 years), and cardiovascular disease (31% versus 19%) compared to those without OIC (P 

  19. Opioid Abuse and Addiction - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish) PDF The basics - Opioids, part 1 - English MP3 The basics - Opioids, part 1 - español (Spanish) MP3 The basics - Opioids, part 1 - English MP4 The ... español (Spanish) PDF Pain - Opioids, part 2 - English MP3 Pain - Opioids, part 2 - español (Spanish) MP3 Pain - ...

  20. 40 CFR 268.49 - Alternative LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil. 268.49 Section 268.49 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Treatment Standards § 268.49 Alternative LDR treatment standards for contaminated...

  1. Addiction to opioids in chronic pain patients: a literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-01-01

    , incidence and prevalence of addiction in opioid treated pain patients, screening tools for assessing opioid addiction in chronic pain patients and recommendations regarding addiction problems in national and international guidelines for opioid treatment in cancer patients and chronic non-malignant pain...... patients. The review indicates that the prevalence of addiction varied from 0% up to 50% in chronic non-malignant pain patients, and from 0% to 7.7% in cancer patients depending of the subpopulation studied and the criteria used. The risk of addiction has to be considered when initiating long-term opioid...... treatment as addiction may result in poor pain control. Several screening tools were identified, but only a few were thoroughly validated with respect to validity and reliability. Most of the identified guidelines mention addiction as a potential problem. The guidelines in cancer pain management...

  2. Tolerance to non-opioid analgesics is opioid-sensitive in nucleus raphe magnus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merab G Tsagareli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of its effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM in the following four days result in progressively less antinociception, i.e. produce the development of tolerance to these drugs in mail rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with μ-opioid antagonist naloxone in NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs at the first day in behavioral tail flick reflex (TF and hot plate (HP latencies. At the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion on endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  3. National treatment in international trade: National law and international standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divljak Drago

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the paper is the principle of national treatment, namely one of the basic principles of international trade. The objective is to determine its outreach and contents set in the forms of international trade organising, primarily in the World Trade Organization, from a legal perspective, naturally, all in the context of the Serbian law. The analysis that has been carried out indicates that there is an obvious intention of our legislators to harmonise in principle our legislation with the WTO requirements and standards, which are incomplete themselves and cause disputes that are not resolved in the practice of dispute resolving either entirely or consistently. In our law, a step forward has been made in relation to the situation from the previous relevant legislation, because the application of this principle is extended not only to trade with goods but also to trade with services, and to industrial property rights. However, in the most significant, basic field, namely trade with goods, it is still being done in a general way, by simplifying the entire topic and bringing it down only to protection against discrimination and neglecting the sphere of protectionism. Such acting does not include all the complexity of this matter and it is not entirely harmonised with the WTO requirements. However, a good side of such an approach is that it gives the state more freedom for acting in this sphere, which may be acceptable in the transition period until full membership of Serbia in this organization.

  4. Risk Factors for Opioid-Use Disorder and Overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Lynn R

    2017-11-01

    Opioid analgesics are recognized as a legitimate medical therapy for selected patients with severe chronic pain that does not respond to other therapies. However, opioids are associated with risks for patients and society that include misuse, abuse, diversion, addiction, and overdose deaths. Therapeutic success depends on proper candidate selection, assessment before administering opioid therapy, and close monitoring throughout the course of treatment. Risk assessment and prevention include knowledge of patient factors that may contribute to misuse, abuse, addiction, suicide, and respiratory depression. Risk factors for opioid misuse or addiction include past or current substance abuse, untreated psychiatric disorders, younger age, and social or family environments that encourage misuse. Opioid mortality prevalence is higher in people who are middle aged and have substance abuse and psychiatric comorbidities. Suicides are probably undercounted or frequently misclassified in reports of opioid-related poisoning deaths. Greater understanding and better assessment are needed of the risk associated with suicide risk in patients with pain. Clinical tools and an evolving evidence base are available to assist clinicians with identifying patients whose risk factors put them at risk for adverse outcomes with opioids.

  5. The Impact of Social Support and Attachment Style on Quality of Life and Readiness to Change in a Sample of Individuals Receiving Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaiola, Alan A; Fulmer, Barbara A; Stout, David

    2015-01-01

    A basic principle within the addictions treatment field is that social support is a vital ingredient in the recovery process. This study examines the nature of social support in a sample of opioid-dependent men and women who are currently being treated in a medication-assisted treatment program (methadone). This research examines the types of social support behaviors that the opioid-dependent individuals consider helpful and explores whether attachment style (i.e., secure, ambivalent, or anxious attachment) was a determining factor in whether social support was perceived as helpful. The dependent variables included readiness to change addictive behaviors and abstinence from other mood-altering drugs. Participants (N = 159) completed a demographic questionnaire, the Significant Others Scale, the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support Assessment, the Readiness to Change Scale, and an Attachment Style Questionnaire. The demographic questionnaire included subjective ratings of self-improvement. Social support predicted perceived improvement in all of the areas examined (e.g., health, family/social relationships) and abstinence; however, attachment style did not predict improvement or with readiness to change. Social support is an important factor in one's recovery from substance use disorders. Yet attachment style (i.e., anxious, avoidant, or secure) did not predict abstinence or overall improvement in functioning.

  6. Chimeric opioid peptides: tools for identifying opioid receptor types.

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, G X; Miyajima, A; Yokota, T; Arai, K; Goldstein, A

    1990-01-01

    We synthesized several chimeric peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the kappa opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surf...

  7. Efficacy and side-effect profiles of lactulose, docusate sodium, and sennosides compared to PEG in opioid-induced constipation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruston, Teresa; Hunter, Kathleen; Cummings, Greta; Lazarescu, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a side effect of opioid therapy that can affect quality of life, adherence to treatment, and morbidity and possibly mortality. To investigate whether docusate sodium, sennosides, and lactulose have equal efficacy and side effect profiles compared to PEG in the management of OIC in adults. A systematic review was undertaken. Randomized controlled trials of adults taking opioids for cancer or non-cancer pain were considered if they met inclusion criteria. Statistical pooling was not possible as no studies met inclusion criteria. Large, well-powered, randomized controlled trials are feasible. Standard definitions of OIC would assist with the execution of these studies and contribute to their internal and external validity. Further research is strongly encouraged.

  8. Side effects and opioid addiction in radiation-induced mucositis pain control in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Atsuhito; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Mizuta, Masanobu; Morita, Mami; Iki, Takehiro; Kojima, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy in head and neck malignancy may trigger mucositis poorly controlled by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Having already reported early opioid efficacy in radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer, we discuss whether this resulted in severe side effects and opioid addiction. Of 11 persons (26.2%) with nausea, 3 could not tolerate opioid. Of 33 (78.6%) with constipation, all were controlled by purgatives. Seven had mild sleepiness. None had severe opioid side effects in radiation-induced mucositis pain treatment, but I showed opioid dependence after 128-days opioid administration. While opioid administration in radiation-induced mucositis pain may not cause addiction, lomg-term opioid use should be carefully monitored. (author)

  9. Diretrizes para o tratamento de pacientes com síndrome de dependência de opióides no Brasil Brazilian guideline for the treatment of patients with opioids dependence syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Antonio Baltieri

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Existe uma prevalência relativamente baixa do uso de ópioides no Brasil, em particular envolvendo o uso não médico da codeína e de xaropes que contêm opióides. No entanto, a síndrome de dependência apresenta um significativo impacto total na mortalidade e morbidade. Nos últimos 20 anos, o avanço científico tem modificado nosso entendimento sobre a natureza da adição aos opióides e os variados tratamentos possíveis. A adição é uma doença crônica tratável se o tratamento for realizado e adaptado tendo em vista as necessidades do paciente específico. Há, de um fato, um conjunto de tratamentos que podem efetivamente reduzir o uso da droga, ajudar a gerenciar a fissura pela droga, prevenir recaídas e recuperar as pessoas para o funcionamento social produtivo. O tratamento da dependência de drogas será parte de perspectivas de longo prazo do ponto de vista médico, psicológico e social. Esta diretriz almeja fornecer um guia para os psiquiatras e outros profissionais de saúde que tratam de pacientes com Síndrome de Dependência de Opióides. Ela tece comentários sobre o tratamento somático e psicossocial que é utilizado nesses pacientes e revisa as evidências científicas e seu poder. Da mesma forma, os aspectos históricos, epidemiológicos e neurobiológicos da dependência de opióides são revisados.There is a relatively low prevalence of opioid use in Brazil, particularly involving the non-medical use of codeine and opiate-containing syrups. However, opioid dependence syndrome shows a significant total impact on mortality and morbidity. Over the past 20 years, scientific progress has changed our understanding of the nature of opioid addiction and its various possible treatments. Addiction is a chronic illness treatable if the treatment is well-delivered and tailored to the needs of the particular patient. There is indeed an array of treatments that can effectively reduce drug use, help manage drug cravings

  10. Polyglycerol-opioid conjugate produces analgesia devoid of side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Sara; Quadir, Mohiuddin A; Gupta, Shilpi; Walker, Karolina A; Zhang, Xuejiao; Spahn, Viola; Labuz, Dominika; Rodriguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio; Schmelz, Martin; Joseph, Jan; Parr, Maria K; Machelska, Halina; Haag, Rainer; Stein, Christoph

    2017-07-04

    Novel painkillers are urgently needed. The activation of opioid receptors in peripheral inflamed tissue can reduce pain without central adverse effects such as sedation, apnoea, or addiction. Here, we use an unprecedented strategy and report the synthesis and analgesic efficacy of the standard opioid morphine covalently attached to hyperbranched polyglycerol (PG-M) by a cleavable linker. With its high-molecular weight and hydrophilicity, this conjugate is designed to selectively release morphine in injured tissue and to prevent blood-brain barrier permeation. In contrast to conventional morphine, intravenous PG-M exclusively activated peripheral opioid receptors to produce analgesia in inflamed rat paws without major side effects such as sedation or constipation. Concentrations of morphine in the brain, blood, paw tissue, and in vitro confirmed the selective release of morphine in the inflamed milieu. Thus, PG-M may serve as prototype of a peripherally restricted opioid formulation designed to forego central and intestinal side effects.

  11. Thallium exists in opioid poisoned patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Amir; Vahdati-Mashhadian, Naser; Oghabian, Zohreh; Moradi, Valiallah; Afshari, Reza; Mehrpour, Omid

    2015-08-01

    Thallium (Tl) is a toxic heavy metal that exists in nature. Tl poisoning (thallotoxicosis) may occur in opioid addicts. This study was designed to evaluate the frequency and level of urinary Tl in opioid abusers. In addition, clinical findings were evaluated. A total of 150 subjects were examined. Cases with a history of at least 3 years of abuse were admitted in the Imam Reza Hospital as the case group; 50 non-opioid abusers from the target population were included as the control group. Twenty-four hour urinary qualitative and quantitative Tl analyses were performed on both groups. Out of the 150 subjects, 128 (85 %) were negative for qualitative urinary Tl, followed by 5 % (trace), 7 % (1+), 2 % (2+), and 1 % (3+). Mean (standard error (SE), Min-Max) quantitative urinary Tl level was 14 μg/L (3.5 μg/L, 0-346 μg/L). Mean urinary Tl level in the case group was 21 μg/L (5 μg/L, 0-346 μg/L) and that in the controls was 1 μg/L (0.14 μg/L, 0-26 μg/L), which were significantly different (P = 0.001). The most frequent clinical findings were ataxia (86 %), sweating (81 %), and constipation (54 %). In all cases (n = 150), the mean (SE) value for cases with positive qualitative urinary Tl was 26.8 μg/L (0.9 μg/L) and that in the negative cases was 2.3 μg/L (0.2 μg/L), which were significantly different (P = 0.002). This study showed that long-term opioid abuse may lead to Tl exposure. In opioid abusers with the clinical manifestation of thallotoxicosis, urinary Tl should be determined.

  12. Preventing Opioid Use Disorders among Fishing Industry Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Wangari Walter

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fishing industry workers are at high risk for work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs and injuries. Prescription opioids used to treat pain injuries may put these workers at increased risk for developing substance disorders. Using a Community-Based Participatory Research approach, formative research was conducted to inform the eventual development of relevant interventions to prevent and reduce opioid use disorders among fishing industry workers. Qualitative interviews (n = 21 were conducted to assess: knowledge and attitudes about opioid use disorders; features of fishing work that might affect use and/or access to treatment; and community and organizational capacity for prevention and treatment. Participants reported numerous pathways connecting commercial fishing with opioid use. The combination of high stress and physically tasking job duties requires comprehensive workplace interventions to prevent chronic pain and MSDs, in addition to tailored and culturally responsive treatment options to address opioid use disorders in this population. Public health programs must integrate workplace health and safety protection along with evidence-based primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions in order to address opioid use disorders, particularly among workers in strenuous jobs.

  13. Pregabalin for Opioid-Refractory Pain in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos A. Kontoangelos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a systemic inflammatory disease with chronic back pain as the most common presenting symptom. We present a case of a male patient with AS reporting symptoms of severe low back pain, buttock pain, and limited spinal mobility. After chronic treatment with opioids, we administered pregabalin at a dose of 300 mg as an analgesic agent while opioids were discontinued. Findings. Pain symptoms improved progressively, and opioids were gradually discontinued without any withdrawal symptoms reported. Conclusions. Pregabalin is potentially useful in the management of pain in patients with AS while effectively managing the discontinuation of opioid treatment.

  14. Safety of oral dronabinol during opioid withdrawal in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jicha, Crystal J; Lofwall, Michelle R; Nuzzo, Paul A; Babalonis, Shanna; Elayi, Samy Claude; Walsh, Sharon L

    2015-12-01

    Opioid dependence remains a significant public health problem worldwide with only three FDA-approved treatments, all targeting the mu-opioid receptor. Dronabinol, a cannabinoid (CB) 1 receptor agonist, is currently under investigation as a novel opioid withdrawal treatment. This study reports on safety outcomes of dronabinol among adults in opioid withdrawal. Twelve adults physically dependent on short-acting opioids participated in this 5-week within-subject, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled inpatient study. Volunteers were maintained on oral oxycodone 30 mg qid. Double-blind placebo substitutions occurred for 21 h before each of 7 experimental sessions in order to produce opioid withdrawal. A single oral test dose was administered each session (placebo, oxycodone 30 and 60 mg, dronabinol 5, 10, 20, and 30 mg [decreased from 40 mg]). Heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory outcomes and pupil diameter were assessed repeatedly. Dronabinol 40 mg produced sustained sinus tachycardia accompanied by anxiety and panic necessitating dose reduction to 30 mg. Sinus tachycardia and anxiety also occurred in one volunteer after dronabinol 20mg. Compared to placebo, dronabinol 20 and 30 mg produced significant increases in heart rate beginning 1h after drug administration that lasted approximately 2h (popioid agonist effects (e.g., miosis). Dronabinol 20mg and higher increased heart rate among healthy adults at rest who were in a state of opioid withdrawal, raising concern about its safety. These results have important implications for future dosing strategies and may limit the utility of dronabinol as a treatment for opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Delayed Ego Strength Development in Opioid Dependent Adolescents and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramoff, Benjamin A.; Lange, Hannah L. H.; Matson, Steven C.; Cottrill, Casey B.; Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Bonny, Andrea E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate ego strengths, in the context of Erikson's framework, among adolescents and young adults diagnosed with opioid dependence as compared to non-drug using youth. Methods. Opioid dependent (n = 51) and non-drug using control (n = 31) youth completed the self-administered Psychosocial Inventory of Ego Strengths (PIES). The PIES assesses development in the framework of Erikson's ego strength stages. Multivariate linear regression modeling assessed the independent association of the primary covariate (opioid dependent versus control) as well as potential confounding variables (e.g., psychiatric comorbidities, intelligence) with total PIES score. Results. Mean total PIES score was significantly lower in opioid dependent youth (231.65 ± 30.39 opioid dependent versus 270.67 ± 30.06 control; p development. A treatment approach acknowledging this delay may be needed in the counseling and treatment of adolescents with opioid dependence. PMID:26664819

  16. A Systematic, Intensive Statistical Investigation of Data from the Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) for Compliance and Illicit Opioid Abstinence in Substance Addiction Treatment with Buprenorphine/naloxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Han, David; Modestino, Edward J; Saunders, Scott; Roy, A Kennison; Jacobs, W; Inaba, Darryl S; Baron, David; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Hauser, Mary; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Smith, David E; Femino, John; Gold, Mark S

    2018-01-28

    Buprenorphine and naloxone (bup/nal), a combination partial mu receptor agonist and low-dose delta mu antagonist, is presently recommended and used to treat opioid-use disorder. However, a literature review revealed a paucity of research involving data from urine drug tests that looked at compliance and abstinence in one sample. Statistical analysis of data from the Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) was used to assess compliance and abstinence during treatment in a large cohort of bup/nal patients attending chemical-dependency programs from eastern USA in 2010 and 2011. Part 1: Bup/nal was present in 93.4% of first (n = 1,282; p drugs were present in 47.7% (n = 655, p =.0261) of samples. Patients who were compliant to the bup/nal prescription were more likely than noncompliant patients to be abstinent during treatment (p =.0012; odds ratio = 1.69 with 95% confidence interval (1.210, 2.354). Part 2: An analysis of all samples collected in 2011 revealed a significant improvement in both compliance (p < 2.2 × 10 -16 ) and abstinence (p < 2.2 × 10 -16 ) during treatment. Conclusion/Importance: While significant use of illicit opioids during treatment with bup/nal is present, improvements in abstinence and high compliance during maintenance-assisted therapy programs may ameliorate fears of diversion in comprehensive programs. Expanded clinical datasets, the treatment modality, location, and year of sampling are important covariates, for further studies. The potential for long-term antireward effects from bup/nal use requires consideration in future investigations.

  17. Acute detoxification of opioid-addicted patients with naloxone during propofol or methohexital anesthesia: a comparison of withdrawal symptoms, neuroendocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienbaum, P.; Scherbaum, N.; Thürauf, N.; Michel, M. C.; Gastpar, M.; Peters, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mu-Opioid receptor blockade during general anesthesia is a new treatment for detoxification of opioid addicted patients. We assessed catecholamine plasma concentrations, oxygen consumption, cardiovascular variables, and withdrawal symptoms after naloxone and tested the hypothesis that

  18. Opioid Epidemic: Cellular & Molecular Anesthesia as a Key Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Dabbagh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are one of the most important arsenals armamentarium of physicians for fighting against pain. During the decades, opioids have been used in a wide range of indications; both for treatment of acute and chronic pain; as natural and synthetic compounds and in a variety of delivery forms from intravenous infusion to intrathecal adjuvants of local anesthetics or as transdermal patches. There is no doubt that we are in an opioid misuse epidemic status; whether in the US or other countries; but if we want to resolve this miserable multilateral complication, there is no doubt that Cellular and Molecular aspects of Anesthesia has a key role in resolving the problem; through creating an opioid free pain management era.

  19. Advances in the delivery of buprenorphine for opioid dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenthal RN

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard N Rosenthal,1 Viral V Goradia2 1Department of Psychiatry, Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, 2Department of Psychiatry, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA Abstract: Opioid use disorders (OUDs have long been a global problem, but the prevalence rates have increased over 20 years to epidemic proportions in the US, with concomitant increases in morbidity and all-cause mortality, but especially opioid overdose. These increases are in part attributable to a several-fold expansion in the prescription of opioid pain medications over the same time period. Opioid detoxification and psychosocial treatments alone have each not yielded sufficient efficacy for OUD, but μ-opioid receptor agonist, partial agonist, and antagonist medications have demonstrated the greatest overall benefit in OUD treatment. Buprenorphine, a μ-opioid receptor partial agonist, has been used successfully on an international basis for several decades in sublingual tablet and film preparations for the treatment of OUD, but the nature of formulation, which is typically self-administered, renders it susceptible to nonadherence, diversion, and accidental exposure. This article reviews the clinical trial data for novel buprenorphine delivery systems in the form of subcutaneous depot injections, transdermal patches, and subdermal implants for the treatment of OUD and discusses both the clinical efficacy of longer-acting formulations through increasing consistent medication exposure and their potential utility in reducing diversion. These new delivery systems also offer new dosing opportunities for buprenorphine and strategies for dosing intervals in the treatment of OUD. Keywords: opioid use disorder, buprenorphine, drug diversion, drug implants, depot medications, maintenance therapy, treatment adherence

  20. γ-endorphin and Nα-acetyl-γ-endorphin interfere with distinct dopaminergic systems in the nucleus accumbens via opioid and non-opioid mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ree, J.M. van; Gaffori, O.; Kiraly, I.

    1984-01-01

    Low doses (10 ng) of the dopamine agonist apomorphine induced hypolocomotion when injected into the nucleus accumbens of rats. This behavioral response was antagonized by local treatment with either the opioid peptide γ-endorphin (γE) or the non-opioid peptide Nα-acetyl-γ-endorphin (AcγE) in a dose

  1. E-cigarette knowledge, attitudes, and use in opioid dependent smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Michael D.; Caviness, Celeste M.; Grimone, Kristin; Audet, Daniel; Borges, Allison; Anderson, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals in treatment for opioid dependence have smoking rates 3-5 times greater than U.S. prevalence rate. Traditional smoking cessation strategies have been ineffective in this population. Novel approaches are needed as well as harm reduction avenues. E-cigarettes (ecigs) may provide such a novel harm reduction and cessation opportunity but little is known about the knowledge of, attitudes about, and usage of e-cigs in opioid dependent smokers. The current study enrolled 315 opioid depen...

  2. Reduction of opioid withdrawal and potentiation of acute opioid analgesia by systemic AV411 (ibudilast).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Mark R; Lewis, Susannah S; Coats, Benjamen D; Skyba, David A; Crysdale, Nicole Y; Berkelhammer, Debra L; Brzeski, Anita; Northcutt, Alexis; Vietz, Christine M; Judd, Charles M; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R; Johnson, Kirk W

    2009-02-01

    Morphine-induced glial proinflammatory responses have been documented to contribute to tolerance to opioid analgesia. Here, we examined whether drugs previously shown to suppress glial proinflammatory responses can alter other clinically relevant opioid effects; namely, withdrawal or acute analgesia. AV411 (ibudilast) and minocycline, drugs with distinct mechanisms of action that result in attenuation of glial proinflammatory responses, each reduced naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Analysis of brain nuclei associated with opioid withdrawal revealed that morphine altered expression of glial activation markers, cytokines, chemokines, and a neurotrophic factor. AV411 attenuated many of these morphine-induced effects. AV411 also protected against spontaneous withdrawal-induced hyperactivity and weight loss recorded across a 12-day timecourse. Notably, in the spontaneous withdrawal study, AV411 treatment was delayed relative to the start of the morphine regimen so to also test whether AV411 could still be effective in the face of established morphine dependence, which it was. AV411 did not simply attenuate all opioid effects, as co-administering AV411 with morphine or oxycodone caused three-to-five-fold increases in acute analgesic potency, as revealed by leftward shifts in the analgesic dose response curves. Timecourse analyses revealed that plasma morphine levels were not altered by AV411, suggestive that potentiated analgesia was not simply due to prolongation of morphine exposure or increased plasma concentrations. These data support and extend similar potentiation of acute opioid analgesia by minocycline, again providing converging lines of evidence of glial involvement. Hence, suppression of glial proinflammatory responses can significantly reduce opioid withdrawal, while improving analgesia.

  3. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Dinarvand

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction.  Methods: 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females participated in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from volunteers’ peripheral blood and exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR whose products were then sequenced.  Results: Three different heterozygote polymorphisms were observed in 3 male individuals: 759T>C and 877G>A mutations were found in 2 control volunteers and 1043G>C substitution was observed in an opioid-addicted subject. Association between genotype and opioid addiction for each mutation was not statistically significant.  Discussion: It seems that the sample size used in our study is not enough to confirm or reject any association between 759T>C, 877G>A and 1043G>C substitutions in exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene and opioid addiction susceptibility in Iranian population.

  4. Opioid pharmaceuticals and addiction: the issues, and research directions seeking solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, Wendy M; Miotto, Karen A; Evans, Christopher J

    2010-05-01

    There are few pharmaceuticals superior to opiates for the treatment of pain. However, with concerns of addiction, withdrawal and questionable efficacy for all types of pain, these compounds are far from a magical panacea for pain-relief. As it is unlikely that other classes of compounds will supersede the opioids in the very near future, it is important to both optimize current opioid therapies and curb the astounding diversion of opioids from their intended analgesic use to non-medical abuse. In optimizing opioid therapeutics it is necessary to enhance the clinical awareness of the benefits of treating pain and combine this with aggressive strategies to reduce diversion for non-medical use. At the heart of the issue of opioid misuse is the role of opioid systems in the reward circuitry, and the adaptive processes associated with repetitive opioid use that manifest during withdrawal. Emerging pharmacological insights of opioid receptors will be reviewed that provide future hope for developing opioid-based analgesics with reduced addictive properties and perhaps, reduced opponent processes. In addition, with the increased understanding of nociceptive circuitry and the molecules involved in transmitting pain, new therapeutic targets have become evident that may result in effective analgesics either alone or in combination with current opioid therapies.

  5. Chimeric opioid peptides: Tools for identifying opioid receptor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, G.; Miyajima, A.; Yokota, T.; Arai, K.; Goldstein, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors synthesized several chimeric [125J-labelled] peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the κ opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surface or membrane preparation, these peptides could still bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody. These chimeric peptides should be useful for isolating μ, δ, and κ opioid receptors and for identifying opioid receptors on transfected cells in expression cloning procedures. The general approach using chimeric peptides should be applicable to other peptide receptors

  6. Pennsylvania State Core Competencies for Education on Opioids and Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburn, Michael A; Levine, Rachel L

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this project was to develop core competencies for education on opioids and addiction to be used in all Pennsylvania medical schools. The Pennsylvania Physician General created a task force that was responsible for the creation of the core competencies. A literature review was completed, and a survey of graduating medical students was conducted. The task force then developed, reviewed, and approved the core competencies. The competencies were grouped into nine domains: understanding core aspects of addiction; patient screening for substance use disorder; proper referral for specialty evaluation and treatment of substance use disorder; proper patient assessment when treating pain; proper use of multimodal treatment options when treating acute pain; proper use of opioids for the treatment of acute pain (after consideration of alternatives); the role of opioids in the treatment of chronic noncancer pain; patient risk assessment related to the use of opioids to treat chronic noncancer pain, including the assessment for substance use disorder or increased risk for aberrant drug-related behavior; and the process for patient education, initiation of treatment, careful patient monitoring, and discontinuation of therapy when using opioids to treat chronic noncancer pain. Specific competencies were developed for each domain. These competencies will be incorporated into the educational process at all Pennsylvania medical schools. It is hoped that these curriculum changes will improve student knowledge and attitudes in these areas, thus improving patient outcomes. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. Re-racialization of Addiction and the Redistribution of Blame in the White Opioid Epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Sonia; Rivera, Allyssa Stephanie; Hansen, Helena Bjerring

    2018-04-27

    New York City has the largest number of opioid dependent people of U.S. cities, and within New York, Whites have the highest rate of prescription opioid and heroin overdose deaths. The rise of opioid abuse among Whites has resulted in popular narratives of victimization by prescribers, framing of addiction as a biological disease, and the promise of pharmaceutical treatments that differ from the criminalizing narratives that have historically described urban Latino and black narcotic use. Through an analysis of popular media press and interviews with opioid prescribers and community pharmacists in Staten Island-the epicenter of opioid overdose in New York City and the most suburban and white of its boroughs-we found that narratives of white opioid users disrupted notions of the addict as "other," producing alternative logics of blame that focus on prescribers and the encroachment of dealers from outside of white neighborhoods. © 2018 by the American Anthropological Association.

  8. Prescription opioid use and misuse: piloting an educational strategy for rural primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anita; Kahan, Meldon; Jiwa, Ashifa

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a multifaceted educational intervention to improve the opioid prescribing practices of rural family physicians in a remote First Nations community. Prospective cohort study. Sioux Lookout, Ont. Family physicians. Eighteen family physicians participated in a 1-year study of a series of educational interventions on safe opioid prescribing. Interventions included a main workshop with a lecture and interactive case discussions, an online chat room, video case conferencing, and consultant support. Responses to questionnaires at baseline and after 1 year on knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to opioid prescribing. The main workshop was feasible and was well received by primary care physicians in remote communities. At 1 year, physicians were less concerned about getting patients addicted to opioids and more comfortable with opioid dosing. Multifaceted education and consultant support might play an important role in improving family physician comfort with opioid prescribing, and could improve the treatment of chronic pain while minimizing the risk of addiction.

  9. Is mechanism and symptom-based analgesia an answer to opioid-Induced hyperalgesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Cancer Pain" and "Pain in cancer patient" are not synonymous. Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia (OIH is a paradoxical state of nociceptive sensitization caused by exposure to opioids. Neuropathic pain is only partially responsive to opioids; injudicious increase in dose of opioids in neuropathic pain may not only result in inadequate pain relief but also OIH. Majority of literature on OIH is in non-cancer pain with systemic use of opioids. We describe the development and successful treatment of OIH in a 55-year-old male patient with Small cell Carcinoma Lung. Opioid tapering, rotation, systemic desensitization helps in combatting OIH. The use of anti-neuropathic adjuvant analgesics helps not only in preventing and treating OIH but also in understanding putative mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain and OIH.

  10. Macroeconomic conditions and opioid abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Alex; Ruhm, Christopher J; Simon, Kosali

    2017-12-01

    We examine how deaths and emergency department (ED) visits related to use of opioid analgesics (opioids) and other drugs vary with macroeconomic conditions. As the county unemployment rate increases by one percentage point, the opioid death rate per 100,000 rises by 0.19 (3.6%) and the opioid overdose ED visit rate per 100,000 increases by 0.95 (7.0%). Macroeconomic shocks also increase the overall drug death rate, but this increase is driven by rising opioid deaths. Our findings hold when performing a state-level analysis, rather than county-level; are primarily driven by adverse events among whites; and are stable across time periods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  12. Nurses and opioids: results of a bi-national survey on mental models regarding opioid administration in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Charlotte; Sobotka, Fabian; Karavasopoulou, Athina; Ward, Stephen; Bantel, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Pain remains insufficiently treated in hospitals. Increasing evidence suggests human factors contribute to this, due to nurses failing to administer opioids. This behavior might be the consequence of nurses' mental models about opioids. As personal experience and conceptions shape these models, the aim of this prospective survey was to identify model-influencing factors. A questionnaire was developed comprising of 14 statements concerning ideations about opioids and seven questions concerning demographics, indicators of adult learning, and strength of religious beliefs. Latent variables that may underlie nurses' mental models were identified using undirected graphical dependence models. Representative items of latent variables were employed for ordinal regression analysis. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,379 nurses in two London, UK, hospitals (n=580) and one German (n=799) hospital between September 2014 and February 2015. A total of 511 (37.1%) questionnaires were returned. Mean (standard deviation) age of participants were 37 (11) years; 83.5% participants were female; 45.2% worked in critical care; and 51.5% had more than 10 years experience. Of the nurses, 84% were not scared of opioids, 87% did not regard opioids as drugs to help patients die, and 72% did not view them as drugs of abuse. More English (41%) than German (28%) nurses were afraid of criminal investigations and were constantly aware of side effects (UK, 94%; Germany, 38%) when using opioids. Four latent variables were identified which likely influence nurses' mental models: "conscious decision-making"; "medication-related fears"; "practice-based observations"; and "risk assessment". They were predicted by strength of religious beliefs and indicators of informal learning such as experience but not by indicators of formal learning such as conference attendance. Nurses in both countries employ analytical and affective mental models when administering the opioids and seem to learn from experience

  13. Yiguanjian cataplasm attenuates opioid dependence in a mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuai; Gao, Hong; Fan, Yuchen; Zhang, Guanghua; Sun, Fengkai; Zhao, Jing; Li, Feng; Yang, Yang; Wang, Kai

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effect of Yiguanjian (YGJ) cataplasm on the development of opioid dependence in a mouse model of naloxone-induced opioid withdrawal syndrome. One hundred Swiss albino mice, of equal male to female ratio, were randomly and equally divided into 10 groups. A portion (3 cm2) of the backside hair of the mice was removed 1 day prior to the experiment. Morphine (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered twice daily for 5 days. YGJ cataplasm was prepared and pasted on the bare region of the mice immediately before morphine administration on day 3 and subsequently removed at the end day 5. On day 6, naloxone (8 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected to precipitate opioid withdrawal syndrome. Behavioral observation was performed in two 30-min phases immediately after naloxone injection. The YGJ cataplasm significantly and dose-dependently attenuated morphine-naloxone- induced experimental opioid withdrawal, in terms of withdrawal severity score and the frequencies of jumping, rearing, forepaw licking, and circling behaviors. However, YGJ cataplasm treatment did not alter the acute analgesic effect of morphine. YGJ cataplasm could attenuate opioid dependence and its associated withdrawal symptoms. Therefore, YGJ cataplasm could serve as a potential therapy for opioid addiction in the future.

  14. Ondansetron does not prevent physical dependence in patients taking opioid medications chronically for pain control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Rico, Tom; Cornell, Erika; Obasi, Hannah; Encisco, Ellen M; Vertelney, Haley; Gamble, Jamison G; Crawford, Clayton W; Sun, John; Clemenson, Anna; Erlendson, Matthew J; Okada, Robin; Carroll, Ian; Clark, J David

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the co-administration of ondansetron with morphine, and whether it could prevent the development of physical dependence in patients taking opioids for the treatment of chronic pain. A total of 48 chronic back pain patients (N = 48) participated in this double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized study. Patients were titrated onto sustained-release oral morphine and randomized to take 8 mg ondansetron or placebo three times daily concurrently with morphine during the 30-day titration. Following titration, patients underwent Naloxone induced opioid withdrawal. Opioid withdrawal signs and symptoms were then assessed by a blinded research assistant (objective opioid withdrawal score: OOWS) and by the research participant (subjective opioid withdrawal score: SOWS). We observed clinically significant signs of naloxone-precipitated opioid withdrawal in all participants (ΔOOWS = 4.3 ± 2.4, p physical dependence in human subjects when co-administered with opioids, but found no difference in naloxone-precipitated opioid withdrawal scores between ondansetron and placebo treatment groups. These results suggest that further studies are needed to determine if 5HT 3 receptor antagonists are useful in preventing opioid physical dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Narcolepsy and its treatment with stimulants. ASDA standards of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitler, M M; Aldrich, M S; Koob, G F; Zarcone, V P

    1994-06-01

    This review is part of the standards of practice recommendations. It has been commended and reviewed by the Board of the ASDA. It reflects recommendations of the Board for the practice of sleep medicine in North America. The subcommittee is responsible for the presented write-up.

  16. Prescription opioid misuse in the United States and the United Kingdom: cautionary lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Daniel F; Becker, William C; Fiellin, David A; Stannard, Cathy

    2014-11-01

    In the United States, opioid analgesics have increasingly been prescribed in the treatment of chronic pain, and this trend has accompanied increasing rates of misuse and overdose. Lawmakers have responded with myriad policies to curb the growing epidemic of opioid misuse, and a global alarm has been sounded among countries wishing to avoid this path. In the United Kingdom, a similar trend of increasing opioid consumption, albeit at lower levels, has been observed without an increase in reported misuse or drug-related deaths. The comparison between these two countries in opioid prescribing and opioid overdose mortality underscores important features of prescribing, culture, and health systems that may be permissive or protective in the development of a public health crisis. As access to opioid medications increases around the world, it becomes vitally important to understand the forces impacting opioid use and misuse. Trends in benzodiazepine and methadone use in the UK as well as structural elements of the National Health Service may serve to buffer opioid-related harms in the face of increasing prescriptions. In addition, the availability and price of heroin, as well as the ease of access to opioid agonist treatment in the UK may limit the growth of the illicit market for prescription opioids. The comparison between the US and the UK in opioid consumption and overdose rates should serve as a call to action for UK physicians and policymakers. Basic, proactive steps in the form of surveillance - of overdoses, marketing practices, prescribers, and patients - and education programs may help avert a public health crisis as opioid prescriptions increase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Desipramine in opioid-dependent cocaine abusers maintained on buprenorphine vs methadone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveto, A H; Feingold, A; Schottenfeld, R; Jatlow, P; Kosten, T R

    1999-09-01

    Cocaine abuse occurs in 40% to 60% of patients entering opioid maintenance treatment, and effective pharmacotherapies are needed for this combined dependence. This 13-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of desipramine hydrochloride (0 or 150 mg/d) plus buprenorphine hydrochloride (12 mg/d) or methadone hydrochloride (65 mg/d) in 180 opioid-dependent cocaine abusers (124 men, 56 women). Supervised urine samples were obtained thrice weekly, and self-reported cocaine and heroin use was reported once weekly. Desipramine plasma levels were determined at weeks 4 and 10. In men, opioid abstinence was increased more rapidly over time when treated with methadone than with buprenorphine, whereas cocaine abstinence was increased more with buprenorphine than with methadone. In women, opioid abstinence was increased the least rapidly when treated with buprenorphine plus placebo, while cocaine abstinence was increased more rapidly over time when treated with methadone than with buprenorphine. Regardless of sex or opioid medication, desipramine increased opioid and cocaine abstinence more rapidly over time than placebo. Self-reported opioid use confirmed these findings. Desipramine plasma levels were higher in women than in men, particularly those on buprenorphine maintenance. Higher desipramine plasma levels were associated with greater opioid, but not cocaine, abstinence. Desipramine may be a useful adjunctive medication in facilitating opioid and cocaine abstinence in opioid-maintained patients. The efficacy of opioid medications to treat opioid or cocaine dependence may differ by sex. These findings highlight the importance of including sex as a factor when examining treatment outcome in these types of trials.

  18. The role of opioid antagonist efficacy and constitutive opioid receptor activity in the opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Navani, Dipesh M.; Sirohi, Sunil; Madia, Priyanka A.; Yoburn, Byron C.

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of efficacy, opioid antagonists are classified as inverse opioid agonists (e.g. naltrexone) or neutral opioid antagonists (e.g. 6β-naltrexol). This study examined the interaction between naltrexone and 6β-naltrexol in the precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome in morphine dependent mice. Furthermore, the possible contribution of constitutive opioid receptor activity to precipitated withdrawal was evaluated using increasing levels of morphine dependence. In the first experiment, ...

  19. DYNAMICS OF OPIOID SUBSTITUTION TREATMENTIN DIFFERENT INITIAL SUBSTANCE USER OPIOID DEPENDENT PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todadze, Kh; Mosia, S

    2016-05-01

    Injecting drug user size estimation studies carried out in 2009, 2012 and 2015 revealed growing trends of drug abuse in Georgia:estimated number of people who inject drugs (PWID) have been increased from 40000 and 45000 to 50000. Since Soviet period the most popular injective narcotics have been opioids: home-made opium, heroine, buprenorphine and home-made desomorphine ("Krokodile") replacing each other on the black market. Self-made desomorphine typically contains big amounts of different toxic substances and causes significant somatic disorders, especially skin, bone, blood infections, liver and kidney failure; is highly addictive, associates with frequent injections that enhance injecting-related harm, including the risk of HIV transmission, in comparison with typical opioids. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of opioid substitution treatment (OST) on depression and anxiety in opioid dependent clients with history of different opioid substance use. 104 opioid drug users undergoing OST with intensive psychological counseling have been divided in 5 groups according to the principal opioid drug that was abused during past 6 months before starting treatment: heroine, desomorphine, illicit methadone injectors, illicit buprenorphine injectors, and multiple drug abusers consuming opioids as primary drugs. Level of depression (Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety (Spielberger Anxiety Inventory) as well as clinical symptoms, risky behavior, quality of life (WHO), and other data were measured before starting and after 3, 9, 15, 21 months of treatment. The illegal use of psychotropic-narcotics was checked through random urine-testing 1-2 times per patient per month. In all five groups remarkable decrease of depression and anxiety was observed in comparison with the starting data. Before inclusion desomorphine and poly-drug users had the highest scores of depression and anxiety while buprenorphine users manifested the lowest rate. Improvement of

  20. Pleiotropic opioid regulation of spinal endomorphin 2 release and its adaptations to opioid withdrawal are sexually dimorphic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sumita; Liu, Nai-Jiang; Zadina, James E; Sharma, Tarak; Gintzler, Alan R

    2012-01-01

    We studied adaptations to acute precipitated opioid withdrawal of spinal μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-coupled regulation of the release of endomorphin 2 (EM2). The release of this highly MOR-selective endogenous opioid from opioid-naive spinal tissue of male rats is subjected to MOR-coupled positive as well as negative modulation via cholera toxin-sensitive G(s) and pertussis toxin-sensitive G(i)/G(o), respectively. The net effect of this concomitant bidirectional modulation is inhibitory. MOR-coupled pleiotropic regulation of EM2 release is retained in opioid-withdrawn spinal tissue of male rats, but the balance of MOR-coupled inhibitory and facilitatory regulation shifted such that facilitatory regulation predominates. Augmented coupling of MOR to G(s) is causally associated with this change. Strikingly, pleiotropic characteristics of MOR-coupled regulation of spinal EM2 release and adaptations thereof to opioid withdrawal are male-specific. In females, MOR-coupled regulation of EM2 release from opioid-naive and -withdrawn spinal tissue does not have a significant G(s)-coupled facilitatory component, and MOR-coupled inhibition of EM2 release persists unabated in withdrawn preparations. The male-specific adaptations to chronic morphine that shift the relative predominance of opposing dual G protein-coupled MOR pathways provides a mechanism for mitigating inhibitory MOR signaling without losing MOR-coupled feedback regulation. These adaptations enable using endogenous EM2 as a substitute for morphine that had been precipitously removed. The sexually dimorphic functionality and regulation of spinal EM2/MOR-coupled signaling suggest the clinical utility of using sex-specific treatments for addiction that harness the activity of endogenous opioids.

  1. The opioid crisis: past, present and future policy climate in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Kristen A; Eibl, Joseph K; Franklyn, Alexandra M; Marsh, David C

    2017-11-02

    Addressing opioid use disorder has become a priority in Ontario, Canada, because of its high economic, social and health burden. There continues to be stigma and criticism relating to opioid use disorder and treatment options. The result has been unsystematic, partial, reactive policies and programs developed based on divergent points of view. The aim of this manuscript is to describe how past and present understandings, narratives, ideologies and discourse of opioid use, have impacted policies over the course of the growing opioid crisis. Assessing the impact of policy is complex. It involves consideration of conceptual issues of what impacts policy change. In this manuscript we argue that the development of polices and initiatives regarding opioids, opioid use disorder and opioid agonist treatment in the last decade, have been more strongly associated with the evolution of ideas, narratives and discourses rather than research relating to opioids. We formulate our argument using a framework by Sumner, Crichton, Theobald, Zulu, and Parkhurs. We use examples from the Canadian context to outline our argument such as: the anti- drug legislation from the Canadian Federal Conservative government in 2007; the removal of OxyContin™ from the drug formulary in 2012; the rapid expansion of opioid agonist treatment beginning in the early 2000s, the unilateral decision made regarding fee cuts for physicians providing opioid agonist treatment in 2015; and the most recent implementation of a narcotics monitoring system, which are all closely linked with the shifts in public opinion and discourse at the time of which these policies and programs are implemented. We conclude with recommendations to consider a multifactorial response using evidence and stakeholder engagement to address the opioid crisis, rather than a reactive policy approach. We suggest that researchers have an important role in shaping future policy by reframing ideas through knowledge translation, formation of

  2. Pharmacogenomics-guided policy in opioid use disorder (OUD) management: An ethnically-diverse case-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettienne, Earl B; Chapman, Edwin; Maneno, Mary; Ofoegbu, Adaku; Wilson, Bradford; Settles-Reaves, Beverlyn; Clarke, Melissa; Dunston, Georgia; Rosenblatt, Kevin

    2017-12-01

    Opioid use disorder (OUD) is characterized by a problematic pattern of opioid use leading to clinically-significant impairment or distress. Opioid agonist treatment is an integral component of OUD management, and buprenorphine is often utilized in OUD management due to strong clinical evidence for efficacy. However, interindividual genetic differences in buprenorphine metabolism may result in variable treatment response, leaving some patients undertreated and at increased risk for relapse. Clinical pharmacogenomics studies the effect that inherited genetic variations have on drug response. Our objective is to demonstrate the impact of pharmacogenetic testing on OUD management outcomes. We analyzed a patient who reported discomfort at daily buprenorphine dose of 24 mg, which was a mandated daily maximum by the pharmacy benefits manager. Regular urine screenings were conducted to detect the presence of unauthorized substances, and pharmacogenetic testing was used to determine the appropriate dose of buprenorphine for OUD management. At the 24 mg buprenorphine daily dose, the patient had multiple relapses with unauthorized substances. Pharmacogenetic testing revealed that the patient exhibited a cytochrome P450 3A4 ultrarapid metabolizer phenotype, which necessitated a higher than recommended daily dose of buprenorphine (32 mg) for adequate OUD management. The patient exhibited a reduction in the number of relapses on the pharmacogenetic-based dose recommendation compared to standard dosing. Pharmacogenomic testing as clinical decision support helped to individualize OUD management. Collaboration by key stakeholders is essential to establishing pharmacogenetic testing as standard of care in OUD management.

  3. Nivolumab as the new standard of metastatic kidney cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Matveev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade was marked by the rapid development of kidney cancer drug treatment and advent of targeted drugs aimed at inhibition of angiogenesis which plays a crucial role in tumor growth. Despite certain success, targeted antiangiogenetic therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR, and monoclonal antibodies against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in most cases do not achieve long-term remission, are highly toxic, and never lead to full cure for the patients. Development of modern immunological approaches to application of inhibitors of the crucial immune response regulators opens up new possibilities in treatment of disseminated kidney cancer. In this review, results of the studies of nivolumab (PD-1 inhibitor, first checkpoint inhibitor registered for treatment of metastatic kidney cancer are presented.

  4. Radiotherapy in head and neck: a standard treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini Blasco, A; Torres Lopez, M; Apardian Manougian, R

    1998-01-01

    The present work is an exhaustive revision of the literature regarding the employment of combined treatments of radiochemotherapy in the head and neck neoplasms. The sanitary importance of this group of illnesses starts to become remarkable not only due to their frequency but for the high percentage of patients that present themselves for consultation with an advanced illness where the results of the classic treatments of surgery and radiotherapy are discouraging. These results are poor for the survival as well as in the quality of this. It analyzes the role of the different pharmaceuticals used in patients as well as the fundamentally different associations with radiotherapy: neoadjuvant, adjuvant and concomitant. These results allow to affirm that this treatment form is elected for those patients with advanced tumors of head and neck with a general state that allows to tolerate a bigger toxicity [es

  5. New framework for standardized notation in wastewater treatment modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corominas, L.; Rieger, L.; Takacs, I.

    2010-01-01

    Many unit process models are available in the field of wastewater treatment. All of these models use their own notation, causing problems for documentation, implementation and connection of different models (using different sets of state variables). The main goal of this paper is to propose a new...... is a framework that can be used in whole plant modelling, which consists of different fields such as activated sludge, anaerobic digestion, sidestream treatment, membrane bioreactors, metabolic approaches, fate of micropollutants and biofilm processes. The main objective of this consensus building paper...... notational framework which allows unique and systematic naming of state variables and parameters of biokinetic models in the wastewater treatment field. The symbols are based on one main letter that gives a general description of the state variable or parameter and several subscript levels that provide...

  6. Safety and efficacy of an oxycodone vaccine: Addressing some of the unique considerations posed by opioid abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M D Raleigh

    Full Text Available Among vaccines aimed at treating substance use disorders, those targeting opioids present several unique medication development challenges. 1 Opioid overdose is a common complication of abuse, so it is desirable for an opioid vaccine to block the toxic as well as the addictive effects of opioids. 2 It is important that an opioid vaccine not interfere with the action of opioid antagonists used to reverse opioid overdose or treat addiction. 3 Some opioids are immunosuppressive and chronic ongoing opioid use could interfere with vaccine immunogenicity. 4 Although antibody-bound oxycodone is unable to enter the brain because of its size, it might still be able to activate peripheral opioid receptors. To assess vaccine impact on opioid toxicity, rats vaccinated with oxycodone conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin subunit dimer (OXY-dKLH adsorbed to alum or controls vaccinated with dKLH were compared with regard to oxycodone-induced hotplate analgesia and oxycodone-induced respiratory depression and bradycardia. Vaccination shifted the dose-response curves to the right, representing protection, for each of these endpoints. Naloxone was equally effective in both OXY-dKLH and control groups, providing complete and rapid reversal of respiratory depression. The administration of a long-acting naltrexone formulation during vaccination did not impair vaccine immunogenicity in mice. Similarly, serum anti-oxycodone antibody titers were not altered by continuous morphine infusion during vaccination compared to opioid-naïve controls. Competitive ELISA assay showed negligible or low affinity of immune antiserum for endogenous opioids or opioid antagonists. In vitro receptor binding assays showed that antibody-bound oxycodone does not activate mu opioid receptors. These data support further study of OXY-dKLH as a potential treatment for oxycodone abuse and suggest that vaccination might also reduce the severity of oxycodone overdose.

  7. Report on the first government-funded opioid substitution programme for heroin users in the Western Cape Province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Graeme; Hoosain, Shuaib; Macharia, Muiruri; Weich, Lize

    2017-05-24

    Although pharmacological opioid substitution treatment (OST) is a well-established treatment modality for heroin addiction, it is a relatively recent introduction in low- and middle-income countries. To report on a pilot OST programme initiated in 2013 that was the only public-funded programme in South Africa (SA) at the time. Participants were offered standard care only (n=68) or, for the OST group (n=67), standard care plus Suboxone (Reckitt Benckiser), a synthetic partial opioid agonist, in a 12-week clinician-monitored programme. Clinical records of 135 participants in the rehabilitation programme at Sultan Bahu Rehabilitation Centre in Mitchell's Plain, Cape Town, SA, from 1 January to 31 December 2014 were reviewed. Data collected included demographics and duration in treatment (retention) as well as number of urine samples provided, positive tests or self-reported use events and dates of first positive/negative tests. Significantly more participants in the OST group (65.7%) than controls (44.1%) completed the treatment (p=0.019). Among the non-completers, retention was higher in the OST group than in the standard care group (48.2 v. 30.1 days; p=0.001). The groups did not differ in respect of number of missed appointments and time to first positive test. However, the proportion of participants testing positive was higher in the OST group (80.6%) than in the standard care group (61.8%), although the former were tested nearly three times (18.3 v. 6.6 times) more. Consequently, the positive rate (proportion of positive tests) was substantially lower in the OST group (16.8%) than in the standard care group (23.3%). The results demonstrate modest success of this pilot OST programme in terms of completion and retention and should argue for a move to increase availability of and accessibility to OSTs for the management of opioid use disorder.

  8. Standardization of intralesional meglumine antimoniate treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Maria Cristina de Oliveira; Vasconcellos, Érica de Camargo Ferreira E; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Pacheco, Sandro Javier Bedoya; Marzochi, Mauro Celio de Almeida; Rosalino, Cláudia Maria Valete; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Intralesional treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis has been applied for over 30 years at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, with good therapeutic results and without relevant systemic toxicity. Meglumine antimoniate was injected subcutaneously, using a long medium-caliber needle (for example, 30mm × 0.8mm); patients received 1-3 injections, with 15-day intervals. The technique is described in detail sufficient to enable replication. The treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis with intralesional meglumine antimoniate is a simple, effective, and safe technique, which may be used in basic healthcare settings.

  9. The impact of benzodiazepine use on methadone maintenance treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Bruna; Blake, Joan; Marsh, David C; Sproule, Beth; Jeyapalan, Renuka; Li, Selina

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine predictors of benzodiazepine use among methadone maintenance treatment patients, to determine whether baseline benzodiazepine use influenced ongoing use during methadone maintenance treatment, and to assess the effect of ongoing benzodiazepine use on treatment outcomes (i.e., opioid and cocaine use and treatment retention). A retrospective chart review of 172 methadone maintenance treatment patients (mean age = 34.6 years; standard deviation = 8.5 years; 64% male) from January 1997 to December 1999 was conducted. At baseline, 29% were "non-users" (past year) of benzodiazepine, 36% were "occasional users," and 35% were "regular/problem users." Regular/problem users were more likely to have started opioid use with prescription opioids, experienced more overdoses, and reported psychiatric comorbidity. Being female, more years of opioid use, and a history of psychiatric treatment were significant predictors of baseline benzodiazepine use. Ongoing benzodiazepine users were more likely to have opioid-positive and cocaine-positive urine screens during methadone maintenance treatment. Only ongoing cocaine use was negatively related to retention. Benzodiazepine use by methadone maintenance treatment patients is associated with a more complex clinical picture and may negatively influence treatment outcomes.

  10. Incidence of iatrogenic opioid dependence or abuse in patients with pain who were exposed to opioid analgesic therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, C; Smith, B H; Matthews, K

    2018-06-01

    The prevalence and incidence of chronic conditions, such as pain and opioid dependence, have implications for policy development, resource allocation, and healthcare delivery. The primary objective of the current review was to estimate the incidence of iatrogenic opioid dependence or abuse after treatment with opioid analgesics. Systematic electronic searches utilised six research databases (Embase, Medline, PubMed, Cinahl Plus, Web of Science, OpenGrey). A 'grey' literature search and a reference search of included articles were also undertaken. The PICOS framework was used to develop search strategies and the findings are reported in accordance with the PRISMA Statement. After eligibility reviews of 6164 articles, 12 studies (involving 310 408 participants) were retained for inclusion in the meta-analyses. A random effects model (DerSimonian-Laird method) generated a pooled incidence of opioid dependence or abuse of 4.7%. There was little within-study risk of bias and no significant publication bias; however, substantial heterogeneity was found among study effects (99.78%). Sensitivity analyses indicated that the diagnostic criteria selected for identifying opioid dependence or abuse (Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) vs International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9)) accounted for 20% and duration of exposure to opioid analgesics accounted for 18% of variance in study effects. Longer-term opioid analgesic exposure, and prescription of strong rather than weak opioids, were associated with a significantly lower incidence of opioid dependence or abuse. The incidence of iatrogenic opioid dependence or abuse was 4.7% of those prescribed opioids for pain. Further research is required to confirm the potential for our findings to inform prevention of this serious adverse event. Copyright © 2018 British Journal of Anaesthesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Low pain intensity after opioid withdrawal as a first step of a comprehensive pain rehabilitation program predicts long-term nonuse of opioids in chronic noncancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumova, Elena K; Bennemann, Philipp; Kindler, Doris; Schwarzer, Andreas; Zenz, Michael; Maier, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    In specialized pain clinics there is an increasing number of patients with severe chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) despite long-term opioid medication. Few clinical studies show short-term pain relief after opioid withdrawal (OW). We have evaluated the relation between pain intensity after OW and long-term opioid nonuse. One hundred two consecutive patients with severe CNCP despite opioid medication (mean treatment duration, 43 mo) reported pain intensity (numerical rating scale, 0 to 10), Pain Disability Index, mood (CES-D), and quality of life (Short Form 36) before, shortly, and 12 to 24 months after inpatient OW. Total opioid withdrawal (n = 78) or significant dose reduction (DR; n = 24, mean reduction, 82%) was performed after individual decision. Opioid intake 12 to 24 months later, respectively dose increase ≥ 100% (DR group), was considered relapse. T tests, multivariable analysis of variance, logistic regression. After OW current pain intensity significantly decreased on an average by 41% (6.4 ± 2.4 vs. 3.8 ± 2.5), maximal and average pain by 18% and 24%, respectively. Twelve to 24 months later 42 patients (41%) relapsed (31 of the total opioid withdrawal group, 6 of the DR group, 5 lost). Patients without later relapse showed significantly lower pain scores than the later relapsed patients already shortly after OW (5.0 ± 2.2 vs. 5.9 ± 2.1) and 12 to 24 months later (5.5 ± 2.4 vs. 6.5 ± 2.0). There was a significant relation between relapse probability and pain intensity immediately after OW. In many patients with severe CNCP, despite opioid medication, sustainable pain relief can be achieved if OW is included in the rehabilitation program. Consequently, we recommend OW for opioid-resistant CNCP before any opioid escalation. Lower pain intensity shortly after OW may predict the long-term opioid nonuse probability.

  12. Creating opioid dependence in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhye, Suneel

    2018-01-01

    Clinical question What is the risk of creating opioid dependence from an ED opioid prescription? Article chosen Barnett ML, Olenski AR, Jena AB. Opioid-prescribing patterns of emergency physicians and risk of long-term use. N Engl J Med 2017;376:663-73, doi:10.1056/NEJMsa1610524. This study examined the risk of creating long-term opioid dependence from a prescription written in an opioid-naive patient in the ED.

  13. Effectiveness of sequential v. standard triple therapy for treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancer.[4] Children are infected with H. pylori at a much younger age in developing ... a recent meta-analysis that included over 53 000 patients showed that the eradication rate .... The child's parents/guardians were questioned ..... human infection, drug resistance, and alternative approaches to treatment. Ann Trop Med ...

  14. 40 CFR 268.40 - Applicability of treatment standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment sludges, spent catalysts, and wastes listed in § 261.31 or § 261.32). All F024 wastes2-Chloro-1,3.../water/solids separation sludge—Any sludge generated from the gravitational separation of oil/water... refineries. Such sludges include, but are not limited to, those generated in: oil/water/solids separators...

  15. Prescription Opioid Usage and Abuse Relationships: An Evaluation of State Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Reisman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context The dramatic rise in the use of prescription opioids to treat non-cancer pain has been paralleled by increasing prescription opioid abuse. However, detailed analyses of these trends and programs to address them are lacking. Objective To study the association between state shipments of prescription opioids for medical use and prescription opioid abuse admissions and to assess the effects of state prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs on prescription opioid abuse admissions. Design and Setting A retrospective ecological cohort study comparing state prescription opioid shipments (source: Automation of Reports and Consolidated Orders Systems database and inpatient admissions for prescription opioid abuse (source: Treatment Episode Data Set in 14 states with PDMPs (intervention group and 36 states without PDMPs (control group for the period 1997–2003. Results From 1997 to 2003, oxycodone, morphine, and hydrocodone shipments increased by 479%, 100%, and 148% respectively. Increasing prescription oxycodone shipments were significantly associated with increasing prescription opioid admission rates (p < 0.001. PDMP states had significantly lower oxycodone shipments than the control group. PDMP states had less increase in prescription opioid admissions per year (p = 0.063. A patient admitted to an inpatient drug abuse rehabilitation program in a PDMP state was less likely to be admitted for prescription opioid drug abuse (Odds ratio = 0.775, 95% Confidence Interval 0.764–0.785. Conclusions PDMPs appear to decrease the quantity of oxycodone shipments and the prescription opioid admission rate for states with these programs. Overall, opioid shipments rose significantly in PDMP states during the study period indicating a negligible “chilling effect” on physician prescribing.

  16. Gabapentin, opioids, and the risk of opioid-related death: A population-based nested case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Gomes

    2017-10-01

    1.61 to 2.47, p < 0.001; adjusted OR [aOR] 1.49, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.88, p < 0.001 compared to opioid prescription alone. In the dose-response analysis, moderate-dose (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.46 to 2.87, p < 0.001; aOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.28, p = 0.024 and high-dose (OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.58 to 3.08, p < 0.001; aOR 1.58, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.27, p = 0.015 gabapentin use was associated with a nearly 60% increase in the odds of opioid-related death relative to no concomitant gabapentin use. As expected, we found no significant association between co-prescription of opioids and NSAIDs and opioid-related death (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.27, p = 0.113; aOR 1.14, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.32, p = 0.083. In an exploratory analysis of patients at risk of combined opioid and gabapentin use, we found that 46.0% (45,173 of 98,288 of gabapentin users in calendar year 2013 received at least 1 concomitant prescription for an opioid. This study was limited to individuals eligible for public drug coverage in Ontario, we were only able to identify prescriptions reimbursed by the government and dispensed from retail pharmacies, and information on indication for gabapentin use was not available. Furthermore, as with all observational studies, confounding due to unmeasured variables is a potential source of bias.In this study we found that among patients receiving prescription opioids, concomitant treatment with gabapentin was associated with a substantial increase in the risk of opioid-related death. Clinicians should consider carefully whether to continue prescribing this combination of products and, when the combination is deemed necessary, should closely monitor their patients and adjust opioid dose accordingly. Future research should investigate whether a similar interaction exists between pregabalin and opioids.

  17. Impact of opioid therapy on gonadal hormones: focus on buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Anjali; Sapra, Mamta; Iranmanesh, Ali

    2018-02-17

    Objective The USA is in the midst of an opioid crisis. Understanding the impact of opioids and commonly used treatments for opioid dependence is essential for clinicians and researchers in order to educate and treat the nation's growing population with opioid use disorders. As a relatively new treatment for opioid dependence, buprenorphine is gaining popularity to the extent of becoming not only a preferred approach to the maintenance of opiate addiction, but also an option for chronic pain management. The purpose of this report is to review the available evidence on the endocrine effects of buprenorphine, particularly as it relates to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, which is controversial and not fully defined. Method We conducted a Pubmed search (2000-2017) for human studies in the English language for articles that were available as full length regarding buprenorphine, endocrinopathy, hypogonadism, bone density, opioids. Case reports were also reviewed, although prospective studies and randomized controlled trials received more weight. Results Opioid induced hypogonadism is well established. Most studies report that buprenorphine being a partial agonist/antagonist may not be impacting the pituitary trophic hormones as much. There are reports of sexual dysfunction in subjects maintained on buprenorphine, some without hormonal correlation. Thus with the understanding that pertinent clinical studies are limited in number, varied in methodology, mostly cross sectional, predominantly in men and small number of participants, more research in this area is warranted. Conclusion Based on a comprehensive review of the available literature, we conclude that despite its increasing popularity, buprenorphine has not been adequately studied in respect to its long-term effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. There is a great need for longitudinal systematic trials to define the potential buprenorphine-induced endocrine consequences.

  18. Variability in prescription opioid intake and reinforcement amongst 129 substrains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, S M; Healy, A F; Coelho, M A; Brown, C N; Kippin, T E; Szumlinski, K K

    2017-09-01

    Opioid abuse in the United States has reached epidemic proportions, with treatment admissions and deaths associated with prescription opioid abuse quadrupling over the past 10 years. Although genetics are theorized to contribute substantially to inter-individual variability in the development, severity and treatment outcomes of opioid abuse/addiction, little direct preclinical study has focused on the behavioral genetics of prescription opioid reinforcement and drug-taking. Herein, we employed different 129 substrains of mice currently available from The Jackson Laboratory (129S1/SvlmJ, 129X1/SvJ, 129S4/SvJaeJ and 129P3/J) as a model system of genetic variation and assayed mice for oral opioid intake and reinforcement, as well as behavioral and somatic signs of dependence. All substrains exhibited a dose-dependent increase in oral oxycodone and heroin preference and intake under limited-access procedures and all, but 129S1/SvlmJ mice, exhibited oxycodone reinforcement. Relative to the other substrains, 129P3/J mice exhibited higher heroin and oxycodone intake. While 129X1/SvJ exhibited the highest anxiety-like behavior during natural opioid withdrawal, somatic and behavior signs of precipitated withdrawal were most robust in 129P3/J mice. These results demonstrate the feasibility and relative sensitivity of our oral opioid self-administration procedures for detecting substrain differences in drug reinforcement/intake among 129 mice, of relevance to the identification of genetic variants contributing to high vs. low oxycodone reinforcement and intake. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  19. Is tapentadol different from classical opioids? A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Richard M; Knaggs, Roger; Farquhar-Smith, Paul; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2016-11-01

    Tapentadol is a single molecule able to deliver analgesia by two distinct mechanisms, a feature which differentiates it from many other analgesics. Pre-clinical data demonstrate two mechanisms of action: mu-opioid receptor agonist activity and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibition. From these, one may predict that tapentadol would be applicable across a broad spectrum of pain from nociceptive to neuropathic. The evidence in animal models suggests that norepinephrine re-uptake inhibition (NRI) is a key mechanism and may even predominate over opioid actions in chronic (and especially neuropathic) pain states, reinforcing that tapentadol is different to classical opioids and may, therefore, be an a priori choice for the treatment of neuropathic and mixed pain. The clinical studies and subsequent practice experience and surveillance support the concept of opioid and non-opioid mechanisms of action. The reduced incidence of some of the typical opioid-induced side effects, compared to equianalgesic doses of classical opioids, supports the hypothesis that tapentadol analgesia is only partially mediated by opioid agonist mechanisms. Both the pre-clinical and clinical profiles appear to be differentiated from those of classical opioids.

  20. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine dependence and reward: participation of the endogenous opioid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Trigo, José Manuel; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary component of tobacco that maintains the smoking habit and develops addiction. The adaptive changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors produced by repeated exposure to nicotine play a crucial role in the establishment of dependence. However, other neurochemical systems also participate in the addictive effects of nicotine including glutamate, cannabinoids, GABA and opioids. This review will cover the involvement of these neurotransmitters in nicotine addictive properties, with a special emphasis on the endogenous opioid system. Thus, endogenous enkephalins and beta-endorphins acting on mu-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine rewarding effects, whereas opioid peptides derived from prodynorphin participate in nicotine aversive responses. An upregulation of mu-opioid receptors has been reported after chronic nicotine treatment that could counteract the development of nicotine tolerance, whereas the downregulation induced on kappa-opioid receptors seems to facilitate nicotine tolerance. Endogenous enkephalins acting on mu-opioid receptors also play a role in the development of physical dependence to nicotine. In agreement with these actions of the endogenous opioid system, the opioid antagonist naltrexone has shown to be effective for smoking cessation in certain subpopulations of smokers. PMID:20170672

  1. Report on ANSI/ASME nuclear air and gas treatment standards for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Original N Committee, N45-8, has completed and published through the approved American National Standards Institute process two Standards, N-509 and N-510. This committee has been dissolved and replaced by ASME Committee on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment with expanded scope to cover not only air cleaning, but thermal treatment equipment. Current efforts are directed to produce Code documents rather than Standards type publications. This report summarizes changed scope, current organization and sub-committee coverage areas

  2. Tolerance to Non-Opioid Analgesics is Opioid Sensitive in the Nucleus Raphe Magnus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagareli, Merab G; Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz

    2011-01-01

    Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) into the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac, and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) in the following 4 days result in progressively less antinociception compare to the saline control, i.e., tolerance develops to these drugs in male rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with the μ-opioid antagonist naloxone into the NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs on the first day of testing in the tail-flick (TF) reflex and hot plate (HP) latency tests. On the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests and impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion of endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain-control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine, and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  3. Predictors of opioid efficacy in patients with chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Kasper; Olesen, Anne E; Gram, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    of life after 14 days of opioid treatment. Secondary outcomes included patient's global impression of clinical change and side effects. Logistic regression models adjusted for age and sex were used to identify biomarkers predictive for successful treatment, defined as at least a 30% reduction in average.......03), relative delta (OR: 0.76; P = 0.03) and beta EEG activity (OR: 1.18; P = 0.04) induced by experimental cold pain. None of the study variables were related to improvement in quality of life. For the first time, individual pain processing characteristics have been linked to opioid response in a mixed chronic...

  4. Glioblastoma: background, standard treatment paradigms, and supportive care considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellor, Susan V; Pagano-Young, Teri Ann; Avgeropoulos, Nicholas G

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a brain tumor condition marked by rapid neurological and clinical demise, resulting in disproportionate disability for those affected. Caring for this group of patients is complex, intense, multidisciplinary in nature, and fraught with the need for expensive treatments, surveillance imaging, physician follow-up, and rehabilitative, psychological, and social support interventions. Few of these patients return to the workforce for any meaningful time frame, and because of the enormity of the financial burden that patients, their caregivers, and society face, utilization reviews become the focus of ethical scrutiny. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  5. A Conceptual Framework for Understanding Unintended Prolonged Opioid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, W Michael; Brummett, Chad M; Sullivan, Mark D; Goesling, Jenna; Tilburt, Jon C; Merlin, Jessica S; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Wasan, Ajay D; Clauw, Daniel J; Warner, David O

    2017-12-01

    An urgent need exists to better understand the transition from short-term opioid use to unintended prolonged opioid use (UPOU). The purpose of this work is to propose a conceptual framework for understanding UPOU that posits the influence of 3 principal domains that include the characteristics of (1) individual patients, (2) the practice environment, and (3) opioid prescribers. Although no standardized method exists for developing a conceptual framework, the process often involves identifying corroborative evidence, leveraging expert opinion to identify factors for inclusion in the framework, and developing a graphic depiction of the relationships between the various factors and the clinical problem of interest. Key patient characteristics potentially associated with UPOU include (1) medical and mental health conditions; (2) pain etiology; (3) individual affective, behavioral, and neurophysiologic reactions to pain and opioids; and (4) sociodemographic factors. Also, UPOU could be influenced by structural and health care policy factors: (1) the practice environment, including the roles of prescribing clinicians, adoption of relevant practice guidelines, and clinician incentives or disincentives, and (2) the regulatory environment. Finally, characteristics inherent to clinicians that could influence prescribing practices include (1) training in pain management and opioid use; (2) personal attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs regarding the risks and benefits of opioids; and (3) professionalism. As the gatekeeper to opioid access, the behavior of prescribing clinicians directly mediates UPOU, with the 3 domains interacting to determine this behavior. This proposed conceptual framework could guide future research on the topic and allow plausible hypothesis-based interventions to reduce UPOU. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Herbal medicines for the management of opioid addiction: safe and effective alternatives to conventional pharmacotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jeanine; Rosenbaum, Christopher; Hernon, Christina; McCurdy, Christopher R; Boyer, Edward W

    2011-12-01

    Striking increases in the abuse of opioids have expanded the need for pharmacotherapeutic interventions. The obstacles that confront effective treatment of opioid addiction - shortage of treatment professionals, stigma associated with treatment and the ability to maintain abstinence - have led to increased interest in alternative treatment strategies among both treatment providers and patients alike. Herbal products for opioid addiction and withdrawal, such as kratom and specific Chinese herbal medications such as WeiniCom, can complement existing treatments. Unfortunately, herbal treatments, while offering some advantages over existing evidence-based pharmacotherapies, have poorly described pharmacokinetics, a lack of supportive data derived from well controlled clinical trials, and severe toxicity, the cause for which remains poorly defined. Herbal products, therefore, require greater additional testing in rigorous clinical trials before they can expect widespread acceptance in the management of opioid addiction.

  7. Effectiveness of integrating individualized and generic complementary medicine treatments with standard care versus standard care alone for reducing preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, Samuel; Keinan Boker, Lital; Arnon, Zahi; Ben-Arye, Eran; Bar'am, Ayala; Sroka, Gideon; Matter, Ibrahim; Somri, Mostafa; Schiff, Elad

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative anxiety is commonly reported by people undergoing surgery. A significant number of studies have found a correlation between preoperative anxiety and post-operative morbidity. Various methods of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) were found to be effective in alleviating preoperative anxiety. This study examined the relative effectiveness of various individual and generic CAM methods combined with standard treatment (ST) in relieving preoperative anxiety, in comparison with ST alone. Randomized controlled trial. Holding room area Three hundred sixty patients. Patients were randomly divided into 6 equal-sized groups. Group 1 received the standard treatment (ST) for anxiety alleviation with anxiolytics. The five other groups received the following, together with ST (anxiolytics): Compact Disk Recording of Guided Imagery (CDRGI); acupuncture; individual guided imagery; reflexology; and individual guided imagery combined with reflexology, based on medical staff availability. Assessment of anxiety was taken upon entering the holding room area (surgery preparation room) ('pre-treatment assessment'), and following the treatment, shortly before transfer to the operating room ('post-treatment assessment'), based on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) questionnaire. Data processing included comparison of VAS averages in the 'pre' and 'post' stages among the various groups. Preoperatively, CAM treatments were associated with significant reduction of anxiety level (5.54-2.32, peffective than individualized CAM (Peffective than generic CDRGI. In light of the scope of preoperative anxiety and its implications for public health, integration of CAM therapies with ST should be considered for reducing preoperative anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Newer approaches to opioid detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid use disorders present with distressing withdrawal symptoms at the time of detoxification. The pharmacological agents and methods currently in use for detoxification mainly include buprenorphine, methadone, and clonidine. Many other pharmacological agents have been tried for opioid detoxification. This review takes a look at the newer pharmacological options, both opioid agonists and non-agonist medications that have been utilized for detoxification. Peer reviewed articles were identified using PubMed and PsychInfo databases. The keywords included for the search were a combination of ′opioid′ and ′detoxification′ and their synonyms. All the articles published in the last 10 years were screened for. Relevant data was extracted from identified studies. Many newer pharmacological agents have been tried in detoxification of opioids. However, the quest for a safe, efficacious, cost-effective pharmacological option which requires minimal monitoring still continues. The role of non-pharmacological measures and alternative medicine needs further evaluation.

  9. Towards safer use of opioids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carson, R W R

    2009-09-01

    The main aim of our work was to improve the safety of opioid use in our institution, an acute generalhospital with 620 beds. Initially, all reported opioid errors from 2001 - 2006 were audited. The findings directed a range of multidisciplinary staff educational inputs to improve opioid prescribing and administration practice, and encourage drug error reporting. 448 drug errors were reported, of which 54 (12%) involved opioids; of these, 43 (79%) involved codeine, morphine or oxycodone. 31 of the errors (57%) were associated with administration, followed by 12 (22%) with dispensing and 11 (20%) with prescribing. There were 2 reports of definite patient harm. A subsequent audit examined a 17-month period following the introduction of the above teaching: 17 errors were noted, of which 14 (83%) involved codeine, morphine or oxycodone. Again, drug administration was most error-prone, comprising 11 (65%) of reports. However, just 2 (12%) of the reported errors now involved prescribing, which was a reduction.

  10. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  11. Reducing the health consequences of opioid addiction in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Sarah; Eiserman, Julie; Beletsky, Leo; Stancliff, Sharon; Bruce, R Douglas

    2013-07-01

    Addiction to prescription opioids is prevalent in primary care settings. Increasing prescription opioid use is largely responsible for a parallel increase in overdose nationally. Many patients most at risk for addiction and overdose come into regular contact with primary care providers. Lack of routine addiction screening results in missed treatment opportunities in this setting. We reviewed the literature on screening and brief interventions for addictive disorders in primary care settings, focusing on opioid addiction. Screening and brief interventions can improve health outcomes for chronic illnesses including diabetes, hypertension, and asthma. Similarly, through the use of screening and brief interventions, patients with addiction can achieve improved health outcome. A spectrum of low-threshold care options can reduce the negative health consequences among individuals with opioid addiction. Screening in primary care coupled with short interventions, including motivational interviewing, syringe distribution, naloxone prescription for overdose prevention, and buprenorphine treatment are effective ways to manage addiction and its associated risks and improve health outcomes for individuals with opioid addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Haloperidol Disrupts Opioid-Antinociceptive Tolerance and Physical Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Chen, Yan; Tang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory and others have implicated a critical role of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in opioid tolerance and dependence. Translational research targeting the CaMKII pathway is challenging, if not impossible, because of a lack of selective inhibitors. We discovered in a preliminary study that haloperidol, a butyrophenone antipsychotic drug, inhibited CaMKII, which led us to hypothesize that haloperidol can attenuate opioid tolerance and dependence by inhibiting CaMKII. The hypothesis was tested in two rodent models of opioid tolerance and dependence. Pretreatment with haloperidol (0.2–1.0 mg/kg i.p.) prevented the development of morphine tolerance and dependence in a dose-dependent manner. Short-term treatment with haloperidol (0.06–0.60 mg/kg i.p.) dose-dependently reversed the established morphine-antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence. Correlating with behavioral effects, pretreatment or short-term treatment with haloperidol dose-dependently inhibited morphine-induced up-regulation of supraspinal and spinal CaMKIIα activity. Moreover, haloperidol given orally was also effective in attenuating morphine-induced CaMKIIα activity, antinociceptive tolerance, and physical dependence. Taken together, these data suggest that haloperidol attenuates opioid tolerance and dependence by suppressing CaMKII activity. Because haloperidol is a clinically used drug that can be taken orally, we propose that the drug may be of use in attenuating opioid tolerance and dependence. PMID:21436292

  13. Recommendations for the treatment of aging in standard technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, R.D.; Allen, R.P.

    1995-09-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the standard technical specifications for nuclear power plants to determine whether the current surveillance requirements (SRs) were effective in detecting age-related degradation. Nuclear Plant Aging Research findings for selected systems and components were reviewed to identify the stressors and operative aging mechanisms and to evaluate the methods available to detect, differentiate, and trend the resulting aging degradation. Current surveillance and testing requirements for these systems and components were reviewed for their effectiveness in detecting degraded conditions and for potential contributions to premature degradation. When the current surveillance and testing requirements appeared ineffective in detecting aging degradation or potentially could contribute to premature degradation, a possible deficiency in the SRs was identified that could result in undetected degradation. Based on this evaluation, PNL developed recommendations for inspection, surveillance, trending, and condition monitoring methods to be incorporated in the SRs to better detect age- related degradation of these selected systems and components

  14. Opioid-free anaesthesia in three dogs | White | Open Veterinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case series of three dogs that underwent OFA for canine ovariohysterectomy is reported. The authors conclude OFA is possible in veterinary medicine; however the move away from the familiar effects of opioids perioperatively is challenging. Gaining experience with these types of protocols for standard procedures in ...

  15. A preliminary study comparing methadone and buprenorphine in patients with chronic pain and coexistent opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anne M; Blondell, Richard D; Jaanimägi, Urmo; Giambrone, Amanda K; Homish, Gregory G; Lozano, Jacqueline R; Kowalik, Urszula; Azadfard, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Patients with opioid addiction who receive prescription opioids for treatment of nonmalignant chronic pain present a therapeutic challenge. Fifty-four participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction were randomized to receive methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. At the 6-month follow-up examination, 26 (48.1%) participants who remained in the study noted a 12.75% reduction in pain (P = 0.043), and no participants in the methadone group compared to 5 in the buprenorphine group reported illicit opioid use (P = 0.039). Other differences between the two conditions were not found. Long-term, low-dose methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone treatment produced analgesia in participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction.

  16. An update on the role of opioids in the management of chronic pain of nonmalignant origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-10-01

    To summarize and reflect over primarily recent epidemiological and randomized controlled trials in opioid-treated chronic nonmalignant pain patients, focusing on effects, side effects, risks and long-term consequences of the treatment. In the western world opioids are increasingly being used for long-term treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain. While the long-term benefits of opioids regarding pain relief, functional capacity and health-related quality of life still remain to be proven, studies are emerging that describe serious long-term consequences such as addiction, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, cognitive disorders, and suppression of the immune and reproductive systems. Much more research is needed concerning long-time effects and consequences of opioid therapy in chronic nonmalignant pain patients; however, some clear warning signals have been sent out within recent years.

  17. "I was a little surprised": Qualitative Insights from Patients Enrolled in a 12-Month Trial Comparing Opioids to Non-Opioid Medications for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianne S Matthias; Donaldson, Melvin T; Jensen, Agnes C; Krebs, Erin E

    2018-04-28

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a major public health problem. Although opioid prescribing for chronic pain has increased dramatically since the 1990s, this practice has come under scrutiny because of increases in opioid-related harms and lack of evidence for long-term effectiveness. The Strategies for Prescribing Analgesics Comparative Effectiveness (SPACE) trial was a pragmatic 12-month randomized trial comparing benefits and harms of opioid versus non-opioid medications for chronic musculoskeletal pain. The current qualitative study was designed to better understand trial results by exploring patients' experiences, including perceptions of medications, experiences with the intervention, and whether expectations were met. Thirty-four participants who were purposefully sampled based on treatment group and intervention response participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparison method guided analysis. Results revealed that participants often held strong beliefs about opioid medications, which sometimes changed during the trial as they gained experience with medications; participants described a wide variety of experiences with treatment effectiveness, regardless of study group or their response to the intervention; and participants highly valued the personalized pain care model used in SPACE. SPACE trial results indicated no advantage for opioid over non-opioid medications. Qualitative findings suggest that, for patients in both treatment groups, pre-existing expectations of medications and of anticipated improvement in pain shaped experiences with and responses to medications. In addition, the personalized pain care model was described as contributing to positive outcomes in both groups. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Opioid-use disorder among patients on long-term opioid therapy: impact of final DSM-5 diagnostic criteria on prevalence and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscarino, Joseph A; Hoffman, Stuart N; Han, John J

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we estimated the prevalence and risk factors for prescription opioid-use disorder among outpatients on opioid therapy using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5 and DSM-4 criteria. However, at the time, the DSM-5 criteria were not finalized. In the current study, we analyzed these data using the final DSM-5 criteria and compared these results. Using electronic records from a large US health care system, we identified outpatients receiving five or more prescription orders for opioid therapy in the past 12 months for noncancer pain (mean prescription orders =10.72; standard deviation =4.96). In 2008, we completed diagnostic interviews with 705 of these patients using the DSM-4 criteria. In the current study, we reassessed these results using the final DSM-5 criteria. The lifetime prevalence of DSM-5 opioid-use disorders using the final DSM-5 criteria was 58.7% for no or few symptoms (DSM-4 criteria indicated that the majority of patients with lifetime DSM-4 opioid dependence were now classified as having mild opioid-use disorder, based on the DSM-5 criteria (53.6%; 95% CI =44.1-62.8). In ordinal logistic regression predicting no/few, mild, moderate, and severe opioid-use disorder, the best predictors were age DSM-5 criteria, including the elimination of tolerance and withdrawal, inclusion of craving and abuse symptoms, and introduction of a new graded severity classification, the prevalence of opioid-use disorders has changed, while many of the DSM-4 risk factors for opioid dependence were similar. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies to compare the final results for DSM-5 versus DSM-4 prescription opioid-use disorders among a high-risk patient population.

  19. Explanation of application standards of hematopoietic stimulating factors in the treatment of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhiwei; Jiang Enhai; Wang Guilin; Luo Qingliang

    2012-01-01

    Occupational standard of the Ministry of health-Application Standards of Hematopoietic Stimulating Factors in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Sickness has been completed as a draft standard. Based on the wide study and analysis of related animal experimental literature about hematopoietic stimulating factor in the treatment of acute radiation sickness and domestic and foreign clinical reports about application of hematopoietic stimulating factor in radiation accidents in the past decade, the standard was enacted according to the suggestions of International Atomic Energy Agency and the United States Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group and European countries about the application of hematopoietic stimulating factor. It is mainly used for nuclear accident emergency and the treatment of the bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness caused by radiation accidents. It also applies to other hematopoietic failure diseases. In order to implement this standard correctly, the relevant contents of the standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  20. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Opioid Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Absalom, Anthony; Visser, Anniek; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; De Vries, Erik FJ; Van Waarde, Aren; Luiten, Paul GM

    2014-01-01

    The opioid system consists of opioid receptors (which mediate the actions of opium), their endogenous ligands (the enkephalins, endorphins, endomorphins, dynorphin, and nociceptin), and the proteins involved in opioid production, transport, and degradation. PET tracers for the various opioid

  1. Nicotine and endogenous opioids: neurochemical and pharmacological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiconstantinou, Maria; Neff, Norton H

    2011-06-01

    Although the mesolimbic dopamine hypothesis is the most influential theory of nicotine reward and reinforcement, there has been a consensus that other neurotransmitter systems contribute to the addictive properties of nicotine as well. In this regard, the brain opioidergic system is of interest. Striatum is rich in opioid peptides and opioid receptors, and striatal opioidergic neurons are engaged in a bidirectional communication with midbrain dopaminergic neurons, closely regulating each other's activity. Enkephalins and dynorphins exert opposing actions on dopaminergic neurons, increasing and decreasing dopamine release respectively, and are components of circuits promoting positive or negative motivational and affective states. Moreover, dopamine controls the synthesis of striatal enkephalins and dynorphins. Evidence suggests that opioidergic function is altered after nicotine and endogenous opioids are involved in nicotine's behavioral effects. 1) The synthesis and release of β-endorphin, met-enkephalin and dynorphin in brain, especially nucleus accumbens (NAc), are altered after acute or chronic nicotine treatment and during nicotine withdrawal. 2) Although opioid receptor binding and mRNA do not appear to change in the striatum during nicotine withdrawal, the activity of κ-opioid (KOPr) and δ-opioid (DOPr) receptors is attenuated in NAc. 3) The nicotine withdrawal syndrome reminisces that of opiates, and naloxone precipitates some of its somatic, motivational, and affective signs. 4) Genetic and pharmacological studies indicate that μ-opioid (MOPr) receptors are mainly involved in nicotine reward, while DOPrs contribute to the emotional and KOPrs to the aversive responses of nicotine. 5) Finally, MOPrs and enkephalin, but not β-endorphin or dynorphin, are necessary for the physical manifestations of nicotine withdrawal. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier

  2. The addition of tramadol as a second opioid may improve pain relief in severe osteoarthritis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Luigi; Foti, Calogero; Forte, Alfonso Maria; Palmieri, Enzo; Formisano, Rita; Vatakencherry, Abraham; Pappagallo, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Opioid combination has been shown to reduce the need for escalating doses for the treatment of cancer pain. A prospective study was planned to evaluate the addition of tramadol to a stronger opioid for the treatment of severe pain as a result of osteoarthritis, previously uncontrolled by non-opioid analgesics or weak opioids. All subjects received tramadol 200 mg and tizanidine 2 mg. At 2 weeks, tramadol was discontinued for patients still reporting poor pain relief (effectiveness ≤50%), and a stronger opioid was titrated to a morphine equivalent amount (MEA) of 40-60 mg orally. After two additional weeks, patients were then divided into two groups: the Strong Opioid Group (SO) and the Tramadol plus the Strong Opioid Group (TSO). The SO group was allowed to escalate opioid dose for lack of effectiveness; the TSO group received tramadol 150 mg daily, thereafter additional strong opioid titration was allowed. A total of 74 patients were studied: SO (n = 40) and TSOG (n = 34). All patients eventually achieved pain relief quality, with both groups reporting similar Karnofsky Performance Scale effectiveness. The SO group achieved satisfactory pain relief (>50%) at an average daily oral MEA of 120 mg. TSO subjects achieved satisfactory pain relief (>50%) at an average daily oral MEA of 95 mg. The addition of tramadol provided a synergistic effect resulting in a 30-mg decrease in necessary morphine equivalents with fewer opioid-related adverse effects. © 2010 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2010 World Institute of Pain.

  3. Problematic Use of Prescription Opioids and Medicinal Cannabis Among Patients Suffering from Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Daniel; Goor-Aryeh, Itay; Bril, Silviu; Delayahu, Yael; Lev-Ran, Shaul

    2017-02-01

    To assess prevalence rates and correlates of problematic use of prescription opioids and medicinal cannabis (MC) among patients receiving treatment for chronic pain. Cross-sectional study. Two leading pain clinics in Israel. Our sample included 888 individuals receiving treatment for chronic pain, of whom 99.4% received treatment with prescription opioids or MC. Problematic use of prescription opioids and MC was assessed using DSM-IV criteria, Portenoy’s Criteria (PC), and the Current Opioid Misuse Measure (COMM) questionnaire. Additional sociodemographic and clinical correlates of problematic use were also assessed. Among individuals treated with prescription opioids, prevalence of problematic use of opioids according to DSM-IV, PC, and COMM was 52.6%, 17.1%, and 28.7%, respectively. Among those treated with MC, prevalence of problematic use of cannabis according to DSM-IV and PC was 21.2% and 10.6%, respectively. Problematic use of opioids and cannabis was more common in individuals using medications for longer periods of time, reporting higher levels of depression and anxiety, and using alcohol or drugs. Problematic use of opioids was associated with higher self-reported levels of pain, and problematic use of cannabis was more common among individuals using larger amounts of MC. Problematic use of opioids is common among chronic pain patients treated with prescription opioids and is more prevalent than problematic use of cannabis among those receiving MC. Pain patients should be screened for risk factors for problematic use before initiating long-term treatment for pain-control.

  4. Low efficacy of non-opioid drugs in opioid withdrawal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Derik; Klages, Eckard; Welzel, Helga; Mann, Karl; Croissant, Bernhard

    2005-06-01

    Opioid withdrawal, stress or cues associated with opioid consumption can induce opioid craving. If opioids are not available, opioid-dependent patients usually search for alternative drugs. Because several non-opioid drugs stimulate the endogenous opioidergic system, this concept may explain their frequent use by opioid-dependent patients. We hypothesized that non-opioid drugs alleviate opioid withdrawal symptoms and are therefore consumed by opioid addicts. We asked 89 opioid-dependent patients participating in an out-patient opioid maintenance program to estimate the potential of several non-opioid drugs in being able to alleviate opioid withdrawal. We applied a five-point Lickert scale (1 = very good reduction of opioid withdrawal; 5 = no reduction of opioid withdrawal). Patients could also indicate a worsening of opioid withdrawal. Values (mean +/- SD) were: for benzodiazepines, 3.2 +/- 1.1; tricyclic antidepressants, 3.6 +/- 1.1; cannabis, 3.6 +/- 1.0; alcohol, 4.1 +/- 1.1; cocaine, 4.2 +/- 1.1; amphetamine, 4.4 +/- 0.9; nicotine, 4.7 +/- 0.7; and caffeine, 4.9 +/- 0.5. A worsening of opioid withdrawal was reported by 62% of the patients for cocaine, 62% for amphetamine, 50% for caffeine, 37.5% for cannabis, 27% for nicotine, 26% for alcohol, 8% for tricyclic antidepressants and 3% for benzodiazepines. Our study shows a low efficacy of non-opioid drugs in alleviating opioid withdrawal symptoms. The data basis of this study was good and the sample was suitable to be asked for estimations of drug-drug interactions. Of the patients, 26 - 62% even reported a worsening of opioid withdrawal for cannabis, alcohol, cocaine and amphetamine. Only benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants were reported to have a moderate positive effect on opioid withdrawal.

  5. Using [11C]diprenorphine to image opioid receptor occupancy by methadone in opioid addiction: clinical and preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melichar, Jan K; Hume, Susan P; Williams, Tim M; Daglish, Mark R C; Taylor, Lindsay G; Ahmad, Rabia; Malizia, Andrea L; Brooks, David J; Myles, Judith S; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Nutt, David J

    2005-01-01

    Substitute methadone prescribing is one of the main modes of treatment for opioid dependence with established evidence for improved health and social outcomes. However, the pharmacology underpinning the effects of methadone is little studied despite controversies about dosing in relation to outcome. We therefore examined the relationship between methadone dose and occupation of opioid receptors in brain using the positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [(11)C]diprenorphine in humans and rats. Eight opioid-dependent subjects stable on their substitute methadone (18-90 mg daily) had an [(11)C]diprenorphine PET scan at predicted peak plasma levels of methadone. These were compared with eight healthy controls. No difference in [(11)C]diprenorphine binding was found between the groups, with no relationship between methadone dose and occupancy. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that had been given an acute i.v. injection of methadone hydrochloride (0.35, 0.5, 0.7, or 1.0 mg kg(-1)) before [(11)C]diprenorphine showed a dose-dependent increase in biodistribution but no reduction in [(11)C]diprenorphine binding. We suggest that the lack of a dose-dependent relationship between methadone dose, either given chronically in human or acutely in rat, and occupancy of opioid receptor measured with [(11)C]diprenorphine PET is related to efficacy of this opioid agonist at very low levels of opioid receptor occupancy. This has implications for understanding the actions of methadone in comparison with other opioid drugs such as partial agonists and antagonists.

  6. What do providers want to know about opioid prescribing? A qualitative analysis of their questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Phoebe A; Liebschutz, Jane M; Hodgkin, Joseph G; Shanahan, Christopher W; White, Julie L; Hardesty, Ilana; Alford, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    In 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) responded to the opioid crisis with a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy, requiring manufacturers of extended-release/long-acting opioids to fund continuing medical education based on the "FDA Blueprint for Prescriber Education." Topics in the Blueprint are "Assessing Patients for Treatment," "Initiating Therapy, Modifying Dosing, and Discontinuing Use," "Managing Therapy," "Counseling Patients and Caregivers about Safe Use," "General Drug Information," and "Specific Drug Information." Based on the FDA Blueprint, Boston University School of Medicine's "Safe and Competent Opioid Prescribing Education" (SCOPE of Pain) offers live trainings for physicians and other prescribers. During trainings, participants submit written questions about the curriculum and/or their clinical experiences. The objective was to compare themes that arose from questions asked by SCOPE of Pain participants with content of the FDA Blueprint in order to evaluate how well the Blueprint answers prescribers' concerns. The authors conducted qualitative analyses of all 1309 questions submitted by participants in 29 trainings across 16 states from May 2013 to May 2015, using conventional content analysis to code the questions. Themes that emerged from participants' questions were then compared with the Blueprint. Most themes fell into the topic categories of the Blueprint. Five main themes diverged: Participants sought information on (1) safe alternatives to opioids, (2) overcoming barriers to safe opioid prescribing, (3) government regulations of opioid prescribing, (4) the role of marijuana in opioid prescribing, and (5) maintaining a positive provider-patient relationship while prescribing opioids. In addition to learning the mechanics of safe opioid prescribing, providers want to understand government regulations and effective patient communication skills. Aware of the limitations of opioids in managing chronic pain, providers seek advice

  7. [Investigation report on the technical standards of TCM diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; Liu, Tangyi; Yang, Huayuan

    2016-02-01

    The questionnaire was adopted so as to investigate the attitudes and recognition of the manufacture eneprises of TCM diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation equipment (DTRE) to the technical standards of, relevant products. It was found that the construction of the industrial standard and the national standard was lagged behind on TCM DTRE. Under the new situation, the enterprises are highly willing to participate in the development of the industrial, national and international standards and have a certain of understanding on the standard development. Nearly 80 % of enterprises believed that it was necessary to set up the relevant mirror organization for the development of industrial, national and international standard of TCM DITRE. In the future, the standard construction of TCM DTRE must face to the new situation. The constant increasing of the enterprises. and scientific research organizations in the standard construction must promote the development of TCM DTRE.

  8. Endogenous opioid activity in the anterior cingulate cortex is required for relief of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Yanhua; Meske, Diana; Qu, Chaoling; Morimura, Kozo; Okun, Alec; Arakawa, Naohisa; Ossipov, Michael; Fields, Howard L; Porreca, Frank

    2015-05-06

    Pain is aversive, and its relief elicits reward mediated by dopaminergic signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a part of the mesolimbic reward motivation pathway. How the reward pathway is engaged by pain-relieving treatments is not known. Endogenous opioid signaling in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), an area encoding pain aversiveness, contributes to pain modulation. We examined whether endogenous ACC opioid neurotransmission is required for relief of pain and subsequent downstream activation of NAc dopamine signaling. Conditioned place preference (CPP) and in vivo microdialysis were used to assess negative reinforcement and NAc dopaminergic transmission. In rats with postsurgical or neuropathic pain, blockade of opioid signaling in the rostral ACC (rACC) inhibited CPP and NAc dopamine release resulting from non-opioid pain-relieving treatments, including peripheral nerve block or spinal clonidine, an α2-adrenergic agonist. Conversely, pharmacological activation of rACC opioid receptors of injured, but not pain-free, animals was sufficient to stimulate dopamine release in the NAc and produce CPP. In neuropathic, but not sham-operated, rats, systemic doses of morphine that did not affect withdrawal thresholds elicited CPP and NAc dopamine release, effects that were prevented by blockade of ACC opioid receptors. The data provide a neural explanation for the preferential effects of opioids on pain affect and demonstrate that engagement of NAc dopaminergic transmission by non-opioid pain-relieving treatments depends on upstream ACC opioid circuits. Endogenous opioid signaling in the ACC appears to be both necessary and sufficient for relief of pain aversiveness. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357264-08$15.00/0.

  9. A brain-targeted ampakine compound protects against opioid-induced respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei; Xiao, Dian; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Xin-Bo; Fang, Tong-Yu; Yong, Zheng; Su, Rui-Bin

    2017-08-15

    The use of opioid drugs for pain relief can induce life-threatening respiratory depression. Although naloxone effectively counteracts opioid-induced respiratory depression, it diminishes the efficacy of analgesia. Our studies indicate that ampakines, in particular, a brain-targeted compound XD-8-17C, are able to reverse respiratory depression without affecting analgesia at relatively low doses. Mice and rats were subcutaneously or intravenously injected with the opioid agonist TH-030418 to induce moderate or severe respiratory depression. XD-8-17C was intravenously administered before or after TH-030418. The effect of XD-8-17C on opioid-induced respiratory depression was evaluated in terms of the opioid-induced acute death rate, arterial blood gas analysis and pulmonary function tests. In addition, the hot-plate test was conducted to investigate whether XD-8-17C influenced opioid-induced analgesia. Pre-treatment with XD-8-17C significantly reduced opioid-induced acute death, and increased the median lethal dose of TH-030418 by 4.7-fold. Blood gas analysis and pulmonary function tests demonstrated that post-treatment with XD-8-17C alleviated respiratory depression, as indicated by restoration of arterial blood gas (pO 2 , sO 2 , cK + ) and lung function parameters (respiratory frequency, minute ventilation) to the normal range. The hot-plate test showed that XD-8-17C had no impact on the antinociceptive efficacy of morphine. The ability of XD-8-17C to reverse opioid-induced respiratory depression has the potential to increase the safety and convenience of opioid treatment. These findings contribute to the discovery of novel therapeutic agents that protect against opioid-induced respiratory depression without loss of analgesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Behavioral intervention to reduce opioid overdose among high-risk persons with opioid use disorder: A pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Oliver Coffin

    Full Text Available The United States is amidst an opioid epidemic, including synthetic opioids that may result in rapid death, leaving minimal opportunity for bystander rescue. We pilot tested a behavioral intervention to reduce the occurrence of opioid overdose among opioid dependent persons at high-risk for subsequent overdose.We conducted a single-blinded randomized-controlled trial of a repeated dose motivational interviewing intervention (REBOOT to reduce overdose versus treatment as usual, defined as information and referrals, over 16 months at the San Francisco Department of Public Health from 2014-2016. Participants were 18-65 years of age, had opioid use disorder by Structured Clinical Interview, active opioid use, opioid overdose within 5 years, and prior receipt of naloxone kits. The intervention was administered at months 0, 4, 8, and 12, preceded by the assessment which was also administered at month 16. Dual primary outcomes were any overdose event and number of events, collected by computer-assisted personal interview, as well as any fatal overdose events per vital records.A total of 78 persons were screened and 63 enrolled. Mean age was 43 years, 67% were born male, 65% White, 17% African-American, and 14% Latino. Ninety-two percent of visits and 93% of counseling sessions were completed. At baseline, 33.3% of participants had experienced an overdose in the past four months, with a similar mean number of overdoses in both arms (p = 0.95; 29% overdosed during follow-up. By intention-to-treat, participants assigned to REBOOT were less likely to experience any overdose (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 0.62 [95%CI 0.41-0.92, p = 0.019 and experienced fewer overdose events (IRR 0.46, 95%CI 0.24-0.90, p = 0.023, findings that were robust to sensitivity analyses. There were no differences between arms in days of opioid use, substance use treatment, or naloxone carriage.REBOOT reduced the occurrence of any opioid overdose and the number of overdoses

  11. Pain relief and clinical outcome: from opioids to balanced analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1996-01-01

    If it is generally accepted that adequate postoperative pain relief will improve outcome from surgery, several controlled trials demonstrated this only for lower body surgical procedures with epidural and spinal anesthetics. Important effects on outcome were not shown when postoperative opioids...... were administered with patient controlled (PCA) or epidural techniques. However, the most optimal pain relief seems to be best achieved with balanced analgesia techniques using combinations of epidural opioids and local anesthetics and systemic non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Future efforts...... should aim at including physical rehabilitation programs in the pain treatment regimen....

  12. Guidance: Demonstrating Compliance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) Alternative Soil Treatment Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guidance provides suggestions and perspectives on how members of the regulated community, states, and the public can demonstrate compliance with the alternative treatment standards for certain contaminated soils that will be land disposed.

  13. Prospective randomized trial of sclerotherapy vs standard treatment for epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Holly; Fernandes, Patricia; Le, Chap; Yueh, Bevan

    2015-05-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated the tolerability and low side-effect profile of office-based sclerotherapy with sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) for treating recurrent epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). The objective of this study was to use a prospective randomized trial to determine the effectiveness of sclerotherapy with STS vs standard treatment. This prospective randomized trial (conducted from November 1, 2011, through January 31, 2014) involved 17 patients with recurrent epistaxis due to HHT. We defined standard treatment as continuation of any treatment that the patient had previously undergone, such as moisturization, packing, and cautery. We used a crossover design, so study participants were randomized to either sclerotherapy or standard treatment during the first time period, and then to the other during the second period. The primary outcome measure was frequency and severity of epistaxis, as measured by the epistaxis severity score (ESS). The ESS is a 10-point scale, with higher scores corresponding to more bleeding. After controlling for treatment order, bleeding was substantially better controlled after sclerotherapy; the ESS after sclerotherapy was nearly one point lower than after standard treatment (-0.95, 1-sided p = 0.027). Treatment order, baseline ESS, the number of lesions, moisturization practices, and a history of previous blood transfusions did not significantly affect the results. This trial demonstrated that sclerotherapy with STS (vs standard treatment) significantly reduced epistaxis due to HHT. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  14. Opioid tapering in patients with prescription opioid use disorder : A retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Kehua; Jia, Peng; Bhargava, Swati; Zhang, Yong; Reza, Taslima; Peng, Yuan Bo; Wang, Gary G.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Opioid use disorder (OUD) refers to a maladaptive pattern of opioid use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress. OUD causes, and vice versa, misuses and abuse of opioid medications. Clinicians face daily challenges to treat patients with prescription opioid use

  15. Improving recruitment to pharmacological trials for illicit opioid use: findings from a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Joanne; Tompkins, Charlotte N E; McDonald, Rebecca; Strang, John

    2018-06-01

    To explore potential study participants' views on willingness to join clinical trials of pharmacological interventions for illicit opioid use to inform and improve future recruitment strategies. Qualitative focus group study [six groups: oral methadone (two groups); buprenorphine tablets (two groups); injectable opioid agonist treatment (one group); and former opioid agonist treatment (one group)]. Drug and alcohol services and a peer support recovery service (London, UK). Forty people with experience of opioid agonist treatment for heroin dependence (26 males, 14 females; aged 33-66 years). Data collection was facilitated by a topic guide that explored willingness to enrol in clinical pharmacological trials. Groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Transcribed data were analysed inductively via Iterative Categorization. Participants' willingness to join pharmacological trials of medications for opioid dependence was affected by factors relating to study burden, study drug, study design, study population and study relationships. Participants worried that the trial drug might be worse than, or interfere with, their current treatment. They also misunderstood aspects of trial design despite the researchers' explanations. Recruitment of participants for clinical trials of pharmacological interventions for illicit opioid use could be improved if researchers became better at explaining clinical trials to potential participants, dispelling misconceptions about trials and increasing trust in the research process and research establishment. A checklist of issues to consider when designing pharmacological trials for illicit opioid use is proposed. © 2018 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. Nurses and opioids: results of a bi-national survey on mental models regarding opioid administration in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guest C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Charlotte Guest,1 Fabian Sobotka,2 Athina Karavasopoulou,3 Stephen Ward,3 Carsten Bantel4,5 1Pain Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 2Division of Epidemiology and Biometry, Department of Health Services Research, Faculty 6, Medicine and Health Sciences, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany; 3Pain Service, Barts Health, St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, UK; 4Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Pain Therapy, Oldenburg University, Klinikum Oldenburg Campus, Oldenburg, Germany; 5Department of Surgery and Cancer, Anaesthetics Section, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, UK Objective: Pain remains insufficiently treated in hospitals. Increasing evidence suggests human factors contribute to this, due to nurses failing to administer opioids. This behavior might be the consequence of nurses’ mental models about opioids. As personal experience and conceptions shape these models, the aim of this prospective survey was to identify model-influencing factors. Material and methods: A questionnaire was developed comprising of 14 statements concerning ideations about opioids and seven questions concerning demographics, indicators of adult learning, and strength of religious beliefs. Latent variables that may underlie nurses’ mental models were identified using undirected graphical dependence models. Representative items of latent variables were employed for ordinal regression analysis. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,379 nurses in two London, UK, hospitals (n=580 and one German (n=799 hospital between September 2014 and February 2015. Results: A total of 511 (37.1% questionnaires were returned. Mean (standard deviation age of participants were 37 (11 years; 83.5% participants were female; 45.2% worked in critical care; and 51.5% had more than 10 years experience. Of the nurses, 84% were not scared of opioids, 87

  17. Opioid-induced hyponatremia in a patient with central diabetes insipidus: independence from ADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nandini; Balliu, Erjola; Osipoff, Jennifer; Lane, Andrew; Wilson, Thomas

    2017-05-24

    Hyponatremia can be a complication of opioid therapy, which has been postulated to occur secondary to inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion [SIADH]). We report severe hyponatremia following wisdom teeth extraction with opioid analgesia in a 19-year-old female with diabetes insipidus (DI) and acquired panhypopituitarism that challenges this theory. As this patient has DI, we believe opioid treatment caused severe hyponatremia by the following mechanisms: (1) Opioids have a direct antidiuretic effect independent of changes in ADH, as demonstrated in Brattleboro rats with central DI. (2) Hydrocodone may have stimulated this patient's thirst center contributing to hyponatremia, as demonstrated in animal studies. Opioid use can cause hyponatremia in patients independent of ADH. It is important for clinicians to be aware of this so that patients can be appropriately counseled.

  18. Personality Disorders Classification and Symptoms in Cocaine and Opioid Addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Robert M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined extent to which personality disorders and associated symptom criteria were found among 117 cocaine- and opioid-dependent men in drug dependence treatment unit. Drug groups were distinguished by higher rates of antisocial and borderline symptomatology rather than by features associated with other personality disorders. Different…

  19. Premenstrual Syndrome and Self-Medication With Opioids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qurishi, R.; Sonneborn, C.; Jong, M. de; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2013-01-01

    We have described a patient in opioid substitution treatment using heroin to treat her premenstrual complaints. After a short review of the diagnosis and etiology of premenstrual syndrome or premenstrual dysphoric disorder, the relation between premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder

  20. Proceedings of the AMCP Partnership Forum: Breaking the Link Between Pain Management and Opioid Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Prescription drug misuse and abuse, especially with opioid analgesics, is the fastest growing drug problem in the United States. Addressing this public health crisis demands the coordinated efforts and actions of all stakeholders to establish a process of improving patient care and decreasing misuse and abuse. On September 9, 2014, the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) convened a meeting of multiple stakeholders to recommend activities and programs that AMCP can promote to improve pain management, prevent opioid use disorder (OUD), and improve medication-assisted treatment outcomes. The speakers and panelists recommended that efforts to improve pain management outcomes and reduce the potential for OUD should rely on demonstrated evidence and best practices. It was recommended that AMCP promote a more holistic and evidence-based approach to pain management and OUD treatment that actively engages the patient in the decision-making process and includes care coordination with medical, pharmacy, behavioral, and mental health aspects of organizations, all of which is seamlessly supported by a technology infrastructure. To accomplish this, it was recommended that AMCP work to collaborate with organizations representing these stakeholders. Additionally, it was recommended that AMCP conduct continuing pharmacy education programs, develop a best practices toolkit on pain management, and actively promote quality standards for OUD prevention and treatment.

  1. PK20, a new opioid-neurotensin hybrid peptide that exhibits central and peripheral antinociceptive effects

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    Tsuda Yuko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical treatment of various types of pain relies upon the use of opioid analgesics. However most of them produce, in addition to the analgesic effect, several side effects such as the development of dependence and addiction as well as sedation, dysphoria, and constipation. One solution to these problems are chimeric compounds in which the opioid pharmacophore is hybridized with another type of compound to incease antinociceptive effects. Neurotensin-induced antinociception is not mediated through the opioid system. Therefore, hybridizing neurotensin with opioid elements may result in a potent synergistic antinociceptor. Results Using the known structure-activity relationships of neurotensin we have synthesized a new chimeric opioid-neurotensin compound PK20 which is characterized by a very strong antinociceptive potency. The observation that the opioid antagonist naltrexone did not completely reverse the antinociceptive effect, indicates the partial involvement of the nonopioid component in PK20 in the produced analgesia. Conclusions The opioid-neurotensin hybrid analogue PK20, in which opioid and neurotensin pharmacophores overlap partially, expresses high antinociceptive tail-flick effects after central as well as peripheral applications.

  2. The downward spiral of chronic pain, prescription opioid misuse, and addiction: cognitive, affective, and neuropsychopharmacologic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Eric L; Froeliger, Brett; Zeidan, Fadel; Partin, Kaitlyn; Howard, Matthew O

    2013-12-01

    Prescription opioid misuse and addiction among chronic pain patients are emerging public health concerns of considerable significance. Estimates suggest that more than 10% of chronic pain patients misuse opioid analgesics, and the number of fatalities related to nonmedical or inappropriate use of prescription opioids is climbing. Because the prevalence and adverse consequences of this threat are increasing, there is a pressing need for research that identifies the biobehavioral risk chain linking chronic pain, opioid analgesia, and addictive behaviors. To that end, the current manuscript draws upon current neuropsychopharmacologic research to provide a conceptual framework of the downward spiral leading to prescription opioid misuse and addiction among chronic pain patients receiving opioid analgesic pharmacotherapy. Addictive use of opioids is described as the outcome of a cycle initiated by chronic pain and negative affect and reinforced by opioidergic-dopamingeric interactions, leading to attentional hypervigilance for pain and drug cues, dysfunctional connectivity between self-referential and cognitive control networks in the brain, and allostatic dysregulation of stress and reward circuitry. Implications for clinical practice are discussed; multimodal, mindfulness-oriented treatment is introduced as a potentially effective approach to disrupting the downward spiral and facilitating recovery from chronic pain and opioid addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sleep-disordered breathing decreases after opioid withdrawal: results of a prospective controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, Andreas; Aichinger-Hinterhofer, Marie; Maier, Christoph; Vollert, Jan; Walther, Jörg Werner

    2015-11-01

    An increased cardiovascular event rate in elderly patients under opioid medications was recently reported. One reason for this increase could be the occurrence of nocturnal apnea and hypoxia, as a consequence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Using a controlled study, we prospectively analyzed SDB using polysomnography in a total of 18 patients before and after opioid withdrawal (opioid withdrawal group [OG]) and 14 patients before and after comprehensive pain management (without any strong-acting opioids) who served as the control group (CG). To analyze the differences, unpaired/paired t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests/Wilcoxon rank tests were used. At baseline, the OG presented more nocturnal apneas/hypopneas than the CG with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 41.4 ± 27.8 vs 21.8 ± 15.9 (P = 0.018). After treatment, the AHI decreased significantly only in the withdrawal group (OG: 16.7 ± 8.9; CG: 20.1 ± 12.9) (P opioid withdrawal and in none of the patients after withdrawal (P opioid intake; these findings may explain the opioid-associated cardiovascular morbidity. Thus, SDB may be a risk at lower opioid doses than hitherto described, and particular caution should be exercised in patients with comorbidities that might make them vulnerable to the consequences of SDB.

  4. Role and psychological dependenci arrangement of opioid by type of reseptor opioid

    OpenAIRE

    Arif Nurrochmad, Arif Nurrochmad

    2015-01-01

    Opioid receptor can be classified as p., 8, and K-opioid receptor that widely expressed in the CNS. The development of selective receptor agonist and cloning of each receptor have contributed greatly to our increasing knowledge of the neuropharmacological profile of each opioid receptor type. This review focuses on the functional interaction among these opioid receptor types that contribute to opioid dependence especially in psychological dependence. Several lines of evidence provide argument...

  5. Endogenous opioid peptide-mediated neurotransmission in central and pericentral nuclei of the inferior colliculus recruits μ1-opioid receptor to modulate post-ictal antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felippotti, Tatiana Tocchini; de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the involvement of the μ1-endogenous opioid peptide receptor-mediated system in post-ictal antinociception. Antinociceptive responses were determined by the tail-flick test after pre-treatment with the selective μ1-opioid receptor antagonist naloxonazine, peripherally or centrally administered at different doses. Peripheral subchronic (24 h) pre-treatment with naloxonazine antagonised the antinociception elicited by tonic-clonic seizures. Acute (10 min) pre-treatment, however, did not have the same effect. In addition, microinjections of naloxonazine into the central, dorsal cortical and external cortical nuclei of the inferior colliculus antagonised tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception. Neither acute (10-min) peripheral pre-treatment with naloxonazine nor subchronic intramesencephalic blockade of μ1-opioid receptors resulted in consistent statistically significant differences in the severity of tonic-clonic seizures shown by Racine's index (1972), although the intracollicular specific antagonism of μ1-opioid receptor decreased the duration of seizures. μ1-Opioid receptors and the inferior colliculus have been implicated in several endogenous opioid peptide-mediated responses such as antinociception and convulsion. The present findings suggest the involvement of μ1-opiate receptors of central and pericentral nuclei of the inferior colliculus in the modulation of tonic-clonic seizures and in the organisation of post-ictal antinociception. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. In-hospital resuscitation: opioids and other factors influencing survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karamarie Fecho

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Karamarie Fecho1, Freeman Jackson1, Frances Smith1, Frank J Overdyk21Department of Anesthesiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USAPurpose: “Code Blue” is a standard term used to alertt hospital staff that a patient requires resuscitation. This study determined rates of survival from Code Blue events and the role of opioids and other factors on survival.Methods: Data derived from medical records and the Code Blue and Pharmacy databases were analyzed for factors affecting survival.Results: During 2006, rates of survival from the code only and to discharge were 25.9% and 26.4%, respectively, for Code Blue events involving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; N = 216. Survival rates for events not ultimately requiring CPR (N = 77 were higher, with 32.5% surviving the code only and 62.3% surviving to discharge. For CPR events, rates of survival to discharge correlated inversely with time to chest compressions and defibrillation, precipitating event, need for airway management, location and age. Time of week, witnessing, postoperative status, gender and opioid use did not influence survival rates. For non-CPR events, opioid use was associated with decreased survival. Survival rates were lowest for patients receiving continuous infusions (P < 0.01 or iv boluses of opioids (P < 0.05.Conclusions: One-quarter of patients survive to discharge after a CPR Code Blue event and two-thirds survive to discharge after a non-CPR event. Opioids may influence survival from non-CPR events.Keywords: code blue, survival, opioids, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, cardiac arrest, patient safety

  7. High-Dose Atomoxetine Treatment of ADHD in Youths with Limited Response to Standard Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Michelson, David; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Weiss, Margaret D.; Busner, Joan; Moore, Rodney J.; Ruff, Dustin D.; Ramsey, Janet; Dickson, Ruth; Turgay, Atilla; Saylor, Keith E.; Luber, Stephen; Vaughan, Brigette; Allen, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the utility and tolerability of higher than standard atomoxetine doses to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Two randomized, double-blind trials of atomoxetine nonresponders ages 6 to 16 years were conducted comparing continued treatment with same-dose atomoxetine to treatment using greater than…

  8. Opioid-prescribing practices in chronic cancer pain in a tertiary care pain clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu S Thota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Under treatment of pain is a recognized global issue. Opioid analgesic medication is the mainstay of treatment in cancer patients as per the World Health Organization (WHO pain relief ladder, yet 50% of cancer patients worldwide do not receive adequate pain relief or are undertreated. Aim: The aim of this study was to audit the ongoing opioid-prescribing practices in our tertiary cancer pain clinic during January-June 2010. Materials& Methods: The prescribed type of opioid, dose, dosing interval, and laxatives details were analyzed. Results: Five hundred pain files were reviewed and 435 were found complete for audit. Three hundred forty-eight (80% patients were prescribed opioids. Two hundred fifty-nine (74.4% received weak opioids while 118 (33.9% received strong opioids. A total of 195 (45% patients had moderate and 184 (42% had severe pain. Ninety-three (26.7% patients received morphine; however, only 31.5% (58 of 184 in severe pain received morphine as per the WHO pain ladder. Only 73 of 93 (78.4% patients received an adequate dose of morphine with an adequate dosing interval and only 27 (29% were prescribed laxatives with morphine. Conclusion: This study shows that the under treatment of pain and under dosing of opioids coupled with improper side effect management are major issues.

  9. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  10. Effect of patient education and standard treatment guidelines on asthma control: an intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwani, Anita; Chhabra, Sunil K

    2012-01-01

    Denial of having a chronic condition, poor knowledge of the disease process and lack of adherence to standard treatment are often considered to be important factors that increase morbidity in asthma. We evaluated the effect of standard treatment guidelines and asthma education programme on asthma control among patients enrolled from a referral health facility of Delhi in India. Fifty patients who visited the health facility first time for treatment of asthma were enrolled after confirming the diagnosis of asthma by symptoms and reversible spirometry. Patients were interviewed at baseline using three researcher-administered questionnaires - quality of asthma management questionnaire, asthma control questionnaire (ACQ) and asthma knowledge questionnaire (AKQ). All patients were given pharmacotherapy according to standard treatment guidelines. In addition, every alternate patient was also given a face-to-face educational intervention. Patients were followed up at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. The ACQ was used at each visit, and AKQ was reassessed at the twelfth week. The paired t test was used to detect significant changes in various domains of asthma control. The knowledge of asthma among patients and the care provided by previous health-care providers were found to be poor at baseline assessment. The application of standard treatment guidelines improved asthma control by the second week and the changes became significant by the fourth week, which persisted till the twelfth week (p Standard treatment guidelines and asthma education improved asthma control.

  11. Opioid dependence and substitution therapy: thymoquinone as potential novel supplement therapy for better outcome for methadone maintenance therapy substitution therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Liyana Hazwani Mohd; Bakar, Nor Hidayah Abu; Mohamad, Nasir

    2014-01-01

    Methadone is widely being used for opioid substitution therapy. However, the administration of methadone to opioid dependent individual is frequently accompanied by withdrawal syndrome and chemical dependency develops. Other than that, it is also difficult to retain patients in the treatment programme making their retention rates are decreasing over time. This article is written to higlights the potential use of prophetic medicines, Nigella sativa, as a supplement for opioid dependent receiving methadone. It focuses on the potential role of N. sativa and its major active compound, Thymoquinone (TQ) as a calcium channel blocking agent to reduce withdrawal syndrome and opioid dependency. PMID:25859295

  12. Opioid dependence and substitution therapy: thymoquinone as potential novel supplement therapy for better outcome for methadone maintenance therapy substitution therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyana Hazwani Mohd Adnan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Methadone is widely being used for opioid substitution therapy. However, the administration of methadone to opioid dependent individual is frequently accompanied by withdrawal syndrome and chemical dependency develops. Other than that, it is also difficult to retain patients in the treatment programme making their retention rates are decreasing over time. This article is written to higlights the potential use of prophetic medicines, Nigella sativa, as a supplement for opioid dependent receiving methadone. It focuses on the potential role of N. sativa and its major active compound, Thymoquinone (TQ as a calcium channel blocking agent to reduce withdrawal syndrome and opioid dependency.

  13. Evolución de la necesidad y cobertura de los programas de tratamiento con sustitutivos opioides e intercambio de jeringas en las prisiones españolas, 1992-2009 Evolution of the need and coverage of opioid substitution treatments and needle exchange programmes in Spanish prisons, 1992-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. de la Fuente

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: España es de los pocos países que ha implementado generalizadamente tratamientos con sustitutivos opioides (TSO y programas de intercambio de jeringas (PIJ para los consumidores de drogas en prisión. Se analiza la evolución de la necesidad, cobertura y oportunidad temporal de estas intervenciones en España durante 1992-2009. Material y métodos: La provisión de intervenciones procede de publicaciones oficiales. La necesidad se estimó aplicando métodos multiplicativos a datos secundarios de varias fuentes. La cobertura se estimó mediante el cociente entre provisión y necesidad, y la diferencia entre dichas magnitudes. La oportunidad temporal se estimó observando el decalaje entre el acmé de incidencia de consumo, de infección por VIH o de necesidad y las curvas de provisión. Resultados: Los TSO comenzaron en 1992. Su máxima cobertura se alcanzó en 2002 (63.8%, y posteriormente se estabilizó. Los PIJ comenzaron en 1997. Su máxima cobertura se alcanzó en 2006 (20.7%, pero disminuyó a la mitad en dos años. El retraso entre el acmé de las epidemias o de la necesidad y la máxima cobertura de las intervenciones fue de 8-25 años. Conclusiones: La implementación de TSO y PIJ en las prisiones españolas supuso un enorme avance de salud pública, pero el retraso en su implementación y la baja cobertura de los PIJ pueden haber limitado mucho su impacto potencial en la mejora de la salud de los consumidores de drogas en prisión. El descenso de la cobertura de los PIJ a la mitad en los últimos años es especialmente preocupante para la evolución de las epidemias de VIH y hepatitis C.Introduction: Spain is one of the few countries to have widely implemented opioid substitution treatments (OST and needle exchange programmes (NEP for drug users in prison. We analyze the evolution of the need, coverage and the timelinessof these interventions in Spain between 1992 and 2009. Methods: Data on the provision of

  14. Neuroimaging in aphasia treatment research: Standards for establishing the effects of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Swathi; Ansaldo, Ana; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Cherney, Leora R.; Howard, David; Faroqi-Shah, Yasmeen; Meinzer, Marcus; Thompson, Cynthia K

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to discuss experimental design options available for establishing the effects of treatment in studies that aim to examine the neural mechanisms associated with treatment-induced language recovery in aphasia, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We present both group and single-subject experimental or case-series design options for doing this and address advantages and disadvantages of each. We also discuss general components of and requirements for treatment research studies, including operational definitions of variables, criteria for defining behavioral change and treatment efficacy, and reliability of measurement. Important considerations that are unique to neuroimaging-based treatment research are addressed, pertaining to the relation between the selected treatment approach and anticipated changes in language processes/functions and how such changes are hypothesized to map onto the brain. PMID:23063559

  15. The US Opioid Crisis: Current Federal and State Legal Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soelberg, Cobin D; Brown, Raeford E; Du Vivier, Derick; Meyer, John E; Ramachandran, Banu K

    2017-11-01

    The United States is in the midst of a devastating opioid misuse epidemic leading to over 33,000 deaths per year from both prescription and illegal opioids. Roughly half of these deaths are attributable to prescription opioids. Federal and state governments have only recently begun to grasp the magnitude of this public health crisis. In 2016, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released their Guidelines for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. While not comprehensive in scope, these guidelines attempt to control and regulate opioid prescribing. Other federal agencies involved with the federal regulatory effort include the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), and the Department of Justice. Each federal agency has a unique role in helping to stem the burgeoning opioid misuse epidemic. The DEA, working with the Department of Justice, has enforcement power to prosecute pill mills and physicians for illegal prescribing. The DEA could also implement use of prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs), currently administered at the state level, and use of electronic prescribing for schedule II and III medications. The FDA has authority to approve new and safer formulations of immediate- and long-acting opioid medications. More importantly, the FDA can also ask pharmaceutical companies to cease manufacturing a drug. Additionally, state agencies play a critical role in reducing overdose deaths, protecting the public safety, and promoting the medically appropriate treatment of pain. One of the states' primary roles is the regulation of practice of medicine and the insurance industry within their borders. Utilizing this authority, states can both educate physicians about the dangers of opioids and make physician licensure dependent on registering and using PDMPs when prescribing controlled substances. Almost every state has implemented a PDMP to some degree; however, in addition to mandating their use, increased interstate

  16. Measuring a Crisis: Questioning the Use of Naloxone Administrations as a Marker for Opioid Overdoses in a Large U.S. EMS System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Joseph M; Alabdrabalnabi, Taibah; Patel, Mehul D; Bachman, Michael W; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Cabanas, Jose G; Williams, Jefferson G

    2018-01-01

    The United States is currently experiencing a public health crisis of opioid overdoses. To determine where resources may be most needed, many public health officials utilize naloxone administration by EMS as an easily-measured surrogate marker for opioid overdoses in a community. Our objective was to evaluate whether naloxone administration by EMS accurately represents EMS calls for opioid overdose. We hypothesize that naloxone administration underestimates opioid overdose. We conducted a chart review of suspected overdose patients and any patients administered naloxone in Wake County, North Carolina, from January 2013 to December 2015. Patient care report narratives and other relevant data were extracted from electronic patient care records and the resultant database was analyzed by two EMS physicians. Cases were divided into categories including "known opioid use," "presumed opioid use," "no known opioid," "altered mental status," "cardiac arrest with known opioid use," "cardiac arrest with no known opioid use," or "suspected alcohol intoxication," and then further separated based on whether naloxone was administered. Patient categories were compared by patient demographics and incident year. Using the chart review classification as the gold standard, we calculated the sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of naloxone administration for opioid overdose. A total of 4,758 overdose cases from years 2013-15 were identified. During the same period, 1,351 patients were administered naloxone. Of the 1,431 patients with known or presumed opioid use, 57% (810 patients) received naloxone and 43% (621 patients) did not. The sensitivity of naloxone administration for the identification of patients with known or presumed opioid use was 57% (95% CI: 54%-59%) and the PPV was 60% (95% CI: 57%-63%). Among patients receiving care in this large urban EMS system in the United States, the overall sensitivity and positive predictive value for naloxone administration for

  17. Use of diagnosis codes for detection of clinically significant opioid poisoning in the emergency department: A retrospective analysis of a surveillance case definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Joseph M; Harmon, Katherine J; Schult, Genevieve C; Staton, Catherine A; Waller, Anna E

    2016-02-08

    Although fatal opioid poisonings tripled from 1999 to 2008, data describing nonfatal poisonings are rare. Public health authorities are in need of tools to track opioid poisonings in near real time. We determined the utility of ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes for identifying clinically significant opioid poisonings in a state-wide emergency department (ED) surveillance system. We sampled visits from four hospitals from July 2009 to June 2012 with diagnosis codes of 965.00, 965.01, 965.02 and 965.09 (poisoning by opiates and related narcotics) and/or an external cause of injury code of E850.0-E850.2 (accidental poisoning by opiates and related narcotics), and developed a novel case definition to determine in which cases opioid poisoning prompted the ED visit. We calculated the percentage of visits coded for opioid poisoning that were clinically significant and compared it to the percentage of visits coded for poisoning by non-opioid agents in which there was actually poisoning by an opioid agent. We created a multivariate regression model to determine if other collected triage data can improve the positive predictive value of diagnosis codes alone for detecting clinically significant opioid poisoning. 70.1 % of visits (Standard Error 2.4 %) coded for opioid poisoning were primarily prompted by opioid poisoning. The remainder of visits represented opioid exposure in the setting of other primary diseases. Among non-opioid poisoning codes reviewed, up to 36 % were reclassified as an opioid poisoning. In multivariate analysis, only naloxone use improved the positive predictive value of ICD-9-CM codes for identifying clinically significant opioid poisoning, but was associated with a high false negative rate. This surveillance mechanism identifies many clinically significant opioid overdoses with a high positive predictive value. With further validation, it may help target control measures such as prescriber education and pharmacy monitoring.

  18. Enhancing system-wide implementation of opioid prescribing guidelines in primary care: protocol for a stepped-wedge quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgierska, Aleksandra E; Vidaver, Regina M; Smith, Paul; Ales, Mary W; Nisbet, Kate; Boss, Deanne; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Hahn, David L

    2018-06-05

    Systematic implementation of guidelines for opioid therapy management in chronic non-cancer pain can reduce opioid-related harms. However, implementation of guideline-recommended practices in routine care is subpar. The goal of this quality improvement (QI) project is to assess whether a clinic-tailored QI intervention improves the implementation of a health system-wide, guideline-driven policy on opioid prescribing in primary care. This manuscript describes the protocol for this QI project. A health system with 28 primary care clinics caring for approximately 294,000 primary care patients developed and implemented a guideline-driven policy on long-term opioid therapy in adults with opioid-treated chronic non-cancer pain (estimated N = 3980). The policy provided multiple recommendations, including the universal use of treatment agreements, urine drug testing, depression and opioid misuse risk screening, and standardized documentation of the chronic pain diagnosis and treatment plan. The project team drew upon existing guidelines, feedback from end-users, experts and health system leadership to develop a robust QI intervention, targeting clinic-level implementation of policy-directed practices. The resulting multi-pronged QI intervention included clinic-wide and individual clinician-level educational interventions. The QI intervention will augment the health system's "routine rollout" method, consisting of a single educational presentation to clinicians in group settings and a separate presentation for staff. A stepped-wedge design will enable 9 primary care clinics to receive the intervention and assessment of within-clinic and between-clinic changes in adherence to the policy items measured by clinic-level electronic health record-based measures and process measures of the experience with the intervention. Developing methods for a health system-tailored QI intervention required a multi-step process to incorporate end-user feedback and account for the needs of

  19. A behavioral typology of opioid overdose risk behaviors among recent veterans in New York City.

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    Alex S Bennett

    Full Text Available To identify meaningful classes of opioid-using military veterans in terms of self-reported opioid overdose risk behaviors.The study recruited a sample of 218 military veterans in the NYC area who were discharged from active duty service after September 11, 2001 and reported past-month opioid use. Survey data including measures of mental health, social stressors, substance use, and opioid-related overdose risk behaviors were analyzed using Latent Class Analysis (LCA.A five group solution had excellent fit scores and interpretability. Factor analysis confirmed the existence of two major dimensions of variation: non-adherence and heroin use. The five groups included lower-risk prescription opioid users, non-adherent prescription opioid users and heroin users. The non-adherent prescription opioid users and heroin user classes were both further subdivided into "occasional" and "regular" use categories. In addition to endorsing a greater number of overdose risk behaviors, users in the regular use classes were more likely to screen positive for alcohol and substance use disorders, reported greater self-medicating opioid use to relieve anxiety, reported greater problems with physical pain, were more likely to have had mental health, alcohol and drug treatment, and were less likely to be employed or in school. Heroin users also were less likely to report stable housing.Findings indicate that opioid overdose risk classes are grounded in contextual factors related to experiences of psychological, physiological, and social adjustment pain and distress which should be addressed in tailored interventions targeting opioid users' unique constellations of risk behaviors and comorbid conditions.

  20. Trait Mindfulness and Progression to Injection Use in Youth With Opioid Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J Deanna; Vo, Hoa; Matson, Pamela; Adger, Hoover; Barnett, Gabriela; Fishman, Marc

    2017-09-19

    Many youth initiate opioid misuse with prescription opioids and transition over time to more severe substance-using behaviors, including injection. Trait mindfulness is a potentially protective factor. This is a cross-sectional study characterizing a sample of opioid-using youth by level of mindfulness and examines the potential effect modification of emotion regulation on the relationship between mindfulness and progression to injection opioid use. A convenience sample of 112 youth (ages 14-24) was recruited during an episode of inpatient detoxification and residential treatment for opioid use disorders. We examined emotion regulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale), mindfulness (Child Acceptance and Mindfulness Measure), and opioid use. We completed multivariable regressions stratified by degree of emotion regulation looking at relationship of mindfulness on time to injection use from age of first prescription opioid. Youth had difficulties in emotion regulation (m = 104.2; SD = 2.41) and low mindfulness (m = 19.1;SD = 0.59). While we found overall that mindfulness was associated with time to progression to injection opioid use, there was significant effect modification. Among youth with high levels of difficulty in emotion regulation, those with high mindfulness trait had quicker progressions to injection (-1.31 years; p =.003). In contrast, youth with normal emotion regulation and high mindfulness trait had a slower progression to injection (1.67 years; p =.041). Conclusion/Importance: Our study showed a majority of youth presenting with opioid use disorders have impairments in emotion regulation and deficits in trait mindfulness. The relationship between mindfulness and opioid use is impacted by emotion regulation capacity. More research is needed to understand the various facets of mindfulness and how they interact with emotion regulation in youth.

  1. Introduction to the College on Problems of Drug Dependence special issue: contemporary advances in opioid neuropharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sharon L; Unterwald, Ellen M; Izenwasser, Sari

    2010-05-01

    Opioid receptors are critical therapeutic targets for medications development relevant to the treatment of drug dependence and pain. With recent advances in molecular neurobiology, it has become evident that the functional activity of opioid receptors, as ligand-regulated protein complexes, is modulated by multifarious intracellular and extracellular events, that there is genetic variation in coding for receptors, and that the activity of endogenous opioid systems may underlie actions common to other addictive disorders. This supplemental issue of Drug and Alcohol Dependence, arising from an invited symposium at the 71st Annual Meeting of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, provides a series of contemporary reviews focused on recent advances in opioid neuropharmacology. Each speaker provides herein an invited comprehensive review of the state of knowledge on a specific topic in opioid neuropharmacology. Evans and colleagues describe the multi-faceted control of the opioid G-protein coupled receptor as a dynamic "sensor" complex and identify novel targets for drug development. von Zastrow focuses on opioid receptor-mediated events regulated by endocytosis and membrane trafficking through the endocytic pathway and differential responses to opioid agonists. Blendy and colleague provide a review of human association studies on the functional relevance of the mu opioid receptor variant, A118G, and presents data from the A112G knock-in model, an analogous mouse variant to A118G. Finally, Maldonado and colleagues provide a broader systems review from genetic, pharmacologic and behavioral studies implicating the endogenous opioid systems as a substrate for the mediation of substance use disorders spanning pharmacological classes.

  2. Dependence and addiction during chronic opioid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juurlink, David N; Dhalla, Irfan A

    2012-12-01

    The use of opioids for chronic noncancer pain has increased dramatically over the past 25 years in North America and has been accompanied by a major increase in opioid addiction and overdose deaths. The increase in opioid prescribing is multifactorial and partly reflects concerns about the effectiveness and safety of alternative medications, particularly the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, much of the rise in opioid prescribing reflects the assertion, widely communicated to physicians in the 1990s, that the risks of dependence and addiction during chronic opioid therapy were low, predictable, and could be minimized by the use of controlled-release opioid formulations. In this narrative review, we offer a critical appraisal of the publications most frequently cited as evidence that the risk of addiction during chronic opioid therapy is low. We conclude that very few well-designed studies support the notion that opioid addiction is rare during chronic opioid therapy and that none can be readily generalized to present-day practice. Despite serious methodological limitations, these studies have been repeatedly mischaracterized as showing that the risk of addiction during chronic opioid therapy is rare. These studies are countered by a larger, more rigorous and contemporary body of evidence demonstrating that dependence and addiction are relatively common consequences of chronic opioid therapy, occurring in up to one-third of patients in some series.

  3. Land Disposal Restrictions Treatment Standards: Compliance Strategies for Four Types of Mixed Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortune, W.B.; Ranek, N.L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the unique challenges involved in achieving compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Public Law 94-580) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) treatment standards for four types of mixed wastes generated throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex: (1) radioactively contaminated lead acid batteries; (2) radioactively contaminated cadmium-, mercury-, and silver-containing batteries; (3) mercury-bearing mixed wastes; and (4) radioactive lead solids. For each of these mixed waste types, the paper identifies the strategy pursued by DOE's Office of Pollution Prevention and Resource Conservation Policy and Guidance (EH-43) in coordination with other DOE elements and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet the compliance challenge. Specifically, a regulatory interpretation was obtained from EPA agreeing that the LDR treatment standard for wastes in the D008 'Radioactive Lead Solids' sub-category applies to radioactively contaminated lead acid batteries. For cadmium-, mercury-, and silver-containing batteries, generically applicable treatability variances were obtained from EPA approving macro-encapsulation as the alternative LDR treatment standard for all three battery types. Joint DOE/EPA technology demonstrations were pursued for mercury-bearing mixed wastes in an effort to justify revising the LDR treatment standards, which focus on thermal recovery of mercury for reuse. Because the demonstrations failed to produce enough supporting data for a rulemaking, however, EPA has recommended site-specific treatability variances for particular mercury-bearing mixed waste streams. Finally, DOE has filed an application for a determination of equivalent treatment requesting approval of container-based macro-encapsulation technologies as an alternative LDR treatment standard for radioactive lead solids. Information is provided concerning the length of time required to implement each of these strategies, and suggestions for

  4. Estimating the prevalence of illicit opioid use in New York City using multiple data sources

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    McNeely Jennifer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite concerns about its health and social consequences, little is known about the prevalence of illicit opioid use in New York City. Individuals who misuse heroin and prescription opioids are known to bear a disproportionate burden of morbidity and mortality. Service providers and public health authorities are challenged to provide appropriate interventions in the absence of basic knowledge about the size and characteristics of this population. While illicit drug users are underrepresented in population-based surveys, they may be identified in multiple administrative data sources. Methods We analyzed large datasets tracking hospital inpatient and emergency room admissions as well as drug treatment and detoxification services utilization. These were applied in combination with findings from a large general population survey and administrative records tracking prescriptions, drug overdose deaths, and correctional health services, to estimate the prevalence of heroin and non-medical prescription opioid use among New York City residents in 2006. These data were further applied to a descriptive analysis of opioid users entering drug treatment and hospital-based medical care. Results These data sources identified 126,681 cases of opioid use among New York City residents in 2006. After applying adjustment scenarios to account for potential overlap between data sources, we estimated over 92,000 individual opioid users. By contrast, just 21,600 opioid users initiated drug treatment in 2006. Opioid users represented 4 % of all individuals hospitalized, and over 44,000 hospitalizations during the calendar year. Conclusions Our findings suggest that innovative approaches are needed to provide adequate services to this sizeable population of opioid users. Given the observed high rates of hospital services utilization, greater integration of drug services into medical settings could be one component of an effective approach to

  5. [The endogenous opioid system and drug addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, R

    2010-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disorder leading to complex adaptive changes within the brain reward circuits. Several neurotransmitters, including the endogenous opioid system are involved in these changes. The opioid system plays a pivotal role in different aspects of addiction. Thus, opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides are largely distributed in the mesolimbic system and modulate dopaminergic activity within the reward circuits. Opioid receptors and peptides are selectively involved in several components of the addictive processes induced by opioids, cannabinoids, psychostimulants, alcohol and nicotine. This review is focused on the contribution of each component of the endogenous opioid system in the addictive properties of the different drugs of abuse. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Opioid rotation with extended-release opioids: where should we begin?

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    Nalamachu S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Srinivas NalamachuInternational Clinical Research Institute and Pain Management Institute, Overland Park, KS, USAAbstract: Opioid rotation is a common and necessary clinical practice in the management of chronic non-cancer pain to improve therapeutic efficacy with the lowest opioid dose. When dose escalations fail to achieve adequate analgesia or are associated with intolerable side effects, a trial of a new opioid should be considered. Much of the scientific rationale of opioid rotation is based on the wide interindividual variability in sensitivity to opioid analgesics and the novel patient response observed when introducing an opioid-tolerant patient to a new opioid. This article discusses patient indicators for opioid rotation, the conversion process between opioid medications, and additional practical considerations for increasing the effectiveness of opioid therapy during a trial of a new opioid. A Patient vignette that demonstrates a step-wise approach to opioid rotation is also presented.Keywords: extended-release opioids, chronic pain, opioid rotation

  7. Opioids Switching with Transdermal Systems in Chronic Cancer Pain

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    Barbarisi M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to tolerance development and adverse side effects, chronic pain patients frequently need to be switched to alternative opioid therapy Objective To assess the efficacy and tolerability of an alternative transdermally applied (TDS opioid in patients with chronic cancer pain receiving insufficient analgesia using their present treatment. Methods A total of 32 patients received alternative opioid therapy, 16 were switched from buprenorphine to fentanyl and 16 were switched from fentanyl to buprenorphine. The dosage used was 50% of that indicated in equipotency conversion tables. Pain relief was assessed at weekly intervals for the next 3 weeks Results Pain relief as assessed by VAS, PPI, and PRI significantly improved (p Conclusion Opioid switching at 50% of the calculated equianalgesic dose produced a significant reduction in pain levels and rescue medication. The incidence of side effects decreased and no new side effects were noted. Further studies are required to provide individualized treatment for patients according to their different types of cancer.

  8. Criminal justice continuum for opioid users at risk of overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Zaller, Nickolas; Martino, Sarah; Cloud, David H; McCauley, Erin; Heise, Andrew; Seal, David

    2018-02-24

    The United States (US) is in the midst of an epidemic of opioid use; however, overdose mortality disproportionately affects certain subgroups. For example, more than half of state prisoners and approximately two-thirds of county jail detainees report issues with substance use. Overdose is one of the leading causes of mortality among individuals released from correctional settings. Even though the criminal justice (CJ) system interacts with a disproportionately high number of individuals at risk of opioid use and overdose, few CJ agencies screen for opioid use disorder (OUD). Even less provide access to medication assisted treatment (e.g. methadone, buprenorphine, and depot naltrexone), which is one of the most effective tools to combat addiction and lower overdose risk. However, there is an opportunity to implement programs across the CJ continuum in collaboration with law enforcement, courts, correctional facilities, community service providers, and probation and parole. In the current paper, we introduce the concept of a "CJ Continuum of Care for Opioid Users at Risk of Overdose", grounded by the Sequential Intercept Model. We present each step on the CJ Continuum and include a general overview and highlight opportunities for: 1) screening for OUD and overdose risk, 2) treatment and/or diversion, and 3) overdose prevention and naloxone provision. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Classification and identification of opioid addiction in chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Guldstrand, Sally Kendall

    2010-01-01

    Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction, to investi......Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction......, to investigate whether PC were applicable and to compare these criteria with the ICD-10 criteria. The study was cross-sectional and included 253 patients with chronic pain at a tertiary pain centre. Patients were screened for addiction by a physician and a nurse. The addiction prevalence was 14.4% according...... as addicted were treated with significantly higher opioid doses, drank more alcohol, smoked more tobacco, used benzodiazepines and had higher levels of depression. According to ICD-10 patients classified as addicted used higher doses of opioids, drank more alcohol and had higher scores of anxiety...

  10. Concomitant use of opioid medications with triptans or serotonergic antidepressants in US office-based physician visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Kyle C; Fairman, Kathleen A; Sclar, David A

    2018-01-01

    Opioids are not recommended for routine treatment of migraine because their benefits are outweighed by risks of medication overuse headache and abuse/dependence. A March 2016 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety communication warned of the risk of serotonin syndrome from using opioids concomitantly with 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor agonists (triptans) or serotonergic antidepressants: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). Epidemiological information about co-prescribing of these medications is limited. The objective of this study was to estimate the nationwide prevalence of co-prescribing of an opioid with a serotonergic antidepressant and/or triptan in US office-based physician visits made by 1) all patients and 2) patients diagnosed with migraine. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) data were obtained for 2013 and 2014. Physician office visits that included the new or continued prescribing of ≥1 opioid medication with a triptan or an SSRI/SNRI were identified. Co-prescribed opioids were stratified by agent to determine the proportion of co-prescriptions with opioids posing a higher risk of serotonergic agonism (meperidine, tapentadol, and tramadol). Of an annualized mean 903.6 million office-based physician visits in 2013-2014, 17.7 million (2.0% of all US visits) resulted in the prescribing of ≥1 opioid medication with a triptan or an SSRI/SNRI. Opioid-SS