WorldWideScience

Sample records for standard curriculum sequence

  1. Standardized Curriculum for Cosmetology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized curricula are provided for two courses for the secondary vocational education program in Mississippi: cosmetology I and II. The 18 units in cosmetology I are as follows: introduction to cosmetology; Vocational Industrial Clubs of America; the look you like; bacteriology; sterilization and sanitation; hair and disorders; draping,…

  2. Sequence Matching Analysis for Curriculum Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liem Yenny Bendatu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many organizations apply information technologies to support their business processes. Using the information technologies, the actual events are recorded and utilized to conform with predefined model. Conformance checking is an approach to measure the fitness and appropriateness between process model and actual events. However, when there are multiple events with the same timestamp, the traditional approach unfit to result such measures. This study attempts to develop a sequence matching analysis. Considering conformance checking as the basis of this approach, this proposed approach utilizes the current control flow technique in process mining domain. A case study in the field of educational process has been conducted. This study also proposes a curriculum analysis framework to test the proposed approach. By considering the learning sequence of students, it results some measurements for curriculum development. Finally, the result of the proposed approach has been verified by relevant instructors for further development.

  3. Standardized Curriculum for Service Station Retailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    This curriculum guide for service station retailing was developed by the state of Mississippi to standardize vocational education course titles and core contents. The objectives contained in this document are common to all service station retailing programs in the state. The guide contains objectives for service station retailing I and II courses.…

  4. Standardized Curriculum for Automotive Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized curricula are provided for two courses for the secondary vocational education program in Mississippi: automotive mechanics I and II. The six units in automotive mechanics I are as follows: orientation and safety; tools, equipment, and manuals; measurement; automotive engines; basic electrical systems; and fuel systems. Automotive…

  5. Standardized Curriculum for General Drafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized vocational education course titles and core contents for two courses in Mississippi are provided: general drafting I and II. The first course contains the following units: (1) orientation; (2) introduction to mechanical drawing; (3) lettering; (4) geometric construction; (5) basic computer-assisted design (CAD); (6) orthographic…

  6. 25 CFR 36.13 - Standard IV-Curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard IV-Curriculum development. 36.13 Section 36.13... § 36.13 Standard IV—Curriculum development. (a) Each school shall implement an organized program of curriculum development involving certified and non-certified staff and shall provide the opportunity for...

  7. Solving the Curriculum Sequencing Problem with DNA Computing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbah, Amina; Ben Ali, Yamina Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In the e-learning systems, a learning path is known as a sequence of learning materials linked to each others to help learners achieving their learning goals. As it is impossible to have the same learning path that suits different learners, the Curriculum Sequencing problem (CS) consists of the generation of a personalized learning path for each…

  8. Interior Design Standards in the Secondary FCS Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Shana H.; Smith, Bettye P.

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with a study on interior design standards in the secondary FCS curriculum. This study assessed the importance FCS teachers placed on content standards in the interior design curriculum to help determine the amount of time and emphasis to place on the units within the courses. A cover letter and questionnaire were sent…

  9. Freedom as Non-Domination, Standards and the Negotiated Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Neil

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the application of Philip Pettit's concept of freedom as non-domination to the issues of educational standards and the negotiated curriculum. The article will argue that freedom as non-domination (and the connected concept of debating contestations as part of a legitimate democratic state) shines a critical light on…

  10. Standardized Curriculum for Diesel Engine Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized curricula are provided for two courses for the secondary vocational education program in Mississippi: diesel engine mechanics I and II. The eight units in diesel engine mechanics I are as follows: orientation; shop safety; basic shop tools; fasteners; measurement; engine operating principles; engine components; and basic auxiliary…

  11. Standardized Curriculum for Electricity/Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized vocational education course titles and core contents are provided for two courses in Mississippi: electricity/electronics I and II. The first course contains the following units: (1) orientation, safety, and leadership; (2) basic principles of electricity/electronics; (3) direct current (DC) theory; (4) magnetism and DC motors; (5)…

  12. DNA sequencing versus standard prenatal aneuploidy screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Diana W; Parker, R Lamar; Wentworth, Jeffrey; Madankumar, Rajeevi; Saffer, Craig; Das, Anita F; Craig, Joseph A; Chudova, Darya I; Devers, Patricia L; Jones, Keith W; Oliver, Kelly; Rava, Richard P; Sehnert, Amy J

    2014-02-27

    In high-risk pregnant women, noninvasive prenatal testing with the use of massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA testing) accurately detects fetal autosomal aneuploidy. Its performance in low-risk women is unclear. At 21 centers in the United States, we collected blood samples from women with singleton pregnancies who were undergoing standard aneuploidy screening (serum biochemical assays with or without nuchal translucency measurement). We performed massively parallel sequencing in a blinded fashion to determine the chromosome dosage for each sample. The primary end point was a comparison of the false positive rates of detection of fetal trisomies 21 and 18 with the use of standard screening and cfDNA testing. Birth outcomes or karyotypes were the reference standard. The primary series included 1914 women (mean age, 29.6 years) with an eligible sample, a singleton fetus without aneuploidy, results from cfDNA testing, and a risk classification based on standard screening. For trisomies 21 and 18, the false positive rates with cfDNA testing were significantly lower than those with standard screening (0.3% vs. 3.6% for trisomy 21, Paneuploidy (5 for trisomy 21, 2 for trisomy 18, and 1 for trisomy 13; negative predictive value, 100% [95% confidence interval, 99.8 to 100]). The positive predictive values for cfDNA testing versus standard screening were 45.5% versus 4.2% for trisomy 21 and 40.0% versus 8.3% for trisomy 18. In a general obstetrical population, prenatal testing with the use of cfDNA had significantly lower false positive rates and higher positive predictive values for detection of trisomies 21 and 18 than standard screening. (Funded by Illumina; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01663350.).

  13. Evolution: Its Treatment in K-12 State Science Curriculum Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, L. S.

    2001-12-01

    State standards are the basis upon which states and local schools build curricula. Usually taking the form of lists of what students are expected to learn at specified grades or clusters of grades, they influence statewide examinations, textbooks, teacher education and credentialing, and other areas in which states typically exercise control over local curriculum development. State science standards vary very widely in overall quality.1,2 This is especially true in their treatment of evolution, both in the life sciences and to a somewhat lesser extent in geology and astronomy. Not surprisingly, a detailed evaluation of the treatment of evolution in state science standards3 has evoked considerably more public interest than the preceding studies of overall quality. We here consider the following questions: What constitutes a good treatment of evolution in science standards and how does one evaluate the standards? Which states have done well, and which less well? What nonscientific influences have been brought to bear on standards, for what reasons, and by whom? What strategies have been used to obscure or distort the role of evolution as the central organizing principle of the historical sciences? What are the effects of such distortions on students' overall understanding of science? What can the scientific community do to assure the publication of good science standards and to counteract attacks on good science teaching? 1. Lerner, L. S., State Science Standards: An Appraisal of Science Standards in 36 States, The Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, Washington, D.C., March 1998. 2. Lerner, L. S. et al ., The State of State Standards 2000, ibid., January 2000. 3. Lerner, L. S., Good Science, Bad Science: Teaching Evolution In the States, ibid., September 2000.

  14. Curriculum guidelines and standards for dental laser education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joel M.

    1999-05-01

    This paper reports on the revision of the Curriculum Guidelines and Standards for Dental Laser Education. The original Guidelines were developed at a workshop at the University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry in 1992, presented at the January 1993 SPIE symposium, and published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1880. They have since been endorsed and implemented worldwide. The Guidelines define the standard of education for practitioners who use lasers, with a goal to enhance of student and practitioner understanding and knowledge of laser technology applications in dentistry. Four levels of education are outlined. Introductory Courses are designed to provide general information on lasers in dentistry. They are informational, without an assessment of the student's proficiency in laser use. Standard Proficiency, Advanced Proficiency, and Educator Courses have specific educational goals, behavioral objectives, and examinations of proficiency. Standard Proficiency Courses prove a basic level of education with didactic, laboratory, and clinical exercises to be satisfactorily completed before using laser clinically. Advanced Proficiency Courses increase this level of education to include a clinical case study requirement. Educator Courses define requirements for instructors of laser education in dentistry. Revision of the Guidelines ensures that they keep pace with technological developments and research findings.

  15. Designing a Standardized Laparoscopy Curriculum for Gynecology Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shore, Eliane M; Lefebvre, Guylaine G; Husslein, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    surgery, and asked 39 experts in gynecologic education to rate the items on a Likert scale (1-5) for inclusion in the curriculum. Consensus was predefined as Cronbach α of ≥0.80. We then conducted another Delphi survey with 9 experienced users of laparoscopic virtual reality simulators to delineate...... of the curriculum Delphi, and after 2 rounds (Cronbach α=0.80) in the virtual reality curriculum Delphi. Consensus was reached for cognitive, technical, and nontechnical skills as well as for 6 virtual reality tasks. Median time and economy of movement scores defined benchmarks for all tasks. CONCLUSIONS...... residents using Delphi consensus methodology. METHODS: This study began with Delphi methodology to determine expert consensus on the components of a gynecology laparoscopic skills curriculum. We generated a list of cognitive content, technical skills, and nontechnical skills for training in laparoscopic...

  16. School-Based Communities of Practice as Mechanisms for Standards-Based Mathematics Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Thomas E.; Jong, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    The authors drew upon Remillard and Bryans' categorization of curriculum use in observating two middle-grade teachers' integration of Standards-based curriculum materials produced by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. Each teacher participated in a two-year professional development program focused on increasing content knowledge and…

  17. Curriculum Viewed as a Binary System: An Approach to the Determination of Sequence. A Project Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renckly, Thomas R.; Orwig, Gary

    A description of the development and application of a hierarchical/binary model by which a curriculum may be analyzed to determine alternative instructional sequences given particular instructional objectives and limiting constraints forms the body of this report. The background of the project as part of an effort by the U.S. Navy Recruiting…

  18. Assessment of a Motivational Interviewing Curriculum for Year 3 Medical Students Using a Standardized Patient Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeseler, Frederick; Fortin, Auguste H.; Pfeiffer, Carol; Walters, Cheryl; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to evaluate a year 3 motivational interviewing (MI) curriculum using a standardized patient case. Methods The 2-hour small group MI curriculum included a didactic presentation followed by interactive role plays. During a clinical skills assessment at the end of year 3 the MI skills of 80 students who had participated in the curriculum were compared with those of 19 students who had not participated. Results The standardized patient reliably rated the students on their performance of 8 items. Students who had participated in the MI curriculum were significantly more proficient than nonparticipating students in the performance of 2 strategic MI skills, importance and confidence rulers (ps motivations for change. Practice Implications Medical schools should consider providing students with MI training and MI skill assessments using standardized patient cases to help students prepare to counsel patients for behavior change. PMID:21123019

  19. Standardization and quality management in next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrullat, Christoph; Glökler, Jörn; Franke, Philipp; Frohme, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    DNA sequencing continues to evolve quickly even after > 30 years. Many new platforms suddenly appeared and former established systems have vanished in almost the same manner. Since establishment of next-generation sequencing devices, this progress gains momentum due to the continually growing demand for higher throughput, lower costs and better quality of data. In consequence of this rapid development, standardized procedures and data formats as well as comprehensive quality management considerations are still scarce. Here, we listed and summarized current standardization efforts and quality management initiatives from companies, organizations and societies in form of published studies and ongoing projects. These comprise on the one hand quality documentation issues like technical notes, accreditation checklists and guidelines for validation of sequencing workflows. On the other hand, general standard proposals and quality metrics are developed and applied to the sequencing workflow steps with the main focus on upstream processes. Finally, certain standard developments for downstream pipeline data handling, processing and storage are discussed in brief. These standardization approaches represent a first basis for continuing work in order to prospectively implement next-generation sequencing in important areas such as clinical diagnostics, where reliable results and fast processing is crucial. Additionally, these efforts will exert a decisive influence on traceability and reproducibility of sequence data.

  20. Clinical evaluation of further-developed MRCP sequences in comparison with standard MRCP sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundt, W.; Scheidler, J.; Reiser, M.; Petsch, R.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the comparison of technically improved single-shot magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) sequences with standard single-shot rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) and half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences in evaluating the normal and abnormal biliary duct system. The bile duct system of 45 patients was prospectively investigated on a 1.5-T MRI system. The investigation was performed with RARE and HASTE MR cholangiography sequences with standard and high spatial resolutions, and with a delayed-echo half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence. Findings of the improved MRCP sequences were compared with the standard MRCP sequences. The level of confidence in assessing the diagnosis was divided into five groups. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test at a level of p<0.05 was applied. In 15 patients no pathology was found. The MRCP showed stenoses of the bile duct system in 10 patients and choledocholithiasis and cholecystolithiasis in 16 patients. In 12 patients a dilatation of the bile duct system was found. Comparison of the low- and high spatial resolution sequences and the short and long TE times of the half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence revealed no statistically significant differences regarding accuracy of the examination. The diagnostic confidence level in assessing normal or pathological findings for the high-resolution RARE and half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) was significantly better than for the standard sequences. For the delayed-echo half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence no statistically significant difference was seen. The high-resolution RARE and half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequences had a higher confidence level, but there was no significant difference in diagnosis in terms of detection and assessment of pathological changes in the biliary duct system compared with standard sequences. (orig.)

  1. Clinical evaluation of further-developed MRCP sequences in comparison with standard MRCP sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundt, W.; Scheidler, J.; Reiser, M. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich (Germany); Petsch, R. [Department of MRI, Siemens Medizintechnik, Erlangen (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was the comparison of technically improved single-shot magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) sequences with standard single-shot rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) and half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences in evaluating the normal and abnormal biliary duct system. The bile duct system of 45 patients was prospectively investigated on a 1.5-T MRI system. The investigation was performed with RARE and HASTE MR cholangiography sequences with standard and high spatial resolutions, and with a delayed-echo half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence. Findings of the improved MRCP sequences were compared with the standard MRCP sequences. The level of confidence in assessing the diagnosis was divided into five groups. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test at a level of p<0.05 was applied. In 15 patients no pathology was found. The MRCP showed stenoses of the bile duct system in 10 patients and choledocholithiasis and cholecystolithiasis in 16 patients. In 12 patients a dilatation of the bile duct system was found. Comparison of the low- and high spatial resolution sequences and the short and long TE times of the half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence revealed no statistically significant differences regarding accuracy of the examination. The diagnostic confidence level in assessing normal or pathological findings for the high-resolution RARE and half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) was significantly better than for the standard sequences. For the delayed-echo half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequence no statistically significant difference was seen. The high-resolution RARE and half-Fourier RARE (HASTE) sequences had a higher confidence level, but there was no significant difference in diagnosis in terms of detection and assessment of pathological changes in the biliary duct system compared with standard sequences. (orig.)

  2. A Creative Approach to the Common Core Standards: The Da Vinci Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaucer, Harry

    2012-01-01

    "A Creative Approach to the Common Core Standards: The Da Vinci Curriculum" challenges educators to design programs that boldly embrace the Common Core State Standards by imaginatively drawing from the genius of great men and women such as Leonardo da Vinci. A central figure in the High Renaissance, Leonardo made extraordinary contributions as a…

  3. Standardized metadata for human pathogen/vector genomic sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien G Dugan

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing has accelerated the determination of genome sequences for thousands of human infectious disease pathogens and dozens of their vectors. The scale and scope of these data are enabling genotype-phenotype association studies to identify genetic determinants of pathogen virulence and drug/insecticide resistance, and phylogenetic studies to track the origin and spread of disease outbreaks. To maximize the utility of genomic sequences for these purposes, it is essential that metadata about the pathogen/vector isolate characteristics be collected and made available in organized, clear, and consistent formats. Here we report the development of the GSCID/BRC Project and Sample Application Standard, developed by representatives of the Genome Sequencing Centers for Infectious Diseases (GSCIDs, the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs for Infectious Diseases, and the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH, informed by interactions with numerous collaborating scientists. It includes mapping to terms from other data standards initiatives, including the Genomic Standards Consortium's minimal information (MIxS and NCBI's BioSample/BioProjects checklists and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI. The standard includes data fields about characteristics of the organism or environmental source of the specimen, spatial-temporal information about the specimen isolation event, phenotypic characteristics of the pathogen/vector isolated, and project leadership and support. By modeling metadata fields into an ontology-based semantic framework and reusing existing ontologies and minimum information checklists, the application standard can be extended to support additional project-specific data fields and integrated with other data represented with comparable standards. The use of this metadata standard by all ongoing and future GSCID sequencing projects will

  4. Definition and Analysis of a System for the Automated Comparison of Curriculum Sequencing Algorithms in Adaptive Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Carla; Sciarrone, Filippo; Temperini, Marco; Vaste, Giulia

    2011-01-01

    LS-Lab provides automatic support to comparison/evaluation of the Learning Object Sequences produced by different Curriculum Sequencing Algorithms. Through this framework a teacher can verify the correspondence between the behaviour of different sequencing algorithms and her pedagogical preferences. In fact the teacher can compare algorithms…

  5. Ocean Sciences Sequence for Grades 6-8: Climate Change Curriculum Developed Through a Collaboration Between Scientists and Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halversen, C.; Weiss, E. L.; Pedemonte, S.

    2016-02-01

    Today's youth have been tasked with the overwhelming job of addressing the world's climate future. The students who will become the scientists, policy makers, and citizens of tomorrow must gain a robust understanding of the causes and effects of climate change, as well as possible adaptation strategies. Currently, few high quality curriculum materials exist that address climate change in a developmentally appropriate manner. The NOAA-funded Ocean Sciences Sequence for Grades 6-8: The Ocean-Atmosphere Connection and Climate Change (OSS) addresses this gap by providing teachers with scientifically accurate climate change curriculum that hits on some of the most salient points in climate science, while simultaneously developing students' science process skills. OSS was developed through a collaboration between some of the nation's leading ocean and climate scientists and the Lawrence Hall of Science's highly qualified curriculum development team. Scientists were active partners throughout the entire development process, from initial brainstorming of key concepts and creating the conceptual storyline for the curriculum to final review of the content and activities. The goal was to focus strategically and effectively on core concepts within ocean and climate sciences that students should understand. OSS was designed in accordance with the latest research from the learning sciences and provides numerous opportunities for students to develop facility with science practices by "doing" science.Through hands-on activities, technology, informational readings, and embedded assessments, OSS deeply addresses a significant number of standards from the Next Generation Science Standards and is being used by many teachers as they explore the shifts required by NGSS. It also aligns with the Ocean Literacy and Climate Literacy Frameworks. OSS comprises 33 45-minute sessions organized into three thematic units, each driven by an exploratory question: (1) How do the ocean and atmosphere

  6. Measuring Course Competencies in a School of Business: The Use of Standardized Curriculum and Rubrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Jane Whitney

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the growing emphasis on measurement of course competencies by individual college students through two course examples, an undergraduate course in managing change and conflict and a graduate course in human resource management. The author explains how standardized curriculum and assignment rubrics are being used to measure…

  7. Integrating GIS in the Middle School Curriculum: Impacts on Diverse Students' Standardized Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Donna; Alibrandi, Marsha

    2013-01-01

    This case study conducted with 1,425 middle school students in Palm Beach County, Florida, included a treatment group receiving GIS instruction (256) and a control group without GIS instruction (1,169). Quantitative analyses on standardized test scores indicated that inclusion of GIS in middle school curriculum had a significant effect on student…

  8. Standardizing the Term "Strategy" in Retail and Business Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, So Young

    2017-01-01

    Strategy is a key concept in retail and business education. Yet, this important term has evolved to include many definitions, which can create confusion in the classroom environment. This paper proposes a standardized use of the term "strategy" in retail and business classrooms. It suggests a focused definition of strategy as "the…

  9. Standardized Curriculum for Marketing and Cooperative Vocational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized course titles and core contents for seven marketing and cooperative vocational education courses in Mississippi are provided: (1) marketing education, part one; (2) marketing education, part two; (3) fashion merchandising; (4) marketing cooperative education, part one; (5) marketing cooperative education, part two; (6) diversified…

  10. Old and Older: Curriculum Standards for History and Archeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Mary S.

    This paper examines the standards and principles recently proposed for teaching both history and archeology. By comparing the goals each discipline has set for good teaching, areas of difference and commonality can be discerned and questions concerning historical thinking and what may be called "archeological" thinking can then be…

  11. Hyper-curriculum: Transcending Borders of Standardization in the Cosmopolitan Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Kazanjian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The world is not just connected; it is hyper-connected. The global flow of ideas, technology, and people are at unmatched levels in history. More classrooms are becoming cosmopolitan centers composed of students with multicultural backgrounds. However, United States public education in this hyper-connected world puts emphasis on standardization and accountability. By doing so, schools driven by federal initiatives fail in helping students to become worldly citizens. Students and teachers are derived of room for creativity or new multicultural possibilities. Hence, this paper intends to develop a theoretical framework for curriculum in the hyper-connected world, aptly named “hyper-curriculum.”

  12. Interdisciplinary Climate Change Curriculum Materials based on the Next Generation Science Standards and The Earth Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, A.; Robertson, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    In the 2012, the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies' reported that one of the major issues associated with the development of climate change curriculum was the lack of interdisciplinary materials that also promoted a correlation between science standards and content. Therefore, in order to respond to this need, our group has developed an interdisciplinary climate change curriculum that has had as its fundamental basis the alignment with the guidelines presented by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the ones presented by the international document entitled The Earth Charter. In this regards, while the alignment with NGSS disciplinary core ideas, cross-concepts and students' expectations intended to fulfill the need for the development of climate change curriculum activities that were directly associated with the appropriate set of NGSS guidelines, the alignment with The Earth Charter document intended to reinforce the need the for the integration of sociological, philosophical and intercultural analysis of the theme 'climate change'. Additionally, our curriculum was also developed as part of a collaborative project between climate scientists and engineers, who are responsible for the development of a Regional Arctic Simulation Model (RASM). Hence, another important curriculum constituent was the feedback, suggestions and reviews provided by these professionals, who have also contributed to these pedagogical materials' scientific accuracy by facilitating the integration of datasets and visualizations developed by RASM. Furthermore, our group has developed a climate change curriculum for two types of audience: high school and early undergraduate students. Each curriculum unit is divided into modules and each module contains a set of lesson plans. The topics selected to compose each unit and module were designated according to the surveys conducted with scientists and engineers involved with the development of the climate change

  13. Human trafficking education for nurse practitioners: Integration into standard curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Rebecca M

    2018-02-01

    of human trafficking among students enrolled in a nurse practitioner program. Informed nurse practitioners have the ability to identify, treat, and refer victims of trafficking. As an integral part of the health care team, nurse practitioners should receive trafficking education as part of the standard course curricula. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Wilderness Education Association certification and safety, ecological impact, and curriculum standardization of graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Detzel, David

    1985-01-01

    Graduates of the Wilderness Education Association (W.E.A.) were surveyed by mail to investigate the effects of their certification on safety, ecological impact, and curriculum standardization of their subsequent leadership activities. Self-reports showed a slight, but not statistically significant, decrease in the number of post- W.E.A. course evacuations and rescues. Graduates reported a moderate W.E.A. influence on their accident records, and knowledge of W.E.A. stan...

  15. National Construction of Global Education: A Critical Review of the National Curriculum Standards for South Korean Global High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Youl-Kwan; Park, Minjeong; Choi, Il-Seon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate what global visions of education are reflected in the selected national curriculum standards, with special reference to two seemingly contradictory forces: globalization and nationalism. This paper examines the socio-economic and cultural foundations of the curriculum and explains how the national curriculum…

  16. First Year K-12 Teachers as High Leverage Point to Implement GEMS Space Science Curriculum Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Mendez, B. J.; Schultz, G.; Wierman, T.

    2013-01-01

    The recurring challenge for curriculum developers is how to efficiently prepare K-12 classroom teachers to use new curricula. First-year teachers, numbering nearly 250,000 in the US each year, have the greatest potential to impact the largest number of students because they have potential to be in the classroom for thirty years. At the same time, these novice teachers are often the most open minded about adopting curricular innovation because they are not yet deeply entrenched in existing practices. To take advantage of this high leverage point, a collaborative of space scientists and science educators at the University of California, Berkeley’s Lawrence Hall of Science and Center for Science Education at the Space Sciences Laboratory with experts from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, the University of Wyoming, and the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education experimented with a unique professional development model focused on helping master teachers work closely with pre-service teachers during their student teaching internship field experience. The Advancing Mentor and Novice Teachers in Space Science (AMANTISS) team first identified master teachers who supervise novice, student teachers and trained these master teachers to use the GEMS Space Science Curriculum Sequence. Then, these master teachers were mentored in coaching interning student teachers assigned to them in using GEMS materials. Evaluation showed that novice teachers mentored by the master teachers felt knowledgeable after teaching the GEMS units. However, they seemed relatively less confident about the solar system and objects beyond the solar system. Overall, mentees felt strongly at the end of the year that they have acquired good strategies for teaching the various topics, suggesting that the support they received while teaching and working with a mentor was of real benefit to them. Funding provided in part by NASA ROSES AMANTISS NNX09AD51G

  17. The standardization in the curriculum educational: the tip of the iceberg of the homogenization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsy Rodríguez-Revelo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Taking as a reference the existing literature, through this article intends to make a brief presentation of curriculum standardization and its implementation in the field of education. Standards, taken from the business field, are considered to be a necessary instrument for assurance of educational quality. However, empirical research, as well as critical voices in relation to their applicability, in all educational contexts, emphasize that these cultural homogenized and unify teaching, which does not guarantee an improvement in learning, since it tends to ignore cultural diversity in schools. Standards, taken from the business field, are considered to be a necessary instrument for assurance of educational quality. However, empirical research, as well as critical voices in relation to their applicability, in all educational contexts, emphasize that these cultural homogenized and unify teaching, which does not guarantee an improvement in learning, since it tends to ignore cultural diversity in schools.

  18. Using Next Generation Science Standards to Strengthen Existing Climate Curriculum Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, N.; Ledley, T. S.; Ellins, K. K.; Bardar, E.; Dunlap, C.; Youngman, E.

    2013-12-01

    "Confronting the Challenges of Climate Literacy" is an NSF-funded (DRK-12) project that includes curriculum development, teacher professional development, teacher leadership development, and research on student learning, all directed at high school teachers and students. The curriculum unit includes three distinct but related modules: "Climate and the Cryosphere"; "Climate and the Biosphere"; and "Climate and the Carbon Cycle". These modules will be added to the growing EarthLabs collection. Climate related themes that cut across all three modules include the Earth system, with the complexities of its positive and negative feedback loops; the range of temporal and spatial scales at which climate, weather, and other Earth system processes occur; and the recurring question, 'How do we know what we know about Earth's past and present climate?' which addresses proxy data and scientific instrumentation. The project, launched in September 2010, used a backwards-design process that was keyed in large part to the 2009 version of 'Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Science'. The first draft of the three curriculum modules was sent to partner teachers in June of 2011 for their review and feedback, and since then a round of pilot testing followed by a round of field testing has led to many revisions and refinements. By the time the final version of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) was released in the spring of 2013, the modules were well along in their development. Nevertheless, with more than a year remaining in the project it was clear that explicitly addressing NGSS was an important next step. The challenge was, how do we approach this without starting over, without launching another 'backwards design' process keyed to the new standards? This presentation will share the different approaches we are using to address the three dimensions of NGSS in a substantive and meaningful way, without starting over, but through studying the various ways in

  19. Patient safety principles in family medicine residency accreditation standards and curriculum objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam, Aliya; Sharma, Nishan; Harvie, Margot; O’Beirne, Maeve; Topps, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To conduct a thematic analysis of the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s (CFPC’s) Red Book accreditation standards and the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum objectives with respect to patient safety principles. Design Thematic content analysis of the CFPC’s Red Book accreditation standards and the Triple C curriculum. Setting Canada. Main outcome measures Coding frequency of the patient safety principles (ie, patient engagement; respectful, transparent relationships; complex systems; a just and trusting culture; responsibility and accountability for actions; and continuous learning and improvement) found in the analyzed CFPC documents. Results Within the analyzed CFPC documents, the most commonly found patient safety principle was patient engagement (n = 51 coding references); the least commonly found patient safety principles were a just and trusting culture (n = 5 coding references) and complex systems (n = 5 coding references). Other patient safety principles that were uncommon included responsibility and accountability for actions (n = 7 coding references) and continuous learning and improvement (n = 12 coding references). Conclusion Explicit inclusion of patient safety content such as the use of patient safety principles is needed for residency training programs across Canada to ensure the full spectrum of care is addressed, from community-based care to acute hospital-based care. This will ensure a patient safety culture can be cultivated from residency and sustained into primary care practice. PMID:27965349

  20. Windmills by Design: Purposeful Curriculum Design to Meet Next Generation Science Standards in a 9-12 Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James; Brown, Patrick L.

    2017-01-01

    The "Next Generation Science Standards" (NGSS) challenges science teachers to think beyond specific content standards when considering how to design and implement curriculum. This lesson, "Windmills by Design," is an insightful lesson in how science teachers can create and implement a cross-cutting lesson to teach the concepts…

  1. Learning-Goals-Driven Design Model: Developing Curriculum Materials that Align with National Standards and Incorporate Project-Based Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcik, Joseph; McNeill, Katherine L.; Reiser, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    Reform efforts in science education emphasize the importance of rigorous treatment of science standards and use of innovative pedagogical approaches to make science more meaningful and successful. In this paper, we present a learning-goals-driven design model for developing curriculum materials, which combines national standards and a…

  2. A Development Curriculum Plan To Achieve a Sequenced Curriculum between High School Courses in Automotive Mechanics and the Mattatuck Community College Automotive Technician Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattatuck Community Coll., Waterbury, CT.

    This document contains a developmental curriculum plan for an articulated curriculum in automotive mechanics for Connecticut's Mattatuck Community College and area high schools. The curriculum guide includes a course description, criteria for evaluation, attendance policy, objectives, a curriculum outline, a three-part automotive technician test,…

  3. A Developmental Curriculum Plan To Achieve a Sequenced Curriculum between High School Courses in Food Preparation and the Mattatuck Community College Hospitality/Food Services Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattatuck Community Coll., Waterbury, CT.

    This document contains a developmental curriculum plan for an articulated curriculum in hospitality/food service for Connecticut's Mattatuck Community College and area high schools. The curriculum guide includes a course description, criteria for evaluation, attendance policy, objectives, a curriculum area outline, 17 content area objectives, a…

  4. Teachers' Evaluations and Use of Web-Based Curriculum Resources in Relation to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webel, Corey; Krupa, Erin E.; McManus, Jason

    2015-01-01

    This study examines patterns in how a group of fifth- and sixth-grade teachers evaluated and reported using different types of curriculum resources to support their teaching in relation to the mathematical concepts outlined in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. In particular, it explores the use of resources that were available to…

  5. A Study of the Benefits of Math Manipulatives versus Standard Curriculum in the Comprehension of Mathematical Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Amanda L.

    This study attempted to determine which teaching method, mainly manipulatives or the standard curriculum, best allowed the students to learn first grade math concepts. The manipulatives consisted of objects such as unifix cubes, personal chalkboards, work mats, and various other articles, which allowed the students to see the math that they were…

  6. GIS Education at Geographical Departments in Japanese Universities in Relation to the Japan Standard GIS Core Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Midori; Oguchi, Takashi; Okabe, Atsuyuki; Sadahiro, Yukio

    2008-01-01

    Geographic information system (GIS) education in Japan lags far behind that in Western developed countries. As such the development of systematic GIS education in Japanese universities, including the preparation of a GIS standard curriculum, becomes an urgent issue. This article examines the present situation and recent trends of GIS education in…

  7. Electronic laboratory quality assurance program: A method of enhancing the prosthodontic curriculum and addressing accreditation standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Marjan; Jahangiri, Leila

    2015-08-01

    An electronic quality assurance (eQA) program was developed to replace a paper-based system and to address standards introduced by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) and to improve educational outcomes. This eQA program provides feedback to predoctoral dental students on prosthodontic laboratory steps at New York University College of Dentistry. The purpose of this study was to compare the eQA program of performing laboratory quality assurance with the former paper-based format. Fourth-year predoctoral dental students (n=334) who experienced both the paper-based and the electronic version of the quality assurance program were surveyed about their experiences. Additionally, data extracted from the eQA program were analyzed to identify areas of weakness in the curriculum. The study findings revealed that 73.8% of the students preferred the eQA program to the paper-based version. The average number of treatments that did not pass quality assurance standards was 119.5 per month. This indicated a 6.34% laboratory failure rate. Further analysis of these data revealed that 62.1% of the errors were related to fixed prosthodontic treatment, 27.9% to partial removable dental prostheses, and 10% to complete removable dental prostheses in the first 18 months of program implementation. The eQA program was favored by dental students who have experienced both electronic and paper-based versions of the system. Error type analysis can yield the ability to create customized faculty standardization sessions and refine the didactic and clinical teaching of the predoctoral students. This program was also able to link patient care activity with the student's laboratory activities, thus addressing the latest requirements of the CODA regarding the competence of graduates in evaluating laboratory work related to their patient care. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Development of a National Curriculum Guide for Persian: Themes, Genres, Standards-based Goals, and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Mills

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wang (2009 has challenged foreign language scholars to “engage in rigorous discussions to develop language-specific examples and performance indicators to guide program development and decision-making for less commonly taught language (LCTL instructors” (p. 284. The 2011-2012 STARTALK programs in Persian aimed to encourage such rigorous discussion through the development of a National Curriculum Guide in Persian. Persian professionals explored current theories in second language acquisition, examined curricular resources and models, and shared successful teaching materials. This article describes the rationale, procedures, and outcomes of a series of faculty development events that aimed to create a model for curriculum development for the LCTLs and, perhaps, also for other language programs in the context of higher education. The final curriculum guide produced by the program participants includes overarching themes and genres, Standards-based goals, strategies for authentic assessment, and model unit plans.

  9. The relationship between geographical curriculum writing on new standard with geography teacher education direction in Normal Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.

    2013-12-01

    Middle school geography curriculum standards emphasize on cultivating students' practical ability and sense of exploration. As a result, when compiling textbook, we emphasize on students' learning geography through exploratory activities. Currently, according to the geographical curriculum writing standard, sets of geography textbooks have been published, which have been reviewed and approved by the Chines National Ministry of Education National School Textbook Examination Committee and approved to be tested trial in the experimental area. From the overall design situation of these new materials, we know that they can reflect the basic reform idea of the national basic education curriculum and exploration is prominent very much. Since part of the new textbook writers are implementers and secondary school geography teachers trained in Geography Education in Normal Universities, and there are natural connection between high school geography education and geography teacher education in Normal Universities, so the exploration in the new curriculum secondary school geography textbooks writing would inevitably lead to further concept changes of Geography Education Teachers.

  10. Development of a standardized curriculum concept for continuing training in hernia surgery: German Hernia School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R; Stechemesser, B; Reinpold, W; Fortelny, R; Mayer, F; Schröder, W; Köckerling, F

    2017-04-01

    The increasingly more complex nature of hernia surgery means that training programs for young surgeons must now meet ever more stringent requirements. There is a growing demand for improved structuring and standardization of education and training in hernia surgery. In 2011, the concept of a Hernia School was developed in Germany and has been gradually implemented ever since. That concept comprises the following series of interrelated, tiered course elements: Hernie kompakt (Hernia compact), Hernie konkret (Hernia concrete), and Hernie complex (Hernia complex). All three course elements make provision for structured clinical training based on guest visits to approved hernia centers. The Hernia compact basic course imparts knowledge of anatomy working with fresh cadavers. Hernia surgery procedures can also be conducted using unfixed specimens. Knowledge of abdominal wall ultrasound diagnostics is also imparted and hernia surgery procedures simulated on pelvic trainers. In all three course elements, lectures are delivered by experts across the entire field of hernia surgery using evidence-based practices from the literature. To date, eight Hernie kompakt (Hernia compact) courses have been conducted, in each case with up to 55 participants, and with a total of 390 participants. On evaluating the course, over 95% of participants expressed the view that the Hernia compact course content improved hernia surgery training. Following that positive feedback, the more advanced Hernie konkret (Hernia concrete) and Hernie complex (Hernia complex) course elements were introduced in 2016. The experiences gained to date since the introduction of a Hernia School-a standardized curriculum concept for continuing training in hernia surgery-has been evaluated by participants as an improvement on hitherto hernia surgery training.

  11. Examining the (False) Dichotomy between "Care" and "Education" in Early Childhood Programs: A Descriptive Case Study of Teacher-Child Relationships within a Standardized Curriculum Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrove, Randi

    2016-01-01

    Public preschool programs using standardized curriculum models are increasing rapidly, and while research has shown that teacher-child relationships have been used successfully as an intervention and compensatory measure, it is unclear what influence the public preschool setting and the use of a curriculum model have on teacher-child…

  12. Molecular indexing enables quantitative targeted RNA sequencing and reveals poor efficiencies in standard library preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Glenn K; Xu, Weihong; Wilhelmy, Julie; Mindrinos, Michael N; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong; Fodor, Stephen P A

    2014-02-04

    We present a simple molecular indexing method for quantitative targeted RNA sequencing, in which mRNAs of interest are selectively captured from complex cDNA libraries and sequenced to determine their absolute concentrations. cDNA fragments are individually labeled so that each molecule can be tracked from the original sample through the library preparation and sequencing process. Multiple copies of cDNA fragments of identical sequence become distinct through labeling, and replicate clones created during PCR amplification steps can be identified and assigned to their distinct parent molecules. Selective capture enables efficient use of sequencing for deep sampling and for the absolute quantitation of rare or transient transcripts that would otherwise escape detection by standard sequencing methods. We have also constructed a set of synthetic barcoded RNA molecules, which can be introduced as controls into the sample preparation mix and used to monitor the efficiency of library construction. The quantitative targeted sequencing revealed extremely low efficiency in standard library preparations, which were further confirmed by using synthetic barcoded RNA molecules. This finding shows that standard library preparation methods result in the loss of rare transcripts and highlights the need for monitoring library efficiency and for developing more efficient sample preparation methods.

  13. Citizenship Education in Texas: Gaps between Theory and Practice in the State Curriculum Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunc, Abbie; King, Kelley

    2013-01-01

    One of the most controversial notions of the twenty and twenty-first centuries is defining citizenship among nations. The power to decide who is and is not a citizen has become so prominent in the culture of the United States that the topic now pervades the curriculum, particularly in states with diverse and rapidly growing populations, such as…

  14. The Impact of Curriculum Looping on Standardized Literacy and Mathematics Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessler, Ralph D.

    2010-01-01

    There is a lack of research on the practice of curriculum looping and student achievement. The purpose of this study was to examine academic achievement between students in looping classes and those in nonlooping classes. The theoretical model of this study was based on the social cognitive theory of Bandura and Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory.…

  15. Preparing for the American Board of Surgery Flexible Endoscopy Curriculum: Development of multi-institutional proficiency-based training standards and pilot testing of a simulation-based mastery learning curriculum for the Endoscopy Training System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Brenton R; Placek, Sarah B; Gardner, Aimee K; Korndorffer, James R; Wagner, Mercy D; Pearl, Jonathan P; Ritter, E Matthew

    2017-09-20

    The Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery (FES) exam is required for American Board of Surgery certification. The purpose of this study was to develop performance standards for a simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) curriculum for the FES performance exam using the Endoscopy Training System (ETS). Experienced endoscopists from multiple institutions and specialties performed each ETS task (scope manipulation (SM), tool targeting (TT), retroflexion (RF), loop management (LM), and mucosal inspection (MI)) with scores used to develop performance standards for a SBML training curriculum. Trainees completed the curriculum to determine feasibility, and effect on FES performance. Task specific training standards were determined (SM-121sec, TT-243sec, RF-159sec, LM-261sec, MI-180-480sec, 7 polyps). Trainees required 29.5 ± 3.7 training trials over 2.75 ± 0.5 training sessions to complete the SBML curriculum. Despite high baseline FES performance, scores improved (pre 73.4 ± 7, post 78.1 ± 5.2; effect size = 0.76, p > 0.1), but this was not statistically discernable. This SBML curriculum was feasible and improved FES scores in a group of high performers. This curriculum should be applied to novice endoscopists to determine effectiveness for FES exam preparation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. The First Molecular Identification of an Olive Collection Applying Standard Simple Sequence Repeats and Novel Expressed Sequence Tag Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Mousavi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Germplasm collections of tree crop species represent fundamental tools for conservation of diversity and key steps for its characterization and evaluation. For the olive tree, several collections were created all over the world, but only few of them have been fully characterized and molecularly identified. The olive collection of Perugia University (UNIPG, established in the years’ 60, represents one of the first attempts to gather and safeguard olive diversity, keeping together cultivars from different countries. In the present study, a set of 370 olive trees previously uncharacterized was screened with 10 standard simple sequence repeats (SSRs and nine new EST-SSR markers, to correctly and thoroughly identify all genotypes, verify their representativeness of the entire cultivated olive variation, and validate the effectiveness of new markers in comparison to standard genotyping tools. The SSR analysis revealed the presence of 59 genotypes, corresponding to 72 well known cultivars, 13 of them resulting exclusively present in this collection. The new EST-SSRs have shown values of diversity parameters quite similar to those of best standard SSRs. When compared to hundreds of Mediterranean cultivars, the UNIPG olive accessions were splitted into the three main populations (East, Center and West Mediterranean, confirming that the collection has a good representativeness of the entire olive variability. Furthermore, Bayesian analysis, performed on the 59 genotypes of the collection by the use of both sets of markers, have demonstrated their splitting into four clusters, with a well balanced membership obtained by EST respect to standard SSRs. The new OLEST (Olea expressed sequence tags SSR markers resulted as effective as the best standard markers. The information obtained from this study represents a high valuable tool for ex situ conservation and management of olive genetic resources, useful to build a common database from worldwide olive

  17. Research on cultivating martial art teachers of primary and secondary schools under the background of new national curriculum standard

    OpenAIRE

    HAN Xue

    2013-01-01

    Martial art instructors play an important role in martial art education,and the quality of martial art instructors determines the level of quality of martial art education. Therefore,under the background of new national curriculum standard,who is to teach martial art,or in other words,martial art teacher issues concern the development of martial art in primary and secondary schools.In this paper,by use of literature,interviews and other research methods,the history of martial art education in...

  18. Setting Up New Standards: A Preview of Indonesia's New Competence-Based Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena I.R. Agustien

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at describing some theoretical foundations as well as practical considerations underlying the new competence-based curriculum. First, a pedagogically motivated model of communicative competence (CC suggested by Celce-Murcia et al. (1995 is discussed. Second, a systemic functional view regarding the relations between text, context of situation and context of culture (Halliday 1985 relevant to the production of various genres is also a central issue. Third, literacy levels - performative, functional, informational, epistemic (Wells 1991 - have also been taken into considerations. Fourth, the curriculum regards meanings as its top priority and, metafunctions (Halliday 1978 are of primary importance. Finally, similarities and differences of spoken and written language (Halliday 1986 that tend to be overlooked in the previous/existing curricula are now illuminated.

  19. Restructuring an undergraduate dental curriculum to global standards--a case study in an Indian dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadagad, P; Tekian, A; Pinto, P X; Jirge, V L

    2012-05-01

    Globalisation has affected all aspects of life and dentistry is no exception. In the context of today's dentist being a global citizen, undergraduate training in dentistry is set to ensure converging standards so that international recognition of dental qualifications can move forward. The decision of the Dental Council of India to expand the undergraduate dental program to five years provides an opportunity to be part of the endeavor of the Global Dental Congress to achieve converging standards which was initially for the European Union, and now spreading out globally. Economic emergence in Indian subcontinent has resulted in growing oral health care needs both in quality and quantity. To address this issue, the graduating dentist needs to be trained following a competency based curricular model. Access to Internet facilitated the goal of achieving converging standards of dental schools to be feasible because of the instant communication and capacity to share information about training strategies via technology across the globe. Upgrading the undergraduate training to global standards by dental schools in India could be a wise and strategic move both for attracting students to study in India, as well as retaining the graduates after their training. The following is a case study of an Indian dental school set to restructure the undergraduate curriculum to global standards using the 8 steps of Kotter's transformational change. Change in curriculum and the subsequent accreditation of the school in global platform not only attracts prospective students but also results in producing competent dentists. Dental education provided by the institution can result in quality assurance, benchmarking the assessment system to achieve international recognition. This paper highlights the need and importance of facilitation of international convergence with long term aspirations for mutual recognition of international degrees. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Mid-level healthcare personnel training: an evaluation of the revised, nationally-standardized, pre-service curriculum for clinical officers in Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl Feldacker

    Full Text Available Mozambique suffers from a critical shortage of healthcare workers. Mid-level healthcare workers, (Tecnicos de Medicina Geral (TMG, in Mozambique require less money and time to train than physicians. From 2009-2010, the Mozambique Ministry of Health (MoH and the International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH, University of Washington, Seattle, revised the TMG curriculum. To evaluate the effect of the curriculum revision, we used mixed methods to determine: 1 if TMGs meet the MoH's basic standards of clinical competency; and 2 do scores on measurements of clinical knowledge, physical exam, and clinical case scenarios differ by curriculum?T-tests of differences in means examined differences in continuous score variables between curriculum groups. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models assess curriculum-related and demographic factors associated with assessment scores on each of the three evaluation methods at the p<0.05 level. Qualitative interviews and focus groups inform interpretation.We found no significant differences in sex, marital status and age between the 112 and 189 TMGs in initial and revised curriculum, respectively. Mean scores at graduation of initial curriculum TMGs were 56.7%, 63.5%, and 49.1% on the clinical cases, knowledge test, and physical exam, respectively. Scores did not differ significantly from TMGs in the revised curriculum. Results from linear regression models find that training institute was the most significant predictor of TMG scores on both the clinical cases and physical exam.TMGs trained in either curriculum may be inadequately prepared to provide quality care. Curriculum changes are a necessary, but insufficient, part of improving TMG knowledge and skills overall. A more comprehensive, multi-level approach to improving TMG training that includes post-graduation mentoring, strengthening the pre-service internship training, and greater resources for training institute faculty may

  1. Use of WONCA global standards to evaluate family medicine postgraduate education for curriculum development and review in Nepal and Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Christine; Ladak, Farah; Shrestha, Ashis; Yadav, Bharat; Thu, Kyaw; Aye, Tin

    2016-09-01

    Family medicine is an integral part of primary care within health systems. Globally, training programmes exhibit a great degree of variability in content and skill acquisition. While this may in part reflect the needs of a given setting, there exists standard criteria that all family medicine programmes should consider core activities. WONCA has provided an open-access list of standards that their expert community considers essential for family medicine (GP) post-graduate training. Evaluation of developing or existing training programmes using these standards can provide insight into the degree of variability, gaps within programmes and equally as important, gaps within recommendations. In collaboration with the host institution, two family medicine programmes in Nepal and Myanmar were evaluated based on WONCA global standards. The results of the evaluation demonstrated that such a process can allow for critical review of curriculum in various stages of development and evaluation. The implications of reviewing training programmes according to WONCA standards can lead to enhanced training world-wide and standardisation of training for post-graduate family medicine.

  2. The Power of Questions to Bring Balance to the Curriculum in the Age of New Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Prado, Pixita; McMillen, Susan E.; Friedland, Ellen S.

    2017-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS); the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS); and the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social State Standards are bringing many changes to schools and classrooms across the United States. This article suggests using the power of questions to make connections across seemingly disparate…

  3. Quality standards for DNA sequence variation databases to improve clinical management under development in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bennetts

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the routine nature of comparing sequence variations identified during clinical testing to database records, few databases meet quality requirements for clinical diagnostics. To address this issue, The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA in collaboration with the Human Genetics Society of Australasia (HGSA, and the Human Variome Project (HVP is developing standards for DNA sequence variation databases intended for use in the Australian clinical environment. The outputs of this project will be promoted to other health systems and accreditation bodies by the Human Variome Project to support the development of similar frameworks in other jurisdictions.

  4. Beyond the Standard Curriculum: A Review of Available Opportunities for Medical Students to Prepare for a Career in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Ankit; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review currently available opportunities for medical students to supplement their standard medical education to prepare for a career in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: Google and PubMed were used to identify existing clinical, health policy, and research programs for medical students in radiation oncology. In addition, results publicly available by the National Resident Matching Program were used to explore opportunities that successful radiation oncology applicants pursued during their medical education, including obtaining additional graduate degrees. Results: Medical students can pursue a wide variety of opportunities before entering radiation oncology. Several national specialty societies, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the Radiological Society of North America, offer summer internships for medical students interested in radiation oncology. In 2011, 30% of allopathic senior medical students in the United States who matched into radiation oncology had an additional graduate degree, including PhD, MPH, MBA, and MA degrees. Some medical schools are beginning to further integrate dedicated education in radiation oncology into the standard 4-year medical curriculum. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of available opportunities for medical students interested in radiation oncology. Early exposure to radiation oncology and additional educational training beyond the standard medical curriculum have the potential to create more successful radiation oncology applicants and practicing radiation oncologists while also promoting the growth of the field. We hope this review can serve as guide to radiation oncology applicants and mentors as well as encourage discussion regarding initiatives in radiation oncology opportunities for medical students

  5. Comparison of standard PCR/cloning to single genome sequencing for analysis of HIV-1 populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Michael R; Kearney, Mary; Palmer, Sarah; Shao, Wei; Maldarelli, Frank; Coakley, Eoin P; Chappey, Colombe; Wanke, Christine; Coffin, John M

    2010-09-01

    To compare standard PCR/cloning and single genome sequencing (SGS) in their ability to reflect actual intra-patient polymorphism of HIV-1 populations, a total of 530 HIV-1 pro-pol sequences obtained by both sequencing techniques from a set of 17 ART naïve patient specimens was analyzed. For each specimen, 12 and 15 sequences, on average, were characterized by the two techniques. Using phylogenetic analysis, tests for panmixia and entropy, and Bland-Altman plots, no difference in population structure or genetic diversity was shown in 14 of the 17 subjects. Evidence of sampling bias by the presence of subsets of identical sequences was found by either method. Overall, the study shows that neither method was more biased than the other, and providing that an adequate number of PCR templates is analyzed, and that the bulk sequencing captures the diversity of the viral population, either method is likely to provide a similar measure of population diversity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mid-level healthcare personnel training: an evaluation of the revised, nationally-standardized, pre-service curriculum for clinical officers in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldacker, Caryl; Chicumbe, Sergio; Dgedge, Martinho; Augusto, Gerito; Cesar, Freide; Robertson, Molly; Mbofana, Francisco; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Mozambique suffers from a critical shortage of healthcare workers. Mid-level healthcare workers, (Tecnicos de Medicina Geral (TMG)), in Mozambique require less money and time to train than physicians. From 2009-2010, the Mozambique Ministry of Health (MoH) and the International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH), University of Washington, Seattle, revised the TMG curriculum. To evaluate the effect of the curriculum revision, we used mixed methods to determine: 1) if TMGs meet the MoH's basic standards of clinical competency; and 2) do scores on measurements of clinical knowledge, physical exam, and clinical case scenarios differ by curriculum? T-tests of differences in means examined differences in continuous score variables between curriculum groups. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models assess curriculum-related and demographic factors associated with assessment scores on each of the three evaluation methods at the pcurriculum, respectively. Mean scores at graduation of initial curriculum TMGs were 56.7%, 63.5%, and 49.1% on the clinical cases, knowledge test, and physical exam, respectively. Scores did not differ significantly from TMGs in the revised curriculum. Results from linear regression models find that training institute was the most significant predictor of TMG scores on both the clinical cases and physical exam. TMGs trained in either curriculum may be inadequately prepared to provide quality care. Curriculum changes are a necessary, but insufficient, part of improving TMG knowledge and skills overall. A more comprehensive, multi-level approach to improving TMG training that includes post-graduation mentoring, strengthening the pre-service internship training, and greater resources for training institute faculty may result in improvements in TMG capacity and patient care over time.

  7. Mid-Level Healthcare Personnel Training: An Evaluation of the Revised, Nationally-Standardized, Pre-Service Curriculum for Clinical Officers in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldacker, Caryl; Chicumbe, Sergio; Dgedge, Martinho; Augusto, Gerito; Cesar, Freide; Robertson, Molly; Mbofana, Francisco; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mozambique suffers from a critical shortage of healthcare workers. Mid-level healthcare workers, (Tecnicos de Medicina Geral (TMG)), in Mozambique require less money and time to train than physicians. From 2009–2010, the Mozambique Ministry of Health (MoH) and the International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH), University of Washington, Seattle, revised the TMG curriculum. To evaluate the effect of the curriculum revision, we used mixed methods to determine: 1) if TMGs meet the MoH's basic standards of clinical competency; and 2) do scores on measurements of clinical knowledge, physical exam, and clinical case scenarios differ by curriculum? Methods T-tests of differences in means examined differences in continuous score variables between curriculum groups. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models assess curriculum-related and demographic factors associated with assessment scores on each of the three evaluation methods at the pcurriculum, respectively. Mean scores at graduation of initial curriculum TMGs were 56.7%, 63.5%, and 49.1% on the clinical cases, knowledge test, and physical exam, respectively. Scores did not differ significantly from TMGs in the revised curriculum. Results from linear regression models find that training institute was the most significant predictor of TMG scores on both the clinical cases and physical exam. Conclusion TMGs trained in either curriculum may be inadequately prepared to provide quality care. Curriculum changes are a necessary, but insufficient, part of improving TMG knowledge and skills overall. A more comprehensive, multi-level approach to improving TMG training that includes post-graduation mentoring, strengthening the pre-service internship training, and greater resources for training institute faculty may result in improvements in TMG capacity and patient care over time. PMID:25068590

  8. College of American Pathologists' laboratory standards for next-generation sequencing clinical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Nazneen; Zhao, Qin; Bry, Lynn; Driscoll, Denise K; Funke, Birgit; Gibson, Jane S; Grody, Wayne W; Hegde, Madhuri R; Hoeltge, Gerald A; Leonard, Debra G B; Merker, Jason D; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Palicki, Linda A; Robetorye, Ryan S; Schrijver, Iris; Weck, Karen E; Voelkerding, Karl V

    2015-04-01

    The higher throughput and lower per-base cost of next-generation sequencing (NGS) as compared to Sanger sequencing has led to its rapid adoption in clinical testing. The number of laboratories offering NGS-based tests has also grown considerably in the past few years, despite the fact that specific Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988/College of American Pathologists (CAP) laboratory standards had not yet been developed to regulate this technology. To develop a checklist for clinical testing using NGS technology that sets standards for the analytic wet bench process and for bioinformatics or "dry bench" analyses. As NGS-based clinical tests are new to diagnostic testing and are of much greater complexity than traditional Sanger sequencing-based tests, there is an urgent need to develop new regulatory standards for laboratories offering these tests. To develop the necessary regulatory framework for NGS and to facilitate appropriate adoption of this technology for clinical testing, CAP formed a committee in 2011, the NGS Work Group, to deliberate upon the contents to be included in the checklist. Results . -A total of 18 laboratory accreditation checklist requirements for the analytic wet bench process and bioinformatics analysis processes have been included within CAP's molecular pathology checklist (MOL). This report describes the important issues considered by the CAP committee during the development of the new checklist requirements, which address documentation, validation, quality assurance, confirmatory testing, exception logs, monitoring of upgrades, variant interpretation and reporting, incidental findings, data storage, version traceability, and data transfer confidentiality.

  9. Core Genome Multilocus Sequence Typing: a Standardized Approach for Molecular Typing of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Mostafa; Wang, Leyi; Zhang, Yan; Edwards, Scott; Lu, Amanda; Ley, David; El-Gazzar, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is the most virulent and economically important Mycoplasma species for poultry worldwide. Currently, M. gallisepticum strain differentiation based on sequence analysis of 5 loci remains insufficient for accurate outbreak investigation. Recently, whole-genome sequences (WGS) of many human and animal pathogens have been successfully used for microbial outbreak investigations. However, the massive sequence data and the diverse properties of different genes within bacterial genomes results in a lack of standard reproducible methods for comparisons among M. gallisepticum whole genomes. Here, we proposed the development of a core genome multilocus sequence typing (cgMLST) scheme for M. gallisepticum strains and field isolates. For development of this scheme, a diverse collection of 37 M. gallisepticum genomes was used to identify cgMLST targets. A total of 425 M. gallisepticum conserved genes (49.85% of M. gallisepticum genome) were selected as core genome targets. A total of 81 M. gallisepticum genomes from 5 countries on 4 continents were typed using M. gallisepticum cgMLST. Analyses of phylogenetic trees generated by cgMLST displayed a high degree of agreement with geographical and temporal information. Moreover, the high discriminatory power of cgMLST allowed differentiation between M. gallisepticum strains of the same outbreak. M. gallisepticum cgMLST represents a standardized, accurate, highly discriminatory, and reproducible method for differentiation among M. gallisepticum isolates. cgMLST provides stable and expandable nomenclature, allowing for comparison and sharing of typing results among laboratories worldwide. cgMLST offers an opportunity to harness the tremendous power of next-generation sequencing technology in applied avian mycoplasma epidemiology at both local and global levels. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. CURRICULUM DESIGN FOR TRAINING SPECIALISTS IN THE SPHERE OF UPBRINGING IN THE CONTEXT OF PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina N Emelyanova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the new guidelines and priorities for modelling specialists’ training in the field of upbringing in the context of the new professional standard.Research method - content analysis for the professional standard “Specialist in the field of upbringing”. The content analysis was carried out according to the types of activities that are identified in the federal state educational standards of the pedagogical direction: pedagogical, project, cultural and educational, research, methodical, and managerial activity. The study revealed a priority of pedagogical, methodological, and managerial contents for training specialists in the field of upbringing. Socio-cultural content lags behind, scientific research content is reduced to zero.Polemical issues: “What does the emergence of new spheres of activities ‘expert in the field of social upbringing’ give us? To what degree professional and educational standards should be identical?” are considered. The need for professional training model to focus not only on the priority content outlined in the professional standards is proved. It is necessary to set cultural and developmental tasks.The model for socio-pedagogical training of a specialist in the field of social upbringing is offered on the example of the master’s level “Methodology and methods of social upbringing” educational program implemented at the Tyumen State University. A general conclusion is drawn on the need to establish a new educational policy in the field of social pedagogical training.

  11. The Effects of Discourses in Regional Contexts on the Development of Curriculum-Based Literacy Standards for Adolescents in Schooling: A Comparative Study of South Australia and Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Lisl

    2017-01-01

    This study analyses how discourses in regional contexts affect the development of curriculum-based literacy standards for adolescents in schooling. A comparative case-study research design enabled the influences of discourses at the regional level to be analysed. The case studies include the development of curricula to define a minimum literacy…

  12. The Impact of International Financial Reporting Standards on Accounting Curriculum in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallapragada, RamMohan R.; Toma, Alfred G.; Roe, C. William

    2011-01-01

    According to the time line presently specified by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), business firms in the United States (US) should switch from the existing US accounting reporting guidelines of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) by the year 2014. The US business…

  13. The Effect of International Financial Reporting Standards Convergence on U. S. Accounting Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Homer L.; Waldrup, Bobby E.; Shea, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Major changes are coming to U.S. financial accounting and accounting education as U. S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and international financial reporting standards (IFRS) converge within the next few years. In 2008, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) published a proposed "road map" for the potential…

  14. Criticality in Physical Education Teacher Education: Do Graduating Standards Constrain and or Inhibit Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpan, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade and a half, physical education curricula in New Zealand and Australia have had a strong socio-cultural-critical orientation, providing in depth opportunities for critical inquiry. This article suggests that trying to achieve a criticality maybe impeded and or constrained by present graduating teacher standards. In the…

  15. Standardization of DNA extraction from sand flies: Application to genotyping by next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaril, Aline Etelvina; de Oliveira, Liliane Prado; Alonso, Diego Peres; de Oliveira, Everton Falcão; Gomes Barrios, Suellem Petilim; de Oliveira Moura Infran, Jucelei; Fernandes, Wagner de Souza; Oshiro, Elisa Teruya; Ferreira, Alda Maria Teixeira; Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; de Oliveira, Alessandra Gutierrez

    2017-06-01

    Standardization of the methods for extraction of DNA from sand flies is essential for obtaining high efficiency during subsequent molecular analyses, such as the new sequencing methods. Information obtained using these methods may contribute substantially to taxonomic, evolutionary, and eco-epidemiological studies. The aim of the present study was to standardize and compare two methods for the extraction of genomic DNA from sand flies for obtaining DNA in sufficient quantities for next-generation sequencing. Sand flies were collected from the municipalities of Campo Grande, Camapuã, Corumbá and Miranda, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Three protocols using a silica column-based commercial kit (ReliaPrep™ Blood gDNA Miniprep System kit, Promega ® ), and three protocols based on the classical phenol-chloroform extraction method (Uliana et al., 1991), were compared with respect to the yield and quality of the extracted DNA. DNA was quantified using a Qubit 2.0 fluorometer. The presence of sand fly DNA was confirmed by PCR amplification of the IVS6 region (constitutive gene), followed by electrophoresis on a 1.5% agarose gel. A total of 144 male specimens were analyzed, 72 per method. Significant differences were observed between the two methods tested. Protocols 2 and 3 of phenol-chloroform extraction presented significantly better performance than all commercial kit extraction protocols tested. For phenol-chloroform extraction, protocol 3 presented significantly better performance than protocols 1 and 2. The IVS6 region was detected in 70 of 72 (97.22%) samples extracted with phenol, including all samples for protocols 2 and 3. This is the first study on the standardization of methods for the extraction of DNA from sand flies for application to next-generation sequencing, which is a promising tool for entomological and molecular studies of sand flies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Global seismic inversion as the next standard step in the processing sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maver, Kim G.; Hansen, Lars S.; Jepsen, Anne-Marie; Rasmussen, Klaus B.

    1998-12-31

    Seismic inversion of post stack seismic data has until recently been regarded as a reservoir oriented method since the standard inversion techniques rely on extensive well control and a detailed user derived input model. Most seismic inversion techniques further requires a stable wavelet. As a consequence seismic inversion is mainly utilised in mature areas focusing of specific zones only after the seismic data has been interpreted and is well understood. By using an advanced 3-D global technique, seismic inversion is presented as the next standard step in the processing sequence. The technique is robust towards noise within the seismic data, utilizes a time variant wavelet, and derives a low frequency model utilizing the stacking velocities and only limited well control. 4 figs.

  17. A nationwide curriculum analysis of integrated plastic surgery training: is training standardized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lisa F; Barr, Jason; Saadeh, Pierre B

    2013-12-01

    The integrated model of plastic surgery education, shortly to become the standard for all 6-year programs, has set minimal but no maximal exposure to plastic surgery. The authors hypothesized that the first 3 years of integrated training will show variability among residency programs. Rotation schedules for all 42 integrated programs were analyzed for plastic surgery versus 18 nonplastic surgery rotations for postgraduate years 1, 2, and 3 as well as cumulatively for the first 3 years. Rotations "strongly suggested" by the Residency Review Committee on Plastic Surgery and American Board of Plastic Surgery were also examined. Postgraduate years 1 through 3 spent a wide range of 3 to 19 months (SD ± 4.9 months) on plastic surgery (mean, 9.1 months). General surgery also varied dramatically, with 8 to 21 months (SD ± 4.0 months) of exposure (mean, 16.3 months). Surgical subspecialty rotations ranged substantially from 1 to 6 months (SD ± 1.0 months). Plastic surgery exposure was greater in programs based within plastic surgery departments than within divisions (13.8 versus 8.3 months, p plastic surgery experience in the first 3 years of residency training varies by a greater than 6-fold difference among integrated programs. This was also found in the 2.5-fold and 6-fold differences in general surgery and subspecialty surgery experiences. Since standardized residency training is an expectation by both accrediting bodies and the public, this variability may warrant closer attention.

  18. A Pilot Curriculum to Integrate Standardized Patient Simulation into Clinical Pastoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rami A; Damore, Deborah R; Viti, Joseph F; Hughes, Patrick G; Miesle, Rebecca; Ataya, Ramsey; Atkinson, S Scott; Gable, Brad

    2016-06-01

    We describe a novel means of experiential learning for clinical pastoral care residents using standardized patient (SP) simulations. A prospective cohort study involving 7 clinical pastoral care residents was performed. All residents underwent 2 verbatim SP sessions and 2 simulation sessions. After all sessions, residents completed a self-evaluation. Faculty completed an evaluation and then provided a debriefing session to all residents. Performance ratings were globally higher on simulated scenarios when compared to the verbatim sessions. More research in the field of pastoral care is needed to validate the learned professional skills that enhance a comprehensive training program through the use of medical simulation, verbatim reports, and clinical pastoral education (CPE) competencies. Medical simulation provides a promising teaching methodology for the training of CPE residents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Students' perception of an integrated approach of teaching entire sequence of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and pharmacotherapeutics courses in PharmD curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed A; Schweiger, Teresa A

    2015-04-01

    To develop an integrated approach of teaching medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and pharmacotherapeutics and to evaluate students' perceptions of integration as they progress through the PharmD curriculum. Instructors from each discipline jointly mapped the course contents and sequenced the course delivery based on organ systems/disease states. Medicinal chemistry and pharmacology contents were integrated and aligned with respective pharmacotherapeutics contents to deliver throughout second and third year of the curriculum. In addition to classroom lectures, active learning strategies such as recitation, case studies, online-discussion boards, open book quizzes, and writing patient progress notes were incorporated to enhance student learning. Student learning was assessed by examination scores, patient progress notes, and writing assignments. The impact of course integration was evaluated by a Web-based survey. One hundred and sixty-nine students completed the survey. Students exhibited positive attitude toward the integrated approach of teaching medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, and therapeutics. The P3 and P4 students better appreciated the benefits of integration compared to P2 students (P < .05). Students perceived the course integration as an effective way of learning. This study supports course improvement and the viability of expanding the concept of integration to other courses in the curriculum. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti Pagels

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents’ health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents N=25 participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents’ ability to measure their patients’ health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge p=0.001 and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8% and a translator more effectively (77.8% three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  1. Research on cultivating martial art teachers of primary and secondary schools under the background of new national curriculum standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Xue

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Martial art instructors play an important role in martial art education,and the quality of martial art instructors determines the level of quality of martial art education. Therefore,under the background of new national curriculum standard,who is to teach martial art,or in other words,martial art teacher issues concern the development of martial art in primary and secondary schools.In this paper,by use of literature,interviews and other research methods,the history of martial art education in our country is reviewed at first,leading to a conclusion that there exist problems in primary and middle school martial art education in our country,i.e.professional martial art instructors in primary and middle schools are seriously deficient,martial art instructors are lacking in professional martial art knowledge and professional competence,the continuing education system is not perfect,and training and education are formalized.The author therefore puts forward countermeasures to improve the current situation.

  2. Characterization of NIST human mitochondrial DNA SRM-2392 and SRM-2392-I standard reference materials by next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riman, Sarah; Kiesler, Kevin M; Borsuk, Lisa A; Vallone, Peter M

    2017-07-01

    Standard Reference Materials SRM 2392 and 2392-I are intended to provide quality control when amplifying and sequencing human mitochondrial genome sequences. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) offers these SRMs to laboratories performing DNA-based forensic human identification, molecular diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases, mutation detection, evolutionary anthropology, and genetic genealogy. The entire mtGenome (∼16569bp) of SRM 2392 and 2392-I have previously been characterized at NIST by Sanger sequencing. Herein, we used the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy offered by next generation sequencing (NGS) to: (1) re-sequence the certified values of the SRM 2392 and 2392-I; (2) confirm Sanger data with a high coverage new sequencing technology; (3) detect lower level heteroplasmies (sequencing communities in the adoption of NGS methods. To obtain a consensus sequence for the SRMs as well as identify and control any bias, sequencing was performed using two NGS platforms and data was analyzed using different bioinformatics pipelines. Our results confirm five low level heteroplasmy sites that were not previously observed with Sanger sequencing: three sites in the GM09947A template in SRM 2392 and two sites in the HL-60 template in SRM 2392-I. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Developement of The Standard-Based Curriculum With Backward Design Process Mathematics Teaching Competency Enhencement Course For 3rd year Teacher Students in Savannakhet Teacher Training College, The Lao People’s Democratic Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonleuth Jundeenooparb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were: 1 to develop a standard-based curriculum with a backward design process in the course for enhancing competency in management of mathematics instruction for the 3rd year undergraduate student teachers, Savannakhet Teachers College, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, 2 to investigate the results of implementing the standard-based curriculum with a backward design in the course for enhancing competency in management of mathematics instruction on the following issues: 2.1 mathematical knowledge and ability, 2.2 knowledge and understanding of mathematical learning management, 2.3 mathematics teachers’ trait, and 3 to examine student teachers’ satisfaction of the standard-based curriculum using a backward design process in the course for enhancing competency in management of mathematics instruction. The study process was divided into 3 steps: 1 investigate basic information for the development of standardbased curriculum with a backward design process, 2 create a standard-based curriculum with a backward design process in the course for enhancing competency in management of mathematics instruction and assess its appropriateness by experts, and 3 experiment in using the curriculum and examine the results of using it. A sample was 37 third year undergraduate student teachers of mathematics in Savannakhet Teachers College, who were enrolled in the first semester of academic year 2014 and selected by cluster random sampling. The instruments used in data collection were: a test of mathematical knowledge and ability, a test of knowledge and understanding on mathematical instruction, a form for measuring mathematics teachers’ trait, and a questionnaire of satisfaction with the curriculum. Statistics used in data analysis were percentage, mean, standard deviation, and t-test for dependent samples. Findings of the study revealed as follows: 1. The curriculum developed consisted of the following components: 1 rationale

  4. The New Zealand Experiment: Assessment-Driven Curriculum--Managing Standards, Competition and Performance to Strengthen Governmentality

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Following the Tomorrow's Schools administrative restructuring, a second wave of educational change installed globalised discourses as governmentality policies in Aotearoa New Zealand. Drawing on Foucault's "toolkit", this genealogical policy chronology traces the transformation of curriculum and assessment into a specific political…

  5. Teaching under the New Taylorism: High-Stakes Testing and the Standardization of the 21st Century Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The application of the principles of scientific management within the structure, organization, and curriculum of public schools in the US became dominant during the early 1900s. Based upon research evidence from the modern day era of high-stakes testing in US public education, the fundamental logics guiding scientific management have resurfaced…

  6. Engaging a middle school teacher and students in formal-informal science education: Contexts of science standards-based curriculum and an urban science center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Shamarion Gladys

    This is a three-article five chapter doctoral dissertation. The overall purpose of this three-pronged study is to engage a middle school science teacher and students in formal-informal science education within the context of a science standards-based curriculum and Urban Science Center. The goals of the study were: (1) to characterize the conversations of formal and informal science educators as they attempted to implement a standards-based curriculum augmented with science center exhibits; (2) to study the classroom discourse between the teacher and students that foster the development of common knowledge in science and student understanding of the concept of energy before observing science center exhibits on energy; (3) to investigate whether or not a standards-driven, project-based Investigating and Questioning our World through Science and Technology (IQWST) curriculum unit on forms and transformation of energy augmented with science center exhibits had a significant effect on urban African-American seventh grade students' achievement and learning. Overall, the study consisted of a mixed-method approach. Article one consists of a case study featuring semi-structured interviews and field notes. Article two consists of documenting and interpreting teacher-students' classroom discourse. Article three consists of qualitative methods (classroom discussion, focus group interviews, student video creation) and quantitative methods (multiple choice and open-ended questions). Oral discourses in all three studies were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. In article one, the community of educators' conversations were critically analyzed to discern the challenges educators encountered when they attempted to connect school curriculum to energy exhibits at the Urban Science Center. The five challenges that characterize the emergence of a third space were as follows: (a) science terminology for lesson focus, (b) "dumb-down" of science exhibits, (c) exploration distracts

  7. Synthetic spike-in standards for high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourlousse, Dieter M; Yoshiike, Satowa; Ohashi, Akiko; Matsukura, Satoko; Noda, Naohiro; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2017-02-28

    High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons (16S-seq) has become a widely deployed method for profiling complex microbial communities but technical pitfalls related to data reliability and quantification remain to be fully addressed. In this work, we have developed and implemented a set of synthetic 16S rRNA genes to serve as universal spike-in standards for 16S-seq experiments. The spike-ins represent full-length 16S rRNA genes containing artificial variable regions with negligible identity to known nucleotide sequences, permitting unambiguous identification of spike-in sequences in 16S-seq read data from any microbiome sample. Using defined mock communities and environmental microbiota, we characterized the performance of the spike-in standards and demonstrated their utility for evaluating data quality on a per-sample basis. Further, we showed that staggered spike-in mixtures added at the point of DNA extraction enable concurrent estimation of absolute microbial abundances suitable for comparative analysis. Results also underscored that template-specific Illumina sequencing artifacts may lead to biases in the perceived abundance of certain taxa. Taken together, the spike-in standards represent a novel bioanalytical tool that can substantially improve 16S-seq-based microbiome studies by enabling comprehensive quality control along with absolute quantification. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Impact of the Use of a Standardized Guidance Tool on the Development of a Teaching Philosophy in a Pharmacy Residency Teaching and Learning Curriculum Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesner, Amber R; Jones, Ryan; Schultz, Karen; Johnson, Mark

    2016-01-26

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized reflection tool on the development of a teaching philosophy statement in a pharmacy residency teaching and learning curriculum program (RTLCP). Pharmacy residents participating in the RTLCP over a two-year period were surveyed using a pre/post method to assess perceptions of teaching philosophy development before and after using the tool. Responses were assessed using a 5-point Likert scale to indicate level of agreement with each statement. For analysis, responses were divided into high (strongly agree/agree) and low (neutral/disagree/strongly disagree) agreement. The level of agreement increased significantly for all items surveyed ( p tool ( p = 0.5027). Overall results were positive, with 81% of participants responding that the reflection tool was helpful in developing a teaching philosophy, and 96% responding that the resulting teaching philosophy statement fully reflected their views on teaching and learning. The standardized reflection tool developed at Shenandoah University assisted pharmacy residents enrolled in a teaching and learning curriculum program to draft a comprehensive teaching philosophy statement, and was well received by participants.

  9. Validation of a standardized mapping system of the hip joint for radial MRA sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klenke, Frank M.; Hoffmann, Daniel B.; Cross, Brian J.; Siebenrock, Klaus A. [Bern University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-10-14

    Intraarticular gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) is commonly applied to characterize morphological disorders of the hip. However, the reproducibility of retrieving anatomic landmarks on MRA scans and their correlation with intraarticular pathologies is unknown. A precise mapping system for the exact localization of hip pathomorphologies with radial MRA sequences is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of the study was the establishment and validation of a reproducible mapping system for radial sequences of hip MRA. Sixty-nine consecutive intraarticular gadolinium-enhanced hip MRAs were evaluated. Radial sequencing consisted of 14 cuts orientated along the axis of the femoral neck. Three orthopedic surgeons read the radial sequences independently. Each MRI was read twice with a minimum interval of 7 days from the first reading. The intra- and inter-observer reliability of the mapping procedure was determined. A clockwise system for hip MRA was established. The teardrop figure served to determine the 6 o'clock position of the acetabulum; the center of the greater trochanter served to determine the 12 o'clock position of the femoral head-neck junction. The intra- and inter-observer ICCs to retrieve the correct 6/12 o'clock positions were 0.906-0.996 and 0.978-0.988, respectively. The established mapping system for radial sequences of hip joint MRA is reproducible and easy to perform. (orig.)

  10. Enduring Understandings, Artistic Processes, and the New Visual Arts Standards: A Close-up Consideration for Curriculum Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Marilyn G.

    2014-01-01

    National Coalition for Core Arts Standards (NCCAS) Writing Team member Marilyn G. Stewart discusses what to expect from the new "next generation" Visual Arts Standards, detailing the 4 Artistic Processes and 15 Enduring Understandings. This invited essay addresses the instructional aspects of the standards, and looks at how they can help…

  11. 49 CFR 571.102 - Standard No. 102; Transmission shift position sequence, starter interlock, and transmission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARDS Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards § 571... position. S3.1.2Transmission braking effect. In vehicles having more than one forward transmission gear... when the transmission shift position is in any forward drive gear; (b) The engine may not automatically...

  12. Validation of next generation sequencing technologies in comparison to current diagnostic gold standards for BRAF, EGFR and KRAS mutational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Clare M; McArt, Darragh G; Mills, Ken; Catherwood, Mark A; Maxwell, Perry; Waugh, David J; Hamilton, Peter; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Salto-Tellez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has the potential of becoming an important tool in clinical diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making in oncology owing to its enhanced sensitivity in DNA mutation detection, fast-turnaround of samples in comparison to current gold standard methods and the potential to sequence a large number of cancer-driving genes at the one time. We aim to test the diagnostic accuracy of current NGS technology in the analysis of mutations that represent current standard-of-care, and its reliability to generate concomitant information on other key genes in human oncogenesis. Thirteen clinical samples (8 lung adenocarcinomas, 3 colon carcinomas and 2 malignant melanomas) already genotyped for EGFR, KRAS and BRAF mutations by current standard-of-care methods (Sanger Sequencing and q-PCR), were analysed for detection of mutations in the same three genes using two NGS platforms and an additional 43 genes with one of these platforms. The results were analysed using closed platform-specific proprietary bioinformatics software as well as open third party applications. Our results indicate that the existing format of the NGS technology performed well in detecting the clinically relevant mutations stated above but may not be reliable for a broader unsupervised analysis of the wider genome in its current design. Our study represents a diagnostically lead validation of the major strengths and weaknesses of this technology before consideration for diagnostic use.

  13. Some data of second sequence non standard austenitic ingot, A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurdin Effendi; Aziz K Jahja; Bandriana; Wisnu Ari Adi

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of second sequence austenite stainless steel named A2 using extracted minerals from Indonesian mines has been carried out. The starting materials for austenite alloy consist of granular ferro scrap, nickel, ferro-chrome, ferro-manganese, and ferro-silicon. The second sequence composition differs from the former first sequence. This A2 sequence contained more nickel, meanwhile titanium element had not been added explicitly to it, and just been found from raw materials contents or impurities, as well as carbon content in the alloy. However before the actual alloying work started, the first important step was to carry out the determination of the fractional amount of each starting material necessary to form an austenite stainless steel alloy as specified. Once the component fraction of each base alloy-element was determined, the raw materials are weighed on the mini-balance. After the fractional quantities of each constituent have been computed, an appropriate amount of these base materials are weighed separately on the micro scale. The raw materials were then placed in the induction foundry furnace, which was operated by an electromagnetic inductive-thermal system. The foundry furnace system performs the stirring of the molten materials automatically. The homogenized molten metals were poured down into sand casting prepared in advance. Some of the austenite stainless steel were normalized at 600°C for 6 hours. The average density is 7.8 g cm -1 and the average hardness value of 'normalized' austenite stainless-steels is in the range of 460 on the Vickers scale. The microstructure observation concludes that an extensive portion of the sample's structure is dendritic and the surface turns out to be homogenous. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the material belongs to the fcc crystallographic system, which fits in with the austenite class of the alloy. The experimental fractional elemental composition data acquired by OES method turn out to

  14. Curriculum Guidelines on Forensic Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curriculum design explain the scope of forensic dentistry and interrelationships with other fields, give an overview of the curriculum, and outline suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty and facility…

  15. The Effects of Different Standard Setting Methods and the Composition of Borderline Groups: A Study within a Law Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dochy, Filip; Kyndt, Eva; Baeten, Marlies; Pottier, Sofie; Veestraeten, Marlies; Leuven, K. U.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of different standard setting methods on the size and composition of the borderline group, on the discrimination between different types of students and on the types of students passing with one method but failing with another. A total of 107 university students were classified into 4 different types…

  16. An Analysis of Curriculum Decision-Making in Moral Curriculum Development in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Lung

    In Taiwan, the moral curriculum has been part of the elementary school curriculum for decades. The 1993 edition of the Taiwan curriculum standard has a new subject titled "Morality and Health" that integrates previous "Life and Ethics" and "Healthy Education" subjects. This study explored the curriculum-development…

  17. The tsunami probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Example of accident sequence analysis of tsunami PRA according to the standard for procedure of tsunami PRA for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Norihiro; Hasegawa, Keiko; Kuroiwa, Katsuya

    2013-01-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) accident, standard for procedure of tsunami PRA for NPP had been established by the Standardization Committee of AESJ. Industry group had been conducting analysis of Tsunami PRA for PWR based on the standard under the cooperation with electric utilities. This article introduced overview of the standard and examples of accident sequence analysis of Tsunami PRA studied by the industry group according to the standard. The standard consisted of (1) investigation of NPP's composition, characteristics and site information, (2) selection of relevant components for Tsunami PRA and initiating events and identification of accident sequence, (3) evaluation of Tsunami hazards, (4) fragility evaluation of building and components and (5) evaluation of accident sequence. Based on the evaluation, countermeasures for further improvement of safety against Tsunami could be identified by the sensitivity analysis. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Can baroreflex measurements with spontaneous sequence analysis be improved by also measuring breathing and by standardization of filtering strategies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollow, M R; Parkes, M J; Clutton-Brock, T H

    2011-01-01

    Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is known to be attenuated by inspiration and all the original BRS methodologies took this into account by measuring only in expiration. Spontaneous sequence analysis (SSA) is a non-invasive clinical tool widely used to estimate BRS in Man but does not take breathing into account. We have therefore modified it to test whether it too can detect inspiratory attenuation. Traditional SSA is also entangled with issues of distinguishing causal from random relationships between blood pressure and heart period and of the optimum choice of data filter settings. We have also tested whether the sequences our modified SSA rejects do behave as random relationships and show the limitations of the absence of filter standardization. SSA was performed on eupneic data from 1 h periods in 20 healthy subjects. Applying SSA traditionally produced a mean BRS of 23 ± 3 ms mmHg −1 . After modification to measure breathing, SSA detected significant inspiratory attenuation (11 ± 1 ms mmHg −1 ), and the mean expiratory BRS was significantly higher (26 ± 5 ms mmHg −1 ). Traditional SSA therefore underestimates BRS by an amount (3 ms mmHg −1 ) as big as the major physiological and clinical factors known to alter BRS. We show that the sequences rejected by SSA do behave like random associations between pressure and period. We also show the minimal effect of the r 2 filter and the biases that some pressure and heart period filters can introduce. We discuss whether SSA might be improved by standardization of filter settings and by also measuring breathing

  19. Developing a yearlong Next Generation Science Standard (NGSS) learning sequence focused on climate solutions: opportunities, challenges and reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, E.; Centeno, D.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last four years, the Green Ninja Project (GNP) has been developing educational media (e.g., videos, games and online lessons) to help motivate student interest and engagement around climate science and solutions. Inspired by the new emphasis in NGSS on climate change, human impact and engineering design, the GNP is developing a technology focused, integrative, and yearlong science curriculum focused around solutions to climate change. Recognizing the importance of teacher training on the successful implementation of NGSS, we have also integrated teacher professional development into our curriculum. During the presentation, we will describe the design philosophy around our middle school curriculum and share data from a series of classes that are piloting the curriculum during Fall 2015. We will also share our perspectives on how data, media creation and engineering can be used to create educational experiences that model the type of 'three-dimensional learning' encouraged by NGSS.

  20. Who Is Learning About Climate Change in American Schools? An Analysis of Climate Change in Curriculum Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, B. W.; Francis, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    This work attempts to answer the question "how much, if any, climate change, exists in middle and high school curricula in the United States?" A necessary first step towards this answer involves an examination of Global Climate Change (GCC) coverage in the requisite standards documents. Until recently, each state had its own science framework, with four states (at the time of writing) having already adopted the new Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) (Achieve, Inc, 2013). This work reports on an analysis of the extent to which GCC exists within the content frameworks of each state, including the NGSS. The analysis began with a word search for such content as "climate change", "greenhouse effect", and "global warming". We then searched through the remainder of the documents in question to understand the nuance of each framework. Each framework was then scored on a scale form zero (no mention of climate change) to four (climate change is explicit, an anthropogenic potential cause is emphasized, and GCC appears within at least one standard of its own). Eighteen states scored a zero, while only five states scored a four. This is particularly troubling, in light of recent statements of scientific consensus (AAAS, 2006; 2009; AGU, 2013; IPCC, 2007). While the NGSS scored well, it is unclear what this means in terms of actual students encountering the subject of climate change in actual classroom. Attention is given to some still-problematic aspects of GCC content are addressed, including its focus largely within courses not required for graduation, as well as the murky details of the yet-to-be determined processes by which individual states will choose to test, or not to test, the subject matter. The authors conclude that as of 2013, there is little evidence that students in most states are required to take courses which include significant aspects of GCC in their curricula.

  1. Curriculum guidelines, standards and skills in spanish language. from untamed industrial objectivity to student’s harmless subjectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Yessid Arias Bedoya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Competency Based Education is a curricular approach that, in addition to the controversy it arises, establishes practices and specific thoughts in schools: its origin from behavioral theories and their connection to the economic field disclose formation objectives that highlight the need of thinking about teaching practices and institutional curricula. These goals linked to projects such as work-oriented education and the propaedeutic cycles reveal the implicit intentions in the education system, where students’ specific characteristics yield to national economic imperatives. This reflection paper seeks to explore and define the ‘conceptual gap’ between an education based on the ideals of trade logic, and one directed to the aesthetic and socio-political formation of the subject, on the basis of legal documents as the Curricular Guidelines, Skill Standards for Spanish Language, Law 39 of 1903, General Law of Education and texts by various educational theorists such as Paulo Freire and Gimeno Sacristan.

  2. Precision Machining Technology. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide was developed from a Technical Committee Report prepared with the assistance of industry personnel and containing a Task List which is the basis of the guide. It presents competency-based program standards for courses in precision machining technology and is part of the Idaho Vocational Curriculum Guide Project, a cooperative…

  3. When Integrated in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    A rich and stimulating opportunity awaits teachers who plan to connect or bring together an art project with another subject area of the curriculum, thus addressing the sixth listing in the National Visual Arts Standards. While art is important in its own right, the reality is there is often too much content in the curriculum nowadays and not…

  4. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST). Common Ground: Toward a Standards-Based Training System for the U.S. Machine Tool and Metal Related Industries. Volume 11: Computer-Aided Manufacturing & Advanced CNC, of a 15-Volume Set of Skill Standards and Curriculum Training Materials for the Precision Manufacturing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    This document is intended to help education and training institutions deliver the Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST) curriculum to a variety of individuals and organizations. MAST consists of industry-specific skill standards and model curricula for 15 occupational specialty areas within the U.S. machine tool and metals-related…

  5. Comparison of Boolean analysis and standard phylogenetic methods using artificially evolved and natural mt-tRNA sequences from great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Eszter; Ittzés, Péter; Podani, János; Thi, Quynh Chi Le; Jakó, Eena

    2012-04-01

    Boolean analysis (or BOOL-AN; Jakó et al., 2009. BOOL-AN: A method for comparative sequence analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 52, 887-97.), a recently developed method for sequence comparison uses the Iterative Canonical Form of Boolean functions. It considers sequence information in a way entirely different from standard phylogenetic methods (i.e. Maximum Parsimony, Maximum-Likelihood, Neighbor-Joining, and Bayesian analysis). The performance and reliability of Boolean analysis were tested and compared with the standard phylogenetic methods, using artificially evolved - simulated - nucleotide sequences and the 22 mitochondrial tRNA genes of the great apes. At the outset, we assumed that the phylogeny of Hominidae is generally well established, and the guide tree of artificial sequence evolution can also be used as a benchmark. These offer a possibility to compare and test the performance of different phylogenetic methods. Trees were reconstructed by each method from 2500 simulated sequences and 22 mitochondrial tRNA sequences. We also introduced a special re-sampling method for Boolean analysis on permuted sequence sites, the P-BOOL-AN procedure. Considering the reliability values (branch support values of consensus trees and Robinson-Foulds distances) we used for simulated sequence trees produced by different phylogenetic methods, BOOL-AN appeared as the most reliable method. Although the mitochondrial tRNA sequences of great apes are relatively short (59-75 bases long) and the ratio of their constant characters is about 75%, BOOL-AN, P-BOOL-AN and the Bayesian approach produced the same tree-topology as the established phylogeny, while the outcomes of Maximum Parsimony, Maximum-Likelihood and Neighbor-Joining methods were equivocal. We conclude that Boolean analysis is a promising alternative to existing methods of sequence comparison for phylogenetic reconstruction and congruence analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All

  6. International Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  7. European core curriculum in neurorehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandrini, G.; Binder, H.; Homberg, V.; Saltuari, L.; Tarkka, I.; Smania, N.; Corradini, C.; Giustini, A.; Katterer, C.; Picari, L.; Diserens, K.; Koenig, E.; Geurts, A.C.; Anghelescu, A.; Opara, J.; Tonin, P.; Kwakkel, G.; Golyk, V.; Onose, G.; Perennou, D.; Picelli, A.

    2017-01-01

    To date, medical education lacks Europe-wide standards on neurorehabilitation. To address this, the European Federation of NeuroRehabilitation Societies (EFNR) here proposes a postgraduate neurorehabilitation training scheme. In particular, the European medical core curriculum in neurorehabilitation

  8. An international effort towards developing standards for best practices in analysis, interpretation and reporting of clinical genome sequencing results in the CLARITY Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownstein, Catherine A; Beggs, Alan H; Homer, Nils

    2014-01-01

    and reporting. The CLARITY Challenge was designed to spur convergence in methods for diagnosing genetic disease starting from clinical case history and genome sequencing data. DNA samples were obtained from three families with heritable genetic disorders and genomic sequence data were donated by sequencing......Background : There is tremendous potential for genome sequencing to improve clinical diagnosis and care once it becomes routinely accessible, but this will require formalizing research methods into clinical best practices in the areas of sequence data generation, analysis, interpretation......, demonstrating a need for consistent fine-tuning of the generally accepted methods. There was greater diversity of the final clinical report content and in the patient consenting process, demonstrating that these areas require additional exploration and standardization. Conclusions : The CLARITY Challenge...

  9. Development of sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers as a quality standard of inoculants based on Azospirillum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy Priya, Pasupuleti; Selastin Antony, Raju; Gopalaswamy, Ganesan; Balachandar, Dananjeyan

    2016-04-01

    An attempt was made in this work to develop a strain-level molecular marker for unambiguous authentication of two Azospirillum inoculants, viz. A. lipoferum (strain Az204) and A. brasilense (strain Sp7). The sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers obtained from DNA fingerprints were designed for discrete detection of the strains. The SCAR primers could successfully amplify the target strain without cross-reaction with other Azospirillum strains, native isolates and other inoculants. The detection limit of SCAR primer for Az204 was 8.00 pg of DNA (approximately 10(5) cells per mL), and for Sp7, it was 0.49 pg of DNA (equal to 10(4) cells per mL). A simplified Sephadex G100-based crude DNA extraction protocol developed in this study was found suitable for SCAR marker-based strain authentication. Further, SCAR primers were assessed for simultaneous authentication as well as quantification of commercially prepared Azospirillum inoculants by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and most-probable-number PCR (MPN-PCR). The RT-PCR assay can be able to quantify the commercial formulations as equal to culturable MPN method, while MPN-PCR failed for Az204. The SCAR marker-based strain authentication and presumptive quantification developed in the present work can contribute to improving the quality standard of commercial inoculants.

  10. Perceptions of Private College Teachers of Karachi about the Curriculum Prescribed by Sindh Bureau of Curriculum (BOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Talat Jehan

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum at the college level is prescribed at provincial level to ensure a standardized education throughout. A prescribed curriculum aligns educational standards and maintains them to ensure teaching standards. In Pakistan the curriculum for intermediate students at both private and government colleges is designed and proposed by Sindh Bureau…

  11. Recovery Act: Develop a Modular Curriculum for Training University Students in Industry Standard CO{sub 2} Sequestration and Enhanced Oil Recovery Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trentham, R. C.; Stoudt, E. L.

    2013-05-31

    CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery, Sequestration, & Monitoring Measuring & Verification are topics that are not typically covered in Geoscience, Land Management, and Petroleum Engineering curriculum. Students are not typically exposed to the level of training that would prepare them for CO{sub 2} reservoir and aquifer sequestration related projects when they begin assignments in industry. As a result, industry training, schools & conferences are essential training venues for new & experienced personnel working on CO{sub 2} projects for the first time. This project collected and/or generated industry level CO{sub 2} training to create modules which faculties can utilize as presentations, projects, field trips and site visits for undergrad and grad students and prepare them to "hit the ground running" & be contributing participants in CO{sub 2} projects with minimal additional training. In order to create the modules, UTPB/CEED utilized a variety of sources. Data & presentations from industry CO{sub 2} Flooding Schools & Conferences, Carbon Management Workshops, UTPB Classes, and other venues was tailored to provide introductory reservoir & aquifer training, state-of-the-art methodologies, field seminars and road logs, site visits, and case studies for students. After discussions with faculty at UTPB, Sul Ross, Midland College, other universities, and petroleum industry professionals, it was decided to base the module sets on a series of road logs from Midland to, and through, a number of Permian Basin CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, CO{sub 2} Carbon Capture and Storage (CCUS) projects and outcrop equivalents of the formations where CO{sub 2} is being utilized or will be utilized, in EOR projects in the Permian Basin. Although road logs to and through these projects exist, none of them included CO{sub 2} specific information. Over 1400 miles of road logs were created, or revised specifically to highlight CO{sub 2} EOR projects. After testing a number of

  12. Molecular typing of Legionella pneumophila isolates from environmental water samples and clinical samples using a five-gene sequence typing and standard Sequence-Based Typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiao-Yong; Zhu, Qing-Yi

    2018-01-01

    Inadequate discriminatory power to distinguish between L. pneumophila isolates, especially those belonging to disease-related prevalent sequence types (STs) such as ST1, ST36 and ST47, is an issue of SBT scheme. In this study, we developed a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme based on two non-virulence loci (trpA, cca) and three virulence loci (icmK, lspE, lssD), to genotype 110 L. pneumophila isolates from various natural and artificial water sources in Guangdong province of China, and compared with the SBT. The isolates were assigned to 33 STs of the SBT and 91 new sequence types (nSTs) of the MLST. The indices of discrimination (IODs) of SBT and MLST were 0.920 and 0.985, respectively. Maximum likelihood trees of the concatenated SBT and MLST sequences both showed distinct phylogenetic relationships between the isolates from the two environments. More intragenic recombinations were detected in nSTs than in STs, and they were both more abundant in natural water isolates. We found out the MLST had a high discriminatory ability for the disease-associated ST1 isolates: 22 ST1 isolates were assigned to 19 nSTs. Furthermore, we assayed the discrimination of the MLST for 29 reference strains (19 clinical and 10 environmental). The clinical strains were assigned to eight STs and ten nSTs. The MLST could also subtype the prevalent clinical ST36 or ST47 strains: eight ST36 strains were subtyped into three nSTs and two ST47 strains were subtyped into two nSTs. We found different distribution patterns of nSTs between the environmental and clinical ST36 isolates, and between the outbreak clinical ST36 isolates and the sporadic clinical ST36 isolates. These results together revealed the MLST scheme could be used as part of a typing scheme that increased discrimination when necessary.

  13. Asian Americans in American History: An AsianCrit Perspective on Asian American Inclusion in State U.S. History Curriculum Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Sohyun

    2016-01-01

    Compared to other groups of color, Asian Americans and their perspectives have rarely been given attention in curriculum studies. This article seeks to address the gap in the literature. It uses AsianCrit, a branch of critical race theory, as a theoretical lens to analyze and explicate common patterns across various states' scripting of Asian…

  14. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines for development of a pedodontics curriculum describe the interrelationships of this and other dental fields, give an overview of the curriculum and its primary educational objectives, and outline the suggested prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, and faculty requirements. (MSE)

  15. Integrated Curriculum and Subject-based Curriculum: Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Victoria

    The research conducted for this mixed-method study, qualitative and quantitative, analyzed the results of an academic year-long study to determine whether the use of an integrated fourth grade curriculum would benefit student achievement in the areas of English language arts, social studies, and science more than a subject-based traditional curriculum. The research was conducted based on the international, national, and state test scores, which show a slowing or lack of growth. Through pre- and post-assessments, student questionnaires, and administrative interviews, the researcher analyzed the phenomenological experiences of the students to determine if the integrated curriculum was a beneficial restructuring of the curriculum. The research questions for this study focused on the achievement and attitudes of the students in the study and whether the curriculum they were taught impacted their achievement and attitudes over the course of one school year. The curricula for the study were organized to cover the current standards, where the integrated curriculum focused on connections between subject areas to help students make connections to what they are learning and the world beyond the classroom. The findings of this study indicated that utilizing the integrated curriculum could increase achievement as well as students' attitudes toward specific content areas. The ANOVA analysis for English language arts was not determined to be significant; although, greater growth in the students from the integrated curriculum setting was recorded. The ANOVA for social studies (0.05) and the paired t-tests (0.001) for science both determined significant positive differences. The qualitative analysis led to the discovery that the experiences of the students from the integrated curriculum setting were more positive. The evaluation of the data from this study led the researcher to determine that the integrated curriculum was a worthwhile endeavor to increase achievement and attitudes

  16. Curriculum as Environments for Learning: A Practicel Meaning and Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Robert L.; Ghory, Ward J.

    Effective curriculum development and implementation may be achieved by considering the multidimensional nature of the term "curriculum." A definition of curriculum should be considered in terms of its expressed, implied, and emergent dimensions. The expressed dimension is the written statement of learning objectives, sequence of contents, learning…

  17. Cosmetology: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a cosmetology vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  18. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center presents Enhancing Standards Based Science Curriculum through NASA Content Relevancy: A Model for Sustainable Teaching-Research Integration Dr. Robert Gabrys, Raquel Marshall, Dr. Evelina Felicite-Maurice, Erin McKinley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. H.; Gabrys, R.

    2016-12-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a systemic educator professional development model for the integration of NASA climate change resources into the K-12 classroom. The desired outcome of this model is to prepare teachers in STEM disciplines to be globally engaged and knowledgeable of current climate change research and its potential for content relevancy alignment to standard-based curriculum. The application and mapping of the model is based on the state education needs assessment, alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and implementation framework developed by the consortium of district superintendents and their science supervisors. In this presentation, we will demonstrate best practices for extending the concept of inquiry-based and project-based learning through the integration of current NASA climate change research into curriculum unit lessons. This model includes a significant teacher development component focused on capacity development for teacher instruction and pedagogy aimed at aligning NASA climate change research to related NGSS student performance expectations and subsequent Crosscutting Concepts, Science and Engineering Practices, and Disciplinary Core Ideas, a need that was presented by the district steering committee as critical for ensuring sustainability and high-impact in the classroom. This model offers a collaborative and inclusive learning community that connects classroom teachers to NASA climate change researchers via an ongoing consultant/mentoring approach. As a result of the first year of implementation of this model, Maryland teachers are implementing NGSS unit lessons that guide students in open-ended research based on current NASA climate change research.

  19. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  20. Predoctoral Curriculum Guidelines for Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' predoctoral guidelines for biomaterials curricula includes notes on interrelationships between this and other fields, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives for each content area, and information on sequencing, faculty and…

  1. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  2. Representing Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaztambide-Fernandez, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Handbooks denote representative authority, which gives their content normative value and through which editors and authors can emphasize certain views and orientations within a field. The representative authority of a handbook is reinforced in various ways, both obvious and subtle. The "SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction" is no exception…

  3. Tourism Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of tourism education programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan tourism employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various components of the…

  4. From Clinical Standards to Translating Next-Generation Sequencing Research into Patient Care Improvement for Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrochristos, Ioannis D; Glantzounis, Georgios K; Ziogas, Demosthenes E; Gizas, Ioannis; Schizas, Dimitrios; Lykoudis, Efstathios G; Felekouras, Evangelos; Machairas, Anastasios; Katsios, Christos; Liakakos, Theodoros; Cho, William C; Roukos, Dimitrios H

    2017-01-18

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HBP) cancers are associated with high cancer-related death rates. Surgery aiming for complete tumor resection (R0) remains the cornerstone of the treatment for HBP cancers. The current progress in the adjuvant treatment is quite slow, with gemcitabine chemotherapy available only for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). In the advanced and metastatic setting, only two targeted drugs have been approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA), which are sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma and erlotinib for PDA. It is a pity that multiple Phase III randomized control trials testing the efficacy of targeted agents have negative results. Failure in the development of effective drugs probably reflects the poor understanding of genome-wide alterations and molecular mechanisms orchestrating therapeutic resistance and recurrence. In the post-ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) era, cancer is referred to as a highly heterogeneous and systemic disease of the genome. The unprecedented potential of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to accurately identify genetic and genomic variations has attracted major research and clinical interest. The applications of NGS include targeted NGS with potential clinical implications, while whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing focus on the discovery of both novel cancer driver genes and therapeutic targets. These advances dictate new designs for clinical trials to validate biomarkers and drugs. This review discusses the findings of available NGS studies on HBP cancers and the limitations of genome sequencing analysis to translate genome-based biomarkers and drugs into patient care in the clinic.

  5. From Clinical Standards to Translating Next-Generation Sequencing Research into Patient Care Improvement for Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis D. Kyrochristos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HBP cancers are associated with high cancer-related death rates. Surgery aiming for complete tumor resection (R0 remains the cornerstone of the treatment for HBP cancers. The current progress in the adjuvant treatment is quite slow, with gemcitabine chemotherapy available only for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA. In the advanced and metastatic setting, only two targeted drugs have been approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA, which are sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma and erlotinib for PDA. It is a pity that multiple Phase III randomized control trials testing the efficacy of targeted agents have negative results. Failure in the development of effective drugs probably reflects the poor understanding of genome-wide alterations and molecular mechanisms orchestrating therapeutic resistance and recurrence. In the post-ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements era, cancer is referred to as a highly heterogeneous and systemic disease of the genome. The unprecedented potential of next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies to accurately identify genetic and genomic variations has attracted major research and clinical interest. The applications of NGS include targeted NGS with potential clinical implications, while whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing focus on the discovery of both novel cancer driver genes and therapeutic targets. These advances dictate new designs for clinical trials to validate biomarkers and drugs. This review discusses the findings of available NGS studies on HBP cancers and the limitations of genome sequencing analysis to translate genome-based biomarkers and drugs into patient care in the clinic.

  6. A Standardized Needs Assessment Tool to Inform the Curriculum Development Process for Pediatric Resuscitation Simulation-Based Education in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Shilkofski

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionUnder five mortality rates (UFMR remain high for children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs in the developing world. Education for practitioners in these environments is a key factor to improve outcomes that will address United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 3 and 10 (good health and well being and reduced inequalities. In order to appropriately contextualize a curriculum using simulation, it is necessary to first conduct a needs assessment of the target learner population. The World Health Organization (WHO has published a tool to assess capacity for emergency and surgical care in LMICs that is adaptable to this goal.Materials and methodsThe WHO Tool for Situational Analysis to Assess Emergency and Essential Surgical Care was modified to assess pediatric resuscitation capacity in clinical settings in two LMICs: Uganda and Myanmar. Modifications included assessment of self-identified learning needs, current practices, and perceived epidemiology of disease burden in each clinical setting, in addition to assessment of pediatric resuscitation capacity in regard to infrastructure, procedures, equipment, and supplies. The modified tool was administered to 94 respondents from the two settings who were target learners of a proposed simulation-based curriculum in pediatric and neonatal resuscitation.ResultsInfectious diseases (respiratory illnesses and diarrheal disease were cited as the most common causes of pediatric deaths in both countries. Self-identified learning needs included knowledge and skill development in pediatric airway/breathing topics, as well as general resuscitation topics such as CPR and fluid resuscitation in shock. Equipment and supply availability varied substantially between settings, and critical shortages were identified in each setting. Current practices and procedures were often limited by equipment availability or infrastructural considerations.Discussion and conclusionEpidemiology of disease

  7. Enhancing Teacher Preparation and Improving Faculty Teaching Skills: Lessons Learned from Implementing ``Science That Matters'' a Standards Based Interdisciplinary Science Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Robert; Meisels, Gerry

    2005-06-01

    In a highly collaborative process we developed an introductory science course sequence to improve science literacy especially among future elementary and middle school education majors. The materials and course features were designed using the results of research on teaching and learning to provide a rigorous, relevant and engaging, standard based science experience. More than ten years of combined planning, development, implementation and assessment of this college science course sequence for nonmajors/future teachers has provided significant insights and success in achieving our goal. This paper describes the history and iterative nature of our ongoing improvements, changes in faculty instructional practice, strategies used to overcome student resistance, significant student learning outcomes, support structures for faculty, and the essential and informative role of assessment in improving the outcomes. Our experience with diverse institutions, students and faculty provides the basis for the lessons we have learned and should be of help to others involved in advancing science education.

  8. Integrating Resources into Curriculum with the Systems Connect Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshry, A.; Bean, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    A broadly applicable and guided approach for planning curriculum and instruction around new academic standards or initiatives is critical for implementation success. Curriculum and assessment differs across schools and districts, so built-in adaptability is important for maximal adoption and ease of use by educators. The Systems Connect Planning Guide directs the flow of instruction for building conceptual links between topics in a unit/curriculum through critical vetting and integration of relevant resources. This curricular template is flexible for use in any setting or subject area, and ensures applicability, high impact and responsiveness to academic standards while providing inquiry-based, real-world investigations and action that incorporate authentic research and data. These needs are what informed the creation of the three components of the planning guide:• Curriculum Anchor: alignment with academic standards & learning outcomes and setting the context of the topic• Issues Investigations: informing how students explore topics, and incorporate authentic research and data into learning progressions• Civic Action: development of how students could apply their knowledgeThe Planning Guide also incorporates criteria from transdisciplinary practices, cross-cutting concepts, and organizational charts for outlining guiding questions and conceptual links embedded in the guide. Integration of experiential learning and real-world connections into curricula is important for proficiency and deeper understanding of content, replacing discrete, stand-alone experiences which are not explicitly connected. Rather than information being dispelled through individual activities, relying on students to make the connections, intentionally documenting explicit connections provides opportunities to foster deeper understanding by building conceptual links between topics, which is how fundamental knowledge about earth and living systems is gained. Through the critical vetting

  9. Mi-STAR Unit Challenges serve as a model for integrating earth science and systems thinking in a Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) aligned curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochis, E. E.; Tubman, S.; Matthys, T.; Bluth, G.; Oppliger, D.; Danhoff, B.; Huntoon, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    Michigan Science Teaching and Assessment Reform (Mi-STAR) is developing an NGSS-aligned middle school curriculum and associated teacher professional learning program in which science is taught and learned as an integrated body of knowledge that can be applied to address societal issues. With the generous support of the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation, Mi-STAR has released several pilot-tested units through the Mi-STAR curriculum portal at mi-star.mtu.edu. Each of these units focuses on an ongoing `Unit Challenge' investigation that integrates STEM content across disciplinary boundaries, stimulates interest, and engages students in using scientific practices to address 21st century challenges. Each Mi-STAR unit is connected to a Unifying NGSS Crosscutting Concept (CCC) that allows students to recognize the concepts that are related to the phenomena or problems under investigation. In the 6th grade, students begin with an exploration of the CCC Systems and System Models. Through repeated applications across units, students refine their understanding of what a system is and how to model a complex Earth system. An example 6th grade unit entitled "Water on the Move: The Water Cycle," provides an example of how Mi-STAR approaches the use of Unifying CCCs and Unit Challenges to enhance middle school students' understanding of the interconnections of Earth system processes and human activities. Throughout the unit, students use a series of hands-on explorations and simulations to explore the hydrologic cycle and how human activity can alter Earth systems. Students develop new knowledge through repeated interactions with the Unit Challenge, which requires development of system models and construction of evidence-based arguments related to flooding problems in a local community. Students have the opportunity to make predictions about how proposed land-use management practices (e.g. development of a skate-park, rain garden, soccer field, etc.) can alter the earth

  10. Envisioning Curriculum as Six Simultaneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Hanin; Conner, Lindsey; Mayo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the discourse of complexity thinking to envision curriculum as six partial and coupled facets that exist simultaneously: curriculum as structure, curriculum as process, curriculum as content, curriculum as teaching, curriculum as learning and curriculum as activity. Such a curriculum is emergent and self-organising. It is emergent…

  11. Global curriculum in surgical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Are, C; Berman, R S; Wyld, L; Cummings, C; Lecoq, C; Audisio, R A

    2016-06-01

    The significant global variations in surgical oncology training paradigms can have a detrimental effect on tackling the rising global cancer burden. While some variations in training are essential to account for the differences in types of cancer and biology, the fundamental principles of providing care to a cancer patient remain the same. The development of a global curriculum in surgical oncology with incorporated essential standards could be very useful in building an adequately trained surgical oncology workforce, which in turn could help in tackling the rising global cancer burden. The leaders of the Society of Surgical Oncology and European Society of Surgical Oncology convened a global curriculum committee to develop a global curriculum in surgical oncology. A global curriculum in surgical oncology was developed to incorporate the required domains considered to be essential in training a surgical oncologist. The curriculum was constructed in a modular fashion to permit flexibility to suit the needs of the different regions of the world. Similarly, recognizing the various sociocultural, financial and cultural influences across the world, the proposed curriculum is aspirational and not mandatory in intent. A global curriculum was developed which may be considered as a foundational scaffolding for training surgical oncologists worldwide. It is envisioned that this initial global curriculum will provide a flexible and modular scaffolding that can be tailored by individual countries or regions to train surgical oncologists in a way that is appropriate for practice in their local environment. Copyright © 2016 Society of Surgical Oncology, European Society of Surgical Oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. B1 mapping for bias-correction in quantitative T1 imaging of the brain at 3T using standard pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Mathieu; Tardif, Christine L; Stikov, Nikola; Sled, John G; Lee, Wayne; Pike, G Bruce

    2017-12-01

    B 1 mapping is important for many quantitative imaging protocols, particularly those that include whole-brain T 1 mapping using the variable flip angle (VFA) technique. However, B 1 mapping sequences are not typically available on many magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. The aim of this work was to demonstrate that B 1 mapping implemented using standard scanner product pulse sequences can produce B 1 (and VFA T 1 ) maps comparable in quality and acquisition time to advanced techniques. Six healthy subjects were scanned at 3.0T. An interleaved multislice spin-echo echo planar imaging double-angle (EPI-DA) B 1 mapping protocol, using a standard product pulse sequence, was compared to two alternative methods (actual flip angle imaging, AFI, and Bloch-Siegert shift, BS). Single-slice spin-echo DA B 1 maps were used as a reference for comparison (Ref. DA). VFA flip angles were scaled using each B 1 map prior to fitting T 1 ; the nominal flip angle case was also compared. The pooled-subject voxelwise correlation (ρ) for B 1 maps (BS/AFI/EPI-DA) relative to the reference B 1 scan (Ref. DA) were ρ = 0.92/0.95/0.98. VFA T 1 correlations using these maps were ρ = 0.86/0.88/0.96, much better than without B 1 correction (ρ = 0.53). The relative error for each B 1 map (BS/AFI/EPI-DA/Nominal) had 95 th percentiles of 5/4/3/13%. Our findings show that B 1 mapping implemented using product pulse sequences can provide excellent quality B 1 (and VFA T 1 ) maps, comparable to other custom techniques. This fast whole-brain measurement (∼2 min) can serve as an excellent alternative for researchers without access to advanced B 1 pulse sequences. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1673-1682. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Aerospace Technology Curriculum Guide. Invest in Success. Vo. Ed. #260.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document contains standards for an articulated secondary and postsecondary curriculum in aerospace technology. The curriculum standards can be used to ensure that vocational programs meet the needs of local business and industry. The first part of the document contains a task list and student performance standards for the aerospace technology…

  14. Incorporating personalized gene sequence variants, molecular genetics knowledge, and health knowledge into an EHR prototype based on the Continuity of Care Record standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xia; Kay, Stephen; Marley, Tom; Hardiker, Nicholas R.; Cimino, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objectives The current volume and complexity of genetic tests, and the molecular genetics knowledge and health knowledge related to interpretation of the results of those tests, are rapidly outstripping the ability of individual clinicians to recall, understand and convey to their patients information relevant to their care. The tailoring of molecular genetics knowledge and health knowledge in clinical settings is important both for the provision of personalized medicine and to reduce clinician information overload. In this paper we describe the incorporation, customization and demonstration of molecular genetic data (mainly sequence variants), molecular genetics knowledge and health knowledge into a standards-based electronic health record (EHR) prototype developed specifically for this study. Methods We extended the CCR (Continuity of Care Record), an existing EHR standard for representing clinical data, to include molecular genetic data. An EHR prototype was built based on the extended CCR and designed to display relevant molecular genetics knowledge and health knowledge from an existing knowledge base for cystic fibrosis (OntoKBCF). We reconstructed test records from published case reports and represented them in the CCR schema. We then used the EHR to dynamically filter molecular genetics knowledge and health knowledge from OntoKBCF using molecular genetic data and clinical data from the test cases. Results The molecular genetic data were successfully incorporated in the CCR by creating a category of laboratory results called “Molecular Genetics ” and specifying a particular class of test (“Gene Mutation Test”) in this category. Unlike other laboratory tests reported in the CCR, results of tests in this class required additional attributes (“Molecular Structure” and “Molecular Position”) to support interpretation by clinicians. These results, along with clinical data (age, sex, ethnicity, diagnostic procedures, and therapies) were used

  15. Discovering Learning, Discovering Self: The Effects of an Interdisciplinary, Standards-Based School Garden Curriculum on Elementary Students in Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Ming Wei

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the effects of an interdisciplinary standards-based school garden-based education program on student learning. The objective of the program is to help students learn to be self-directed learners, community contributors, complex thinkers, quality producers, effective communicators, and effective/ethical users of technology. For…

  16. The Questions of Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    What are the basic things that compose curriculum, and what are the questions that may be posed about these things? Joseph Schwab's conception of curriculum is used to introduce a scheme of questions concerning the nature, elements, and practice of curriculum. Formulations of questions by other curriculum theorists are reviewed and analysed in…

  17. Disrupting the Official Curriculum: Cultural Biography and the Curriculum Decision Making of Latino Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Cinthia; Castro, Antonio J.

    2010-01-01

    This multiple case study traces the influence of cultural biographies on the curriculum decision making of two Latino preservice teachers who student taught in standards-based schools. These participants drew on their personal and cultural experiences to disrupt the "official" curriculum, which they believed failed to address fundamental issues of…

  18. State-Based Curriculum Work and Curriculum-Making: Norway's "Laereplanverket 1997"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivesind, Kirsten; Westbury, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This case study of the development of the Norwegian compulsory school curriculum of 1997, "Laereplanverket 1997," parallels a study of the development of the "Illinois Learning Standards" of 1997. The pair of case studies is designed to explore the administration of state-based curriculum-making and, in particular, the use in…

  19. Examining IS Curriculum Profiles and the IS 2010 Model Curriculum Guidelines in AACSB-Accredited Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Robert J.; Velasquez, Nicole Forsgren; Fadel, Kelly J.; Bell, Corbin C.

    2012-01-01

    The IS 2010 Model Curriculum Guidelines were developed to provide recommendations for standardized information systems curricula while simultaneously allowing for customization within individual programs. While some studies have examined program adherence to the IS 2010 Model Curriculum Guidelines, a more detailed analysis of IS curriculum…

  20. Mapping and sequencing the human genome: Science, ethics, and public policy. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, J.D.

    1993-03-31

    Development of Mapping and Sequencing the Human Genome: Science, Ethics, and Public Policy followed the standard process of curriculum development at the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS), the process is described. The production of this module was a collaborative effort between BSCS and the American Medical Association (AMA). Appendix A contains a copy of the module. Copies of reports sent to the Department of Energy (DOE) during the development process are contained in Appendix B; all reports should be on file at DOE. Appendix B also contains copies of status reports submitted to the BSCS Board of Directors.

  1. Engineering the curriculum: Towards an adaptive curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns-Boast, Lynette Frances

    The curriculum is one of the most important artefacts produced by higher education institutions, yet it is one of the least studied. Additionally, little is known about the decision-making of academics when designing and developing their curricula, nor how they make use of them. This research investigates how 22 Australian higher education engineering, software engineering, computer science, and information systems academics conceive of curriculum, what approaches they take when designing, and developing course and program curricula, and what use they make of the curriculum. It also considers the implications of these conceptions and behaviour upon their curricula. Data were collected through a series of one-to-one, in-depth, qualitative interviews as well as small focus group sessions and were analysed following Charmaz’ (2006) approach to grounded theory. In this thesis, I argue that the development of curricula for new higher degree programs and courses and / or the updating and innovating of an existing curriculum is a design problem. I also argue that curriculum is a complex adaptive system. Surrounding the design and development of a curriculum is a process of design that leads to the creation of a designed object – the official-curriculum. The official-curriculum provides the guiding principles for its implementation, which involves the design and development of the curriculum-in-use, its delivery, and evaluation. Data show that while the participants conceive of curriculum as a problem of design involving a design process leading to the development of the official-curriculum, surprisingly, their behaviour does not match their conceptions. Over a very short period, their behaviour leads to a process I have called curriculum drift where the official-curriculum and the curriculum-in-use drift away from each other causing the curriculum to lose its integrity. Curricular integrity is characterised through the attributes of alignment, coherence, and

  2. An analysis of curriculum implementation on high schools in Yogyakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriana, Beta Wulan; Arlianty, Widinda Normalia; Diniaty, Artina; Fauzi'ah, Lina

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to find out how the implementation of the curriculum at three schools in Yogyakarta. The selection of these three schools is based on the use of different curriculum in each school. The analysis was done by distributing questionnaire analysis of eight national education standards (NES). The purpose of this questionnaire is to find out how the curriculum implemented in the schools. In addition, to find out whether or not the implementation was done in accordance with the expectations of the curriculum. The questionnaire distributed in the form of indicators on each NES. These indicators include, Content Standards, Process Standards, Graduates Competency Standards, Teacher and Education Staff Standards, Facility and Infrastructure Standards, Management Standards, Financing Standards and Assessment Standards. Results of the observation indicate that there is a discrepancy between the expectations and the reality of the three schools observed.

  3. Diesel Mechanics: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a diesel mechanics vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  4. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, Jason A.; Sun, Jidi; Pichler, Peter; Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya; Richardson, Haylea; Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Fripp, Jurgen; Menk, Frederick W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods: A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results: The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions: The MR-Sim setup and automatic s

  5. Automatic Substitute Computed Tomography Generation and Contouring for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone External Beam Radiation Therapy From Standard MRI Sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Sun, Jidi [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Pichler, Peter [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Rivest-Hénault, David; Ghose, Soumya [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Richardson, Haylea [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Arm, Jameen [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Best, Leah [Department of Radiology, Hunter New England Health, New Lambton, New South Wales (Australia); Chandra, Shekhar S. [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Fripp, Jurgen [CSIRO Australian e-Health Research Centre, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Menk, Frederick W. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales (Australia); Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To validate automatic substitute computed tomography CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance (MR) pelvic scans for MR-Sim prostate treatment planning. Patients and Methods: A Siemens Skyra 3T MR imaging (MRI) scanner with laser bridge, flat couch, and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole-pelvis MRI scan (1.6 mm 3-dimensional isotropic T2w SPACE [Sampling Perfection with Application optimized Contrasts using different flip angle Evolution] sequence) was acquired. Three additional small field of view scans were acquired: T2w, T2*w, and T1w flip angle 80° for gold fiducials. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Manual contouring of the prostate, rectum, bladder, and bones was performed independently on the CT and MR scans. Three experienced observers contoured each organ on MRI, allowing interobserver quantification. To generate a training database, each patient CT scan was coregistered to their whole-pelvis T2w using symmetric rigid registration and structure-guided deformable registration. A new multi-atlas local weighted voting method was used to generate automatic contours and sCT results. Results: The mean error in Hounsfield units between the sCT and corresponding patient CT (within the body contour) was 0.6 ± 14.7 (mean ± 1 SD), with a mean absolute error of 40.5 ± 8.2 Hounsfield units. Automatic contouring results were very close to the expert interobserver level (Dice similarity coefficient): prostate 0.80 ± 0.08, bladder 0.86 ± 0.12, rectum 0.84 ± 0.06, bones 0.91 ± 0.03, and body 1.00 ± 0.003. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same dose prescription was found to be 0.3% ± 0.8%. The 3-dimensional γ pass rate was 1.00 ± 0.00 (2 mm/2%). Conclusions: The MR-Sim setup and automatic s

  6. Policy in the Way of Practice: How Assessment Legislation Is Affecting Social Studies Curriculum and Instruction in Ohio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Misco

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In a national context of standards and high-stakes testing, concerns are emerging about challenges to the already tenuous position of the citizenship mission in the social studies curriculum. In this qualitative study, the authors administered a survey to social studies teachers in Ohio and conducted follow-up interviews focusing on the present purposes of social studies and the ways in which standards and testing are affecting instructional practice. The findings reveal a perception of standards as being of high quality, yet ultimately undermined through changes in scope and se-quence, narrowing of the curriculum, and a paucity of time to enact them. In addition, respondents indicated that high-stakes testing has become the primary curricular focus, which impacts instructional strategy decision making and frustrates citizenship education.

  7. Understanding connections in the school mathematics curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Mwakapenda

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available I identify and discuss ways in which different types of connections are described in the South African mathematics National Curriculum Statement and its related documents, particularly at the Further Education and Training (FET level. I argue that connections are central to the way the discipline of mathematics, its learning outcomes, and assessment standards are conceptualised. The notions of representation and integration are found to be key aspects in understanding connections in mathematics. Using these two notions, I then analyse connections in the National Curriculum Statement and its related documents. Finally, theoretical and practical implications of connections in the curriculum are identified.

  8. Regression and statistical shape model based substitute CT generation for MRI alone external beam radiation therapy from standard clinical MRI sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Soumya; Greer, Peter B.; Sun, Jidi; Pichler, Peter; Rivest-Henault, David; Mitra, Jhimli; Richardson, Haylea; Wratten, Chris; Martin, Jarad; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Dowling, Jason A.

    2017-11-01

    In MR only radiation therapy planning, generation of the tissue specific HU map directly from the MRI would eliminate the need of CT image acquisition and may improve radiation therapy planning. The aim of this work is to generate and validate substitute CT (sCT) scans generated from standard T2 weighted MR pelvic scans in prostate radiation therapy dose planning. A Siemens Skyra 3T MRI scanner with laser bridge, flat couch and pelvic coil mounts was used to scan 39 patients scheduled for external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer. For sCT generation a whole pelvis MRI (1.6 mm 3D isotropic T2w SPACE sequence) was acquired. Patients received a routine planning CT scan. Co-registered whole pelvis CT and T2w MRI pairs were used as training images. Advanced tissue specific non-linear regression models to predict HU for the fat, muscle, bladder and air were created from co-registered CT-MRI image pairs. On a test case T2w MRI, the bones and bladder were automatically segmented using a novel statistical shape and appearance model, while other soft tissues were separated using an Expectation-Maximization based clustering model. The CT bone in the training database that was most ‘similar’ to the segmented bone was then transformed with deformable registration to create the sCT component of the test case T2w MRI bone tissue. Predictions for the bone, air and soft tissue from the separate regression models were successively combined to generate a whole pelvis sCT. The change in monitor units between the sCT-based plans relative to the gold standard CT plan for the same IMRT dose plan was found to be 0.3%+/-0.9% (mean  ±  standard deviation) for 39 patients. The 3D Gamma pass rate was 99.8+/-0.00 (2 mm/2%). The novel hybrid model is computationally efficient, generating an sCT in 20 min from standard T2w images for prostate cancer radiation therapy dose planning and DRR generation.

  9. Curriculum Guidelines on Predoctoral Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' Curriculum Guidelines include an introduction to the discipline and its interrelationships with other disciplines, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives, and notes on sequencing and faculty. (MSE)

  10. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities designed for specific curriculum units. Curriculum areas represented include art (wire sculpture); mathematics (place values); reading and language arts (poetry); science (properties of chemical elements); and social studies (famous women, and American history). (LRW)

  11. Curriculum Development: Teacher Involvement in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    In order for curriculum development to be effective and schools to be successful, teachers must be involved in the development process. An effective curriculum should reflect the philosophy, goals, objectives, learning experiences, instructional resources, and assessments that comprise a specific educational program ("Guide to curriculum…

  12. School Curriculum Committee: Its Role In Curriculum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover, the Regional Education Bureau, the Zonal Education Department or the school should give orientation about the roles and responsibilities of the school curriculum committee members, and the purpose of supervision for principals, department heads, and supervisor, allocate budget for school curriculum ...

  13. Bacterial Whole-Genome Sequencing Revisited: Portable, Scalable, and Standardized Analysis for Typing and Detection of Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Shana R.; Goering, Richard V.; Witten, Anika; Harmsen, Dag

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogens present a major burden for hospitals. Rapid cluster identification and pathogen profiling, i.e., of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes, are crucial for effective infection control. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), in particular, is now one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. In this study, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was applied retrospectively to an unusual spike in MRSA cases in two intensive care units (ICUs) over the course of 4 weeks. While the epidemiological investigation concluded that there were two separate clusters, each associated with one ICU, S. aureus protein A gene (spa) typing data suggested that they belonged to single clonal cluster (all cases shared spa type t001). Standardized gene sets were used to extract an allele-based profile for typing and an antibiotic resistance and toxin gene profile. The WGS results produced high-resolution allelic profiles, which were used to discriminate the MRSA clusters, corroborating the epidemiological investigation and identifying previously unsuspected transmission events. The antibiotic resistance profile was in agreement with the original clinical laboratory susceptibility profile, and the toxin profile provided additional, previously unknown information. WGS coupled with allelic profiling provided a high-resolution method that can be implemented as regular screening for effective infection control. PMID:24759713

  14. Special Curriculum Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Bridget N.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Includes "Foreword" (O'Connor, Fidoten); "Organizational and End-User Information Systems (OEIS)" (Regan); "Curriculum Development" (Bronner); "OEIS Model Curriculum" (O'Connor); "OEIS Model Curriculum: A Template for Implementation" (Moses, Rehwaldt); "Status of Model Curricula Development" (Caouette, Lutz); "Training in Industry and Education"…

  15. Curriculum Evaluation in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikas, Vangelis

    2009-01-01

    The role of curriculum in the official educational process is widely recognized by the international scientific community. Beginning in the 19th century, and perhaps even earlier, curriculum research began, not only to be systematized, but to also constitute an autonomous field of study. On the other hand, curriculum evaluation has captured the…

  16. Curriculum Integration: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Amanda; Leckie, Alisa

    2017-01-01

    Curriculum integration is a tenet of middle level education. "This We Believe," the position paper of the Association for Middle Level Education, advocates for curriculum that is exploratory, relevant, integrative, and meaningful for young adolescents. Teachers can integrate curriculum across content areas by anchoring units of study in…

  17. Industrial Arts Curriculum Guide for Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide provides topic outlines and objectives for 12 units of an industrial arts program in plastics at any grade level. Introductory material describes the scope and sequence of an Industrial Arts program, gives specific guidelines for Industrial Arts, and briefly discusses the nature of plastics. Unit titles include Orientation of…

  18. Farm Animals: Unit Manual Eight. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ann; And Others

    This is number eight in a series of resource manuals consisting of 11 sequenced curriculum guides developed by the Demonstration and Research Center for Early Education (DARCEE) for use in early childhood education programs. Emphasis is placed on the development of sensory, abstracting and mediating and response skills. The projected order of the…

  19. The role of curriculum committees in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jean T; Draugalis, JoLaine R; Bruce, Susan P; Gonyeau, Michael R

    2011-10-10

    To conduct a follow-up survey of curriculum committee chairs in US colleges and schools of pharmacy to describe current committee structures and functions and determine whether changes have occurred over time. A descriptive cross-sectional study design using a 30-item survey instrument regarding the structure, function, and charges of curriculum committees was sent to 100 curriculum committee chairs. Several new variables were added to the questionnaire to explore the use of systematic reviews, oversight of experiential education, and the impact of accreditation standards on work focus. Eighty-five chairs responded. Curriculum committees are on average 1 person larger, less likely to have a student vote, more likely to have formal charges, and more likely to be involved in implementing an outcomes-based curriculum compared with 1994. Committees have shifted their work focus from review of curricular content to curricular revision. Curriculum committees continue to evolve as they respond to changes in pharmacy education and accreditation standards.

  20. MRI of the temporo-mandibular joint: which sequence is best suited to assess the cortical bone of the mandibular condyle? A cadaveric study using micro-CT as the standard of reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlo, Christoph A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Patcas, Raphael; Signorelli, Luca; Mueller, Lukas [University of Zurich, Clinic for Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, Center of Dental Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Kau, Thomas; Watzal, Helmut; Kellenberger, Christian J. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Ullrich, Oliver [University of Zurich, Institute of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Luder, Hans-Ulrich [University of Zurich, Section of Orofacial Structures and Development, Center of Dental Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-07-15

    To determine the best suited sagittal MRI sequence out of a standard temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) imaging protocol for the assessment of the cortical bone of the mandibular condyles of cadaveric specimens using micro-CT as the standard of reference. Sixteen TMJs in 8 human cadaveric heads (mean age, 81 years) were examined by MRI. Upon all sagittal sequences, two observers measured the cortical bone thickness (CBT) of the anterior, superior and posterior portions of the mandibular condyles (i.e. objective analysis), and assessed for the presence of cortical bone thinning, erosions or surface irregularities as well as subcortical bone cysts and anterior osteophytes (i.e. subjective analysis). Micro-CT of the condyles was performed to serve as the standard of reference for statistical analysis. Inter-observer agreements for objective (r = 0.83-0.99, P < 0.01) and subjective ({kappa} = 0.67-0.88) analyses were very good. Mean CBT measurements were most accurate, and cortical bone thinning, erosions, surface irregularities and subcortical bone cysts were best depicted on the 3D fast spoiled gradient echo recalled sequence (3D FSPGR). The most reliable MRI sequence to assess the cortical bone of the mandibular condyles on sagittal imaging planes is the 3D FSPGR sequence. (orig.)

  1. MRI of the temporo-mandibular joint: which sequence is best suited to assess the cortical bone of the mandibular condyle? A cadaveric study using micro-CT as the standard of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlo, Christoph A.; Patcas, Raphael; Signorelli, Luca; Mueller, Lukas; Kau, Thomas; Watzal, Helmut; Kellenberger, Christian J.; Ullrich, Oliver; Luder, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    To determine the best suited sagittal MRI sequence out of a standard temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) imaging protocol for the assessment of the cortical bone of the mandibular condyles of cadaveric specimens using micro-CT as the standard of reference. Sixteen TMJs in 8 human cadaveric heads (mean age, 81 years) were examined by MRI. Upon all sagittal sequences, two observers measured the cortical bone thickness (CBT) of the anterior, superior and posterior portions of the mandibular condyles (i.e. objective analysis), and assessed for the presence of cortical bone thinning, erosions or surface irregularities as well as subcortical bone cysts and anterior osteophytes (i.e. subjective analysis). Micro-CT of the condyles was performed to serve as the standard of reference for statistical analysis. Inter-observer agreements for objective (r = 0.83-0.99, P < 0.01) and subjective (κ = 0.67-0.88) analyses were very good. Mean CBT measurements were most accurate, and cortical bone thinning, erosions, surface irregularities and subcortical bone cysts were best depicted on the 3D fast spoiled gradient echo recalled sequence (3D FSPGR). The most reliable MRI sequence to assess the cortical bone of the mandibular condyles on sagittal imaging planes is the 3D FSPGR sequence. (orig.)

  2. Curriculum reform and the market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    A neo-liberal discourse in the 2000s has been prevalent not only in international and Danish educational policy contexts, but also within a specific area, namely the education of adult immigrants in Denmark. With the adoption of a new law in 2003 high-stakes testing, standards, new market economy...... in Denmark. Based on studies of curriculum reform and research about headmasters’ and teachers’ attitudes the article addresses paradoxes rising in the wake of the neo-liberal education policy. Despite the intention of high-stakes testing to increase adult migrants’ language and employment related....... Teachers furthermore find the new working conditions stressing. It is discussed whether a neo-liberal discourse in adult teaching is ‘dumping down’ the intentions of curriculum and education reform....

  3. Curriculum reform and the market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    A neo-liberal discourse in the 2000s has been prevalent not only in international and Danish educational policy contexts, but also within a specific area, namely the education of adult immigrants in Denmark. With the adoption of a new law in 2003 high-stakes testing, standards, new market economy...... in Denmark. Based on studies of curriculum reform and research about headmasters’ and teachers’ attitudes the article addresses paradoxes rising in the wake of the neo-liberal education policy. Despite the intention of high-stakes testing to increase adult migrants’ language and employment related....... Teachers furthermore find the new working conditions stressing. It is discussed whether a neo-liberal discourse in adult teaching is ‘dumping down’ the intentions of curriculum and education reform....

  4. [Research and development of evaluation criteria for premedical curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinyoung; Shin, Jwa-Seop; Yoon, Hyun-Bae; Kim, Do-Hwan; Yoo, Dong-Mi; Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Seung-Hee

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop criteria to evaluate a premedical curriculum to ultimately improve the quality of premedical education. The first draft of the evaluation criteria was developed through a literature review and expert consultation. The Delphi survey was conducted to ensure the validity of the draft. The final premedical curriculum criteria consisted of three evaluation areas (curriculum development, curriculum implementation, and curriculum outcome), five evaluation items (educational objective, organization of curriculum, instructional method, class management,and educational outcome), and 18 evaluation indicators. There should be further discussion on the evaluation questionnaire and the content for each evaluation indicator with regard to its practical application. Also, a concrete evaluation system, including evaluation standards and rating scales, should be developed.

  5. The process of internationalization of the nursing and midwifery curriculum: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Mumin, Khadizah H

    2016-11-01

    There is an abundance of literature on internationalization of curricula. However, research on how a curriculum is internationalized to accommodate non-mobile students studying in their home countries is limited. To describe the process undertaken by curriculum developers in internationalizing the Brunei nursing and midwifery curriculum through curriculum design. A descriptive qualitative research design. A nursing and midwifery higher education institution in Brunei. Seventeen nurse/midwife academics. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 curriculum developers. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Four themes emerged: expectations of an internationalized curriculum; formation of a committee; benchmarking and setting standards; and designing the curriculum for internationalization. This study has implications for the development of an internationally-oriented curriculum that takes into account the cultural context of a specific country. The findings highlight the need to involve students in curriculum design, a practice that is not common in Brunei. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Suggested Test Sequence Amendments of the Current ECSS E-ST-20-08C Standard for Bare Solar Cells Qualification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanco G.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, test sequence variations and obtained results on those subgroups B, C1 and P, are presented. The gained experience at this qualification and other previous work about solar cell characterization is used to suggest amendments.

  7. Development of a Green Fluorescent Protein-Based Laboratory Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Patrick D.; Hartberg, Yasha

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory curriculum has been designed for an undergraduate biochemistry course that focuses on the investigation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The sequence of procedures extends from analysis of the DNA sequence through PCR amplification, recombinant plasmid DNA synthesis, bacterial transformation, expression, isolation, and…

  8. A Critical Humanist Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Kevin; Rodriguez, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a critical humanist discussion of curriculum; a departure from the technicist view of education [education meant to support a global capitalist economy] and an analysis of curriculum considering critical humanism, political economy and critical race theory among other modes of critical analysis and inquiry. Our discussion supports a…

  9. Criminal Justice Curriculum Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Richard C.; Alm, Mary

    This report outlines three new curriculum models for criminal justice developed as part of the North Carolina Community College System's Curriculum Improvement Project (CIP): the "Generalist"; "Generalist-with-Options" for a Law Enforcement Specialty, Corrections Specialty, or Protective Services Specialty; and "Generalist…

  10. Cosmetology. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local secondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  11. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities designed for specific curriculum units. Curriculum areas represented include reading and language arts (proverbs and fables, letters of the alphabet, and biographies); science (the study of Gregor Mendel and genetics, oil resources); and social studies (global awareness). (LRW)

  12. Marketing Education Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide is intended to provide a common core of competencies from which to design an effective secondary marketing education program. Introductory materials include a definition of marketing education, objectives, outline of instructional content, and questions and answers regarding the curriculum guide. These practical materials are…

  13. Equasions for Curriculum Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrod, James S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Technology in Curriculum (TIC) program resource guides which will be distributed to California schools in the fall of 1986. These guides match available instructional television programs and computer software to existing California curriculum guides in order to facilitate teachers' classroom use. (JDH)

  14. The Galapagos Jason Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    The JASON Curriculum Project materials are designed to prepare teachers and students for an exploration around the Galapagos Islands via satellite transmission of live images and sound. This curriculum package contains five units, 25 lesson plans, and over 50 activities, along with teacher background material, student worksheets and readings, a…

  15. Solar Technology Curriculum, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains lecture outlines and handouts for training solar technicians in the installation, maintenance, and repair of solar energy hot water and space heating systems. The curriculum consists of four modular units developed to provide a model through which community colleges and area vocational/technical schools can respond…

  16. Designing a Curriculum for Teacher Educators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunenberg, Mieke; Elt, Introduction

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY This article describes the experiences of a small group with designing a curriculum for beginning teacher educators in teacher education institutes as well as in schools. Based on the Dutch professional standard for teacher educators, literature study, case studies and discussions with

  17. Negotiating Change: Participatory Curriculum Design in Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkin, Marian

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines an important component of the developing field of education in emergencies: curriculum decision-making processes. The paper argues that in order to fully meet the commitment articulated by the INEE Minimum Standards to provide quality education for all, curricula decisions cannot be ignored or postponed until after a crisis has…

  18. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Postsecondary Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    The purpose of this curriculum guide is to assist administrators and instructors in establishing nuclear medicine technician programs that will meet the accreditation standards of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education. The guide has been developed to prepare nuclear medicine technicians (NMT's) in two-year…

  19. Didactic Communication and the Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Arsith

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesiswhichwe assume is thatthemanagementof thecurriculum is a coherentand unifiedwhole ofprinciples,functions, strategies, criteria designed, integrated andcontextualizedin such way that it would determine the achievement of the aims of quality standards of variousdegrees of generality. Inourapproach,we proposeas basis theconstructivism, a theory of scientificknowledge,which isapplied to learning problems, characterized by the following key ideas: our mindis real;the essenceofthe studyrepresents themental events;knowledge is dynamic activity; learningrepresentsa natural consequence of performance;teaching is a processof negotiated construction ofmeaning;theknowledge processcorerepresent soling problems.What we want to prove is that acompetency-based curriculum isappropriate forachievingthe aims of education.

  20. Optimized and standardized 192-plex solution for 16S rDNA gene sequencing on Illumina Miseq platform to assess soil biodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    Denonfoux, J.; Wahl, C.; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Laurent, Y.; Lebreton, Lionel; Terrat, Sébastien; Mougel, Christophe; Ferreira, S.

    2014-01-01

    The growing need to survey the tremendous microbial diversity in a culture independent manner, has led to the development of molecular methods through sequence profiling of conserved genes such as 16S rDNA. Next-generation sequencing technologies are now used routinely to assess bacterial communities composition in complex environmental samples. Recently, the improvement of the Illumina MiSeq platform to a 2×300 bases paired-end version made it much more attractive for 16S rDNA amplicons sequ...

  1. Thematic curriculum approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šefer Jasmina P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Thematic curriculum combines disciplines and media. The process is problem-oriented and the scenario most often follows the logic of exploring or storytelling. Those two approaches to teaching are appropriate because they fit into interdisciplinary and creative open-ended problem solving through play, as insisted upon by thematic curriculum. The matrix, where seven types of abilities intersect with five types of problems according to their degree of openness, defines well the outcomes of teaching. However, it did not prove to be suitable for planning the majority of activities in thematic curriculum, for it follows with difficulty the process of exploring or storytelling i.e. it disrupts the subject matter coherence of thematic curriculum. Therefore, it is suggested that matrix should be used for disciplinary curriculum planning but for that of thematic curriculum only in exclusive cases. The matrix should be used primarily as a framework for evaluating the distribution of various types of abilities and problem situations in teaching. The logic of diverse approaches to teaching reflects itself in the manner of planning and organizing the teaching process. Conceptual, visual-graphic, structural and other aids employed during educational process planning should suit the nature of the approach chosen. On the basis of qualitative investigations of educational process, in the present paper considerations are given to various approaches to teaching development of various drafts for the planning of teaching, and recognition of the logic of storytelling and exploring in thematic curriculum.

  2. The Integrated Curriculum Model (ICM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce; Wood, Susannah

    2010-01-01

    This article explicates the Integrated Curriculum Model (ICM) which has been used worldwide to design differentiated curriculum, instruction, and assessment units of study for gifted learners. The article includes a literature review of appropriate curriculum features for the gifted, other extant curriculum models, the theoretical basis for the…

  3. Curriculum-based neurosurgery digital library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Jean-Philippe; Dang, Thai; Kon, David; Sapo, Monica; Batzdorf, Ulrich; Martin, Neil

    2010-11-01

    Recent work-hour restrictions and the constantly evolving body of knowledge are challenging the current ways of teaching neurosurgery residents. To develop a curriculum-based digital library of multimedia content to face the challenges in neurosurgery education. We used the residency program curriculum developed by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons to structure the library and Microsoft Sharepoint as the user interface. This project led to the creation of a user-friendly and searchable digital library that could be accessed remotely and throughout the hospital, including the operating rooms. The electronic format allows standardization of the content and transformation of the operating room into a classroom. This in turn facilitates the implementation of a curriculum within the training program and improves teaching efficiency. Future work will focus on evaluating the efficacy of the library as a teaching tool for residents.

  4. Clinical nutrition in the hepatogastroenterology curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulder, Chris J J; Wanten, Geert J A; Semrad, Carol E

    2016-01-01

    of Gastroenterology and Hepatology has defined specific expertise areas in Advanced endoscopy, hepatology, digestive oncology and clinical nutrition, training for the latter topic is lacking in the current hepatogastroenterology (HGE) curriculum. Given its relevance for HGE practice, and being at the core...... of gastrointestinal functioning, there is an obvious need for training in nutrition and related issues including the treatment of disease-related malnutrition and obesity and its associated metabolic derangements. This document aims to be a starting point for the integration of nutritional expertise in the HGE...... curriculum, allowing a central role in the management of malnutrition and obesity. We suggest minimum endpoints for nutritional knowledge and expertise in the standard curriculum and recommend a focus period of training in nutrition issues in order to produce well-trained HGE specialists. This article...

  5. Evaluation of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation curriculum in a low resource environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mary P; Lyon, Camila B; Janiszewski, David; Aksamit, Deborah; Kateh, Francis; Sampson, John

    2015-11-07

    To evaluate whether a 2-day International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) Universal Algorithm-based curriculum taught in a tertiary care hospital in Liberia increases local health care provider knowledge and skill comfort level. A combined basic and advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum was developed for low-resource settings that included lectures and low-fidelity manikin-based simulations. In March 2014, the curriculum was taught to healthcare providers in a tertiary care hospital in Liberia. In a quality assurance review, participants were evaluated for knowledge and comfort levels with resuscitation before and after the workshop. They were also videotaped during simulation sessions and evaluated on standardized performance metrics. Fifty-two hospital staff completed both pre-and post-curriculum surveys. The median score was 45% pre-curriculum and 82% post-curriculum (pprovider comfort level score was 4 of 5 pre-curriculum and 5 of 5 post-curriculum (presource setting.

  6. Curriculum Trends in Medical Education in Mauritius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprajita Panwar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Medical education began in Mauritius with the establishment of Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam (SSR Medical college in 1999 followed by a breakthrough in field of medicine with opening of Anna Medical College and Research Center (AMCRC in 2010 and Padhamshree DY PatilMedical College in 2013.Though it was an appreciable beginning of medical education in Mauritius, medical schools are currently experiencing hardships in delivering right medical exposure to health care professionals.Mauritian medical schools now need to review their current teaching methodology and present curriculum to keep pace with global standards. Integrated curriculum which is now gaining popularity world-wide is to be introduced and strongly implemented in medical schools in Mauritius. This curriculum would breach barriers and improve integration between pre-clinical and clinical sciences thus facilitating long-term retention of knowledge in medical schools and develop a professionally soundapproach towards management of health care. Horizontal curriculum can be replaced by vertical and spiral integration. For this major change, faculty engaged in medical profession are to be acquainted about innovative strategies and emerging trends in medical education. Thus this article aims to highlight the current scenario of medical education in Mauritius and also offer suggestions about possible future strategies to be implemented in medical colleges.Keywords: MEDICAL EDUCATION, CURRICULUM, CHALLENGES

  7. Survey and Research on Continuing Education Curriculum Construction for Primary and Secondary School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuing education curriculum construction is the key work to complete the teachers’ continuing education system, it is also an important part of the teachers’ specialization. This study aims to master the main problems of the current primary and secondary school teachers’ continuing education curriculum construction and put forward the corresponding improvement countermeasures. Research in Yunnan province of China as a case, through the Questionnaire Method, Interview Method and Factors Analysis Method, this study make an thorough analysis on the prominent questions of the curriculum resources informationization level, curriculum structure, curriculum practicability, curriculum management and curriculum evaluation mechanism of the primary and secondary school teachers continuing education curriculums construction. Study found that the curriculum construction should also increase the intensity of curriculum resources informatization, develop diversified curriculum resources, complete six modules, carry out a standardized and scientific management and diversified curriculum evaluation mechanism. Research data and conclusions both enrich the theory of the con-struction of the teachers continuing education curriculum, and also provide a practical reference for the admin-istrative department of education and teacher training institutions to formulate measures.

  8. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Banking & Finance Technology (Program CIP: 52.0803--Banking and Related Financial Programs, Other). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the banking and finance technology program. Presented in the introduction are a program description and suggested course sequence. Section I is a curriculum guide consisting of outlines for…

  9. Georgia science curriculum alignment and accountability: A blueprint for student success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reining-Gray, Kimberly M.

    Current trends and legislation in education indicate an increased dependency on standardized test results as a measure for learner success. This study analyzed test data in an effort to assess the impact of curriculum alignment on learner success as well as teacher perceptions of the changes in classroom instruction due to curriculum alignment. Qualitative and quantitative design methods were used to determine the impact of science curriculum alignment in grades 9-12. To determine the impact of science curriculum alignment from the Quality Core Curriculum (QCC) to the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) test data and teacher opinion surveys from one Georgia School system were examined. Standardized test scores before and after curriculum alignment were analyzed as well as teacher perception survey data regarding the impact of curriculum change. A quantitative teacher perception survey was administered to science teachers in the school system to identify significant changes in teacher perceptions or teaching strategies following curriculum realignment. Responses to the survey were assigned Likert scale values for analysis purposes. Selected teachers were also interviewed using panel-approved questions to further determine teacher opinions of curriculum realignment and the impact on student success and teaching strategies. Results of this study indicate significant changes related to curriculum alignment. Teachers reported a positive change in teaching strategies and instructional delivery as a result of curriculum alignment and implementation. Student scores also showed improvement, but more research is recommended in this area.

  10. Medical Education and Curriculum Reform: Putting Reform Proposals in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kam Yin Chan, MD, MB.BS, MHA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to elaborate criteria by which the principles of curriculum reform can be judged. To this end, the paper presents an overview of standard critiques of medical education and examines the ways medical curriculum reforms have responded to these critiques. The paper then sets out our assessment of these curriculum reforms along three parameters: pedagogy, educational context, and knowledge status. Following on from this evaluation of recent curriculum reforms, the paper puts forward four criteria with which to gauge the adequacy medical curriculum reform. These criteria enable us to question the extent to which new curricula incorporate methods and approaches for ensuring that its substance: overcomes the traditional opposition between clinical and resource dimensions of care; emphasizes that the clinical work needs to be systematized in so far as that it feasible; promotes multi-disciplinary team work, and balances clinical autonomy with accountability to non-clinical stakeholders.

  11. Comparison of different segmentation approaches without using gold standard. Application to the estimation of the left ventricle ejection fraction from cardiac cine MRI sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebenberg, Jessica; Buvat, Irène; Garreau, Mireille; Casta, Christopher; Constantinidès, Constantin; Cousty, Jean; Cochet, Alexandre; Jehan-Besson, Stéphanie; Tilmant, Christophe; Lefort, Muriel; Roullot, Elodie; Najman, Laurent; Sarry, Laurent; Clarysse, Patrick; De Cesare, Alain; Lalande, Alain; Frouin, Frédérique

    2011-01-01

    A statistical method is proposed to compare several estimates of a relevant clinical parameter when no gold standard is available. The method is illustrated by considering the left ventricle ejection fraction derived from cardiac magnetic resonance images and computed using seven approaches with different degrees of automation. The proposed method did not use any a priori regarding with the reliability of each method and its degree of automation. The results showed that the most accurate estimates of the ejection fraction were obtained using manual segmentations, followed by the semi-automatic methods, while the methods with the least user input yielded the least accurate ejection fraction estimates. These results were consistent with the expected performance of the estimation methods, suggesting that the proposed statistical approach might be helpful to assess the performance of estimation methods on clinical data for which no gold standard is available. PMID:22254889

  12. General Mechanical Repair 2. Minor Automotive Maintenance, Small Engine [Repair, and] Welding. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Larry

    This curriculum guide provides materials for teachers to use in developing a 1-year course in general mechanical repair as part of the trade and industrial education curriculum. The guide contains the following: (1) essential elements common to all trade and industrial courses; (2) an instructional delivery outline (teaching sequence) for the…

  13. A need for standardization in drinking water analysis – an investigation of DNA extraction procedure, primer choice and detection limit of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Jakob; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Albertsen, Mads

    have been made to illuminate the effects specifically related to bacterial communities in drinking water. In this study, we investigated the impact of the DNA extraction and primer choice on the observed community structure, and we also estimated the detection limit of the 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing....... The PowerWater DNA Isolation Kit resulted in significantly higher amounts of isolated DNA compared to the FastDNA SPIN Kit for Soil. Furthermore, extraction with the PowerWater kit lead to detection of a significantly higher number of OTUs. Likewise, the primer experiment revealed great discrepancies in OTU....... coli could be detected in all samples. However, samples with 101 cells/mL had several contaminating OTUs, constituting approximately 8% of the read abundances. For 16S rRNA gene analysis in drinking water samples, we recommend using the PowerWater DNA Isolation Kit for DNA extraction in combination...

  14. Undergraduate Computer Science and Engineering Curriculum in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rajaraman, Vaidyeswaran

    1993-01-01

    The undergraduate computer science and engineering degree in India is a professional engineering degree and follows the general structure of other engineering degree programs. It aims to provide a good breadth in basic engineering and 50% of the curriculum in common with all engineering disciplines. The curriculum has a strong electrical engineering bias. At present there is no formal accreditation of engineering programs in India and each university is expected to maintain their own standard...

  15. Hidden Curriculum as One of Current Issue of Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2015-01-01

    There are several issues in the education system, especially in the curriculum field that affect education. Hidden curriculum is one of current controversial curriculum issues. Many hidden curricular issues are the result of assumptions and expectations that are not formally communicated, established, or conveyed within the learning environment.…

  16. Automatic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Haeseler, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Automatic sequences are sequences which are produced by a finite automaton. Although they are not random they may look as being random. They are complicated, in the sense of not being not ultimately periodic, they may look rather complicated, in the sense that it may not be easy to name the rule by which the sequence is generated, however there exists a rule which generates the sequence. The concept automatic sequences has special applications in algebra, number theory, finite automata and formal languages, combinatorics on words. The text deals with different aspects of automatic sequences, in particular:· a general introduction to automatic sequences· the basic (combinatorial) properties of automatic sequences· the algebraic approach to automatic sequences· geometric objects related to automatic sequences.

  17. Rethinking the mathematics curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyles, Celia; Woodhouse, Geoffrey

    1998-01-01

    At a time when political interest in mathematics education is at its highest, this book demonstrates that the issues are far from straightforward. A wide range of international contributors address such questions as: What is mathematics, and what is it for? What skills does mathematics education need to provide as technology advances? What are the implications for teacher education? What can we learn from past attempts to change the mathematics curriculum? Rethinking the Mathematics Curriculum offers stimulating discussions, showing much is to be learnt from the differences in culture, national expectations, and political restraints revealed in the book. This accessible book will be of particular interest to policy makers, curriculum developers, educators, researchers and employers as well as the general reader.

  18. Learners, teachers and curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2008-01-01

    of virtual e-learning, interviews with teachers and 10 learner participants in a virtual classroom setting, and discourse analysis of curriculum developed for the particular e-learning course The research has taken place in the context of a study of e-learning and virtual teaching of Danish as a Second...... language for adults. The research results indicate that teachers seem to compensate by trying to create virtual communities of learning. Learners, however, experience disembedded relations. Conversely, curriculum development, on tends to ‘exploit’ the conditions of disembedding social relations in e-learning......, locationally distant”. The aim of the paper is to analyse and discuss how different positions in e-learning settings result in different answers to modernity. These settings can be applied to either teacher, learner or curriculum positions. The research was based on a qualitative longitudinal case study...

  19. Curriculum at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This Symposium presents curriculum design and content issues in a Scandinavian business school at its Centenary. The aim is an exploration of an educational institution at the interface of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) within the historical trends of the European Union. We hope...... this step will empirically document how the goals of the European Higher Education Area are functionally linked with the entrepreneurial sensibilities of administration, faculty, and administrative staff during the concrete operations of work. The series of presentations are framed between trans......-cultural epistemological foundations in insight-based critical realism and inquiry into how the institutional entrepreneurs – the program directors – negotiate opportunities, risks, and tensions in curriculum and program implementation. Detailed case presentations take up curriculum effort to successfully engage issues...

  20. ICT and Curriculum Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Voogt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The change towards the information society implies that many countries have to change their curricula, because students need to develop competencies that are not addressed in the traditional curricula. A case study approach was applied to examine curriculum changes in ICT-supported pedagogical practices from 28 countries. The analysis focused on curriculum content and goals of the ICT-supported pedagogical practices, how these aims were implemented in practice and which outcomes for students and teachers could be observed. The results showed that the curriculum content often was not new but rather was delivered in a different way. Many ICT-supported pedagogical practices strove to realize new goals important for lifelong learning in an information society. Content and goals were offered in curricular settings, often crossing the traditional boundaries of academic subjects. In many of the cases students worked on topics that were meaningful to them.

  1. Annotating public fungal ITS sequences from the built environment according to the MIxS-Built Environment standard – a report from a May 23-24, 2016 workshop (Gothenburg, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessy Abarenkov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent molecular studies have identified substantial fungal diversity in indoor environments. Fungi and fungal particles have been linked to a range of potentially unwanted effects in the built environment, including asthma, decay of building materials, and food spoilage. The study of the built mycobiome is hampered by a number of constraints, one of which is the poor state of the metadata annotation of fungal DNA sequences from the built environment in public databases. In order to enable precise interrogation of such data – for example, “retrieve all fungal sequences recovered from bathrooms” – a workshop was organized at the University of Gothenburg (May 23-24, 2016 to annotate public fungal barcode (ITS sequences according to the MIxS-Built Environment annotation standard (http://gensc.org/mixs/. The 36 participants assembled a total of 45,488 data points from the published literature, including the addition of 8,430 instances of countries of collection from a total of 83 countries, 5,801 instances of building types, and 3,876 instances of surface-air contaminants. The results were implemented in the UNITE database for molecular identification of fungi (http://unite.ut.ee and were shared with other online resources. Data obtained from human/animal pathogenic fungi will furthermore be verified on culture based metadata for subsequent inclusion in the ISHAM-ITS database (http://its.mycologylab.org.

  2. Paving the road for a European postgraduate training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa, Jessica E; Goverde, Angelique J; Teunissen, Pim W; Scheele, Fedde

    2016-08-01

    The 'Project for Achieving Consensus in Training' has been initiated by the European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology to harmonise training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology throughout Europe. In this project called the EBCOG-PACT, a state of the art pan-European training curriculum will be developed. Implementation of a pan-European curriculum will enhance harmonisation of both quality standards of women's healthcare practice and standards of postgraduate training. Secondly, it will assure equal quality of training of gynaecologists, promoting mobility throughout Europe. Thirdly, it will enhance cooperation and exchange of best practices between medical specialists and hospitals within Europe. The project is expecting to deliver (1) a description of the core and electives of the curriculum based on previously defined standards of care, (2) a societally responsive competency framework based on input from societal stakeholders and (3) strategies for education and assessment based on the current literature. Also, the project focuses on implementation and sustainability of the curriculum by delivering (4) a SWOT-analysis for the implementation based on insights into transcultural differences, (5) recommendations for implementation, change management and sustainability based on the SWOT analysis (6) and finally a handbook for other specialties initiating European curriculum development. The development and the implementation of this modern pan-European curriculum in Obstetrics and Gynaecology aims to serve as an example for the harmonisation of postgraduate training in Europe. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Curriculum Mapping with Academic Analytics in Medical and Healthcare Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komenda, Martin; Víta, Martin; Vaitsis, Christos; Schwarz, Daniel; Pokorná, Andrea; Zary, Nabil; Dušek, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    No universal solution, based on an approved pedagogical approach, exists to parametrically describe, effectively manage, and clearly visualize a higher education institution's curriculum, including tools for unveiling relationships inside curricular datasets. We aim to solve the issue of medical curriculum mapping to improve understanding of the complex structure and content of medical education programs. Our effort is based on the long-term development and implementation of an original web-based platform, which supports an outcomes-based approach to medical and healthcare education and is suitable for repeated updates and adoption to curriculum innovations. We adopted data exploration and visualization approaches in the context of medical curriculum innovations in higher education institutions domain. We have developed a robust platform, covering detailed formal metadata specifications down to the level of learning units, interconnections, and learning outcomes, in accordance with Bloom's taxonomy and direct links to a particular biomedical nomenclature. Furthermore, we used selected modeling techniques and data mining methods to generate academic analytics reports from medical curriculum mapping datasets. We present a solution that allows users to effectively optimize a curriculum structure that is described with appropriate metadata, such as course attributes, learning units and outcomes, a standardized vocabulary nomenclature, and a tree structure of essential terms. We present a case study implementation that includes effective support for curriculum reengineering efforts of academics through a comprehensive overview of the General Medicine study program. Moreover, we introduce deep content analysis of a dataset that was captured with the use of the curriculum mapping platform; this may assist in detecting any potentially problematic areas, and hence it may help to construct a comprehensive overview for the subsequent global in-depth medical curriculum

  4. Curriculum Mapping with Academic Analytics in Medical and Healthcare Education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Komenda

    Full Text Available No universal solution, based on an approved pedagogical approach, exists to parametrically describe, effectively manage, and clearly visualize a higher education institution's curriculum, including tools for unveiling relationships inside curricular datasets.We aim to solve the issue of medical curriculum mapping to improve understanding of the complex structure and content of medical education programs. Our effort is based on the long-term development and implementation of an original web-based platform, which supports an outcomes-based approach to medical and healthcare education and is suitable for repeated updates and adoption to curriculum innovations.We adopted data exploration and visualization approaches in the context of medical curriculum innovations in higher education institutions domain. We have developed a robust platform, covering detailed formal metadata specifications down to the level of learning units, interconnections, and learning outcomes, in accordance with Bloom's taxonomy and direct links to a particular biomedical nomenclature. Furthermore, we used selected modeling techniques and data mining methods to generate academic analytics reports from medical curriculum mapping datasets.We present a solution that allows users to effectively optimize a curriculum structure that is described with appropriate metadata, such as course attributes, learning units and outcomes, a standardized vocabulary nomenclature, and a tree structure of essential terms. We present a case study implementation that includes effective support for curriculum reengineering efforts of academics through a comprehensive overview of the General Medicine study program. Moreover, we introduce deep content analysis of a dataset that was captured with the use of the curriculum mapping platform; this may assist in detecting any potentially problematic areas, and hence it may help to construct a comprehensive overview for the subsequent global in-depth medical

  5. Curriculum Pearls for Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staykova, Milena P.

    2013-01-01

    Many nurse educators fear involvement in curriculum development because of limited understanding of what it entails. Curricula, as etymological, epistemological, and phenomenological concepts have attracted the attention of educators for decades. Several curriculum models exist to explain curriculum decision-making, and the relationship among…

  6. Assessing quality standards for ChIP-seq and related massive parallel sequencing-generated datasets: When rating goes beyond avoiding the crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Mendoza-Parra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Massive parallel DNA sequencing combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation and a large variety of DNA/RNA-enrichment methodologies is at the origin of data resources of major importance. Indeed these resources, available for multiple genomes, represent the most comprehensive catalogue of (i cell, development and signal transduction-specified patterns of binding sites for transcription factors (‘cistromes’ and for transcription and chromatin modifying machineries and (ii the patterns of specific local post-translational modifications of histones and DNA (‘epigenome’ or of regulatory chromatin binding factors. In addition, (iii the resources specifying chromatin structure alterations are emerging. Importantly, these types of “omics” datasets populate increasingly public repositories and provide highly valuable resources for the exploration of general principles of cell function in a multi-dimensional genome–transcriptome–epigenome–chromatin structure context. However, data mining is critically dependent on the data quality, an issue that, surprisingly, is still largely ignored by scientists and well-financed consortia, data repositories and scientific journals. So what determines the quality of ChIP-seq experiments and the datasets generated therefrom and what refrains scientists from associating quality criteria to their data? In this ‘opinion’ we trace the various parameters that influence the quality of this type of datasets, as well as the computational efforts that were made until now to qualify them. Moreover, we describe a universal quality control (QC certification approach that provides a quality rating for ChIP-seq and enrichment-related assays. The corresponding QC tool and a regularly updated database, from which at present the quality parameters of more than 8000 datasets can be retrieved, are freely accessible at www.ngs-qc.org.

  7. Clinical nutrition in the hepatogastroenterology curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Chris J J; Wanten, Geert J A; Semrad, Carol E; Jeppesen, Palle B; Kruizenga, Hinke M; Wierdsma, Nicolette J; Grasman, Matthijs E; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A

    2016-02-07

    Gastroenterology (GE) used to be considered a subspecialty of internal medicine. Today, GE is generally recognized as a wide-ranging specialty incorporating capacities, such as hepatology, oncology and interventional endoscopy, necessitating GE-expert differentiation. Although the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology has defined specific expertise areas in Advanced endoscopy, hepatology, digestive oncology and clinical nutrition, training for the latter topic is lacking in the current hepatogastroenterology (HGE) curriculum. Given its relevance for HGE practice, and being at the core of gastrointestinal functioning, there is an obvious need for training in nutrition and related issues including the treatment of disease-related malnutrition and obesity and its associated metabolic derangements. This document aims to be a starting point for the integration of nutritional expertise in the HGE curriculum, allowing a central role in the management of malnutrition and obesity. We suggest minimum endpoints for nutritional knowledge and expertise in the standard curriculum and recommend a focus period of training in nutrition issues in order to produce well-trained HGE specialists. This article provides a road map for the organization of such a training program. We would highly welcome the World Gastroenterology Organisation, the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the American Gastroenterology Association and other (inter)national Gastroenterology societies support the necessary certifications for this item in the HGE-curriculum.

  8. Competency-Based Materials for the Florida Automotive Mechanics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Ludy; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes Florida's new automotive mechanics curriculum, an individualized, self-paced learning sequence that combines text material, review exercises and actual work activities. Development of the materials, including incorporation of Florida's V-TECS catalog of performance objectives in auto mechanics, is described. A field-test experience of a…

  9. Industrial Arts Curriculum Guide for Automated Machining in Metals Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985

    This curriculum guide is designed to be used for creating programs in automated machining education in Connecticut. The first sections of the guide are introductory, explaining the importance of computer-numerically controlled machines, describing the industrial arts scope and sequence for kindergarten through adult levels, describing the…

  10. Degrassi Health Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Robin J.

    This health curriculum is intended to help teachers deal with some of today's adolescent health issues: (1) alcoholism (issues surrounding family alcoholism); (2) relationships (stereotyping and teen friendships); (3) Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) (insight into what it is like to live with HIV);…

  11. Incentives from Curriculum Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerselman, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum tracking creates incentives in the years before its start, and we should therefore expect test scores to be higher during those years. I find robust evidence for incentive effects of tracking in the UK based on the UK comprehensive school reform. Results from the Swedish comprehensive school reform are inconclusive. Internationally, I…

  12. Community as Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Jim; Chow, Patricia; Schechter, Sandra R.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a project involving teachers, parents, and university researchers in collaborations to support multilingual children's development and use of language. Strategies for fostering an inclusive climate included building on the interests and resources of the local community, involving community members in curriculum development,…

  13. Listening across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2014-01-01

    Listening as a skills objective must be emphasized throughout the curriculum of school subjects. There are a variety of learning opportunities which stress the art and skills of listening. In conversation, it might be embarrassing if the sender of the message needs to repeat content due to faulty listening habits. Or, the responder in response…

  14. Revisiting the Rhetorical Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Kris; Soetaert, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the special strand on "Revisiting the rhetorical curriculum" is to explore the educational potential of a new rhetorical perspective, specifically in relation to different traditions within educational and rhetorical studies. This implies that we do not only look at education "in" rhetoric, but that we position education also "as" a…

  15. School Curriculum in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Chie

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Japanese education system especially relevant to the school curriculum, which might support Japanese high performance in the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), mainly through Japanese policy documents. The Japanese education systems have been constructed by the local context of society and politics,…

  16. The Corporate Law Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofsky, James S.

    1976-01-01

    On the premise that corporate counsel must be an able diagnostician before he can focus on highly specialized and interrelated issues of business law, the author suggests an approach to corporate law curriculum in which the basic course balances the quality and quantity of material designed to create the needed sensitivity. (JT)

  17. Curriculum Development Through Delphi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Gary; Jauch, Lawrence R.

    1978-01-01

    The basic Delphi methodology is outlined along with possible goals and objectives in a Delphi study. The results of an actual case study in the use of the Delphi method for higher education curriculum development are reported, and attention is given to the problem of selecting participants for a Delphi exercise. (Author/LBH)

  18. Classical Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Judith W.

    2009-01-01

    The article identifies some key findings in pedagogical research over recent decades, placing them within a framework of logical curriculum development and current practice in quality assurance and enhancement. Throughout, the ideas and comments are related to the practice of teaching classics in university. (Contains 1 figure and 3 notes.)

  19. Decolonizing the (Distance) Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Postcolonial theory remains part of the challenge of literary theory to curriculum development. As the author's personal history suggests, it is more than simply another way of reading and interpretation, but enables an engagement with, a bearing witness to, the gross inequalities of the world today. Drama is a good example, evidenced by the…

  20. Across the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Marilyn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Across-the-curriculum articles focus on four areas. A math activity describes optical illusions and the properties of shapes. A hands-on science activity presents the chemistry of secret messages. A writing lesson helps students capture the essence of character. An art lesson presents a project on medieval castles. (SM)

  1. Solar Curriculum Guides, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This document contains an outline for a curriculum to train solar energy technicians in community colleges. The guide contains eight courses, each of which is divided into one to five modules. Modules, in turn, are divided into units, and units contain student handouts appropriate to the material. The following eight courses are included in this…

  2. The Counseling & Guidance Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Counseling and guidance services are vital in any school curriculum. Counselors may themselves be dealing with students of diverse abilities and handicaps. Counselors may have to work with students affected by drug addiction, fetal alcohol syndrome, homelessness, poverty, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and divorce. Students may present…

  3. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  4. Plumbing and Heating Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    Theory and experience in the following areas are included in this plumbing curriculum: (1) plumbing fixtures and heating; (2) city water service; (3) fixture roughing; (4) venting; and (5) solar heating systems. The plumbing program manual includes the following sections: (1) general objectives for grades 10, 11, and 12; (2) a list of 33 major…

  5. Curriculum, curriculum development, curriculum studies? Problematising theoretical ambiguities in doctoral theses in the education field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro du Preez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical ambiguities in curriculum studies result in conceptual mayhem. Accordingly, they hinder the development of the complicated conversation on curriculum as a verb. This article aims to contribute to reconceptualizing curriculum studies as a dynamic social practice that aspires to thinking and acting with intelligences and sensitivity so as to understand oneself and others. It also raises awareness that equating all forms of research on curriculum with curriculum studies dilutes the scope of the conversation. This exploration asks two key questions: What is the nature of doctoral theses in the field of education's theoretical contributions to nuances of curriculum (curriculum, curriculum development, and curriculum studies? In what ways do these theses perpetuate or even add to current ambiguities in the discipline of curriculum studies? The exploration of these two questions draws on a critical meta-study of 511 theses completed in South African universities (2005-2012 conducted using a three level process. It appears that the main detractions of these theses are that some of them see curriculum studies as a dumping ground and others make no theoretical contribution to the discipline. The article concludes by suggesting ways which would encourage the intellectual advancement of curriculum studies through rigorous disciplinarity.

  6. Curriculum, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Studies? Problematising Theoretical Ambiguities in Doctoral Theses in the Education Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Preez, Petro; Simmonds, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical ambiguities in curriculum studies result in conceptual mayhem. Accordingly, they hinder the development of the complicated conversation on curriculum as a verb. This article aims to contribute to reconceptualizing curriculum studies as a dynamic social practice that aspires to thinking and acting with intelligences and sensitivity so…

  7. The evolution of nanopore sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Yang, Qiuping; Wang, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    The “$1000 Genome” project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the “$1000 Genome” while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards. PMID:25610451

  8. The Evolution of Nanopore Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue eWang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The $1,000 Genome project has been drawing increasing attention since its launch a decade ago. Nanopore sequencing, the third-generation, is believed to be one of the most promising sequencing technologies to reach four gold standards set for the $1,000 Genome while the second-generation sequencing technologies are bringing about a revolution in life sciences, particularly in genome sequencing-based personalized medicine. Both of protein and solid-state nanopores have been extensively investigated for a series of issues, from detection of ionic current blockage to field-effect-transistor (FET sensors. A newly released protein nanopore sequencer has shown encouraging potential that nanopore sequencing will ultimately fulfill the gold standards. In this review, we address advances, challenges, and possible solutions of nanopore sequencing according to these standards.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of a standardized scheme for identification of Streptococcus uberis in quarter milk samples: A comparison between conventional bacteriological examination, modified Rambach agar medium culturing, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Regina; Baumgartner, Martina; Urbantke, Verena; Stessl, Beatrix; Wittek, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Bacteriological examination of milk samples is a prerequisite for pathogen-specific therapy and aids in limiting antimicrobial resistance. The aims of this study were to establish a standardized scheme for reliable Streptococcus uberis identification in routine diagnosis and to evaluate the accuracy of conventional tests and growing patterns of Strep. uberis on a selective medium (modified Rambach agar medium, MRAM) using 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis as a reference method. We obtained isolates of presumptive Strep. uberis (n = 336) from quarter milk samples of dairy cows with intramammary infections and classified the isolates into 2 clusters using biochemical characterization. In cluster 1 (n = 280), cocci grew as non-hemolytic colonies, hydrolyzing esculin, carrying no Lancefield antigen (A/B/C/D/G) or Christie Atkins Munch-Petersen factor, and their growth was inhibited on an Enterococcus agar. Production of β-d-galactosidase on MRAM was shown by 257 of the cluster 1 isolates (91.79%), and 16S rRNA gene sequencing verified 271 (96.79%) of the isolates to be Strep. uberis. In 264 isolates (94.29%), MRAM agreed with the sequencing results. In cluster 2 (n = 56), isolates showed different characteristics: 37 (66.07%) were β-d-galactosidase-positive, and based on 16S sequencing results, 36 (64.29%) were identified correctly as Strep. uberis using biochemical methods. Identification success in this group differed significantly between routine diagnosis and MRAM application: MRAM agreed with sequencing results in 47 isolates (83.93%). To identify Strep. uberis and differentiate it from other lactic acid bacteria in routine diagnosis, we suggest using catalase reaction, hemolysis, esculin hydrolysis, and growth on enterococci agar. Isolates that show a typical biochemical profile can be identified satisfactorily with these tests. For Strep. uberis isolates with divergent patterns, application of MRAM as a follow-up test increased the diagnostic accuracy to 94

  10. Designing a Mathematics Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Peng Yee

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A decade of PMRI saw the changes in the classroom in some of the primary schools in Indonesia. Based on observation, we can say that though the mathematics syllabus in Indonesia did not change, its curriculum has changed under the movement of PMRI. In this article, we put in writing some of the experience gained through the involvement in designing curricula since 1971. Hopefully, some of the observations made may be of use to the colleagues in Indonesia. The discussion below will cover some deciding factors in designing a curriculum, some practices, and the latest trends. For convenience, we keep the discussion general, and do not refer to a specific syllabus. Also, in many cases, we refer mainly to secondary schools, that is, Grade 7 to Grade 10.

  11. On the Development of Digital Forensics Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manghui Tu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer Crime and computer related incidents continue their prevalence and frequency and result in loss of billions of dollars. To fight against those crimes and frauds, it is urgent to develop digital forensics education programs to train a suitable workforce to efficiently and effectively investigate crimes and frauds. However, there is no standard to guide the design of digital forensics curriculum for an academic program. In this research, we investigate the research works on digital forensics curriculum design and existing education programs.  Both digital forensics educators and practitioners were surveyed and the results are analyzed to determine what industry and law enforcement need. Based on the survey results and what the industry certificate programs cover, we identified topics that are desired to be covered in digital forensics courses. Finally, we propose six digital forensics courses and their topics that can be offered in both undergraduate and graduate digital forensics programs.

  12. An Exploratory Analysis of a Middle School Science Curriculum: Implications for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gregory S.; Hord, Casey

    2016-01-01

    An exploratory study of a middle school curriculum directly aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards was conducted with a focus on how the curriculum addresses the instructional needs of students with learning disabilities. A descriptive analysis of a lesson on speed and velocity was conducted and implications discussed for students with…

  13. Explore-Create-Share Study: An Evaluation of Teachers as Curriculum Innovators in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ayora

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a curriculum design-based (CDB) professional development model on K-12 teachers' capacity to integrate engineering education in the classroom. This teacher professional development approach differs from other training programs where teachers learn how to use a standard curriculum and…

  14. Models and automation technologies for the curriculum development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Volkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the sequence of the curriculum development stages on the basis of the system analysis, as well as to create models and information technologies for the implementation of thesestages.The methods and the models of the systems’ theory and the system analysis, including methods and automated procedures for structuring organizational aims, models and automated procedures for organizing complex expertise.On the basis of the analysis of existing studies in the field of curriculum modeling, using formal mathematical language, including optimization models, that help to make distribution of disciplines by years and semesters in accordance with the relevant restrictions, it is shown, that the complexity and dimension of these tasks require the development of special software; the problem of defining the input data and restrictions requires a large time investment, that seems to be difficult to provide in real conditions of plans’ developing, thus it is almost impossible to verify the objectivity of the input data and the restrictions in such models. For a complete analysis of the process of curriculum development it is proposed to use the system definition, based on the system-targeted approach. On the basis of this definition the reasonable sequence of the integrated stages for the development of the curriculum was justified: 1 definition (specification of the requirements for the educational content; 2 determining the number of subjects, included in the curriculum; 3 definition of the sequence of the subjects; 4 distribution of subjects by semesters. The models and technologies for the implementation of these stages of curriculum development were given in the article: 1 models, based on the information approach of A.Denisov and the modified degree of compliance with objectives based on Denisov’s evaluation index (in the article the idea of evaluating the degree of the impact of disciplines for realization

  15. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...... on transcriptional evidence. Analysis of repetitive sequences suggests that they are underrepresented in the reference assembly, reflecting an enrichment of gene-rich regions in the current assembly. Characterization of Lotus natural variation by resequencing of L. japonicus accessions and diploid Lotus species...... is currently ongoing, facilitated by the MG20 reference sequence...

  16. The teacher and the curriculum;

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priestley, M.; Biesta, G.; Philippou, Stavroula

    2015-01-01

    A key debate in the curriculum field has centred on the extent to which teachers should or could achieve agency over the curriculum they enact. Risks to teacher agency have come from top-down control of curricula, either through input regulation (prescription of content, methods and/or teaching...... with a discussion of why it is important to understand and take into account teacher agency, when formulating and developing curriculum policy....

  17. Organizing Curriculum Change: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbury, Ian; Aspfors, Jessica; Fries, Anna-Verena; Hansén, Sven-Erik; Ohlhaver, Frank; Rosenmund, Moritz; Sivesind, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the questions and approaches of a five-nation cross-cultural study of state-based curriculum-making discussed in this issue of "JCS." The paper reviews the two decade-long interest of many nations in state-based curriculum-making and presents a framework for thinking about state-based curriculum-making as a tool of…

  18. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.B.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.M.; Vries, de B.

    2011-01-01

    Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers’ collaborative curriculum design were analyzed to identify the

  19. Simulation and curriculum design: a global survey in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, S; Burrow, M F; Leung, W K; Bridges, S M

    2017-12-01

    Curriculum reforms are being driven by globalization and international standardization. Although new information technologies such as dental haptic virtual reality (VR) simulation systems have provided potential new possibilities for clinical learning in dental curricula, infusion into curricula requires careful planning. This study aimed to identify current patterns in the role and integration of simulation in dental degree curricula internationally. An original internet survey was distributed by invitation to clinical curriculum leaders in dental schools in Asia, Europe, North America, and Oceania (Australia and New Zealand). The results (N = 62) showed Asia, Europe and Oceania tended towards integrated curriculum designs with North America having a higher proportion of traditional curricula. North America had limited implementation of haptic VR simulation technology but reported the highest number of scheduled simulation hours. Australia and New Zealand were the most likely regions to incorporate haptic VR simulation technology. This survey indicated considerable variation in curriculum structure with regionally-specific preferences being evident in terms of curriculum structure, teaching philosophies and motivation for incorporation of VR haptic simulation into curricula. This study illustrates the need for an improved evidence base on dental simulations to inform curriculum designs and psychomotor skill learning in dentistry. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Curriculum Assessment: Constructivist Primary Mathematics Curriculum in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ismet

    2010-01-01

    Many national and international studies put forward the idea that primary education in Turkey is questionable in many aspects. As a result, the Ministry of National Education changed primary curriculums in 2004 in Turkey. The curriculum for primary mathematics was redeveloped taking into consideration constructivist theory of education. The…

  1. Curriculum Online Review System: Proposing Curriculum with Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhinehart, Marilyn; Barlow, Rhonda; Shafer, Stu; Hassur, Debby

    2009-01-01

    The Curriculum Online Review System (CORS) at Johnson County Community College (JCCC) uses SharePoint as a Web platform for the JCCC Curriculum Proposals Process. The CORS application manages proposals throughout the approval process using collaboration tools and workflows to notify all stakeholders. This innovative new program has changed the way…

  2. Engendering Curriculum History. Studies in Curriculum Theory Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Petra

    2011-01-01

    How can curriculum history be re-envisioned from a feminist, poststructuralist perspective? "Engendering Curriculum History" disrupts dominant notions of history as linear, as inevitable progress, and as embedded in the individual. This conversation requires a history that seeks "rememberance" not representation, "reflexivity" not linearity, and…

  3. Whatever Happened to Curriculum Theory? Critical Realism and Curriculum Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestley, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In the face of what has been characterised by some as a "crisis" in curriculum--an apparent decline of some aspects of curriculum studies combined with the emergence of new types of national curricula which downgrade knowledge--some writers have been arguing for the use of realist theory to address these issues. This article offers a…

  4. Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for an air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed…

  5. The Hidden Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onatra Amparo

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the way hidden curriculum goes farther than just being the conscious and unconscious setting within the formal instruction context. It also shapes students personality and assigns to each individual the role they are supposed to play in society. In this process, interaction with the teacher is crucial since he/she is the one who directly moulds and cultivates the singularity of students according to the specific demands of the social class to which they belong. This phenomenon is well described in research conducted by Jane Anyon (1980 which is referred to in this paper as an example of the influence of the hidden curriculum on school life. Key words: Hidden Curriculum, Unconscious Setting, Teacher’s Role, Singularity, Society Este artículo muestra cómo el currículo oculto va más allá de ser simplemente el escenario consciente e inconsciente en el que se desarrolla la instrucción formal. El currículo oculto define la personalidad del estudiante y asigna a cada uno el papel que se supone debe ocupar en la sociedad. En este proceso, la interacción directa con el docente es decisiva ya que es éste quien directamente moldea y cultiva la singularidad de los estudiantes según las exigencias específicas de la clase social a la que pertenecen. Dicho fenómeno se describe muy bien en la investigación adelantada por Jane Anyon (1980, a la cual se hace referencia en este escrito, como ejemplo de la influencia del currículo oculto en la vida escolar. Palabras claves: Currículo Oculto, Escenario Inconsciente, Rol del Docente, Singularidad, Sociedad

  6. Sustainability Infused Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Independent Schools Foundation Academy (ISF) in Hong Kong established a sustainability policy in 2015, which explicitly states, "an experimentally integrated, environmentally and ethically sustainable system of science education and conservation practices based on the 2012 Jeju Declaration of the World Conservation Congress will be implemented through the school". ISF Academy is a private Chinese bilingual school in Hong Kong serving over 1500 students K-12, following the framework and curriculum of the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The strategy behind the implementation of this policy includes: development of a scientific sustainable curriculum that is age appropriate; establish a culture of sustainability within the ISF community and beyond to the wider HK community; install sustainable infrastructure that allows students to learn; and learn first hand sustainable living practices. It is well understood that solutions to the environmental challenges facing Hong Kong and our planet will require multiple disciplines. The current sustainability programs at ISF include: a) a whole school aerobic food waste composting system and organic farming, b) energy consumption monitoring of existing buildings, c) upcoming installation of an air pollution monitoring equipment that will correlate with the AQHI data collected by the Hong Kong government, d) a Renewable Energy Education Center (REEC) that will teach students about RE and also produce solar energy for classroom consumption, and e) student lead environmental group that manages the paper and used cooking oil recycling on campus. The Shuyuan Science and Sustainability faculty work closely with classroom teachers to ensure that the above mentioned projects are incorporated into the curriculum throughout the school. Interdisciplinary units (IDU) of study are being developed that encourage faculty and students to work across subject areas. Projects include Personal Projects, Extended Essays

  7. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Physical Therapist Assistant (CIP: 51.0806--Physical Therapy Assistant). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the physical therapy assistant program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and section…

  8. International Federation for Emergency Medicine model curriculum for medical student education in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobgood, Cherri; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Bandiera, Glen; Cameron, Peter; Halpern, Pinchas; Holliman, James; Jouriles, Nicholas; Kilroy, Darren; Mulligan, Terrence; Singer, Andrew

    2010-10-01

    Currently, there is no internationally recognised, standard curriculum that defines the basic minimum standards for emergency medicine education. To address this, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine convened a committee of international experts in emergency medicine and international emergency medicine development to outline a global curriculum for medical students in emergency medicine. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this committee. The curriculum is designed with a focus on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any medical school should be delivering to its students during their undergraduate years of training. The content is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems, but also for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within current educational structures. It is anticipated that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught, reflecting the existing educational milieu, the resources available and the goals of the institutions' educational leadership.

  9. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  10. Transportation Consumer Education Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    Materials in this curriculum guide represent a selection of the major transportation consumer topics and ideas and are designed to set the stage for more intensive transportation consumer education curriculum development and teacher efforts. (Eleven manuals covering the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the…

  11. Life Science. A Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Margaret; Cowan, Connie

    The life science curriculum is designed to promote the development of healthy living habits. Emphasis is placed on problems of major concern in the daily life of students and on significant problems in modern society. The curriculum is designed for students enrolled in the coordinated vocational education and training for disadvantaged and…

  12. Vocational Preparation Curriculum: Electrical Wiring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usoro, Hogan

    This document is a curriculum guide for instructors teaching vocational preparation for electrical wiring to special needs students. The purpose of the curriculum guide is to provide minimum skills for disadvantaged and handicapped students entering the mainstream; to supplement vocational skills of those students already in a regular training…

  13. Many Mansions: Conceptualizing Translingual Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmetdinova, Alsu; Burdick, Jake

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a vision for fostering multilingualism in schools that extends the notion of translanguaging to include the realm of multilingual curriculum theorizing. We locate our analysis at the intersection of multicultural education, multilingual education, and curriculum studies in order to conceptualize language, culture, and…

  14. Curriculum Development. Instructional Leadership Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatthorn, Allan A.

    Practical strategies for administrative education faculty involved in principal preparation programs are compiled in this guidebook. This unit in an instructional leadership series focuses on curriculum development and implementation, with a secondary focus on curriculum evaluation. Stages of the process include evaluation, planning, development,…

  15. Cosmetology. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local postsecondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  16. Research and the music curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Swanwick, Keith

    2000-01-01

    In this paper I wish to demonstrate how research can illuminate practice and inform curriculum and teachingdecisions. I shall draw attention to three areas where I believe research contributes to the development of music education. These are: assessment of the musical work of students, the evaluation of curriculum activities, the relationship between music in schools and music beyond the school gate.

  17. Curriculum theory in physical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Ann E.

    1989-03-01

    Primary current concerns of curriculum theorists in sport and physical education relate to clarification of value orientations underlying curricular decision-making, selection and statement of curriculum goals, identification and organization of programme content, and the process of curriculum change. Disciplinary mastery is the most traditional value orientation and that which is most frequently found in practice. Curriculum theorists have identified four other value orientations for study: social reconstruction, self-actualization, learning process, and ecological validity. Health-related fitness and the development of motor skills have long been the primary goals of physical education. In recent years, however, curriculum specialists have begun to assign higher priorities to goals of personal integration and challenge, of social development and multicultural understanding. There is general agreement that human movement activities constitute the subject-matter of the sport and physical education curriculum. Differences exist, however, as to how learning activities should be selected for particular programmes. The current trend in seeking better understanding of content is toward studying the operational curriculum with particular attention to the historical and social contexts. An important contemporary focus is the need to translate short-term results into lifestyle changes. The curriculum in sports and physical education should be viewed as a multitude of possibilities.

  18. Context, Curriculum and Professional Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Ivor

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a historical overview of how the process of curriculum change has evolved over the past 40 years. The intention is to explore how patterns of power and control have changed their configuration during different historical periods. The historical investigation of curriculum change shows a progressive movement away from the…

  19. Regrouping for an Integrated Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Jane E.

    1978-01-01

    A new integrated nursing curriculum at the University of Connecticut School of Nursing, representative of a change from a traditional to an integrated nursing program, required teachers to become generalists in nursing theory and practice. The author describes the new curriculum framework, redefined faculty teams, and clinical experience. (MF)

  20. Curriculum Change Management and Workload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahtani, Aishah

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which Saudi teachers have responded or are responding to the challenges posed by a new curriculum. It also deals with issues relating to workload demands which affect teachers' performance when they apply a new curriculum in a Saudi Arabian secondary school. In addition, problems such as scheduling and sharing space…

  1. Computer Timetabling and Curriculum Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarraga, M. N.; Bates, S.

    1980-01-01

    A Manchester, England, high school designed lower school curriculum structures via computer and investigated their feasibility using the Nor Data School Scheduling System. The positive results suggest that the computer system could provide all schools with an invaluable aid to the planning and implementation of their curriculum. (CT)

  2. IBE Glossary of Curriculum Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    UNESCO International Bureau of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The International Bureau of Education (IBE) has compiled a "Glossary of Curriculum Terminology" offering definitions for over 180 terms related to the curriculum. It is also intended to be a working reference tool for specialists, educators and practitioners, and therefore feedback and suggestions are invited to help us to continue to…

  3. Whales. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Claire

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  4. Designing anatomy program in modern medical curriculum: matter of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grković, Ivica; Marinović Guić, Maja; Kosta, Vana; Poljicanin, Ana; Carić, Ana; Vilović, Katarina

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the structure of the anatomy program in the first year medical curriculum of University of Split School of Medicine by comparing it with the recommendations by the Educational Affairs Committee of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and the Terminologia Anatomica (TA); we also quantitatively evaluated the organization of teaching material in contemporary topographical anatomy textbooks and matched them with the AACA recommendations, TA, and the curriculum of the anatomy course taught at Medical School in Split, Croatia. TA, official recommendations of the AACA, 6 contemporary anatomy textbooks, and the structure of the anatomy course were analyzed for the proportion of the terms or text devoted to standard topographical regions of the body. The findings were correlated using Spearman rho test. The curriculum outline correlated both with the AACA recommendations (Spearman rho=0.83, P=0.015) and TA (Spearman rho=0.73, P=0.046). Textbooks contained 8 distinct sections, 7 allocated to topographic anatomy regions and 1 to general anatomy concepts and principles. The structure of all textbooks correlated significantly with the course curriculum. However, 4 out of 6 textbooks did not correlate with TA and only a single textbook showed significant correlation with the AACA recommendations. Anatomy textbooks vary in the amount of text dedicated to different parts of topographical anatomy and are not quite concordant with curriculum recommendations and standard anatomical terminology. Planning the structure of an anatomy course should not be based on a single book or recommendation but on evidence.

  5. Incorporating Sustainability Issues into the Financial Accounting Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskin, Daniel L.; Burke, Megan M.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the views that society holds of capital allocation suggest that sustainability reporting needs to be incorporated into the financial accounting curriculum. This paper reviews the background and history of corporate social responsibility and sustainability reporting and discusses formation of the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board…

  6. Impact of Curriculum Strategies in Ameliorating Communicative Skill in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Study investigated the problems of the students in improving communicative skill in English at standard VII and found the impact of creative competency (new curriculum strategy) to eliminate the problem of it. Eighty eight subjects were involved in the study. Achievement test was considered as instrumentation for the study. Creative competency…

  7. Living Authors, Living Stories: Integrating Local Authors into Our Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Beatrice Mendez

    2009-01-01

    Keeping literature classrooms vibrant, energized, and current can require supreme pedagogical effort, especially in light of students' sometimes pointed disinterest in traditional and/or canonical texts. Integrating local authors into a standard curriculum can be an effective strategy for invigorating students' interest in literature and helping…

  8. Linking Children's Literature with Social Studies in the Elementary Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almerico, Gina M.

    2013-01-01

    The author shares information related to integrating quality literature written for children into the teaching of social studies at the elementary school level. Research within the past decade informs educators of the strong impact of curriculum standards for the social studies as developed by professional organizations. Teachers today are…

  9. Comparative Economics Systems in the Undergraduate Curriculum: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovzik, Alexander; Johnson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors report on the status of comparative economics systems in the U.S. undergraduate economics curriculum. The treatment of comparative economics systems topics in introductory courses is examined through a survey of standard textbooks. To evaluate comparative economics systems at the advanced undergraduate level, they rely…

  10. Using Curriculum Mapping to Engage Faculty Members in the Analysis of a Pharmacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercaigne, Lavern; Davies, Neal M.; Davis, Christine; Renaud, Robert; Kristjanson, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To develop a curriculum mapping process that supports continuous analysis and evidence-based decisions in a pharmacy program. Design. A curriculum map based on the national educational outcomes for pharmacy programs was created using conceptual frameworks grounded in cognitive learning and skill acquisition. Assessment. The curriculum map was used to align the intended curriculum with the national educational outcomes and licensing examination blueprint. The leveling and sequencing of content showed longitudinal progression of student learning and performance. There was good concordance between the intended and learned curricula as validated by survey responses from employers and graduating students. Conclusion. The curriculum mapping process was efficient and effective in providing an evidence-based approach to the continuous quality improvement of a pharmacy program. PMID:25258444

  11. Nucleonics across the curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrano, Rich

    2005-01-01

    Many within the ''nuclear'' community are interested in attracting young people to careers in nuclear related fields while they are at the age when they are considering career choices. High school is a good to introduce students to ideas that may lead them to investigate careers in nuclear science. However, they may not even be exposed to those ideas for various reasons. For example, many teachers may not see the connection between nuclear issues and other areas of instruction. In addition, most teachers already have a full curriculum, and adding another topic is unlikely. As a result many students will not see some of the practical applications of nuclear science in other fields of study unless they take a class where nuclear science is a specified topic of study. A good alternative is to incorporate nuclear examples across the curriculum to illustrate concepts already included in other classes. This would be a simple step that teachers may find interesting and would expose a variety of students to nuclear issues. (author)

  12. Toward a Curriculum Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoronka, Kevin F. W.

    2008-05-01

    This paper proposes an innovation on HIV prevention, in response to the United Nations Millennium Development Goal to combat HIV/AIDS. The curriculum innovation is through a participatory research design of life skills based education course, involving both healthy faculty tutors and young community leaders at the centre. The innovation builds onto the strengths of previous IIV prevention interventions and argues that effective life skills based education targets the individual, peers and the wider community since the same levels are crucial in HIV transmission. The innovation also recommends a rethinking of the content used to teach and learn life skill based education to prevent HIV and recommends that such content is to be co-conducted by the young community involvement. The content is to be delivered in a participatory way in order for the young community leaders to engage in critical action to prevent HIV. Because of the novelty of such an intervention, the innovation recognizes that such an approach to the design and implementation of the curriculum initiative is complex and involves careful planning, monitoring and evaluation to yield desired outcomes. In conclusion, the innovation recommends that HIV prevention can be possible even in a country such as Sierra Leone, with increasing HIV prevalence in the world.

  13. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Total-Genome-Sequenced Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the "gold standard" of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS...

  14. An exploratory curriculum analysis of thirteen virtual schools, online homeschools and online curriculum providers' science curriculum from kindergarten through twelfth grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dussy L.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and examine various Internet-based science curricula in terms of their educational value and comprehensiveness. Thirteen online homeschool providers' science curricula were analyzed through an examination of the content and organization of instruction and through a comparison with the seven National Science Education Standards (NSES) in order to assess the pedagogical and developmental appropriateness of online science curriculum, to find the ideological perspectives exhibited by each curriculum, and to identify implications for the future of homeschooling regarding children who use an online science curriculum as the basis of their science education. The results reveal that only a few online schools incorporate all seven NSES in their science curriculum; most online schools' content and instruction have a traditional/behavioral perspective; and the Systematizer theoretical perspective was prevalent in online schools' science curricula. This study investigates the issue of whether online homeschooling can accurately be termed homeschooling. A discussion of education and schooling according to Holt (1976), Illich (1972), and Moore and Moore (1975) explore this issue. The findings from this discussion suggest that the online homeschool movement may be an undiscovered form of "schooling" and that parents, educators, researchers, curriculum developers, and specialists should be aware of the implications online homeschooling has on homeschooling's philosophy of education.

  15. 25 CFR 36.23 - Standard VIII-Junior high/middle school instructional program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... curriculum. (1) Career exploration and orientation. (2) Environmental and safety education. (3) Metric... vocational exploration class shall be consistent with applicable health and safety standards. ...

  16. Curriculum inventory: Modeling, sharing and comparing medical education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Albright, Susan; Smothers, Valerie; Cameron, Terri; Willett, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Abstract descriptions of how curricula are structured and run. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) MedBiquitous Curriculum Inventory Standard provides a technical syntax through which a wide range of different curricula can be expressed and subsequently compared and analyzed. This standard has the potential to shift curriculum mapping and reporting from a somewhat disjointed and institution-specific undertaking to something that is shared among multiple medical schools and across whole medical education systems. Given the current explosion of different models of curricula (time-free, competency-based, socially accountable, distributed, accelerated, etc.), the ability to consider this diversity using a common model has particular value in medical education management and scholarship. This article describes the development and structure of the Curriculum Inventory Standard as a way of standardizing the modeling of different curricula for audit, evaluation and research purposes. It also considers the strengths and limitations of the current standard and the implications for a medical education world in which this level of commonality, precision, and accountability for curricular practice is the norm rather than the exception.

  17. Curriculum Prototypes and the Seven Dwarfs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Shirley

    Jonathan Culler's notion, that each change of perspective a reader makes brings something different from the text, is explored by using four curricula. They are: the traditional language arts curriculum, an active reading comprehension curriculum, a psychology curriculum, and a feminist curriculum. By analyzing the same text, "Snow White and…

  18. Developing a National Geography Curriculum for Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Alaric Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Australia is in the process of implementing a national geography curriculum to replace the separate state and territory curriculums. The paper describes the process of curriculum development, and identifies the different groups that were involved. These included the board and staff of the national curriculum authority, geography teachers across…

  19. Stability and Change in Curriculum Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Tamar

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the lack of congruence between different curricular and evaluation ideologies and the lack of sensitivity regarding underlying theoretical assumptions in curriculum evaluation practices from a perspective that calls for a joint ontological and epistemological view of the curriculum and curriculum evaluation. Explores curriculum as a…

  20. 14 CFR 121.911 - Indoctrination curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Indoctrination curriculum. 121.911 Section... Indoctrination curriculum. Each indoctrination curriculum must include the following: (a) For newly hired persons... curriculums, as appropriate. (d) For evaluators: General evaluation requirements of the AQP; methods of...

  1. 24 CFR 3286.308 - Training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Training curriculum. 3286.308... States § 3286.308 Training curriculum. (a) Curriculum for initial installer licensing. The training... regulations in this part. The curriculum must include, at a minimum, training in the following areas: (1) An...

  2. CPM (Critical Path Method) as a Curriculum Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongerson, M. Duane

    This document discusses and illustrates the use of the Critical Path Method (CPM) as a tool for developing curriculum. In so doing a brief review of the evolution of CPM as a management tool developed by E. I. duPont de Nemours Company is presented. It is also noted that CPM is only a method of sequencing learning activities and not an end unto…

  3. Common Standards for Career Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Office of College and Career Readiness has developed the "Common Standards for Career Education Programs." The six common standards are: (1) Program Management and Planning; (2) Curriculum; (3) Instruction; (4) Professional Development; (5) Career and Technical Student Organizations; and (6) Instructional Facilities and Equipment.…

  4. Modeling in the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Kai Chung

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion of modeling and applications into the mathematics curriculum has proven to be a challenging task over the last fifty years. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has made mathematical modeling both one of its Standards for Mathematical Practice and one of its Conceptual Categories. This article discusses the need for mathematical…

  5. Progress in simulation education: developing an anesthesia curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, David J

    2014-12-01

    Simulation's role in anesthesia education is expanding to include more advanced skills and training for subspecialty practice. This review will provide an overview of many recent studies that expand the simulation curriculum for anesthesia education. Recent studies describe a curriculum that uses a range of simulation modalities, including part-task trainers, mannequin-based simulation, virtual reality, in-situ techniques, screen-based simulations as well as encounters with 'standardized' patients, nurses or physician colleagues. A variety of studies describe the use of task-training devises to more effectively acquire skills, such as fibre-optic intubation, ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia and transthoracic echocardiography as well as expand on a variety of teamwork skills particularly in subspecialty anesthesia practice. A curriculum is emerging that utilizes a variety of simulation modalities as part of a more comprehensive educational strategy for anesthesia specialty training.

  6. [Selection and optimal sequence of critical elements for medication review: A simulation with hospital pharmacy residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, S; Barbier, A; Thibault, M; Atkinson, S; Bussières, J-F

    2017-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the responses of pharmacy residents regarding critical steps for medication order review, in the presence or absence of clinical pharmacists on patient care units, to describe the sequence of these steps and to compare them to an optimal sequence. The secondary objectives were to test this sequence in a simulation and to assess the residents' level of agreement on medication order review. Twenty-two validation steps were selected from guidelines. A simulation on order review was organized in three steps: selecting elements judged to be necessary or not for the order review critical path, then organizing this sequence in chronological order, implementation of this critical path on two simulated practical cases, resident perceptions about order review in their training. Forty-one residents participated in the activity. Responses were heterogeneous regarding the elements' sequence and the time required for the review of a simulated case (3-13minutes). A majority of residents considered that their training was insufficient (29/41), that pharmacists validated differently (27/41), and that it was impossible to review the 22 proposed items for each prescription (30/41). This article highlights heterogeneous medication order review practices among pharmacy residents, due to a lack of training in their curriculum according to them. It is essential to acquire medication order review standard both locally and nationally. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. A model marine-science curriculum for fourth-grade pupils in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Philip James

    This dissertation focused on the development of a model marine-science curriculum for fourth-grade pupils in the State of Florida. The curriculum was developed using grounded theory research method, including a component of data collected from an on-line survey administered to 106 professional educators and marine biologists. The results of the data collection and analysis showed a definitive necessity for teacher preparedness, multidisciplinary content, and inquiry-based science instruction. Further, three important factors emerged: (a) collaborative grouping increases achievement; (b) field excursions significantly impact student motivation; (c) standardized testing influences curriculum development. The curriculum is organized as an 11-day unit, with detailed lesson plans presented in standard curricular format and with all components correlated to the Florida State Educational Standards. The curriculum incorporates teacher preparation, multimedia presentations, computer-assisted instruction, scientific art appreciation, and replication as well as assessment factors. The curriculum addresses topics of ichthyology, marine animal identification, environmental conservation and protection, marine animal anatomy, water safety, environmental stewardship, and responsible angling techniques. The components of the curriculum were discussed with reference to the literature on which it was based and recommendations for future research were addressed.

  8. Implementation and modification of an anatomy-based integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Brenda J; Paulsen, Douglas F; Wineski, Lawrence E

    2017-06-01

    Morehouse School of Medicine elected to restructure its first-year medical curriculum by transitioning from a discipline-based to an integrated program. The anatomy course, with regional dissection at its core, served as the backbone for this integration by weaving the content from prior traditional courses into the curriculum around the anatomy topics. There were four primary goals for this restructuring process. Goal 1: develop new integrated courses. Course boundaries were established at locations where logical breaks in anatomy content occurred. Four new courses were created, each containing integrated subject content. Goal 2: establish a curriculum management team. The team consisted of course directors, subject specialists, and a curriculum director. This team worked together to efficiently manage the new curriculum. Goal 3: launch contemporary examination and question banking methods. An electronic system, in which images could be included, was implemented for examinations and quizzes, and for storing and refining questions. Goal 4: ensure equitable distribution of standardized examinations and course grading systems among all courses. Assessments included quizzes, in-course examinations, and National Board of Medical Examiners ® (NBME ® ) Subject Examinations. A standard plan assigned the contribution of each to the final course grade. Significant improvement was seen on subject examinations. Once the obstacles and challenges of integration were overcome, a robust and efficient education program was developed. The curriculum is expected to continue evolving and improving, while retaining full regional dissection as a core element. Anat Sci Educ 10: 262-275. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  9. Grade 6 Science Curriculum Specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Branch.

    This material describes curriculum specifications for grade 6 science in Alberta. Emphases recommended are: (1) process skills (50%); (2) psychomotor skills (10%); (3) attitudes (10%); and (4) subject matter (30%). Priorities within each category are identified. (YP)

  10. Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, W.C.

    1987-02-01

    The Energy Management Curriculum Starter Kit was designed to help engineering educators develop and teach energy management courses. Montana State University and Oklahoma State University courses are embodied in the model curriculum given. The curricula offered at many other universities throughout the United States are also presented. The kit was designed specifically to train engineering students to be good energy managers. Courses at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level are presented.

  11. Core curriculum illustration: acute pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Muhammad Mubashir; Sandstrom, Claire Kalsch

    2017-10-01

    This is the 26th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at: http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.htm .

  12. Synergic principles as a base working out of curriculums for professional formation on foreign language in non-linguistic universities

    OpenAIRE

    Anzina T. I.; Rozhina E.Yu.; Selivanova I.V.

    2017-01-01

    the conception of synergic approach presented in the article concerns building curriculums for foreign language. The competency format of the Federal State Educational Standard is a ground for structuring curriculums on the following principles: interdisciplinary, homeostatic, hierarchical, open, complimentary, nonlinear and activity and communication unity. It enables the education system to prepare a perspective specialist for an efficient professional performance.

  13. A Case Study: The High/Scope Preschool Curriculum and Kindergarten Readiness in the Pittsgrove Township School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Loren D.

    2010-01-01

    The New Jersey Department of Education has been stressing the value of early childhood education for the past 12 years. Research has clearly demonstrated the value of high-quality preschool programs for preparing children for school and even later life. Particularly in light of the Core Curriculum Content Standards and elementary curriculum, which…

  14. Music Education Curriculum and Social Change: A Study of Popular Music in Secondary Schools in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wai-Chung

    2014-01-01

    In Chinese society over the last two decades, modernisation and globalisation, together with the transition to a market economy, have created new imperatives and challenges for the school music curriculum. As a result, the 2011 reform of the Curriculum Standards for Primary Education and Junior Secondary Education marks the first time that the…

  15. A Portrait of a Teacher's Life: Learning to Teach, Curriculum-Making, and Teaching about Islam in a Public School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aown, Najwa

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance and the inclusion of teaching about religion in most national and state curriculum standards, especially in social studies curriculum, many public school teachers are not adequately prepared to how, and what, to teach about religion, in particular Islam. As a result, many teachers are left alone to sink and swim in their…

  16. Radiation oncology medical student clerkship: implementation and evaluation of a bi-institutional pilot curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Daniel W; Spektor, Alexander; Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C; Krishnan, Monica S; Jimenez, Rachel B; Viswanathan, Akila N; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R; Chmura, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1=not at all, 5=extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as "quite useful" to "extremely useful" (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, Daniel W.; Spektor, Alexander; Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C.; Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency

  18. Unified programs nationally? Strengths and weaknesses of the learning standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Polo Martínez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of measurable learning standards as an element of the curriculum has definitely opened the door to the connection between the curriculum and external assessments. Since its origin, the potential impact of that element in improving our educational system has been defended and criticized. The truth is that in our country, though all regions are based on the same Royal Decree of core curriculum, and therefore the same reference for the evaluation, curriculum that ultimately applies to students ( teaching-learning- assessment from the different regions can have significant differences . This article proposes, from the analysis of various research , training programs, the plan of action for inspection and the author's own experience in processes of curriculum specifications , assess the potential strengths and weaknesses of the learning standards.

  19. What does the Development of the European Core Curriculum for Cardiovascular Nurses Mean for Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, Lis; Lin, Stella Hsi-Man; Ferry, Cate; Gallagher, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    A core curriculum for the continuing professional development of nurses has recently been published by the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. This core curriculum was envisaged to bridge the educational gap between qualification as a nurse and an advance practice role. In addition, the shared elements and international consensus on core themes creates a strong pathway for nursing career development that is directly relevant to Australia. Education programs for nurses in Australia must meet the mandatory standards of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC), but without a national core curriculum, there can be considerable variation in the content of such courses. The core curriculum is developed to be adapted locally, allowing the addition of nationally relevant competencies, for example, culturally appropriate care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals. Two existing specialist resources could be utilised to deliver a tailored cardiovascular core curriculum; the Heart Education Assessment and Rehabilitation Toolkit (HEART) online (www.heartonline.org.au) and HeartOne (www.heartone.com.au). Both resources could be further enhanced by incorporating the core curriculum. The release of the European core curriculum should be viewed as a call to action for Australia to develop a core curriculum for cardiovascular nurses. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Subitizing and Early Mathematics Standards: A Winning Combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conderman, Greg; Jung, Myoungwhon; Hartman, Paula

    2014-01-01

    In early childhood and primary (PreK-2) grades, subitizing is a critical skill that helps children meet early mathematics standards. Discover ways teachers can infuse this critical skill into their math curriculum.

  1. Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST). Common Ground: Toward a Standards-Based Training System for the U.S. Machine Tool and Metal Related Industries. Volume 1: Executive Summary, of a 15-Volume Set of Skills Standards and Curriculum Training Materials for the Precision Manufacturing Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Technical Coll., Waco.

    The Machine Tool Advanced Skills Technology (MAST) consortium was formed to address the shortage of skilled workers for the machine tools and metals-related industries. Featuring six of the nation's leading advanced technology centers, the MAST consortium developed, tested, and disseminated industry-specific skill standards and model curricula for…

  2. RNAome sequencing delineates the complete RNA landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.W.J. Derks (Kasper); J. Pothof (Joris)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractStandard RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species. For example, small and large RNAs from the same sample cannot be sequenced in a single sequence run. We designed RNAome sequencing, which is a

  3. Moebius sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Kjeldgaard; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2017-01-01

    and photographical evaluation. Five patients maintained the diagnosis of MS according to the diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: All five patients had bilateral facial and abducens paralysis confirmed by ophthalmological examination. Three of five had normal brain MR imaging. Two had missing facial nerves and one had......BACKGROUND: Moebius Sequence (MS) is a rare disorder defined by bilateral congenital paralysis of the abducens and facial nerves in combination with various odontological, craniofacial, ophthalmological and orthopaedic conditions. The aetiology is still unknown; but both genetic (de novo mutations...

  4. Switzerland: new medical informatics curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, P

    2000-01-01

    Swiss Society for Medical Informatics (SSMI) started to build a postgraduate curriculum in medical informatics a year ago. The aim is to build a curriculum with different modules allowing the healthcare professionals to follow individual path in order to fulfill their objectives. The professionals who could benefit from the curriculum are physicians, nurses, medical assistants, computer specialists in the healthcare domain. Different levels of certificates or diplomas will be given depending on the number of modules taken and the professional background. Modules can be taken in different ways: universities, hospitals, distance learning.... The kickoff meeting for the leading group of this curriculum chaired by Dr Denz from Zurich was held on June 5 and 6 1998 was Swiss Nursing informatics group is active in this field. Working Group 5 (WG5) "Nursing Informatics in Europe" is supporting countries efforts in building nursing informatics curriculum. Promoting links between specialists in this domain in different countries. Selecting relevant Websites to be used. Disseminating information to country members of WG5.

  5. Applications: Quadratic Formulas Up to NCTM's Curriculum Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievergelt, Yves

    1992-01-01

    Discusses an alternative form of the quadratic formula to solve quadratic equations. Presents an application to chemistry to illustrate the need for quadratic formulas better suited to approximations obtained using hand-held calculators. Addresses the problems of rounding errors, accuracy of solutions, and factoring as a method of solution. (MDH)

  6. Widening the Lens to Teach Character Education Alongside Standards Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiff-Williams, Helen R.

    2010-01-01

    This article challenges policymakers, school leaders, and teachers to implement wide-scale and systematic teaching of character education in every classroom. In support of the idea that student character development should be a priority in all classes, I explain that youth need "decision-filters" to negotiate life's challenges. Further,…

  7. Implementing the Standards: Incorporating Mathematical Modeling into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Following a brief historical review of the mechanism of mathematical modeling, examples are included that associate a mathematical model with given data (changes in sea level) and that model a real-life situation (process of parallel parking). Also provided is the rationale for the curricular implementation of mathematical modeling. (JJK)

  8. Anatomy as the Backbone of an Integrated First Year Medical Curriculum: Design and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Brenda J.; Paulsen, Douglas F.; Wineski, Lawrence E

    2011-01-01

    Morehouse School of Medicine chose to restructure its first year medical curriculum in 2005. The anatomy faculty had prior experience in integrating courses, stemming from the successful integration of individual anatomical sciences courses into a single course called Human Morphology. The integration process was expanded to include the other first year basic science courses (Biochemistry, Physiology, and Neurobiology) as we progressed toward an integrated curriculum. A team, consisting of the course directors, a curriculum coordinator and the Associate Dean for Educational and Faculty Affairs, was assembled to build the new curriculum. For the initial phase, the original course titles were retained but the lecture order was reorganized around the Human Morphology topic sequence. The material from all four courses was organized into four sequential units. Other curricular changes included placing laboratories and lectures more consistently in the daily routine, reducing lecture time from 120 to 90 minute blocks, eliminating unnecessary duplication of content, and increasing the amount of independent study time. Examinations were constructed to include questions from all courses on a single test, reducing the number of examination days in each block from three to one. The entire restructuring process took two years to complete, and the revised curriculum was implemented for the students entering in 2007. The outcomes of the restructured curriculum include a reduction in the number of contact hours by 28%, higher or equivalent subject examination average scores, enhanced student satisfaction, and a first year curriculum team better prepared to move forward with future integration. PMID:21538939

  9. Musculoskeletal education: a curriculum evaluation at one university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Marcia L; Hutchison, Carol R; Lockyer, Jocelyn M

    2010-12-12

    The increasing burden of illness related to musculoskeletal diseases makes it essential that attention be paid to musculoskeletal education in medical schools. This case study examines the undergraduate musculoskeletal curriculum at one medical school. A case study research methodology used quantitative and qualitative approaches to systematically examine the undergraduate musculoskeletal course at the University of Calgary (Alberta, Canada) Faculty of Medicine. The aim of the study was to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the curriculum guided by four questions: (1) Was the course structured according to standard principles for curriculum design as described in the Kern framework? (2) How did students and faculty perceive the course? (3) Was the assessment of the students valid and reliable? (4) Were the course evaluations completed by student and faculty valid and reliable? The analysis showed that the structure of the musculoskeletal course mapped to many components of Kern's framework in course design. The course had a high level of commitment by teachers, included a valid and reliable final examination, and valid evaluation questionnaires that provided relevant information to assess curriculum function. The curricular review identified several weaknesses in the course: the apparent absence of a formalized needs assessment, course objectives that were not specific or measurable, poor development of clinical presentations, small group sessions that exceeded normal 'small group' sizes, and poor alignment between the course objectives, examination blueprint and the examination. Both students and faculty members perceived the same strengths and weaknesses in the curriculum. Course evaluation data provided information that was consistent with the findings from the interviews with the key stakeholders. The case study approach using the Kern framework and selected questions provided a robust way to assess a curriculum, identify its strengths and weaknesses

  10. Effectiveness of a quality improvement curriculum for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Tartaglia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As health systems find ways to improve quality of care, medical training programs are finding opportunities to prepare learners on principles of quality improvement (QI. The impact of QI curricula for medical students as measured by student learning is not well delineated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a QI curriculum for senior medical students as measured by student knowledge and skills. Methods: This study was an observational study that involved a self-assessment and post-test Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool (QIKAT for intervention and control students. A QI curriculum consisting of online modules, live discussions, independent readings and reflective writing, and participation in a mentored QI project was offered to fourth-year medical students completing an honor's elective (intervention group. Senior medical students who received the standard QI curriculum only were recruited as controls. Results: A total of 22 intervention students and 12 control students completed the self-assessment and QIKAT. At baseline, there was no difference between groups in self-reported prior exposure to QI principles. Students in the intervention group reported more comfort with their skills in QI overall and in 9 of the 12 domains (p<0.05. Additionally, intervention students performed better in each of the three case scenarios (p<0.01. Discussion: A brief QI curriculum for senior medical students results in improved comfort and knowledge with QI principles. The strengths of our curriculum include effective use of classroom time and faculty mentorship with reliance on pre-existing online modules and written resources. Additionally, the curriculum is easily expandable to larger groups of students and transferable to other institutions.

  11. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Welding and Cutting Programs (Program CIP: 48.0508--Welder/Welding Technologist). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the welding and cutting programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and…

  12. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Diesel Equipment Technology (CIP: 47.0605--Diesel Engine Mechanic & Repairer). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the diesel equipment technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies,…

  13. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Fashion Marketing Technology (Program CIP: 08.0101--Apparel and Accessories Mkt. Op., Gen.). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the fashion marketing technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies,…

  14. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Ophthalmic Technology (Program CIP: 51.1801--Opticianry/Dispensing Optician). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the ophthalmic technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and section II…

  15. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Radiologic Technology (Radiography) (CIP: 51.0907--Medical Radiologic Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the radiologic technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the program,…

  16. Obstetric and Gynecologic Ultrasound Curriculum and Competency Assessment in Residency Training Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuhamad, Alfred; Minton, Katherine K; Benson, Carol B

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has become integral to the practice of obstetrics and gynecology. With increasing educational demands and limited hours in residency programs, dedicated time for training and achieving competency in ultrasound has diminished substantially. The American Institute of Ultrasound...... in Medicine assembled a multisociety task force to develop a consensus-based, standardized curriculum and competency assessment tools for obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound training in residency programs. The curriculum and competency assessment tools were developed based on existing national...

  17. Obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound curriculum and competency assessment in residency training programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuhamad, Alfred; Minton, Katherine K; Benson, Carol B

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has become integral to the practice of obstetrics and gynecology. With increasing educational demands and limited hours in residency programs, dedicated time for training and achieving competency in ultrasound has diminished substantially. The American Institute of Ultrasound...... in Medicine assembled a multisociety task force to develop a consensus-based, standardized curriculum and competency assessment tools for obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound training in residency programs. The curriculum and competency assessment tools were developed based on existing national...

  18. Guidelines for Developing Competency-Based Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Ludy

    1979-01-01

    Presents guidelines for the development of competency-based curriculum formulated as a result of an automotive mechanics curriculum workshop. Listed are specific guidelines for content development, writing style, and illustration. (LRA)

  19. Towards a mobile learning curriculum framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, Adèle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available of the definitive Mobile Learning Curriculum Framework as a first attempt to systematically and comprehensively explore, where and how mobiles could appear within educational provision. The curriculum framework is underpinned by three broad learning objectives...

  20. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bregje de Vries; J. Voogt; A. Walraven; J. Pieters; A. Handelzalts; S. McKenney; H. Westbroek

    2011-01-01

    The Interconnected Model of Professional Growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers’

  1. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.B.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.M.; de Vries, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Interconnected Model of Professional Growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers'

  2. Curriculum as a Discourse: Using Critical Discourse Analysis to Revive Curriculum Reconceptualists' Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Majed

    2017-01-01

    Curriculum reconceptualists seek to reshape the field of curriculum studies. Unlike traditional curricularists, they reprobate the technical approach of curriculum development because of its pure functional and managerial tendency. Reconceptualists look at curriculum from various philosophy-saturated perspectives. One of their claims is…

  3. Curriculum Renewal: Barriers to Successful Curriculum Change and Suggestions for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Trudi

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the practical difficulties encountered when a renewed curriculum is implemented in higher education. Attention has been given in the literature to the importance of coherent curriculum and approaches to curriculum design. Less attention has been paid to whether the renewed curriculum can be faithfully implemented within a…

  4. Designing Anatomy Program in Modern Medical Curriculum: Matter of Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grković, Ivica; Marinović Guić, Maja; Košta, Vana; Poljičanin, Ana; Čarić, Ana; Vilović, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the structure of the anatomy program in the first year medical curriculum of University of Split School of Medicine by comparing it with the recommendations by the Educational Affairs Committee of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists (AACA) and the Terminologia Anatomica (TA); we also quantitatively evaluated the organization of teaching material in contemporary topographical anatomy textbooks and matched them with the AACA recommendations, TA, and the curriculum of the anatomy course taught at Medical School in Split, Croatia. Methods TA, official recommendations of the AACA, 6 contemporary anatomy textbooks, and the structure of the anatomy course were analyzed for the proportion of the terms or text devoted to standard topographical regions of the body. The findings were correlated using Spearman ρ test. Results The curriculum outline correlated both with the AACA recommendations (Spearman ρ = 0.83, P = 0.015) and TA (Spearman ρ = 0.73, P = 0.046). Textbooks contained 8 distinct sections, 7 allocated to topographic anatomy regions and 1 to general anatomy concepts and principles. The structure of all textbooks correlated significantly with the course curriculum. However, 4 out of 6 textbooks did not correlate with TA and only a single textbook showed significant correlation with the AACA recommendations. Conclusion Anatomy textbooks vary in the amount of text dedicated to different parts of topographical anatomy and are not quite concordant with curriculum recommendations and standard anatomical terminology. Planning the structure of an anatomy course should not be based on a single book or recommendation but on evidence. PMID:19260144

  5. Comparison of two fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences to standard t2-weighted images for brain parenchymal contrast and lesion detection in dogs with inflammatory intracranial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Benjamin D; Mankin, Joseph M; Griffin, John F; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fowler, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    T2-weighted (T2w) sequences are commonly relied upon in magnetic resonance imaging protocols for the detection of brain lesions in dogs. Previously, the effect of fluid suppression via fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) has been compared to T2-weighting with mixed results. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) has been reported to increase the detection of some CNS lesions in people. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of fat suppression on brain parenchymal contrast resolution and lesion detection in dogs. We compared three sequences: T2w images, STIR, and T2w FLAIR with chemical fat suppression (T2-FLAIR-FS) in dogs with meningoencephalitis. Dogs with meningoencephalitis and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy were retrospectively identified and anonymized. Evaluators recorded the presence or absence of lesions within 12 predetermined brain regions on randomized sequences, viewing and scoring each sequence individually. Additionally, signal-to-noise ratios, contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative contrast (RC) were measured in a reference population. Short tau inversion recovery sequences had the highest RC between gray and white matter. While descriptively more lesions were identified by evaluators on T2-FLAIR-FS images, there was no statistical difference in the relative sensitivity of lesion detection between the sequences. Nor was there a statistical difference in false lesion detection within our reference population. Short tau inversion recovery may be favored for enhanced anatomic contrast depiction in brain imaging. No benefit of the inclusion of a fat-suppressed T2-FLAIR sequence was found. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  6. Teacher' s approach to family related curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Plavcová, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    My diploma thesis focuses on the approach to family related curriculum at primary school. The theoretical part includes analysis of contemporary view of family in terms of psychology and sociology, summary of possible problems connected with the family related curriculum, some recommendations how to approach the family related curriculum and analysis of approach to this curriculum in FEP EE, three school education programmes and three sets of textbooks from primary education. The practical pa...

  7. The Society of European Robotic Gynaecological Surgery (SERGS) Pilot Curriculum for robot assisted gynecological surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Peter; Kimmig, Rainer; Lecuru, Fabrice; Persson, Jan; Ponce, Jordi; Degueldre, Michel; Verheijen, René

    2018-02-01

    To set forth experiences in the context of the SERGS Pilot Curriculum-the first standardized educational program for robotic use in gynecological surgery-in terms of feasibility, effectiveness and potential for certification. The Society of European Robotic Gynecological Surgery (SERGS) outlined a Pilot Curriculum for standardized education in robot-assisted laparoscopic gynecological surgery. Its feasibility and acceptance were checked in the form of a fellowship pilot program conducted at four European Centers of Excellence for robot-assisted surgery. Results and conclusions derived from this pilot program are presented. The SERGS Pilot Curriculum defines criteria for a standardized training and assessment of performance, boosts the learning curve of the candidate and increases contentment at work. Regarding face validity, it proves valuable as finally all candidates could perform the outlined procedure safely and efficiently without supervision. Due to the immense increase of robotic procedures in gynecology standardized training curricula are indispensable. This seems highly necessary to ensure patients' safety and surgical outcome. The SERGS Pilot Curriculum sets standards for a stepwise theoretical and practical training in gynecological robotic procedures. It seems feasible as instrument for accreditation as gynecologic robotic surgeon. Though as a general applicable guideline for systematic training in robot-assisted surgery, a definite curriculum should have a more definite timeline and implementation of a structured assessment of performance.

  8. Mapping onto the mathematics curriculum – an opportunity for teachers to learn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Shalem

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum mapping is a common practice amongst test designers but not amongst teachers. As part of the Data Informed Practice Improvement Project’s (DIPIP attempt to de-fetishise accountability assessment, teachers were tasked to investigate the alignment of a large-scale assessment with the South African mathematics curriculum. About 50 mathematics teachers from Grade 3–9 worked in groups together with subject facilitators from the Gauteng Department of Education and a university postgraduate student or lecturer who acted as group leader. The first project activity, curriculum mapping, provided a professional development opportunity in which groups mapped mathematical assessment items to the assessment standards of the curriculum. The items were taken from three sources: the 2006 and 2007 International Competitions and Assessments for Schools tests and from ‘own tests’ developed by the groups in the last term of the project. Groups were required to analyse the knowledge base underlying test items and to reflect on what they teach in relation to what the curriculum intends them to teach. They used a protocol (mapping template to record their responses. This article deals with the question of how to transform data collected from large- scale learner assessments into structured learning opportunities for teachers. The findings were that through the curriculum mapping activity, groups became more aware of what is intended by the curriculum and how this differs from what is enacted in their classes. The findings were also that the capacity of groups to align content was better when they worked with leaders and that with more experience they gained confidence in mapping test items against the curriculum and made better judgments in relation to curriculum alignment. Involving teachers in the interpretation of both public assessment data and data from their own classroom activities can build their own understanding of the knowledge base of

  9. Mapping and assessment of personal and professional development skills in a pharmacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramia, Elsy; Salameh, Pascale; Btaiche, Imad F; Saad, Aline Hanna

    2016-01-15

    Health sciences programs are increasingly expanding their curricula to bridge foundational scientific knowledge with needed skills to practice and patient care. The primary objectives of this study are to 1) assess whether the personal and professional development (PPD) subdomains (self-assessment, leadership, innovation and entrepreneurship, and professionalism) are integrated in a pharmacy curriculum; and 2) identify any gaps related to the subdomains' learning objectives. Four different mapping activities were completed to create a comprehensive mapping plan regarding the integration of the PPD subdomains in the curriculum. The first mapping activity entailed matching the school's program educational outcomes (PEOs) to these subdomains (Step 1). Mapping of the enacted curriculum by faculty (Step 2) and learned curriculum by students (Step 3) were also completed in order to evaluate the integration of these subdomains in the curriculum. Finally, Step 4 involved mapping of the assessed curriculum by analyzing the progress of students on PPD-related competencies using standardized scoring rubrics and the correlation between students' and facultys' assessments with regard to matching competencies. The Cochrane's Q test and the Cohen's kappa coefficient were used in the statistical analysis of parametric data. The subdomains were found to be woven across curricular, co-curricular, and extra-curricular activities based on the four different mapping activities. Faculty and students agreed that the PPD competencies are integrated in the curriculum; provided example courses, experiences and activities; and identified areas of further improvements. The completed mapping activities drove the development of action plans for remediation of identified gaps in the curriculum. Mapping activities showed the sequential integration of the PPD skills at different depths and breadths in the curriculum. This study provides an example to health sciences schools on the incorporation of

  10. Wind energy curriculum development at GWU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Stephen M [GWU

    2013-06-08

    A wind energy curriculum has been developed at the George Washington University, School of Engineering and Applied Science. Surveys of student interest and potential employers expectations were conducted. Wind industry desires a combination of mechanical engineering training with electrical engineering training. The curriculum topics and syllabus were tested in several graduate/undergraduate elective courses. The developed curriculum was then submitted for consideration.

  11. Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Dennis H.; Parsons, Marsha B.

    2007-01-01

    The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities' (AAIDD's) Positive Behavior Support Training Curriculum," Second Edition" ("PBSTC"), is a curriculum for training direct support personnel and their supervisors in the values and practices of Positive Behavior Support. The curriculum is designed for direct support persons and…

  12. Adequate Social Science, Curriculum Investigations, and Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyon, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Two studies of curriculum are used as examples of trends in social science research. Criteria are developed for the "ideal" social science and then applied to the two studies. Curriculum theorizing is discussed as related to social science theory. Suggestions are made for the content of an adequate curriculum theory. (JN)

  13. Career Education. The Comprehensive Curriculum. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshastin-Dryden School District, WA.

    The development and implementation of a comprehensive career education curriculum was the major purpose of a project conducted in the Cashmere and Peshastin-Dryden School Districts (Washington), K-12. The objectives of the project were divided into the following eight work areas: curriculum development; curriculum installation; advisor/advisee…

  14. Grief Support Group Curriculum: Facilitator's Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Linda; Jimerson, Shane R.; Gaasch, Ann

    This handbook is designed for facilitators of grief support groups for mourning children. The first chapter discusses the history, philosophy, and format of a specific curriculum - the Mourning Child curriculum. This curriculum, originally written in 1986 and later expanded and revised, has been used with hundreds of children. Chapter two covers…

  15. Sustainability in the Australian Curriculum: Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Alaric

    2014-01-01

    "Sustainability" is one of the seven major concepts in the geography curriculum. It is also one of the three cross-curriculum priorities in the Australian curriculum, together with Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. This paper describes how the concept is explained…

  16. Corrupting the Curriculum? The Case of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, David; Morgan, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers influences on the contemporary school curriculum in England. It does so mainly through a critical analysis of one significant critique of the curriculum made by the think tank Civitas in their collection of essays asserting the "corruption" of the curriculum, published in 2007. The paper places the Civitas position…

  17. 14 CFR 121.913 - Qualification curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualification curriculum. 121.913 Section 121.913 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Qualification curriculum. Each qualification curriculum must contain training, evaluation, and certification...

  18. Application of the Reggio Emilia Approach to Early Childhood Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegelin, Dolores A.

    2003-01-01

    This article focuses on the relevance of the Reggio Emilia approach to early childhood education for science knowledge and content standards for the preK-12 student population. The article includes: (1) a summary of key concepts; (2) a description of the science curriculum standards for K-3 in the United States; and (3) an example of an in-depth…

  19. Integrating Content on Feminism and Racism into the Social Work Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Sophie F.

    1976-01-01

    It is suggested that power relationships among people have become a unifying concept of human behavior in modern society, replacing the Freudian libido, and that this concept can function as a unifying principle for integrating racism, sexism and other key relationship concerns into the human behavior curriculum sequence. (Editor/JT)

  20. A New Project-Based Curriculum of Design Thinking with Systems Engineering Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haruyama, S.; Kim, S.K.; Beiter, K.A.; Dijkema, G.P.J.; De Weck, O.L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a new education curriculum called "ALPS" (Active Learning Project Sequence) at Keio University that emphasizes team project-based learning and design thinking with systems engineering techniques. ALPS is a 6 month course, in which students work as a team and design and propose

  1. The Global Awareness Curriculum in International Business Programs: A Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Anne E.

    2010-01-01

    Designing educational sequences that enhance the cognitive, behavioral, and critical skills of a diverse learning community seeking global competencies, requires mindfulness of different international educational models, a tailored curriculum designed to build different types of awareness learning, and clarity in targeted outputs keeping in mind a…

  2. A One-Year Introductory Robotics Curriculum for Computer Science Upperclassmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, N.; Wing, R.; Coleman, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a one-year introductory robotics course sequence focusing on computational aspects of robotics for third- and fourth-year students. The key challenges this curriculum addresses are "scalability," i.e., how to teach a robotics class with a limited amount of hardware to a large audience, "student assessment,"…

  3. Cherokee Culture across the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larch, Lillie

    1993-01-01

    A teacher describes how she integrated Cherokee culture and folklore with the required curriculum at Cherokee Elementary School (Cherokee, North Carolina). Includes an annotated list of 22 Native American cultural resources and a list of 30 books and journal articles on folk games and toys and their uses in education. (LP)

  4. "Mexico in Transition." Curriculum Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Foreign Language Resource Center.

    These curriculum units were developed in a National Endowment for the Humanities 1994 summer seminar "Mexico in Transition." The 23 lessons are written in Spanish. Lessons are entitled: (1) "La Migracion Mexicana Vista a Traves del Cuento 'Paso del Norte' de Juan Rulfo" (Jose Jorge Armendariz); (2) "Los Grupos Indigenas de…

  5. Science Curriculum Guide, Level 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newark School District, DE.

    The third of four levels in a K-12 science curriculum is outlined. In Level 3 (grades 6-8), science areas include life science, earth science, and physical science (physics and chemistry). Conveniently listed are page locations for educational and instructional objectives, cross-referenced to science area (i.e., life science, animals, genetics)…

  6. Science Curriculum Guide, Level 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newark School District, DE.

    The fourth of four levels in a K-12 science curriculum is outlined. In Level 4 (grades 9-12), science areas include earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics. Six major themes provide the basis for study in all levels (K-12). These are: Change, Continuity, Diversity, Interaction, Limitation, and Organization. In Level 4, all six themes are…

  7. Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Carol; Mansoor, Inaam

    The Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum was developed for English-as-a-Second-Language classes offered by the Southland Corporation, 7-Eleven stores, through a national workplace literacy grant. It is based on an analysis of the tasks and interactions common to a convenience store worksite. Store employees, managers, field consultants,…

  8. Embodied Cognition and Curriculum Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-qian; Zheng, Xu-dong

    2018-01-01

    The disembodiment of cognitive science has resulted in curricula with disembodied concepts and practice. The emergence of the embodied cognitive science provoked public reflections on the nature of the curriculum. This has elevated the body from the "peripheral" position to the "central" position, acting as the subject in…

  9. Curriculum Innovation for Marketing Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Elizabeth J.; McCabe, Catherine; Smith, Robert S.

    2018-01-01

    College graduates need better preparation for and experience in data analytics for higher-quality problem solving. Using the curriculum innovation framework of Borin, Metcalf, and Tietje (2007) and case study research methods, we offer rich insights about one higher education institution's work to address the marketing analytics skills gap.…

  10. Collecting as a Curriculum Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osga, Elizabeth

    1986-01-01

    The article details the advantages (such as the multidisciplinary nature) of collecting as a curriculum strategy for gifted students, suggests activities to arouse collecting interests, and offers ways to build such skills as decision making, research techniques and organization/classification. (DB)

  11. Management Strategies for Curriculum Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Organizational factors affecting curriculum change are discussed, including resistance to change, organizational climate, leadership and organizational culture, and conditions for effective participation. Four special considerations are outlined: the ethics of curricular change, creating a culture of innovation, zero-based curricular review, and…

  12. Social Studies Curriculum: Grade Six.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Arthur

    This document outlines the content of the grade 6 social studies curriculum of the Lebanon School District, Lebanon, New Hampshire. The program is essentially a chronological review of western civilization, which includes pre-historic man, early civilization, classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, Medieval period, and the Age of Expansion.…

  13. ECOS Process for Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam and Northern Westchester Counties Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Yorktown Heights, NY.

    This booklet details a methodology for infusing almost any subject into a school district's ongoing curriculum. The process involved three interrelated parts: infusion, community, and stewardship. The infusion component makes it possible to upgrade teacher's skills, improve classroom management, strengthen community-school cooperation, and diffuse…

  14. Social Crisis and Curriculum Accords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, Michael W.

    1988-01-01

    School curricula are not politically neutral grounds of knowledge. Rather, each takes certain social forms and embodies certain interests. The article discusses how the power of class, race, and gender dynamics determines curriculum structure. It also discusses the role of the school in capitalist countries. (JL)

  15. Broadening the spectrum through curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel-Hills P

    2006-01-01

    Radiography has experienced changes and challenges from a number of sources. The rapid technological changes in imaging an radiation treatment, changes in the professional context and social transformation have had an impact on the shape and structure of the radiography curriculum. It too must change to prepare graduates for the broadening radiography spectrum

  16. Feminism and the College Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Christina Hoff

    1990-01-01

    Leading academic feminists charge that the traditional college curriculum promotes sexism and social injustice, and that Western culture is a flawed concept from the start because all that it has recorded for succeeding generations has been dominated by a male bias. This "gender feminism," in contrast to "equity feminism," aims to transform…

  17. Telenovelas as Art Curriculum Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Martha

    2010-01-01

    In February and March 2007, the author investigated the possibilities of visual culture art education in two Greek Primary schools in Athens with students in Grades 5 and 6. One of her goals was to determine whether or not the telenovela genre was appropriate as curriculum content in primary art education. She chose telenovelas because they are a…

  18. Analytical Chemists Eye Curriculum Revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Steve

    1986-01-01

    Analytical chemists need to revise curricula and make better use of computers to improve the status of their discipline. Highlights of an international panel of leading analytical chemists which addressed topics and issues related to these needs are presented. A chart showing the five-year Soviet chemistry curriculum is included. (JN)

  19. Ethnomusicology, Ethnomathematics, and Integrating Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazinet, Ryan; Marshall, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Integrating curriculum provides rich opportunities for students to focus on relevant applications to the real world and make meaningful connections across different disciplines. This article attempts to go beyond common discourse and platitudes by offering specific examples, showing we--an ethnomusicologist and a mathematics educator--attempted to…

  20. Developing a Curriculum for Teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Kolkin, Donna; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Outlines the development of a secondary school curriculum for teaching the following critical television viewing abilities: to evaluate and manage one's own television viewing behavior, to question the reality of television programing, to recognize the persuasive arguments on television, and to recognize the effects of television on daily life.…

  1. Solid Waste/Energy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivan, V. Eugene; And Others

    Provided are solid waste/energy curriculum materials for grades K-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-9, and 10-12. Separate folders containing units of study (focusing on trash, litter, and recycling) are provided for kindergarten (four units), grade 1 (two units), and grade 2 (two units). Folders contain teachers' directions and activity cards which include picture…

  2. Sustainability in Chemical Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassey, Jarka; Haile, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a concentrated strategy to embed sustainability teaching into a (chemical) engineering undergraduate curriculum throughout the whole programme. Innovative teaching approaches in subject-specific context are described and their efficiency investigated. Design/methodology/approach: The activities in…

  3. An Art Centered Art Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Hope

    1984-01-01

    There are 10 approaches that teachers can use to sort out and present works of art to students, e.g., stylistic, topical, specific artist. Teachers should use all the approaches when developing a curriculum. An example of how a study of impressionism by secondary students might include these approaches is provided. (RM)

  4. Digital Citizenship in the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutka, Daniel G.; Carpenter, Jeffrey P.

    2017-01-01

    "If education is to be a safeguard of democracy, then recent events suggest tweets and other social media must be part of curriculum," write Daniel G. Krutka and Jeffrey P. Carpenter. In this article, the authors argue that teaching citizenship also requires teaching with and about social media. They provide a framework for educators to…

  5. Curriculum review and reorientation experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S Blignaut

    the flow of information and the learning activities. This is the basis upon which our Home Economics curricula were redesigned. Curriculum design should in practice include the motivation of staff and institutions to carry out the changes or innovations. A tentative set of principles was identified to illustrate this process:.

  6. Politisk retorik, curriculum og praksis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansdottir, Bergthora

    2017-01-01

    orienteret fag i en globaliseret verden. Bergthóra Kristjánsdóttir Lektor, ph.d., DPU Aarhus Universitet. Underviser på DAV og masteruddannelsen i dansk som andetsprog. Forsker i uddannelsespolitik på makro- og mikroniveau, herunder minoriteter/majoriteter, curriculum, tosprogethed, dansk og dansk som...

  7. Food Production & Service Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide deals with planning and implementing a course in food production and service. Addressed in the course are the following topics: using basic food service processes; performing the tasks of a kitchen helper, stock clerk, baker's helper, pastry helper, cook's helper, pantry goods maker, short order cook, cook, dining room…

  8. Ethics Across-the-Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, David L.

    One attempt to integrate the aims of liberal and professional education at a public university, St. Cloud State Univesity (St. Cloud, Minnesota), is described. The question of whether professional education precludes a coherent liberal arts curriculum is raised. At St. Cloud, relationships between the liberal arts and professional programs are…

  9. Uncovering Settler Grammars in Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I focus on making settler colonialism explicit in education. I turn to social studies curriculum as a clear example of how settler colonialism is deeply embedded in educational knowledge production in the United States that is rooted in a dialectic of Indigenous presence and absence. I argue that the United States, and the…

  10. World Religions: A Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilzer, Robert J., Jr.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is for a semester length elective course on the world's major religions designed to be used at the 10th grade level in the Newtown Public Schools, Newton, Connecticut. It reviews each religion's origins, historical developments, sacred literature, beliefs, values, and practices while emphasizing the impact of religion on…

  11. SYMBIOSIS: development, implementation, and assessment of a model curriculum across biology and mathematics at the introductory level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depelteau, Audrey M; Joplin, Karl H; Govett, Aimee; Miller, Hugh A; Seier, Edith

    2010-01-01

    "It takes a lot of courage to release the familiar and seemingly secure, to embrace the new. But there is no real security in what is no longer meaningful. There is more security in the adventurous and exciting, for in movement there is life, and in change there is power." Alan Cohen (Used by permission. All rights reserved. For more information on Alan Cohen's books and programs, see (www.alancohen.com.) With the support of the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) administration and a grant from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the departments of Biological Sciences, Mathematics and Statistics, and Curriculum and Instruction have developed a biology-math integrated curriculum. An interdisciplinary faculty team, charged with teaching the 18 curriculum modules, designed this three-semester curriculum, known as SYMBIOSIS. This curriculum was piloted to two student cohorts during the developmental stage. The positive feedback and assessment results of this project have given us the foundation to implement the SYMBIOSIS curriculum as a replacement for the standard biology majors curriculum at the introductory level. This article addresses the history and development of the curriculum, previous assessment results and current assessment protocol, and the future of ETSU's approach to implementing the SYMBIOSIS curriculum.

  12. SYMBIOSIS: Development, Implementation, and Assessment of a Model Curriculum across Biology and Mathematics at the Introductory Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joplin, Karl H.; Govett, Aimee; Miller, Hugh A.; Seier, Edith

    2010-01-01

    “It takes a lot of courage to release the familiar and seemingly secure, to embrace the new. But there is no real security in what is no longer meaningful. There is more security in the adventurous and exciting, for in movement there is life, and in change there is power.”Alan Cohen (Used by permission. All rights reserved. For more information on Alan Cohen's books and programs, see (www.alancohen.com.) With the support of the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) administration and a grant from Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the departments of Biological Sciences, Mathematics and Statistics, and Curriculum and Instruction have developed a biology–math integrated curriculum. An interdisciplinary faculty team, charged with teaching the 18 curriculum modules, designed this three-semester curriculum, known as SYMBIOSIS. This curriculum was piloted to two student cohorts during the developmental stage. The positive feedback and assessment results of this project have given us the foundation to implement the SYMBIOSIS curriculum as a replacement for the standard biology majors curriculum at the introductory level. This article addresses the history and development of the curriculum, previous assessment results and current assessment protocol, and the future of ETSU's approach to implementing the SYMBIOSIS curriculum. PMID:20810967

  13. Striving for excellence: developing a framework for the Triple C curriculum in family medicine education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Colla J; McKeen, Martha; Wooltorton, Eric; Boucher, Francois; Lemelin, Jacques; Leith-Gudbranson, Donna; Viner, Gary; Pullen, Judi

    2012-10-01

    Postgraduate medical education programs will need to be restructured in order to respond to curriculum initiatives promoted by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. To develop a framework for the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum that will help provide residents with quality family medicine (FM) education programs. The Family Medicine Curriculum Framework (FMCF) incorporates the 4 principles of FM, the CanMEDs-FM roles, the Triple C curriculum principles, the curriculum content domains, and the pedagogic strategies, all of which support the development of attitudes, knowledge, and skills in postgraduate FM training programs. The FMCF was an effective approach to the development of an FM curriculum because it incorporated not only core competencies of FM health education but also contextual educational values, principles, and dynamic learning approaches. In addition, the FMCF provided a foundation and quality standard to designing, delivering, and evaluating the FM curriculum to ensure it met the needs of FM education stakeholders, including preceptors, residents, and patients and their families.

  14. Enhancing Medical Student Education by Implementing a Competency-Based Ophthalmology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succar, Tony; McCluskey, Peter; Grigg, John

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate innovative educational strategies that help optimize ophthalmology teaching in a crowded medical curriculum. The knowledge acquisition and perceptions of medical students undertaking the revised competency-based curriculum were compared with the prior content-based curriculum within the Sydney Medical Program. A mixed-methods research design was employed to include both quantitative and qualitative dimensions in evaluating the revised curriculum with medical students (n = 328) undergoing their ophthalmology rotation. Quantitative evaluation was performed with a 20-item multiple choice pre- and post-test of ophthalmic knowledge. A 12-month follow-up test was readministered to compare the long-term retention rate of graduates. Qualitative evaluation was measured with student satisfaction questionnaires. In the original curriculum there was an improvement of 19.9% from pre- to post-test scores [2.15; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.35-2.94; P academic performance and a higher degree of student satisfaction. Given the gradual decline of ophthalmic education in the standard medical school curriculum, our results are timely in providing guidance for minimum ophthalmic curriculum exposure and strategies to improve ophthalmic education in medical schools. Copyright© 2017 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  15. Twelve tips for developing an integrated curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Alam Sher; Malik, Rukhsana Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Integration of curriculum is meant to make the teaching/learning activities meaningful; however, the interpretation of 'integration' varies in different institutions and among individuals. Many medical schools find it hard to change their existing curriculum or develop a new integrated curriculum mainly because of lack of will, infrastructure and understanding the process of change. Drawn from experience, these 12 tips relating to staff development, establishing working groups, organizing the teaching/learning materials under themes and developing some innovative teaching/learning and assessment strategies, are the techniques that a teaching institution can use to change the existing curriculum to an integrated one or develop a new curriculum. Knowing about the different levels of integration and steps for developing an integrated curriculum can make it easier to integrate an existing curriculum or develop a new one.

  16. Using clinical journaling to capture critical thinking across the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthman, Jacklyn; Jackson, Janet; Cluskey, Maureen; Flannigan, Peggy; Folse, Victoria N; Bunten, Jo

    2004-01-01

    Clinical journaling is used as an integrated teaching methodology throughout the practicum component of a baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Two disciplines, Nursing and English, collaborated to develop clinical journaling guidelines to provide a consistent framework for student learning and evaluation in a variety of clinical settings. Students complete a weekly log for each clinical rotation. They identify learning goals, analyze events and relate them to nursing practice, use critical thinking to connect theory and practice, and reflect on the experience.A collegiate standard of writing is used. As the student advances through the program, a pattern of accomplishments and a cumulative integration of skills is evidenced to provide consistent standards for student evaluation.

  17. Increasing ocean sciences in K and 1st grade classrooms through ocean sciences curriculum aligned to A Framework for K-12 Science Education, and implementation support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedemonte, S.; Weiss, E. L.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean and climate sciences are rarely introduced at the early elementary levels. Reasons for this vary, but include little direct attention at the national and state levels; lack of quality instructional materials; and, lack of teacher content knowledge. Recent recommendations by the National Research Council, "revise the Earth and Space sciences core ideas and grade band endpoints to include more attention to the ocean whenever possible" (NRC, 2012, p. 336) adopted in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), may increase the call for ocean and climate sciences to be addressed. In response to these recommendations' and the recognition that an understanding of some of the Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs) would be incomplete without an understanding of processes or phenomena unique to the ocean and ocean organisms; the ocean Literacy community have created documents that show the alignment of NGSS with the Ocean Literacy Principles and Fundamental Concepts (Ocean Literacy, 2013) as well as the Ocean Literacy Scope and Sequence for Grades K-12 (Ocean Literacy, 2010), providing a solid argument for how and to what degree ocean sciences should be part of the curriculum. However, the percentage of science education curricula focused on the ocean remains very low. This session will describe a new project, that draws on the expertise of curriculum developers, ocean literacy advocates, and researchers to meet the challenges of aligning ocean sciences curriculum to NGSS, and supporting its implementation. The desired outcomes of the proposed project are to provide a rigorous standards aligned curricula that addresses all of the Life Sciences, and some Earth and Space Sciences and Engineering Design Core Ideas for Grades K and 1; and provides teachers with the support they need to understand the content and begin implementation. The process and lessons learned will be shared.

  18. International Federation for Emergency Medicine model curriculum for emergency medicine specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherri Hobgood

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To meet a critical and growing need for emergency physicians and emergency medicine resources worldwide, physicians must be trained to deliver time-sensitive interventions and lifesaving emergency care. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard curriculum that defines the basic minimum standards for specialist trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM convened a committee of international physicians, health professionals, and other experts in emergency medicine and international emergency medicine development to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency medicine. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for educational programs in emergency medicine. The focus is on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any emergency medicine physician specialist should be prepared to deliver on completion of a training program. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance physician education in basic emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught. This variability will reflect the existing educational milieu, the resources available, and the goals of the institutions’ educational leadership with regard to the training of emergency medicine specialists.

  19. Preparing skilled labor in industry through production-based curriculum approach in vocational high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoto

    2017-09-01

    Vocational high school (Sekolah Menengah Kejuruan / SMK) aims to prepare mid-level skilled labors to work in the industry and are able to create self-employment opportunities. For those reasons, the curriculum in SMK should be based on meeting the needs of the industries and is able to prepare learners to master the competence in accordance with the skills program of their choice. Production based curriculum is the curriculum which the learning process is designed together with the production process or using production process as a learning medium. This approach with the primary intention to introduce students with the real working environment and not merely simulations. In the production-based curriculum implementation model, students are directly involved in the industry through the implementation of industrial working practices, do work on production units in school, and do practical work in school by doing the job as done in the industry by using industry standards machines.

  20. Curriculum of broaden education and theory of teaching activity in school Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirléia Silvano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the conception of curriculum with broaden character in Physical Education and Davidov and Leontiev’s learning theory as possibility of focusing on human education in the omnilateral perspective. We endorse the necessity that the curriculum dynamics – dealing with knowledge, school systematization and standardization of school practices – becomes effective in a curriculum of broaden character. We consider that dealing with knowledge involves the necessity to create conditions that promote the transmission and assimilation of school knowledge. We refer therefore to a scientific direction of the teaching process, in other words, that the teacher leads the student to enter into study activity; from abstract knowledge rising to concrete theoretical knowledge, which is brought about by curriculum organization from a broaden conception.

  1. Communicating curriculum reform to students: Advice in hindsight.....

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean Michelle M

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgound In view of the changing health care needs of communities, curriculum reform of traditional curricula is inevitable. In order to allay the apprehension that may accompany such change, curriculum development and implementation should be an inclusive process, with both staff and students being well informed of the planned reform. In 2001, the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine implemented Year 1 of a problem-based learning curriculum. During the design phase, students and staff were invited to take part in the development and were kept abreast of developments through meetings and newsletters. Method A survey of Years 1–5 students of the last intake into the traditional curriculum was undertaken a few months prior to the implementation of the new programme. Results Students were generally well informed about the impending change, having heard about it from fellow students and staff. The more senior the students, the less the perceived impact of the reform. Although most of what students had heard was correct, some, however, had misconceptions that were generally extreme views (e.g. all self-directed learning; no Anatomy about the new programme. Others expressed valid concerns (e.g. underpreparedness of students from disadvantaged schools; overcrowding in hospitals. Conclusions Advice offered to institutions considering curriculum reform include using various methods to inform internal and external affected parties, ensuring that the student representative body and staff is well informed, reiterating the need for the change, confirming that the new programme meets recognised standards and that the students most affected are reassured about their future studies.

  2. Talk the Talk: Implementing a Communication Curriculum for Surgical Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Anna B; Trickey, Amber W; Porrey, Melissa; Wright, Jeffrey; Piscitani, Franco; Graling, Paula; Dort, Jonathan

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education milestones provide a framework of specific interpersonal and communication skills that surgical trainees should aim to master. However, training and assessment of resident nontechnical skills remains challenging. We aimed to develop and implement a curriculum incorporating interactive learning principles such as group discussion and simulation-based scenarios to formalize instruction in patient-centered communication skills, and to identify best practices when building such a program. The curriculum is presented in quarterly modules over a 2-year cycle. Using our surgical simulation center for the training, we focused on proven strategies for interacting with patients and other providers. We trained and used former patients as standardized participants (SPs) in communication scenarios. Surgical simulation center in a 900-bed tertiary care hospital. Program learners were general surgery residents (postgraduate year 1-5). Trauma Survivors Network volunteers served as SPs in simulation scenarios. We identified several important lessons: (1) designing and implementing a new curriculum is a challenging process with multiple barriers and complexities; (2) several readily available facilitators can ease the implementation process; (3) with the right approach, learners, faculty, and colleagues are enthusiastic and engaged participants; (4) learners increasingly agree that communication skills can be improved with practice and appreciate the curriculum value; (5) patient SPs can be valuable members of the team; and importantly (6) the culture of patient-physician communication appears to shift with the implementation of such a curriculum. Our approach using Trauma Survivors Network volunteers as SPs could be reproduced in other institutions with similar programs. Faculty enthusiasm and support is strong, and learner participation is active. Continued focus on patient and family communication skills would enhance

  3. Up Bloom's pyramid with slices of Fink's pie: Mapping an occupational therapy curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan C. Burwash

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum design is a complex task. One tool used in the design process is curriculum mapping. A mandated transition from a quarter to a semester academic calendar, alongside preparation of accreditation self-study materials, provided an opportunity for faculty teaching in an entry-level occupational therapy program to review the underlying basis of the curriculum. Two taxonomies of learning (Bloom’s cognitive domain and Fink’s taxonomy of significant learning experiences were used to examine existing courses and to consider how learning outcomes and experiences varied over the sequence of courses in the curriculum. This led to the creation of a series of course maps that have been useful in informing current curriculum design and guiding future work. In this article, the authors describe the context under which this review took place, briefly review the pertinent literature relating to curriculum design and mapping in occupational therapy education, discuss the mapping process, and provide examples of course maps. The authors reflect on the process and plans for using what was learned in future curricular design projects.

  4. Exome sequencing for syndrome diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elsebet; Risom, Lotte; Ek, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The majority of rare congenital disorders and syndromes have a genetic cause, but the diagnostic rate using standard workup is only around 50%. Whole exome and whole genome sequencing methods have improved the genetic diagnosis of syndromes during the latest few years. This article...

  5. Extended professional development for systemic curriculum reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitskey, Mary Elizabeth

    Education standards call for adopting inquiry science instruction. Successful adoption requires professional development (PD) to support teachers, increasing the need for research on PD. This dissertation examines the question: What is the influence of high quality, curriculum aligned, long-term group workshops and related practice on teacher learning? I focus on the following subquestions: (1) What is the influence of high quality, curriculum aligned, long-term, group workshops on teacher knowledge and beliefs? (2) What is the impact of the workshops on teacher practice? (3) What is the influence of practice on student response? (4) What is the impact of practice and student response on teacher knowledge and beliefs? I focus on an instance of PD nested within a long-term systemic change initiative, tracing eleven science teachers' learning from workshops and associated enactments. The data included pre and post-unit interviews (n=22), two post-workshop interviews (n=17), workshop observations (n=2), classroom observations (n=24) and student work (n=351). I used mixed-methods analysis. Quantitative analysis measured teacher learning by comparing pre and post-unit interview ratings. Qualitative components included two case study approaches: logic model technique and cross-case synthesis, examining teacher learning within and across teachers. The findings suggested a teacher-learning model incorporating PD, teacher knowledge, beliefs, practice and student response. PD impacts teachers' knowledge by providing teachers with new knowledge, adapting previous knowledge, or convincing them to value existing knowledge they chose not to use. The workshops can influence beliefs, providing teachers with confidence and motivation to adopt the practice. Beliefs can mediate how knowledge manifested itself in practice that, in turn, impacts students' response. Student response influences the teachers' beliefs, either reinforcing or motivating change. This teacher-learning model

  6. Nurses' occupational health as a driver for curriculum change emphasising health promotion: an historical research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Pamela J

    2014-05-01

    Reasons stated for curriculum change in nursing education are usually shifts in knowledge, care delivery, roles, regulatory standards and population health needs. In New Zealand in the 1930s, a curriculum change was driven instead by the need to protect and promote nurses' health. Tuberculosis was an international occupational health risk among nurses. Mary Lambie, New Zealand's chief nurse, considered nursing a "hazardous profession". One remedy she instituted was curriculum change in the national nurse training programme to emphasise health promotion among nurses. Global nursing issues today also impact on nurses' health. Curriculum changes again address this by promoting self-care and resilience. To examine how international and national concern for nurses' occupational health drove a curriculum change in New Zealand nurse training in the 1930s. Historical Research International occupational health reports (1930s), Lambie's annual reports (1932-1950), and questions and examiners' comments in a new state examination (1940s-1950s), were analysed to identify the reasons for and direction of the curriculum change. Findings were interpreted within international and national concerns and measures related to occupational health in nursing. Lambie used the political leverage of international and national worry over tuberculosis as a nursing occupational health risk to protect nurses' health more generally. In 1933 she revised the first year of the three-year national nursing curriculum to emphasise personal hygiene and bacteriology related to cross-infection, and in 1938 introduced a State Preliminary Examination at the end of the first year of training to test this knowledge. Analysis of examinations, 1940s-1950s, confirms that the curriculum change driver was a concern to make nursing a less "hazardous profession". Nurse educators today should be aware of the variety of factors that can lead to curriculum change in nursing. In addition, concern for nurses' health

  7. ['Gold standard', not 'golden standard'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2005-01-01

    In medical literature, both 'gold standard' and 'golden standard' are employed to describe a reference test used for comparison with a novel method. The term 'gold standard' in its current sense in medical research was coined by Rudd in 1979, in reference to the monetary gold standard. In the same

  8. Inadequacy of Palliative Training in the Medical School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Nicholas; Cheon, Paul; Lutz, Stephen; Lao, Nicholas; Pulenzas, Natalie; Chiu, Leonard; McDonald, Rachel; Rowbottom, Leigha; Chow, Edward

    2015-12-01

    This report examines the literature on palliative training in the current medical school curriculum. A literature search was conducted to identify relevant articles. Physicians and medical students both report feeling that their training in end-of-life care and in palliative issues is lacking. The literature expresses concerns about the varied and non-uniform approach to palliative care training across medical schools. The authors recommend the development of more palliative training assessment tools in order to aid in the standardization of curriculum involving end-of-life care. In addition, increased exposure to dying patients will aid students in building comfort with palliative care issues. Such a goal may be accomplished through required clerkships or other similar programs.

  9. Curriculum, Classroom, Culture and Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    O'Rawe, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum and pedagogy are central to many contemporary debates on fostering a successful student experience, particularly in a massified higher education sector. These themes are evident in discussions from policy level to the staffroom in many countries. Attention has been specifically directed at the transition point from ‘second level’ to ‘higher/third level’ education, resulting in the development of many initiatives and materials around the ‘first year experience’ (‘FYE’). Central prin...

  10. Core curriculum illustration: epiploic appendagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Girbes, Alexandre; Alegre, Alberto; Linnau, Ken F

    2017-10-12

    This is the 45th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at: http://www.erad.org/page/CCIP_TOC .

  11. Core curriculum illustration: pulmonary laceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Daniel; Edwards, Rachael

    2017-09-05

    This is the 44th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at: http://www.erad.org/page/CCIP_TOC .

  12. A strategy for teacher involvement in curriculum development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Education alluded to greater teacher involvement in curriculum development. The Gauteng Department of Education in- volved teachers in the curriculum development process with the introduction of the new curriculum namely Curriculum 2005. The extent to which teachers impacted on the curriculum ...

  13. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  14. Standards for plant synthetic biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patron, Nicola J.; Orzaez, Diego; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Bouwmeester, Harro

    2015-01-01

    Inventors in the field of mechanical and electronic engineering can access multitudes of components and, thanks to standardization, parts from different manufacturers can be used in combination with each other. The introduction of BioBrick standards for the assembly of characterized DNA sequences

  15. Teacher collaborative curriculum design in technical vocational colleges: a strategy for maintaining curriculum consistency?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, N.M.; Voogt, J.M.; Pieters, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) curriculum requires continuous renewal and constant involvement of stakeholders in the redesign process. Due to a lack of curriculum design expertise, TVET institutions in developing contexts encounter challenges maintaining and advancing the

  16. Accounting standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellinga, B.; Mügge, D.

    2014-01-01

    The European and global regulation of accounting standards have witnessed remarkable changes over the past twenty years. In the early 1990s, EU accounting practices were fragmented along national lines and US accounting standards were the de facto global standards. Since 2005, all EU listed

  17. Multi-Institutional Implementation and Evaluation of a Curriculum for the Medical Student Clerkship in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Daniel W; Braunstein, Steve; Jimenez, Rachel B; Mohindra, Pranshu; Spektor, Alexander; Ye, Jason C

    2016-02-01

    Radiation oncology curriculum development is challenging because of limited numbers of trainees at any single institution. The goal of this project is to implement and evaluate a standardized medical student clerkship curriculum following the multi-institutional cooperative group research model. During the 2013 academic year, a standardized curriculum was implemented at 11 academic medical centers consisting of three 1-hour lectures and a hands-on radiation treatment planning workshop. After the curriculum, students completed anonymous evaluations using Likert-type scales (1 = "not at all" to 5 = "extremely") and free responses. Evaluations asked students to rate their comfort, before and after the curriculum, with radiation oncology as a specialty, knowledge of radiotherapy planning methods, and ability to function as a radiation oncology resident. Nonparametric statistical tests were used in the analysis. Eighty-eight students at 11 academic medical centers completed the curriculum de novo, with a 72.7% (64 of 88) survey response rate. Fifty-seven students (89.1%) reported intent to pursue radiation oncology as their specialty. Median (interquartile range) student ratings of the importance of curricular content were as follows: overview, 4 (4-5); radiation biology/physics, 5 (4-5); practical aspects/emergencies, 5 (4-5); and planning workshop, 4 (4-5). Students reported that the curriculum helped them better understand radiation oncology as a specialty (5 [4-5]), increased specialty decision comfort (4 [3-5]), and would help the transition to radiation oncology residency (4 [4-5]). Students rated their specialty decision comfort significantly higher after completing the curriculum (4 [4-5] versus 5 [5-5]; P curriculum was successfully implemented at 11 academic medical centers, providing proof of principle that curriculum development can follow the multi-institutional cooperative group research model. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published

  18. Evaluating the philosophical foundation of 2013 Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mardiana; Pujiati Suyata

    2017-01-01

    The study was to: (1) identify the interpretation toward the philosophical foundation of 2013 Curriculum; and (2) evaluate the philosophical foundation of 2013 Curriculum. In order to achieve these objectives, the researchers implemented the method of philosophy interpretation, namely a method that might discover an individual’s paradigm through the texts or the articles that he or she composed. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the philosophical foundation of 2013 Curriculum the researchers ...

  19. Galaxy LIMS for next-generation sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtalbers, J.; Rossler, J.; Sorn, P.; Graaf, J. de; Boisguerin, V.; Castle, J.; Sahin, U.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY: We have developed a laboratory information management system (LIMS) for a next-generation sequencing (NGS) laboratory within the existing Galaxy platform. The system provides lab technicians standard and customizable sample information forms, barcoded submission forms, tracking of input

  20. What school curriculum promotes an inclusive education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Alves da Silva Santiago

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the meanings of the school curriculum regarding the proposal for implementing inclusive education. Based on a review of the literature, the study analyzes different perspectives of the curriculum; while analysis of the different legal devices that support inclusion used documentary research. Based on these analyses, the results indicate the direction towards Post-Critical curriculum as that which best meets the needs of building a truly inclusive school. Conclusions lead to the understanding that the trend of post-critical curriculum breaks with the ways of being and organizing schools, as well as question the absolute truth that disabled students require either different or exclusive school.

  1. A Piagetian Constructivist Perspective on Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Clement B. G.

    1990-01-01

    Focuses specifically on Jean Piaget's theory of development. Examines Piaget's ideas about constructivism and explores the application of this theoretical perspective to the conceptualization of curriculum development. (MG)

  2. Development of Curriculum of Learning through Photograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiko; Aoki, Naokazu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    A curriculum of an integrated learning using power of photography in the junior highschool was constructed, and was experimented in the class "Seminar for Photographic Expression" of the integrated learning at a junior high school. The center of the curriculum is viewing photographs and self-expression using photography. By comparing the results of questionnaires investigation between before and after the class it is suggested that the curriculum brings about increase in self-esteem, empathy, and motivation for learning. This educational effect is really to foster ability to live self-sufficient lives. On the basis of these results curriculums which can be conducted by anyone at every junior highschool were proposed.

  3. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  4. Curriculum Code, Arena, and Context: Curriculum and Leadership Research in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Eva; Nihlfors, Elisabet; Pettersson, Daniel; Skott, Pia

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Swedish curriculum-theory tradition with a focus on different curriculum practices, educational message systems, arenas, and curriculum makers. Attention has been paid to different places, spaces, and times in relation to the selection, ordering, and manifestation of knowledge, norms, and values, as…

  5. From Curriculum Guide to Classroom Practice: Teachers' Narratives of Curriculum Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkedi, Asher

    2009-01-01

    The paper examines the implementation of an external written curriculum in the classroom. The study is based on observation of and interviews with 26 Israeli Bible teachers who followed a formal curriculum and used a teachers' guide. The study identified three types of curriculum narrative: the frame narrative, the task narrative, and the…

  6. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum Outline for Secondary Schools. Vocational Education Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum outline for secondary automotive mechanics is structured around Louisiana's Vocational-Technical Automotive Mechanics Curriculum. The curriculum is composed of 16 units of instruction, covering the following topics: benchwork, fundamentals of automotive engines, preventive maintenance, automotive brakes, steering and front…

  7. Crossroads: A K-16 American History Curriculum. The Elementary Curriculum. [Part Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Citizenship Education, Troy, NY.

    This U.S. history curriculum guide, based upon historical essays written by Richard B. Bernstein, is part of the 'Crossroads' curriculum project. The elementary school component of the 'Crossroads' curriculum introduces students to the important things about the world they live in, the nation that they are a part of, the connection between the…

  8. Formative Evaluation of EFNEP Curriculum: Ensuring the Eating Smart • Being Active Curriculum Is Theory Based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natker, Elana; Baker, Susan S.; Auld, Garry; McGirr, Kathryn; Sutherland, Barbara; Cason, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    The project reported here served to assess a curriculum for EFNEP to ensure theory compliance and content validity. Adherence to Adult Learning Theory and Social Cognitive Theory tenets was determined. A curriculum assessment tool was developed and used by five reviewers to assess initial and revised versions of the curriculum. T-tests for…

  9. State-Based Curriculum-Making: Approaches to Local Curriculum Work in Norway and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølstad, Christina Elde

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates how state authorities in Norway and Finland design national curriculum to provide different policy conditions for local curriculum work in municipalities and schools. The topic is explored by comparing how national authorities in Norway and Finland create a scope for local curriculum. The data consist of interviews with…

  10. A Review of Curriculum History and the Conceptual Framework of Curriculum History in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktan, Sümer

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum is generally defined based on the philosophical perspectives of the individuals. One of the definitions of curriculum states that curriculum is a field of academic study and research, having an intrinsic research systematic, theory, and tradition. From this perspective, this study is designed as three main chapters. The first chapter…

  11. Children's understanding of area concepts: development, curriculum and educational achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Trevor G; Parkinson, Kellie

    2010-01-01

    As one part of a series of studies undertaken to investigate the contribution of developmental attributes of learners to school learning, a representative sample of forty-two students (age from 5 years and 3 months to 13 years and 1 month) was randomly selected from a total student population of 142 students at a small private primary school in northern Australia. Those children's understandings of area concepts taught during the primary school years were assessed by their performance in two testing situations. The first consisted of a written classroom test of ability to solve area problems with items drawn directly from school texts, school examinations and other relevant curriculum documents. The second, which focused more directly on each child's cognitive development, was an individual interview for each child in which four "area" tasks such as the Meadows and Farmhouse Experiment taken from Chapter 11 of The Child's Conception of Geometry (Piaget, Inhelder and Szeminska, 1960, pp. 261-301) were administered. Analysis using the Rasch Partial Credit Model provided a finely detailed quantitative description of the developmental and learning progressions revealed in the data. It is evident that the school mathematics curriculum does not satisfactorily match the learner's developmental sequence at some key points. Moreover, the children's ability to conserve area on the Piagetian tasks, rather than other learner characteristics, such as age and school grade seems to be a precursor for complete success on the mathematical test of area. The discussion focuses on the assessment of developmental (and other) characteristics of school-aged learners and suggests how curriculum and school organization might better capitalize on such information in the design and sequencing of learning experiences for school children. Some features unique to the Rasch family of measurement models are held to have special significance in elucidating the development/attainment nexus.

  12. Novel bioinformatic developments for exome sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, S.H.; Veltman, J.A.; Gilissen, C.F.

    2016-01-01

    With the widespread adoption of next generation sequencing technologies by the genetics community and the rapid decrease in costs per base, exome sequencing has become a standard within the repertoire of genetic experiments for both research and diagnostics. Although bioinformatics now offers

  13. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  14. Rad World -- computer-animated video radiation and hazardous waste-management science curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, B.

    1996-01-01

    The Rad World computer-animated video and curriculum materials were developed through a grant from the Waste-management Education and Research Consortium. The package, which includes a computer-animated video, hands-on activities, and multidisciplinary lessons concerning radiation and hazardous-waste management, was created to approach these subjects in an informative, yet entertaining, manner. The lessons and video, designed to supplement studies of energy and physical science at the middle school and high school level, also implement quality and consistent science education as outlined by the New Mexico Science Standards and Benchmarks (1995). Consistent with the curriculum standards and benchmarks, the curriculum includes library research, collaborative learning, hands-on-science, and discovery learning. Pre- and post-tests are included

  15. Description and Early Outcomes of a Comprehensive Curriculum Redesign at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Heather L; O'Brien, Celia L; Curry, Raymond H; Green, Marianne M; Baker, James F; Kushner, Robert F; Thomas, John X; Corbridge, Thomas C; Corcoran, Julia F; Hauser, Joshua M; Garcia, Patricia M

    2017-09-26

    In 2012, the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine launched a redesigned curriculum addressing the four primary recommendations in the 2010 Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching report on reforming medical education. This new curriculum provides a more standardized evaluation of students' competency achievement through a robust portfolio review process coupled with standard evaluations of medical knowledge and clinical skills. It individualizes learning processes through curriculum flexibility, enabling students to take electives earlier and complete clerkships in their preferred order. The new curriculum is integrated both horizontally and vertically, combining disciplines within organ-based modules and deliberately linking elements (science in medicine, clinical medicine, health and society, professional development) and threads (medical decision making, quality and safety, teamwork and leadership, lifestyle medicine, advocacy and equity) across the three phases that replaced the traditional four-year timeline. It encourages students to conduct research in an area of interest and commit to lifelong learning and self-improvement. The curriculum formalizes the process of professional identity formation and requires students to reflect on their experiences with the informal and hidden curricula, which strongly shape their identities.The authors describe the new curriculum structure, explain their approach to each Carnegie report recommendation, describe early outcomes and challenges, and propose areas for further work. Early data from the first cohort to progress through the curriculum show unchanged United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 and 2 scores, enhanced student research engagement and career exploration, and improved student confidence in the patient care and professional development domains.

  16. LITERATURE CURRICULUM III--TEST FOR "THE MERCHANT OF VENICE."

    Science.gov (United States)

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    THIS TEST--"THE MERCHANT OF VENICE"--WAS DESIGNED BY THE OREGON CURRICULUM STUDY CENTER FOR A NINTH-GRADE LITERATURE CURRICULUM. IT IS INTENDED TO ACCOMPANY CURRICULUM UNITS AVAILABLE AS ED 010 815 AND ED 010 816. (MM)

  17. Energy Transformation: Teaching Youth about Energy Efficiency while Meeting Science Essential Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Sarah D.; Chilcote, Amy G.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the Energy Transformation 4-H school enrichment curriculum. The curriculum addresses energy efficiency and conservation while meeting sixth-grade science essential standards requirements. Through experiential learning, including building and testing a model home, youth learn the relationship between various technologies and…

  18. Native Teachers' Beliefs and Practices: Choosing Language and Cultural Revitalization over Uniformity and Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazzie-Mintz, Tarajean

    2011-01-01

    The goal of implementing a culture-based curriculum that draws upon indigenous knowledge, traditions, and language is currently in competition with demands placed on schools by high stakes educational reform to implement a standards-based curriculum in schools. Though often left out of the policy conversation, Native teachers in particular have…

  19. Common Core State Standards for Students with Gifts and Talents

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    As many states have adopted the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), teachers can look to these standards as a framework for supporting students with gifts and talents. Differentiation of curriculum and instruction to address the CCSS will be necessary to meet the unique learning needs of learners with high ability and those with gifts and talents.…

  20. Investing in future pediatric subspecialists: a fellowship curriculum that prepares for the transition to academic careers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Rama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The experience of transitioning to an academic faculty position can be improved with standardized educational interventions. Although a number of such interventions have been described, few utilize an evaluation framework, describe a robust evaluation process, and address why their interventions were successful. In this article, the authors apply a logic model to describe their efforts to develop, implement, evaluate, and revise a comprehensive academic career development curriculum among pediatric subspecialty fellows. They describe inputs, activities, outputs, and outcomes using quantitative data from fellow evaluations and qualitative data from faculty interviews. Methods: Methods are described under the input and activities sections. The curriculum started with collaboration among educational leadership and conducting a needs assessment. Using the needs assessment results and targeted learning objectives, we piloted the curriculum and then implemented the full curriculum 1 year later. Results: Results are described under the outputs and outcomes sections. We present immediate, short-term, and 6-month evaluation data. Cumulative data over 3 years reveal that fellows consistently acquired knowledge relevant to transitioning and that they applied acquired knowledge to prepare for finding jobs and career advancement. The curriculum also benefits faculty instructors who gain a sense of reward by filling a critical knowledge gap and fostering fellows’ professional growth. Conclusion: The authors relate the success and effectiveness of the curriculum to principles of adult learning, and share lessons learned, including the importance of buy-in from junior and senior fellows and faculty, collaboration, and designating the time to teach and learn.

  1. Health Is Life in Balance: Students and Communities Explore Healthy Lifestyles in a Culturally Based Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, Lynn; Ackerman, Joni; Bointy, Shelley; Cuch, Marilyn; Hindelang, Mary; Pinnow, Stephanie; Turnbull, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    From exploring knowledge from wise members of the community to investigating the science of homeostasis, students learn healthy ways of living through a new hands-on curriculum, Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools: Health Is Life in Balance. The curriculum integrates science and Native American traditions to educate students about science, diabetes and its risk factors, and the importance of nutrition and physical activity in maintaining health and balance in life. Applying an inquiry-based approach to learning, the curriculum builds skills in observation, measurement, prediction, experimentation, and communication, and provides healthy lifestyle messages and innovative science activities for all students. The curriculum is now available to teachers and health educators at no cost through a federal grant.Health Is life in Balance incorporates interdisciplinary standards as well as storytelling to help children understand important messages. Implementation evaluation of the curriculum indicated improved knowledge and attitudes about science and health, positive teacher and student comments, and culturally relevant content. The lessons highlighted in this article give a glimpse into this hands-on curriculum which integrates science and Native American traditions, looking to our past and listening to the wisdom of our Elders, to gain powerful information for healthy, holistic living. The circle of balance is a theme in many indigenous belief systems and is woven into the lessons, providing enduring understandings of health behaviours that can prevent type 2 diabetes in the context of Native American cultural themes.

  2. Can social semantic web techniques foster collaborative curriculum mapping in medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreckelsen, Cord; Finsterer, Sonja; Cremer, Jan; Schenkat, Hennig

    2013-08-15

    Curriculum mapping, which is aimed at the systematic realignment of the planned, taught, and learned curriculum, is considered a challenging and ongoing effort in medical education. Second-generation curriculum managing systems foster knowledge management processes including curriculum mapping in order to give comprehensive support to learners, teachers, and administrators. The large quantity of custom-built software in this field indicates a shortcoming of available IT tools and standards. The project reported here aims at the systematic adoption of techniques and standards of the Social Semantic Web to implement collaborative curriculum mapping for a complete medical model curriculum. A semantic MediaWiki (SMW)-based Web application has been introduced as a platform for the elicitation and revision process of the Aachen Catalogue of Learning Objectives (ACLO). The semantic wiki uses a domain model of the curricular context and offers structured (form-based) data entry, multiple views, structured querying, semantic indexing, and commenting for learning objectives ("LOs"). Semantic indexing of learning objectives relies on both a controlled vocabulary of international medical classifications (ICD, MeSH) and a folksonomy maintained by the users. An additional module supporting the global checking of consistency complements the semantic wiki. Statements of the Object Constraint Language define the consistency criteria. We evaluated the application by a scenario-based formative usability study, where the participants solved tasks in the (fictional) context of 7 typical situations and answered a questionnaire containing Likert-scaled items and free-text questions. At present, ACLO contains roughly 5350 operational (ie, specific and measurable) objectives acquired during the last 25 months. The wiki-based user interface uses 13 online forms for data entry and 4 online forms for flexible searches of LOs, and all the forms are accessible by standard Web browsers. The

  3. Sequence Read Archive (SRA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Sequence Read Archive (SRA) stores raw sequencing data from the next generation of sequencing platforms including Roche 454 GS System®, Illumina Genome...

  4. EST Reading Curriculum & Instruction: An Alignment Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Ali Mohammed

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order for a curriculum to achieve its goals, it is imperative that the curriculum is coherent at all levels. In order to determine the coherency of a curriculum, the alignment of its theoretical underpinning and the label of a curriculum is one of the aspects that can be examined. The purpose of the current study was to examine if the theoretical grounding of the Yemeni EST senior secondary curriculum is in alignment with its communicative-based curriculum label. In line with its label, the reading curriculum embedded in the EST curriculum should be developed and designed based on the Communicative Language Teaching (CLT, which should be reflected in the EST reading instructional practice. In analysing the alignment of the communicative language teaching approach in the EST senior secondary school reading curriculum, the primary focus of the analysis was on the major SLA theories and L2 reading theories and the related instructional approaches. The data for this study were collected via an ESP textbook review as well as from the observation of the EST reading classroom instruction. The findings show that the EST senior secondary reading curriculum was not developed based on the socio-cognitive and socio-cultural theories which are the grounding principles of the communicative approach. Instead, the findings show that the EST senior secondary reading curriculum was primarily developed based on the cognitive information processing theory, in which teaching instruction reflects the student as an individual information processor and the focus on teaching vocabulary and grammatical rules using reading texts in non-communicative manner. Keywords: Communicative Approach, SLA Theories, L2 Reading Theories

  5. RNAome sequencing delineates the complete RNA landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper W.J. Derks

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Standard RNA expression profiling methods rely on enrichment steps for specific RNA classes, thereby not detecting all RNA species. For example, small and large RNAs from the same sample cannot be sequenced in a single sequence run. We designed RNAome sequencing, which is a strand-specific method to determine the expression of small and large RNAs from ribosomal RNA-depleted total RNA in a single sequence run. RNAome sequencing quantitatively preserves all RNA classes. This characteristic allows comparisons between RNA classes, thereby facilitating relationships between different RNA classes. Here, we describe in detail the experimental procedure associated with RNAome sequencing published by Derks and colleagues in RNA Biology (2015 [1]. We also provide the R code for the developed Total Rna Analysis Pipeline (TRAP, an algorithm to analyze RNAome sequencing datasets (deposited at the Gene Expression Omnibus data repository, accession number GSE48084.

  6. Examining the Gaps between Teaching and Learning in the Technology Curriculum within Taiwan's 9-Year Articulated Curriculum Reform from the Perspective of Curriculum Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuen-Yi; Chang, Liang-Te; Tsai, Fu-Hsing; Kao, Chia-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum reform has frequently focused on the curriculum-development stage, overlooking considerations regarding curriculum implementation, which has led to reform failure. In this study, consideration was placed primarily on the curriculum implementation stage. The gaps between teachers' and students' perceptions of content, learning…

  7. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Horticulture Technology Cluster (Program CIP: 01.0601--Horticulture Serv. Op. & Mgmt., Gen.) (Program CIP: 01.0605--Landscaping Op. & Mgmt.). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the horticulture technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a framework of programs and courses, description of the programs, and suggested course sequences for…

  8. A Formalized Three-Year Emergency Medicine Residency Ultrasound Education Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience and type of curriculum: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Medicine Residency Program Ultrasound Education Curriculum is a three-year curriculum for PGY-1 to PGY-3 learners. Introduction/Background: Each year of the three-year The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Medicine Ultrasound Curriculum focuses on different aspects of emergency ultrasonography, thereby promoting progressive understanding and utilization of point-of-care ultrasound in medical decision-making during residency training. Ultrasound is an invaluable bedside tool for emergency physicians; this skill must be mastered by resident learners during residency training, and ultrasound competency is a required ACGME milestone.1 The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP currently recommends that 11 applications of emergency ultrasound be part of the core skills of an emergency physician.2 This curriculum acknowledges the standards developed by ACEP and the ACGME. Objectives: Learners will 1 know the indications for each the 11 ACEP point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS applications; 2 perform each of the 11 ACEP POCUS applications; 3 integrate POCUS into medical decision-making. Methods: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include: independent, self-directed learning (textbook and literature reading, brief didactic sessions describing indications and technique for each examination, hands-on ultrasound scanning under the direct supervision of ultrasound faculty with real-time feedback, and quality assurance review of ultrasound images. Residents are expected to perform a minimum of 150 ultrasound examinations with associated quality assurance during the course of their residency training. The time requirements, reading material, and ultrasound techniques taught vary depending on the year of training. Length of curriculum: The entirety of the curriculum is three years; however, each year of residency training has

  9. Communications standards

    CERN Document Server

    Stokes, A V

    1986-01-01

    Communications Standards deals with the standardization of computer communication networks. This book examines the types of local area networks (LANs) that have been developed and looks at some of the relevant protocols in more detail. The work of Project 802 is briefly discussed, along with a protocol which has developed from one of the LAN standards and is now a de facto standard in one particular area, namely the Manufacturing Automation Protocol (MAP). Factors that affect the usage of networks, such as network management and security, are also considered. This book is divided into three se

  10. Shared Curriculum Model: A Promising Practice for Education Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Liz; Gorski, Mary Sue; Sroczynski, Maureen; Farmer, Pat; Wortock, Jean

    2015-12-01

    The shared curriculum model is one of four successful models of academic progression identified through a consensus-building process facilitated by The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, AARP, and the AARP Foundation. Seamless academic progression from the associate degree in nursing (ADN) to the baccalaureate degree in nursing (BSN) is achieved either by simultaneously revising both ADN and BSN curricula or by making targeted adjustments in ADN or BSN curricula to create a unified academic progression. Systematic vetting and definitive agreement on nursing prerequisites and corequisites, general education courses, nursing major content, and general degree requirements are necessary to ensure coordinated degree progression. A standardized set of expectations for beginning professional practice and for unique baccalaureate nursing knowledge ensures vital nursing content across the ADN-to-BSN continuum. Examples of state and regional ADN-to-BSN progression programs using the shared curriculum model are highlighted. The shared curriculum model is a promising practical and sustainable approach to seamless ADN-to-BSN academic progression. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Physics in the Pre-pharmacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Richard P.

    2000-01-01

    Results of a survey of the 81 colleges of pharmacy affiliated with the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy regarding requirements of physics in the pre-pharmacy curriculum are presented. The author concludes that colleges that do not currently require a course in physics in their pre-pharmacy curriculum should consider adding one. (Author)

  12. Curriculum Lessons from the Animal School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Maggie A.; Willems, Arnold L.

    1996-01-01

    Uses a metaphor of an animal school (where teachers, students, administrators, and parents are represented by various species of animals) to address the nature of school curriculum. Synthesizes, from the description of the animal school, fundamental principles of curriculum that should be considered when improving school programs. (PA)

  13. Evolution of Singapore's School Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Berinderjeet

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of Singapore's school mathematics curriculum is in tandem with developments in the education system of Singapore. In the last six decades, economic policies of the government that are necessary for the survival of Singapore in a fast changing world have shaped the aims of the school mathematics curriculum. The present day curriculum…

  14. Getting Started: Curriculum Exploration Process Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Gwynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This mini-article describes a faculty meeting process used for curriculum planning. The proffered outline helped us document and assess our program, to focus our conversation, to envision where we wanted students to be, and to share across the curriculum what was happening in our solitary courses. The results prompted us to share with each other…

  15. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  16. Integrating gender into a basic medical curriculum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, P.; Mans, L.J.L.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 1998, gaps were found to exist in the basic medical curriculum of the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre regarding health-related gender differences in terms of biological, psychological and social factors. After screening the curriculum for language, content and context,

  17. Computer Service Technician "COMPS." Curriculum Grant 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolcraft Coll., Livonia, MI.

    This document is a curriculum guide for a program in computer service technology developed at Schoolcraft College, Livonia, Michigan. The program is designed to give students a strong background in the fundamentals of electricity, electronic devices, and basic circuits (digital and linear). The curriculum includes laboratory demonstrations of the…

  18. Housekeeping ESL. Workplace Literacy Curriculum for Hotels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Carol; And Others

    This curriculum for hotel employees is based on the analyses of worksite tasks and interactions. Hotel housekeepers were observed on the job, supervisors were consulted, and existing resources were reviewed to determine the language and basic skills needed to effectively and efficiently perform job duties. Twelve curriculum units were developed,…

  19. Anatomy of a Bible Course Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Frances R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Examines case law on the subject of Bible instruction in the public schools, offers a detailed analysis and critique of the National Council on Bible Curriculum in Public Schools curriculum, and provides suggestions for public schools contemplating adding a course on the Bible to their curricula. (Contains 89 references.) (Author/PKP)

  20. Rethinking Recycling: An Oregon Waste Reduction Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon State Dept. of Environmental Quality, Portland.

    This updated curriculum guide is designed to provide teachers of elementary school science with a set of activities on recycling and waste reduction. The curriculum has three sections: (1) Grades K-3 Lessons; (2) Grades 4-5 Lessons; and (3) Teacher's Resource Guide. It is designed to take students from an introduction to natural resources and…

  1. Curriculum Change: Old Wine in New Bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenburg, Sandra Lloyd; Johnson, Theodore E.

    A survey of the past 100 years of curriculum development in the United States reveals a series of changes in curricular practice and philosophies. This document reviews those trends in curriculum change, according to historical time periods. Discussed in the section covering 1880-1910 are the Herbartian and Romantic philosophies, the Baltimore…

  2. Water Pollution, Environmental Science Curriculum Guide Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Harold J.

    This curriculum guide is a 40-day unit plan on water pollution developed, in part, from the National Science Foundation Environmental Science Institutes' Ninth Grade Environmental Science Curriculum Guide. This unit contains teacher lesson plans, suggested teacher and student modules, case studies, and activities to be developed by teachers…

  3. Can curriculum managers' reflections produce new strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    managers) who used Moodle visions to manage their school curriculum at a school in Durban, South Africa. The curriculum managers' main aim of using Moodle was to improve teacher and learner performance. The purpose of the study was to ...

  4. Designing Research in Environmental Education Curriculum Policy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is increasing dissatisfaction at many levels with existing environmental education curricula in southern Africa. The resulting change and innovation is opening up possibilities for innovative research into the construction, conceptualisation and implementation of the curriculum. However, researching the curriculum ...

  5. Curriculum Review. Volume 43, Number 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leischer, Jennifer; Fordham, Thomas B.

    2004-01-01

    Each month, "Curriculum Review" offers teachers mutual support, the sharing of ideas, and words of encouragement to help them face challenges in the classroom. The May 2004 issue of "Curriculum Review" contains the following articles: (1) "Inspiring Words for Educators"; (2) "We Hear from Readers"; (3) "Last Month in Education"; (4) "What They're…

  6. Teachers' Experiences of Science Curriculum Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Jim; Banner, Indira; Homer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    We report on a three-year study of teachers' experiences of a major reform of the science National Curriculum for 14- to 16-year-olds in England. Teachers' responses to this curriculum reform were guided by: "personal" aims and biography; "internal" features of their workplace such as departmental collegiality; and…

  7. Adolescent Sexual Education: Designing Curriculum That Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quincy, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this review paper, "Adolescent Sexual Education: Designing Curriculum That Works", is to present some basic curriculum necessities for developing an in-school sexual education program that results in decreasing the number of teenagers initiating sex, thus reducing the number of teen pregnancies and cases of sexually transmitted…

  8. Innovative Conference Curriculum: Maximizing Learning and Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Nancy; Kranzow, Jeannine

    2012-01-01

    This action research study evaluated the potential of an innovative curriculum to move 73 graduate students toward professional development. The curriculum was grounded in the professional conference and utilized the motivation and expertise of conference presenters. This innovation required students to be more independent, act as a critical…

  9. Curriculum Redesign in Veterinary Medicine: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Kristin P; Macik, Maria L; Turner, Jacqueline S; Korich, Jodi A; Rogers, Kenita S; Fowler, Debra; Scallan, Elizabeth M; Keefe, Lisa M

    Curricular review is considered a necessary component for growth and enhancement of academic programs and requires time, energy, creativity, and persistence from both faculty and administration. At Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (TAMU), the faculty and administration partnered with the university's Center for Teaching Excellence to create a faculty-driven, data-enhanced curricular redesign process. The 8-step process begins with the formation of a dedicated faculty curriculum design team to drive the redesign process and to support the college curriculum committee. The next steps include defining graduate outcomes and mapping the current curriculum to identify gaps and redundancies across the curriculum. Data are collected from internal and external stakeholders including veterinary students, faculty, alumni, and employers of graduates. Data collected through curriculum mapping and stakeholder engagement substantiate the curriculum redesign. The guidelines, supporting documents, and 8-step process developed at TAMU are provided to assist other veterinary schools in successful curricular redesign. This is the first of a two-part report that provides the background, context, and description of the process for charting the course for curricular change. The process involves defining expected learning outcomes for new graduates, conducting a curriculum mapping exercise, and collecting stakeholder data for curricular evaluation (steps 1-4). The second part of the report describes the development of rubrics that were applied to the graduate learning outcomes (steps 5-8) and engagement of faculty during the implementation phases of data-driven curriculum change.

  10. A Political Analysis of Curriculum Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf-Wilets, Vivian C.; Nugent, L. Catherine

    1979-01-01

    Presents an analysis of faculty dynamics in nursing curriculum situations based on the social theories of conflict, community power, and interest-group to form a political model representing stages in policy development. These stages are applied to curriculum change examples to show how social conflict and power plays cause problems. (MF)

  11. Ratio in the primary school curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    NOVÁKOVÁ, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this bachelor's work is curriculum mapping ratio, direct and inverse proportion on the second stage of Primary School and then to create a set of solved examples. The set of solved examples should serve pupils of Primary Schools and it should help them for better understanding of the curriculum.

  12. The 2010 Canterbury Earthquake: Curriculum Shockwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mike; Moeed, Azra

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports data from an exploratory questionnaire designed to capture "curriculum P-waves"--those curriculum responses that were the fastest and therefore measured first--following a significant earthquake in New Zealand. As well as taking a professional interest in a major disaster in their backyard, it is assumed that social…

  13. Texas Real Estate Curriculum Workshop Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Robert

    The Texas Real Estate Research Center-Texas Education Agency (TRERC-TEA) curriculum workshop was attended by over 40 participants representing 26 Texas community colleges. These participants divided into eight small groups by real estate specialty area and developed curriculum outlines and learning objectives for the following real estate courses:…

  14. How Science Could Drive Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwick, Andy; Nandhra, Satvinder

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how science can lead whole-school curriculum change at key stage 3 (ages 11-14). Two thematic curriculum models are described. Model 1 shows how science specialists can develop student understanding of how science interrelates to a variety of other subject areas, while Model 2 shows how science might help to create a…

  15. The Multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidergor, Hava E.

    2010-01-01

    The multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM) helps teachers to better prepare gifted and able students for our changing world, acquiring much needed skills. It is influenced by general learning theory of constructivism, notions of preparing students for 21st century, Teaching the Future Model, and current comprehensive curriculum models for…

  16. Students' Perspectives on LGBTQ-Inclusive Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp, Shannon D.; Burdge, Hilary; Licona, Adela C.; Moody, Raymond L.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Implementing curriculum that is inclusive of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) people has the potential to create an equitable learning environment. In order to learn more about students' experiences of LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum, 26 high school students with diverse racial/ethnic, sexual, and gender identities…

  17. Problem Based Learning, curriculum development and change ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The faculty of Medicine, (FOM) Makerere University Kampala was started in 1924 and has been running a traditional curriculum for 79 years. A few years back it embarked on changing its curriculum from traditional to Problem Based Learning (PBL) and Community Based Education and Service (COBES) as ...

  18. The SWISS-PROT protein sequence data bank: current status.

    OpenAIRE

    Bairoch, A; Boeckmann, B

    1994-01-01

    SWISS-PROT is an annotated protein sequence database established in 1986 and maintained collaboratively, since 1988, by the Department of Medical Biochemistry of the University of Geneva and the EMBL Data Library. The SWISS-PROT protein sequence data bank consist of sequence entries. Sequence entries are composed of different lines types, each with their own format. For standardization purposes the format of SWISS-PROT follows as closely as possible that of the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Databa...

  19. A Model Curriculum for an Emergency Medical Services (EMS Rotation for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mancera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This EMS curriculum is designed for Emergency Medicine residents at all levels of training. Introduction: Emergency Medicine (EM physicians have routine interaction with Emergency Medical Services (EMS in their clinical practice. Additionally, the American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandates that all Emergency Medicine resident physicians receive specific training in the area of EMS.1 Historically, EMS training for EM residents has been conducted in the absence of a standardized didactic curriculum. Despite advancements in the area of prehospital training, there remains wide inconsistency in EMS training experiences among EM residency training programs.2 To our knowledge a standardized and reproducible EMS curriculum for EM residents does not exist. Objectives: The aim of this curriculum is to provide a robust learning experience for EM residents around prehospital care and EMS that fulfills the ACGME requirements and which can be easily replicated and implemented in a variety of EM residency training programs. Method: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include didactics, asynchronous learning through online modules and a focused reading list, experiential learning through ride-alongs, structured small group discussion, supervised medical command shifts, and mentored practice in organizing and delivering didactics to EMS providers.

  20. Negotiating a Curriculum Balance: Perceptions of Special Education Teachers and Administrators Regarding Alternate Assessments in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modenbach, Joy Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to understand how teachers and administrators navigate the state and federal requirements for students with severe and profound disabilities in regards to alternate standards and assessments. Special education teachers must balance the required curriculum while continuing to meet the physical and emotional needs of…

  1. The Curriculum in School External Evaluation Frameworks in Portugal and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Carla; Leite, Carlinda; Fernandes, Preciosa

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum has been target of social and political demands due to its central role in school education and to the changes that occurred in education over the 20th century. The changes include more autonomy assigned to schools and teachers and the establishment of educational standards. These raised concerns that led European bodies to…

  2. Nature of Environmental Education in Bangladesh: A School Level Assessment with Reference to the National Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, M. A. Taiyeb

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to identify the nature of formal environmental education in Bangladesh at school level with particular reference to the national curriculum. The main objective of the study is to assess the contents of the school textbooks for each standard, and to see whether the diversified themes covered are a good representation of…

  3. Engineering in Elementary STEM Education: Curriculum Design, Instruction, Learning, and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Christine M.

    2018-01-01

    Bolstered by new standards and new initiatives to promote STEM education, engineering is making its way into the school curriculum. This comprehensive introduction will help elementary educators integrate engineering into their classroom, school, or district in age-appropriate, inclusive, and engaging ways. Building on the work of a Museum of…

  4. Merging Information Literacy and Evidence-Based Practice in an Undergraduate Health Sciences Curriculum Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Susan; Bannon, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    The ACRL's "Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education" offers the opportunity to rethink information literacy teaching and curriculum. However, the ACRL's rescinded "Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education" correlate with the preferred research and decision-making model of the health…

  5. Curriculum Matters: The Common Core, Authors of Color, and Inclusion for Inclusion's Sake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchini, Christina

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author employs a critical analysis of a short story with cross-cultural themes to illustrate how it is framed in a widely used textbook aligned with the Common Core State Standards. The author shows how the inclusion of literature by authors of color in any curriculum does not necessitate that the needs of racially,…

  6. The Promise of Integrated English Curriculum: Teachers' and Head Teachers' Reactions and Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoma, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    The current Kenyan secondary English curriculum (2002) has adopted an integrated approach not only to teaching, but also to the assessment of English language and Literature. This re-organisation is meant to improve the standards of teaching and performance in English. However, national performance in integrated English has remained consistently…

  7. Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Education: A review of School Policy and Curriculum Provision in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kerryann; Berthelsen, Donna; Nicholson, Jan M.; Brandon, Leisa; Stevens, Judyann; Rachele, Jerome N.

    2013-01-01

    The past four decades have seen increasing public and professional awareness of child sexual abuse. Congruent with public health approaches to prevention, efforts to eliminate child sexual abuse have inspired the emergence of prevention initiatives which can be provided to all children as part of their standard school curriculum. However,…

  8. Adherence to Treatment in a Behavioral Intervention Curriculum for Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Timothy R.; Symons, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Parents (N = 21) of children with autism spectrum disorders responded to a survey on adherence to skills instruction and problem behavior management strategies they had previously been observed to master in a standardized training curriculum based on the principles of applied behavior analysis. Survey items were guided by existing models of and…

  9. "Embodied Curriculum": Teaching Disability Studies in the First Year Composition Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Kathleen A.

    The first, and perhaps the most obvious, way to incorporate disability studies into the composition curriculum is to alter the way instructors teach canonical texts. The standard literary approaches to disability are genre studies, which consider disability to be an element of the gothic or the grotesque, and rhetorical studies, which analyze its…

  10. Creating a Critical Genetics Curriculum as a Counternarrative to/in the Urban Imaginary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Kerrita K.

    2017-01-01

    I am explicating the neologism critical genetics as a site of curricular engagement for urban science students, acknowledging that schools and school systems are hierarchical structures that reflect a community's social norms and practices. This critical and standards-based critical genetics curriculum interrogates and disrupts the deficit…

  11. Teachers Evaluate the New Curriculum in English: Views Regarding Evaluation and Evaluation Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adin-Surkis, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    English is solidly entrenched in Israel as the "first foreign language", as defined in the Policy on Language Education in Israeli Schools. The English curriculum published in 2001 expresses the view that English is the world's most important language and therefore requires the highest standards of teaching. This research examined how…

  12. Opportunities and Options for Facilitating and Evaluating Access to the General Curriculum for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Andrew T.; Chilungu, E. Namisi; LaSalle, Tamika P.; Talapatra, Devadrita; Vignieri, Matthew J.; Kurz, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Federal regulations concerning the development and implementation of alternate assessments based on modified achievement standards include a set of safeguards intended to ensure that eligible students have access to grade-level general curriculum. These regulations concerning curricular access and opportunity to learn for students with…

  13. Use of Integrated Curriculum Model (ICM) in Social Studies: Gifted and Talented Students' Conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, Nihat Gürel; Atalay, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: There have been several studies that have investigated curricular interventions for gifted students to address their educational needs. For most courses and disciplines, a standard curriculum may not be sufficient for the majority of gifted students. Here, among other curricular efforts in the education of the gifted, an…

  14. Comprehensive simulation-enhanced training curriculum for an advanced minimally invasive procedure: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, Boris; Dedy, Nicolas J; Bonrath, Esther M; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2017-05-01

    There is no comprehensive simulation-enhanced training curriculum to address cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical skills for an advanced minimally invasive procedure. 1) To develop and provide evidence of validity for a comprehensive simulation-enhanced training (SET) curriculum for an advanced minimally invasive procedure; (2) to demonstrate transfer of acquired psychomotor skills from a simulation laboratory to live porcine model; and (3) to compare training outcomes of SET curriculum group and chief resident group. University. This prospective single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial allocated 20 intermediate-level surgery residents to receive either conventional training (control) or SET curriculum training (intervention). The SET curriculum consisted of cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical training modules. Psychomotor skills in a live anesthetized porcine model in the OR was the primary outcome. Knowledge of advanced minimally invasive and bariatric surgery and nontechnical skills in a simulated OR crisis scenario were the secondary outcomes. Residents in the SET curriculum group went on to perform a laparoscopic jejunojejunostomy in the OR. Cognitive, psychomotor, and nontechnical skills of SET curriculum group were also compared to a group of 12 chief surgery residents. SET curriculum group demonstrated superior psychomotor skills in a live porcine model (56 [47-62] versus 44 [38-53], Ppsychomotor skills in the live porcine model and in the OR in a human patient (56 [47-62] versus 63 [61-68]; P = .21). SET curriculum group demonstrated inferior knowledge (13 [11-15] versus 16 [14-16]; P<.05), equivalent psychomotor skill (63 [61-68] versus 68 [62-74]; P = .50), and superior nontechnical skills (41 [38-45] versus 34 [27-35], P<.01) compared with chief resident group. Completion of the SET curriculum resulted in superior training outcomes, compared with conventional surgery training. Implementation of the SET curriculum can standardize training

  15. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has......International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...... to be harmonized in order for a global company to perceive e-Customs as standardized. In doing so, they contribute an explanation of the challenges associated with using a standardization mechanism for harmonizing socio-technical information systems....

  16. Achieving Standardization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    competitive, national customs and regional economic organizations are seeking to establish a standardized solution for digital reporting of customs data. However, standardization has proven hard to achieve in the socio-technical e-Customs solution. In this chapter, the authors identify and describe what has......International e-Customs is going through a standardization process. Driven by the need to increase control in the trade process to address security challenges stemming from threats of terrorists, diseases, and counterfeit products, and to lower the administrative burdens on traders to stay...... to be harmonized in order for a global company to perceive e-Customs as standardized. In doing so, they contribute an explanation of the challenges associated with using a standardization mechanism for harmonizing socio-technical information systems....

  17. Training Standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2003-01-01

    The article describes the benefits of and required process and recommendations for implementing the standardization of training in the nuclear power industry in the United States and abroad. Current Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) enable training standardization in the nuclear power industry. The delivery of training through the Internet, Intranet and video over IP will facilitate this standardization and bring multiple benefits to the nuclear power industry worldwide. As the amount of available qualified and experienced professionals decreases because of retirements and fewer nuclear engineering institutions, standardized training will help increase the number of available professionals in the industry. Technology will make it possible to use the experience of retired professionals who may be interested in working part-time from a remote location. Well-planned standardized training will prevent a fragmented approach among utilities, and it will save the industry considerable resources in the long run. It will also ensure cost-effective and safe nuclear power plant operation

  18. ENTREPRENEURSHIP CURRICULUM IN ROMANIAN UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cordea

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The central focus of universities should be the improving the quality and quantity of entrepreneurs or students with an entrepreneurial attitude. We argue that the academic field of entrepreneurship is at a very low level in Romania on several axes and the University must determine the best fit for them given their students, their alumni, their stakeholders, the region and its economic base and the aspiration of institutions. Entrepreneurship should it be something that will have high and positive impact for students not just another course in the curriculum. Entrepreneurship is concerned with establishing new activities and about being able to perceive new opportunities. Entrepreneurship competence is relevant for all areas of working and business life, in both new and established activities and enterprises. The aim of this paper is to provide an analysis of the present situation and recent evolution of entrepreneurship education in Romanian universities and to discuss these courses and curricula match the demand for entrepreneurial competences. This paper presents a short summary of the status of entrepreneurship curriculum and different challenges. The information collected through the Internet refers to the academic year 2012-2013. The range of theoretical choices, objectives, publics, pedagogical methods and institutional context should be structured around a general framework.

  19. Biology curriculum in twentieth-century Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberá, Óscar; Zanón, Beatriz; Pérez-Pl, José Francisco

    1999-01-01

    One hundred years of history of Spanish biology curricula are reviewed in this article. The aim of this analysis is focused on the relationship between socially controversial biological issues and the decisionmaking procedures in the construction of the national curricula published under the different regimes that have governed Spain over the last 100 years. The study covers the secondary level of schooling (age 10 up to university), and is based mainly on the data afforded by the official publications of the nine national curricula in twentieth-century Spain, and some of the main textbooks used for this schooling level. Special attention is given to the teaching of evolution, the most sensitive issue in biology education, and some parallelisms are traced and compared with similar phenomena occurring in other countries. The new trends in biology education from the last reform of the Spanish education system are briefly discussed. This study provides a perspective of the pressures affecting socially controversial issues included in education. These pressures have been identified mainly as political, social, and religious beliefs held by powerful and influential social groups, the same kinds of forces that have existed in other countries worldwide. Studies such as this one, about the real forces that have shaped curriculum development in the past, are vital for understanding the present circumstances in biology education and, therefore, unavoidable in order to enhance future standards in biology education.

  20. Translating sanger-based routine DNA diagnostics into generic massive parallel ion semiconductor sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekstra, A.; Bosgoed, E.A.J.; Rikken, A.; Lier, B. van; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Tychon, M.W.J.; Derks, R.C.; Soest, R.A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Scheffer, H.; Neveling, K.; Nelen, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dideoxy-based chain termination sequencing developed by Sanger is the gold standard sequencing approach and allows clinical diagnostics of disorders with relatively low genetic heterogeneity. Recently, new next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have found their way into diagnostic

  1. Massively parallel signature sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daixing; Rao, Mahendra S; Walker, Roger; Khrebtukova, Irina; Haudenschild, Christian D; Miura, Takumi; Decola, Shannon; Vermaas, Eric; Moon, Keith; Vasicek, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    Massively parallel signature sequencing is an ultra-high throughput sequencing technology. It can simultaneously sequence millions of sequence tags, and, therefore, is ideal for whole genome analysis. When applied to expression profiling, it reveals almost every transcript in the sample and provides its accurate expression level. This chapter describes the technology and its application in establishing stem cell transcriptome databases.

  2. Goldbach Partitions and Sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    as a sum of two primes (for even numbers) and three primes (for odd numbers). We call this the Goldbach sequence g(n), which may be converted into a binary sequence b(n) by mapping each even number to 0 and each odd number to 1. The resulting binary sequences may be used as pseudorandom sequences in ...

  3. Teaching Arabic to Native Speakers Educational Games in a New Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alshikhabobakr, Hanan; Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.; Ibrahim, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents nine educational games and activities for learning the Arabic language developed for Arabiyyatii project, a three-year endeavor that involves re-conceptualization of the standard Arabic language learning curriculum as a first language for kindergarten students. The applications...... presented in this paper are developed for tabletop surface computers, which support a collaborative and interactive learning environment. These applications focus on speaking, word production, and sentence recognition of the Modern Standard Arabic to young native speakers. This work employs...

  4. Developing a comprehensive and articulated nuclear training curriculum - the Westinghouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholand, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The training of nuclear power plant personnel to a level that meets the needs of public safety and plant efficiency has become an important issue. Following an evaluation of its training program, Westinghouse have, after considerable research and development, upgraded their program. This process is described. The steps covered include conducting the task analysis, identifying the appropriate educational domains and taxonomies, writing behavioural objectives, sequencing the objectives, selecting the proper mode of instructional delivery the unit of instruction and evaluating the actual effectiveness of the curriculum product. As these tasks are conducted on a microscopic scale for discrete units of information, a macroscopic analysis is also being conducted to organize and sequence global topic areas, thus producing a comprehensive and articulated curriculum model. (U.K.)

  5. Learning material in compliance with the Revised National Curriculum Statement: A dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertus van Etten

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the challenges confronting a developer of mathematics learning material according to the Revised National Curriculum Statement of South Africa. The material development is based on the approach to learning embodied in Realistic Mathematics Education in the Netherlands. It is a real challenge to realise the learning outcomes and assessment standards in the South African curriculum and simultaneously to explore learners’ informal strategies to come up with their ‘own’ solutions to practical problems and thus to experience mathematics as real, relevant and enjoyable.

  6. Sequence Factorization with Multiple References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The success of high-throughput sequencing has lead to an increasing number of projects which sequence large populations of a species. Storage and analysis of sequence data is a key challenge in these projects, because of the sheer size of the datasets. Compression is one simple technology to deal with this challenge. Referential factorization and compression schemes, which store only the differences between input sequence and a reference sequence, gained lots of interest in this field. Highly-similar sequences, e.g., Human genomes, can be compressed with a compression ratio of 1,000:1 and more, up to two orders of magnitude better than with standard compression techniques. Recently, it was shown that the compression against multiple references from the same species can boost the compression ratio up to 4,000:1. However, a detailed analysis of using multiple references is lacking, e.g., for main memory consumption and optimality. In this paper, we describe one key technique for the referential compression against multiple references: The factorization of sequences. Based on the notion of an optimal factorization, we propose optimization heuristics and identify parameter settings which greatly influence 1) the size of the factorization, 2) the time for factorization, and 3) the required amount of main memory. We evaluate a total of 30 setups with a varying number of references on data from three different species. Our results show a wide range of factorization sizes (optimal to an overhead of up to 300%), factorization speed (0.01 MB/s to more than 600 MB/s), and main memory usage (few dozen MB to dozens of GB). Based on our evaluation, we identify the best configurations for common use cases. Our evaluation shows that multi-reference factorization is much better than single-reference factorization.

  7. Sequence Factorization with Multiple References.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wandelt

    Full Text Available The success of high-throughput sequencing has lead to an increasing number of projects which sequence large populations of a species. Storage and analysis of sequence data is a key challenge in these projects, because of the sheer size of the datasets. Compression is one simple technology to deal with this challenge. Referential factorization and compression schemes, which store only the differences between input sequence and a reference sequence, gained lots of interest in this field. Highly-similar sequences, e.g., Human genomes, can be compressed with a compression ratio of 1,000:1 and more, up to two orders of magnitude better than with standard compression techniques. Recently, it was shown that the compression against multiple references from the same species can boost the compression ratio up to 4,000:1. However, a detailed analysis of using multiple references is lacking, e.g., for main memory consumption and optimality. In this paper, we describe one key technique for the referential compression against multiple references: The factorization of sequences. Based on the notion of an optimal factorization, we propose optimization heuristics and identify parameter settings which greatly influence 1 the size of the factorization, 2 the time for factorization, and 3 the required amount of main memory. We evaluate a total of 30 setups with a varying number of references on data from three different species. Our results show a wide range of factorization sizes (optimal to an overhead of up to 300%, factorization speed (0.01 MB/s to more than 600 MB/s, and main memory usage (few dozen MB to dozens of GB. Based on our evaluation, we identify the best configurations for common use cases. Our evaluation shows that multi-reference factorization is much better than single-reference factorization.

  8. Crowdsourced Curriculum Development for Online Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappell, Eric; Chan, Teresa M; Thoma, Brent; Trueger, N Seth; Stuntz, Bob; Cooney, Robert; Ahn, James

    2017-12-08

    In recent years online educational content, efforts at quality appraisal, and integration of online material into institutional teaching initiatives have increased. However, medical education has yet to develop large-scale online learning centers. Crowd-sourced curriculum development may expedite the realization of this potential while providing opportunities for innovation and scholarship. This article describes the current landscape, best practices, and future directions for crowdsourced curriculum development using Kern's framework for curriculum development and the example topic of core content in emergency medicine. A scoping review of online educational content was performed by a panel of subject area experts for each step in Kern's framework. Best practices and recommendations for future development for each step were established by the same panel using a modified nominal group consensus process. The most prevalent curriculum design steps were (1) educational content and (2) needs assessments. Identified areas of potential innovation within these steps included targeting gaps in specific content areas and developing underrepresented instructional methods. Steps in curriculum development without significant representation included (1) articulation of goals and objectives and (2) tools for curricular evaluation. By leveraging the power of the community, crowd-sourced curriculum development offers a mechanism to diffuse the burden associated with creating comprehensive online learning centers. There is fertile ground for innovation and scholarship in each step along the continuum of curriculum development. Realization of this paradigm's full potential will require individual developers to strongly consider how their contributions will align with the work of others.

  9. Evolution across the Curriculum: Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alita R. Burmeister

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An integrated understanding of microbiology and evolutionary biology is essential for students pursuing careers in microbiology and healthcare fields. In this Perspective, we discuss the usefulness of evolutionary concepts and an overall evolutionary framework for students enrolled in microbiology courses. Further, we propose a set of learning goals for students studying microbial evolution concepts. We then describe some barriers to microbial evolution teaching and learning and encourage the continued incorporation of evidence-based teaching practices into microbiology courses at all levels. Next, we review the current status of microbial evolution assessment tools and describe some education resources available for teaching microbial evolution. Successful microbial evolution education will require that evolution be taught across the undergraduate biology curriculum, with a continued focus on applications and applied careers, while aligning with national biology education reform initiatives.

  10. International trends in curriculum research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    After the first PISA study was published in 2000 many European states were shocked. Many European countries – among them the Scandinavian countries and Germany – assumed that they had the most effective, fair and efficient school systems. But the PISA study showed that they were ranked below...... the average for the PISA countries. It became clear that the school systems did not perform as well as they were supposed and considered to do. PISA-2000 became a chock for many European countries that can be compared to the Sputnik-chock in the 1950s. Like the Sputnik-chock resulted in comprehensive reforms...... of the western school systems (especially within natural science and mathematics), the PISA-study has also been followed by school and curriculum radical reforms. The inspiration for the European reforms was taken in the so called accountability policy that during the 1990s had been developed in the USA...

  11. Science curriculum formation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    Cultural-historical theory is primarily a psychological theory about and human action and development within meaningful contexts. As a psychologically-oriented theory, it can be relevant to science education research, even if it was not been developed or elaborated specifically in relation...... to problems within science education. STEM education research can be reduced (roughly) to four major problem areas: curriculum, empirical evaluation of existing practices and conditions, didactics, and professional development, where each of these categories can be concretised further according to grade...... between research and practice, (b) the idea of developmental teaching, and (c) the idea of theoretical thinking. This paper will present an example of subject-matter analysis for food production and food chemistry to illustrate practical consequences that follow from these three points....

  12. Botany in Edinburgh's Medical Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    In the early 18th century, at the founding of Edinburgh University Medical School, the study of botany was regarded as an essential component of medical training. Botanical teaching began as basic instruction in the recognition of medical plants, considered a vital aspect of a physician's Materia Medica studies. Over the next hundred years growing importance was given to the study of botany as a science, its popularity peaking under John Hutton Balfour's tenure as Professor (1845-1879). The relevance of botanical study later declined in the undergraduate medical curriculum until its cessation in 1961 .This paper considers the history of botanical studies in Edinburgh, including the reasons for its introduction and its changing importance over time.

  13. Putting culture in the curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sairanen, Raija; Richardson, Eileen; Kelly, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    . The completed work is available in the form of a CD-ROM. The paper describes the steps taken to reach the project outcomes over 4 years. The methods of dissemination of the project outcomes are included. The discussion considers the journey of the group towards the outcomes of the project and identifies...... the need to discover how effective the framework is in achieving the aims of the group. In conclusion it articulates the hope that this work will improve the care which is shown to all recipients of health care whatever their cultural background....... for such a project. The project group emerged from the European organisation known as COHEHRE (Consortium of Higher Education Institutes in Health and Rehabilitation in Europe). Composed of a group of nurse educators from 5 European countries it charts the process which led them to create a curriculum framework...

  14. Evolution across the Curriculum: Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Alita R.; Smith, James J.

    2016-01-01

    An integrated understanding of microbiology and evolutionary biology is essential for students pursuing careers in microbiology and healthcare fields. In this Perspective, we discuss the usefulness of evolutionary concepts and an overall evolutionary framework for students enrolled in microbiology courses. Further, we propose a set of learning goals for students studying microbial evolution concepts. We then describe some barriers to microbial evolution teaching and learning and encourage the continued incorporation of evidence-based teaching practices into microbiology courses at all levels. Next, we review the current status of microbial evolution assessment tools and describe some education resources available for teaching microbial evolution. Successful microbial evolution education will require that evolution be taught across the undergraduate biology curriculum, with a continued focus on applications and applied careers, while aligning with national biology education reform initiatives. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education PMID:27158306

  15. Evaluation of oral microbiology lab curriculum reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Min; Gao, Zhen Y; Wu, Xin Y; Jiang, Chen X; Du, Jia H

    2015-12-07

    According to the updated concept of oral microbiology, the School of Stomatology, Wuhan University, has carried out oral microbiology teaching reforms during the last 5 years. There was no lab curriculum before 2009 except for a theory course of oral microbiology. The school has implemented an innovative curriculum with oral medicine characteristics to strengthen understanding of knowledge, cultivate students' scientific interest and develop their potential, to cultivate the comprehensive ability of students. This study was designed to evaluate the oral microbiology lab curriculum by analyzing student performance and perceptions regarding the curriculum from 2009 to 2013. The lab curriculum adopted modalities for cooperative learning. Students collected dental plaque from each other and isolated the cariogenic bacteria with selective medium plates. Then they purified the enrichment culture medium and identified the cariogenic strains by Gram stain and biochemical tests. Both quantitative and qualitative data for 5 years were analysed in this study. Part One of the current study assessed student performance in the lab from 2009 to 2013. Part Two used qualitative means to assess students' perceptions by an open questionnaire. The 271 study students' grades on oral microbiology improved during the lab curriculum: "A" grades rose from 60.5 to 81.2 %, and "C" grades fell from 28.4 to 6.3 %. All students considered the lab curriculum to be interesting and helpful. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that the lab curriculum has strengthened students' grasp of important microbiology-related theory, cultivated their scientific interest, and developed their potential and comprehensive abilities. Our student performance and perception data support the continued use of the innovative teaching system. As an extension and complement of the theory course, the oral microbiology lab curriculum appears to improve the quality of oral medicine education and help to

  16. Curriculum Policies for Students with Special Needs in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspland, Tania; Datta, Poulomee; Talukdar, Joy

    2012-01-01

    The curriculum policies for students with special needs across Australia have been reviewed. The Curriculum Framework in the Australian Capital Territory is used to inform their school based curriculum. The Northern Territory Curriculum Framework describes what learners are expected to achieve and what learners have achieved. The New South Wales…

  17. Some Thoughts on the New Zealand Geography Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craymer, Clive

    1998-01-01

    Believes that the current geography curriculum in New Zealand needs to be reevaluated in order to maintain geography's relevance in the school curriculum. Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the current curriculum and considers possible content for a new curriculum, such as field inquiry and global patterns and processes. (CMK)

  18. State-Based Curriculum-Making, Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivesind, Kirsten; Westbury, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This paper frames the problem underlying the cross-cultural Organizing Curriculum Change (OCC) study of state-based curriculum-making. The paper discusses the increased use by states over the past two decades of the century-old instrument of the state-based curriculum and the tool of the curriculum commission. The paper contrasts the slender…

  19. 14 CFR 142.39 - Training program curriculum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training program curriculum requirements... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS Aircrew Curriculum and Syllabus Requirements § 142.39 Training program curriculum requirements. Each training program curriculum...

  20. 14 CFR 147.38 - Maintenance of curriculum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintenance of curriculum requirements. 147... § 147.38 Maintenance of curriculum requirements. (a) Each certificated aviation maintenance technician school shall adhere to its approved curriculum. With FAA approval, curriculum subjects may be taught at...