WorldWideScience

Sample records for standard cooling coil

  1. Water cooling coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S; Ito, Y; Kazawa, Y

    1975-02-05

    Object: To provide a water cooling coil in a toroidal nuclear fusion device, in which coil is formed into a small-size in section so as not to increase dimensions, weight or the like of machineries including the coil. Structure: A conductor arranged as an outermost layer of a multiple-wind water cooling coil comprises a hollow conductor, which is directly cooled by fluid, and as a consequence, a solid conductor disposed interiorly thereof is cooled indirectly.

  2. Cooling and dehumidifying coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.V.K.

    1988-01-01

    The operating features of cooling and dehumidifying coils and their constructional details are discussed. The heat transfer relations as applicable to the boiling refrigerant and a single phase fluid are presented. Methods of accounting for the effect of moisture condensation on the air side heat transfer coefficient and the fin effectiveness are explained. The logic flow necessary to analyze direct expansion coils and chilled water coils is discussed

  3. Cooling device of superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthil, R.; Lottin, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    This device is rotating around an horizontal axis. The superconducting coils are contained in a cryogenic enclosure feeded in liquid helium forced circulation. They are related to an electric generator by electric mains each of them comprising a gas exchanger, and an exchanger-evaporator set between the cryogenic device and those exchangers. The exchanger-evaporator is aimed at dissipating the heat arriving by conductors connected to the superconducting coils. According to the invention, the invention includes an annular canalization with horizontal axis in which the connection conductors bathe in liquid helium [fr

  4. Performance of the Conduction-Cooled LDX Levitation Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, P. C.; Schultz, J. H.; Smith, B. A.; Titus, P. H.; Radovinsky, A.; Zhukovsky, A.; Hwang, K. P.; Naumovich, G. J.; Camille, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) was developed to study plasma confinement in a dipole magnetic field. Plasma is confined in the magnetic field of a 680-kg Nb3Sn Floating Coil (F-coil) that is electromagnetically supported at the center of a 5-m diameter by 3-m tall vacuum chamber. The Levitation Coil (L-coil) is a 2800-turn, double pancake winding that supports the weight of the F-coil and controls its vertical position within the vacuum chamber. The use of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) Bi-2223 for the L-coil minimizes the electrical and cooling power needed for levitation. The L-coil winding pack and support plate are suspended within the L-coil cryostat and cooled by conduction to a single-stage cryocooler rated for 25-W heat load at approximately 20 K. The coil current leads consist of conduction-cooled copper running from room temperature to 80 K and a pair of commercially-available, 150-A HTS leads. An automatically filled liquid-nitrogen reservoir provides cooling for the coil's radiation shield and for the leads' 80-K heat stations. This paper discusses the L-coil system design and its observed cryogenic performance.

  5. Measurement of a Conduction Cooled Nb3Sn Racetrack Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HS; Kovacs, C.; Rochester, J.; Sumption, MD; Tomsic, M.; Peng, X.; Doll, D.

    2017-12-01

    Use of superconducting coils for wind turbines and electric aircraft is of interest because of the potential for high power density and weight reduction. Here we test a racetrack coil developed as a proof-of-concept for cryogen-free superconducting motors and generators. The coil was wound with 1209 m of 0.7-mm-diameter insulated tube-type Nb3Sn wire. The coil was epoxy-impregnated, instrumented, covered with numerous layers of aluminized mylar insulation, and inserted vertically into a dewar. The system was cooled to 4.2 K, and a few inches of liquid helium was allowed to collect at the bottom of the dewar but below the coil. The coil was cooled by conduction via copper cooling bars were attached to the coil but also were immersed in the liquid helium at their lower ends. Several current tests were performed on the coil, initially in voltage mode, and one run in current mode. The maximum coil Ic at 4.2 K was 480 A, generating 3.06 T at the surface of the coil. The coil met the design targets with a noticeable margin.

  6. Development and testing of the cooling coil cleaning end effector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.I.; Mullen, O.D.; Powell, M.R.; Daly, D.S.; Engel, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancement (KPD ampersand E) program has developed and tested an end effector to support the waste retrieval mission at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The end effector was developed specifically to remove a sticky waste material from the cooling coils in the High Level Liquid Waste (HLLW) tank, and to vacuum up a sediment layer that has settled beneath the cooling coils. An extensive testing program was conducted in the hydraulic test bed (HTB) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to evaluate the performance of the end effector under simulated in-tank conditions. A mock up of the cooling coils was installed in the test bed tank, and simulated waste materials were included to represent the sticky waste on the tubes and the particulate waste settled beneath them. The testing program focused on assessing long-duration mining strategies for cleaning the cooling coils and removing the particulate waste forms. The report describes the results of the end effector testing program at PNNL. Section 2 describes the physical characteristics of the HLLW tanks, including the layout of the cooling coils, and it also describes what is known of the waste forms in the tanks. Section 3 describes the cleaning and retrieval strategy that was used in developing the end effector design. Section 4 describes the cooling coil mockup in the hydraulic test bed. Section 5 discusses the rationale used in selecting the simulants for the tarry waste and particulate waste forms. Section 6 describes the tests that were performed to evaluate cleaning of the cooling coils and retrieval of the particulate simulant. Section 7 summarizes the cleaning and retrieval tests, assesses the relative importance of cleaning the cooling coils and retrieving the particulate waste, and suggests modifications that would simplify the end effector design

  7. Passive radiative cooling of a HTS coil for attitude orbit control in micro-spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamori, Takaya; Ozaki, Naoya; Saisutjarit, Phongsatorn; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel radiative cooling system for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil for an attitude orbit control system in nano- and micro-spacecraft missions. These days, nano-spacecraft (1-10 kg) and micro-spacecraft (10-100 kg) provide space access to a broader range of spacecraft developers and attract interest as space development applications. In planetary and high earth orbits, most previous standard-size spacecraft used thrusters for their attitude and orbit control, which are not available for nano- and micro-spacecraft missions because of the strict power consumption, space, and weight constraints. This paper considers orbit and attitude control methods that use a superconducting coil, which interacts with on-orbit space plasmas and creates a propulsion force. Because these spacecraft cannot use an active cooling system for the superconducting coil because of their mass and power consumption constraints, this paper proposes the utilization of a passive radiative cooling system, in which the superconducting coil is thermally connected to the 3 K cosmic background radiation of deep space, insulated from the heat generation using magnetic holders, and shielded from the sun. With this proposed cooling system, the HTS coil is cooled to 60 K in interplanetary orbits. Because the system does not use refrigerators for its cooling system, the spacecraft can achieve an HTS coil with low power consumption, small mass, and low cost.

  8. Study on usage of fluorocarbon for toroidal field coil cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Hiroshi; Arai, Takashi

    1998-09-01

    In JT-60 machine, usage of fluorocarbon as an alternate coolant to a cooling channel of toroidal field coil (TF coil) in which a crack was detected is investigated. Fluorinert (a registered trademark of 3M) liquid which is one of fluorocarbon was reviewed, and liquid 'FC-43' was found as an appropriate one for TF coils cooling because of its physical properties about boiling point and thermal capacity. Fortunately, Fluorinert does not have impact on the greenhouse effect for the earth under the temperature of its boiling point. And thermal analysis shows that the cooling effectiveness obtained with liquid 'FC-43' for TF coils is rather well. Moreover, corrosion tests were carried out between liquid 'FC-43' and materials used in JT-60 by considering deterioration of TF coils. The test results demonstrate that there is no problem in applying liquid 'FC-43' as a coolant to cooling channel of TF coils. Results obtained above conclude that usage of fluorocarbon is one of the effective means to perform further experiments in JT-60. (author)

  9. Is the cooling of coils of pulsed accelerators profitable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neyret, G.; Parain, J.; Schnuriger, J.C.

    1960-05-01

    In this report, the authors recall how metal resistivity decreases at low temperatures, and give some indications about the power and price of cryogenic installations. They report the study of the cooling of coils in accelerators displaying an alternate gradient with a 15 GeV energy, with or without a magnetic circuit in iron. They establish that cooling does not result in a decrease in the cost price for an hour of operation. They also state that it is not even sure that this cooling would result in a dimension reduction while increasing the maximum achievable induction [fr

  10. Thermal Analysis of Cryocooler-Cooled Bi2223 Pulsed Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, H; Chigusa, S; Tanaka, I; Iwakuma, M; Funaki, K; Hayashi, H; Tomioka, A

    2006-01-01

    We fabricated a cryocooler-cooled Bi2223 superconducting pulsed coil and experimentally studied thermal runaway in dc or ac operation. We carried out numerical simulation of thermal properties of the coil in order to explain thermal runaway of the coil. Firstly, we analyzed the total heat generation of flux-flow loss and ac loss inside the winding from the experimental results of the external field losses and the E-J characteristics for the Bi2223 strands. Secondly, we numerically simulated the thermal properties by using 2- dimensional heat conduction equation with axial symmetry. The numerical simulation shows the relation between the initiation of thermal runaway and the temperature distribution with highly concentrated heat source in the winding. We have a semi-quantitative agreement between the numerical results and the experimental ones for the condition of the thermal runaway

  11. Replacement inhibitors for tank farm cooling coil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, T.C.

    1995-01-01

    Sodium chromate has been an effective corrosion inhibitor for the cooling coil systems in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks for over 40 years. Due to their age and operating history, cooling coils occasionally fail allowing chromate water to leak into the environment. When the leaks spill 10 lbs. or more of sodium chromate over a 24-hr period, the leak incidents are classified as Unusual Occurrences (UO) per CERCLA (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act). The cost of reporting and cleaning up chromate spills prompted High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) to initiate a study to investigate alternative tank cooling water inhibitor systems and the associated cost of replacement. Several inhibitor systems were investigated as potential alternatives to sodium chromate. All would have a lesser regulatory impact, if a spill occurred. However, the conversion cost is estimated to be $8.5 million over a period of 8 to 12 months to convert all 5 cooling systems. Although each of the alternative inhibitors examined is effective in preventing corrosion, there is no inhibitor identified that is as effective as chromate. Assuming 3 major leaks a year (the average over the past several years), the cost of maintaining the existing inhibitor was estimated at $0.5 million per year. Since there is no economic or regulatory incentive to replace the sodium chromate with an alternate inhibitor, HLWE recommends that sodium chromate continue to be used as the inhibitor for the waste tank cooling systems

  12. COOLING COIL EFFECTS ON BLENDING IN A PILOT SCALE TANK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

    2010-01-01

    Blending, or mixing, processes in 1.3 million gallon nuclear waste tanks are complicated by the fact that miles of serpentine, vertical, cooling coils are installed in the tanks. As a step toward investigating blending interference due to coils in this type of tank, a 1/10.85 scale tank and pump model were constructed for pilot scale testing. A series of tests were performed in this scaled tank by adding blue dye to visualize blending, and by adding acid or base tracers to solution to quantify the time required to effectively blend the tank contents. The acid and base tests were monitored with pH probes, which were located in the pilot scale tank to ensure that representative samples were obtained. Using the probes, the hydronium ion concentration [H + ] was measured to ensure that a uniform concentration was obtained throughout the tank. As a result of pilot scale testing, a significantly improved understanding of mixing, or blending, in nuclear waste tanks has been achieved. Evaluation of test data showed that cooling coils in the waste tank model increased pilot scale blending times by 200% in the recommended operating range, compared to previous theoretical estimates of a 10-50% increase. Below the planned operating range, pilot scale blending times were increased by as much as 700% in a tank with coils installed. One pump, rather than two or more, was shown to effectively blend the tank contents, and dual pump nozzles installed parallel to the tank wall were shown to provide optimal blending. In short, experimental results varied significantly from expectations.

  13. Cooling a solar telescope enclosure: plate coil thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Michael; Galapon, Chriselle; Montijo, Guillermo; Phelps, LeEllen; Murga, Gaizka

    2016-08-01

    The climate of Haleakalā requires the observatories to actively adapt to changing conditions in order to produce the best possible images. Observatories need to be maintained at a temperature closely matching ambient or the images become blurred and unusable. The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope is a unique telescope as it will be active during the day as opposed to the other night-time stellar observatories. This means that it will not only need to constantly match the ever-changing temperature during the day, but also during the night so as not to sub-cool and affect the view field of other telescopes while they are in use. To accomplish this task, plate coil heat exchanger panels will be installed on the DKIST enclosure that are designed to keep the temperature at ambient temperature +0°C/-4°C. To verify the feasibility of this and to validate the design models, a test rig has been installed at the summit of Haleakalā. The project's purpose is to confirm that the plate coil panels are capable of maintaining this temperature throughout all seasons and involved collecting data sets of various variables including pressures, temperatures, coolant flows, solar radiations and wind velocities during typical operating hours. Using MATLAB, a script was written to observe the plate coil's thermal performance. The plate coil did not perform as expected, achieving a surface temperature that was generally 2ºC above ambient temperature. This isn't to say that the plate coil does not work, but the small chiller used for the experiment was undersized resulting in coolant pumped through the plate coil that was not supplied at a low enough temperature. Calculated heat depositions were about 23% lower than that used as the basis of the design for the hillers to be used on the full system, a reasonable agreement given the fact that many simplifying assumptions were used in the models. These were not carried over into the testing. The test rig performance showing a 23% margin

  14. Performance of cold compressors in a cooling system of an R and D superconducting coil cooled with subcooled helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, S.; Imagawa, S.; Yanagi, N.; Takahata, K.; Maekawa, R.; Mito, T.

    2006-01-01

    The helical coils of large helical device (LHD) have been operated in saturated helium at 4.4 K and plasma experiments have been carried out at magnetic fields lower than 3 T for 8 years. Now, it is considered that the cooling system of helical coils will be improved to enhance magnetic fields in 2006. In the improvement, the helical coils will be cooled with subcooled helium and the operating temperature of helical coils will be lowered to achieve the designed field of 3 T and enhance cryogenic stabilities. Two cold compressors will be used in the cooling system of helical coils to generate subcooled helium. In the present study, the performance of cold compressors has been investigated, using a cooling system of R and D coil, to apply cold compressors to the cooling system of helical coils. Actual surge lines of cold compressors were observed and the stable operation area was obtained. Automatic operations were also performed within the area. In the automatic operations, the suitable pressure of a saturated helium bath, calculated from the rotation speed of the 1st cold compressor, was regulated by bypass valve. From these results, stable operations will be expected in the cooling system of helical coils

  15. The transfer function model for dynamic response of wet cooling coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Ye; Liu Shiqing

    2008-01-01

    This paper mainly concerned about the dynamic response model of wet cooling coils that is developed by the Laplace transform method. The theoretic equations are firstly established based on the theory of energy conservation. Then, the transfer functions on the transient responses of wet cooling coils have been deduced using the method of Laplace transform. The transfer functions reveal the dynamic relationships between the inlet variables and the outlet ones of the cooling coils. Partial-fraction method and Newton-Raphson method are both used in the inversion of the transfer functions from the s-domain to τ-domain. To make the dynamic model of wet cooling coils more adaptive, RBFNN method is employed to determine the coefficients of heat and mass transfer. Experiments have been done and manifested that the coefficients of heat and mass transfer by RBFNN will be of great value to the validity of the transient response model of wet cooling coils in this study

  16. STATUS OF MECHANICAL SLUDGE REMOVAL AND COOLING COILS CLOSURE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - F TANK FARM CLOSURE PORJECT -9225

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolly, R.

    2009-01-01

    The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system within two of its storage tanks. The Waste on Wheels (WOW) system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), Submersible Transfer Pumps (STPs), and a mobile control room with a control panel and variable speed drives. These tanks, designated as Tank 6 and Tank 5 respectively, are Type I waste tanks located in F-Tank Farm (FTF) with a capacity of 2839 cubic meters (750,000 gallons) each. In addition, Type I tanks have 34 vertically oriented cooling coils and two horizontal cooling coil circuits along the tank floor. DOE intends to remove from service and operationally close Tank 5 and Tank 6 and other HLW tanks that do not meet current containment standards. After obtaining regulatory approval, the tanks and cooling coils will be isolated and filled with grout for long term stabilization. Mechanical Sludge Removal of the remaining sludge waste within Tank 6 removed ∼ 75% of the original 25,000 gallons in August 2007. Utilizing lessons learned from Tank 6, Tank 5 Mechanical Sludge Removal completed removal of ∼ 90% of the original 125 cubic meters (33,000 gallons) of sludge material in May 2008. The successful removal of sludge material meets the requirement of approximately 19 to 28 cubic meters (5,000 to 7,500 gallons) remaining prior to the Chemical Cleaning process. The Chemical Cleaning Process will utilize 8 wt% oxalic acid to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The flow sheet for Chemical Cleaning planned a 20:1 volume ratio of acid to sludge for the first strike with mixing provided by the submersible mixer pumps. The subsequent strikes will utilize a 13:1 volume ratio of acid to sludge with no mixing. The results of the Chemical Cleaning Process are detailed in the 'Status of Chemical

  17. STATUS OF MECHANICAL SLUDGE REMOVAL AND COOLING COILS CLOSURE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT - 9225

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolly, R

    2009-01-06

    The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system within two of its storage tanks. The Waste on Wheels (WOW) system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), Submersible Transfer Pumps (STPs), and a mobile control room with a control panel and variable speed drives. These tanks, designated as Tank 6 and Tank 5 respectively, are Type I waste tanks located in F-Tank Farm (FTF) with a capacity of 2839 cubic meters (750,000 gallons) each. In addition, Type I tanks have 34 vertically oriented cooling coils and two horizontal cooling coil circuits along the tank floor. DOE intends to remove from service and operationally close Tank 5 and Tank 6 and other HLW tanks that do not meet current containment standards. After obtaining regulatory approval, the tanks and cooling coils will be isolated and filled with grout for long term stabilization. Mechanical Sludge Removal of the remaining sludge waste within Tank 6 removed {approx} 75% of the original 25,000 gallons in August 2007. Utilizing lessons learned from Tank 6, Tank 5 Mechanical Sludge Removal completed removal of {approx} 90% of the original 125 cubic meters (33,000 gallons) of sludge material in May 2008. The successful removal of sludge material meets the requirement of approximately 19 to 28 cubic meters (5,000 to 7,500 gallons) remaining prior to the Chemical Cleaning process. The Chemical Cleaning Process will utilize 8 wt% oxalic acid to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The flow sheet for Chemical Cleaning planned a 20:1 volume ratio of acid to sludge for the first strike with mixing provided by the submersible mixer pumps. The subsequent strikes will utilize a 13:1 volume ratio of acid to sludge with no mixing. The results of the Chemical Cleaning Process are detailed in the &apos

  18. Thermal and hydraulic analyses of TFTR cooling water system and magnetic field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.Y.

    1975-10-01

    The TFTR toroidal field coils, ohmic heating, hybrid and equilibrium field coils are cooled by water from the machine area cooling water system. The system has the following major equipment and capacities: flow rate of 3600 gpm; ballast tank volume of 5500 gal; pumps of 70.4 m head; chiller refrigeration rating of 3300 tons and connecting pipe of 45.7 cm I.D. The performance of the closed loop system was analyzed and found to be adequate for the thermal loads. The field coils were analyzed with detailed thermal and hydraulic models, including a simulation of the complete water cooling loop. Under the nominal operating mode of one second of toroidal field flat top time and 300 seconds of pulse cycle time, the maximum temperature for the TF coils is 53 0 C; for the OH coils 46 0 C and for the EF coils 39 0 C, which are well below the coil design limit of 120 0 C. The maximum TF coil coolant temperature is 33 0 C which is below the coolant design limit of 100 0 C. The overall pressure loss of the system is below 6.89 x 10 5 Pa (100 psi). With the given chiller refrigeration capacity, the TF coils can be operated to yield up to 4 seconds of flat top time. The TF coils can be operated on a steady state basis at up to 20% of the pulsed duty design current rating of 7.32 kA/coil

  19. Simulation of thermal processes in superconducting pancake coils cooled by GM cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebioda, M; Rymaszewski, J; Korzeniewska, E

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the thermal model of a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system with the closed cycle helium cryocooler. The authors propose the use of contact-cooled coils with maintaining the possibility of the system reconfiguring. The model assumes the use of the second generation superconducting tapes to make the windings in the form of flat discs (pancakes). The paper presents results for a field model of the single pancake coil and the winding system consisting of several coils.

  20. Test results of the SMES model coil. Cool-down and thermal characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Kazuya; Kato, Takashi; Kawano, Katsumi

    1998-01-01

    A model coil of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) device, which is a forced-cooled Nb-Ti coil, has been fabricated and a performance test at cryogenic temperatures has been carried out. The SMES model coil is composed of 4 dual pancakes and its total weight is 4.5 t. The applied conductors are cable-in-conduit conductors cooled by supercritical helium (SHe) at 4.5 K and 0.7 MPa. SHe is supplied to the SMES model coil and the structure by a reciprocating bellows pump. The test facility is located at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) common test facility, was constructed for the testing of an ITER central solenoid model coil. In the experiments, cool-down was finished within 10 days under controlled temperature differences in the SMES model coil. During cool-down and 4.5 K operation, pressure drop characteristics of the conductor were measured and the friction factor estimated. The pressure drop characteristics of the SMES model coil were in good agreement with those of the previous cable-in-conduit conductor. During static operation without current, the heat load and refrigerator operation conditions were measured. The heat load of the SMES model coil is 7.5 W, which is within the expected value. (author)

  1. Dehumidification effects in the superheated region (SPR) of a direct expansion (DX) air cooling coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Liang; Chan Mingyin; Deng Shiming; Xu Xiangguo

    2009-01-01

    A DX air cooling coil may normally be assumed to have two regions in its refrigerant side, according to refrigerant status, a two-phase region (TPR) and a superheated region (SPR). Dry air side surface of the SPR in a DX air cooling coil has been normally assumed in lumped-parameter mathematical models previously developed without however being validated. Therefore, an experimental study has been carried out to examine such an assumption under different operating conditions. The experimental results suggested that the air side surface of the SPR in a DX air cooling coil was either fully or partially wet under all experimental conditions and assuming dry air side of the SPR could lead to an underestimated total amount of water vapor condensed on the entire DX coil surface. Therefore, it is recommended that the assumption of dry air side in a SPR be no longer used in future lumped-parameter models to be developed for improved modeling accuracy.

  2. Simulation-based prediction of hot-rolled coil forced cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saboonchi, Ahmad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84154 (Iran); Hassanpour, Saeid [Rayan Tahlil Sepahan Co., Isfahan Science and Technology Town, Isfahan 84155 (Iran)

    2008-09-15

    Hot-rolled coils take a long time to cool under normal storehouse conditions due to their high mass. Hotter seasons will lead to even longer storage times and, thus, to shortage of space. Forced cooling methods such as water-immersion and water-spray can be employed to reduce hot-rolled coil cooling time. In this paper, a mathematical model of the thermal behavior of coils is developed to predict and to evaluate the results expected from employing these methods before any real changes can be made on the ground. The results obtained from the model were compared with those from various experiments to verify the model's accuracy. The cooling time was then computed based on changes effected in the boundary conditions appropriate to each of the forced cooling methods employed. Moreover, the savings in storage times were compared to identify the best cooling method. Predictions showed that water immersion at the beginning of cooling cycle was more effective and that the cycle should not exceed 1 h for cost efficiency considerations. When using nozzles to spray it was found that spraying water on end surfaces of coils would be the optimum option resulting in savings in time, water and energy, and with restricted temperature gradient. (author)

  3. A simplified model of a mechanical cooling tower with both a fill pack and a coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Riet, Freek; Steenackers, Gunther; Verhaert, Ivan

    2017-11-01

    Cooling accounts for a large amount of the global primary energy consumption in buildings and industrial processes. A substantial part of this cooling demand is produced by mechanical cooling towers. Simulations benefit the sizing and integration of cooling towers in overall cooling networks. However, for these simulations fast-to-calculate and easy-to-parametrize models are required. In this paper, a new model is developed for a mechanical draught cooling tower with both a cooling coil and a fill pack. The model needs manufacturers' performance data at only three operational states (at varying air and water flow rates) to be parametrized. The model predicts the cooled, outgoing water temperature. These predictions were compared with experimental data for a wide range of operational states. The model was able to predict the temperature with a maximum absolute error of 0.59°C. The relative error of cooling capacity was mostly between ±5%.

  4. Investigation of cooling coil corrosion in storage tanks for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    The high frequency of cooling coil leaks observed in high-heat waste storage tanks soon after sludge removal operations is attributed to pitting, according to laboratory corrosion studies. Experiments show that the most likely series of events leading to coil leakage is (1) excessive dilution of basic nitrite in the supernate, (2) initiation of attack in crevices due to oxygen depletion cells, and (3) acceleration of the attack by sulfate dissolved from the sludge. When sludge was slurried with water, the interstitial liquid was diluted. Nitrite, the anodic inhibitor that prevented attack on coils and tanks in normal operation when its concentration was 0.5 to 3.0M, could accelerate attack when diluted to 10 -4 to 10 -3 M. Attack was presumably initiated at oxygen depletion cells. The presence of sulfate, leached from the sludge, produced a conductive solution that could produce high current densities at the corroding steel surface. The proposed series of events leading to coil leakage agrees with the observations previously made on one leaking coil removed from Tank 2F after sludge removal in 1967. Examination revealed pitting that had originated on the outside of the coils. This pitting was attributed to oxygen depletion cells in coil crevices. To prevent recurrence of pitting attack on cooling coils during future sludge removal operations, the sludge should be slurried (1) with waste diluted less than one hundredfold with water, or (2) with a 500-ppm nitrite-H 2 O solution at pH 12. Either method should preclude pitting damage to the coils

  5. The Effect of Extending the Length of the Coupling Coils in a Muon Ionization Cooling Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    RF cavities are used to re-accelerate muons that have been cooled by absorbers that are in low beta regions of a muon ionization cooling channel. A superconducting coupling magnet (or magnets) are around or among the RF cavities of a muon ionization-cooling channel. The field from the magnet guides the muons so that they are kept within the iris of the RF cavities that are used to accelerate the muons. This report compares the use of a single short coupling magnet with an extended coupling magnet that has one or more superconducting coils as part of a muon-cooling channel of the same design as the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). Whether the superconducting magnet is short and thick or long and this affects the magnet stored energy and the peak field in the winding. The magnetic field distribution also affects is the muon beam optics in the cooling cell of a muon cooling channel

  6. Static stress analysis of coupling superconducting solenoid coil assembly for muon ionization cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Heng; Wang Li; Wu Hong; Guo Xinglong; Xu Fengyu

    2010-01-01

    The stresses in the coupling superconducting solenoid coil assembly, which is applied in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), are critical for the structure design and mechanical stability because of a large diameter and relative high magnetic field. This paper presents an analytical stress solution for the MICE coupling coil assembly. The stress due to winding tension is calculated by assuming the coil package as a set of combined cylinders. The thermal and electromechanical stresses are obtained by solving the partial differential equations of displacement based on the power series expansion method. The analytical stress solution is proved to be feasible by calculating stresses in a tested superconducting solenoid with 2.58 m bore at room temperature. The analytical result of the MICE coupling coil is in good agreement with that of the finite element which shows that the transverse shear stress induced by Lorentz force is principally dominant to magnet instability. (authors)

  7. Conceptual design of cooling anchor for current lead on HTS field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyeon, C. J.; Kim, J. H.; Quach, H. L. [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-06-15

    The role of current lead in high-temperature superconducting synchronous machine (HTSSM) is to function as a power supply by connecting the power supply unit at room temperature with the HTS field coils at cryogenic temperature. Such physical and electrical connection causes conduction and Joule-heating losses, which are major thermal losses of HTSSM rotors. To ensure definite stability and economic feasibility of HTS field coils, quickly and smoothly cooling down the current lead is a key design technology. Therefore, in this paper, we introduce a novel concept of a cooling anchor to enhance the cooling performance of a metal current lead. The technical concept of this technology is the simultaneously chilling and supporting the current lead. First, the structure of the current lead and cooling anchor were conceptually designed for field coils for a 1.5 MW-class HTSSM. Then, the effect of this installation on the thermal characteristics of HTS coils was investigated by 3D finite element analysis.

  8. Dynamic Models of Heating and Cooling Coils with One—Dimensional Air Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangZijie; G.Krauss

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the simulation models of the plate-fin,air-to-water(or water vapour) heat exchangers used as air-heating or air-cooling and dehumidifying colis in the HVAC(Heating,Ventilation and AIr-Conditioning)systems.The thermal models are used to calculate the heat exchange between distributing air and coil pipes and outlet temperatures of air and heat or chilled fluid.The aerodynamic models are used to account for the pressure drop of the air crossing the coil tubes,They can also be used to optimize the structres of such coils.The models are based on principal laws of teat and mass conservation and fluid mechanics.They are transparent and easy to use.In our work,a coil is considered as an assembly of numbers of basic elements in which all the state variables are unique.Therefore we can conveniently simulate the coils with different structures and different geometric parameters.Two modular programs TRNSYS(Transient System Simulation)and ESACAP are utilized as supporting softwares which make the programming and simulation greatly simplified.The coil elements and a real coil were simulated.The results were compared with the data offered by the manufacturer(company SOFICA) and also with those obtained using critical methods such as NTU method ,etc.and good agreement is attained.

  9. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. • We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. • The coil is tightly bonded to cooling members by epoxy resin without the degradation. • We made a REBCO racetrack coil with the same outer dimension as the Maglev magnet. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed

  10. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi, E-mail: mizuno.katsutoshi.14@rtri.or.jp; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. • We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. • The coil is tightly bonded to cooling members by epoxy resin without the degradation. • We made a REBCO racetrack coil with the same outer dimension as the Maglev magnet. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  11. Selection of a cryostabilized Nb3Sn conductor cooling system for the large coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, J.W.H.; Murphy, J.H.; Jones, C.K.

    1977-01-01

    The Large Coil Project (LCP) is a program to design, fabricate and test relatively large superconducting toroidal field coils for tokamak fusion reactor applications. Some basic requirements that affect the conductor design are cryostabilization, 8 tesla peak magnetic field, and a specified maximum refrigeration load. The engineering considerations that led to the selection of a forced flow supercritical helium-cooled cable conductor are described. Comparisons of forced flow supercritical helium cooled cable conductors with pool boiling cooled monolithic conductors were made with regard to a number of factors such as the thermal capacity of the coolant, the thermal design margins, propensity for conductor normalization, predictability of the thermal-flow performance, controllability of the cooling conditions, etc. It was concluded that, although there exists a number of design uncertainties and engineering problems, forced flow supercritical helium cooled conductors can provide a far more reliable coil design than the pool boiling monolithic concept. The design of a cryostabilized Nb 3 Sn hollow cabled conductor involved detailed considerations of the need for fully transposed conductor strands, the nonuniform void and helium flow distributions, heat transfer from the twisted conductor strands, and helium flow rate and pump work requirements. The uncertainties in the design are discussed and the specifications of a reference Nb 3 Sn conductor concept that meets the design requirements and constraints are presented

  12. Pool-cooled superconducting coils: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Dawson, A.M.

    1985-08-01

    An overview of large magnet systems which have been studied, constructed, or operated in the last 12 years is presented and shows a substantial advance in overall current density, stored energy, and magnet complexity. The preferable coolant mode for very large magnets is still a bath of helium I, but it is clear that other coolant modes are gaining acceptance. The data base for design using stability criteria dependent on transients has expanded to the point where the risk is often acceptable, compared to the lower current density, low risk, steady state stability criteria which launched large superconducting magnet technology. The limitation imposed by structure and protection on increasing overall current density in large magnets is discussed and a simple model is used to illustrate the extreme requirements imposed on a winding without direct helium contact. The latter implies that a significant technological step is required before conduction cooling or indirect cooling will be used in the large magnets envisioned for the future and that helium contact with the conductor will remain the key ingredient for risk reduction in large magnet design

  13. Manufacturing of REBCO coils strongly bonded to cooling members with epoxy resin aimed at its application to Maglev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2014-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor has been attracted attention because of its high current density in the presence of high magnetic field. If the coated conductor is applied to Maglev, the operational temperature of the on-board magnets will be over 40 K and energy consumption of cryocoolers will be reduced. That high operational temperature also means the absence of liquid helium. Therefore, reliable thermal coupling is desirable for cooling the coils. We propose an epoxy impregnated REBCO coil co-wound with PTFE tape. While the PTFE tape prevents the performance degradation of the coil, the epoxy resin bonds the coil to cooling members. We carried out three experiments to confirm that the coil structure which we propose has robust thermal coupling without the degradation. First, thermal resistances of paraffin and epoxy were measured varying the temperature from room temperature to 10 K. The measurement result indicates that paraffin has a risk of losing thermal coupling during cooling down. In another experiment, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) tape insulator prevented performance degradation of a small epoxy impregnated REBCO coil, while another REBCO coil with polyimide tape showed clear performance degradation. Finally, we produced a racetrack REBCO coil with the same outer dimension as a Maglev on-board magnet coil. Although the racetrack coil was installed in a GFRP coil case and tightly bonded to the case by epoxy impregnation, any performance degradation was not observed.

  14. Analysis of transmission efficiency of the superconducting resonance coil according the materials of cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu Kyeong; Hwang, Jun Won; Choi, Hyo Sang [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The wireless power transfer (WPT) system using a magnetic resonance was based on magnetic resonance coupling of the transmission and the receiver coils. In these system, it is important to maintain a high quality-factor (Q-factor) to increase the transmission efficiency of WPT system. Our research team used a superconducting coil to increase the Q-factor of the magnetic resonance coil in WPT system. When the superconductor is applied in these system, we confirmed that transmission efficiency of WPT system was higher than normal conductor coil through a preceding study. The efficiency of the transmission and the receiver coil is affected by the magnetic shielding effect of materials around the coils. The magnetic shielding effect is dependent on the type, thickness, frequency, distance, shape of materials. Therefore, it is necessary to study the WPT system on the basis of these conditions. In this paper, the magnetic shield properties of the cooling system were analyzed using the High-Frequency Structure Simulation (HFSS, Ansys) program. We have used the shielding materials such as plastic, aluminum and iron, etc. As a result, when we applied the fiber reinforced polymer (FRP), the transmission efficiency of WPT was not affected because electromagnetic waves went through the FRP. On the other hand, in case of a iron and aluminum, transmission efficiency was decreased because of their electromagnetic shielding effect. Based on these results, the research to improve the transmission efficiency and reliability of WPT system is continuously necessary.

  15. Electrical and thermal characteristics of Bi2212/Ag HTS coils for conduction-cooled SMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, N; Noguchi, S; Kurupakorn, C; Kojima, H; Endo, F; Hirano, N; Nagaya, S; Okubo, H

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated the electrical and thermal performance of conduction-cooled Bi2212/Ag HTS coils with 4K-GM cryocooler system. First, we measured the critical current I c for different ambient temperatures T 0 at 4.2 K - 40 K. Experimental results revealed that I c increased with the decrease in T 0 and was saturated at T 0 0 = 4.8 K. Experimental results revealed the criterion of thermal runaway, which was discussed in terms of heat generation and propagation in the test coil

  16. Heat dissipation research on the water-cooling channel of HL-2M in-vessel coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, J., E-mail: jiangjiaming@swip.ac.cn; Liu, Y.; Chen, Q.; Ji, X.Q.

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • The joule heat of in-vessel coils is very difficult to dissipate inside HL-2M vacuum vessel. • Heat dissipation model of the coil includes the joule heat model, the heat conduction model and the heat transfer model. • The CFD analysis has been done for the coil-water cooling, with comparison with the date of theoretical analysis and experiment. • The result shows water-cooling channel is good for the joule heat transfer and taken away. - Abstract: HL-2M in-vessel coils are positioned in high vacuum circumstance, and they will generate joule heat when they carry 15 kA electrical current, but joule heat is very difficult to dissipate in vacuum, so a hollow cable with 8 mm inner diameter is design as water-cooling channel for heat convection. By using the methods of the theoretical derivation, together with CFD numeric simulation method and the experiment of the heat transfer, the water channel of HL-2M in-vessel coils has been studied, and the temperature of HL-2M in-vessel coils under different cooling water flow rates is obtained and acceptable. Simultaneously, the external cooling water supply system parameters for the water-cooling channel of the coils are estimated. Three methods’ results are in good agreement; the theoretical model is verified and could be popularized for predicting the temperature rise of HL-2M in-vessel coils.

  17. Electrical and thermal characteristics of Bi2212/Ag HTS coils for conduction-cooled SMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, N.; Noguchi, S.; Kurupakorn, C.; Kojima, H.; Endo, F.; Hirano, N.; Nagaya, S.; Okubo, H.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we investigated the electrical and thermal performance of conduction-cooled Bi2212/Ag HTS coils with 4K-GM cryocooler system. First, we measured the critical current Ic for different ambient temperatures T0 at 4.2 K - 40 K. Experimental results revealed that Ic increased with the decrease in T0 and was saturated at T0 account of temperature dependence of specific heat and thermal conductivity of the materials. We also measured the temperature rise of Bi2212/Ag HTS coil for different continuous current levels at T0 = 4.8 K. Experimental results revealed the criterion of thermal runaway, which was discussed in terms of heat generation and propagation in the test coil.

  18. Development of a 5.1 T conduction-cooled YBCO coil composed of a stack of 12 single pancakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiroshi17.miyazaki@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Corporation, Power Systems Company, 2-4 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Iwai, Sadanori; Tosaka, Taizo; Tasaki, Kenji; Hanai, Satoshi; Urata, Masami; Ioka, Shigeru; Ishii, Yusuke [Toshiba Corporation, Power Systems Company, 2-4 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► We confirmed that performance of YBCO coil was improved by using APC wire. ► We made a conduction-cooled YBCO coil composed of a stack of 12 single pancakes. ► The coil had a central magnetic field as high as 5.1 T at 10 K. ► We also tested the coil operation in a 4 T background magnetic field. -- Abstract: We fabricated and tested a 5 T-class conduction-cooled high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil composed of a stack of 12 single pancake coils wound with YBCO-coated conductors. The length of each single pancake coil was 25 m, and the inner diameter of the coil was 50 mm. The voltage–current characteristics were measured in liquid nitrogen and under conduction-cooled conditions at 10–60 K. At 10 K, the central magnetic field of the 12 stacked pancake coils was as high as 5.1 T at 305 A. We also tested the coil operation in a 4 T background magnetic field.

  19. ''Football'' test coil: a simulated service test of internally-cooled, cabled superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, P.G.; Iwasa, Y.; Thome, R.J.; Hoenig, M.O.

    1981-01-01

    Internally-cooled, cabled superconductor, (ICCS), appears from small-scale tests to be a viable alternative to pool-boiling cooled superconductors for large superconducting magnets. Potential advantages may include savings in helium inventory, smaller structure and ease of fabrication. Questions remain, however, about the structural performance of these systems. The ''football'' test coil has been designed to simulate the actual ''field-current-stress-thermal'' operating conditions of a 25 ka ICCS in a commercial scale MHD magnet. The test procedure will permit demonstration of the 20 year cyclic life of such a magnet in less than 20 days. This paper describes the design, construction and test of that coil which is wound of copper-stabilized niobium-titanium cable in steel conduit. 2 refs

  20. Cool-down performance of CICC superconducting coils for the CHMFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Li, J.; Ouyang, Z. R.

    2017-10-01

    A hybrid magnet composed of a water-cooled magnet and a superconducting magnet was developed at the High Magnetic Field Laboratory of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The superconducting coils made of Nb3Sn CICC were cooled by the forced flow of supercritical helium at 4.5 K. The paper presents the cryogenic system framework, and reports the characteristics of the supercritical helium in a cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC), including the friction factor change during the cooling process, the heat transfer coefficient from 4.6 K to 6.8 K, and the helium mass flow rate distribution. After the 23-day cooling process, the temperature reached 4.5 K. The operation process was introduced in the paper.

  1. Design and Manufacture of the Conduction Cooled Torus Coils for The Jefferson Laboratory 12-GeV Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiseman, M. [Jefferson Lab; Elementi, L. [Fermilab; Elouadhiri, L. [Jefferson Lab; Gabrielli, G. [Fermilab; Gardner, T. J. [Fermilab; Ghoshal, P. K. [Jefferson Lab; Kashy, D. [Jefferson Lab; Kiemschies, O. [Fermilab; Krave, S. [Fermilab; Makarov, A. [Fermilab; Robotham, B. [Fermilab; Szal, J. [Fermilab; Velev, G. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    The design of the 12-GeV torus required the construction of six superconducting coils with a unique geometry required for the experimental needs of Jefferson Laboratory Hall B. Each of these coils consists of 234 turns of copper-stabilized superconducting cable conduction cooled by 4.6 K helium gas. The finished coils are each roughly 2 × 4 × 0.05 m and supported in an aluminum coil case. Because of its geometry, new tooling and manufacturing methods had to be developed for each stage of construction. The tooling was designed and developed while producing a practice coil at Fermi National Laboratory. This paper describes the tooling and manufacturing techniques required to produce the six production coils and two spare coils required by the project. Project status and future plans are also presented.

  2. Building and environmental factors that influence bacterial and fungal loading on air conditioning cooling coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, A; Siegel, J A; Mendell, M J; Peccia, J

    2018-05-30

    We investigated bacterial and fungal concentrations on cooling coils of commercial AC units and quantified associations between microbial loads and AC unit or building operational parameters. A field campaign was conducted to sample 25 AC units in the humid, subtropical climate of Southern CT, USA and 15 AC units in the hot-summer Mediterranean climate of Sacramento, CA, USA. Median concentrations (with interquartile range) of bacteria and fungi on the cooling coils were 1.2 × 10 7 (5.1 × 10 6 -3.9 × 10 7 ) cells/m 2 and 7.6 × 10 5 (5.6 × 10 4 -4.4 × 10 6 ) spore equivalents (SE)/m 2 , respectively. Concentrations varied among units with median unit concentrations ranging three orders of magnitude for bacteria and seven orders of magnitude for fungi. Controlled comparisons and multivariable regressions indicate that dominant factors associated with AC coil loading include the nominal efficiency of upstream filters (P = .008 for bacteria and P < .001 for fungi) and coil moisture, which was reflected in fungal loading differences between top and bottom halves of the AC coils in Southern CT (P = .05) and the dew points of the two climates considered (P = .04). Environmental and building characteristics explained 42% (P < .001) of bacterial concentration variability and 66% (P < .001) of fungal concentration variability among samples. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Ultra-Low Field SQUID-NMR using LN2 Cooled Cu Polarizing Field coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demachi, K.; Kawagoe, S.; Ariyoshi, S.; Tanaka, S.

    2017-07-01

    We are developing an Ultra-Low Field (ULF) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using a High-Temperature Superconductor superconducting quantum interference device (HTS rf-SQUID) for food inspection. The advantages of the ULF-NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) / MRI as compared with a conventional high field MRI are that they are compact and of low cost. In this study, we developed a ULF SQUID-NMR system using a polarizing coil to measure fat of which relaxation time T1 is shorter. The handmade polarizing coil was cooled by liquid nitrogen to reduce the resistance and accordingly increase the allowable current. The measured decay time of the polarizing field was 40 ms. The measurement system consisted of the liquid nitrogen cooled polarizing coil, a SQUID, a Cu wound flux transformer, a measurement field coil for the field of 47 μT, and an AC pulse coil for a 90°pulse field. The NMR measurements were performed in a magnetically shielded room to reduce the environmental magnetic field. The size of the sample was ϕ35 mm × L80 mm. After applying a polarizing field and a 90°pulse, an NMR signal was detected by the SQUID through the flux transformer. As a result, the NMR spectra of fat samples were obtained at 2.0 kHz corresponding to the measurement field Bm of 47 μT. The T1 relaxation time of the mineral oil measured in Bm was 45 ms. These results suggested that the ULF-NMR/MRI system has potential for food inspection.

  4. Production of large number of water-cooled excitation coils with improved techniques for multipole magnets of INDUS -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmarkar, M.G.; Sreeramulu, K.; Kulshreshta, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Accelerator multipole magnets are characterized by high field gradients powered with relatively high current excitation coils. Due to space limitations in the magnet core/poles, compact coil geometry is also necessary. The coils are made of several insulated turns using hollow copper conductor. High current densities in these require cooling with low conductivity water. Additionally during operation, these are subjected to thermal fatigue stresses. A large number of coils ( Qty: 650 nos.) having different geometries were required for all multipole magnets like quadrupole (QP), sextupole (SP). Improved techniques for winding, insulation and epoxy consolidation were developed in-house at M D Lab and all coils have been successfully made. Improved technology, production techniques adopted for magnet coils and their inspection are briefly discussed in this paper. (author)

  5. Characteristics analysis on a superconductor resonance coil WPT system according to cooling vessel materials in different distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, In-Sung; Lee, Yu-Kyeong; Choi, Hyo-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • WPT using the superconductor coil was needed research for cooling vessel. FRP, bakelite, polystyrene, aluminum, and iron were applied as the cooling vessel material to analyze the WPT distance efficiency. • When the distance between the transmitter and receiver coils was 2000 mm, FRP being used for the cooling vessel made the transmission efficiency higher than any other materials. The efficiency and distance of sending power can be improved in the superconductor coil if the cooling vessel is made with FRP. - Abstract: The interest in wireless power transfer (WPT) that can send power without using wires has been increasing recently. Especially, there is a great interest in the wireless power devices for portable IT devices. The WPT devices that have been developed so far use the magnetic induction method, and they are not active due to their distance problem. A magnetic resonance WPT method was developed and has been actively researched to resolve this problem. A superconductor coil was applied in this study to increase the efficiency of the magnetic resonance WPT. FRP, bakelite, polystyrene, aluminum, and iron were applied as the cooling vessel material to analyze the WPT distance. The distance between the transmitter and receiver coils started from 800 mm and was increased by 200 mm. The reflection coefficient was measured at each distance. As a result, FRP, bakelite, plastic PVC, polystyrene of the reflection coefficient was similar. From among these FRP being used for the cooling vessel made the transmission characteristics higher than any other materials when the distance between the transmitter and receiver coils was 2,000 mm. On the other hand, the reflection coefficient dropped when iron was used. It is estimated based on the experimental results that the wireless power transmission characteristics and distance of sending power can be improved in the superconductor coil if the cooling vessel is made with FRP.

  6. Characteristics analysis on a superconductor resonance coil WPT system according to cooling vessel materials in different distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, In-Sung, E-mail: no21park@hanmail.net; Lee, Yu-Kyeong; Choi, Hyo-Sang, E-mail: hyosang@chosun.ac.kr

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • WPT using the superconductor coil was needed research for cooling vessel. FRP, bakelite, polystyrene, aluminum, and iron were applied as the cooling vessel material to analyze the WPT distance efficiency. • When the distance between the transmitter and receiver coils was 2000 mm, FRP being used for the cooling vessel made the transmission efficiency higher than any other materials. The efficiency and distance of sending power can be improved in the superconductor coil if the cooling vessel is made with FRP. - Abstract: The interest in wireless power transfer (WPT) that can send power without using wires has been increasing recently. Especially, there is a great interest in the wireless power devices for portable IT devices. The WPT devices that have been developed so far use the magnetic induction method, and they are not active due to their distance problem. A magnetic resonance WPT method was developed and has been actively researched to resolve this problem. A superconductor coil was applied in this study to increase the efficiency of the magnetic resonance WPT. FRP, bakelite, polystyrene, aluminum, and iron were applied as the cooling vessel material to analyze the WPT distance. The distance between the transmitter and receiver coils started from 800 mm and was increased by 200 mm. The reflection coefficient was measured at each distance. As a result, FRP, bakelite, plastic PVC, polystyrene of the reflection coefficient was similar. From among these FRP being used for the cooling vessel made the transmission characteristics higher than any other materials when the distance between the transmitter and receiver coils was 2,000 mm. On the other hand, the reflection coefficient dropped when iron was used. It is estimated based on the experimental results that the wireless power transmission characteristics and distance of sending power can be improved in the superconductor coil if the cooling vessel is made with FRP.

  7. Effects of a GPC-PID control strategy with hierarchical structure for a cooling coil unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Min; Li Shaoyuan; Cai Wenjian; Lu Lu

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a GPC-PID control strategy for a cooling-coil unit in heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. By analysis of the cooling towers and chillers, different models in the occupied period are considered in each operating condition. Because of the complication of components, well tuned PID controllers are unsatisfied, and the results are poor over a wide range of operation conditions. To solve this problem, a GPC-PID controller with hierarchical structure is proposed based on minimizing the generalized predictive control criterion to tune conventional PID controller parameters. Simulation and experiments show that the proposed controller is able to deal with a wide range of operating conditions and to achieve better performance than conventional methods

  8. Residual gas analysis of a cryostat vacuum chamber during the cool down of SST - 1 superconducting magnet field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semwal, P.; Joshi, K.S.; Thankey, P.L.; Pathan, F.S.; Raval, D.C.; Patel, R.J.; Pathak, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important feature of Steady state Superconducting Tokamak -1 (SST-l) is the Nb-Ti superconducting magnet field coils. The coils will be kept in a high vacuum chamber (Cryostat) and liquid Helium will be flown through it to cool it down to its critical temperature of 4.5K. The coil along with its hydraulics has four types of joints (1) Stainless Steel (S.S.) to Copper (Cu) weld joints (2) S. S. to S. S. weld joints (3) Cu to Cu brazed joints and (4) G-10 to S. S. joints with Sti-cast as the binding material. The joints were leak tested with a Helium mass spectrometer leak detector in vacuum as well as in sniffer mode. However during the cool-down of the coil, these joints may develop leaks. This would deteriorate the vacuum inside the cryostat and coil cool-down would subsequently become more difficult. To study the effect of cooling on the vacuum condition of the Cryostat, a dummy Cryostat chamber was fabricated and a toroidal Field (TF) magnet was kept inside this chamber and cooled down to 4.5 K.A residual gas analyzer (RGA) was connected to the Cryostat chamber to study the behaviour of major gases inside this chamber with temperature. An analysis of the RGA data acquired during the coo-down has been presented in this chamber. (author)

  9. Measurement of the ductile to brittle transition temperature for waste tank cooling coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, B.J.

    1992-09-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on ASTM A106 carbon steel archived from SRS waste tanks to determine the susceptibility of the cooling coils to brittle fracture during a seismic event. The highest ductile to brittle transition temperature measured was -5 degree F and, with the addition of a 30 degree F safety factor, the minimum safe operating temperature was determined to be 25 degree F. Calculations also showed that a pre-existing circumferential flaw that is 2.2in. long would be necessary to initiate brittle fracture of the pipe. These results demonstrate that the pipes will not be susceptible to brittle fracture if the cooling water inlet temperature is lowered to 50 degree F. Visual observation of the inner and outer walls of the pipe showed no localized attack or significant wall thinning. A 100--200 micron zinc coating is probably the reason for the lack of corrosion. A build-up of zinc slag occurred at pipe fittings where the weld had burned through. Although no attack was observed, the slag created several crevices which have the potential to trap the chromated water and initiate localized attack

  10. Coupled-analysis of current transport performance and thermal behaviour of conduction-cooled Bi-2223/Ag double-pancake coil for magnetic sail spacecraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaki, Y., E-mail: nagasaki@rish.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Institute of Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Nakamura, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyotodaigakukatsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Funaki, I. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Ashida, Y.; Yamakawa, H. [Research Institute of Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We model current transport and thermal performances of conduction-cooled HTS coil. • We investigate the effect of the longitudinal inhomogeneity of the HTS tape. • The analysis can precisely estimate performances of the conduction-cooled coil. • The longitudinal inhomogeneity of the HTS tape deteriorates coil performances. • Quench currents of the HTS coil are not consistent with the critical currents. -- Abstract: This paper investigated the quantitative current transport performance and thermal behaviour of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, and the effect of the critical current inhomogeneity along the longitudinal direction of HTS tapes on the coil performances. We fabricated a double-pancake coil using a Bi-2223/Ag tape with a length of 200 m as a scale-down model for a magnetic sail spacecraft. We measured the current transport property and temperature rises during current applications of the HTS coil in a conduction-cooled system, and analytically reproduced the results on the basis of the percolation depinning model and three-dimensional heat balance equation. The percolation depinning model can describe the electric field versus current density of HTS tapes as a function of temperature and magnetic field vector, and we also introduced the longitudinal distribution of the local critical current of the HTS tape into this model. As a result, we can estimate the critical currents of the HTS coil within 10% error for a wide range of the operational temperatures from 45 to 80 K, and temperature rises on the coil during current applications. These results showed that our analysis and conduction-cooled system were successfully realized. The analysis also suggested that the critical current inhomogeneity along the length of the HTS tape deteriorated the current transport performance and thermal stability of the HTS coil. The present study contributes to the characterization of HTS coils and design of a coil system for the

  11. Coupled-analysis of current transport performance and thermal behaviour of conduction-cooled Bi-2223/Ag double-pancake coil for magnetic sail spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Funaki, I.; Ashida, Y.; Yamakawa, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We model current transport and thermal performances of conduction-cooled HTS coil. • We investigate the effect of the longitudinal inhomogeneity of the HTS tape. • The analysis can precisely estimate performances of the conduction-cooled coil. • The longitudinal inhomogeneity of the HTS tape deteriorates coil performances. • Quench currents of the HTS coil are not consistent with the critical currents. -- Abstract: This paper investigated the quantitative current transport performance and thermal behaviour of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, and the effect of the critical current inhomogeneity along the longitudinal direction of HTS tapes on the coil performances. We fabricated a double-pancake coil using a Bi-2223/Ag tape with a length of 200 m as a scale-down model for a magnetic sail spacecraft. We measured the current transport property and temperature rises during current applications of the HTS coil in a conduction-cooled system, and analytically reproduced the results on the basis of the percolation depinning model and three-dimensional heat balance equation. The percolation depinning model can describe the electric field versus current density of HTS tapes as a function of temperature and magnetic field vector, and we also introduced the longitudinal distribution of the local critical current of the HTS tape into this model. As a result, we can estimate the critical currents of the HTS coil within 10% error for a wide range of the operational temperatures from 45 to 80 K, and temperature rises on the coil during current applications. These results showed that our analysis and conduction-cooled system were successfully realized. The analysis also suggested that the critical current inhomogeneity along the length of the HTS tape deteriorated the current transport performance and thermal stability of the HTS coil. The present study contributes to the characterization of HTS coils and design of a coil system for the

  12. A 5.9 tesla conduction-cooled coil composed of a stack of four single pancakes wound with YBCO wide tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, Sadanori, E-mail: sadanori.iwai@toshiba.co.jp; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Tosaka, Taizo; Tasaki, Kenji; Urata, Masami; Ioka, Shigeru; Ishii, Yusuke

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •We made a coil composed of a stack of four single pancakes wound with YBCO wide tapes. •The coil had a central magnetic field as high as 5.9 T at 20 K. •The effect of the tape width on the central magnetic field was small near coil I{sub c}. •We confirmed that performance of YBCO coil was improved by using wider tape. -- Abstract: We have been developing a conduction-cooled coil wound with YBCO-coated conductors for HTS applications. Previously, we have fabricated a coil composed of a stack of 12 single pancakes wound with 4 mm-wide YBCO tapes. This coil had a central magnetic field as high as 5.1 T at 10 K under conduction-cooled conditions. In the present study, we fabricated and tested a coil composed of a stack of four single pancakes wound with 12 mm-wide YBCO tapes. The total size of the coil and the J{sub c} value of the tapes were almost the same as those of the former coil. At 77 K, the voltage–current characteristics showed a high n-value of 24, confirming that the coil had no degradation. Furthermore, in a conduction-cooled configuration at 20 K to 60 K, the coil showed a high n-value of over 20. At 20 K, the central magnetic field reached 5.9 T at 903 A, which is 1.3-times higher than that of the former coil.

  13. A 5.9 tesla conduction-cooled coil composed of a stack of four single pancakes wound with YBCO wide tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Sadanori; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Tosaka, Taizo; Tasaki, Kenji; Urata, Masami; Ioka, Shigeru; Ishii, Yusuke

    2013-11-01

    We have been developing a conduction-cooled coil wound with YBCO-coated conductors for HTS applications. Previously, we have fabricated a coil composed of a stack of 12 single pancakes wound with 4 mm-wide YBCO tapes. This coil had a central magnetic field as high as 5.1 T at 10 K under conduction-cooled conditions. In the present study, we fabricated and tested a coil composed of a stack of four single pancakes wound with 12 mm-wide YBCO tapes. The total size of the coil and the Jc value of the tapes were almost the same as those of the former coil. At 77 K, the voltage-current characteristics showed a high n-value of 24, confirming that the coil had no degradation. Furthermore, in a conduction-cooled configuration at 20 K to 60 K, the coil showed a high n-value of over 20. At 20 K, the central magnetic field reached 5.9 T at 903 A, which is 1.3-times higher than that of the former coil.

  14. Slightly flexed knee position within a standard knee coil: MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of positioning the knee slightly flexed within a standard MR knee coil in delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Within the confined space of a commercially available knee coil, knee could bend as much as 30 , average 17 of flexion. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained at both fully extended and slightly flexed positions. Twenty-two normal knees and 18 knees with ACL tears were examined and paired MR images were evaluated by two observers. Compared with knee extension, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 57 % of reviews of full length of the ACL and 53 % of the femoral attachment. In the extended position the anterior margin of the ligament was obscured due to partial averaging with the intercondylar roof. We recommend examining the knee in an achievable flexed position within the standard knee coil. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs.

  15. Slightly flexed knee position within a standard knee coil: MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y.; Ikeda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of positioning the knee slightly flexed within a standard MR knee coil in delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Within the confined space of a commercially available knee coil, knee could bend as much as 30 , average 17 of flexion. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained at both fully extended and slightly flexed positions. Twenty-two normal knees and 18 knees with ACL tears were examined and paired MR images were evaluated by two observers. Compared with knee extension, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 57 % of reviews of full length of the ACL and 53 % of the femoral attachment. In the extended position the anterior margin of the ligament was obscured due to partial averaging with the intercondylar roof. We recommend examining the knee in an achievable flexed position within the standard knee coil. (orig.)

  16. Analytical solutions for evaluating the thermal performances of wet air cooling coils under both unit and non-unit Lewis Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Liang; Chan, M.Y.; Deng, S.M.; Xu, X.G.

    2010-01-01

    Analytical solutions for evaluating the thermal performances of both chilled water wet cooling coils and direct expansion (DX) wet cooling coils, respectively, under both unit and non-unit Lewis Factors are developed and reported in this paper. The analytical solution was validated by comparing its predictions with those from numerically solving the fundamental governing equations of heat and mass transfer taking place in a wet cooling coil. With the analytical solutions, the distributions of air temperature and humidity ratio along air flow direction in a wet cooling coil can be predicted, and the differences in the thermal performances of the cooling coils under both unit and non-unit Lewis Factors can be identified. The analytical solutions, on one hand, can be a low-cost replacement to numerically solving the fundamental heat and mass transfer governing equations, and on the other hand, is able to deal with evaluating thermal performance for wet air cooling coils operated under both unit and non-unit Lewis Factors.

  17. Numerical Analysis of Rotating Pumping Flows in Inter-Coil Rotor Cavities and Short Cooling Grooves of a Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tong

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An important characteristic of wall rotating-driven flows is the tendency of fluid with high angular momentum to be flung radially outward. For a generator, the rotor rotating-driven flow, usually referred to as the rotating pumping flow, plays an important role in rotor winding cooling. In this study, three-dimensional numerical analyzes are presented for turbulent pumping flow in the inter-coil rotor cavity and short cooling grooves of a generator. Calculations of the flow field and the mass flux distribution through the grooves were carried out in a sequence of four related cases Under an isothermal condition: (a pumping flow, which is the self-generated flow resulted from the rotor pumping action; (b mixing flow, which is the combination of the ventilating flow and pumping flow, under a constant density condition; (c mixing flow, with density modeled by the ideal gas law; and (d mixing flow, with different pressure differentials applied on the system. The comparisons of the results from these cases can provide useful information regarding the impacts of the ventilating flow, gas density, and system pressure differential on the mass flux distribution in the short cooling grooves. Results show that the pumping effect is strong enough to generate the cooling flow for rotor winding cooling. Therefore, for small- or mid-size generators ventilation fans may be eliminated. It also suggests that increasing the chimney dimension can improve the distribution uniformity of mass flux through the cooling grooves.

  18. Sodium-immersed self-cooled electromagnetic pump design and development of a large-scale coil for high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oto, Akihiro; Naohara, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Masayoshi; Katsuki, Kenji; Kumazawa, Ryouji

    1995-01-01

    A sodium-immersed, self-cooled electromagnetic (EM) pump was recently studied as a prospective innovative technology to simplify a fast breeder reactor plant system. The EM pump for a primary pump, a pump type, was designed, and the structural concept and the system performance were clarified. For the flow control method, a constant voltage/frequency method was preferable from the point of view of pump performance and efficiency. The insulation life was tested on a large-scale coil at high temperature as part of the development of a large-capacity EM pump. Mechanical and electrical damage were not observed, and the insulation performance was quite good. The insulation system could also be applied to large-scale coils

  19. A study on nuclear heat load tolerable for NET/TF coils cooled by internal flow of helium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.

    1988-02-01

    NbTi cables cooled by internal flow of superfluid helium are considered an option for the design of NET/TF coils with about 11 T peak fields. Starting from an available winding cross section of 0.61x0.61 m 2 for a 8 MA turns coil made of a 16 kA conductor it is shown that sufficient hydraulic cross section can be provided within such cables to remove the expected thermal load resulting from nuclear heating with exponential decay from inboard to outboard side of the winding. The concept is a pancake type coil with 1.8 K helium fed-in the high field region of each pancake. The temperature distribution within such coils is calculated, and the local safety margin is determined from temperature and field. The calculation takes account of nuclear and a.c. heating, and of thermal conductance between the individual layers and the coil casing. It is shown that operation with 1.8 K inlet and about 3 K outlet temperature is possible. The electrical insulation with about 0.5 mm thickness proves to provide sufficient thermal insulation. No additional thermal shield is required between the coil casing and the winding package. Two different types of conductors are being considered: a) POLO type cable with quadratic cross section and a central circular coolant duct, and b) an LCT type cable with two conductors wound in hand. Both concepts with about 500 m length of the cooland channels are shown to meet the requirements resulting from a peak nuclear heat load of 0.3 mW/cm 3 in the inboard turns. The hydraulic diameters are sufficient to operate each coils with self-sustained fountain effect pumps. Even appreciably higher heat loads with up to 3 mW/cm 3 of nuclear heating can be tolerated for the POLO type cable when the hydraulic diameter is enlarged to its maximum of 17 mm. (orig.) [de

  20. Cooling device of superconducting coils. Dispositif de refroidissement de bobinages supraconducteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duthil, R; Lottin, J C

    1985-08-30

    This device is rotating around an horizontal axis. The superconducting coils are contained in a cryogenic enclosure feeded in liquid helium forced circulation. They are related to an electric generator by electric mains each of them comprising a gas exchanger, and an exchanger-evaporator set between the cryogenic device and those exchangers. The exchanger-evaporator is aimed at dissipating the heat arriving by conductors connected to the superconducting coils. According to the invention, the invention includes an annular canalization with horizontal axis in which the connection conductors bathe in liquid helium.

  1. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fat’yanov, O. V., E-mail: fatyan1@gps.caltech.edu; Asimow, P. D., E-mail: asimow@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences 252-21, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  2. Development of a Rigid One-Meter-Side and Cooled Coil Sensor at 77 K for Magnetic Resonance Sounding to Detect Subsurface Water Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Du, Guanfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yi, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Chuandong; Lin, Tingting

    2017-06-12

    Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) using the Earth's magnetic field is a noninvasive and on-site geophysical technique providing quantitative characteristics of aquifers in the subsurface. When the MRS technology is applied in a mine or tunnel for advance detecting the source of water that may cause disastrous accident, spatial constraints limit the size of coil sensor and thus lower the detection capability. In this paper, a coil sensor for detecting the weak MRS signal is designed and the signal to noise (SNR) for the coil sensor is analyzed and optimized. The coil sensor has a rigid structure and square size of 1 m for deploying in a narrow underground space and is cooled at a low temperature of 77 K for improving the SNR. A theoretical calculation and an experimental test in an electromagnetically shielded room (EMSR) show that the optimal design of coil sensor consists of an 80-turn coil and a low-current-noise preamplifier AD745. It has a field sensitivity of 0.17 fT / Hz in the EMSR at 77 K, which is superior to the low temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (LT SQUID) that is the latest application in MRS and the cooled coil with a diameter of 9 cm when detecting the laboratory NMR signal in kHz range. In the field experiment above the Taipingchi Reservoir near Changchun in China, the cooled coil sensor (CCS) developed in this paper has successfully obtained a valid weak MRS signal in high noise environment. The field results showed that the quality of measured MRS signal at 77 K is significantly superior to that at 298 K and the SNR is improved up to three times. This property of CCS makes the MRS instrument more convenient and reliable in a constricted space underground engineering environment (e.g., a mine or a tunnel).

  3. Development of a Rigid One-Meter-Side and Cooled Coil Sensor at 77 K for Magnetic Resonance Sounding to Detect Subsurface Water Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance sounding (MRS using the Earth’s magnetic field is a noninvasive and on-site geophysical technique providing quantitative characteristics of aquifers in the subsurface. When the MRS technology is applied in a mine or tunnel for advance detecting the source of water that may cause disastrous accident, spatial constraints limit the size of coil sensor and thus lower the detection capability. In this paper, a coil sensor for detecting the weak MRS signal is designed and the signal to noise (SNR for the coil sensor is analyzed and optimized. The coil sensor has a rigid structure and square size of 1 m for deploying in a narrow underground space and is cooled at a low temperature of 77 K for improving the SNR. A theoretical calculation and an experimental test in an electromagnetically shielded room (EMSR show that the optimal design of coil sensor consists of an 80-turn coil and a low-current-noise preamplifier AD745. It has a field sensitivity of 0.17 fT / Hz in the EMSR at 77 K, which is superior to the low temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (LT SQUID that is the latest application in MRS and the cooled coil with a diameter of 9 cm when detecting the laboratory NMR signal in kHz range. In the field experiment above the Taipingchi Reservoir near Changchun in China, the cooled coil sensor (CCS developed in this paper has successfully obtained a valid weak MRS signal in high noise environment. The field results showed that the quality of measured MRS signal at 77 K is significantly superior to that at 298 K and the SNR is improved up to three times. This property of CCS makes the MRS instrument more convenient and reliable in a constricted space underground engineering environment (e.g., a mine or a tunnel.

  4. Energy and Exergy Analysis for Improving the Energy Performance of Air-Cooled Liquid Chillers by Different Condensing-Coil Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Shing Lee

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study constructed a parameter analysis for improving the energy performance of air-cooled water chillers by altering the angle configuration of the condenser coils. The mathematical models for energy and exergy analyses of the individual components and overall system of air-cooled water chillers are presented. This study investigated the potential enhancement of performance efficiency in air-cooled chillers and the energy conversion efficiency of each component, in order to determine how the angle configuration of condenser coils influences chiller performance. This study found that the overall performance of an air-cooled chiller could be improved by approximately 3.4%, and the total irreversibility could be reduced by approximately 2.7%. With each 1% increase in average wind speed over the condenser coils, the overall performance of an air‑cooled chiller was found to be enhanced by approximately 0.43%, and its total irreversibility was reduced by approximately 0.35%. The results of this study can be effectively applied to air-cooled condenser units, and can provide an important basis of reference for developing and enhancing the energy efficiency of air-cooled chillers.

  5. Conceptual design of a superconducting coil system cooled by forced flow HE II for the central column of net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J.L.; Turck, B.

    1987-01-01

    In order to increase the maximum flux sweep, a present trend is to design ohmic coils producing fields as high as II teslas. In Niobium-Titanium, critical current densities of 10 9 A/m 2 at 1.8 K under a field of 11 teslas are now claimed by several manufacturers. This in addition enables to make use of the outstanding cooling properties of He II. The forced flow technics can again be envisaged for He II to remove the heat load. Two solutions are investigated. The first one uses a 40 kA cable wound in double pancakes. The second one makes use of several conductors layer wound and current supplied in parallel

  6. Influence of the spacers on the stability of channel cooled superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuris, C.

    1980-10-01

    In a previous paper, the thermal stability of channel cooled superconducting magnets was experimentally studied. Stable normal zones were observed within a range of currents and local disturbance energies. Usual theories fail to fully explain these results, owing to the fact that they take into account a heat transfer to liquid helium only function of the temperature of the conductor, whatever the position is. In a simplified theoretical analysis, it is shown that in a locally uncooled superconducting wire several stationary normal zones can exist. A criterion is derived that yields the recovery current as a function of the length of the uncooled region. Besides, a detailed numerical analysis determines the evolution of a normal zone in a channel cooled magnet. Theoretical calculations are compared with experimental results

  7. Measurement of cooling coil film heat transfer coefficient with polymer reaction proceeding in a stirred batch reactor; Jugo sonai ni okeru hanno shinko ni tomonau reikyaku coil no kyomaku netsudentatsu keisu no keiji henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, K [Soken Chemical and Engineering Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan); Nishi, K; Kaminoyama, M; Kamiwano, M [Yokohama National University, Yokohama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-09-10

    In radical additional solution polymerization, the viscosity increases with reaction progress. It is important to evaluate beforehand the cooling capacity of the reactor, which worsens with the process. In this study, a stirred batch reactor with both a paddle and a helical screw impeller were studied, and measurements were made for the dynamic changes of the film heat transfer coefficient of the cooling coil with progress of the polymer reaction. We found the change could be evaluated by the calculating heat balance of the generated heat, the viscous dissipation energy and the sensible heat change under conditions of monomer conversion and changing viscosity. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Is the cooling of coils of pulsed accelerators profitable?; Le refroidissement des bobines des accelerateurs pulses est-il avantageux?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyret, G.; Parain, J.; Schnuriger, J. C.

    1960-05-15

    In this report, the authors recall how metal resistivity decreases at low temperatures, and give some indications about the power and price of cryogenic installations. They report the study of the cooling of coils in accelerators displaying an alternate gradient with a 15 GeV energy, with or without a magnetic circuit in iron. They establish that cooling does not result in a decrease in the cost price for an hour of operation. They also state that it is not even sure that this cooling would result in a dimension reduction while increasing the maximum achievable induction [French] On rappelle comment la resistivite des metaux diminue aux basses temperatures, et on donne des indications sur la puissance et le prix des installations cryogeniques. On etudie le refroidissement des bobines d'accelerateurs a gradient alterne d'une energie de 15 GeV, avec ou sans circuit magnetique en fer; on trouve que le refroidissement ne permet pas de diminuer le prix de revient de l'heure de fonctionnement; il n'est meme pas sur qu'il puisse permettre de reduire les dimensions en elevant l'induction maximum realisable. L'idee de refroidir les bobines sans fer jusqu'a la temperature de l'air liquide est ancienne: Jean Perrin des 1907, puis Charly Fabry en 1910 l'avaient deja proposee. Recemment, cette idee est revenue a l'actualite: en 1958, R.F. Post a suggere de l'appliquer a la production de champs intenses en vue du confinement des plasmas thermonucleaires; en 1959, N.C. Christofilos a publie un projet d'accelerateur refroidi a 80 deg. K. Nous voulons examiner l'interet de refroidir les bobines d'un accelerateur, d'une part pour augmenter l'induction maximum (dans le cas de machines sans fer) et d'autre part pour diminuer l'importance de l'alimentation electrique. Cet examen est precede de generalites sur le refroidissement des bobines, generalites qui s'appliquent d'ailleurs a tous les champs magnetiques. Les trois metaux etudies sont ceux retenus comme les meilleurs par Post: le

  9. Large coil task and results of testing US coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1986-01-01

    The United States, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland have collaborated since 1978 in development of superconducting toroidal field coils for fusion reactor applications. The United States provided a test facility nd three coils; the other participants, one coil each. All coils have the same interface dimensions and performance requirements (stable at 8 T), but internal design was decided by each team. Two US coil teams chose bath-cooled NbTi, 10-kA conductors. One developed a Nb 3 Sn conductor, cooled by internal flow, rated at 18 kA. All US coils have diagnostic instrumentation and imbedded heaters that enable stability tests and simulated nuclear heating experiments. In single-coil tests, each coil operated at full current in self-field (6.4 T). In six-coil tests that began in July 1986, one US coil and the Japanese coil hve been successfully operated at full current at 8 T. The other coils have operated as background coils while awaiting their turn as test coil. Coil tests have been informative and results gratifying. The facility has capably supported coil testing and its operation has provided information that will be useful in designing future fusion systems. Coil capabilities beyond nominal design points will be determined

  10. Industrial Process Cooling Towers: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standards limiting discharge of chromium compound air emissions from industrial process cooling towers (IPCT's). Includes rule history, Federal Registry citations, implementation information and additional resources.

  11. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers. 61.134 Section 61.134 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers. (a) No (“zero”) emissions are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke by...

  12. Non-equilibrium effects evidenced by vibrational spectra during the coil-to-globule transition in poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) subjected to an ultrafast heating-cooling cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Sanket A; Kamath, Ganesh; Suthar, Kamlesh J; Mancini, Derrick C; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2014-03-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with finite element calculations are used to explore the conformational dynamics of a thermo-sensitive oligomer, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), subjected to an ultra-fast heating-cooling cycle. Finite element (FE) calculations were used to predict the temperature profile resulting from laser-induced heating of the polymer-aqueous system. The heating rate (∼0.6 K ps(-1)) deduced from FE calculations was used to heat an aqueous solution of PNIPAM consisting of 30 monomeric units (30-mer) from 285 K to 315 K. Non-equilibrium effects arising from the ultra-fast heating-cooling cycle results in a hysteresis during the coil-to-globule transition. The corresponding atomic scale conformations were characterized by monitoring the changes in the vibrational spectra, which provided a reliable metric to study the coil-to-globule transition in PNIPAM and vice-versa across the LCST. The vibrational spectra of bonds involving atoms from the oligomer backbone and the various side-groups (amide I, amide II, and the isopropyl group of PNIPAM) of the oligomers were analyzed to study the conformational changes in the oligomer corresponding to the observed hysteresis. The differences in the vibrational spectra calculated at various temperatures during heating and cooling cycles were used to understand the coil-to-globule and globule-to-coil transitions in the PNIPAM oligomer and identify the changes in the relative interactions between various atoms in the backbone and in the side groups of the oligomer with water. The shifts in the computed vibrational spectral peaks and the changes in the intensity of peaks for the different regions of PNIPAM, seen across the LCST during the heating cycle, are in good agreement with previous experimental studies. The changes in the radius of gyration (Rg) and vibrational spectra for amide I and amide II regions of PNIPAM suggest a clear coil-to-globule transition at ∼301 K during the

  13. The JET divertor coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.R.; Froger, C.; Sborchia, C.

    1989-01-01

    The divertor coil is mounted inside the Jet vacuum vessel and is able to carry 1 MA turns. It is of conventional construction - water cooled copper, epoxy glass insulation -and is contained in a thin stainless steel case. The coil has to be assembled, insulated and encased inside the Jet vacuum vessel. A description of the coil is given, together with technical information (including mechanical effects on the vacuum vessel), an outline of the manufacture process and a time schedule. (author)

  14. The Advancement of Cool Roof Standards in China from 2010 to 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Jing [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Levinson, Ronnen M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Since the initiation of the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center-Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE) cool roof research collaboration between the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Heat Island Group and Chinese institutions in 2010, new cool surface credits (insulation trade- offs) have been adopted in Chinese building energy efficiency standards, industry standards, and green building standards. JGJ 75-2012: Design Standard for Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings in Hot Summer and Warm Winter Zone became the first national level standard to provide cool surface credits. GB/T 50378-2014: Assessment Standard for Green Building is the first national level green building standard that offers points for heat island mitigation. JGJ/T 359-2015: Technical Specification for Application of Architectural Reflective Thermal Insulation Coating is the first industry standard that offers cool coating credits for both public and residential buildings in all hot-summer climates (Hot Summer/Cold Winter, Hot Summer/Warm Winter). As of December 2015, eight provinces or municipalities in hot-summer regions have credited cool surfaces credits in their residential and/or public building design standards; five other provinces or municipalities in hot-summer regions recommend, but do not credit, the use of cool surfaces in their building design standards. Cool surfaces could be further advanced in China by including cool roof credits for residential and public building energy efficiency standards in all hot-summer regions; developing a standardized process for natural exposure and aged-property rating of cool roofing products; and adapting the U.S.-developed laboratory aging process for roofing materials to replicate solar reflectance changes induced by natural exposure in China.

  15. TFTR toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.E.; Punchard, W.F.B.

    1977-01-01

    The design of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Toroidal Field (TF) magnetic coils is described. The TF coil is a 44-turn, spiral-wound, two-pancake, water-cooled configuration which, at a coil current of 73.3 kiloamperes, produces a 5.2-Tesla field at a major radius of 2.48 meters. The magnetic coils are installed in titanium cases, which transmit the loads generated in the coils to the adjacent supporting structure. The TFTR utilizes 20 of these coils, positioned radially at 18 0 intervals, to provide the required toroidal field. Because it is very highly loaded and subject to tight volume constraints within the machine, the coil presents unique design problems. The TF coil requirements are summarized, the coil configuration is described, and the problems highlighted which have been encountered thus far in the coil design effort, together with the development tests which have been undertaken to verify the design

  16. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish M; Rushinski J; Myatt L; Brooks A; Dahlgren F; Chrzanowski J; Reiersen W; Freudenberg K.

    2005-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements

  17. 77 FR 60041 - Heating, Cooling, and Lighting Standards for Bureau-Funded Dormitory Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... 1076-AF10 Heating, Cooling, and Lighting Standards for Bureau-Funded Dormitory Facilities AGENCY... confirming the interim final rule published and effective on May 24, 2012, addressing heating, cooling, and... identified in the ``School Facilities Design Handbook'' (handbook) dated March 30, 2007, respecting heating...

  18. Technical aspects: development, manufacture and installation of a cryo-cooled HTS coil system for high-resolution in-vivo imaging of the mouse at 1.5 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Girard, Olivier; Darrasse, Luc

    2007-09-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio improvement is of major importance to achieve microscopic spatial resolution in magnetic resonance experiments. Magnetic resonance imaging of small animals is particularly concerned since it typically requires voxels of less than (100 microm)(3) to observe the small anatomical structures having size reduction by a factor of more than 10 as compared to human being. The signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by working at high static magnetic field strengths, but the biomedical interest of such high-field systems may be limited due to field-dependent contrast mechanisms and severe technological difficulties. An alternative approach that allows working in clinical imaging system is to improve the sensitivity of the radio-frequency receiver coil. This can be done using small cryogenically operated coils made either of copper or high-temperature superconducting material. We report the technological development of cryo-cooled superconducting coils for high-resolution imaging in a whole-body magnetic resonance scanner operating at 1.5 T. The technological background supporting this development is first addressed, including HTS coil design, simulation tools, cryogenic mean description and electrical characterization procedure. To illustrate the performances of superconducting coils for magnetic resonance imaging at intermediate field strength, in-vivo mouse images of various anatomic sites acquired with a 12 mm diameter cryo-cooled superconducting coil are presented.

  19. Novel technique for MR elastography of the prostate using a modified standard endorectal coil as actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thörmer, Gregor; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Otto, Josephin; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Moche, Michael; Garnov, Nikita; Kahn, Thomas; Busse, Harald

    2013-06-01

    To present a novel method for MR elastography (MRE) of the prostate at 3 Tesla using a modified endorectal imaging coil. A commercial endorectal coil was modified to dynamically generate mechanical stress (contraction and dilation) in a prostate phantom with embedded phantom "lesions" (6 mm diameter) and in a porcine model. Resulting tissue displacements were measured with a motion-sensitive EPI sequence at actuation frequencies of 50-200 Hz. Maps of shear modulus G were calculated from the measured phase-difference shear-wave patterns. In the G maps of the phantom, "lesions" were easily discernible against the background. The average G values of regions of interest placed in the "lesion" (8.2 ± 1.9 kPa) were much higher than those in the background (3.6 ± 1.4 kPa) but systematically lower than values reported by the vendor (13.0 ± 1.0 and 6.7 ± 0.7 kPa, respectively). In the porcine model, shear waves could be generated and measured shear moduli were substantially different for muscle (7.1 ± 2.0 kPa), prostate (3.0 ± 1.4 kPa), and bulbourethral gland (5.6 ± 1.9 kPa). An endorectal MRE concept is technically feasible. The presented technique will allow for simultaneous MRE and MRI acquisitions using a commercial base device with minor, MR-conditional modifications. The diagnostic value needs to be determined in further trials. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Is the Ellipsoid Formula the New Standard for 3-Tesla MRI Prostate Volume Calculation without Endorectal Coil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Matthias; Günzel, Karsten; Miller, Kurt; Hamm, Bernd; Cash, Hannes; Asbach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Prostate volume in multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) is of clinical importance. For 3-Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil, there is no distinctive standard for volume calculation. We tested the accuracy of the ellipsoid formula with planimetric volume measurements as reference and investigated the correlation of gland volume and cancer detection rate on MRI/ultrasound (MRI/US) fusion-guided biopsy. One hundred forty-three patients with findings on 3-Tesla mpMRI suspicious of cancer and subsequent MRI/US fusion-guided targeted biopsy and additional systematic biopsy were analyzed. T2-weighted images were used for measuring the prostate diameters and for planimetric volume measurement by a segmentation software. Planimetric and calculated prostate volumes were compared with clinical data. The median prostate volume was 48.1 ml (interquartile range (IQR) 36.9-62.1 ml). Volume calculated by the ellipsoid formula showed a strong concordance with planimetric volume, with a tendency to underestimate prostate volume (median volume 43.1 ml (IQR 31.2-58.8 ml); r = 0.903, p Tesla mpMRI without endorectal coil. It allows a fast, valid volume calculation in prostate MRI datasets. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Active internal corrector coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Cottingham, J.; Dahl, P.

    1986-01-01

    Trim or corrector coils to correct main magnet field errors and provide higher multipole fields for beam optics purposes are a standard feature of superconducting magnet accelerator systems. This paper describes some of the design and construction features of powered internal trim coils and a sampling of the test results obtained

  2. 18th national meeting for energy saving promotion (prize winning case awarded by Ministry of International Trade and Industry). ; Saving energy in annealed coil cooling equipment by using volatile corrosion inhibitor. Dai 18 kai sho energy suishin zenkoku taikai (tsusho sangyo daijinsho jusho jirei); Kikasei boseizai ni yoru shodon coil reikyaku setsubi no sho energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-30

    A method and a device for preventing rust in annealed coils using volatile corrosion inhibitor (VCI) were put into practical use. Air cooling using dehumidified air and corrosion inhibiting air cooling have been used to prevent rusting caused by condensation on surfaces of coils being cooled, but these methods consume a very large amount of energy. As a result of discussing new corrosion inhibiting methods, cyclohexylamine carbonate (CHC) showed a highest corrosion prohibition capability as a VCI. Because CHC has a strong odor, new deodorants have been searched by combining it with special metallic salts. It was found that the range where a deodorant can be added without impeding the corrosion prohibiting effect is from 20% to 30%. A test for practical application indicated that rusting could be suppressed even using a VCI with concentration as low as 0.4 ppm to 0.8 ppm if the velocity of cooling air on coil surfaces is held from 0.2 m/s to 0.4 m/s. A high-accuracy continuous CHC analyzing method was established that uses a nitrogen oxide analyzer. The required installation space was reduced to 1/15 to 1/20 and the running cost to 1/8 to 1/10 of conventional methods. 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Trim coil power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisler, R.; Peeler, H.; Zajicek, W.

    1985-01-01

    The 18 trim coil power supplies have been constructed and are now in place in the K500 pit and pit mezzanine. Final wiring of the primary power and control power is proceeding along with installation of cooling water supplies. The supplies are expected to be ready for final testing into resistive loads at the beginning of June, 1985

  4. IAEA Workshop (Training Course) on Codes and Standards for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The training course consisted of lectures and Q&A sessions. The lectures dealt with the history of the development of Design Codes and Standards for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) in the respective country, the detailed description of the current design Codes and Standards for SFRs and their application to ongoing Fast Reactor design projects, as well as the ongoing development work and plans for the future in this area. Annex 1 contains the detailed Workshop program

  5. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Flux Using a Water-Cooled Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of a steady heat flux to a given water-cooled surface by means of a system energy balance. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. Status of the Swiss LCT-coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zichy, J; Benz, H.; Horvath, I.; Jakob, B.; Marinucci, C.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Swiss coil is a forced flow coil cooled by supercritical helium. A brief review of the design considerations, some of its specific features, and the progress in fabrication are described. A discussion of both the instrumentation and the cryogenic characteristics of the coil is presented

  7. Draft of standard for graphite core components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Taiju; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Eto, Motokuni; Kunimoto, Eiji; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Oku, Tatsuo; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    For the design of the graphite components in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), the graphite structural design code for the HTTR etc. were applied. However, general standard systems for the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) have not been established yet. The authors had studied on the technical issues which is necessary for the establishment of a general standard system for the graphite components in the HTGR. The results of the study were documented and discussed at a 'Special committee on research on preparation for codes for graphite components in HTGR' at Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). As a result, 'Draft of Standard for Graphite Core Components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor.' was established. In the draft standard, the graphite components are classified three categories (A, B and C) in the standpoints of safety functions and possibility of replacement. For the components in the each class, design standard, material and product standards, and in-service inspection and maintenance standard are determined. As an appendix of the design standard, the graphical expressions of material property data of 1G-110 graphite as a function of fast neutron fluence are expressed. The graphical expressions were determined through the interpolation and extrapolation of the irradiated data. (author)

  8. Large coil program support structure conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litherland, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to perform tests on both pool boiling and force cooled superconducting toroidal field coils. The tests will attempt to approximate conditions anticipated in an ignition tokamak. The test requirements resulted in a coil support design which accommodates up to six (6) test coils and is mounted to a structure capable of resisting coil interactions. The steps leading to the present LCP coil support structure design, details on selected structural components, and the basic assembly sequence are discussed

  9. Radiation resistant ducted superconductive coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleich, A.

    1976-01-01

    The radiation-resistant ducted superconductive coil consists of a helically wound electrical conductor constituted by an electrically conductive core of superconductive material provided with a longitudinally extending cooling duct. The core is covered with a layer of inorganic insulating material and the duct is covered by an electrically conductive metallic gas-tight sheath. The metallic sheaths on adjacent turns of the coil are secured together. 2 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures

  10. Application of objective provision tree to development of standard review plan for sodium-cooled fast reactor nuclear design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Moo-Hoon; Suh, Namduk; Choi, Yongwon; Shin, Andong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    A systematic methodology was developed for the standard review plan for sodium-cooled fast reactor nuclear design. The process is first to develop an objective provision tree of sodium-cooled fast reactor for the reactivity control safety function. The provision tree is generally developed by designer to confirm whether the design satisfies the defense-in-depth concept. Then applicability of the current standard review plan of nuclear design for light water reactor to sodium-cooled fast reactor was evaluated and complemented by the developed objective provision tree.

  11. Post-LOCA long term cooling performance in Korean standard nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Young Seok; Jung, Jae Won; Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Hho Jung

    1999-01-01

    The post-LOCA long term cooling (LTC) performance of the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNPP) is analyzed for both small break LOCA and large break LOCA. The RELAP5/MOD3.2.2 code is used to calculate the LTC sequences based on the LTC plan of the KSNPP. A standard input model is developed such that LOCA and the followed LTC sequence can be calculated in a single run for both small break LOCA and large break LOCA. A spectrum of small break LOCA ranging from 0.02 to 0.5 ft 2 of break area and a double-ended guillotine break are analyzed. Through the code calculations, the thermal-hydraulic behavior and the boron behavior are evaluated and the effect of the important manual action including the safety injection tank isolation in LTC procedure is investigated

  12. Toroidal field coils for the PDX machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushnell, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the engineering design features of the TF coils for the PDX machine. Included are design details of the electrical insulation, water cooling, and coil segment joint which allows access to the central machine area. A discussion of the problems anticipated in the manufacture and the planned solutions are presented

  13. Evaluation of post-LOCA long term cooling performance in Korean standard nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Young Seok; Jung, Jae Won; Seul, Kwang Won; Kim, Hho Jung

    2001-01-01

    The post-LOCA long term cooling (LTC) performance of the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNPP) is analyzed for both small break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA at cold leg. The RELAP5/MOD3.2.2 beta code is used to calculate the LTC sequences based on the LTC plan of the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants (KSNPP). A standard input model is developed such that LOCA and the followed LTC sequence can be calculated in a single run for both small break LOCA and large break LOCA. A spectrum of small break LOCA ranging from 0.02 to 0.5 ft 2 of break area and a double-ended guillotine break are analyzed. Through the code calculations, the thermal-hydraulic behavior and the boron behavior are evaluated and the effect of the important action including the safety injection tank (SIT) isolation and the simultaneous injection in LTC procedure is investigated. As a result, it is found that the sufficient margin is available in avoiding the boron precipitation in the core. It is also found that a further specific condition for the SIT isolation action need to be setup and it is recommended that the early initiation of the simultaneous injection be taken for larger break LTC sequences. (author)

  14. The IEA Large Coil Task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, D.S.; Klose, W.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1988-01-01

    A multinational program of cooperative research, development, demonstrations, and exchanges of information on superconducting magnets for fusion was initiated in 1977 under an IEA agreement. The first major step in the development of TF magnets was called the Large Coil Task. Participants in LCT were the U.S. DOE, EURATOM, JAERI, and the Departement Federal de l'Interieur of Switzerland. The goals of LCT were to obtain experimental data, to demonstrate reliable operation of large superconducting coils, and to prove design principles and fabrication techniques being considered for the toroidal magnets of thermonuclear reactors. These goals were to be accomplished through coordinated but largely independent design, development, and construction of six test coils, followed by collaborative testing in a compact toroidal test array at fields of 8 T and higher. Under the terms of the IEA Agreement, the United States built and operated the test facility at Oak Ridge and provided three test coils. The other participants provided one coil each. Information on design and manufacturing and all test data were shared by all. The LCT team of each participant included a government laboratory and industrial partners or contractors. The last coil was completed in 1985, and the test assembly was completed in October of that year. Over the next 23 months, the six-coil array was cooled down and extensive testing was performed. Results were gratifying, as tests achieved design-point performance and well beyond. (Each coil reached a peak field of 9 T.) Experiments elucidated coil behavior, delineated limits of operability, and demonstrated coil safety. (orig./KP)

  15. Superconducting cyclotron magnet coil short

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, M.L.; Blosser, H.G.; Clark, D.J.; Launer, H.; Lawton, D.; Miller, P.; Resmini, F.

    1982-01-01

    In February 1981, a short circuit appeared in the superconducting coil of the K500 cyclotron. The short is resistive in character and therefore has no effect on steady state operation of the magnet. The resistance of the short varies, sometimes being below threshold of detection as a heat load on the cooling system and sometimes being significant. The resistance under certain conditions shows approximately cyclic phenomena with time constants in the range of seconds and other approximately cyclic phenomena which correlate with gross operating parameters of the magnet (shifting current from one coil to another at high field and lowering and raising the liquid helium level). A number of diagnostic studies of the short have been made, using 1) an array of flux sensing loops to sense the magnetic effect of the short, 2) voltage comparisons between upper and lower sections of the coil, 3) comparisons of forces in the nine member coil support system and 4) the effect of the short on the thermal charactersitics of the coil. Insulation failure or a metal chip shorting out turns have been explored in some detail but a convincing determination of the exact cause of the short may never be available, (even the extreme step of unwinding the coil having a significant probability that an imperfection with the observed characteristics would pass unnoticed). Analysis of the characteristics of the short indicated that the most serious consequence would be failure of the coils mechanical support system in the event that the magnet was quickly discharged, as in a dump or quench. To deal with this hazard, the support system has been modified by installing solid supports which prevent the coil from moving by an amount sufficient to damage the support system. We have also reexamined the data and calculations used in the original coil design and have made some additional measurements of the properties of the materials (yield strength, friction coefficient, Young's modulus) used in the

  16. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Lawson, J.E.; Persing, R.G.; Senko, T.R.; Woolley, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    A new coil protection system (CPS) is being developed to replace the existing TFTR magnetic coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPS, when installed in October of 1988, will permit operation up to the actual coil stress limits parameters in real-time. The computation will be done in a microprocessor based Coil Protection Calculator (CPC) currently under construction at PPL. THe new CPC will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates. The CPC will provide real-time estimates of critical coil and bus temperatures and stresses based on real-time redundant measurements of coil currents, coil cooling water inlet temperature, and plasma current. The critical parameter calculations are compared to prespecified limits. If these limits are reached or exceeded, protection action will be initiated to a hard wired control system (HCS), which will shut down the power supplies. The CPC consists of a redundant VME based microprocessor system which will sample all input data and compute all stress quantities every ten milliseconds. Thermal calculations will be approximated every 10ms with an exact solution occurring every second. The CPC features continuous cross-checking of redundant input signal, automatic detection of internal failure modes, monitoring and recording of calculated results, and a quick, functional verification of performance via an internal test system. (author)

  17. Design and Fabrication of the KSTAR Poloidal Field Coil Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H. K.; Choi, C. H.; Sa, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    The KSTAR magnet system consists of 16 toroidal field(TF) coils. 4 pairs of central solenoid(CS) coils, and 3 pairs of outer poloidal field(PF) coils. The TF coils are encased in a structure to enhance mechanical stability. The CS coil structure is supported on top of the TF coil structure and supplies a vertical compression of 15 MN to prevent lateral movement due to a repulsive force between the CS coils. The PF coil system is vertically symmetry to the machine mid-plane and consists of 6 coils and 80 support structures(i.e, 16 for PF5, 32 for PF6 and 32 fort PF7). All PF coil structures should absorb the thermal contraction difference between TF coil structure and PF coils due to cool down and endure the vertical and radial magnetic forces due to current charging. In order to satisfy these structural requirements. the PF5 coil structure is designed base on hinges and both of PF6 and PF7 coil structures based on flexible plates. The PF coil structures are assembled on the TF coil structure with an individual basement that is welded on the TF coil structure

  18. Mechanical study of 20 MJ superconducting pulse coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Yasuhide; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1985-09-01

    This paper describes calculation methods and computer codes of stress distribution in a circular-shaped superconducting pulsed coils. The stress problems of a large sized superconducting coil, for example, are discussed for 20 MJ pool-cooled pulse coil. Young's modulus of a stranded flat cable, low rigidity, is measured and evaluated. (author)

  19. Merging fluxgate and induction coil data to produce low-noise geomagnetic observatory data meeting the INTERMAGNET definitive 1 s data standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunke, Heinz-Peter; Widmer-Schnidrig, Rudolf; Korte, Monika

    2017-11-01

    For frequencies above 30 mHz the instrument intrinsic noise level of typical fluxgate magnetometers used at geomagnetic observatories usually masks ambient magnetic field variations on magnetically quiet days. This is especially true for stations located at middle and low latitudes, where variations are generally smaller than at high latitudes. INTERMAGNET has set a minimum quality standard for definitive 1 s data. Natural field variations referred to as pulsations (Pc-1, Pc-2, Pi-1) fall in this band. Usually their intensity is so small that they rarely surpass the instrumental noise of fluxgate magnetometers. Moreover, high-quality magnetic field observations in the band 30 mHz-0.5 Hz contain interesting information, e.g., for the study of ionospheric electron interactions with electromagnetic ion cyclotron plasma waves. We propose a method to improve 1 Hz observatory data by merging data from the proven and tested fluxgate magnetometers currently in use with induction coil magnetometers into a single data stream. We show how measurements of both instruments can be combined without information loss or phase distortion. The result is a time series of the magnetic field vector components, combining the benefits of both instruments: long-term stability (fluxgate) and low noise at high frequencies (induction coil). This new data stream fits perfectly into the data management procedures of INTERMAGNET and meets the requirements defined in the definitive 1 s data standard. We describe the applied algorithm and validate the result by comparing power spectra of the fluxgate magnetometer output with the merged signal. Daily spectrograms from the Niemegk observatory show that the resulting data series reveal information at frequencies above 30 mHz that cannot be seen in raw fluxgate data.

  20. Merging fluxgate and induction coil data to produce low-noise geomagnetic observatory data meeting the INTERMAGNET definitive 1 s data standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-P. Brunke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available For frequencies above 30 mHz the instrument intrinsic noise level of typical fluxgate magnetometers used at geomagnetic observatories usually masks ambient magnetic field variations on magnetically quiet days. This is especially true for stations located at middle and low latitudes, where variations are generally smaller than at high latitudes. INTERMAGNET has set a minimum quality standard for definitive 1 s data. Natural field variations referred to as pulsations (Pc-1, Pc-2, Pi-1 fall in this band. Usually their intensity is so small that they rarely surpass the instrumental noise of fluxgate magnetometers. Moreover, high-quality magnetic field observations in the band 30 mHz–0.5 Hz contain interesting information, e.g., for the study of ionospheric electron interactions with electromagnetic ion cyclotron plasma waves. We propose a method to improve 1 Hz observatory data by merging data from the proven and tested fluxgate magnetometers currently in use with induction coil magnetometers into a single data stream. We show how measurements of both instruments can be combined without information loss or phase distortion. The result is a time series of the magnetic field vector components, combining the benefits of both instruments: long-term stability (fluxgate and low noise at high frequencies (induction coil. This new data stream fits perfectly into the data management procedures of INTERMAGNET and meets the requirements defined in the definitive 1 s data standard. We describe the applied algorithm and validate the result by comparing power spectra of the fluxgate magnetometer output with the merged signal. Daily spectrograms from the Niemegk observatory show that the resulting data series reveal information at frequencies above 30 mHz that cannot be seen in raw fluxgate data.

  1. Large coil test facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelms, L.W.; Thompson, P.B.; Mann, T.L.

    1978-02-01

    In the development of a superconducting toroidal field (TF) magnet for The Next Step (TNS) tokamak reactor, several different TF coils, about half TNS size, will be built and tested to permit selection of a design and fabrication procedure for full-scale TNS coils. A conceptual design has been completed for a facility to test D-shaped TF coils, 2.5 x 3.5-m bore, operating at 4-6 K, cooled either by boiling helium or by forced-flow supercritical helium. Up to six coils can be accommodated in a toroidal array housed in a single vacuum tank. The principal components and systems in the facility are an 11-m vacuum tank, a test stand providing structural support and service connections for the coils, a liquid nitrogen system, a system providing helium both as saturated liquid and at supercritical pressure, coils to produce a pulsed vertical field at any selected test coil position, coil power supplies, process instrumentation and control, coil diagnostics, and a data acquisition and handling system. The test stand structure is composed of a central bucking post, a base structure, and two horizontal torque rings. The coils are bolted to the bucking post, which transmits all gravity loads to the base structure. The torque ring structure, consisting of beams between adjacent coils, acts with the bucking structure to react all the magnetic loads that occur when the coils are energized. Liquid helium is used to cool the test stand structure to 5 K to minimize heat conduction to the coils. Liquid nitrogen is used to precool gaseous helium during system cooldown and to provide thermal radiation shielding

  2. Instrumentation and test of the Swiss LCT-coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zichy, J.A.; Horvath, I.; Jakob, B.; Marinucci, C.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1985-01-01

    Just before Christmas 1983 the fabrication of the Swiss LCT-coil was finished. Tests at ambient temperature were performed on the factory site and after delivery in Oak Ridge. To avoid an undesirable delay of the rescheduled Partial-Array Test it was agreed to install the coil without its superconducting bus. In July 1984 the Swiss LCT-coil was successfully cooled down to LHe temperature together with the other two fully installed coils. Besides the cooling system, the instrumentation, measured parameters of the coil and some preliminary results obtained during the ongoing Partial-Array Test are presented

  3. Notes on the creation of high magnetic fields. Cooling of the coils; Considerations sur la creation de champs magnetiques eleves. Refroidissement des bobines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armand, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    When the temperature of a conductor is lowered, its resistance decreases appreciably. This fact can be made particular use of in the production of high magnetic fields, to reduce the total energy consumed for a given coil. In this paper the problem of the evacuation of heat is examined, and the various fluids which can be used are compared from the viewpoint of the maximum fields attainable from them for a given coil. These fluids are: - water (nucleate boiling); - liquid nitrogen; - liquid hydrogen; - helium at a temperature of 20 deg. K; - helium at a temperature of 10 deg. K. First of all a method for calculating the quantities of heat evacuated by a fluid is established, using general equations for fluid flow with heat exchange. (author) [French] Lorsque l'on abaisse la temperature d'un conducteur, sa resistivite diminue d'une facon sensible. Ce fait peut etre mis a profit notamment en vue de la production de champs magnetiques eleves, de facon a reduire l'energie totale consommee pour une bobine donnee. Dans ce qui suit, le probleme de l'evacuation des pertes Joules est examinee et les differents fluides utilisables sont compares du point de vue des champs maximum qu'ils permettent d'atteindre pour une bobine donnee. Ces fluides sont: - l'eau (nucleate boiling); - l'azote liquide; - l'hydrogene liquide; - l'helium a une temperature de 20 deg. K; - l'helium a une temperature de 10 deg. K. Au prealable une methode de calcul des quantites de chaleur evacuee par un fluide est etablie, a partir des equations globales de dynamique des fluides avec echange de chaleur. (auteur)

  4. Testing electrical insulation of LCT coils and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luton, J.N.; Ulbricht, A.R.; Ellis, J.F.; Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.; Okuno, K.; Siewerdt, L.O.; Zahn, G.R.; Zichy, J.A.

    1986-09-01

    Three of the superconducting test coils in the Large Coil Task (LCT) use conductors cooled internally by forced flow of helium. In the other three coils, the conductors are cooled externally by a bath of helium. The coils and facility are designed for rapid discharges (dumps) at voltages up to 2.5 kV, depending on coil design. Many coil sensors are connected electrically to the conductors. These sensor leads and signal conditioning equipment also experience high voltage. High-potential tests of ground insulation were performed on all components of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF). Coil insulation was also tested by ring-down tests that produced voltage distributions within the coils like those occurring during rapid discharge. Methods were developed to localize problem areas and to eliminate them. The effect on breakdown voltage near the Paschen minimum of magnetic fields up to 2 T was investigated

  5. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments

  6. The SMES model coil. Fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari; Takahashi, Nobuji

    1998-01-01

    A SMES model coil was fabricated as R and D item in the development of component technologies for a 480 MJ/20 MW SMES pilot plant. The coil consists of four double-pancake windings. The coil is the same diameter but half the number of pancakes that will be needed for a SMES pilot plant. The NbTi cable-in-conduit conductor and superconducting joints between the double pancakes are cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. Prior to fabrication, various characteristics of the cable-in-conduit were measured by full-sized short samples from actual conductors and by scaled short samples from scaled conductors. The critical current of the scaled short samples was in agreement with that calculated from one strand of the conductor. The impedance between arbitrary dual-oxide coated strands in the full-size conductor was measured to be smaller than that obtained from two Cr-plated strands, which showed a good degree of stability in another coil. It was estimated that oxide-coated conductors would have high stability. Through fabrication of a model coil, it was demonstrated that a large forced-flow coil for a small-scale 100 kWh SMES device could be manufactured. (author)

  7. The SMES model coil. Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanai, Satoshi; Nakamoto, Kazunari; Takahashi, Nobuji [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)] [and others

    1998-07-01

    A SMES model coil was fabricated as R and D item in the development of component technologies for a 480 MJ/20 MW SMES pilot plant. The coil consists of four double-pancake windings. The coil is the same diameter but half the number of pancakes that will be needed for a SMES pilot plant. The NbTi cable-in-conduit conductor and superconducting joints between the double pancakes are cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. Prior to fabrication, various characteristics of the cable-in-conduit were measured by full-sized short samples from actual conductors and by scaled short samples from scaled conductors. The critical current of the scaled short samples was in agreement with that calculated from one strand of the conductor. The impedance between arbitrary dual-oxide coated strands in the full-size conductor was measured to be smaller than that obtained from two Cr-plated strands, which showed a good degree of stability in another coil. It was estimated that oxide-coated conductors would have high stability. Through fabrication of a model coil, it was demonstrated that a large forced-flow coil for a small-scale 100 kWh SMES device could be manufactured. (author)

  8. Design of the coolant system for the Large Coil Test Facility pulse coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridgman, C.; Ryan, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    The pulse coils will be a part of the Large Coil Test Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is designed to test six large tokamak-type superconducting coils. The pulse coil set consists of two resistive coaxial solenoid coils, mounted so that their magnetic axis is perpendicular to the toroidal field lines of the test coil. The pulse coils provide transient vertical fields at test coil locations to simulate the pulsed vertical fields present in tokamak devices. The pulse coils are designed to be pulsed for 30 s every 150 s, which results in a Joule heating of 116 kW per coil. In order to provide this capability, the pulse coil coolant system is required to deliver 6.3 L/s (100 gpm) of subcooled liquid nitrogen at 10-atm absolute pressure. The coolant system can also cool down each pulse coil from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. This paper provides details of the pumping and heat exchange equipment designed for the coolant system and of the associated instrumentation and controls

  9. BPX toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitzenvoeder, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the toroidal field (TF) coil system of the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) which consists of (18) beryllium copper magnets arrayed in a wedged configuration with a major radius of 2.6 meters and a field strength capability on axis of 9.0 Tesla. The toroidal array is constructed from six (3)-coil modules to facilitate remote recovery in the event of a magnet failure after nuclear activation precludes hands-on servicing. The magnets are of a modified Bitter plate design with partial cases of type 316-LN stainless steel welded with Inconel 182 weld wire. The coil turn plates are fabricated from CDA C17510 beryllium copper with optimized mechanical, thermal, and electrical characteristics. joints within the turns and between turns are made by welding with C17200 filler wire. Cryogenic cooling is employed to reduce power dissipation and to enhance performance. The magnets are cooled between experimental pulses by pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through channels in the edges of the coil turns. This arrangement makes possible one full-power pulse per hour. Electrical insulation consists of polyimide-glass sheets bonded in place with vacuum-pressure impregnated epoxy/glass

  10. Large magnetic coils for fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, P.; Ulbricht, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of research in this field and outlines future tasks and experiments for the Next European Torus (NET). Research and development work accomplished so far permits generation and safe operation of magnetic fields up to 9 T by means of NbTi coils. Fields up to 11 T are feasible if the coils are cooled with superfluid helium at 1.8 K. The potential of the Nb 3 Sn coils promise achievement of magnetic fields between 12 and 13 T. (MM) [de

  11. Stability analysis of high temperature superconducting coil in liquid hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, T.; Yagai, T.; Tsuda, M.; Hamajima, T.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, it is expected that hydrogen plays an important role in energy source including electric power in near future. Liquid hydrogen has high potential for cooling down superconducting coil wound with high temperature superconductors (HTS), such as BSCCO, YBCO. In this paper, we study stabilities of the coils wound with BSCCO tapes, which are immersed in the liquid hydrogen, and compare stability results with those cooled by liquid helium. We treat a minimum propagation zone (MPZ) theory to evaluate the coil stability considering boiling heat flux of the liquid hydrogen, and specific heat, heat conduction and resistivity of HTS materials as a function of temperature. It is found that the coil cooled by the liquid hydrogen has higher stability margin than that cooled by the liquid helium. We compare the stability margins of both coils wound with Bi-2223/Ag tape and Bi-2212/Ag tape in liquid hydrogen. As a result, it is found that the stability of Bi-2212 coil is equivalent to that of Bi-2223 coil in low and high magnetic field, while the maximum current of Bi-2212 coil exceeds a little bit that of Bi-2223 coil in both magnetic fields

  12. Conception of Brownian coil

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiayuan

    2018-01-01

    This article proposes a conception of Brownian coil. Brownian coil is a tiny coil with the same size of pollen. Once immersed into designed magnetic field and liquid, the coil will be moved and deformed macroscopically, due to the microscopic thermodynamic molecular collisions. Such deformation and movement will change the magnetic flux through the coil, by which an ElectroMotive Force (EMF) is produced. In this work, Brownian heat exchanger and Brownian generator are further designed to tran...

  13. Progress on large superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.; Beard, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    Large superconducting toroidal field coils of competing designs are being produced by six major industrial teams. In the US, teams headed by General Dynamics Convair, General Electric, and Westinghouse are under contract to design and fabricate one coil each to specifications established by the Large Coil Program. A facility for testing 6 coils in a toroidal array at fields to 8 to 12 tesla is under construction at Oak Ridge. Through an international agreement, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland will produce one coil each for testing with the US coils. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape winding bore and is designed to operate at a current of 10 to 18 kA at a peak field of 8T while subjected to pulsed fields of 0.14 T applied in 1.0 s. There are significant differences among the six coil designs: five use NbTi, one Nb 3 Sn; three are cooled by pool boiling helium, three by forced flow; five have welded or bolted stainless steel coil cases, one has aluminum plate structure. All are designed to be cryostable at 8T, with structural margin for extended operation. The three US coil teams are almost or completely finished with detailed design and are now procuring materials and setting up manufacturing equipment. The non-US teams are at various stages of verification testing and design. The GDC and GE coils are scheduled for delivery in the spring of 1981 and the others will be completed a year later. The 11-m diameter vessel at the test facility has been completed and major components of the test stand are being procured. Engineering and procurement to upgrade the helium liquifier-refrigerator system are under way

  14. Development of superconducting pulsed poloidal coil in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, S.; Okuno, K.; Ando, T.; Tsuji, H.

    1990-01-01

    In the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (JAERI), development work on pulsed superconductors and coils started in 1979, aiming at the demonstration of the applicability of superconducting technologies to pulsed poloidal coils in a fusion reactor. Initially our effort was concentrated mainly on the development of pool-cooled large-current pulsed conductors. Over the past ten years, superconducting technology has made great progress and the forced-flow cooled coil has assumed great importance in the development work. Now the Demo Poloidal Coil Project is in progress in JAERI, and three large forced-flow cooled coils have so far been fabricated and tested. Many improvements have been achieved in ac-loss performance and mechanical characteristics. (author)

  15. Demonstration poloidal coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Masahiko; Kawano, Katumi; Tada, Eisuke

    1989-01-01

    A new compact cryogenic cold compressor was developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in collaboration with Isikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI) in order to produce the supercritical helium below 4.2 K for Demonstration Poloidal Coils (DPC) which are forced-flow cooled type superconducting pulse coils. This compressor is one of key components for DPC test facility. The cold compressor reduces pressure in liquid helium bath, which contains liquid helium of around 3,000 l, down to 0.5 atm efficiently. Consequently, supercritical helium down to 3.5 K is produced and supplied to the DPC coils. A centrifugal compressor with dynamic gas bearing is selected as a compressor mechanism to realize high adiabatic efficiency and large flow rate. In this performance tests, the compressor was operated for 220 h at saturated condition from 0.5 to 1.0 atm without any failure. High adiabatic efficiency (more than 60 %) is achieved with wide flow range (25-65 g/s) and the design value is fully satisfied. The compressor can rotate up to 80,000 rpm at maximum then the coil supply temperature of supercritical helium is 3.5 K. (author)

  16. Measurement of heating coil temperature for e-cigarettes with a "top-coil" clearomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenhao; Wang, Ping; Ito, Kazuhide; Fowles, Jeff; Shusterman, Dennis; Jaques, Peter A; Kumagai, Kazukiyo

    2018-01-01

    To determine the effect of applied power settings, coil wetness conditions, and e-liquid compositions on the coil heating temperature for e-cigarettes with a "top-coil" clearomizer, and to make associations of coil conditions with emission of toxic carbonyl compounds by combining results herein with the literature. The coil temperature of a second generation e-cigarette was measured at various applied power levels, coil conditions, and e-liquid compositions, including (1) measurements by thermocouple at three e-liquid fill levels (dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet), three coil resistances (low, standard, and high), and four voltage settings (3-6 V) for multiple coils using propylene glycol (PG) as a test liquid; (2) measurements by thermocouple at additional degrees of coil wetness for a high resistance coil using PG; and (3) measurements by both thermocouple and infrared (IR) camera for high resistance coils using PG alone and a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of PG and glycerol (PG/GL). For single point thermocouple measurements with PG, coil temperatures ranged from 322 ‒ 1008°C, 145 ‒ 334°C, and 110 ‒ 185°C under dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet conditions, respectively, for the total of 13 replaceable coil heads. For conditions measured with both a thermocouple and an IR camera, all thermocouple measurements were between the minimum and maximum across-coil IR camera measurements and equal to 74% ‒ 115% of the across-coil mean, depending on test conditions. The IR camera showed details of the non-uniform temperature distribution across heating coils. The large temperature variations under wet-through-wick conditions may explain the large variations in formaldehyde formation rate reported in the literature for such "top-coil" clearomizers. This study established a simple and straight-forward protocol to systematically measure e-cigarette coil heating temperature under dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet conditions. In addition to applied power, the

  17. Magnet coils made from high-temperature superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R.G.; Yang, M.; Grovenor, C.R.M.; Goringe, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    We review the progress we have made in constructing HTS coils and report our latest results. Also we describe the cryogen-free operation of one of our HTS coils cooled to 55 K using a Stirling cycle cryocooler. Lastly, we describe how 4 Oxford coils are being used in a project to investigate the controllability of HTS magnets in applications such as ''maglev'' suspension systems. We briefly report the initial findings of this work and describe developments in progress. (orig.)

  18. Coil assembly for use with an electric motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Coil assemblies ( 2 ) of electric motors ( 1 ) produce heat that can be a disadvantage when needing the electric motor ( 1 ) for high precision positioning applications. To reduce the negative impact of the heat, the coils ( 26 a , 26 b , 26 c) are arranged in an internally cooled housing ( 21 ).

  19. EPB standard EN ISO 52016: calculation of the building’s energy needs for heating and cooling, internal temperatures and heating and cooling load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, H.A.L. van; Spiekman, M.E.; Hoes-van Oeffelen, E.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    EN ISO 52016-1 presents a coherent set of calculation methods at different levels of detail, for the (sensible) energy needs for the space heating and cooling and (latent) energy needs (de)humidification of a building and/or internal temperatures and heating and/or cooling loads, including the

  20. Design considerations for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb 3 Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the U.S. TIBER concept. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils

  1. NCSX Trim Coil Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalish, M.; Brooks, A.; Rushinski, J.; Upcavage, R.

    2009-01-01

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was being constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory before work was stopped in 2008. The objective of this experiment was to develop the stellarator concept and evaluate it's potential as a model for future fusion power plants. Stellarator design requires very precisely positioned Modular Coils of complex shape to form 3D plasmas. In the design of NCSX, Trim Coils were required to compensate for both the positioning of the coils during assembly and the fabrication tolerances of the Modular Coils. Use of the Trim Coils allowed for larger tolerances increasing ease of assembly and decreasing overall cost. A set of Trim coils was developed to suppress the toroidal flux in island regions due to misalignment, magnetic materials, and eddy currents. The requirement imposed upon the design forced the toroidal flux in island regions below 10% of the total toroidal flux in the plasma. An analysis was first performed to evaluate candidate Trim Coil configurations iterating both the size, number, and position of the coils. The design was optimized considering both performance and cost while staying within the tight restraints presented by the space limited geometry. The final design of the Trim Coils incorporated a 48 Coil top bottom symmetric set. Fabrication costs were minimized by having only two coil types and using a planar conventional design with off the shelf commercial conductor. The Trim Coil design incorporated supports made from simple structural shapes assembled together in a way which allowed for adjustment as well as accommodation for the tolerance build up on the mating surfaces. This paper will summarize the analysis that led to the optimization of the Trim Coils set, the trim coil mechanical design, thermal and stress analysis, and the design of the supporting Trim Coil structure

  2. Dual coil ignition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberts, Garlan J.; Qu, Qiuping; Czekala, Michael Damian

    2017-03-28

    A dual coil ignition system is provided. The dual coil ignition system includes a first inductive ignition coil including a first primary winding and a first secondary winding, and a second inductive ignition coil including a second primary winding and a second secondary winding, the second secondary winding connected in series to the first secondary winding. The dual coil ignition system further includes a diode network including a first diode and a second diode connected between the first secondary winding and the second secondary winding.

  3. Status of the GA/MCA 12 Tesla Coil Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, J.S.; Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.Y.; Hsu, Y.H.

    1980-09-01

    The current status of the Team One effort of the DOE/OFE/D and T 12 Tesla Coil Development Program is presented. Subatmospheric, helium bath cooled, NbTiTa alloy is employed for the test coil, and ETF TF-coil concept. General Atomic is the Team One leader, with Magnetic Corporation of American as industrial subcontractor

  4. Biomaterials Made from Coiled-Coil Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conticello, Vincent; Hughes, Spencer; Modlin, Charles

    The development of biomaterials designed for specific applications is an important objective in personalized medicine. While the breadth and prominence of biomaterials have increased exponentially over the past decades, critical challenges remain to be addressed, particularly in the development of biomaterials that exhibit highly specific functions. These functional properties are often encoded within the molecular structure of the component molecules. Proteins, as a consequence of their structural specificity, represent useful substrates for the construction of functional biomaterials through rational design. This chapter provides an in-depth survey of biomaterials constructed from coiled-coils, one of the best-understood protein structural motifs. We discuss the utility of this structurally diverse and functionally tunable class of proteins for the creation of novel biomaterials. This discussion illustrates the progress that has been made in the development of coiled-coil biomaterials by showcasing studies that bridge the gap between the academic science and potential technological impact.

  5. Superconductors for W VII-X coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, W.

    1987-01-01

    Superconductor concepts are discussed with respect to operational current, cooling and bending behavior, and ac losses. The encouraging results for NbTi superconducting technology are recalled. It is argued that the WVII-X stellarator modular superconducting coils can be built just as the modular Cu coils for WVII-AS. Special attention must be paid to the dB/dt allowed for the conductor. Shape and price depend on the means used to avoid ac losses. Formula to elucidate the main physical parameters influencing ac loss behavior of superconductors are given. Configurations investigated with respect to plasma behavior are compared. Masses to be cooled were estimated for two configurations. The estimated cooling power is of the order of 3kW

  6. PANDA experiment and International Standard Problem for passive cooling systems for afterheat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Aksan, N.S.

    1999-01-01

    In the context of OECD/NEA, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) is working on an International Standard Problem which is to provide information on the efficiency and use of computer program systems for passive afterheat removal systems. The PANDA test facility of PSI was designed for these investigations. A six-phase PANDA experiment provides a basis for pre-calculation and recalculation of selected phases covering a limited number of system-typical operating states and phenomena. The experiment was specified and carried out in the year under report [de

  7. The design of the SULTAN inner coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, W.M.P.; Spoorenberg, C.J.G.

    1981-12-01

    The background field of the first phase of the test facility SULTAN will be generated by two concentric solenoids: a 6 Tesla outer coil with a free bore of 1.3 m and an inner coil for increasing the field to 8 Tesla. The free bore (cold) will be 1.055 m. The final design of the 8 Tesla inner coil is described. The coil will operate at an overall current density of 23 x 10 6 A/m 2 . It will be cooled directly by forced flow supercritical helium. A hollow conductor is applied, composed of a rectangular copper tube and a 16 strands Rutherford cable, soldered on one side of the tube. The copper tube will be cold worked to cope with the high stress level (165 MPa). The design base (field and stress analysis, cooling, stability), the mechanical design and the instrumentation will be specified. The design and construction of the coil is a part of the collaboration between ECN and Holec Transformer Group

  8. Novel transcranial magnetic stimulation coil for mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Stephen; Stark, Spencer; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) shows potential for non-invasive treatment of various neurological disorders. Significant work has been performed on the design of coils used for TMS on human subjects but few reports have been made on the design of coils for use on the brains of animals such as mice. This work is needed as TMS studies utilizing mice can allow rapid preclinical development of TMS for human disorders but the coil designs developed for use on humans are inadequate for optimal stimulation of the much smaller mouse brain. A novel TMS coil has been developed with the goal of inducing strong and focused electric fields for the stimulation of small animals such as mice. Calculations of induced electric fields were performed utilizing an MRI derived inhomogeneous model of an adult male mouse. Mechanical and thermal analysis of this new TMS helmet-coil design have also been performed at anticipated TMS operating conditions to ensure mechanical stability of the new coil and establish expected linear attraction and rotational force values. Calculated temperature increases for typical stimulation periods indicate the helmet-coil system is capable of operating within established medical standards. A prototype of the coil has been fabricated and characterization results are presented.

  9. Mechanical behavior of the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Acerbi, E; Alessandria, F; Berthier, R; Broggi, F; Daël, A; Dudarev, A; Mayri, C; Miele, P; Reytier, M; Rossi, L; Sorbi, M; Sun, Z; ten Kate, H H J; Vanenkov, I; Volpini, G

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS B0 model coil has been developed and constructed to verify the design parameters and the manufacture techniques of the Barrel Toroid coils (BT) that are under construction for the ATLAS Detector. Essential for successful operation is the mechanical behavior of the superconducting coil and its support structure. In the ATLAS magnet test facility, a magnetic mirror is used to reproduce in the model coil the electromagnetic forces of the BT coils when assembled in the final Barrel Toroid magnet system. The model coil is extensively equipped with mechanical instrumentation to monitor stresses and force levels as well as contraction during a cooling down and excitation up to nominal current. The installed set up of strain gauges, position sensors and capacitive force transducers is presented. Moreover the first mechanical results in terms of expected main stress, strain and deformation values are presented based on detailed mechanical analysis of the design. (7 refs).

  10. Dual levitated coils for antihydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, J. D.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2013-04-01

    Two coaxial superconducting magnetic coils that carry currents in the same direction and that are simultaneously levitated may serve for antihydrogen plasma confinement. The configuration may be suitable for use by a collaboration at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator facility to test fundamental symmetries between the properties of hydrogen and antihydrogen. Nested Penning traps are currently used to confine recombining antihydrogen plasma. Symmetry studies require the production of sufficiently cold antihydrogen. However, plasma drifts within nested Penning traps can increase the kinetic energy of antiprotons that form antihydrogen atoms. Dual levitated coils may serve to confine relatively large, cold, dense non-drifting recombining antihydrogen plasmas. A minimum-B magnetic field that is produced by the coils could provide for atom trapping. A toroidal plasma is confined between the coils. High density plasmas may be possible, by allowing plasma pressure to balance mechanical pressure to keep the coils apart. Progress is reported on theoretical and experimental efforts. The theoretical effort includes the development of a classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation of confinement. The experimental effort includes levitation of a NdFeB permanent ring magnet, which produces a magnetic field that is qualitatively similar to the field that would be produced by the two coaxial superconducting magnetic coils. Liquid-nitrogen-cooled Bi-2223 high-temperature-superconducting components, with a critical temperature of 108 K, were used to levitate the ring magnet. An issue concerning keeping the plane of the levitated ring horizontal is discussed.

  11. Superconducting magnetic coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aized, Dawood; Schwall, Robert E.

    1996-06-11

    A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

  12. Standard casks for the transport of LWR spent fuel. Storage/transport casks for long cooled spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, P.; Sert, G.; Gagnon, R.

    1983-01-01

    During the past decade, TRANSNUCLEAIRE has developed, licensed and marketed a family of standard casks for the transport of spent fuel from LWR reactors to reprocessing plants and the ancillary equipments necessary for their operation and transport. A large number of these casks are presently used for European and intercontinental transports and manufactured under TRANSNUCLEAIRE supervision in different countries. The main advantages of these casks are: - large payload for considered modes of transport, - moderate cost, - reliability due to the large experience gained by TRANSNUCLEAIRE as concerns fabrication and operation problems, - standardization faciliting fabrication, operation and spare part supply. Recently, TRANSNUCLEAIRE also developed a new generation of casks for the dry storage and occasional transport of LWR spent fuel which has been cooled for 5 years or 7 years in case of consolidated fuel rods. These casks have an optimum payload which takes into account the shielding requirements and the weight limitations at most sites. This paper deals more particularly with the TN 24 model which exists in 4 versions among which one for 24 PWR 900 fuel assemblies and another one for the consolidated fuel rods from 48 of same fuel assemblies

  13. Current contact device for a superconducting magnet coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hieronymus, H.

    1987-01-01

    The invention concerns a current supply device for a superconducting magnet coil to be shortcircuited, with a separating device per coil end, which contains a fixed cooled contact and a moving contact connected to a power supply device and a mechanical actuating device for closing and opening the contacts. When closing the heated contact on to the cooled contact, relatively large quantities of heat can be transferred to the cooled contact and therefore to the connected superconducting coil end and can cause normal conduction there. The invention therefore provides that the mass ratio of the cooled contact to the moving contact is at least 5:1, preferably at least 10:1, and that the cooled contact part is provided, at the end away from the contact area, with means for increasing the area, for example cooling fins and is connected to the coil end has a thermal resistance between the contact area and the coil end of at least 0.2 k/W, preferably at least 0.5 k/W per 1000 A of current to be transmitted. (orig.) [de

  14. Compact stellarator coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Berry, L.A.; Boozer, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental devices to study the physics of high-beta (β>∼4%), low aspect ratio (A<∼4.5) stellarator plasmas require coils that will produce plasmas satisfying a set of physics goals, provide experimental flexibility, and be practical to construct. In the course of designing a flexible coil set for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment, we have made several innovations that may be useful in future stellarator design efforts. These include: the use of Singular Value Decomposition methods for obtaining families of smooth current potentials on distant coil winding surfaces from which low current density solutions may be identified; the use of a Control Matrix Method for identifying which few of the many detailed elements of the stellarator boundary must be targeted if a coil set is to provide fields to control the essential physics of the plasma; the use of Genetic Algorithms for choosing an optimal set of discrete coils from a continuum of potential contours; the evaluation of alternate coil topologies for balancing the tradeoff between physics objective and engineering constraints; the development of a new coil optimization code for designing modular coils, and the identification of a 'natural' basis for describing current sheet distributions. (author)

  15. Liquid rope coiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribe, N.M.; Habibi, M.; Bonn, D.

    2012-01-01

    A thin stream or rope of viscous fluid falling from a sufficient height onto a surface forms a steadily rotating helical coil. Tabletop laboratory experiments in combination with a numerical model for slender liquid ropes reveal that finite-amplitude coiling can occur in four distinct regimes

  16. Molecular basis of coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Barbara; Bjelic, Saša; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jawhari, Hatim; Jaussi, Rolf; Payapilly, Aishwarya; Jowitt, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Kammerer, Richard A

    2010-11-16

    Coiled coils are extensively and successfully used nowadays to rationally design multistranded structures for applications, including basic research, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and medicine. The wide range of applications as well as the important functions these structures play in almost all biological processes highlight the need for a detailed understanding of the factors that control coiled-coil folding and oligomerization. Here, we address the important and unresolved question why the presence of particular oligomerization-state determinants within a coiled coil does frequently not correlate with its topology. We found an unexpected, general link between coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity and trigger sequences, elements that are indispensable for coiled-coil formation. By using the archetype coiled-coil domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 as a model system, we show that well-established trimer-specific oligomerization-state determinants switch the peptide's topology from a dimer to a trimer only when inserted into the trigger sequence. We successfully confirmed our results in two other, unrelated coiled-coil dimers, ATF1 and cortexillin-1. We furthermore show that multiple topology determinants can coexist in the same trigger sequence, revealing a delicate balance of the resulting oligomerization state by position-dependent forces. Our experimental results should significantly improve the prediction of the oligomerization state of coiled coils. They therefore should have major implications for the rational design of coiled coils and consequently many applications using these popular oligomerization domains.

  17. Narrow Line Cooling of 88Sr Atoms in the Magneto-optical Trap for Precision Frequency Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelkin, S. A.; Galyshev, A. A.; Berdasov, O. I.; Gribov, A. Yu.; Sutyrin, D. V.; Khabarova, K. Yu.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Slyusarev, S. N.

    We report on our progress toward the realization of a Strontium optical lattice clock, which is under development at VNIIFTRI as a part of GLONASS program. We've prepared the narrow line width laser system for secondary cooling of 88Sr atoms which allows us to reach atom cloud temperature below 3 μK after second cooling stage.

  18. Effect of temperature on the orthodontic clinical applications of niti closed-coil springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinar-Escalona, Eduardo; Llamas-Carreras, José M.; Barrera-Mora, José M.; Abalos-Lasbrucci, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    NiTi spring coils were used to obtain large deformation under a constant force. The device consists on a NiTi coil spring, superelastic at body temperature, in order to have a stress plateau during the austenitic retransformation during the unloading. The temperature variations induced changes in the spring force. Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the temperature variations in the spring forces and corrosion behaviour simulating the ingestion hot/cold drinks and food. Study Design: The springs were subjected to a tensile force using universal testing machine MTS-Adamel (100 N load cell). All tests were performed in artificial saliva maintained at different temperatures. The corrosion tests were performed according to the ISO-standard 10993-15:2000. Results: The increase in temperature of 18oC induced an increase in the spring force of 30%. However, when the temperature returns to 37oC the distraction force recovers near the initial level. After cooling down the spring to 15oC, the force decreased by 46%. This investigation show as the temperature increase, the corrosion potential shifts towards negative values and the corrosion density is rising. Conclusions: The changes of the temperatures do not modify the superelastic behaviour of the NiTi closed-coil springs. The corrosion potential of NiTi in artificial saliva is decreasing by the rise of the temperatures. Key words:Superelasticity, NiTi, springs, orthodontic, coils, recovery, temperature. PMID:23722142

  19. Design of the dummy coil for magnet power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang-Hwan; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Jin, Jong-Kook; Lee, Dong-Keun; Kong, Jong-Dea; Joung, Nam-Young; Kim, Sang-Tae; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Yang-Soo; Kwon, Myeun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • It is necessary to confirm safety of the MPS on a dummy coil before the operating it. • We selected and designed the water cooling type dummy coil to test on the MPS's rating (12.5 kA) test. • For the design of the dummy coil, we considered requirements about electrical, structural and water cooling. • We will test as the rating power after MPS upgrade and that test will do before every KSTAR campaign. -- Abstract: It is necessary to test it on a dummy coil, before using a magnet power supply (MPS) to energize a Poloidal Field (PF) coil in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The dummy coil should accept the same large current from the MPS as the PF coil and be within the capability of the utilities located at the KSTAR site. Therefore a coil design based on the characteristics of the MPS and other restrictive conditions needed to be made. There are three requirements to be met in the design: an electrical requirement, a structural requirement, and a water cooling requirement. The electrical requirement was that the coil should have an inductance of 40 mH. For the structural requirement, the material should be non magnetic. The coil support structure and water cooling manifold were made of SUS 304. The water cooling requirement was that there should be sufficient flow rate so that the temperature rise ΔT should not exceed 12 °C for operation at 12.5 kA for 5 min. Square cross-section hollow conductor with dimensions of 38.1 mm × 38.1 mm was used with a 25.4 mm center hole for cooling water. However, as a result of tests, it was found that the electrical and structural requirements were satisfied but that the water cooling was over designed. It is imperative that the verification will be redone for a test with 12.5 kA for 5 min

  20. Design of the dummy coil for magnet power supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: kch2004@nfri.re.kr; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Jin, Jong-Kook; Lee, Dong-Keun; Kong, Jong-Dea; Joung, Nam-Young; Kim, Sang-Tae; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Yang-Soo; Kwon, Myeun

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • It is necessary to confirm safety of the MPS on a dummy coil before the operating it. • We selected and designed the water cooling type dummy coil to test on the MPS's rating (12.5 kA) test. • For the design of the dummy coil, we considered requirements about electrical, structural and water cooling. • We will test as the rating power after MPS upgrade and that test will do before every KSTAR campaign. -- Abstract: It is necessary to test it on a dummy coil, before using a magnet power supply (MPS) to energize a Poloidal Field (PF) coil in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The dummy coil should accept the same large current from the MPS as the PF coil and be within the capability of the utilities located at the KSTAR site. Therefore a coil design based on the characteristics of the MPS and other restrictive conditions needed to be made. There are three requirements to be met in the design: an electrical requirement, a structural requirement, and a water cooling requirement. The electrical requirement was that the coil should have an inductance of 40 mH. For the structural requirement, the material should be non magnetic. The coil support structure and water cooling manifold were made of SUS 304. The water cooling requirement was that there should be sufficient flow rate so that the temperature rise ΔT should not exceed 12 °C for operation at 12.5 kA for 5 min. Square cross-section hollow conductor with dimensions of 38.1 mm × 38.1 mm was used with a 25.4 mm center hole for cooling water. However, as a result of tests, it was found that the electrical and structural requirements were satisfied but that the water cooling was over designed. It is imperative that the verification will be redone for a test with 12.5 kA for 5 min.

  1. Commercial applications for COIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Wayne C.; Carroll, David L.; King, D. M.; Fockler, L. A.; Stromberg, D. S.; Sexauer, M.; Milmoe, A.; Sentman, Lee H.

    2000-01-01

    The chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is a high power, fiber deliverable tool, which can be used for a number of different industrial applications. COIL is of particular interest because of its short fiber deliverable wavelength, high scaleable continuous wave power, and excellent material interaction properties. In past research the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign identified and decommissioning and decontamination (DD) of nuclear facilities as a primary focus for COIL technology. DD will be a major challenge in the coming decades. The use of a robotically driven fiber delivered cutting/ablation tool in contaminated areas promises to lower risks to workers for the DD mission. Further, the high cutting speed of COIL will significantly reduce the time required to cut contaminated equipment, reducing costs. The high power of COIL will permit the dismantling of thick stacks of piping and equipment as well as reactor vessels. COIL is very promising for the removal of material from contaminated surfaces, perhaps to depths thicker than an inch. Laser cutting and ablation minimizes dust and fumes, which reduces the required number of high efficiency particulate accumulator filters, thus reducing costly waste disposal. Other potential industrial applications for COIL are shipbuilding, automotive manufacturing, heavy machinery manufacturing, tasks requiring underwater cutting or welding, and there appear to be very promising applications for high powers lasers in the oil industry.

  2. Open coil traction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibhute, Pavankumar Janardan

    2012-01-01

    Sliding mechanics have become a popular method for space closure, with the development of preadjusted edgewise appliances. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and extensively evaluated for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness is enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low load deflection rate/force decay. With the advent of nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) springs in orthodontics, load deflection rates have been markedly reduced. To use Ni-Ti springs, clinicians have to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. The open coil traction system, or open coil retraction spring, is developed utilizing Ni-Ti open coil springs for orthodontic space closure. This article describes the fabrication and clinical application of the open coil traction system, which has a number of advantages. It sustains a low load deflection rate with optimum force magnitude, and its design is adjustable for a desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (ie, it cannot be overactivated, and the decompression limit of the open coil is controlled by the operator). The open coil traction system can be offset from the mucosa to help reduce soft tissue impingement.

  3. Split-coil-system SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecsey, G.

    1992-08-01

    The high field superconductor test facility SULTAN started operation successfully in May 1992. Originally designed for testing full scale conductors for the large magnets of the next generation fusion reactors, the SULTAN facility installed at PSI (Switzerland) was designed as a common venture of three European Laboratories: ENEA (Italy), ECN (Netherlands) and PSI, and built by ENEA and PSI in the framework of the Euratom Fusion Technology Program. Presently the largest facility in the world, with its superconducting split coil system generating 11 Tesla in a 0.6 m bore, it is ready now for testing superconductor samples with currents up to 50 kA at variable cooling conditions. Similar tests can be arranged also for other applications. SULTAN is offered by the European Community as a contribution to the worldwide cooperation for the next step of fusion reactor development ITER. First measurements on conductor developed by CEA (Cadarache) are now in progress. Others like those of ENEA and CERN will follow. For 1993, a test of an Italian 12 TZ model coil for fusion application is planned. SULTAN is a worldwide unique facility marking the competitive presence of Swiss technology in the field of applied superconductivity research. Based on development and design of PSI, the high field Nb 3 Sn superconductors and coils were fabricated at the works of Kabelwerke Brugg and ABB, numerous Swiss companies contributed to the success of this international effort. Financing of the Swiss contribution of SULTAN was made available by NEFF, BEW, BBW, PSI and EURATOM. (author) figs., tabs., 20 refs

  4. Coil spring venting arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCugh, R.M.

    1975-01-01

    A simple venting device for trapped gas pockets in hydraulic systems is inserted through a small access passages, operated remotely, and removed completely. The device comprises a small diameter, closely wound coil spring which is pushed through a guide temporarily inserted in the access passage. The guide has a central passageway which directs the coil spring radially upward into the pocket, so that, with the guide properly positioned for depth and properly oriented, the coil spring can be pushed up into the top of the pocket to vent it. By positioning a seal around the free end of the guide, the spring and guide are removed and the passage is sealed

  5. Quench detector for large pulsed coils and quench analysis for the LASL/Westinghouse 20 MJ coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennessy, M.J.; Heintz, A.W.; Eckels, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    A detection scheme has been devised for use in the test of the 20 Mj Induction Heating Coil. This scheme allows the sensing of plus or minus voltages less than 320 mv resistive in magnitude in coils which will have inductive voltage components as high as /plus or minus/2.5 kv. The network which achieves this sensitivity is stable to less than 12.8 ppm. This method adopted involves the bucking out of the inductive voltage with two secondary co-wound flux sensing coils tapped at locations adjacent to voltage taps in the main superconducting coil. The detection scheme is recommended if large ripple or control voltages exist subsequent to the coil pulse. The most severe event which might quench the coil and/or damage the winding is exposure of the coil to gaseous cooling through lack of proper liquid level control. The detection scheme will protect the coil against this and other abnormal conditions that could damage the coil

  6. Superconducting Coil of Po Dipole

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The Po superconducting dipole was built as a prototype beam transport magnet for the SPS extracted proton beam P0. Its main features were: coil aperture 72 mm, length 5 m, room-temperature yoke, NbTi cable conductor impregnated with solder, nominal field 4.2 T at 4.7 K (87% of critical field). It reached its nominal field without any quench.After this successful test up to its nominal field of 4.2 T, the power was not raised to reach a quench. The magnet was not installed in a beam and had no other further use. Nevertheless its construction provided knowledges and experience which became useful in the design and construction of the LHC magnets. The photo shows a detail of the inner layer winding before superposing the outer layer to form the complete coil of a pole. Worth noticing is the interleaved glass-epoxy sheet (white) with grooved channels for the flow of cooling helium. See also 8211532X.

  7. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Transporting the coil to the heating table using a special lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia in preparation for the 'bladderisation' operation.

  8. Extending the self-assembly of coiled-coil hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robson Marsden, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Of the various biomolecular building blocks in use in nature, coiled-coil forming peptides are amongst those with the most potential as building blocks for the synthetic self-assembly of nanostructures. Native coiled coils have the ability to function in, and influence, complex systems composed of

  9. A periodic table of coiled-coil protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N

    2009-01-23

    Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more alpha-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils," which we have made available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus/search/periodic_table. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of alpha-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

  10. Resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1980-11-01

    This paper analyzes the optimization of the geometry of resistive TF coils of rectangular bore for tokamak fusion test reactors and practical neutron generators. In examining the trade-offs between geometric parameters and magnetic field for reactors giving a specified neutron wall loading, either the resistive power loss or the lifetime coil cost can be minimized. Aspects of cooling, magnetic stress, and construction are addressed for several reference designs. Bending moment distributions in closed form have been derived for rectangular coils on the basis of the theory of rigid frames. Candidate methods of fabrication and of implementing demountable joints are summarized

  11. LHC bending magnet coil

    CERN Multimedia

    A short test version of coil of wire used for the LHC dipole magnets. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. Magnet coils are made of copper-clad niobium–titanium cables — each wire in the cable consists of 9’000 niobium–titanium filaments ten times finer than a hair.

  12. Borehole induction coil transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Gale; Wilt, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A borehole induction coil transmitter which is a part of a cross-borehole electromagnetic field system that is used for underground imaging applications. The transmitter consists of four major parts: 1) a wound ferrite or mu-metal core, 2) an array of tuning capacitors, 3) a current driver circuit board, and 4) a flux monitor. The core is wound with several hundred turns of wire and connected in series with the capacitor array, to produce a tuned coil. This tuned coil uses internal circuitry to generate sinusoidal signals that are transmitted through the earth to a receiver coil in another borehole. The transmitter can operate at frequencies from 1-200 kHz and supplies sufficient power to permit the field system to operate in boreholes separated by up to 400 meters.

  13. Measured Strain of Nb3Sn Coils During Excitation and Quench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, S.; Bartlett, S.E.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Hafalia, A.R.; Lietzke, S.; Mattafirri, M.; Nyman, M.; Sabbi, G.

    2005-01-01

    The strain in a high field Nb 3 Sn coil was measured during magnet assembly, cool-down, excitation and spot heater quenches. Strain was measured with a full bridge strain gauge mounted directly over the turns and impregnated with the coil. Two such coils were placed in a ''common coil'' fashion capable of reaching 11T at 4.2K. The measured steady state strain in the coil is compared with results obtained using the FEM code ANSYS. During quenches, the transient strain (due to temperature rise) was also measured and compared with the calculated mechanical time response to a quench

  14. Levitation experiment using a high-temperature superconductor coil for a plasma confinement device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Junji; Ogawa, Yuichi [Tokyo Univ., High Temperature Plasma Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ozawa, Daisaku [Tokyo Univ., School of Engineering, Tokyo (Japan); Yanagi, Nagato; Hamaguchi, Sinji; Mito, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    Levitation experiments using a high-temperature superconductor coil have been carried out. A coil with a minor radius of 42 mm was fabricated with a Bi-2223 tape conductor, and immersed in the liquid nitrogen. The coil current was induced by the field-cooling method up to the critical current value. The current decay of the coil can be accounted for by the flux flow resistance and the normal resistance at the lap joint. The high-temperature superconductor coil can be levitated for 4 min or more within an accuracy of 25-30 {mu}m. (author)

  15. Levitation experiment using a high-temperature superconductor coil for a plasma confinement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, Junji; Ogawa, Yuichi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Yanagi, Nagato; Hamaguchi, Sinji; Mito, Toshiyuki

    2001-01-01

    Levitation experiments using a high-temperature superconductor coil have been carried out. A coil with a minor radius of 42 mm was fabricated with a Bi-2223 tape conductor, and immersed in the liquid nitrogen. The coil current was induced by the field-cooling method up to the critical current value. The current decay of the coil can be accounted for by the flux flow resistance and the normal resistance at the lap joint. The high-temperature superconductor coil can be levitated for 4 min or more within an accuracy of 25-30 μm. (author)

  16. Levitation Experiment Using a High-Temperature Superconductor Coil for a Plasma Confinement Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Junji; Ozawa, Daisaku; Ogawa, Yuichi; Yanagi, Nagato; Hamaguchi, Sinji; Mito, Toshiyuki

    2001-10-01

    Levitation experiments using a high-temperature superconductor coil have been carried out. A coil with a minor radius of 42 mm was fabricated with a Bi-2223 tape conductor, and immersed in the liquid nitrogen. The coil current was induced by the field-cooling method up to the critical current value. The current decay of the coil can be accounted for by the flux flow resistance and the normal resistance at the lap joint. The high-temperature superconductor coil can be levitated for 4 min or more within an accuracy of 25-30 μm.

  17. Proposed Advanced Reactor Adaptation of the Standard Review Plan NUREG-0800 Chapter 4 (Reactor) for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors and Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Poore, III, Willis P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Flanagan, George F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Moe, Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sofu, Tanju [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This report proposes adaptation of the previous regulatory gap analysis in Chapter 4 (Reactor) of NUREG 0800, Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR [Light Water Reactor] Edition. The proposed adaptation would result in a Chapter 4 review plan applicable to certain advanced reactors. This report addresses two technologies: the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (mHTGR). SRP Chapter 4, which addresses reactor components, was selected for adaptation because of the possible significant differences in advanced non-light water reactor (non-LWR) technologies compared with the current LWR-based description in Chapter 4. SFR and mHTGR technologies were chosen for this gap analysis because of their diverse designs and the availability of significant historical design detail.

  18. On modular stellarator reactor coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, F.; Harmeyer, E.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H.

    1985-01-01

    Modular twisted coils are discussed which produce magnetic fields of the Advanced Stellarator WENDELSTEIN VII-AS type. Reducing the number coils/FP offers advantage for maintenance of coils, but increases the magnetic ripple and B m /B o . Computation of force densities within the coils of ASR and ASB yield local maximum values of about 80 and 180 MN/m 3 , respectively. A system of mutual coil support is being developed. Twisted coils in helical arrangement provide a reactor-sized HELIAC system. In order to reduce the magnetic ripple, a large number of 14 coils/FP in special arrangement is used

  19. Coil protection calculator for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsala, R.J.; Woolley, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new coil protection calculator (CPC) is presented in this paper. It is now being developed for TFTR's magnetic field coils will replace the existing coil fault detector. The existing fault detector sacrifices TFTR operating capability for simplicity. The new CPC will permit operation up to the actual coil limits by accurately and continuously computing coil parameters in real-time. The improvement will allow TFTR to operate with higher plasma currents and will permit the optimization of pulse repetition rates

  20. Coil-springs used as mechanical filter. Modification of the bottom tie plate of a fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nylund, O.

    1993-01-01

    Describes an improved design of the bottom tie plate of a fuel assembly. The improvement of the design is an arrangement of horizontal channels holding coil-springs and crossing the vertical channels for the cooling water. The coil-springs work as strainers for the cooling water

  1. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Use of the overhead travelling crane to hoist the coil up and then tilt it over, the coil frame's metal feet being used as rotational pivots, supporting half the coil's weight. Once it has been turned over, the coil, now with only half the frame, is transported to the heating table using a special lifting gant...

  2. Proposals for cold testing of the ITER TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libeyre, P.; Ciazynski, D.; Dolgetta, N.; Duchateau, J.L.; Lyraud, C.; Kircher, F.; Schild, T.; Fietz, W.H.; Zahn, G.

    2005-01-01

    The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system will be made of 18 coils using Nb 3 Sn as superconducting material. These coils will operate at a maximum field of 11.8 T for a nominal current of 68 kA carried by a dual channel cable-in-conduit conductor cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium at 4.5 K. In each coil, seven 760 m conductor lengths wound in double pancakes will be connected to each other by low resistance joints. As a final step of the reception tests, it is proposed to perform cold tests of these coils at liquid helium temperature after completion of their manufacture. The testing shall include high voltage tests to check the quality of the insulation, leak tests and pressure drop measurements of the hydraulic circuits as well as measurement of the joint resistances. Testing the coils up to nominal current is a discussed option, addressing on one hand measurement of the electrical performances in self field and on the other hand the mechanical behaviour of the coils. To perform these tests, a dedicated test facility has to be built, allowing possible simultaneous testing of two coils, assembled together in a twin coil configuration, similarly to their assembly in the torus. (authors)

  3. NET model coil test possibilities in the TOSKA TWIN configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenhagen, A.; Heller, R.; Herz, W.; Hofmann, A.; Jentzsch, K.; Kapulla, H.; Kneifel, B.; Komarek, P.; Lehmann, W.; Maurer, W.; Ulbricht, A.; Vogt, A.; Zahn, G.

    1989-07-01

    This report continues an earlier one on the possibilities of NET model coil testing in the TOSKA Upgrade facility at KfK. The investigation of a 'Cluster Test Facility' and a 'Solenoid Test Facility' is followed by the investigation of two further test arrangements. They are called 'Twin Configurations'. One common feature of both arrangements is that the EURATOM-LCT-coil delivers a background magnetic field. This coil should be operated at a temperature of 1.8 K and an enhanced current up to 20 kA compared to the LCT test where 3.5 K and up to 16 kA were the operating conditions. In one configuration the NET model test coil is adjacent to the LCT coil (ATC = Adjacent Twin Configuration), in the other one the NET model coil is inserted into the bore of LCT coil (ITC = Inserted Twin Configuration) either upright or with a 60 0 C slope. The configurations are investigated with respect to their electromagnetic mechanical and thermo-hydraulic properties. The requirements for the necessary mechanical support structure of the LCT coil were computed. Installation and cooling of the whole system were discussed. The time schedule and the costs for the test facility modification were estimated. Advantages and disadvantages for the configurations were discussed with respect to feasibility of the test arrangement and operation. (orig.) [de

  4. Proposals for cold testing of the ITER TF coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libeyre, P.; Ciazynski, D.; Dolgetta, N.; Duchateau, J.L.; Lyraud, C. [Association Euratom/CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Kircher, F.; Schild, T. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Fietz, W.H.; Zahn, G. [Association Euratom-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) magnet system will be made of 18 coils using Nb{sub 3}Sn as superconducting material. These coils will operate at a maximum field of 11.8 T for a nominal current of 68 kA carried by a dual channel cable-in-conduit conductor cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium at 4.5 K. In each coil, seven 760 m conductor lengths wound in double pancakes will be connected to each other by low resistance joints. As a final step of the reception tests, it is proposed to perform cold tests of these coils at liquid helium temperature after completion of their manufacture. The testing shall include high voltage tests to check the quality of the insulation, leak tests and pressure drop measurements of the hydraulic circuits as well as measurement of the joint resistances. Testing the coils up to nominal current is a discussed option, addressing on one hand measurement of the electrical performances in self field and on the other hand the mechanical behaviour of the coils. To perform these tests, a dedicated test facility has to be built, allowing possible simultaneous testing of two coils, assembled together in a twin coil configuration, similarly to their assembly in the torus. (authors)

  5. Thermal and Mechanical Performance of the First MICE Coupling Coil and the Fermilab Solenoid Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, Roger [Fermilab; Carcagno, Ruben [Fermilab; Caspi, Shlomo [LBNL, Berkeley; DeMello, Allan [LBNL, Berkeley; Kokoska, Lidija [Fermilab; Orris, D. [Fermilab; Pan, Heng [LBNL, Berkeley; Sylvester, Cosmore [Fermilab; Tartaglia, Michael

    2014-11-06

    The first coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has been tested in a conduction-cooled environment at the Solenoid Test Facility at Fermilab. An overview of the thermal and mechanical performance of the magnet and the test stand during cool-down and power testing of the magnet is presented.

  6. An automated coil winding machine for the SSC dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, S.; Iwase, T.; Inoue, I.; Fukui, I.; Ishida, K.; Kashiwagi, S.; Sato, Y.; Yoshihara, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Johnson, E.; Gibson, C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have finished the preliminary design of a fully automated coil winding machine that can be used to manufacture the large number of SSC dipole magnets. The machine aims to perform all coil winding operations including coil parts inserting without human operators at a high productive rate. The machine is composed of five industrial robots. In order to verify the design, they built a small winding machine using an industrial robot and successfully wound a 1 meter long coil using SSC dipole magnet wire. The basic design for the full length coil and the robot winding technique are described in this paper. A fully automated coil winding machine using standard industrial components would be very useful if duplicate production lines are used. 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Effects of insulation on potted superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeller, A.F.; DeKamp, J.C.; Magsig, C.T.; Nolen, J.A.; McInturff, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    Test coils using identical wire but with either Formvar or Polyesterimid insulation were fabricated to determine the effects of insulation on training behavior. It was found that the type of insulation did not affect the training behavior. While considerable attention has been paid to epoxy formulations used for superconducting coils, little study has been devoted to the effects of the wire insulation on training behavior. If the insulation does not bind well with the epoxy, the wires will not be held securely in place, and training will be required to make the coil operate at its design limit. In fact, the coil may never reach its design current, showing considerable degredation. Conversely, if the epoxy-insulation reaction is to soften or weaken the insulation, then shorts and/or training may result. The authors have undertaken a study of the effects of the insulation on potted coils wet wound with Stycast 2850 FT epoxy. The wire was insulated with one of two insulting varnishes: Formvar (a polyvinyl formal resin) or Polyesterimid (a phenolic resin). Formvar is the standard insulation in the United States while Polyesterimid the European standard

  8. Split coil made of (RE)BCO pancake coils for IC(B) anisotropy measurements of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolek, L; Pardo, E; Gömöry, F; Šouc, J; Pitel, J

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the I c (B) anisotropy is standard characterization of superconducting tapes, wires or cables. This contribution presents a split coil consisting on two superconducting pancake coils in order to generate the magnetic field necessary for this kind of measurement. Both coils were made using (RE)BCO – based second generation (2G) coated conductor tape with cross section 0.1 mm × 12 mm. The individual turns of the tape were insulated by a fiberglass tape without impregnation. These coils have identical inner and outer diameter and number of turns. Their inner and outer diameters are 50 mm and 80 mm, respectively, and they have 62 turns. The length of conductor in each coil is approximately 13 m. The distance between both pancake coils is 22 mm. Individual coils and the complete split coil were characterized in liquid nitrogen bath. Their parameters, like the critical currents, E(I) characteristics and magnetic field of complete split coil, were measured and interpreted. The split coil can be used up to magnetic fields of 210 mT. The length between the potential taps on the sample can be up to 20 mm, while the magnetic field decrease is lower than 1% on this length.

  9. Superconducting coil protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    The protection system is based on a two-phase construction program. Phase I is the development of a reliable hardwired relay control system with a digital loop utilizing firmware and a microprocessor controller. Phase II is an expansion of the digital loop to include many heretofore unmonitored coil variables. These new monitored variables will be utilized to establish early quench detection and to formulate confirmation techniques of the quench detection mechanism. Established quench detection methods are discussed and a new approach to quench detection is presented. The new circuit is insensitive to external pulsed magnetic fields and the associated induced voltages. Reliability aspects of the coil protection system are discussed with respect to shutdowns of superconducting coil systems. Redundance and digital system methods are presented as related topics

  10. 46 CFR 153.434 - Heat transfer coils within a tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heat transfer coils within a tank. 153.434 Section 153... Cargo Temperature Control Systems § 153.434 Heat transfer coils within a tank. When a cargo tank... the heat transfer fluid at a pressure greater than the pressure exerted on the heating or cooling...

  11. Construction and assembling of the trim coils for the Milan superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baccaglioni, G.; Cartegni, G.C.; Fusetti, M.; Gini, L.; Grilli, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the main characteristics of the trim coils realized for the heavy ions superconducting cyclotron under construction at the Milan University. The guidelines in the choice of the conductor size, of the insulation and cooling parameters are discussed in some details. The main operations in the coils construction, as winding, impregnation, electrical tests and assembling, are described

  12. NET model coil test possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, J.; Gruenhagen, A.; Herz, W.; Jentzsch, K.; Komarek, P.; Lotz, E.; Malang, S.; Maurer, W.; Noether, G.; Ulbricht, A.; Vogt, A.; Zahn, G.; Horvath, I.; Kwasnitza, K.; Marinucci, C.; Pasztor, G.; Sborchia, C.; Weymuth, P.; Peters, A.; Roeterdink, A.

    1987-11-01

    A single full size coil for NET/INTOR represents an investment of the order of 40 MUC (Million Unit Costs). Before such an amount of money or even more for the 16 TF coils is invested as much risks as possible must be eliminated by a comprehensive development programme. In the course of such a programme a coil technology verification test should finally prove the feasibility of NET/INTOR TF coils. This study report is almost exclusively dealing with such a verification test by model coil testing. These coils will be built out of two Nb 3 Sn-conductors based on two concepts already under development and investigation. Two possible coil arrangements are discussed: A cluster facility, where two model coils out of the two Nb 3 TF-conductors are used, and the already tested LCT-coils producing a background field. A solenoid arrangement, where in addition to the two TF model coils another model coil out of a PF-conductor for the central PF-coils of NET/INTOR is used instead of LCT background coils. Technical advantages and disadvantages are worked out in order to compare and judge both facilities. Costs estimates and the time schedules broaden the base for a decision about the realisation of such a facility. (orig.) [de

  13. Development work for the Japanese LCT coil and its design and construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Susumu; Ando, Toshinari; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Yasukochi, Ko

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes design, verification tests, and construction of the Japanese test coil for the Large Coil Task (LCT). Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) signed on the LCT international agreement under the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 1978, and since then JAERI has been working to develop the Japanese LCT coil to explore the problems of design and construction of tokamak toroidal coil. Based on the common requirements of the LCT, the Japanese LCT coil was designed to be a pool-cooled NbTi fully-stabilized coil whose operating current is 10,220 A at 8 T. Through research and development of the Japanese LCT coil, new advances in the super-conducting coil technology were obtained, such as mechanically and chemically treated conductor surface that has high heat transfer about four times as much as usual ones, nitrogen-strengthened stainless steel that has the yield strength twice as much as usual stainless steel, NbTi filaments those have the critical current density twice as much as those before LCT, and so on. These advances have enabled to construct the Japanese LCT coil and it was completed in the spring of 1982. During the construction of the coil, new fabrication techniques were obtained to wind large current conductor into a mechanically rigid coil and thus to construct a totally stable large coil. (author)

  14. Epoxy resin casting of trim coils for superconducting cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajra, D.P.; Sarkar, S.C.; Saha, Subimal; Chaudhuri, J.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2006-01-01

    The life of any magnet depends on the soundness of the coil insulation, its aging properties and initial and final endurance limitations. The insulation of water-cooled trim coils for superconducting cyclotron is made of glass fibre tape with heat cured unfilled epoxy resin combination. This type of insulation has been selected to achieve excellent stability against thermal and electromagnetic stresses, tight dimensional control, good dielectric strength, non-hygroscopic and considerably low vapour-pressure as it will be inside rough vacuum. The process development and the difficulties encountered for appropriate selection of epoxy resin combination, potting, vacuum process, curing cycle, control of coil dimension to achieve a sound coil absolutely free from cracks, trapped air and voids has been discussed. (author)

  15. Thermal results of the Japanese LCT coil's domestic test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Eisuke; Hiyama, Tadao; Kato, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes thermal results obtained in the domestic test of the Japanese LCT coil which was constructed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in order to develop large superconducting coils for fusion in international collaboration proposed by the IEA. The domestic test was carried out from May 13 to June 17 in 1982 by using the test facility named as SETF (Superconducting Engineering Test Facility) which was composed of a 350-l/h helium cryogenic system, a vacuum system, a 30 KA-DC power supply and protection system, and a PDP-11/70 computer system. The cool-down characteristics, heat load, fast discharge characteristics, stability, and warm-up characteristics of the LCT coil were successfully measured in the test. The details of thermal test results acquired in the cool-down, heat load measurement, fast discharge, and warm-up, and the comparison between measurements and calculations are described in this paper. (author)

  16. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a novel REBCO coil structure which applies thermoplastic resin. • The thermoplastic resin bonds the coil winding and cooling plates. • The adhesiveness of the resin is strong enough to withstand the thermal stress. • The thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation because of its high viscosity. • We successfully made a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil with the thermoplastic resin. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40–50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  17. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi, E-mail: mizuno.katsutoshi.14@rtri.or.jp; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We propose a novel REBCO coil structure which applies thermoplastic resin. • The thermoplastic resin bonds the coil winding and cooling plates. • The adhesiveness of the resin is strong enough to withstand the thermal stress. • The thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation because of its high viscosity. • We successfully made a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil with the thermoplastic resin. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40–50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  18. Electrical and Quench Performance of the First MICE Coupling Coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tartaglia, M. A.; Carcagno, R.; Makulski, A.; Nogiec, Jerzy; Orris, D.; Pilipenko, R.; Sylvester, C.; Caspi, S.; Pan, H.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.

    2014-01-01

    The first MICE Coupling Coil has been tested in a conduction-cooled environment in the new Solenoid Test Facility at Fermilab. We present an overview of the power and quench protection scheme, and report on the electrical and quench performance results obtained during cold power tests of the magnet

  19. Manufacturing Development of the NCSX Modular Coil Windings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrzanowski, JH; Fogarty, PJ; Heitzenroeder, PJ; Meighan, T.; Nelson, B.; Raftopoulos, S.; Williamson, D.

    2005-01-01

    The modular coils on the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) present a number of significant engineering challenges due to their complex shapes, requirements for high dimensional accuracy and the high current density required in the modular coils due to space constraints. In order to address these challenges, an R and D program was established to develop the conductor, insulation scheme, manufacturing techniques, and procedures. A prototype winding named Twisted Racetrack Coil (TRC) was of particular importance in dealing with these challenges. The TRC included a complex shaped winding form, conductor, insulation scheme, leads and termination, cooling system and coil clamps typical of the modular coil design. Even though the TRC is smaller in size than a modular coil, its similar complex geometry provided invaluable information in developing the final design, metrology techniques and development of manufacturing procedures. In addition a discussion of the development of the copper rope conductor including ''Keystoning'' concerns; the epoxy impregnation system (VPI) plus the tooling and equipment required to manufacture the modular coils will be presented

  20. Test of a model coil of TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.; Claudet, G.; Disdier, F.; Hamelin, J.; Libeyre, P.; Mayaux, C.; Meuris, C.; Parain, J.; Torossian, A.

    1980-10-01

    Inside the qualifying test programme, supporting the 'Tore Supra' Tokamak design, a reduced scale model of coil was fabricated by an industrial firm and fully tested. This model coil is provided with the same features as those retained for the complete magnet and is built according to the same design; in particular the Nb-Ti mixed matrix monolithic conductor is cooled by a pressurized superfluid helium bath, supplied from a model of the envisaged complete cryogenic system. Three main objectives have been assigned to this test: operation of the cryogenic system, stability of the superconductor winding under high mechanical stresses, mainly shear, and simulation of coil quench conditions. For this purpose, the model coil (outside bore 0.8 m) is located inside a 4 T magnet, an hydraulic jack applies a 1 MN force along a coil diameter. Operation of the model coil has been found highly stable, under the conditions of applied field and forces, a coil transition can be induced by an electrical heater only when the superfluid bath temperature is close to Tlambda. The 1.8 K cryogenic system provides a useful calorimetric measure of total losses induced inside the winding; its operation has been quite simple and reliable, permitting a sure extrapolation to a much larger size

  1. Eccentric Coil Test Facility (ECTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, P.B.; Walstrom, P.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design of a facility for testing superconducting coils under some conditions peculiar to tokamak systems is given. A primary element of the proposed facility is a large 25 MJ background solenoid. Discussions of the mechanical structure, the stress distribution and the thermal stability for this coil are included. The systems for controlling the facility and diagnosing test coil behavior are also described

  2. Modular coils: a promising toroidal-reactor-coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.; Furth, H.P.; Johnson, J.L.; Ludescher, C.; Weimer, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    The concept of modular coils originated from a need to find reactor-relevant stellarator windings, but its usefulness can be extended to provide an externally applied, additional rotational transform in tokamaks. Considerations of (1) basic principles of modular coils, (2) types of coils, (3) types of configurations (general, helically symmetric, helically asymmetric, with magnetic well, with magnetic hill), (4) types of rotational transform profile, and (5) structure and origin of ripples are given. These results show that modular coils can offer a wide range of vacuum magnetic field configurations, some of which cannot be obtained with the classical stellarator or torsatron coil configuration

  3. Design of the outer poloidal field coils for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sborchia, C.; Mitchell, N.; Yoshida, K.

    1995-01-01

    The ITER poloidal field (PF) system consists of a central solenoid (CS or PF-1), which is not subject of this paper, and six ring coils using a 40 kA forced flow cooled superconductor. The coils, placed around the toroidal field (TF) system, are used to start-up the plasma with typical ramp-up times of 100 s and burn duration of 1000 s. They also provide control and shaping of the plasma, with small, frequent current variations on a 1-5 s time scale. The magnetic field produced by the coils ranges from about 4.5 to 8 T and the AC losses in the conductor are significant: the largest coils require cooling path lengths up to 1000 m as well as the use of 2 in-hand winding. The field level and high thermal loads make the use of Nb 3 Sn strand attractive. This paper describes the basic design of the six ring (outer) coils developed by the ITER Joint Central Team in collaboration with the four Home Teams. The coil structural material is provided by a thick conductor jacket and by a bonded insulation system. The forces acting on the coils during typical operational scenarios and plasma disruption/vertical instabilities have been evaluated: radial forces are self-reacted by hoop stresses in the ring coil, with tensile stresses up to 300 MPa in the conductor jacket, and the vertical forces are resisted by a discrete support system, with shear stresses up to 10 MPa in the insulation. (orig./WL)

  4. Cooling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.P.

    1994-01-01

    After an introduction to the general concepts of cooling of charged particle beams, some specific cooling methods are discussed, namely stochastic, electron and laser cooling. The treatment concentrates on the physical ideas of the cooling methods and only very crude derivations of cooling times are given. At the end three other proposed cooling schemes are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  5. Historical review: another 50th anniversary--new periodicities in coiled coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Markus; Lupas, Andrei N

    2003-12-01

    In 1953, Francis Crick and Linus Pauling both proposed models of supercoiled alpha helices ('coiled coils') for the structure of keratin. These were the first attempts at modelling the tertiary structure of a protein. Crick emphasized the packing mode of the side-chains ('knobs-into-holes'), which required a periodicity of seven residues over two helical turns (7/2) and a supercoil in the opposite sense of the constituent helices. By contrast, Pauling envisaged a broader set of periodicities (4/1, 7/2, 18/5, 15/4, 11/3) and supercoils of both senses. Crick's model became canonical and the 'heptad repeat' essentially synonymous with coiled coils, but 50 years later new crystal structures and protein sequences show that the less common periodicities envisaged by Pauling also occur in coiled coils, adding a variant packing mode ('knobs-to-knobs') to the standard model. Pauling's laboratory notebooks suggest that he searched unsuccessfully for this packing mode in 1953.

  6. Optimization of Coil Element Configurations for a Matrix Gradient Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroboth, Stefan; Layton, Kelvin J; Jia, Feng; Littin, Sebastian; Yu, Huijun; Hennig, Jurgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2018-01-01

    Recently, matrix gradient coils (also termed multi-coils or multi-coil arrays) were introduced for imaging and B 0 shimming with 24, 48, and even 84 coil elements. However, in imaging applications, providing one amplifier per coil element is not always feasible due to high cost and technical complexity. In this simulation study, we show that an 84-channel matrix gradient coil (head insert for brain imaging) is able to create a wide variety of field shapes even if the number of amplifiers is reduced. An optimization algorithm was implemented that obtains groups of coil elements, such that a desired target field can be created by driving each group with an amplifier. This limits the number of amplifiers to the number of coil element groups. Simulated annealing is used due to the NP-hard combinatorial nature of the given problem. A spherical harmonic basis set up to the full third order within a sphere of 20-cm diameter in the center of the coil was investigated as target fields. We show that the median normalized least squares error for all target fields is below approximately 5% for 12 or more amplifiers. At the same time, the dissipated power stays within reasonable limits. With a relatively small set of amplifiers, switches can be used to sequentially generate spherical harmonics up to third order. The costs associated with a matrix gradient coil can be lowered, which increases the practical utility of matrix gradient coils.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A CHEST FREEZER – OPTIMUM DESIGN OF AN EVAPORATOR COIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kalyani Radha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In a country such as India, food grains, fruit, vegetables, meat, poultry and fish, are very susceptible to microbial contamination and spoilage and require stringent preservation methods. One such method is by the use of a chest freezer for the storage of frozen food. This investigation considers different loads and design parameters for the development of a chest freezer using R134a as the working fluid. Experimental designs of an evaporator coil, condenser coil and capillary tube are investigated through the development of storage periods in terms of steady state and cyclic performance, by optimising the quantity of refrigerant charge, with strict adherence to the standards and requirement for maintaining an internal temperature of -23 °C at 43 °C ambient. Cyclic load performance tests optimise the performance of individual components selected for the design of a chest freezer. The system selection has a highly balanced performance with R134a and showed 118 kJ/kg cooling capacity with 8.42 coefficient of performance (COP. By the replacement of R134a, temperatures of -23 °C are maintained inside the freezer cabinet with low power consumption and an increase in the net refrigerating effect, which in turn increases the COP. The system design has optimum efficiency with moderate costs by optimising the length and diameter of the evaporator coil, i.e., 34.15 m and 7.94 mm, respectively.

  8. Experimental comparison of standard fuel cells PEM in radial configuration, coil and spiral; Comparacion experimental de celdas de combustible tipo PEM en configuracion radial, serpentin y espiral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano Andrade, Sergio

    2008-12-15

    After analyzing each one of the possible energy sources to replace oil the following question arises: which of all the possible sources is the suitable one? With no doubt another important factor in the election of this source is due to take into account, which has to do with the great problem that the humanity deals on a daily basis: the greenhouse effect. Taking into account the greenhouse effect, the fuel cells on the basis of hydrogen are the more viable energy source to substitute oil, since in their operation they are friendly with the environment since they do not produce polluting agents, reducing enormously the problem of global heating in which the planet is bottled. It is very certain that many disadvantages in these fuel cells on the basis of hydrogen still exist, but the arduous investigations realized until the present time foresee an excellent future where the planet will be able to satisfy its daily energy demand on the basis of the hydrogen technology. In future works one must have special care of the humidity control of gases before entering the fuel cell, since it is an important parameter in the correct operation of the standard fuel cells PEM. In the present investigation the advance in the state-of-the-art of the hydrogen technology is illustrated, specifically with the generation of electricity on the basis of the novel configurations of standard fuel cells PEM. Until the moment similar work it has not been found in the bibliography similar work where it is experienced with this type of radial configuration for the hydrogen technologies. The geometry and the results presented/displayed in this analysis correspond to a work of the highest category in the state-of-the-art of the fuel cells; in addition, an ample expectation due to the highly satisfactory results found, either numerically as well as experimentally, in comparison with other geometries is obtained. [Spanish] Despues de analizar cada una de las posibles fuentes de energia para

  9. Cooling water conditioning and quality control for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gootgeld, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Designers and operators of Tokamaks and all associated water cooled, peripheral equipment, are faced with the task of providing and maintaining closed-loop, low conductivity, low impurity, cooling water systems. The primary reason for supplying low conductivity water to the DIII-D vacuum vessel coils, power supplies and auxiliary heating components is to assure, along with the use of a non-conducting break in the supply piping, sufficient electrical resistance and thus an acceptable current-leakage path to ground at operating voltage potentials. As important, good quality cooling water significantly reduces the likelihood of scaling and fouling of flow passages and heat transfer surfaces. Dissolved oxygen gas removal is also required in one major DIII-D cooling water system to minimize corrosion in the ion sources of the neutral beam injectors. Currently, the combined pumping capacity of the high quality cooling water systems at DIII-D is ∼5,000 gpm. Another area that receives close attention at DIII-D is the chemical treatment of the water used in the cooling towers. This paper discusses the DIII-D water quality requirements, the means used to obtain the necessary quality and the instrumentation used for control and monitoring. Costs to mechanically and chemically condition and maintain water quality are discussed as well as the various aspects of complying with government standards and regulations

  10. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, J.; Purcell, J.

    1978-01-01

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  11. Coil development for the quasi-poloidal stellarator project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Berry, L.A.; Cole, M.J.; Fogarty, P.J.; Freudenberg, K.; Hirshman, S.P.; Lyon, J.F.; Spong, D.A.; Strickler, D.J.; Williamson, D.; Benson, R.D.; Lumsdaine, A.; Madhukar, M.; Parang, M.; Shannon, T.; Dahlgren, F.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Neilson, G.H.; Goranson, P.; Hargrove, T.; Jones, G.; Lovett, G.

    2005-01-01

    , vacuum canning studies, and fabrication of a full scale-prototype modular coil. One of the most critical issues is the cooling of the winding pack because of space constraints, variable conductor behavior, coolant effectiveness, complex electrical circuits, impregnation issues, vacuum can conductance, possibility of welding/brazing damage, and the extremely complex conductor leads interface and connection. Two possible conductor cooling concepts are being evaluated: (1) an internally cooled conductor having a copper tube filled with a Pb-Bi filler imbedded in the conductor cable to avoid crimping during winding, and (2) an externally cooled winding pack using copper cladding inboard and copper chill plates outboard of the pack. The internally cooled conductor concept is attractive due to a much more effective, active cooling of the conductor than the copper cladding/chill plates allow, resulting in up to a factor of 5 faster cooldown between shots. Issues being studied are the effect of the increased conductor stiffness on winding the coil, evacuating the filler material in the coolant tube after the initial potting step, and separating the cooling tube from the conductor at the electrical connection interface. Four- turn test coils are being tested for mechanical properties (cyclic loading for fatigue properties), thermal properties (conductivity), and tensile properties (stiffness and strength). (author)

  12. Standard Practice for Laboratory Screening of Metallic Containment Materials for Use With Liquids in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1980-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers several laboratory test procedures for evaluating corrosion performance of metallic containment materials under conditions similar to those that may occur in solar heating and cooling systems. All test results relate to the performance of the metallic containment material only as a part of a metal/fluid pair. Performance in these laboratory test procedures, taken by itself, does not necessarily constitute an adequate basis for acceptance or rejection of a particular metal/fluid pair in solar heating and cooling systems, either in general or in a particular design. This practice is not intended to preclude the use of other screening tests, particularly when those tests are designed to more closely simulate field service conditions. 1.2 This practice describes apparatus and procedures for several tests, any one or more of which may be used to evaluate the deterioration of the metallic containment material in a metal/fluid pair. The procedures are designed to permit simulation, heating...

  13. Supporting device for Toroidal coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Takao.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the response of a toroidal coil supporting device upon earthquakes and improve the earthquake proofness in a tokamak type thermonuclear device. Constitution: Structural materials having large longitudinal modulus and enduring great stresses, for example, stainless steels are used as the toroidal coil supporting legs and heat insulating structural materials are embedded in a nuclear reactor base mats below the supporting legs. Furthermore, heat insulating concretes are spiked around the heat insulating structural materials to prevent the intrusion of heat to the toroidal coils. The toroidal coils are kept at cryogenic state and superconductive state for the conductors. In this way, the period of proper vibrations of the toroidal coils and the toroidal coil supporting structures can be shortened thereby decreasing the seismic response. Furthermore, since the strength of the supporting legs is increased, the earthquake proofness of the coils can be improved. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Core/coil assembly for use in superconducting magnets and method for assembling the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassner, David A.

    1979-01-01

    A core/coil assembly for use in a superconducting magnet of the focusing or bending type used in syncronous particle accelerators comprising a coil assembly contained within an axial bore of the stacked, washer type, carbon steel laminations which comprise the magnet core assembly, and forming an interference fit with said laminations at the operating temperature of said magnet. Also a method for making such core/coil assemblies comprising the steps of cooling the coil assembly to cryogenic temperatures and drawing it rapidly upwards into the bore of said stacked laminations.

  15. TF insert experiment log book. 2nd Experiment of CS model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Makoto; Isono, Takaaki; Matsui, Kunihiro

    2001-12-01

    The cool down of CS model coil and TF insert was started on August 20, 2001. It took almost one month and immediately started coil charge since September 17, 2001. The charge test of TF insert and CS model coil was completed on October 19, 2001. In this campaign, total shot numbers were 88 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was about 4 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. This is an experiment logbook for 2nd experiment of CS model coil and TF insert for charge test. (author)

  16. Design and fabrication of the active feedback control coils for EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Shijun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)], E-mail: dsj@ipp.ac.cn; Liu Xufeng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2008-10-15

    As the active feedback control coils are located inside vacuum vessel, a reasonable design is important not only for safe operation of the coils but also for reliable operation of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). There are some different characteristics from other coils in the design and fabrication of the coils, such as the insulation structure bearing the high baking temperature, the insulation joint with special flexible structure and the brazing method of the large size conductor inside vacuum vessel. All joints of coils are located outside the vacuum vessel for providing more connection. The conductors of the coils are designed inside the stainless steel tube and actively water cooled to prevent overheating. The ceramic rings with fiberglass tapes are used to separate the conductors and the steel tube. This insulation structure adopted in the coils can bear the high baking temperature of the vacuum vessel and its details are given in the paper. For protecting the hermetic and insulating property of the insulation joint, the small bellows is located on insulation joints to eliminate the forces on the insulator. In the fabrication, the coils are built in sections and then assembled together to form whole coils inside the vacuum vessel. The 8 kHz frequency induction heater is used to braze the conductors for cutting short brazing time and reducing heating area. The electromagnetic loads acting on the current leaders, the electrical parameters of the coil and the coil temperature are also analyzed in this paper.

  17. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40-50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  18. Superconducting coil manufacturing method for low current dc beam line magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satti, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of manufacturing superconducting multipole coils for 40 to 50 kG dc beam line magnets with low current is described. Small coils were built and tested successfully to short sample characteristics. The coils did not train after the first cooldown. The coils are porous and well cooled to cope with mechanical instability and energy deposited in the coil from the beam particles. The coils are wound with insulated strand cable. The cable is shaped rectangularly for winding simplicity and good tolerances. After the coil is wound, the insulated strands are electrically connected in series. This reduces the operating current and, most important, improves the coil quench propagation due to heat conduction of one strand adjacent to the other. A well distributed quench allows the magnet energy to distribute more uniformly to the copper in the superconductor wire, giving self-protected coils. A one-meter long, 43 kG, 6-inch bore tube superconducting dipole is now being fabricated. The porous coil design and coil winding methods are discussed

  19. Design and fabrication of the active feedback control coils for EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Shijun; Liu Xufeng

    2008-01-01

    As the active feedback control coils are located inside vacuum vessel, a reasonable design is important not only for safe operation of the coils but also for reliable operation of EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). There are some different characteristics from other coils in the design and fabrication of the coils, such as the insulation structure bearing the high baking temperature, the insulation joint with special flexible structure and the brazing method of the large size conductor inside vacuum vessel. All joints of coils are located outside the vacuum vessel for providing more connection. The conductors of the coils are designed inside the stainless steel tube and actively water cooled to prevent overheating. The ceramic rings with fiberglass tapes are used to separate the conductors and the steel tube. This insulation structure adopted in the coils can bear the high baking temperature of the vacuum vessel and its details are given in the paper. For protecting the hermetic and insulating property of the insulation joint, the small bellows is located on insulation joints to eliminate the forces on the insulator. In the fabrication, the coils are built in sections and then assembled together to form whole coils inside the vacuum vessel. The 8 kHz frequency induction heater is used to braze the conductors for cutting short brazing time and reducing heating area. The electromagnetic loads acting on the current leaders, the electrical parameters of the coil and the coil temperature are also analyzed in this paper.

  20. Production of a magnetic field of 1 600 000 At/m in a non-magnetic region of volume 0.5 cubic decimeters by a coil cooled by liquid hydrogen (1963); Production d'un champ magnetique de l 600 000 At/m dans un milieu non magnetique dont le volume est 0,5 decimetre cube. Enroulement refroidi a l'hydrogene liquide (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garin, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The eventual application of the technique of cryogenic coils for the production of magnetic fields for liquid hydrogen bubble chambers has led us to the study and construction of two copper coils (cooled in a bath of liquid hydrogen). Part one treats certain generalities concerning the resistivity of several pure metals at very low temperatures, the gain in power, thermal isolation and the choice of conductor and power supply. Part two describes the experimental arrangement. The last part is devoted to a description of the two coils which were constructed, and to the results obtained. (author) [French] L'application eventuelle de la technique des ''bobines cryogeniques'' aux chambres a bulles a hydrogene liquide pour la production du champ magnetique nous a conduits a l'etude et a la construction de deux bobines en cuivre (refroidies dans un bain d'hydrogene liquide). La premiere partie traite de generalites concernant la resistivite de quelques metaux purs, a tres basse temperature, le gain de puissance, l'isolement thermique et le choix du conducteur et de l'alimentation electrique. Dans la seconde partie on decrit l'installation d'essais. La derniere partie est consacree a la description des deux bobines realisees et aux resultats obtenus. (auteur)

  1. Magnetic field alignment of coil-coil diblock copolymers and blends via intrinsic chain anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Majewski, Pawel; Larson, Steven; Yager, Kevin; Gopalan, Padma; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Chan, Edwin; Osuji, Chinedum

    Magnetic fields can control alignment of self-assembled soft materials such as block copolymers provided there is a suitably large magnetic susceptibility anisotropy present in the system. Recent results have highlighted the existence of a non-trivial intrinsic anisotropy in coil-coil diblock copolymers, specifically in lamellar-forming PS-b-P4VP, which enables alignment at field strengths of a few tesla in systems lacking mesogenic components. Alignment is predicated on correlation in the orientation of end-end vectors implied by the localization of block junctions at the microdomain interface and is observed on cooling across the order-disorder transition in the presence of the field. For appropriate combinations of field strength and grain size, we can leverage intrinsic chain anisotropy to magnetically direct self-assembly of many non-mesogenic systems, including other coil-coil BCPs like PS-b-PDMS and PS-b-PMMA, blends of BCPs of disparate morphologies and MWs, and blends of BCPs with homopolymers. This is noteworthy as blends of PS-b-P4VP with PEO provide a route to form functional materials such as nanoporous films by dissolution of PEO, or aligned ion conduction materials. We survey these various systems using TEM and in-situ X-ray scattering to study the phase behavior and temperature-, time- and field- dependent dynamics of alignment.

  2. Preliminary results of the US pool-boiling coils from the IFSMTF full-array tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Lubell, M.S.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    The Large Coil Task to develop superconducting magnets for fusion reactors, is now in the midst of full-array tests in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Included in the test array are two pool-boiling coils designed and fabricated by US manufacturers, General Dynamics/Convair Division and General Electric/Union Carbide Corporation. So far, both coils have been energized to full design currents in the single-coil tests, and the General Dynamics coil has reached the design point in the first Standard-I full-array test. Both coils performed well in the charging experiments. Extensive heating tests and the heavy instrumentation of these coils have, however, revealed some generic limitations of large pool-boiling superconducting coils. Details of these results and their analyses are reported

  3. Role of the large coil program in the development of superconducting magnets for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.

    1978-01-01

    Three U.S. industrial teams are designing and will build one coil each to a common set of specifications. Coil specifications and test conditions were chosen to insure maximum relevance to fusion program needs. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape bore, will contain about 7 MA-turns, and must operate at a peak field of 8 T while subjected to pulsed fields up to 0.14 T in a test stand that can accommodate up to 6 coils in a compact toroidal array. Coils by General Dynamics/Convair and General Electric will use different NbTi conductors cooled by pool-boiling helium. The Westinghouse coil will use Nb 3 Sn cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. These coils will be delivered in 1980 and 1981 for testing in the Large Coil Test Facility at Oak Ridge in a compact toroidal array with three coils from outside the U.S. These will be produced by EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland for testing under an International Energy Agency agreement

  4. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, S E; Rodriguez, A O; Wang, R; Tomasi, D

    2011-01-01

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  5. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, S E; Rodriguez, A O [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico); Wang, R; Tomasi, D, E-mail: arog@xanum.uam.mx [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-06-21

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  6. A multi-slot surface coil for MRI of dual-rat imaging at 4T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis, S.E.; Tomasi, D.; Solis, S.E.; Wang, R.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A.O.

    2011-07-01

    A slotted surface coil inspired by the hole-and-slot cavity magnetron was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of obese rats at 4 T. Full-wave analysis of the magnetic field was carried out at 170 MHz for both the slotted and circular-shaped coils. The noise figure values of two coils were investigated via the numerical calculation of the quality factors. Fat simulated phantoms to mimic overweight rats were included in the analysis with weights ranging from 300 to 900 g. The noise figures were 1.2 dB for the slotted coil and 2.4 dB for the circular coil when loaded with 600 g of simulated phantom. A slotted surface coil with eight circular slots and a circular coil with similar dimensions were built and operated in the transceiver mode, and their performances were experimentally compared. The imaging tests in phantoms demonstrated that the slotted surface coil has a deeper RF-sensitivity and better field uniformity than the single-loop RF-coil. High quality images of two overweight Zucker rats were acquired simultaneously with the slotted surface coil using standard spin-echo pulse sequences. Experimental results showed that the slotted surface coil outperformed the circular coil for imaging considerably overweight rats. Thus, the slotted surface coil can be a good tool for MRI experiments in rats on a human whole-body 4 T scanner.

  7. Desgn of a 20-MJ superconducting ohmic-heating coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Murphy, J.H.; Janocko, M.A.; Haller, H.E.; Litz, D.C.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.; Thullen, P.

    1979-01-01

    Conceptual designs of 20-MJ superconducting coils which were developed to demonstrate the feasibility of an ohmic-heating system were discussed. The superconductor materials were NbTi and Nb 3 Sn for the pool boil and forced-flow cooling, respectively. The coils were designed to be cryostable for bipolar operation from +7 to -7 tesla maximum field within one second. The structural design addresses the distribution of structure and structural materials used in the pulsed field environment. The cyclic stresses anticipated and the fatigue limits of the structural materials were examined in view of the operating life of the coil. The coils were designed to generate the flux swings while simultaneously meeting the limitations imposed by cooling, insulation, current density and the stresses in the materials. Both the pool and forced cooled conductors have the same criterion for cryostability, i.e., the conductor must return to the superconducting state from an initial temperature of 20 0 K while the full transport current is flowing through the conductor

  8. Steady-state resistive toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnavarns, J.; Jassby, D.L.

    1979-12-01

    If spatially-averaged values of the beta ratio can reach 5 to 10% in tokamaks, as now seems likely, resistive toroidal-field coils may be advantageous for use in reactors intended for fusion-neutron applications. The present investigation has parameterized the design of steady-state water-cooled copper coils of rectangular cross section in order to maximize figures of merit such as the ratio of fusion neutron wall loading to coil power dissipation. Four design variations distinguished by different ohmic-heating coil configurations have been examined. For a wall loading of 0.5 MW/m 2 , minimum TF-coil lifetime costs (including capital and electricity costs) are found to occur with coil masses in the range 2400 to 4400 tons, giving 200 to 250 MW of resistive dissipation, which is comparable with the total power drain of the other reactor subsystems

  9. Oval gradient coils for an open magnetic resonance imaging system with a vertical magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Koki; Abe, Mitsushi; Kose, Katsumi; Terada, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Existing open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems use biplanar gradient coils for the spatial encoding of signals. We propose using novel oval gradient coils for an open vertical-field MRI. We designed oval gradients for a 0.3T open MRI system and showed that such a system could outperform a traditional biplanar gradient system while maintaining adequate gradient homogeneity and subject accessibility. Such oval gradient coils would exhibit high efficiency, low inductance and resistance, and high switching capability. Although the designed oval Y and Z coils showed more heat dissipation and less cooling capability than biplanar coils with the same gap, they showed an efficient heat-dissipation path to the surrounding air, which would alleviate the heat problem. The performance of the designed oval-coil system was demonstrated experimentally by imaging a human hand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Updating the Design of the Poloidal Field Coils for the ITER Magnet System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Mitchell, N.; Jong, C.; Bessette, D.

    2006-01-01

    The ITER superconducting coil system consists of 18 Toroidal Field coils, six Poloidal Field (PF) coils, six Central Solenoid (CS) modules, 18 Correction Coils and their feeders. The six PF coils are attached to the TF coil cases through flexible plates or sliding supports allowing radial displacements. The PF coils and CS modules provide suitable magnetic fields for plasma shaping and position control. The PF coils use NbTi superconductor, cooled by supercritical helium. This gives a substantial cost saving compared to Nb 3 Sn and the elimination of a reaction heat treatment greatly simplifies the insulation of such large diameter coils. The cable configuration is 6 sub-cables arranged around a central cooling space. The conductors have a heavy square walled stainless steel jacket. The latest parameters of conductor design are evaluated by analysis of the minimum quench energy and hotspot temperature. The PF coils are self supporting as regards the radial magnetic loads. The vertical loads on each PF coil are transmitted to the TF coil cases. Load transmission is through flexible plates for the PF2 to PF5 coils or sliding supports for the PF1 and PF6 coils with fibreslip bearing surfaces. The supports for the PF winding consist of a set of clamping plates and stud bolts. The shape of the clamping plates has been designed to minimize stresses in the winding pack insulation. Bolts are pre-tensioned to keep pressure between the winding pack and clamping plate. Because of the difficulties in replacing the PF coils, the most unreliable component (the coil insulation) is designed with extra redundancy. There are two insulation layers with a thin metal screen in between. By monitoring the voltage of the intermediate screen, it is possible to detect an incipient short, defined as a short in only one of the two insulation layers. Adjustment of the screen voltage level may allow the shot growth to the stopped once it is detected. Alternately the faulty double pancake must

  11. Comparison between predicted duct effectiveness from proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P and measured field data for residential forced air cooling systems; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, Jeffrey A.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.; Walker, Iain S.

    2002-01-01

    The proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P ''Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems'' (ASHRAE 2002) has recently completed its second public review. As part of the standard development process, this study compares the forced air distribution system ratings provided by the public review draft of Standard 152P to measured field results. 58 field tests were performed on cooling systems in 11 homes in the summers of 1998 and 1999. Seven of these houses had standard attics with insulation on the attic floor and a well-vented attic space. The other four houses had unvented attics where the insulation is placed directly under the roof deck and the attic space is not deliberately vented. Each house was tested under a range of summer weather conditions at each particular site, and in some cases the amount of duct leakage was intentionally varied. The comparison between 152P predicted efficiencies and the measured results includes evaluation of the effects of weather, duct location, thermal conditions, duct leakage, and system capacity. The results showed that the difference between measured delivery effectiveness and that calculated using proposed Standard 152P is about 5 percentage points if weather data, duct leakage and air handler flow are well known. However, the accuracy of the standard is strongly dependent on having good measurements of duct leakage and system airflow. Given that the uncertainty in the measured delivery effectiveness is typically also about 5 percentage points, the Standard 152P results are acceptably close to the measured data

  12. F-state quenching with CH4 for buffer-gas cooled 171Y b+ frequency standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-Y. Jau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We report that methane, CH4, can be used as an efficient F-state quenching gas for trapped ytterbium ions. The quenching rate coefficient is measured to be (2.8 ± 0.3 × 106 s−1 Torr−1. For applications that use microwave hyperfine transitions of the ground-state 171Y b ions, the CH4 induced frequency shift coefficient and the decoherence rate coefficient are measured as δν/ν = (−3.6 ± 0.1 × 10−6 Torr−1 and 1/T2 = (1.5 ± 0.2 × 105 s−1 Torr−1. In our buffer-gas cooled 171Y b+ microwave clock system, we find that only ≤10−8 Torr of CH4 is required under normal operating conditions to efficiently clear the F-state and maintain ≥85% of trapped ions in the ground state with insignificant pressure shift and collisional decoherence of the clock resonance.

  13. Quadrature Slotted Surface Coil Pair for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla: Phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solis S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A coil array was composed of two slotted surface coils forming a structure with two plates at 900, each one having 6 circular slots and is introduced in this paper. Numerical simulations of the magnetic field of this coil array were performed at 170 MHz using the finite element method to study its behaviour. This coil array was developed for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode and quadrature driven. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Endoluminal ultrasound applicator with an integrated RF coil for high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity contact ultrasound thermotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rata, Mihaela; Salomir, Rares; Lafon, Cyril; Umathum, Reiner; Jenne, Juergen; Bock, Michael; Cotton, Francois

    2008-01-01

    High-intensity contact ultrasound (HICU) under MRI guidance may provide minimally invasive treatment of endocavitary digestive tumors in the esophagus, colon or rectum. In this study, a miniature receive-only coil was integrated into an endoscopic ultrasound applicator to offer high-resolution MRI guidance of thermotherapy. A cylindrical plastic support with an incorporated single element flat transducer (9.45 MHz, water cooling tip) was made and equipped with a rectangular RF loop coil surrounding the active element. The integrated coil provided significantly higher sensitivity than a four-element extracorporeal phased array coil, and the standard deviation of the MR thermometry (SDT) improved up to a factor of 7 at 10 mm depth in tissue. High-resolution morphological images (T1w-TFE and IR-T1w-TSE with a voxel size of 0.25 x 0.25 x 3 mm 3 ) and accurate thermometry data (the PRFS method with a voxel size of 0.5 x 0.5 x 5 mm 3 , 2.2 s/image, 0.3 deg. C voxel-wise SDT) were acquired in an ex vivo esophagus sample, on a clinical 1.5T scanner. The endoscopic device was actively operated under automatic temperature control, demonstrating a high level of accuracy (1.7% standard deviation, 1.1% error of mean value), which indicates that this technology may be suitable for HICU therapy of endoluminal cancer.

  15. Endoluminal ultrasound applicator with an integrated RF coil for high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity contact ultrasound thermotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rata, Mihaela; Salomir, Rares; Umathum, Reiner; Jenne, Jürgen; Lafon, Cyril; Cotton, François; Bock, Michael

    2008-11-01

    High-intensity contact ultrasound (HICU) under MRI guidance may provide minimally invasive treatment of endocavitary digestive tumors in the esophagus, colon or rectum. In this study, a miniature receive-only coil was integrated into an endoscopic ultrasound applicator to offer high-resolution MRI guidance of thermotherapy. A cylindrical plastic support with an incorporated single element flat transducer (9.45 MHz, water cooling tip) was made and equipped with a rectangular RF loop coil surrounding the active element. The integrated coil provided significantly higher sensitivity than a four-element extracorporeal phased array coil, and the standard deviation of the MR thermometry (SDT) improved up to a factor of 7 at 10 mm depth in tissue. High-resolution morphological images (T1w-TFE and IR-T1w-TSE with a voxel size of 0.25 × 0.25 × 3 mm3) and accurate thermometry data (the PRFS method with a voxel size of 0.5 × 0.5 × 5 mm3, 2.2 s/image, 0.3 °C voxel-wise SDT) were acquired in an ex vivo esophagus sample, on a clinical 1.5T scanner. The endoscopic device was actively operated under automatic temperature control, demonstrating a high level of accuracy (1.7% standard deviation, 1.1% error of mean value), which indicates that this technology may be suitable for HICU therapy of endoluminal cancer.

  16. Coil Optimization for HTS Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    An optimization approach of HTS coils in HTS synchronous machines (SM) is presented. The optimization is aimed at high power SM suitable for direct driven wind turbines applications. The optimization process was applied to a general radial flux machine with a peak air gap flux density of ~3T...... is suitable for which coil segment is presented. Thus, the performed study gives valuable input for the coil design of HTS machines ensuring optimal usage of HTS tapes....

  17. Application of high-temperature superconducting coil for internal ring devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Yuichi [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)]. E-mail: ogawa@ppl.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Morikawa, Junji [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Mito, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yanagi, Nagato [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Iwakuma, Masataka [Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    A high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil is applied for plasma confinement devices, where plasma is confined with a magnetic field of a floating HTS coil. The internal coil device mini-RT with a BSCCO tape has been constructed, in which the coil major radius and magnetomotive force are 0.15 m and 50 kA, respectively. The coil is cooled to 20 K with a helium gas by using a demountable transfer tube and check valve system. The coil current is directly excited by the external power supply with demountable electrodes. To reduce the heat load, the electrodes were cooled with liquid nitrogen. The levitation experiment of the HTS coil has been carried out. The position of the HTS coil is measured by laser sensors, and is feedback-controlled with the levitation coil current. We have succeeded in levitating the HTS coil during 1 h with accuracy of less than 20 {mu}m. The magnetic field strength near the internal coil is around 0.1 T, and a radio-frequency wave of 2.45 GHz is applied for the plasma production. At the floating condition of the HTS coil, a high-density plasma with more than 10{sup 17} m{sup -3}, which is higher than the cut-off density of a 2.45 GHz microwave, has been produced. A new device RT-1 with a major radius of 0.25 m and a magnetomotive force of 250 kA is under construction, and a persistent current has been demonstrated. The feasibility on YBCO tape is briefly discussed.

  18. Large superconducting coil fabrication development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.L.; Allred, E.L.; Anderson, W.C.; Burn, P.B.; Deaderick, R.I.; Henderson, G.M.; Marguerat, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    Toroidal fields for some fusion devices will be produced by an array of large superconducting coils. Their size, space limitation, and field requirements dictate that they be high performance coils. Once installed, accessibility for maintenance and repairs is severely restricted; therefore, good reliability is an obvious necessity. Sufficient coil fabrication will be undertaken to develop and test methods that are reliable, fast, and economical. Industrial participation will be encouraged from the outset to insure smooth transition from development phases to production phases. Initially, practice equipment for three meter bore circular coils will be developed. Oval shape coil forms will be included in the practice facility later. Equipment that is more automated will be developed with the expectation of winding faster and obtaining good coil quality. Alternate types of coil construction, methods of winding and insulating, will be investigated. Handling and assembly problems will be studied. All technology developed must be feasible for scaling up when much larger coils are needed. Experimental power reactors may need coils having six meter or larger bores

  19. Complex study of transport AC loss in various 2G HTS racetrack coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yiran, E-mail: yc315@cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Zhang, Min; Chudy, Michal; Matsuda, Koichi; Coombs, Tim [University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Comparing transport AC losses of two types of 2G HTS racetrack coils. ► The magnetic substrate in the MAG RABITS coil is the main difference. ► Experimental data agree well with simulation results. ► The transport AC loss in the MAG RABITS coil is 36% higher than that in the IBAD coil. ► It is better to keep all the substrate non-magnetic. -- Abstract: HTS racetrack coils are becoming important elements of an emerging number of superconducting devices such as generators or motors. In these devices the issue of AC loss is crucial, as performance and cooling power are derived from this quantity. This paper presents a comparative study of transport AC loss in two different types of 2G HTS racetrack coils. In this study, both experimental measurements and computer simulation approaches were employed. All the experiments were performed using classical AC electrical method. The finite-element computer model was used to estimate electromagnetic properties and calculate transport AC loss. The main difference between the characterized coils is covered inside tape architectures. While one coil uses tape based on RABITS magnetic substrate, the second coil uses a non-magnetic tape. Ferromagnetic loss caused by a magnetic substrate is an important issue involved in the total AC loss. As a result, the coil with the magnetic substrate surprised with high AC loss and rather low performance.

  20. Triple Halo Coil: Development and Comparison with Other TMS Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive stimulation technique that can be used for the treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's Disease, PTSD, TBI and anxiety by regulating synaptic activity. TMS is FDA approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. There is a critical need to develop deep TMS coils that can stimulate deeper regions of the brain without excessively stimulating the cortex in order to provide an alternative to surgical methods. We have developed a novel multi-coil configuration called ``Triple Halo Coil'' (THC) that can stimulate deep brain regions. Investigation of induced electric and magnetic field in these regions have been achieved by computer modelling. Comparison of the results due to THC configuration have been conducted with other TMS coils such as ``Halo Coil'', circular coil and ``Figure of Eight'' coil. There was an improvement of more than 15 times in the strength of magnetic field, induced by THC configuration at 10 cm below the vertex of the head when compared with the ``Figure of Eight'' coil alone. Carver Charitable Trust.

  1. The coiled coil motif in polymer drug delivery systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, Michal; Pola, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 1 (2013), s. 90-96 ISSN 0734-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/0543; GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : coiled coil * hydrophilic polymer * recombinant protein Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 8.905, year: 2013

  2. A diode-laser optical frequency standard based on laser-cooled Ca atoms: sub-kilohertz spectroscopy by optical shelving detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, C.W.; Bondu, F.; Fox, R.W.; Hollberg, L.

    1999-01-01

    We report an optical frequency standard at 657 nm based on laser-cooled/trapped Ca atoms. The system consists of a novel, compact magneto-optic trap which uses 50 mW of frequency-doubled diode laser light at 423 nm and can trap >10 7 Ca atoms in 20 ms. High resolution spectroscopy on this atomic sample using the narrow 657 nm intercombination line resolves linewidths (FWHM) as narrow as 400 Hz, the natural linewidth of the transition. The spectroscopic signal-to-noise ratio is enhanced by an order of magnitude with the implementation of a ''shelving'' detection scheme on the 423 nm transition. Our present apparatus achieves a fractional frequency instability of 5 x 10 -14 in 1 s with a potential atom shot-noise-limited performance of 10 -16 τ -1/2 and excellent prospects for high accuracy. (orig.)

  3. Compressing DNA sequence databases with coil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendy Michael D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publicly available DNA sequence databases such as GenBank are large, and are growing at an exponential rate. The sheer volume of data being dealt with presents serious storage and data communications problems. Currently, sequence data is usually kept in large "flat files," which are then compressed using standard Lempel-Ziv (gzip compression – an approach which rarely achieves good compression ratios. While much research has been done on compressing individual DNA sequences, surprisingly little has focused on the compression of entire databases of such sequences. In this study we introduce the sequence database compression software coil. Results We have designed and implemented a portable software package, coil, for compressing and decompressing DNA sequence databases based on the idea of edit-tree coding. coil is geared towards achieving high compression ratios at the expense of execution time and memory usage during compression – the compression time represents a "one-off investment" whose cost is quickly amortised if the resulting compressed file is transmitted many times. Decompression requires little memory and is extremely fast. We demonstrate a 5% improvement in compression ratio over state-of-the-art general-purpose compression tools for a large GenBank database file containing Expressed Sequence Tag (EST data. Finally, coil can efficiently encode incremental additions to a sequence database. Conclusion coil presents a compelling alternative to conventional compression of flat files for the storage and distribution of DNA sequence databases having a narrow distribution of sequence lengths, such as EST data. Increasing compression levels for databases having a wide distribution of sequence lengths is a direction for future work.

  4. The characteristic of evaporative cooling magnet for ECRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, B., E-mail: xiongbin@mail.iee.ac.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ruan, L.; Gu, G. B. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Lu, W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhan, W. L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 73000 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Compared with traditional de-ionized pressurized-water cooled magnet of ECRIS, evaporative cooling magnet has some special characteristics, such as high cooling efficiency, simple maintenance, and operation. The analysis is carried out according to the design and operation of LECR4 (Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4, since July 2013), whose magnet is cooled by evaporative cooling technology. The insulation coolant replaces the de-ionized pressurized-water to absorb the heat of coils, and the physical and chemical properties of coolant remain stable for a long time with no need for purification or filtration. The coils of magnet are immersed in the liquid coolant. For the higher cooling efficiency of coolant, the current density of coils can be greatly improved. The heat transfer process executes under atmospheric pressure, and the temperature of coils is lower than 70 °C when the current density of coils is 12 A/mm{sup 2}. On the other hand, the heat transfer temperature of coolant is about 50 °C, and the heat can be transferred to fresh air which can save cost of water cooling system. Two years of LECR4 stable operation show that evaporative cooling technology can be used on magnet of ECRIS, and the application advantages are very obvious.

  5. The characteristic of evaporative cooling magnet for ECRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Gu, G. B.; Lu, W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhan, W. L.

    2016-02-01

    Compared with traditional de-ionized pressurized-water cooled magnet of ECRIS, evaporative cooling magnet has some special characteristics, such as high cooling efficiency, simple maintenance, and operation. The analysis is carried out according to the design and operation of LECR4 (Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4, since July 2013), whose magnet is cooled by evaporative cooling technology. The insulation coolant replaces the de-ionized pressurized-water to absorb the heat of coils, and the physical and chemical properties of coolant remain stable for a long time with no need for purification or filtration. The coils of magnet are immersed in the liquid coolant. For the higher cooling efficiency of coolant, the current density of coils can be greatly improved. The heat transfer process executes under atmospheric pressure, and the temperature of coils is lower than 70 °C when the current density of coils is 12 A/mm2. On the other hand, the heat transfer temperature of coolant is about 50 °C, and the heat can be transferred to fresh air which can save cost of water cooling system. Two years of LECR4 stable operation show that evaporative cooling technology can be used on magnet of ECRIS, and the application advantages are very obvious.

  6. Two-Slotted Surface Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, S. E.; Hernandez, J. A.; Rodriguez, A. O.; Tomasi, D.

    2008-01-01

    Arrays of antennas have been widely accepted for magnetic resonance imaging applications due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over large volumes of interest. A new surface coil based on the magnetron tube and called slotted surface coil, has been recently introduced by our group. This coil design experimentally demonstrated a significant improvement over the circular-shaped coil when used in the receive-only mode. The slotted coils formed a two-sheet structure with a 90 deg. separation and each coil had 6 circular slots. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element method for this coil design to study the behaviour of the array magnetic field. Then, we developed a two-coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses for high field magnetic resonance imaging

  7. ITER Side Correction Coil Quench model and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollet, S.; Bessette, D.; Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J. L.; Gauthier, F.; Lacroix, B.

    2016-12-01

    Previous thermohydraulic studies performed for the ITER TF, CS and PF magnet systems have brought some important information on the detection and consequences of a quench as a function of the initial conditions (deposited energy, heated length). Even if the temperature margin of the Correction Coils is high, their behavior during a quench should also be studied since a quench is likely to be triggered by potential anomalies in joints, ground fault on the instrumentation wires, etc. A model has been developed with the SuperMagnet Code (Bagnasco et al., 2010) for a Side Correction Coil (SCC2) with four pancakes cooled in parallel, each of them represented by a Thea module (with the proper Cable In Conduit Conductor characteristics). All the other coils of the PF cooling loop are hydraulically connected in parallel (top/bottom correction coils and six Poloidal Field Coils) are modeled by Flower modules with equivalent hydraulics properties. The model and the analysis results are presented for five quench initiation cases with/without fast discharge: two quenches initiated by a heat input to the innermost turn of one pancake (case 1 and case 2) and two other quenches initiated at the innermost turns of four pancakes (case 3 and case 4). In the 5th case, the quench is initiated at the middle turn of one pancake. The impact on the cooling circuit, e.g. the exceedance of the opening pressure of the quench relief valves, is detailed in case of an undetected quench (i.e. no discharge of the magnet). Particular attention is also paid to a possible secondary quench detection system based on measured thermohydraulic signals (pressure, temperature and/or helium mass flow rate). The maximum cable temperature achieved in case of a fast current discharge (primary detection by voltage) is compared to the design hot spot criterion of 150 K, which includes the contribution of helium and jacket.

  8. Frosting and defrosting of air-coils - results from laboratory testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahlen, P

    1997-12-31

    Frosting of air-coils is an important factor in the design and operation of air-source heat pumps, heat recovery ventilators, cooling and refrigeration equipment etc. This report presents results from laboratory testing of two brine-cooled air-coils under frosting conditions. The coils have the same number of plane, continuous fins, 4 tube rows with 12 tubes in each row, tube spacing of 50 mm and fin spacing of 3 and 6 mm respectively. The original purpose of the test program was to compare various possible indicators of coil frosting and to analyze the possible effects of different control strategies on coil capacity and the COP of the system (the analysis will be presented in a separate report). Tests involved inlet air temperatures of -7 and +2 degC, variation of humidity between 70 and 100% RH (including simulated rain), velocities in the range 1 to 4 m/s, and specific cooling loads from 50 to 150 W/m{sup 2}. Test results include variations due to frosting of e.g. cooling capacity, COP, air flow and pressure drop, fan power, air outlet temperature and humidity, coil temperature, frost mass, and frosting time. Results also include the subsequently required defrost time, defrost energy and collected mass of defrost water. The frosting process was interrupted when the air flow had decreased to 30% of the original value with a non-frosted coil. The results clearly show the advantage of demand controlled defrosting with variations in frosting time between 2 h with high humidity/high specific cooling load up to, for practical purposes, infinite frosting times with low humidity/low specific cooling load. The accumulated frost mass during one frosting cycle varied from less than 0.02 kg/m{sup 2} up to approximately 0.4 kg/m{sup 2}. 23 refs, 93 figs, 89 tabs

  9. Frosting and defrosting of air-coils - results from laboratory testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahlen, P.

    1996-12-31

    Frosting of air-coils is an important factor in the design and operation of air-source heat pumps, heat recovery ventilators, cooling and refrigeration equipment etc. This report presents results from laboratory testing of two brine-cooled air-coils under frosting conditions. The coils have the same number of plane, continuous fins, 4 tube rows with 12 tubes in each row, tube spacing of 50 mm and fin spacing of 3 and 6 mm respectively. The original purpose of the test program was to compare various possible indicators of coil frosting and to analyze the possible effects of different control strategies on coil capacity and the COP of the system (the analysis will be presented in a separate report). Tests involved inlet air temperatures of -7 and +2 degC, variation of humidity between 70 and 100% RH (including simulated rain), velocities in the range 1 to 4 m/s, and specific cooling loads from 50 to 150 W/m{sup 2}. Test results include variations due to frosting of e.g. cooling capacity, COP, air flow and pressure drop, fan power, air outlet temperature and humidity, coil temperature, frost mass, and frosting time. Results also include the subsequently required defrost time, defrost energy and collected mass of defrost water. The frosting process was interrupted when the air flow had decreased to 30% of the original value with a non-frosted coil. The results clearly show the advantage of demand controlled defrosting with variations in frosting time between 2 h with high humidity/high specific cooling load up to, for practical purposes, infinite frosting times with low humidity/low specific cooling load. The accumulated frost mass during one frosting cycle varied from less than 0.02 kg/m{sup 2} up to approximately 0.4 kg/m{sup 2}. 23 refs, 93 figs, 89 tabs

  10. Iron-free moving coil high temperature displacement transducer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grindrod, A

    1976-07-01

    A unique, iron free, moving coil linear displacement transducer system is described, which is suitable for continuously monitoring linear movements, at varying temperatures up to 750/sup 0/C, in operational nuclear reactors. Although this device has been primarily developed for Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Systems, it also has uses where long term measurements on conventional high temperature plant are required. Furthermore it could be particularly useful in material creep laboratories where precise linear changes in specimen length need to be monitored at elevated temperatures, over several years. Since individual transducer installations demand specific mounting arrangements to suit particular component geometries, evaluations have been made only on standard operational modules or capsules which are designed for containment in a range of housing or fixtures to suit particular applications. The behaviour of these devices has been studied at temperatures up to 750/sup 0/C for periods of over 10,000 h. An evaluation is also included of a commercially designed sensor assembly employing the same principle, for monitoring the boiler-shield wall movement at Hinkley Point 'B' AGR Station.

  11. Eddy-current testing of nuclear fuel cladding tubes using tilted encircling coil system, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Renzhong; Sekine, Kazuyoshi; Shimizu, Hisaji; Tsukui, Kazushige; Urata, Megumu.

    1989-01-01

    The eddy current testing method with external encircling-coils has been widely used as a standard technique for inspection of defects in irradiated zircaloy cladding tubes. In this inspection, the systematic procedure to reliably characterize defects is required. This paper describes the newly developed external tilted encircling-coil system, in which the coil axis is inclined by an angle α to the sample tube axis, for reliable determination of the sort, location and size of defects. As the results of experimental work concerning some kinds of artificial defects in zircaloy cladding tubes using newly designed tilted coil system, an adaptable general-procedure for characterization of defects has been proposed. Furthermore, it has been confirmed that in the case of smaller tilt angles of coil, the signal-to noise ratio for defect response in this coil system is approximately equal to that of ordinary encircling coil system. (author)

  12. Superconducting poloidal coils for STARFIRE commercial reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Evans, K. Jr.; Turner, L.R.; Huang, Y.C.; Prater, R.; Alcorn, J.

    1979-01-01

    STARFIRE is considered to be the tenth commercial tokamak power plant. A preliminary design study on its superconducting poloidal coil system is presented. Key features of the design studies are: the elimination of the ohmic heating coil; the trade-off studies of the equilibrium field coil locations; and the development of a conceptual design for the superconducting equilibrium field coils. Described are the 100 kA cryostable conductor design, the coil structure, and evaluation of the coil forces

  13. Feasibility Study: Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems with Fan Coil Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; Backman, C.

    2012-07-01

    The primary objectives of this study are to estimate potential energy savings relative to conventional ducted air distribution, and to identify equipment requirements, costs, and barriers with a focus on ductless hydronic delivery systems that utilize water-to-air terminal units in each zone. Results indicate that annual heating and cooling energy use can be reduced by up to 27% assuming replacement of the conventional 13 SEER heat pump and coil with a similarly rated air-to-water heat pump.

  14. Stability tests of the Westinghouse coil in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Fehling, D.T.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1987-09-01

    The Westinghouse coil is one of three forced-flow coils in the six-coil toroidal array of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is wound with an 18-kA, Nb 3 Sn/Cu, cable-in-conduit superconductor structurally supported by aluminum plates and cooled by 4-K, 15-atm supercritical helium. The coil is instrumented to permit measurement of helium temperature, pressure, and flow rate; structure temperature and strain; field; and normal zone voltage. A resistive heater has been installed to simulate nuclear heating, and inductive heaters have been installed to facilitate stability testing. The coil has been tested both individually and in the six-coil array. The tests covered charging to full design current and field, measuring the current-sharing threshold temperature using the resistive heaters, and measuring the stability margin using the pulsed inductive heaters. At least one section of the conductor exhibits a very broad resistive transition (resistive transition index = 4). The broad transition, though causing the appearance of voltage at relatively low temperatures, does not compromise the stability margin of the coil, which was greater than 1.1 J/cm 3 of strands. In another, nonresistive location, the stability margin was between 1.7 and 1.9 J/cm 3 of strands. The coil is completely stable in operation at 100% design current in both the single- and six-coil modes

  15. Making an Inexpensive Electromagnetic Wiggler Using Sheet Materials for the Coils

    CERN Document Server

    Herman-Biallas, George; Hiatt, Thomas; Neil, George; Snyder, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An inexpensive electromagnetic wiggler, made with twenty-eight, 4 cm periods with a K of 1 and gap of 2.6 cm was made within 10 weeks after receipt of order by an industrial machine shop. The coil design used sheet and plate materials cut to shapes using water jet cutting and was assembled in a simple stack design. The coil design extends the serpentine conductor design of the Duke OK4 to more and smaller conductors. The coils are conduction cooled to imbedded cooling plates. The wiggler features graded end pole fields, trim coil compensation for end field errors and mirror plates on the ends to avoid three dimensional end field effects. Details of the methods used in construction and the wiggler performance are presented.

  16. The cryogenic helium cooling system for the Tokamak physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felker, B.; Slack, D.S.; Wendland, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will use supercritical helium to cool all the magnets and supply helium to the Vacuum cryopumping subsystem. The heat loads will come from the standard steady state conduction and thermal radiation sources and from the pulsed loads of the nuclear and eddy currents caused by the Central Solenoid Coils and the plasma positioning coils. The operations of the TPX will begin with pulses of up to 1000 seconds in duration every 75 minutes. The helium system utilizes a pulse load leveling scheme to buffer out the effects of the pulse load and maintain a constant cryogenic plant operation. The pulse load leveling scheme utilizes the thermal mass of liquid and gaseous helium stored in a remote dewar to absorb the pulses of the tokamak loads. The mass of the stored helium will buffer out the temperature pulses allowing 5 K helium to be delivered to the magnets throughout the length of the pulse. The temperature of the dewar will remain below 5 K with all the energy of the pulse absorbed. This paper will present the details of the heat load sources, of the pulse load leveling scheme operations, a partial helium schematic, dewar temperature as a function of time, the heat load sources as a function of time and the helium temperature as a function of length along the various components that will be cooled

  17. Design of an 18 Tesla, tandem mirror, fusion reactor, hybrid choke coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmer, J.F.; Agarwal, K.; Gurol, H.; Mancuso, A.; Michels, P.H.; Peck, S.D.; Burgeson, J.; Dalder, E.N.

    1987-01-01

    A hybrid, part normal part superconducting 18-Tesla solenoid choke coil is designed for a tandem mirror fusion reactor. The present state of the art is represented by the 12-Tesla, superconducting NbSn coil. Future applications other than tandem mirror fusion devices needing high field solenoids might require hybrid magnets of the type described herein. The hybrid design was generated because of critical field performance limitations on present, practical superconducting wires. A hybrid design might be required (due to structural limits) even if the critical field were higher. Also, hybrids could be a cost-effective way of getting very high fields for certain applications. The 18-Tesla solenoid described is composed of an inner coil made of water-cooled, high-strength zirconium copper which generates 3 Tesla. A superconducting NbSn background coil contributes the remaining 15 Tesla. The focus of the design study was on the inner coil. Demonstration fabrication and testing was performed

  18. Insulation and Heat Treatment of Bi-2212 Wire for Wind-and-React Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter K. F. Hwang

    2007-10-22

    Higher Field Magnets demand higher field materials such as Bi-2212 round superconducting wire. The Bi-2212 wire manufacture process depends on the coil fabrication method and wire insulation material. Considering the wind-and-react method, the coil must unifirmly heated to the melt temperature and uniformly cooled to the solidification temperature. During heat treat cycle for tightly wound coils, the leakage melt from conductor can chemically react with insulation on the conductor and creat short turns in the coils. In this research project, conductor, insulation, and coils are made to systemically study the suitable insulation materials, coil fabrication method, and heat treatment cycles. In this phase I study, 800 meters Bi-2212 wire with 3 different insulation materials have been produced. Best insulation material has been identified after testing six small coils for insulation integrity and critical current at 4.2 K. Four larger coils (2" dia) have been also made with Bi-2212 wrapped with best insulation and with different heattreatment cycle. These coils were tested for Ic in a 6T background field and at 4.2 K. The test result shows that Ic from 4 coils are very close to short samples (1 meter) result. It demonstrates that HTS coils can be made with Bi-2212 wire with best insulation consistently. Better wire insulation, improving coil winding technique, and wire manufacture process can be used for a wide range of high field magnet application including acclerators such as Muon Collider, fusion energy research, NMR spectroscopy, MRI, and other industrial magnets.

  19. Fabrication of the new poloidal field coils for DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiberger, M.; Bott, R.J.; Gallix, R.; Street, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The six new poloidal field coil assemblies manufactured by GA Technologies (GA) for DIII-D range in diameter from 3.4-5.3 m. Two of them are 55-turn field shaping coils. Each of the other four combines one turn of the ohmic heating coil and a 55-turn field shaping coil into a single unit encased in a stainless steel box beam. These four box beams, which provide support for the coils inside, are part of the overall coil and vacuum vessel support structure. They also serve as molds for vacuum impregnating the coils with epoxy. All coils are made of hollow, water-cooled copper conductor. The larger field shaping coils are designed for 20 kA, 3 sec rectangular current pulses with 40 0 C temperature rise. The ohmic heating coil turns are capable of currents of up to 110 kA. The conductor is wrapped with Kapton and fiberglass tape; Kapton provides 1000 V/turn and 28 kV coil-to-ground insulation. The fiberglass acts as wick and reinforcement for the vacuum impregnated epoxy resin which bonds the coil together. The fabrication process is described in detail and illustrated. Tools and setups used for special operations such as induction brazing, conductor winding, conductor bending, and vacuum impregnation are presented. The quality control procedures followed to guarantee sound brazed joints are explained. The electrical tests performed at several stages of fabrication, especially the 1000 V/turn impulse tests conducted before potting to facilitate fault detection and repair, are described

  20. Insulation and Heat Treatment of Bi-2212 Wires for Wind-and-React Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Peter K.F.

    2007-01-01

    Higher Field Magnets demand higher field materials such as Bi-2212 round superconducting wire. The Bi-2212 wire manufacture process depends on the coil fabrication method and wire insulation material. Considering the wind-and-react method, the coil must unifirmly heated to the melt temperature and uniformly cooled to the solidification temperature. During heat treat cycle for tightly wound coils, the leakage melt from conductor can chemically react with insulation on the conductor and creat short turns in the coils. In this research project, conductor, insulation, and coils are made to systemically study the suitable insulation materials, coil fabrication method, and heat treatment cycles. In this phase I study, 800 meters Bi-2212 wire with 3 different insulation materials have been produced. Best insulation material has been identified after testing six small coils for insulation integrity and critical current at 4.2 K. Four larger coils (2-inch dia) have been also made with Bi-2212 wrapped with best insulation and with different heattreatment cycle. These coils were tested for Ic in a 6T background field and at 4.2 K. The test result shows that Ic from 4 coils are very close to short samples (1 meter) result. It demonstrates that HTS coils can be made with Bi-2212 wire with best insulation consistently. Better wire insulation, improving coil winding technique, and wire manufacture process can be used for a wide range of high field magnet application including acclerators such as Muon Collider, fusion energy research, NMR spectroscopy, MRI, and other industrial magnets.

  1. Cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boernke, F.

    1975-01-01

    The need for the use of cooling systems in power plant engineering is dealt with from the point of view of a non-polluting form of energy production. The various cooling system concepts up to the modern natural-draught cooling towers are illustrated by examples. (TK/AK) [de

  2. Indirectly cooled large thin superconducting CDF solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Kunitaka; Mori, Shigeki; Yoshizaki, Ryozo; Saito, Ryusei; Asano, Katsuhiko.

    1985-01-01

    The manufacturing technique of the indirectly cooled large thin superconducting solenoid for the collider detector facility (CDF solenoid) has been studied through cooperation of University of Tsukuba and the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics of the Ministry of Education of Japan, and the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the U.S. Fabrication and testing of the solenoid has recently been completed by Hitachi. The CDF solenoid has a large-sized thin structure for meeting the requirement by experiments to be applied. Hitachi has thus developed a variety of new technologies including the design standard, coil cooling method, material selection, and manufacturing technique in accordance with experimental data, which were confirmed in a series of analyses and tests made on various prototypes. The CDF solenoid, built using Hitachi's new technologies, is of the world's top class among equipment of this type. This paper outlines the design criteria for the major components employed in the CDF solenoid and the test results of the solenoid. (author)

  3. Nb3Al insert experiment log book. 3rd experiment of CS model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Makoto; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Isono, Takaaki

    2002-10-01

    The cool down of CS model coil and Nb 3 Al insert was started on March 4, 2002. It took almost one month and immediately started coil charge since April 3, 2002. The charge test of Nb 3 Al insert and CS model coil was completed on May 2, 2002. All of the experiments including the warm up was also completed on May 30, 2002. In this campaign, total shot numbers were 102 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was about 5.2 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. (author)

  4. Development of superconducting poloidal field coils for medium and large size tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, H.-G.; Forster, S.; Hofmann, A.

    1983-01-01

    Large long pulse tokamak fusion experiments require the use of superconducting poloidal field (PF) coils. In the past not much attention has been paid to the development of such coils. Therefore a development programme has been initiated recently at KfK. In this report start with summarizing the relevant PF coil parameters of some medium and large size tokamaks presently under construction or design, respectively. The most important areas of research and development work are deduced from these parameters. Design considerations and first experimental results concerning low loss conductors, cooling concepts and structural components are given

  5. Coil for LEAR extraction septum

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    Which way does the current flow ? This intriguing object is the coil for the LEAR extraction septum. There were two septa, first a thin one, then this one, not so thin, somewhat on the borderline between septum and bending magnet.

  6. First coil for the SC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1955-01-01

    The coils for the SC magnet were stored in the large hangar of the Cointrin Airport (to make sure that they would be available before snow and ice would block the roads and canals from Belgium, where they were built).

  7. The Swiss LCT-coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecsey, G.; Benz, H.; Horvath, I.

    1985-01-01

    With delivery of the coil to ORNL on February 4, 1984, the second phase of the Swiss Large Coil Program - design and construction - was terminated. Mainlines of the Swiss design concept are summarized and related to theoretical calculations, experimental results of the supporting program, fabricational experience and first successful test results. An attempt is made to draw preliminary conclusions with regard to the design of future toroidal systems such as NET

  8. Advanced examination techniques applied to the qualification of critical welds for the ITER correction coils

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Libeyre, Paul; Marcinek, Dawid Jaroslaw; Piguiet, Aline; Cécillon, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The ITER correction coils (CCs) consist of three sets of six coils located in between the toroidal (TF) and poloidal field (PF) magnets. The CCs rely on a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC), whose supercritical cooling at 4.5 K is provided by helium inlets and outlets. The assembly of the nozzles to the stainless steel conductor conduit includes fillet welds requiring full penetration through the thickness of the nozzle. Static and cyclic stresses have to be sustained by the inlet welds during operation. The entire volume of helium inlet and outlet welds, that are submitted to the most stringent quality levels of imperfections according to standards in force, is virtually uninspectable with sufficient resolution by conventional or computed radiography or by Ultrasonic Testing. On the other hand, X-ray computed tomography (CT) was successfully applied to inspect the full weld volume of several dozens of helium inlet qualification samples. The extensive use of CT techniques allowed a significant progress in the ...

  9. Equilibrium field coil concepts for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Brown, T.G.

    1981-08-01

    Methods are presented for reducing ampere-turn requirements in the EF coil system. It is shown that coil currents in an EF coil system external to the toroidal field coils can be substantially reduced by relaxing the triangularity of a D-shaped plasma. Further reductions are realized through a hybrid EF coil system using both internal and external coils. Equilibrium field coils for a poloidally asymmetric, single-null INTOR configuration are presented. It is shown that the shape of field lines in the plasma scrapeoff region and divertor channel improves as triangularity is reduced, but it does so at the possible expense of achievable stable beta values

  10. Design, manufacture and performance of the JET Toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, M.; Booth, J.; Pohlchen, R.

    1983-01-01

    The JET Toroidal field magnet compromises 32 D shaped coils each 5.7 m high, 3.8 wide and weighing 12 tonnes. The field produced is 3.45 Tesla at 2.9 m radius when operating at the maximum current of 66.5 kA. The coils are wound with water cooled hollow conductor and operate with an equivalent rectangular current pulse length of 20 seconds at full current. A description of the evolution of the design in relation to the constraints imposed is given first. These design constraints included the low aspect ratio of the Torus, the long pulse duration, the large mechanical forces and also the availability of suitable copper conductor sections. The stress analysis of the coil is outlined as well as the cooling requirements and some specific stresses. The construction of the D shaped coils in hard copper presents problems due to the spring back effect of the conductor. The methods adopted to solve these difficulties together with other problems related to the winding process are given. A large number of tests were carried out in order to establish the conditions necessary to obtain reliable brazed joints. During production the non destructive tests for each joint were very severe and included X-ray examination. In order to meet the JET delivery programme, a large effort has been required in terms of production tools and organization of the work at the supplier's works. This effort and the construction schedule is outlined. After assembly on the JET machine the TF coils have been tested and their initial performances in electrical, mechanical and thermal terms are compared with predicted values

  11. Dynamic multi-channel TMS with reconfigurable coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ruoli; Jansen, Ben H; Sheth, Bhavin R; Chen, Ji

    2013-05-01

    Investigations of the causal involvement of particular brain areas and interconnections in behavior require an external stimulation system with reasonable spatio-temporal resolution. Current transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technology is limited to stimulating a single brain area once in a given trial. Here, we present a feasibility study for a novel TMS system based on multi-channel reconfigurable coils. With this hardware, researchers will be able to stimulate multiple brain sites in any temporal order in a trial. The system employs a wire-mesh coil, constructed using x- and y-directional wires. By varying the current direction and/or strength on each wire, we can configure the proposed mesh-wire coil into a standard loop coil and figure-eight coil of varying size. This provides maximum flexibility to the experimenter in that the location and extent of stimulation on the brain surface can be modified depending on experimental requirement. Moreover, one can dynamically and automatically modify the site(s) of stimulation several times within the span of seconds. By pre-storing various sequences of excitation patterns inside a control unit, one can explore the effect of dynamic TMS on behavior, in associative learning, and as rehabilitative therapy. Here, we present a computer simulation and bench experiments that show the feasibility of the dynamically-reconfigurable coil.

  12. Endovascular rescue method for undesirably stretched coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae Hoon

    2014-10-01

    Undesirable detachment or stretching of coils within the parent artery during aneurysm embolization can be related with thrombus formation, which can be caused occlusion of parent artery or embolic event(s). To escape from this situation, several rescue methods have been reported. A case with undesirably stretched coil in which another rescue method was used, is presented. When the stretched coil is still located in the coil delivery microcatheter, the stretched coil can be removed safely using a snare and a handmade monorail microcatheter. After a snare is lodged in the handmade monorail microcatheter, the snare is introduced over the coil delivery micorcatheter and located in the distal part of the stretched coil. After then, the handmade monorail microcatheter captures the stretched coil and the snare as one unit. This technique using a handmade monorail microcatheter and a snare can be a good rescue modality for the undesirably stretched coil, still remained within the coil delivery microcatheter.

  13. Coil supporting device in nuclear fusion apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Ryo; Imura, Yasuya.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To secure intermediate fittings with a coil fixed thereon by an insulating tape to a fixed body by means of fittings, thereby supporting the coil in a narrow space. Structure: A coil is secured to intermediate fittings by means of an insulating tape, after which the intermediate fittings is mounted on a fixed body through fittings to support the coil in a narrow clearance portion between a plasma sealed vessel and a main coil. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Measurement of heating coil temperature for e-cigarettes with a “top-coil” clearomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Ito, Kazuhide; Fowles, Jeff; Shusterman, Dennis; Jaques, Peter A.; Kumagai, Kazukiyo

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of applied power settings, coil wetness conditions, and e-liquid compositions on the coil heating temperature for e-cigarettes with a “top-coil” clearomizer, and to make associations of coil conditions with emission of toxic carbonyl compounds by combining results herein with the literature. Methods The coil temperature of a second generation e-cigarette was measured at various applied power levels, coil conditions, and e-liquid compositions, including (1) measurements by thermocouple at three e-liquid fill levels (dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet), three coil resistances (low, standard, and high), and four voltage settings (3–6 V) for multiple coils using propylene glycol (PG) as a test liquid; (2) measurements by thermocouple at additional degrees of coil wetness for a high resistance coil using PG; and (3) measurements by both thermocouple and infrared (IR) camera for high resistance coils using PG alone and a 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture of PG and glycerol (PG/GL). Results For single point thermocouple measurements with PG, coil temperatures ranged from 322 ‒ 1008°C, 145 ‒ 334°C, and 110 ‒ 185°C under dry, wet-through-wick, and full-wet conditions, respectively, for the total of 13 replaceable coil heads. For conditions measured with both a thermocouple and an IR camera, all thermocouple measurements were between the minimum and maximum across-coil IR camera measurements and equal to 74% ‒ 115% of the across-coil mean, depending on test conditions. The IR camera showed details of the non-uniform temperature distribution across heating coils. The large temperature variations under wet-through-wick conditions may explain the large variations in formaldehyde formation rate reported in the literature for such “top-coil” clearomizers. Conclusions This study established a simple and straight-forward protocol to systematically measure e-cigarette coil heating temperature under dry, wet-through-wick, and full

  15. The B00 model coil in the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Anashkin, O P; Keilin, V E; Lysenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    A 1-m size model coil has been developed to investigate the transport properties of the three aluminum-stabilized superconductors used in the ATLAS magnets. The coil, named B00, is also used for debugging the cryogenic, power and control systems of the ATLAS Magnet Test Facility. The coil comprises two double pancakes made of the barrel toroid and end-cap toroid conductors and a single pancake made of the central solenoid conductor. The pancakes are placed inside an aluminum coil casing. The coil construction and cooling conditions are quite similar to the final design of the ATLAS magnets. The B00 coil is well equipped with various sensors to measure thermal and electrodynamic properties of the conductor inside the coils. Special attention has been paid to the study of the current diffusion process and the normal zone propagation in the ATLAS conductors and windings. Special pick-up coils have been made to measure the diffusion at different currents and magnetic field values. (6 refs).

  16. Current leads cooling for the series-connected hybrid magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hongyu; Marshall, William S.; Bird, Mark D.; Gavrilin, Andrew V.; Weijers, Hubertus W.

    2014-01-01

    Two Series-Connected Hybrid (SCH) magnets are being developed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. Both SCH magnets combine a set of resistive Florida-Bitter coils with a superconducting outsert coil constructed of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC). The outsert coils of the two magnets employ 20 kA BSCCO HTS current leads for the power supply although they have different designs and cooling methods. The copper heat exchangers of the HTS current leads for the HZB SCH are cooled with forced flow helium at a supply temperature of 44 K, while the copper heat exchangers of HTS current leads for NHMFL SCH are cooled with liquid nitrogen at a temperature of 78 K in a self-demand boil-off mode. This paper presents the two cooling methods and their impacts on cryogenic systems. Their efficiencies and costs are compared and presented.

  17. Primary calibration of coiled 103Pd brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, Adam B.; Culberson, Wesley S.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Micka, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Coiled 103 Pd brachytherapy sources have been developed by RadioMed Corporation for use as low-dose-rate (LDR) interstitial implants. The coiled sources are provided in integer lengths from 1 to 6 cm and address many common issues seen with traditional LDR brachytherapy sources. The current standard for determining the air-kerma strength (S K ) of low-energy LDR brachytherapy sources is the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Wide-Angle Free-Air Chamber (NIST WAFAC). Due to geometric limitations, however, the NIST WAFAC is unable to determine the S K of sources longer than 1 cm. This project utilized the University of Wisconsin's Variable-Aperture Free-Air Chamber (UW VAFAC) to determine the S K of the longer coiled sources. The UW VAFAC has shown agreement in S K values of 1 cm length coils to within 1% of those determined with the NIST WAFAC, but the UW VAFAC does not share the same geometric limitations as the NIST WAFAC. A new source holder was constructed to hold the coiled sources in place during measurements with the UW VAFAC. Correction factors for the increased length of the sources have been determined and applied to the measurements. Using the new source holder and corrections, the S K of 3 and 6 cm coiled sources has been determined. Corrected UW VAFAC data and ionization current measurements from well chambers have been used to determine calibration coefficients for use in the measurement of 3 and 6 cm coiled sources in well chambers. Thus, the UW VAFAC has provided the first transferable, primary measurement of low-energy LDR brachytherapy sources with lengths greater than 1 cm

  18. Vacuum magnetic field and modular coil system of the advanced stellarator Wendelstein VII-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, F.; Kisslinger, J.; Wobig, H.

    1982-06-01

    The vacuum field and the modular coils of the advanced stellarator WENDELSTEIN VII-AS are described. Each of the five field periods contains 9 different twisted coils, one of them with increased dimensions and current in order to provide sufficient access. The standard vacuum field configuration (B=3 T, t=0.39, aspect ratio approx. equal to 10, low shear, and magnetic well) can be varied by toroidal and vertical fields, or by changing independently the current in the large special coils. From a study of magnetic field perturbations some estimates are derived for the admissible coil tolerances. (orig.)

  19. Performance of long J-shaped coils in large and giant intracranial aneurysms: an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, K.; Tanaka, N.; Sugiu, K.; Levrier, O.; Martin, J.B.; Ruefenacht, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of long straight coils (Detach-18 trademark J-shaped coils) in large and giant in-vitro aneurysms. The coils consisted of a distal semicircular part 7 or 15 mm in diameter and a proximal 70 cm straight part having three types of stiffness: soft, standard, and stiff. We first investigated the ease of passage through a microcatheter in a realistic cerebral vessel model. Second, we made silicone models simulating lateral-type aneurysms of various spherical dome diameters (12, 15, 20 and 30 mm) and neck sizes (3-10 mm; dome-to-neck ratio approximately 3:1) and connected them to a pulsating circulatory pump. We evaluated the anchoring and folding patterns of the coils, stability of the microcatheter and coils in the aneurysm, and smoothness of delivery and retrieval of coils. Third, we compared the conformability of a coil in a large, irregular aneurysm with that of a spiral coil. The long J-shaped coils were easily advanced and retrieved through a microcatheter in a tortuous vessel model. In 12 mm spherical aneurysms, each coil made a complex framework, and knot formation or damage to the coil during withdrawal was often observed. In 15 mm aneurysms, the coils were all easily delivered and retrieved; standard-stiffness coils adapted best to this size. In 20 mm aneurysms, frameworks were less complex but still good with a standard or stiff coil, but those with soft coil were unstable and changed significantly within 3 min of detachment due to gravity and pulsatile flow. In 30 mm aneurysms, soft coils filled only the lower part during introduction, whereas a stiff coil still made a favourable framework. Conformability of a long J-shaped coil was superior to that of a spiral coil in a large, irregular aneurysm. Long J-shaped coils conform well to various configurations of large and giant aneurysms and can shorten procedures since a larger implant volume can be delivered with a single coil. Their principle of action may promote more favourable

  20. The design study of the JT-60SU device. No. 3. The superconductor-coils of JT-60SU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushigusa, Kenkichi; Mori, Katsuharu; Nakagawa, Syouji

    1997-03-01

    The superconducting coil systems and the cryogenic system for the JT-60 Super Upgrade (JT-60SU) has been designed. Both Nb 3 Al and NbTi as a superconducting wire material are employed in the toroidal coils (D-shaped 18 coils) to realize a high field magnet with a low cost. Significant reduction of the coil weight (150 tons/coil) without losing the coil rigidity has been achieved by connecting two toroidal coils with shear panels. Validity of this design is confirmed by the detailed structural analysis and thermohydraulic analysis. The poloidal coil system consists of 4 central solenoid coils with (NbTi) 3 Sn and 6 outer equilibrium field coils with NbTi. This system has an enough capability to supply the flux of 170Vs to produce a 10MA discharge with 200s of flat-top and to make various plasma configurations. The construction procedure of the poloidal coil system is also established under the constraint of the JT-60 site. Two sets of race-track shaped superconducting coils mounted on the top of the machine is designed to compensate the error field inside the vessel by supplying helical (m=2/n=1) magnetic field. By using cryogenic system with a 36kW of cooling capacity, the total cold weight of around 4000tons can be cooled down to 4.5K within one month, and steady heat load of 6.5kW and transient heat load of 9.0MJ can be removed within 30 minutes of discharge repetition rate. (author)

  1. Spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollin, Philippe.

    1975-01-01

    Spray cooling - using water spraying in air - is surveyed as a possible system for make-up (peak clipping in open circuit) or major cooling (in closed circuit) of the cooling water of the condensers in thermal power plants. Indications are given on the experiments made in France and the systems recently developed in USA, questions relating to performance, cost and environmental effects of spray devices are then dealt with [fr

  2. MR-based conductivity imaging using multiple receiver coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joonsung; Shin, Jaewook; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    To propose a signal combination method for MR-based tissue conductivity mapping using a standard clinical scanner with multiple receiver coils. The theory of the proposed method is presented with two practical approaches, a coil-specific approach and a subject-specific approach. Conductivity maps were reconstructed using the transceive phase of the combined signal. The sensitivities of the coefficients used for signal combination were analyzed and the method was compared with other signal combination methods. For validation, multiple receiver brain coils and multiple receiver breast coils were used in phantom, in vivo brain, and in vivo breast studies. The variation among the conductivity estimates was conductivity estimates. MR-based tissue conductivity mapping is feasible when using a standard clinical MR scanner with multiple receiver coils. The proposed method reduces systematic errors in phase-based conductivity mapping that can occur due to the inhomogeneous magnitude of the combined receive profile. Magn Reson Med 76:530-539, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. 14 CFR 29.908 - Cooling fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooling fans. 29.908 Section 29.908... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant General § 29.908 Cooling fans. For cooling fans that are a part of a powerplant installation the following apply: (a) Category A. For cooling fans installed...

  4. Dental MRI using a dedicated RF-coil at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Marcel; Heiland, Sabine; Gareis, Daniel; Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Gaudino, Chiara

    2015-12-01

    To assess the benefit of a dedicated surface coil to visualize dental structures in comparison to standard head/neck coil. Measurements were performed using the standard head/neck coil and a dedicated array coil for dental MRI at 3 T. As MRI methods, we used a T1-weighted spin-echo sequence with and without spectral fat saturation, a T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence and a 3-dimensional T2-weighted SPACE sequence. Measurements were performed in a phantom to examine sensitivity profiles. Then the signal gain in dental structures was examined in volunteers and in a patient. As expected for a surface coil, the signal gain of the dental coil was highest at the surface of the phantom and decreased with increasing distance to the coil; it was >120% even at a depth of 30 mm, measured from the centre of the coil. The signal gain within the pulp of the volunteers ranged between 236 and 413%. The dedicated array coil offers a significantly higher signal within the region of interest for dental MR imaging thus allowing for better depiction of pathologies within the periodontium and for delineation and tracking of the branches of the maxillary and mandibular nerves. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. New structural design standard for cooling towers. Pilot project BoA 2 and 3 in Neurath; Pilotprojekt der neuen Normengeneration im Kuehlturmbau. Die Naturzugkuehltuerme von BoA 2 and 3 in Neurath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woermann, Ralf [Kraetzig und Partner Ingenieurgesellschaft fuer Bautechnik mbH, Bochum (Germany); Haupt, Ralf [ALPINE BAU DEUTSCHLAND AG NL Industrie- und Kraftwerksbau, Dortmund (Germany); Ohlmann, Uwe [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany). Bautechnik

    2010-01-15

    Starting in 2006 RWE Power is erecting two lignite power plants with highly optimized efficiency (BoA) in Neurath near Cologne. These will be the second and third plant of this most advanced technique after the completion of BoA1 in Niederaussem in 2003. The most outstanding buildings of the new power-station are the natural draught cooling towers with a height of 173 m. Their design and execution will be described in this paper. For the first time in cooling tower design the completely revised new edition 2005 of the VGB-Guideline ''Structural Design of Cooling Towers'' was applied in connection with other related new design standards. (orig.)

  6. Effective therapy to reduce edema after total knee arthroplasty Multi-layer compression therapy or standard therapy with cool pack - a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Brigitta; Babendererde, Christine; Rohner-Spengler, Manuela; Müller, Urs W; Meichtry, André; Luomajoki, Hannu

    2018-02-01

    Background: After total knee arthroplasty (TKA) efficient control and reduction of postoperative edema is of great importance. Aim: The aim of this pilot study (EKNZ 2014 – 225 DRKS00006271) was to investigate the effectiveness of multi-layer compression therapy (MLCT) to reduce edema in the early period after surgery compared to the standard treatment with Cool Pack. Methods: In this randomized controlled pilot trial, sixteen patients after TKA were randomized into an intervention group (IG) or a control group (CG). Circumferential measurements were used to assess edema. Secondary outcomes were range of motion (ROM), pain (numeric rating scale, NRS) and function as measured with the fast Self Paced Walking Test (fSPWT). Results: Clinically relevant differences in edema reduction between the two groups were found in the early postoperative period and at the six weeks follow up. Six days postoperatively the group time interaction (IE) in favor of the IG were −3.8 cm (95 % CI: −5.1; −2.4) when measured 10 cm proximal to the joint space and −2.7 cm (CI: −4.1; −1.3) when measured 5 cm proximally. We further observed differences in secondary outcomes in favor of the CG. Six days postoperatively the IE for knee flexion was –8.3 ° (CI: −22.0; 5.4) and for the fSPWT it was 12.8 seconds (CI: −16.4; 41.3). Six weeks postoperatively these differences diminished. Conclusions: The findings suggest that MLCT could be an alternative treatment to reduce postoperative edema in patients after total knee arthroplasty. Eventually possible negative effects on early knee flexion and function must be considered.

  7. Acoustic emission measurement on large scale coils at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Hattori, Y.; Nishi, M.F.; Shimamoto, S.; Tsuji, H.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of acoustic emission measurement at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is an establishment of a general diagnostic method for superconducting magnet systems. Output of strain and displacement gages can not cover a whole system in monitoring premonitory phenomena of a magnet system s failure, because these sensors are mounted on points and therefore localized. Acoustic emissions can be transmitted to sensors through structural materials without electrical noise. Monitoring of acoustic emission will be one of the methods to predict a serious failure of magnet systems in a vacuum vessel. For this purpose, several sensors were installed on the Japanese LCT coil and the Test Module Coil (TMC). Some of acoustic activity was similar as seen in these coils. The correlation between voltage spikes and acoustic events is excellent during single coil charging mode, but poorer during out of plane force mode. There are no indicative acoustical phenomena before a magnet quench or during normal zone generation. The conditioning of acoustic events and voltage spikes can be seen after any cooling down. The localization of electrical insulation damage with the acoustic emission technique is one of its most useful applications

  8. Structural analyses of ITER toroidal field coils under fault conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, C.T.J.

    1992-04-01

    ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is intended to be an experimental thermonuclear tokamak reactor testing the basic physics performance and technologies essential to future fusion reactors. The magnet system of ITER consists essentially of 4 sub-systems, i.e. toroidal field coils (TFCs), poloidal field coils (PFCs), power supplies, and cryogenic supplies. These subsystems do not contain significant radioactivity inventories, but the large energy inventory is a potential accident initiator. The aim of the structural analyses is to prevent accidents from propagating into vacuum vessel, tritium system and cooling system, which all contain significant amounts of radioactivity. As part of design process 3 conditions are defined for PF and TF coils, at which mechanical behaviour has to be analyzed in some detail, viz: normal operating conditions, upset conditions and fault conditions. This paper describes the work carried out by ECN to create a detailed finite element model of 16 TFCs as well as results of some fault condition analyses made with the model. Due to fault conditions, either electrical or mechanical, magnetic loading of TFCs becomes abnormal and further mechanical failure of parts of the overall structure might occur (e.g. failure of coil, gravitational supports, intercoil structure). The analyses performed consist of linear elastic stress analyses and electro-magneto-structural analyses (coupled field analyses). 8 refs.; 5 figs.; 5 tabs

  9. The Cold Mass Support System and the Helium Cooling System for the MICE Focusing Solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Green, Michael A.; Lau, Wing W.; Senanayake, Rohan S.; Witte, Holger

    2006-01-01

    The heart of the absorber focus coil (AFC) module for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is the two-coil superconducting solenoid that surrounds the muon absorber. The superconducting magnet focuses the muons that are cooled using ionization cooling, in order to improve the efficiency of cooling. The coils of the magnet may either be run in the solenoid mode (both coils operate at the same polarity) or the gradient (the coils operate at opposite polarity). The AFC magnet cold mass support system is designed to carry a longitudinal force up to 700 kN. The AFC module will be cooled using three pulse tube coolers that produce 1.5 W of cooling at 4.2 K. One of the coolers will be used to cool the liquid (hydrogen or helium) absorber used for ionization cooling. The other two coolers will cool the superconducting solenoid. This report will describe the MICE AFC magnet. The cold mass supports will be discussed. The reasons for using a pulsed tube cooler to cool this superconducting magnet will also be discussed

  10. CCHMM_PROF: a HMM-based coiled-coil predictor with evolutionary information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartoli, Lisa; Fariselli, Piero; Krogh, Anders

    2009-01-01

    tools are available for predicting coiled-coil domains in protein sequences, including those based on position-specific score matrices and machine learning methods. RESULTS: In this article, we introduce a hidden Markov model (CCHMM_PROF) that exploits the information contained in multiple sequence...... alignments (profiles) to predict coiled-coil regions. The new method discriminates coiled-coil sequences with an accuracy of 97% and achieves a true positive rate of 79% with only 1% of false positives. Furthermore, when predicting the location of coiled-coil segments in protein sequences, the method reaches...

  11. Transient voltage oscillations in coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    Magnet coils may be excited into internal voltage oscillations by transient voltages. Such oscillations may electrically stress the magnet's dielectric components to many times its normal stress. This may precipitate a dielectric failure, and the attendant prolonged loss of service and costly repair work. Therefore, it is important to know the natural frequencies of oscillations of a magnet during the design stage, and to determine whether the expected switching transient voltages can excite the magnet into high-voltage internal oscillations. The series capacitance of a winding significantly affects its natural frequencies. However, the series capacitance is difficult to calculate, because it may comprise complex capacitance network, consisting of intra- and inter-coil turn-to-turn capacitances of the coil sections. A method of calculating the series capacitance of a winding is proposed. This method is rigorous but simple to execute. The time-varying transient voltages along the winding are also calculated

  12. Air-cooled fast discharge resistors for ITER magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanchuk, Victor; Grigoriev, Sergey; Lokiev, Vladimir; Roshal, Alexander; Song, Inho; Buzykin, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    The ITER superconducting magnets will store up to 50 GJ of magnetic energy per operation cycle. In case of coil quench the energy stored in the coils must be extracted rapidly with a time constant from 7.5 to 14 s. It will be achieved by fast discharge resistors (FDR) normally bridged by circuit breakers and inserted in series with the superconducting coils. The fast discharge of the coils results practically in adiabatic heating of the resistive elements up to 200-300 deg. C. The resistors need to be cooled to the initial temperature over 6-8 h. Natural air circulation is proposed as a cooling method. In order to simulate the temperature response of the resistors to energy released in the resistive plates and to demonstrate their cooling capability within the required time by natural air circulation the numerical model of the resistor cooling circuit has been developed. As the calculations have shown, the developed FDR cooling system based on cooling by natural air circulation is capable of providing the required temperature operation regime of FDRs, but the supply channels are to be optimized so that the cooling time does not exceed the permissible one.

  13. Studies of a thermal energy storage unit with ice on coils; Ice on coil gata kori chikunetsuso no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, S; Miura, N [Kanagawa Institute of Technology, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Study was made of an ice-on-coil heat storage tank for power load levelling. Prior to the prediction of performance of the system as a whole, the performance of the heat storage tank itself needs to be predicted. A brine (35.9% water solution of ethylene glycol) cooled by a refrigerating machine was poured from the upper end of the piping in the heat storage tank (consisting of 19 spiral pipes or coils arranged in parallel in the vertical direction) for the collection of ice around the coils. Ice grew thicker with the passage of time but there was no remarkable decrease in the transfer of heat because there was an increase in the area of contact between ice and water, and the brine exit temperature remained constant over a prolonged period of time. There was a close agreement between experiment results and theoretical conclusions throughout the heat accumulation process, including changes with time in the thickness of ice on the coils, all pointing to the appropriateness of this analytical effort. To melt the ice, water was poured into the tank top at a predetermined rate. Water chilly at 2-4{degree}C was recovered at the tank bottom, stable in the amount produced. As for the use of spiral pipes for making ice, the laminar heat transfer rate in such pipes are supposed to be more than two times higher than that in straight pipes, and this was quite effective in accelerating heat transfer. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  14. Superconducting solenoids for an international muon cooling experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Rey, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The international muon ionization cooling experiment MICE will consist of two focusing cooling cells and a pair of uniform field solenoids used for particle identification and emittance measurements. The 2.75-meter long cooling cells have a pair of field flip coils and a coupling coil. The 0.52-meter diameter field flip coils surround an absorber that removes transverse and longitudinal momentum from the muons to be cooled. The beam in the absorber is at a minimum beta point so that scattering of the muons is minimized. The 1.7-meter diameter coupling coils are outside of conventional 201.25 MHz RF cavities that accelerate the muons putting longitudinal momentum into the muons without putting back the transverse momentum into the beam. A third set of flip coils helps the muon beam transition from and to the experimental solenoids. The 0.6-meter diameter experimental solenoids have a uniform field region (good to about 1 part in 1000) that is 1.3-meters long. The MICE experiment magnets must operate as a single unit so that the field profile will produce the maximum muon cooling

  15. Effects of Slip Planes on Stresses in MICE Coupling Solenoid Coil Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Cheng, Y.; Green, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The MICE superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is made from copper matrix Nb-Ti conductors with inner radius of 750 mm, length of 285 mm and thickness of 110.4 mm at room temperature. The coil is to be wound on a mandrel made of aluminum. The peak magnetic field on the conductor is about 7.3 T when fully charged at 210 A. High magnetic field and large size make the stress inside the coupling coil assembly relatively high during cool down and full energizing. The shear stress between coil winding and aluminum casing may cause premature quench. To avoid quench potential induced by stress, slip planes were designed for the coil assembly. In this paper, FE models with and without slip planes for it have been developed to simulate the stresses during the process including winding, cooling down and charging. The stress distribution in the coil assembly with and without slip planes was investigated. The results show that slip planes with low friction coefficients can improve the stress condition in the coil, especially reduce the shear stress largely so that improve the stability.

  16. Design considerations for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the US TIBER concept. The nuclear heating generated during operation is removed from the windings by helium flowing through the conductor. The heat in the coil case is removed through a separate cooling circuit operating at approximately 20 K. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete coil cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  17. Large Coil Program magnetic system design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, S.D.; Johnson, N.E.

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the Large Coil Program (LCP) is to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting coils to provide a basis for the design principles, materials, and fabrication techniques proposed for the toroidal magnets for the THE NEXT STEP (TNS) and other future tokamak devices. This paper documents a design study of the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) in which the structural response of the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils and the supporting structure was evaluated under simulated reactor conditions. The LCP test facility structural system consists of six TF Coils, twelve coil-to-coil torsional restraining beams (torque rings), a central bucking post with base, and a Pulse Coil system. The NASTRAN Finite Element Structural Analysis computer Code was utilized to determine the distribution of deflections, forces, and stresses for each of the TF Coils, torque rings, and the central bucking post. Eleven load conditions were selected to represent probable test operations. Pulse Coils suspended in the bore of the test coil were energized to simulate the pulsed field environment characteristic of the TNS reactor system. The TORMAC Computer Code was utilized to develop the magnetic forces in the TF Coils for each of the eleven loading conditions examined, with or without the Pulse Coils energized. The TORMAC computer program output forces were used directly as input load conditions for the NASTRAN analyses. Results are presented which demonstrate the reliability of the LCTF under simulated reactor operating conditions

  18. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  19. Open-Coil Retraction Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavankumar Janardan Vibhute

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sliding mechanic has become a popular method for space closure with developments in preadjusted edgewise appliance. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and evaluated extensively for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low-load deflection rate (LDR/force decay. With the advent of NiTi springs in orthodontics, LDRs have been markedly reduced. For use of NiTi, clinician has to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. “Open Coil Retraction Spring (OCRS” is developed utilizing NiTi open-coil spring for orthodontic space closure. This paper describes fabrication and clinical application of OCRS which have number of advantages. It sustains low LDR with optimum force magnitude. Its design is adjustable for desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (i.e., it cannot be over activated, and decompression limit of open coil is also controlled by the operator, resp.. A possibility to offset the OCRS away from mucosa helps to reduce its soft-tissue impingement.

  20. PDX toroidal field coils stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.; Smith, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A method used in the stress analysis of the PDX toroidal field coil is developed. A multilayer coil design of arbitrary dimensions in the shape of either a circle or an oval is considered. The analytical model of the coil and the supporting coil case with connections to the main support structure is analyzed using the finite element technique. The three dimensional magnetic fields and the non-uniform body forces which are a loading condition on a coil due to toroidal and poloidal fields are calculated. The method of analysis permits rapid and economic evaluations of design changes in coil geometry as well as in coil support structures. Some results pertinent to the design evolution and their comparison are discussed. The results of the detailed stress analysis of the final coil design due to toroidal field, poloidal field and temperature loads are presented

  1. Conceptual designs of 50 kA 20 MJ superconducting ohmic heating coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Murphy, J.H.; Janocko, M.A.; Haller, H.E.; Litz, D.C.; Eckels, P.W.; Rogers, J.D.; Thullen, P.

    1979-01-01

    Two designs of 20 Mj superconducting coils are described which were developed to demonstrate the feasibility of an ohmic heating system. NbTi and Nb;sub 3;Sn superconductors were considered for both 7 tesla and 9 tesla maximum fields. Cabled and braided conductors were investigated and the braided conductor is identified as the best alternative due to its high operating current densities and because of its porosity. The coils are designed to be cryostable for bipolar operation from +7 tesla to -7 tesla and from +9 tesla to -9 tesla maximum fields within 1 sec. The structural design addresses the distribution of structure and structural materials used in the pulsed field environment. Immersion cooled (pool boil) and forced flow cooled coils are described. 2 refs

  2. A 16-channel MR coil for simultaneous PET/MR imaging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dregely, Isabel; Lanz, Titus; Mueller, Matthias F.; Metz, Stephan; Kuschan, Marika; Nimbalkar, Manoj; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus; Bundschuh, Ralph A.; Haase, Axel

    2015-01-01

    To implement and evaluate a dedicated receiver array coil for simultaneous positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in breast cancer. A 16-channel receiver coil design was optimized for simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To assess MR performance, the signal-to-noise ratio, parallel imaging capability and image quality was evaluated in phantoms, volunteers and patients and compared to clinical standard protocols. For PET evaluation, quantitative 18 F-FDG PET images of phantoms and seven patients (14 lesions) were compared to images without the coil. In PET image reconstruction, a CT-based template of the coil was combined with the MR-acquired attenuation correction (AC) map of the phantom/patient. MR image quality was comparable to clinical MR-only examinations. PET evaluation in phantoms showed regionally varying underestimation of the standardised uptake value (SUV; mean 22 %) due to attenuation caused by the coil. This was improved by implementing the CT-based coil template in the AC (<2 % SUV underestimation). Patient data indicated that including the coil in the AC increased the SUV values in the lesions (21 ± 9 %). Using a dedicated PET/MR breast coil, state-of-the-art MRI was possible. In PET, accurate quantification and image homogeneity could be achieved if a CT-template of this coil was included in the AC for PET image reconstruction. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of rodent spinal cord with an improved performance coil at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of animal models provide reliable means to study human diseases. The image acquisition particularly determined by the radio frequency coil to detect the signal emanated from a particular region of interest. A scaled-down version of the slotted surface coil was built based on the previous results of a magnetron-type surface coil for human applications. Our coil prototype had a 2 cm total diameter and six circular slots and was developed for murine spinal cord at 7 T. Electromagnetic simulations of the slotted and circular coils were also performed to compute the spatially dependent magnetic and electric fields using a simulated saline-solution sphere. The quality factor of both coils was experimentally measured giving a lower noise figure and a higher quality factor for the slotted coil outperforming the circular coil. Images of the spinal cord of a rat were acquired using standard pulse sequences. The slotted surface coil can be a good tool for spinal cord rat imaging using conventional pulse sequences at 7 T.

  4. Comparison of the induced fields using different coil configurations during deep transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Lu

    Full Text Available Stimulation of deeper brain structures by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS plays a role in the study of reward and motivation mechanisms, which may be beneficial in the treatment of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, electric field distributions induced in the brain by deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS are still unknown. In this paper, the double cone coil, H-coil and Halo-circular assembly (HCA coil which have been proposed for dTMS have been numerically designed. The distributions of magnetic flux density, induced electric field in an anatomically based realistic head model by applying the dTMS coils were numerically calculated by the impedance method. Results were compared with that of standard figure-of-eight (Fo8 coil. Simulation results show that double cone, H- and HCA coils have significantly deep field penetration compared to the conventional Fo8 coil, at the expense of induced higher and wider spread electrical fields in superficial cortical regions. Double cone and HCA coils have better ability to stimulate deep brain subregions compared to that of the H-coil. In the mean time, both double cone and HCA coils increase risk for optical nerve excitation. Our results suggest although the dTMS coils offer new tool with potential for both research and clinical applications for psychiatric and neurological disorders associated with dysfunctions of deep brain regions, the selection of the most suitable coil settings for a specific clinical application should be based on a balanced evaluation between stimulation depth and focality.

  5. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case

  6. Design and modelling of a SMES coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Weijia; Campbell, A M; Coombs, T A, E-mail: wy215@cam.ac.u [EPEC Superconductivity group, Engineering Department, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01

    The design of a Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) coil wound by coated conductors has been presented. Based on an existing model for coated conductor pancake coils, this paper analysed the magnetic field and current density distribution of the coil at two different operation temperatures, 77K and 22K. A comparison table of the critical currents and AC losses at these two temperatures has been presented. Several steps to improve the transport current of the coil have been suggested as well.

  7. Design of a low temperature superconducting coil to be applied to current regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Tabares, L.; Grau Carles, A

    1998-05-01

    We study the magnetic design and the cryogenic stability of a superconducting coil cooled with liquid helium, which works both in DC and AC modes. In DC mode, we obtain the maximum quench current; while in AC mode, we analyze Joule losses produced by the superconductor magnetization and the generation of eddy currents inside the copper matrix. (Author)

  8. Studies on normal-conducting coils for Wendelstein VII-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmeyer, E.; Kisslinger, J.; Rau, F.; Sapper, J.; Wobig, H.

    1990-08-01

    For Wendelstein VII-X, the next step stellarator experiment at IPP Garching, a Helias configuration has been chosen. The goals of Wendelstein VII-X are to continue the development of the modular stellarator and to demonstrate the reactor capability of this stellarator line. The main data of the selected HS5-10 configuration with five field periods are: major radius R 0 = 5.5 m, magnetic induction B 0 = 3 T and stored magnetic energy W ≅ 0.6 GJ. For comparison with the superconducting coil system which is foreseen for Wendelstein VII-X, a pulsed water-cooled normal-conducting version has been designed in order to explore the limitations and restrictions of this approach. Limitations are the high ohmic power dissipated in the coils and the electric energy currently available at IPP. Normal-conducting coils would allow to apply the well-known techniques in manufactoring these coils, as successful in use in the Wendelstein VII-AS experiment. But these techniques are applicable also for the conductor proposed for the superconducting coils of Wendelstein VII-X. In this report the time-dependent current and resistance of the coil system circuit is considered; the electric power needed, the total dissipated energy, and the temperature rise of the coil copper is calculated. Scaling laws are derived and parameter studies are made by varying the geometrical dimensions of the system. (orig.)

  9. Stress and Thermal Analysis of the In-Vessel RMP Coils in HL-2M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cen Yishun; Li Qiang; Cai Lijun; Jiang Jiaming; Li Guangsheng; Liu Yi; Ding Yonghua

    2013-01-01

    A set of in-vessel resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) coils for MHD instability suppression is proposed for the design of a HL-2M tokamak. Each coil is to be fed with a current of up to 5 kA, operated in a frequency range from DC to about 1 kHz. Stainless steel (SS) jacketed mineral insulated cables are proposed for the conductor of the coils. In-vessel coils must withstand large electromagnetic (EM) and thermal loads. The support, insulation and vacuum sealing in a very limited space are crucial issues for engineering design. Hence finite element calculations are performed to verify the design, optimize the support by minimizing stress caused by EM forces on the coil conductors and work out the temperature rise occurring on the coil in different working conditions, the corresponding thermal stress caused by the thermal expansion of materials is evaluated to be allowable. The techniques to develop the in-vessel RMP coils, such as support, insulation and cooling, are discussed

  10. Design Of JET ELM Control Coils For Operation At 350 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatz, I.J.; Baker, R.; Brooks, A.; Cole, M.; Neilson, G.H.; Lowry, C.; Mardenfeld, M.; Omran, H.; Thompson, V.; Todd, T.

    2010-01-01

    A study has confirmed the feasibility of designing, fabricating and installing resonant magnetic field perturbation (RMP) coils in JET1 with the objective of controlling edge localized modes (ELM). A system of two rows of in-vessel coils, above the machine midplane, has been chosen as it not only can investigate the physics of and achieve the empirical criteria for ELM suppression, but also permits variation of the spectra allowing for comparison with other experiments. These coils present several engineering challenges. Conditions in JET necessitate the installation of these coils via remote handling, which will impose weight, dimensional and logistical limitations. And while the encased coils are designed to be conventionally wound and bonded, they will not have the usual benefit of active cooling. Accordingly, coil temperatures are expected to reach 350 C during bakeout as well as during plasma operations. These elevated temperatures are beyond the safe operating limits of conventional OFHC copper and the epoxies that bond and insulate the turns of typical coils. This has necessitated the use of an alternative copper alloy conductor C18150 (CuCrZr). More importantly, an alternative to epoxy had to be found. An R and D program was initiated to find the best available insulating and bonding material. The search included polyimides and ceramic polymers. The scope and status of this R and D program, as well as the critical engineering issues encountered to date are reviewed and discussed.

  11. Plasmodium vivax antigen discovery based on alpha-helical coiled coil protein motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Céspedes, Nora; Habel, Catherine; Lopez-Perez, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Protein α-helical coiled coil structures that elicit antibody responses, which block critical functions of medically important microorganisms, represent a means for vaccine development. By using bioinformatics algorithms, a total of 50 antigens with α-helical coiled coil motifs orthologous to Pla...

  12. Sensitive quench detection of the HTS coil using a co-winding coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Tomohiro; Ariyama, Takahiro; Takao, Tomoaki; Tsukamoto, Osami

    2017-01-01

    The authors have studied the co-winding coil method (CW method) using the co-wound coil electrically insulated from the HTS coil. In this method, the quench is detected by the voltage difference between the coil of the HTS tape (HTS coil) and the coil of the normal conductor (CW coil). The voltage induced in the CW coil caused by the change of the magnetic field is almost the same as that in the HTS coil because the coils are magnetically coupled close to each other. Therefore, it is expected that the induced voltage will be canceled with high accuracy and that the resistive voltage in the HTS coil will be detected with greater sensitivity compared to the bridge balance method, which is used commonly. In this study, quench detection applying the CW method is demonstrated using an experimental double-pancake coil. A tape with the copper layer deposited on the polymer substrate was used as the insulated conductor wire to form the CW coil. An additional pancake coil was used to expose the experimental double-pancake coil to the external magnetic field asymmetrically. It was shown that the CW method can detect the resistive voltage with greater sensitivity even when the HTS coil was exposed to the changing asymmetric external magnetic field. (author)

  13. Linear motor coil assembly and linear motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    An ironless linear motor (5) comprising a magnet track (53) and a coil assembly (50) operating in cooperation with said magnet track (53) and having a plurality of concentrated multi-turn coils (31 a-f, 41 a-d, 51 a-k), wherein the end windings (31E) of the coils (31 a-f, 41 a-e) are substantially

  14. Split Coil Forms for Rotary Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, C. W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Split cores for rotor and stator windings of rotary transformer mounted around their respective coils (which are in bobbins) and cemented together. This arrangement simplifies winding of stator coil to go in a slot in inner diameter of stator coil. One practical application of rotary transformers fabricated according to this technique is for centrifuges, in which conventional sliprings are of uncertain reliability.

  15. Startup of large coil test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils. (author)

  16. Novel method of aligning ATF-1 coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, J.A.; Harris, J.H.; Neilson, G.H.; Jernigan, T.C.

    1983-08-01

    The coils for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF-1) torsatron may be easily aligned before the machine is placed under vacuum. This is done by creating nulls in the magnetic field by energizing the coils in various configurations. All of the nulls in vertical bar B vector vertical bar occur on the z-axis. When the nulls coincide, the coils are properly aligned

  17. Experimental approach to investigate the constrained recovery behavior of coiled monofilament polymer fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, S. S.; Nunes, L. C. S.

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a new approach for investigating the thermo-mechanical behavior of coiled oriented polymer fibers with fixed ends and promote an understanding of the actuation response of coiled polymers in constrained recovery applications. In the proposed experimental methodology, a coiled fiber was pre-stretched by 50% and the distance between its ends remained constant, then it was subjected to a heating-cooling cycle ranging from 30 °C to 120 °C and the induced restoring force was measured. Based on these measurements, axial deformation and shear strain were obtained from full-field displacements extracted by the digital image correlation method from images of the coiled fiber. Three coiled fibers with different initial pitch angles were manufactured, and samples with lengths of 15 mm and 20 mm were tested. Bias angles and coil radius were also estimated using the experimental data associated with the helical spring theory. Results show that significant shape changes can be noticed above the glass transition temperature (47 °C), and these changes induce variation in the resultant forces. The effects of thermal softening and thermal contraction for a modest negative thermal expansion coefficient became evident at temperatures ranging from ∼47 °C to ∼90 °C, while the response of a coiled homochiral polymer fiber was achieved at temperatures close to 90 °C. During the cooling process, saturated states of the axial deformation and shear strain of the coiled fibers were observed at temperatures between 120 °C and 100 °C.

  18. Self-Assembly of Rod-Coil Block Copolymers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jenekhe, S

    1999-01-01

    ... the self-assembly of new rod-coil diblock, rod- coil-rod triblock, and coil-rod-coil triblock copolymers from solution and the resulting discrete and periodic mesostmctares with sizes in the 100...

  19. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state-of-the-art of ventil......This report, by venticool, summarises the outcome of the work of the initial working phase of IEA ECB Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling and is based on the findings in the participating countries. It presents a summary of the first official Annex 62 report that describes the state......-of-the-art of ventilative cooling potentials and limitations, its consideration in current energy performance regulations, available building components and control strategies and analysis methods and tools. In addition, the report provides twenty six examples of operational buildings using ventilative cooling ranging from...

  20. Magnetic Field Alignment of PS-P4VP: a Non-Liquid Crystalline Coil-Coil Block Copolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhlenko, Yekaterina; Zhang, Kai; Larson, Steven; Gopalan, Padma; O'Hern, Corey; Osuji, Chinedum

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic fields provide the ability to control alignment of self-assembled soft materials such as block copolymers. Most prior work in this area has relied on the presence of ordered assemblies of anisotropic liquid crystalline species to ensure sufficient magnetic anisotropy to drive alignment. Recent experiments with poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine), a non-liquid crystalline BCP, however, show field-induced alignment of a lamellar microstructure during cooling across the order-disorder transition. Using in situ x-ray scattering, we examine the roles of field strength and cooling rate on the alignment response of this low MW coil-coil BCP. Alignment is first observed at field strengths as low as 1 Tesla and improves markedly with both increasing field strength and slower cooling. We present a geometric argument to illustrate the origin of a finite, non-trivial magnetic susceptibility anisotropy for highly stretched surface-tethered polymer chains and corroborate this using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. We rationalize the magnetic field response of the system in terms of the mobility afforded by the absence of entanglements, the intrinsic anisotropy resulting from the stretched polymer chains and sterically constrained conjugated rings, and the large grain size in these low molecular weight materials.

  1. A novel method for coiled tubing installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Peter J. [2H Offshore, Houston, TX (United States); Tibbetts, David [Aquactic Engineering and Construction Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-19

    Installation of flexible pipe for offshore developments is costly due to the physical cost of the flexible pipe, expensive day rates and the availability of suitable installation vessels. Considering the scarcity of flexible pipe in today's increasingly demanding and busy market, operators are seeking a cost effective solution for installing piping in a range of water depths using vessels which are readily on hand. This paper describes a novel approach to installing reeled coiled tubing, from 1 inch to 5 inch diameter, from the back of a small vessel in water depths from 40 m up to around 1000 m. The uniqueness of the system is the fact that the equipment design is modular and compact. This means that when disassembled, it fits into standard 40 ft shipping containers, and the size allows it to be installed on even relatively small vessels of opportunity, such as anchor handling or installation vessels, from smaller, and cheaper quay side locations. Such an approach is the ideal solution to the problem faced by operators, in that it allows the installation of cheaper, readily available coiled tubing, from cost-effective vessels, which do not need to transit to a pick up the system. (author)

  2. Calibration of Helmholtz Coils for the characterization of MEMS magnetic sensor using fluxgate magnetometer with DAS1 magnetic range data acquisition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Farooq; Dennis, John Ojur; Md Khir, Mohd Haris; Hamid, Nor Hisham

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents the calibration of Helmholtz coils for the characterization of MEMS Magnetic sensor using Fluxgate magnetometer with DAS1 Magnetic Range Data Acquisition System. The Helmholtz coils arrangement is often used to generate a uniform magnetic field in space. In the past, standard magnets were used to calibrate the Helmholtz coils. A method is presented here for calibrating these coils using a Fluxgate magnetometer and known current source, which is easier and results in greater accuracy.

  3. TPX heating and cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kungl, D.J.; Knutson, D.S.; Costello, J.; Stoenescu, S.; Yemin, L.

    1995-01-01

    TPX, while having primarily super-conducting coils that do not require water cooling, still has very significant water cooling requirements for the plasma heating systems, vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, diagnostics, and ancillary equipment. This is accentuated by the 1000-second pulse requirement. Two major design changes, which have significantly affected the TPX Heating and Cooling System, have been made since the conceptual design review in March of 1993. This paper will discuss these changes and review the current status of the conceptual design. The first change involves replacing the vacuum vessel neutron shielding configuration of lead/glass composite tile by a much simpler and more reliable borated water shield. The second change reduces the operating temperature of the vacuum vessel from 150 C to ≥50 C. With this temperature reduction, all in-vessel components and the vessel will be supplied by coolant at a common ≥50 C inlet temperature. In all, six different heating and cooling supply requirements (temperature, pressure, water quality) for the various TPX components must be met. This paper will detail these requirements and provide an overview of the Heating and Cooling System design while focusing on the ramifications of the TPX changes described above

  4. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, J.C.

    1997-05-13

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

  5. Coil Migration through a Neuroform 3 Stent during Endovascular Coiling. A Case Report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, A

    2009-07-29

    Summary: A 43-year-old woman attended for stent assisted coiling. A Neuroform 30 x 4.5 mm stent had been successfully placed over the left periophthalmic aneurysm. During the coiling the first coil migrated through the crowns in the stent, lodging at the MCA bifurcation. We believe that the coil herniated through the overlying stent due to the carotid siphon curvature and the open cell design. Furthermore the distal markers of the stent impeded coil extraction with a MERCI device.

  6. An inflatable surface coil for rectal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.F.; Hajek, P.C.; Baker, L.L.; Gylys-Morin, V.; Mattrey, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Surface coils have become ubiquitous in MR imaging of the body because of substantial gains in signal-to-noise ratio. Unfortunately, there are some anatomic regions, such as the prostate, for which surface coils have insufficient depth sensitivity. The authors have developed an inflatable, distributed capacitance, passively decoupled surface coil which is collapsed for insertion and reinflated for imaging. Images of the prostate are dramatically improved due to proximity of the coil. Lesions in cadaver specimens were observed which were not seen with body coil imaging. Clinical trials are expected to begin in September

  7. Introduction of fuzzy logic theorem for quench detection in the superconducting coil system of a Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Yamato; Ninomiya, Akira; Uriu, Yoshihisa; Ishigohka, Takeshi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Imagawa, Shinsaku; Yanagi, Nagato; Sekiguchi, Haruo; Yamada, Shuichi

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed the state of the superconducting coil system in a LHD at NIFS (National Institute of Fusion Science) using a fuzzy logic theorem to detect quenching at an early stage. In this method, the 'warning coefficient' of the coil system is calculated. As for the fuzzy variables, 'effective stored heat' in the coil is introduced in addition to the voltage signal in order to improve quench detection and state estimation. The 'effective stored heat' is an integrated value of the heat generated in the coil on the assumption that instantaneous heat in the conductor is continuously cooled by liquid helium. Experiments conducted using the LHD coils confirmed that quench alarm signals can be issued with sufficient lead time before quenching. On the other hand, in the case of small local disturbances, the system shows only a small increase in the caution level. (author)

  8. ANL experimental program for pulsed superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1978-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and started in aggressive development program in FY 1977. The main objectives for FY 1977 are to develop cryostable basic cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to develop 12 kA cryostable cable, using it to design and build a 1.5 MJ pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat for the 1.5 MJ pulsed coil. The principal objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil ranging from 2 T/s up to 12 T/s. Another objective in the pulsed coil program is to determine the feasibility of parallel coil operation in order to avoid excessive voltage and current requirements and to minimize the number of turns for the equilibrium field (EF) coils, should the EF coils be connected in parallel with the OH coils. A two-coil section model using the 11 kA cable will be built and tested

  9. Pulse coil concepts for the LCP Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.E.; Burn, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    The pulse coils described in this paper are resistive copper magnets driven by time-varying currents. They are included in the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) portion of the Large Coil Program (LCP) to simulate the pulsed field environment of the toroidal coils in a tokamak reactor. Since TNS (a 150 sec, 5MA, igniting tokamak) and the Oak Ridge EPR (Experimental Power Reactor) are representative of the first tokamaks to require the technology developed in LCP, the reference designs for these machines, especially TNS, are used to derive the magnetic criteria for the pulse coils. This criteria includes the magnitude, distribution, and rate of change of pulsed fields in the toroidal coil windings. Three pulse coil concepts are evaluated on the basis of magnetic criteria and factors such as versatility of design, ease of fabrication and cost of operation. The three concepts include (1) a pair of poloidal coils outside the LCTF torus, (2) a single poloidal coil threaded through the torus, and (3) a pair of vertical axis coil windings inside the bore of one or more of the toroidal test coils

  10. ANL experimental program for pulsed superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.; Praeg, W.F.; Krieger, C.I.

    1977-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) had recognized the clear advantage of a superconducting ohmic-heating (OH) coil and started an aggressive development program in FY 1977. The main objectives for FY 1977 are to develop cryostable basic cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to develop 12 kA cryostable cable, using it to design and build a 1.5 MJ pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat for the 1.5 MJ pulsed coil. The principal objective in building the 1.5 MJ ac coil is to demonstrate ac cryostability of a large coil ranging from 2 T/s up to 12 T/s. Another objective in the pusled coil program is to determine the feasibility of parallel coil operation in order to avoid excessive voltage and current requirements and to minimize the number of turns for the equilibrium field (EF) coils, should the EF coils be connected in parallel with the OH coils. A two-coil section model using the 11 kA cable will be built and tested

  11. Performance evaluation of matrix gradient coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Feng; Schultz, Gerrit; Testud, Frederik; Welz, Anna Masako; Weber, Hans; Littin, Sebastian; Yu, Huijun; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we present a new performance measure of a matrix coil (also known as multi-coil) from the perspective of efficient, local, non-linear encoding without explicitly considering target encoding fields. An optimization problem based on a joint optimization for the non-linear encoding fields is formulated. Based on the derived objective function, a figure of merit of a matrix coil is defined, which is a generalization of a previously known resistive figure of merit for traditional gradient coils. A cylindrical matrix coil design with a high number of elements is used to illustrate the proposed performance measure. The results are analyzed to reveal novel features of matrix coil designs, which allowed us to optimize coil parameters, such as number of coil elements. A comparison to a scaled, existing multi-coil is also provided to demonstrate the use of the proposed performance parameter. The assessment of a matrix gradient coil profits from using a single performance parameter that takes the local encoding performance of the coil into account in relation to the dissipated power.

  12. Cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korik, L.; Burger, R.

    1992-01-01

    What is the effect of 0.6C (1F) temperature rise across turbines, compressors, or evaporators? Enthalpy charts indicate for every 0.6C (1F) hotter water off the cooling tower will require an additional 2 1/2% more energy cost. Therefore, running 2.2C (4F) warmer due to substandard cooling towers could result in a 10% penalty for overcoming high heads and temperatures. If it costs $1,250,000.00 a year to operate the system, $125,000.00 is the energy penalty for hotter water. This paper investigates extra fuel costs involved in maintaining design electric production with cooling water 0.6C (1F) to 3C (5.5F) hotter than design. If design KWH cannot be maintained, paper will calculate dollar loss of saleable electricity. The presentation will conclude with examining the main causes of deficient cold water production. State-of-the-art upgrading and methodology available to retrofit existing cooling towers to optimize lower cooling water temperatures will be discussed

  13. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  14. MICE - Absorber and focus coil safety working group design document: Preliminary design and assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, Giles; Baynham, Elwyn; Black, Edgar; Bradshaw, Tom; Cummings, Mary Anne; Green, Michael A.; Ishimoto, Shigeru; Ivanyushenkov, Yury; Lau, Wing; Zisman, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A Neutrino Factory based on a muon storage ring is the ultimate tool for studies of neutrino oscillations, including possibly the discovery of leptonic CP violation. it is also the first step toward a muon collider. To develop a stored-muon-beam facility to serve as a Neutrino Factory, it is necessary to ''cool'' a muon beam (decrease its phase-space volume). The short lifetime of the muon, 2.2 (micro)s at rest, eliminates all currently demonstrated cooling techniques and requires that a new, heretofore untried, technique--ionization cooling--be employed. Although ionization cooling of muons has never been demonstrated in practice, it has been shown by end-to-end simulation and design studies to be an important factor both for the performance and for the cost of a Neutrino Factory. This motivates an international program of R and D, including an experimental demonstration at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The aims of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment are: (1) to show that it is possible to design, engineer and build a section of cooling channel capable of giving the desired performance for a Neutrino Factory; and (2) to place it in a muon beam and measure its performance in various modes of operation and beam conditions, thereby investigating the limits and practicality of cooling. The MICE collaboration has designed an experiment in which a section of an ionization cooling channel is exposed to a muon beam. This cooling channel assembles liquid-hydrogen absorbers providing energy loss and high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to re-accelerate the particles, all tightly contained in a magnetic channel. It reduces the beam transverse emittance by > 10% for muon momenta between 140 and 240 MeV/c. The layout of the experiment is shown. They utilize one complete magnetic cell of the cooling channel, comprising three absorber-focus-coil (AFC) modules and two RF-coupling-coil (RFCC) modules. Spectrometers placed before and after the

  15. Status of the cold test facility for the JT-60SA tokamak toroidal field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Maksoud, Walid, E-mail: walid.abdelmaksoud@cea.fr; Bargueden, Patrick; Bouty, André; Dispau, Gilles; Donati, André; Eppelle, Dominique; Genini, Laurent; Guiho, Patrice; Guihard, Quentin; Joubert, Jean-Michel; Kuster, Olivier; Médioni, Damien; Molinié, Frédéric; Sinanna, Armand; Solenne, Nicolas; Somson, Sébastien; Vieillard, Laurence

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The 5 K cryogenic loop includes a 500 W refrigerator and a She cold pump. • The coils are energized thanks to a 25.7 kA power supply and HTS current leads. • Temperature margin tests between 5 K and 7.5 K will be made on each coil. • A magnet safety system protects each double pancake of the coil in case of quench. • Instrumentation is monitored on a 1 Hz to 10 kHz fast acquisition system. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a fusion experiment which is jointly constructed by Japan and Europe and which shall contribute to the early realization of fusion energy, by providing support to the operation of ITER, and by addressing key physics issues for ITER and DEMO. In order to achieve these goals, the existing JT-60U experiment will be upgraded to JT-60SA by using superconducting coils. The 18 TF coils of the JT-60SA device will be provided by European industry and tested in a Cold Test Facility (CTF) at CEA Saclay. The coils will be tested at the nominal current of 25.7 kA and will be cooled with supercritical helium between 5 K and 7.5 K to check the temperature margin against a quench. The main objective of these tests is to check the TF coils performance and hence mitigate the fabrication risks. The most important components of the facility are: a 11.5 m × 6.5 m large cryostat in which the TF coils will be thermally insulated by vacuum; a 500 W helium refrigerator and a valve box to cool the coils down to 5 K and circulate 24 g/s of supercritical helium through the winding pack and through the casing; a power supply and HTS current leads to energize the coil; the control and instrumentation equipment (sensors, PLC's, supervision system, fast data acquisition system, etc.) and the Magnet Safety System (MSS) that protects the coils in case of quench. The paper will give an overview of the design of this large facility and the status of its realization.

  16. Crucible and coil monitoring during melting operation in induction crucible furnaces; Tiegel- und Spulenueberwachung beim Schmelzbetrieb von Induktionstiegeloefen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doetsch, Erwin; Forsthoevel, Christoph; Rische, Marco [ABP Induction Systems GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    The immediate proximity of the metal melt, with a temperature of up to above, 1600 C, to the induction coil in inductive melting necessitates highly reliable monitoring systems, in order to prevent dangerous contact between the melt and the cooling-water-conducting copper section. Ground-fault monitoring, in which the electrical resistance between the melt and the coil is continuously measured, is a standard solution for this function. Everyday use of this long-established system has been made more dependable by automating a number of functions, and the system has also been adapted to modern plant technology, including synchronous tandem operation of two crucible furnaces from a common converter power supply, for example. Measurement of frequency and effective power, as a function of wall thickness, is a supplementary monitoring strategy. Processing of the measured data in the melt processor, in combination with visual assessment, permits appraisal of the integral crucible state and reliable estimation of the remaining service-life of the current crucible. (orig.)

  17. Thermal analysis of the conduction cooling system for HTS SMES system of 600 kJ class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Yong Ju; Yeom, Han Kil; Park, Seong Je; Kim, Hyo Bong; Koh, Deuk Yong

    2007-01-01

    SMES systems need cryogenic cooling systems. Conduction cooling system has more effective, compact structure than cryogen. In general, 2 stage GM cryocoolers are used for conduction cooling of HTS SMES system. 1st stages of cryocoolers are used for the cooling of current leads and radiation shields, and 2nd stages of cryocoolers for HTS coil. For the effective conduction cooling of the HTS SMES system, the temperature difference between the cryocooler and HTS coil should be minimized. In this paper, a cryogenic conduction cooling system for HTS SMES is analyzed to evaluate the performance of the cooling system. The analysis is carried out for the steady state with the heat generation of the HTS coil and effects of the thermal contact resistance. The results show the effects of the heat generation and thermal contact resistance on the temperature distribution

  18. Passive cooling of control rod drive mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, M.F.; Schwirian, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for passively cooling the control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) in the reactor vessel of a nuclear power plant. Passive cooling is achieved by dispersing a plurality of chimneys within the CRDM array in positions where a control rod is not required. The chimneys induce convective air currents which cause ambient air from within the containment to flow over the CRDM coils. The air heated by the coils is guided into inlets in the chimneys by baffles. The chimney is insulated and extends through the seismic support platform and missile shield disposed above the closure head. A collar of adjustable height mates with plate elements formed at the distal end of the CRDM pressure housings by an interlocking arrangement so that the seismic support platform provides lateral restraint for the chimneys. (Author)

  19. Conformational switching in the coiled-coil domains of a proteasomal ATPase regulates substrate processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoberger, Aaron; Brettrager, Evan J; Smith, David M

    2018-06-18

    Protein degradation in all domains of life requires ATPases that unfold and inject proteins into compartmentalized proteolytic chambers. Proteasomal ATPases in eukaryotes and archaea contain poorly understood N-terminally conserved coiled-coil domains. In this study, we engineer disulfide crosslinks in the coiled-coils of the archaeal proteasomal ATPase (PAN) and report that its three identical coiled-coil domains can adopt three different conformations: (1) in-register and zipped, (2) in-register and partially unzipped, and (3) out-of-register. This conformational heterogeneity conflicts with PAN's symmetrical OB-coiled-coil crystal structure but resembles the conformational heterogeneity of the 26S proteasomal ATPases' coiled-coils. Furthermore, we find that one coiled-coil can be conformationally constrained even while unfolding substrates, and conformational changes in two of the coiled-coils regulate PAN switching between resting and active states. This switching functionally mimics similar states proposed for the 26S proteasome from cryo-EM. These findings thus build a mechanistic framework to understand regulation of proteasome activity.

  20. Cooling tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbaeck, P; Heneby, H

    1976-01-22

    Cooling towers to be transported on road vehicles as a unit are not allowed to exceed certain dimensions. In order to improve the efficiency of such a cooling tower (of cross-flow design and box-type body) with given dimensions, it is proposed to arrange at least one of the scrubbing bodies displaceable within a module or box. Then it can be moved out of the casing into working position, thereby increasing the front surface available for the inlet of air (and with it the efficiency) by nearly a factor of two.

  1. Enhanced MR angiography of the lower extremities with synergy spine coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2002-01-01

    A synergy spine coil is a phased-array coil designed for spine imaging. The coil's sensitive area is narrow in both the x-axis and y-axis directions but very wide in the z-axis direction. It is therefore suitable for using in long parts of the body, such as the spine. We used the coil for enhanced MR angiography in the lower extremities, which requires a very long field of view on the z-axis direction. Using on the NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) standard test for special-purpose coils, the sensitive volume of the synergy spine coil was first measured by using a phantom. It was found that the sensitive lengths along x-axis and y-axis were 300 mm and 120 mm, respectively, while that along z-axis could set at any length required for the examination by modifying the element number. The above area was confirmed to be sufficient for obtaining enhanced MR angiograms of the lower extremities. The results of this study showed the use of the synergy spine coil in enhanced MR angiography of the lower extremities is superior to the use of a conventional whole body coil for obtaining good MR angiograms with a good single-to-noise ratio (SNR). (author)

  2. Design study of an indirect cooling superconducting magnet for a fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, Toshiyuki; Hemmi, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    The design study of superconducting magnets adapting a new coil winding scheme of an indirect cooling method is reported. The superconducting magnet system for the spherical tokamak (ST), which is proposed to study the steady state plasma experiment with Q - equiv-1, requires high performances with a high current density compared to the ordinal magnet design because of its tight spatial restriction. The superconducting magnet system for the fusion device has been used in the condition of high magnetic field, high electromagnetic force, and high heat load. The pool boiling liquid helium cooling outside of the conductor or the forced flow of supercritical helium cooling inside of the conductor, such as cable-in-conduit conductors, were used so far for the cooling method of the superconducting magnet for a fusion application. The pool cooling magnet has the disadvantages of low mechanical rigidities and low withstand voltages of the coil windings. The forced flow cooling magnet with cable-in-conduit conductors has the disadvantages of the restriction of the coil design because of the path of the electric current must be the same as that of the cooling channel for refrigerant. The path of the electric current and that of the cooling channel for refrigerant can be independently designed by adopting the indirect cooling method that inserts the independent cooling panel in the coil windings and cools the conductor from the outside. Therefore the optimization of the coil windings structure can be attempted. It was shown that the superconducting magnet design of the high current density became possible by the indirect cooling method compared with those of the conventional cooling scheme. (author)

  3. Remote maintenance of tandem mirror hybrid coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid Coils (superconducting coils with normal conducting inserts) are being employed with increasing frequency on Tandem Mirror Devices to obtain high field strengths. The normal conducting copper inserts are short lived in comparison to their encircling superconductors. It becomes desirable, therefore, to devise design features and maintenance procedures to replace the inner normal conducting coils without simultaneously replacing the longer lived (and significantly more costly) superconducting coils. The high neutron wall loadings require that the task be accomplished by remote control. The approach is to permanently mount the coil assemblies on track mounted carriages which serve, during machine operation merely as structural supports, but during maintenance procedures as moveable transport devices. The carriages incorporate all necessary provisions to facilitate remote maintenance operations and to adjust and align the coil assemblies with respect to adjacent machine components. The vacuum vessel is severed on both sides of the hybrid coil by means of a remote cutting machine. The entire coil is transported horizontally, normal to the machine axis to a nearby repair station. Prepositioned carriage mounted repair equipment at the repair station withdraws the damaged normal coil as a single entity and inserts a preassembled spare unit. The repaired hybrid coil is reassembled to the reactor. A cost and risk effective procedure has been evolved to maintain one of the more critical components of a Tandem Mirror Machine

  4. Discussion of discrete D shape toroidal coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiho, Katsuyuki; Ohara, Takeshi; Agatsuma, Ko; Onishi, Toshitada

    1988-01-01

    A novel design for a toroidal coil, called the D shape coil, was reported by J. File. The coil conductors are in pure tension and then subject to no bending moment. This leads to a smaller number of emf supports in a simpler configuration than that with the conventional toroidal coil of circular cross-section. The contours of the D shape are given as solutions of a differential equation. This equation includes the function of the magnetic field distribution in the conductor region which is inversely proportional to the winding radius. It is therefore important to use the exact magnetic field distribution. However the magnetic field distribution becomes complicated when the D shape toroidal coil is comprised of discrete coils and also depends on the D shape configuration. A theory and a computer program for designing the practical pure-tension toroidal coil are developed. Using this computer code, D shape conductors are calculated for various numbers of discrete coils and the results are compared. Electromagnetic forces in the coils are also calculated. It is shown that the hoop stress in the conductors depends only on the total ampere-turns of the coil when the contours of the D shape are similar. (author)

  5. Conductor for a fluid-cooled winding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Walter J.

    1983-01-01

    A conductor and method of making the conductor are provided for use in winding electrical coils which are cooled by a fluid communicating with the conductor. The conductor is cold worked through twisting and reshaping steps to form a generally rectangular cross section conductor having a plurality of helical cooling grooves extending axially of the conductor. The conductor configuration makes it suitable for a wide variety of winding applications and permits the use of simple strip insulation between turns and perforated sheet insulation between layers of the winding.

  6. Decoupling Scheme for a Cryogenic Rx-Only RF Coil for 13C Imaging at 3T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Juan Diego; Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Laustsen, Christoffer

    In this study we evaluate the different active decoupling schemes that can be used to drive an Rx-only coil, in order to determine the optimal design for 13C MRI at 3T. Three different circuit schemes are studied: two known ones (with regular series and parallel tuning respectively), and a novel...... one which we found to be optimal for this case. The circuits have been cooled to 77K to reduce coil noise. Preliminary tests with the preamplifier cooled to 77K for reduction of noise figure, are also reported....

  7. Influence of dump voltage and allowable temperature rise on stabilizer requirements in superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenterly, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    A superconducting winding must have enough stabilizer to satisfy two sets of criteria. During normal operation, the amount of stabilizer must be large enough either to make the coil unconditionally stable or to give a certain desired stability margin. Once a dump occurs, the amount of stabilizer must be large enough to carry the current without generating excessive dump voltages or allowing the winding to exceed a certain maximum temperature (and maximum pressure, in the case of force-cooled coils). The voltage criterion often dominates for very large coil systems, but it is frequently ignored in initial design studies. This paper gives some simple relations between the dump voltage and the stored energy, temperature rise, and coil geometry that are useful in scooping the required amount of stabilizer. Comparison with some recently proposed fusion magnet system designs indicates that excessive dump voltages could result in some cases. High-temperature superconductors may require more stabilizer than the conventional alloys. Calculations with simple model coil systems indicate how trade-offs between various coil parameters affect the dump voltage. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Some aspects of the design of the ITER NBI Active Correction and Compensation Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Javier, E-mail: javier.alonso@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Barrera, Germán; Cabrera, Santiago; Rincón, Esther; Ríos, Luis; Soleto, Alfonso [CIEMAT, Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); El-Ouazzani, Anass; Graceffa, Joseph; Shah, Darshan; Urbani, Marc [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Agarici, Gilbert [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3 – 07/08, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Water cooled coil design. • Magnetic shielding of the plasma heating Neutral Beam Injection System. • Active coils for magnetic field compensation. - Abstract: The neutral beam system for ITER consists of two heating and current drive injectors plus a diagnostic neutral beam injector. The proposed physical plant layout allows for a possible third heating injector to be installed later. For correct operation of the beam source, and to avoid deflections of the charged fraction of the beam, the magnetic field along the beam path must be very low. To minimize the stray ITER field in critical areas (ion source, acceleration grids, neutralizer, residual ion dump), a Magnetic Field Reduction System will envelop the beam vessels and the high voltage transmission lines to ion source. This whole system comprises the Passive Magnetic Shield, a set of thick steel plates, and the Active Correction and Compensation Coils, a set of coils carrying currents which depend on the tokamak stray field. This paper describes the status of the coil design, terminals and support structures, as well as a description of the calculations carried out. Most coils are suitable for removal from their final position to be replaced in case of a fault. Conclusions of the chosen design highlight the strategy for the system feasibility.

  9. Design features of the A-cell and transition coils of MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatro, R.E.; Wohlwend, J.W.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    The MFTF-B transition coil and A-cell magnet designs use variations of the copper-stabilized NbTi conductor developed by LLNL for the MFTF Yin-Yang magnets. This conductor will be wound on the one inch thick (12.7 mm) stainless steel coil forms using a two-axis winding machine similar to the existing LLNL Yin-Yang winding machine. After winding, covers will be placed over the coil and welded to the coil form to form a helium-tight jacket around the conductor. These jacketed coils are then enclosed in thick structural cases that react the large Lorentz forces on the magnets. The space between the coil jacket and case will be filled by a stainless steel bladder that will be injected with urethane. The injection bladder will provide cooling passages during cooldown as well as transmitting the Lorentz forces between the jacket and the case. The large self-equilibrating lobe-spreading forces on the magnets (29.10 6 lb, 127.0 MN) for the A-cell are reacted primarily through the thick 304 LN case into the external superstructure. The net Lorentz forces and the inertial forces on the magnet are reacted through support systems into the LLNL vacuum vessel structure

  10. Stochastic cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron

  11. Design and fabrication of forced-flow superconducting poloidal coils for the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamoto, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Mizumaki, S.; Yamakoshi, T.; Kanai, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Wachi, Y.; Ushijima, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kai, T.; Takahata, K.; Yamamoto, J.; Satow, T.; Motojima, O.

    1995-01-01

    Three pairs of superconducting poloidal coils for the LHD (Large Helical Device) have been designed and fabricated using NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductors cooled with forced-flow supercritical helium (SHE). In the LHD poloidal coils, high field accuracy as well as high reliability are required. To meet these requirements, detailed field and structural analyses have been performed and key parameters including winding pattern and size and locations of conductor joints have been determined. Compact conductor joint, where NbTi filaments are directly bonded, has also been developed using the solid state bonding technique. (orig.)

  12. Development of a new error field correction coil (C-coil) for DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.I.; Scoville, J.T.

    1995-12-01

    The C-coil recently installed on the DIII-D tokamak was developed to reduce the error fields created by imperfections in the location and geometry of the existing coils used to confine, heat, and shape the plasma. First results from C-coil experiments include stable operation in a 1.6 MA plasma with a density less than 1.0 x 10 13 cm -3 , nearly a factor of three lower density than that achievable without the C-coil. The C-coil has also been used in magnetic braking of the plasma rotation and high energy particle confinement experiments. The C-coil system consists of six individual saddle coils, each 60 degree wide toroidally, spanning the midplane of the vessel with a vertical height of 1.6 m. The coils are located at a major radius of 3.2 m, just outside of the toroidal field coils. The actual shape and geometry of each coil section varied somewhat from the nominal dimensions due to the large number of obstructions to the desired coil path around the already crowded tokamak. Each coil section consists of four turns of 750 MCM insulated copper cable banded with stainless steel straps within the web of a 3 in. x 3 in. stainless steel angle frame. The C-coil structure was designed to resist peak transient radial forces (up to 1,800 Nm) exerted on the coil by the toroidal and ploidal fields. The coil frames were supported from existing poloidal field coil case brackets, coil studs, and various other structures on the tokamak

  13. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms with bioactive Cerecyte coils: effects on treatment stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyik, Serdar; Yavuz, Kivilcim; Ergun, Onur; Koc, Osman; Cekirge, Saruhan; Saatci, Isil

    2008-01-01

    The Cerecyte coils were developed to improve long-term stability of embolized cerebral aneurysms by producing an increased fibrous reaction over the neck of the aneurysms. We report our preliminary clinical experience with mid-term follow-up. Seventy-eight consecutive patients with 84 intracranial aneurysms treated exclusively with Cerecyte coils were included in this study. Forty-eight aneurysms were ruptured and 36 were incidental. Twenty-two aneurysms were small with ( 25 mm). The embolization technique was the same with that in standard bare coiling. Immediate post-procedure angiography demonstrated complete aneurysm occlusion in 69%, neck remnant in 29.8% and incomplete occlusion in 1.2%. Follow-up angiography was obtained in 80 aneurysms in a period of time ranging from 6 months to 2 years. The overall recanalization rate was 11.3%, and the re-treatment rate was 6.3%; in the subgroup analysis, recanalization rates were 4.5% in S/S; 9.8% in S/W; and 33.3% in large aneurysms. The only giant aneurysm also showed recanalization. Procedure-related morbidity and mortality rates were 2.6% and 1.3%, respectively. Our midterm results showed a relatively low rate of recurrence compared to those reported for platinum coils with morbidity and mortality rates comparable to those with standard bare platinum coils. The efficacy of Cerecyte coils in the long term will be specifically addressed by the ongoing randomized Cerecyte coil trial. (orig.)

  14. Argonne National Laboratory superconducting pulsed coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.

    1979-01-01

    The main objectives are to develop high current (approx. 100 kA) cryostable cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to build a demonstration pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat. A 1.5-MJ cryostable pulsed superconducting coil has been developed and constructed at ANL. The coil has a peak field of 4.5 T at an operating current of 11.0 kA. A large inexpensive plastic cryostat has been developed for testing the pulsed coil. The coil has been pulsed with a maximum dB/dt of 11 T/s. The coil was pulsed more than 4000 cycles. Detailed results of the ac loss measurements and the current sharing of the cryostability will be described

  15. Test facility for PLT TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearney, J.; File, J.; Dreskin, S.

    1975-01-01

    Past experience with the model C stellerator and other toroidal field devices indicates that mechanical and electrical tests of a toroidal field coil prior to maximum field operation of the device is prudent and desirable. This paper describes a test program for the PLT-TF coils. The test stand consists of one test coil, two background coils and a steel supporting structure. The three coil configuration produces a 67.5 kG field at the inner conductor (38 kG at the bore center) and simulates a 1/R field distribution in the bore of the test coil. The resolution of the field force system and resultant stresses within the test structure are discussed. A test procedure is described which maximizes the information obtained from a 100,000 pulse program

  16. Power loss problems in EXTRAP coil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1977-02-01

    The Ohmic power loss in the coils of external ring traps is minimized with respect to the thermonuclear power production. In the case of the DT-reaction this leads to dimensions and power densities being relevant to full-scale reactors. Not only superconducting or refrigerated coil windings can thus be used, but also hot-coil systems which are operated at several hundred degrees centrigrade and form part of a steam cycle and power extraction system. For hot coils the problems of void formation and tritium regeneration have to be further examined. The high beta value leads to moderately large coil stresses. Finally, replacement and repair become simplified by the present coil geometry. (Auth.)

  17. Coil supporting device for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okubo, Minoru; Ando, Toshiro; Ota, Mitsuru; Ishimura, Masabumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To lower the bending stress exerted on coils thereby preventing the coils from deformation by branching the outer circumferential support frames of coil support frames disposed at an equal pitch circumferentially to the coils into plurality, and integrally forming them to the inner circumferential support frames. Constitution: Each of the support frames for supporting poloidal coils winding around a vacuum vessel is bisected at the radial midway so that the outer circumferential branches are disposed at an equal pitch and they are formed integrally with the inner circumferential support frames. The inner circumferential support frames are fixed by support posts on a bed and the outer circumferential support frames are mounted to the outer edge of wedge-like support posts. Accordingly, if the coils expand outwardly upon increase in the temperature, the stress exerted on the support frame can be decreased. (Yoshino, Y.)

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF COILED TUBING STRESS ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Matanović

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of coiled tubing is increasing rapidly with drilling of horizontal wells. To satisfy all requirements (larger mechanical stresses, larger fluid capacities the production of larger sizes and better material qualities was developed. Stresses due to axial forces and pressures that coiled tubing is subjected are close to its performance limits. So it is really important to know and understand the behaviour of coiled tubing to avoid its break, burst or collapse in the well.

  19. A very cool cooling system

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The NA62 Gigatracker is a jewel of technology: its sensor, which delivers the time of the crossing particles with a precision of less than 200 picoseconds (better than similar LHC detectors), has a cooling system that might become the precursor to a completely new detector technique.   The 115 metre long vacuum tank of the NA62 experiment. The NA62 Gigatracker (GTK) is composed of a set of three innovative silicon pixel detectors, whose job is to measure the arrival time and the position of the incoming beam particles. Installed in the heart of the NA62 detector, the silicon sensors are cooled down (to about -20 degrees Celsius) by a microfluidic silicon device. “The cooling system is needed to remove the heat produced by the readout chips the silicon sensor is bonded to,” explains Alessandro Mapelli, microsystems engineer working in the Physics department. “For the NA62 Gigatracker we have designed a cooling plate on top of which both the silicon sensor and the...

  20. Manufacturing development of the Westinghouse Nb3Sn coil for the Large Coil Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, J.L.; Vota, T.L.; Singh, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    The Westinghouse Nb 3 Sn Magnet for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Large Coil Program (LCP) is currently well into the manufacturing phase. This paper identifies the manufacturing processes and development tasks for his unique, advanced coil

  1. Optimization of the ECT background coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.K.; Luton, J.N.

    1975-01-01

    This study was begun to optimize the Eccentric Coil Test (ECT) background coil. In the course of this work a general optimization code was obtained, tested, and applied to the ECT problem. So far this code has proven to be very satisfactory. The results obtained with this code and earlier codes have illustrated the parametric behavior of such a coil system and that the optimum for this type system is broad. This study also shows that a background coil with a winding current density of less than 3000 A/cm 2 is not feasible for the ECT models presented in this paper

  2. Magnetic field coil in nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Mitsugi; Takano, Hirohisa.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide an electrical-insulatively stabilized magnetic field coil in nuclear fusion device, restraining an increase in voltage when plasma current is rapidly changed. Structure: A magnetic field coil comprises coils arranged coaxial with respective vacuum vessels, said coils being wound in positive and reverse polarities so as to form a vertical magnetic field within the plasma. The coils of the positive polarity are arranged along the vacuum vessel inside of an axis vertical in section of the annular plasma and are arranged symmetrically up and down of a horizontal axis. On the other hand, the coils of the reverse polarity are arranged along the vacuum vessel outside of a vertical axis and arranged symmetrically up and down of the horizontal axis. These positive and reverse polarity coils are alternately connected in series, and lead portions of the coils are connected to a power source by means of connecting wires. In this case, lead positions of the coils are arranged in one direction, and the connecting wires are disposed in closely contact relation to offset magnetic fields formed by the connecting wires each other. (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. A precise technique for manufacturing correction coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schieber, L.

    1992-01-01

    An automated method of manufacturing correction coils has been developed which provides a precise embodiment of the coil design. Numerically controlled machines have been developed to accurately position coil windings on the beam tube. Two types of machines have been built. One machine bonds the wire to a substrate which is wrapped around the beam tube after it is completed while the second machine bonds the wire directly to the beam tube. Both machines use the Multiwire reg-sign technique of bonding the wire to the substrate utilizing an ultrasonic stylus. These machines are being used to manufacture coils for both the SSC and RHIC

  4. Tesla coil theoretical model and experimental verification

    OpenAIRE

    Voitkans, Janis; Voitkans, Arnis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract – In this paper a theoretical model of a Tesla coil operation is proposed. Tesla coil is described as a long line with distributed parameters in a single-wired format, where the line voltage is measured against electrically neutral space. It is shown that equivalent two-wired scheme can be found for a single-wired scheme and already known long line theory can be applied to a Tesla coil. Formulas for calculation of voltage in a Tesla coil by coordinate and calculation of resonance fre...

  5. Cooling Performance of ALIP according to the Air or Sodium Cooling Type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Huee-Youl; Yoon, Jung; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    ALIP pumps the liquid sodium by Lorentz force produced by the interaction of induced current in the liquid metal and their associated magnetic field. Even though the efficiency of the ALIP is very low compared to conventional mechanical pumps, it is very useful due to the absence of moving parts, low noise and vibration level, simplicity of flow rate regulation and maintenance, and high temperature operation capability. Problems in utilization of ALIP concern a countermeasure for elevation of internal temperature of the coil due to joule heating and how to increase magnetic flux density of Na channel gap. The conventional ALIP usually used cooling methods by circulating the air or water. On the other hand, GE-Toshiba developed a double stator pump adopting the sodium-immersed self-cooled type, and it recovered the heat loss in sodium. Therefore, the station load factor of the plant could be reduced. In this study, the cooling performance with cooling types of ALIP is analyzed. We developed thermal analysis models to evaluate the cooling performance of air or sodium cooling type of ALIP. The cooling performance is analyzed for operating parameters and evaluated with cooling type. 1-D and 3-D thermal analysis model for IHTS ALIP was developed, and the cooling performance was analyzed for air or sodium cooling type. The cooling performance for air cooling type was better than sodium cooling type at higher air velocity than 0.2 m/s. Also, the air temperature of below 270 .deg. demonstrated the better cooling performance as compared to sodium.

  6. In vivo MR imaging of the human skin at subnanoliter resolution using a superconducting surface coil at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laistler, Elmar; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Lambert, Simon A; Dubuisson, Rose-Marie; Girard, Olivier M; Moser, Ewald; Darrasse, Luc; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a highly sensitive superconducting surface coil for microscopic MRI of the human skin in vivo in a clinical 1.5 Tesla (T) scanner. A 12.4-mm high-temperature superconducting coil was used at 1.5T for phantom and in vivo skin imaging. Images were inspected to identify fine anatomical skin structures. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement by the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, as compared to a commercial MR microscopy coil was quantified from phantom imaging; the gain over a geometrically identical coil made from copper (cooled or not) was theoretically deduced. Noise sources were identified to evaluate the potential of HTS coils for future studies. In vivo skin images with isotropic 80 μm resolution were demonstrated revealing fine anatomical structures. The HTS coil improved SNR by a factor 32 over the reference coil in a nonloading phantom. For calf imaging, SNR gains of 380% and 30% can be expected over an identical copper coil at room temperature and 77 K, respectively. The high sensitivity of HTS coils allows for microscopic imaging of the skin at 1.5T and could serve as a tool for dermatology in a clinical setting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cooling pancakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, J.R.; Wilson, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    In theories of galaxy formation with a damping cut-off in the density fluctuation spectrum, the first non-linear structures to form are Zeldovich pancakes in which dissipation separates gas from any collisionless dark matter then present. One-dimensional numerical simulations of the collapse, shock heating, and subsequent thermal evolution of pancakes are described. Neutrinos (or any other cool collisionless particles) are followed by direct N-body methods and the gas by Eulerian hydrodynamics with conduction as well as cooling included. It is found that the pressure is relatively uniform within the shocked region and approximately equals the instantaneous ram pressure acting at the shock front. An analytic theory based upon this result accurately describes the numerical calculations. (author)

  8. Cool Sportswear

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  9. Cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutant, C.C.

    1978-01-01

    Progress on the thermal effects project is reported with regard to physiology and distribution of Corbicula; power plant effects studies on burrowing mayfly populations; comparative thermal responses of largemouth bass from northern and southern populations; temperature selection by striped bass in Cherokee Reservoir; fish population studies; and predictive thermoregulation by fishes. Progress is also reported on the following; cause and ecological ramifications of threadfin shad impingement; entrainment project; aquaculture project; pathogenic amoeba project; and cooling tower drift project

  10. Multicoil2: predicting coiled coils and their oligomerization states from sequence in the twilight zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Trigg

    Full Text Available The alpha-helical coiled coil can adopt a variety of topologies, among the most common of which are parallel and antiparallel dimers and trimers. We present Multicoil2, an algorithm that predicts both the location and oligomerization state (two versus three helices of coiled coils in protein sequences. Multicoil2 combines the pairwise correlations of the previous Multicoil method with the flexibility of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs in a Markov Random Field (MRF. The resulting algorithm integrates sequence features, including pairwise interactions, through multinomial logistic regression to devise an optimized scoring function for distinguishing dimer, trimer and non-coiled-coil oligomerization states; this scoring function is used to produce Markov Random Field potentials that incorporate pairwise correlations localized in sequence. Multicoil2 significantly improves both coiled-coil detection and dimer versus trimer state prediction over the original Multicoil algorithm retrained on a newly-constructed database of coiled-coil sequences. The new database, comprised of 2,105 sequences containing 124,088 residues, includes reliable structural annotations based on experimental data in the literature. Notably, the enhanced performance of Multicoil2 is evident when tested in stringent leave-family-out cross-validation on the new database, reflecting expected performance on challenging new prediction targets that have minimal sequence similarity to known coiled-coil families. The Multicoil2 program and training database are available for download from http://multicoil2.csail.mit.edu.

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound coil placement of gastric varices: Emerging modality for recurrent bleeding gastric varices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Harwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric varices are the probable source of bleeding in 10-36% of patients, with acute variceal bleeding and carry high mortality and rebleeding rates. Till date, cyanoacrylate glue injection is considered as the standard of care but has high complication rate. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS guided coil placement is a new emerging technique of management of gastric varices. In this case report, we detail the EUS guided coil placement for management of gastric varices after failed glue injections.

  12. Cartilage and bone neoformation in rabbit carotid bifurcation aneurysms after endovascular coil embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Plenk

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence and histomorphology of cartilage and bone neoformations was retrospectively evaluated in rabbit experimental aneurysms after endovascular coil embolization. During product development, 115 carotid bifurcation aneurysms were treated with hydrogel-containing devices (HydroCoil®, n=77; HydroSoft®, n=28; prototype Hydrogel-only, n=10; MicroVentionTerumo, Aliso Viejo, CA. Additional 29 aneurysms were treated with standard (n=22 or with degradable polymer-covered (n=7 platinum coils. After 4 to 52 weeks, the retrieved aneurysms were methylmethacrylate embedded, and ground sections were surface-stained with Rapid Bone Stain and Giemsa solution. Cartilage and/or bone tissue was assessed by light microscopy; respective tissue areas in the aneurysms were determined by computerized histomorphometry. Cartilage neoformation was observed from 26 to 52 weeks. Single chondrocytes to hyaline or fibrous cartilage areas, occupying up to 29% of the aneurysm cavity, were found in 6 aneurysms, treated with HydroCoil (n=4, Hydrogel-only (n=1, and resorbable polymer (n=1 devices. Chondral ossification associated cartilage neoformation in 2 of these 4 HydroCoil-treated aneurysms. Membranous woven and lamellar bone ossicles were observed from 13 to 52 weeks in 7 aneurysms, treated with HydroCoil (n=3 and platinum coil (n=4 devices. Altogether, cartilage and/or bone neoformation was observed in 13 (9% of 144 rabbit bifurcation aneurysms treated with various embolic devices. Incidence was low until 26 weeks, but increased at 52 weeks in both, HydroCoil and standard platinum coil treated aneurysms. As the neoformations were predominantly located in proximity to the aneurysm neck, they could be related to the long-term mechanobiology of cell differentiation during fibrovascular healing of blood flow-exposed embolized aneurysms.

  13. Magnet cooling economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmer, J.F.; Liggett, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    The recommendation to use superfluid helium II in superconducting magnet design has become more prevalent in recent years. Advanced fusion reactor studies such as the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study recently completed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLML) have based superconducting magnet design on the use of He II because of reduced magnet volume, improved stability characteristics, or increased superconductor critical current at fields above 9 Tesla. This paper reports the results of a study to determine the capital costs ($/watt) and the operating costs (watts/watt) of refrigeration systems in the 1.8K to 300K temperature range. The cost data is applied to a 1.8K magnet that is subject to neutronic heating wherein the magnet case is insulated from the winding so that the case can be cooled at a higher temperature (less costly) than the winding. The life cycle cost (capital plus operating) is reported as a function of coil temperature and insulation thickness. In some cases there is an optimum, least-cost thickness. In addition, the basic data can be used to evaluate the impact of neutron shielding effectiveness trades on the combined shield, magnet, cryorefrigerator, and operating life cycle cost

  14. Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolle , Jack J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

  15. First full-size ATLAS barrel toroid coil successfully tested up to 22 kA at 4 T

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Benoit, P; Berriaud, C P; Broggi, F; Deront, L; Foussat, A; Junker, S; ten Kate, H H J; Kopeykin, N; Olesen, G; Olyunin, A; Pengo, R; Rabbers, J J; Ravat, S; Rey, J M; Sbrissa, E; Shugaev, I; Stepanov, V; Védrine, P; Volpini, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The Superconducting Barrel Toroid is providing (together with the two End-Cap Toroids not presented here) the magnetic field for the muon detectors in the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC at CERN. The toroid with outer dimensions of 25 m length and 20 m diameter, is built up from 8 identical racetrack coils. The coils with 120 turns each are wound with an aluminum stabilized NbTi conductor and operate at 20.5 kA at 3.9 T local field in the windings and is conduction cooled at 4.8 K by circulating forced flow helium in cooling tubes attached to the cold mass. The 8 coils of 25 m * 5 m are presently under construction and the first coils have already been fully integrated and tested. Meanwhile the assembly of the toroid 100 m underground in the ATLAS cavern at CERN has started. The 8 coils are individually tested on surface before installation. In this paper the test of the first coil, unique in size and manufacturing technology, is described in detail and the results are compared to the previous experience with the...

  16. Outcomes with single-coil versus dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Nicholas; Kaura, Amit; Murgatroyd, Francis; Dhillon, Para; Scott, Paul A

    2018-03-01

    Dual-coil implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads have traditionally been used over single-coil leads due to concerns regarding high defibrillation thresholds (DFT) and consequent poor shock efficacy. However, accumulating evidence suggests that this position may be unfounded and that dual-coil leads may also be associated with higher complication rates during lead extraction. This meta-analysis collates data comparing dual- and single-coil ICD leads. Electronic databases were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and non-randomized studies comparing single-coil and dual-coil leads. The mean differences in DFT and summary estimates of the odds-ratio (OR) for first-shock efficacy and the hazard-ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality were calculated using random effects models. Eighteen studies including a total of 138,124 patients were identified. Dual-coil leads were associated with a lower DFT compared to single coil leads (mean difference -0.83J; 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.39--0.27; P = 0.004). There was no difference in the first-shock success rate with dual-coil compared to single-coil leads (OR 0.74; 95%CI 0.45-1.21; P=0.22). There was a significantly lower risk of all-cause mortality associated with single-coil leads (HR 0.91; 95%CI 0.86-0.95; P dual-coil leads. The mortality benefit with single-coil leads most likely represents patient selection bias. Given the increased risk and complexity of extracting dual-coil leads, centres should strongly consider single-coil ICD leads as the lead of choice for routine new left-sided ICD implants. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. HydroCoil as an adjuvant to bare platinum coil treatment of 100 cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanning, Noel F.; Berentei, Zsolt; Brennan, Paul R.; Thornton, John

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The overall safety of the HydroCoil, an expansile hybrid hydrogel-platinum coil, is unknown. We report a prospective observational study of our first 100 cerebral aneurysms treated with HydroCoils, focusing on safety and initial efficacy.Methods Indications, procedural complications, clinical and angiographic outcomes were recorded. Packing density, number of coils deployed and angiographic results were compared with those in a matched control group of 100 aneurysms treated solely with bare platinum coils. HydroCoil complication rates were compared to bare platinum coil rates at our institution and in published series. Results Adjuvant HydroCoil treatment led to increased mean percentage aneurysm filling compared to controls (50 ± 21% versus 27 ± 13%, P < 0.001). Immediate posttreatment angiographic results showed significantly (P < 0.001) more complete occlusions and fewer incomplete (<95%) occlusions compared to controls. Intermediate follow-up angiograms (median 7.5 months) in 63 aneurysms showed a trend towards fewer incomplete occlusions with HydroCoil treatment. There were significantly fewer major recurrences with HydroCoil treatment compared to the control treatment (9.5% versus 22.6%, P 0.046). In the adjuvant HydroCoil group, major recurrent aneurysms had significantly less percentage volume packing with HydroCoils than non-recurrent aneurysms (50.3 ± 5.0% versus 65.3 ± 18.0%, P = 0.04). There was a 12% procedural complication rate, 6% procedural morbidity and 1% mortality rate, similar to institutional and reported bare platinum coil complication rates.Conclusion HydroCoils can be safely deployed with a similar complication rate to bare platinum coils. They result in improved aneurysm filling. Intermediate follow-up angiography showed significantly fewer major recurrences. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm initial improved stability. (orig.)

  18. Lessons learned from the manufacture of the W7-X planar coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viebke, H; Gustke, D; Rummel, T; Sborchia, C; Schroeder, R; Williams, D; Bates, S; Leigh, B; Winter, R

    2006-01-01

    WENDELSTEIN 7-X (W7-X) is a superconducting stellarator. The planar coils are in charge to modify the magnetic filed configuration of the W7-X. The major challenges during manufacturing were the fabrication of the cable-in-conduit conductor, the accuracy of the coil cases after welding and machining and the development of electrical joints with a resistance below 1 nΩ. Leaks were detected during repetitive in the case cooling system, which were caused by stress corrosion cracking. High voltage tests in a reduced vacuum environment (Paschen conditions) revealed that the insulation had to be reinforced and the quench detection wires had to be exchanged. This paper gives an overview about the main technical challenges of the planar coils and the lessons learned during production

  19. Lessons learned from the manufacture of the W7-X planar coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viebke, H.; Gustke, D.; Rummel, T.; Sborchia, C.; Schroeder, R.; Williams, D.; Bates, S.; Leigh, B.; Winter, R.

    2006-06-01

    WENDELSTEIN 7-X (W7-X) is a superconducting stellarator. The planar coils are in charge to modify the magnetic filed configuration of the W7-X. The major challenges during manufacturing were the fabrication of the cable-in-conduit conductor, the accuracy of the coil cases after welding and machining and the development of electrical joints with a resistance below 1 nΩ. Leaks were detected during repetitive in the case cooling system, which were caused by stress corrosion cracking. High voltage tests in a reduced vacuum environment (Paschen conditions) revealed that the insulation had to be reinforced and the quench detection wires had to be exchanged. This paper gives an overview about the main technical challenges of the planar coils and the lessons learned during production.

  20. Operator coil monitoring Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erhart, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) abort coils from the Master and RSS stations will be systematically tested during performance of this procedure. It should be noted that these are not physical abort coils but software coils controlled by the software's ladder logic. The readiness of the DACS to properly interface with the ENRAF wire level gauge installed in the SY-101 storage tank will also be tested. During this test, a verification of all abort coil indications will be conducted at the DACS Development Facility in the 306E Building by injecting an input signal for each DACS sensor that has an associated abort coil until the abort coil actuates, and then ensuring that the status of the abort coil indicated at the Master and RSS stations is correct. Each abort coil will also be tested to ensure that the ''ENABLE'' and ''DISABLE'' controls from the Master and RSS stations function correctly, and only with the use of proper passwords

  1. Coil Optimization for High Temperature Superconductor Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents topology optimization of HTS racetrack coils for large HTS synchronous machines. The topology optimization is used to acquire optimal coil designs for the excitation system of 3 T HTS machines. Several tapes are evaluated and the optimization results are discussed. The optimiz...

  2. The bar coil for NMR tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogorodzki, P.; Piatkowski, A.; Wasielewski, J.

    1995-01-01

    The bar coil (bi-planar) for the NMR tomograph, designed for medical diagnostics, has been described. The tests of coil shown that it generates good homogenous magnetic field in a big volume what results in improving of the signal-to-noise ratio

  3. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  4. Composite coils for toroidal field coils and method of using same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, R. G.; Trujillo, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A composite toroidal field (TF) generating means consisting of segmented magnetic coil windings is disclosed. Each coil winding of the TF generating means consists of a copper or copper alloy conductor segment and an aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segment. The conductor segments are joined at a high strength, low electrical resistance joint and the joint may either be a mechanical or metallurgical one. The use of the aluminum or aluminum alloy conductor segments improves the neutron economy of the reactor with which the TF coil is associated and reduces TF coil nuclear heating and heating gradients, and activation in the TF coils

  5. Forced flow cooling of ISABELLE dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Aggus, J.; Brown, D.P.; Kassner, D.A.; Sondericker, J.H.; Strobridge, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    The superconducting magnets for ISABELLE will use a forced flow supercritical helium cooling system. In order to evaluate this cooling scheme, two individual dipole magnets were first tested in conventional dewars using pool boiling helium. These magnets were then modified for forced flow cooling and retested with the identical magnet coils. The first evaluation test used a l m-long ISA model dipole magnet whose pool boiling performance had been established. The same magnet was then retested with forced flow cooling, energizing it at various operating temperatures until quench occurred. The magnet performance with forced flow cooling was consistent with data from the previous pool boiling tests. The next step in the program was a full-scale ISABELLE dipole ring magnet, 4.25 m long, whose performance was first evaluated with pool boiling. For the forced flow test the magnet was shrunk-fit into an unsplit laminated core encased in a stainless steel cylinder. The high pressure gas is cooled below 4 K by a helium bath which is pumped below atmospheric pressure with an ejector nozzle. The performance of the full-scale dipole magnet in the new configuration with forced flow cooling, showed a 10 percent increase in the attainable maximum current as compared to the pool boiling data

  6. Use of a High-Temperature Superconducting Coil for Magnetic Energy Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagnard, J-F; Crate, D; Jamoye, J-F; Laurent, Ph; Mattivi, B; Cloots, R; Ausloos, M; Genon, A; Vanderbemden, Ph

    2006-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage device (SMES) has been realised using a 350 m-long BSCCO tape wound as a ''pancake'' coil. The coil is mounted on a cryocooler allowing temperatures down to 17.2 K to be achieved. The temperature dependence of coil electrical resistance R(T) shows a superconducting transition at T = 102.5 K. Measurements of the V(I) characteristics were performed at several temperatures between 17.2 K and 101.5 K to obtain the temperature dependence of the critical current (using a 1 μV/cm criterion). Critical currents were found to exceed 100 A for T < 30 K. An electronic DC-DC converter was built in order to control the energy flow in and out of the superconducting coil. The converter consists of a MOS transistor bridge switching at a 80 kHz frequency and controlled with standard Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) techniques. The system was tested using a 30 V squared wave power supply as bridge input voltage. The coil current, the bridge input and output voltages were recorded simultaneously. Using a 10 A setpoint current in the superconducting coil, the whole system (coil + DC-DC converter) can provide a stable output voltage showing uninterruptible power supply (UPS) capabilities over 1 s

  7. Cryocooler-cooled 10 T superconducting magnet; Reitoki chokurei hoshiki no 10T chodendo jishaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Urata, M. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    A superconducting magnet totally free of such cooling agents as liquefied helium has been developed, which can be cooled by a cryocooler alone in a direct cooler cooled method, and a success was attained when a 10T magnetic field was generated in a vacancy 10cm in diameter. The value is the highest in the world realized by a system not using a cooling medium (only 7.7T attained before this). The coil comprises a coil of an NbTi superconducting lead and a coil of Nb3Sn superconducting lead, and is impregnated with epoxy resin for reduction in size. It is cooled only by heat conduction thanks to a thermally coupled 4K cooler in vacuum, and necessitates the insertion of indium between the coil and a copper made cooling board which combination is further tightened up by a stainless steel wire. Furthermore, a superconducting oxide lead has been developed, with its performance not lowered even in an intensive magnetic field, for the supply of power to the coil, and this suppresses the infiltration of conduction caused heat and the generation of Joule heat. The magnet is designed small and light with dimensions 650{times}500{times}490mm (height), and can be operated by mere manipulation of a switch. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Cooling tower and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.; Ederhof, A.; Gosdowski, J.; Harms, A.; Ide, G.; Klotz, B.; Kowalczyk, R.; Necker, P.; Tesche, W.

    The influence of a cooling tower on the environment, or rather the influence of the environment on the cooling tower stands presently -along with the cooling water supply - in the middle of much discussion. The literature on these questions can hardly be overlooked by the experts concerned, especially not by the power station designers and operators. The document 'Cooling Tower and Environment' is intented to give a general idea of the important publications in this field, and to inform of the present state of technology. In this, the explanations on every section make it easier to get to know the specific subject area. In addition to older standard literature, this publication contains the best-known literature of recent years up to spring 1975, including some articles written in English. Further English literature has been collected by the ZAED (KFK) and is available at the VGB-Geschaefsstelle. Furthermore, The Bundesumweltamt compiles the literature on the subject of 'Environmental protection'. On top of that, further documentation centres are listed at the end of this text. (orig.) [de

  9. Design and test program of a simplified divertor dummy coil structure for the WEST project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doceul, L., E-mail: louis.doceul@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex F-13108 (France); Bucalossi, J.; Dougnac, H.; Ferlay, F.; Gargiulo, L.; Keller, D.; Larroque, S.; Lipa, M.; Pilia, A. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex F-13108 (France); Portafaix, C. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon 13115, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Saille, A. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex F-13108 (France); Salami, M. [AVANTIS Engineering Groupe, ZI de l’Aiguille 46100, Figeac (France); Samaille, F.; Soler, B.; Thouvenin, D.; Verger, J.M.; Zago, B. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex F-13108 (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The mechanical design and integration of the divertor structure has been performed. • The design of the casing and the winding-pack has been finalized. • The coil assembly process has been validated. • The realization of a coil mock-up scale one is in progress. -- Abstract: In order to fully validate actively cooled tungsten plasma facing components (industrial fabrication, operation with long plasma duration), the implementation of a tungsten axisymmetric divertor structure in the tokamak Tore-Supra is studied. With this major upgrade, so-called WEST (Tungsten Environment in Steady state Tokamak), Tore-Supra will be able to address the problematic of long plasma discharges with a metallic divertor target. To do so, it is planned to install two symmetric divertor coils inside the vacuum vessel. This assembly, called divertor structure, is made up of two stainless steel casings containing a copper winding pack cooled by a pressurized hot water circuit (up to 180 °C, 4 MPa) and is designed to perform steady state plasma operation (up to 1000 s). The divertor structure will be a complex assembly ring of 4 m diameter representing a total weight of around 20 tons. The technical challenge of this component will be the implementation of angular sectors inside the vacuum vessel environment (TIG welding of the coil casing, induction brazing and electrical insulation of the copper winding). Moreover, this complex assembly must sustain harsh environmental conditions in terms of ultra high vacuum conditions, electromagnetical loads and electrical isolation (13 kV ground voltage) under high temperature. In order to fully validate the assembly and the performance of this complex component, the production of a scale one dummy coil is in progress. The paper will illustrate, the technical developments performed in order to finalize the design for the call for tender for fabrication. The progress and the first results of the simplified dummy coils will be also

  10. Design and test program of a simplified divertor dummy coil structure for the WEST project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doceul, L.; Bucalossi, J.; Dougnac, H.; Ferlay, F.; Gargiulo, L.; Keller, D.; Larroque, S.; Lipa, M.; Pilia, A.; Portafaix, C.; Saille, A.; Salami, M.; Samaille, F.; Soler, B.; Thouvenin, D.; Verger, J.M.; Zago, B.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical design and integration of the divertor structure has been performed. • The design of the casing and the winding-pack has been finalized. • The coil assembly process has been validated. • The realization of a coil mock-up scale one is in progress. -- Abstract: In order to fully validate actively cooled tungsten plasma facing components (industrial fabrication, operation with long plasma duration), the implementation of a tungsten axisymmetric divertor structure in the tokamak Tore-Supra is studied. With this major upgrade, so-called WEST (Tungsten Environment in Steady state Tokamak), Tore-Supra will be able to address the problematic of long plasma discharges with a metallic divertor target. To do so, it is planned to install two symmetric divertor coils inside the vacuum vessel. This assembly, called divertor structure, is made up of two stainless steel casings containing a copper winding pack cooled by a pressurized hot water circuit (up to 180 °C, 4 MPa) and is designed to perform steady state plasma operation (up to 1000 s). The divertor structure will be a complex assembly ring of 4 m diameter representing a total weight of around 20 tons. The technical challenge of this component will be the implementation of angular sectors inside the vacuum vessel environment (TIG welding of the coil casing, induction brazing and electrical insulation of the copper winding). Moreover, this complex assembly must sustain harsh environmental conditions in terms of ultra high vacuum conditions, electromagnetical loads and electrical isolation (13 kV ground voltage) under high temperature. In order to fully validate the assembly and the performance of this complex component, the production of a scale one dummy coil is in progress. The paper will illustrate, the technical developments performed in order to finalize the design for the call for tender for fabrication. The progress and the first results of the simplified dummy coils will be also

  11. Startup of Large Coil Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils

  12. Startup of Large Coil Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Bohanan, R.E.; Fietz, W.A.; Luton, J.N.; May, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) is being used to test superconducting toroidal field coils about one-third the size of those for INTOR. Eventually, six different coils from four countries will be tested. Operations began in 1983 with acceptance testing of the helium refrigerator/liquefier system. Comprehensive shakedown of the facility and tests with the first three coils (from Japan, the United States, and Switzerland) were successfully accomplished in the summer of 1984. Currents up to 10,200 A and fields up to 6.4 T were reached. Data were obtained on performance of refrigerator, helium distribution, power supplies, controls, and data acquisition systems and on the acoustic emission, voltages, currents, and mechanical strains during charging and discharging the coils

  13. Helically coiled tube heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a heat exchanger such as a steam generator for a nuclear reactor, two or more bundles of helically coiled tubes are arranged in series with the tubes in each bundle integrally continuing through the tube bundles arranged in series therewith. Pitch values for the tubing in any pair of tube bundles, taken transverse to the path of the reactor coolant flow about the tubes, are selected as a ratio of two unequal integers to permit efficient operation of each tube bundle while maintaining the various tube bundles of the heat exchanger within a compact envelope. Preferably, the helix angle and tube pitch parallel to the path of coolant flow are constant for all tubes in a single bundle so that the tubes are of approximately the same length within each bundle

  14. Effects of passive coils on spheromak gross MHD instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, C.; Janos, A.; Paul, S.; Wysocki, F.; Yamada, M.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental investigation of the effectiveness of figure-8 coils in stabilizing the n=1 tilting mode of spheromak plasmas in Proto S-1 A/B is extended. In addition, another coil configuration, the saddle coil, is examined

  15. DETERMINATION OF RADIATOR COOLING SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Yakubovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a methodology for calculation of a radiator cooling surface with due account of heat transfer non-uniformity on depth of its core. Calculation of radiator cooling surfaces of «Belarus-1221» and «Belarus-3022» tractors has been carried out in the paper. The paper also advances standard size series of radiators for powerful «Belarus» tractor type.

  16. iGrab: hand orthosis powered by twisted and coiled polymer muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharan, Lokesh; de Andrade, Monica Jung; Saleem, Wahaj; Baughman, Ray H.; Tadesse, Yonas

    2017-10-01

    Several works have been reported in powered hand orthosis in the last ten years for assistive or rehabilitative purposes. However, most of these approaches uses conventional actuators such as servo motors to power orthosis. In this work, we demonstrate the recently reported twisted and coiled polymeric (TCP) muscles to drive a compact, light, inexpensive and wearable upper extremity device, iGrab. A 3D printed orthotic hand module was designed, developed and tested for the performance. The device has six 2-ply muscles of diameter 1.35 mm with a length of 380 mm. We used a single 2-ply muscle for each finger and two 2-ply muscles for the thumb. Pulsed actuation of the muscles at 1.8 A current for 25 s with 7% duty cycle under natural cooling showed full flexion of the fingers within 2 s. Modeling and simulation were performed on the device using standard Euler-Lagrangian equations. Our artificial muscles powered hand orthosis demonstrated the capability of pinching and picking objects of different shapes, weights, and sizes.

  17. A fully MEMS-compatible process for 3D high aspect ratio micro coils obtained with an automatic wire bonder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratt, K; Badilita, V; Burger, T; Wallrabe, U; Korvink, J G

    2010-01-01

    We report the fabrication of 3D micro coils made with an automatic wire bonder. Using standard MEMS processes such as spin coating and UV lithography on silicon and Pyrex® wafers results in high aspect ratio SU-8 posts with diameters down to 100 µm that serve as mechanical stabilization yokes for the coils. The wire bonder is employed to wind 25 µm insulated gold wire around the posts in an arbitrary (e.g. solenoidal) path, yielding arrays of micro coils. Each micro coil is bonded directly on-chip, so that loose wire ends are avoided and, compared to other winding methods, coil re-soldering is unnecessary. The manufacturing time for a single coil is about 200 ms, and although the process is serial, it is batch fabrication compatible due to the high throughput of the machine. Despite the speed of manufacture we obtain high manufacturing precision and reliability. The micro air-core solenoids show an RF quality factor of over 50 when tested at 400 MHz. We present a flexible coil making method where the number of windings is only limited by the post height. The coil diameter is restricted by limits defined by lithography and the mechanical strength of the posts. Based on this technique we present coils ranging from 100 µm diameter and 1 winding up to 1000 µm diameter and 20 windings

  18. The 8 cm Period Electromagnetic Wiggler Magnet with Coils Made from Sheet Copper

    CERN Document Server

    Biallas, George H; Hiatt, Tommy; Neil, George R; Snyder, Michael D

    2005-01-01

    An electromagnetic wiggler, now lasing at the Jefferson Lab FEL, has 29 eight cm periods with K variable from 0.6 to1.1 and gap of 2.6 cm. The wiggler was made inexpensively in 11 weeks by an industrial machine shop. The conduction cooled coil design uses copper sheet material cut to forms using water jet cutting. The conductor is cut to serpentine shapes and the cooling plates are cut to ladder shape. The sheets are assembled in stacks insulated with polymer film, also cut with water jet. The coil design extends the serpentine conductor design of the Duke OK4 to more and smaller conductors. The wiggler features graded fields in the two poles at each end and trim coils on these poles to eliminate field errors caused by saturation. An added critical feature is mirror plates at the ends with integral trim coils to eliminate three dimensional end field effects and align the entrance and exit orbit with the axis of the wiggler. Details of construction, measurement methods and excellent wiggler performance are pre...

  19. Releases from the cooling water system in the Waste Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.C.; Lux, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    On September 12, 1991, a cooling-water header broke in the H-Area Waste Tank farm, at the Savannah River Site, releasing contaminated water down a storm sewer that drains to the creek. A copy of the Occurrence Report is attached. As part of the follow-up on this incident, the NPSR Section was asked by Waste Management Technology to perform a probabilistic analysis of the following cases: (1) A large break in the header combined with a large break in a cooling coil inside a waste tank. (2) A large break in the header combined with a leak in a cooling coil inside a waste tank. (3) A large break in the header combined with a very small leak in a cooling coil inside a waste tank. This report documents the results of the analysis of these cases

  20. A six-channel pediatric coil array for detection of children spinal pathologies by MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Terrones, Marcos Alonso; Solís-Nájera, Sergio Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays, magnetic resonance (MR) in Mexico has become a standard technique for clinical imaging. Although most of the times the MR systems contain only coils oriented for adults. Radiologists use these coils for children studies due to the non-availability of pediatric coils. Image quality is decreased due to the low signal to noise ratio delivered to the system. The development of RF coils is always focused towards increasing SNR and optimizing the RF penetration into the sample. Moreover, spinal pathologies in children, which are an important topic in pediatric care, cover congenital and neuromuscular disorders that occur in childhood. In this work, the design of a dedicated six-channel coil for detection of spinal pathologies at 1.5 Tesla is addressed. Numerical electromagnetic simulations were performed in order to evaluate their magnetic field performance at (63.6 MHz) 1.5 Tesla. The magnetic field uniformity as well as the RF penetration depth of the coil configurations was evaluated in order to find the best/optimized coil array configuration. The coil is comprised of three rows, one with 4 coil elements and two with only one coil element. Phantom and in vivo images were acquired with the six-channel pediatric coil array. The phantom images agree with the simulated data. In vivo images acquired with the 6-channel pediatric coil array have shown very good penetration depth and homogeneity, which allow better image quality throughout the whole FOV. In addition, the parallel imaging capabilities of the array allow the acceleration of the experiments avoiding possible motion artifacts.

  1. A six-channel pediatric coil array for detection of children spinal pathologies by MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López Terrones, Marcos Alonso, E-mail: malt.marcos@gmail.com [Ingeniería Biomédica, Dirección de Planeación, Servicios de Salud de Durango. Cuauhtémoc 225 Norte, Durango, Durango 34000 (Mexico); Solís-Nájera, Sergio Enrique, E-mail: solisnajera@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    Nowadays, magnetic resonance (MR) in Mexico has become a standard technique for clinical imaging. Although most of the times the MR systems contain only coils oriented for adults. Radiologists use these coils for children studies due to the non-availability of pediatric coils. Image quality is decreased due to the low signal to noise ratio delivered to the system. The development of RF coils is always focused towards increasing SNR and optimizing the RF penetration into the sample. Moreover, spinal pathologies in children, which are an important topic in pediatric care, cover congenital and neuromuscular disorders that occur in childhood. In this work, the design of a dedicated six-channel coil for detection of spinal pathologies at 1.5 Tesla is addressed. Numerical electromagnetic simulations were performed in order to evaluate their magnetic field performance at (63.6 MHz) 1.5 Tesla. The magnetic field uniformity as well as the RF penetration depth of the coil configurations was evaluated in order to find the best/optimized coil array configuration. The coil is comprised of three rows, one with 4 coil elements and two with only one coil element. Phantom and in vivo images were acquired with the six-channel pediatric coil array. The phantom images agree with the simulated data. In vivo images acquired with the 6-channel pediatric coil array have shown very good penetration depth and homogeneity, which allow better image quality throughout the whole FOV. In addition, the parallel imaging capabilities of the array allow the acceleration of the experiments avoiding possible motion artifacts.

  2. Thermal anchoring of wires in large scale superconducting coil test experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Dipak; Sharma, A.N.; Prasad, Upendra; Khristi, Yohan; Varmora, Pankaj; Doshi, Kalpesh; Pradhan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We addressed how thermal anchoring in large scale coil test is different compare to small cryogenic apparatus? • We did precise estimation of thermal anchoring length at 77 K and 4.2 K heat sink in large scale superconducting coil test experiment. • We addressed, the quality of anchoring without covering entire wires using Kapton/Teflon tape. • We obtained excellent results in temperature measurement without using GE Varnish by doubling estimated anchoring length. -- Abstract: Effective and precise thermal anchoring of wires in cryogenic experiment is mandatory to measure temperature in milikelvin accuracy and to avoid unnecessary cooling power due to additional heat conduction from room temperature (RT) to operating temperature (OT) through potential, field, displacement and stress measurement instrumentation wires. Instrumentation wires used in large scale superconducting coil test experiments are different compare to cryogenic apparatus in terms of unique construction and overall diameter/area due to errorless measurement in large time-varying magnetic field compare to small cryogenic apparatus, often shielded wires are used. Hence, along with other variables, anchoring techniques and required thermal anchoring length are entirely different in this experiment compare to cryogenic apparatus. In present paper, estimation of thermal anchoring length of five different types of instrumentation wires used in coils test campaign at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India has been discussed and some temperature measurement results of coils test campaign have been presented

  3. Latest status of the Japanese LCT coil and the domestic test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, S.; Ando, T.; Hiyama, T.

    1981-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), representing Japan, is now making one of six test coils for the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Large Coil Task(LCT). The Japanese LCT coil, which has a stored energy of 120 MJ, is based on a NgTi conductor, is pool-cooled, has a maximum field of 8T, and is edgewise, double-pancake wound, was completed in October, 1981. The LCT coil will be tested in the newly constructed domestic test facility up to its rated current in November, 1981, before transportation ORNL. The domestic test facility, which is composed of a cryogenic system a vacuum system, a power supply with protection system, and a data acqusition and control system, was completed and its performance measured at a new building for the LCT test at JSAERI in June, 1981. This paper describes the latest construction status of the Japanese LCT coil and the domestic test facility. The performance of the domestic test facility is described in this paper

  4. Engineering development of an HTS floating coil for the Mini-RT project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Nagato; Mito, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Junji

    2004-01-01

    A magnetically-levitated superconducting coil device, Mini-RT, has been constructed using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) for the purpose of examining a new magnetic confinement scheme of high-beta non-neutral plasmas. The floating coil is wound with silver-sheathed Bi-2223 tapes, and it is operated in the temperature range of 20-40 K. A number of studies and experiments were carried out in order to realize the necessary system. One of them was to demonstrate magnetic levitation using a miniature HTS floating coil having a diameter of 80 mm. The coil was fabricated using Bi-2223/Ag tapes of 12 m and excited by field cooling with liquid nitrogen. The magnetic levitation was examined using a real-time feedback control system with laser displacement gauges. Additionally, a persistent current switch (PCS) has been developed using Bi-2223/Ag tapes of 21 m, and a prototype HTS-PCS was tested in a cryostat. After construction of the floating coil and HTS-PCS for the Mini-RT device was completed, excitation tests were carried out in the cryostat and the basic properties up to the nominal operation condition were examined. (author)

  5. Completion of designing and manufacturing of the coil support structure of W7-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvin, Didier; Koppe, Torsten; Cardella, Antonio; Missal, Bernd; Pilopp, Dirk; Di Bartolo, Giovanni; Camin, Rocio; Gonzales, Ivan; Giordano, Luca; Langone, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    In February 2000, the project called coil support structure for the Wendelstein 7-X fusion machine was started. Since October 2009 the full production of this big (80 tons) and complex component is now completed and delivered at IPP Greifswald. The W7-X coil system consists of 20 planar and 50 non-planar coils. They are supported by a pentagonal 10 m diameter, 2.5 m high called coil support structure (CSS). The CSS is divided into five modules and each module consists of two equal half modules around the radial axis. Currently, the five modules were successfully assembled with the coils meeting the tight manufacturing tolerances. Designing, structural calculation, raw material procurement, welding and soldering technologies, milling, drilling, accurate machining, helium cooling pipe forming, laser metrology, ultra sonic cleaning and vacuum test are some of the key points used all along this successful manufacturing process. The lessons learned in the large scale production of this difficult kind of support structure will be presented as relevant experience for the realization of similar systems for future fusion devices, such as ITER.

  6. Thermo hydraulic and quench propagation characteristics of SST-1 TF coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, A.N., E-mail: ansharma@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Pradhan, S. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India); Duchateau, J.L. [CEA Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Khristi, Y.; Prasad, U.; Doshi, K.; Varmora, P.; Patel, D.; Tanna, V.L. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Details of SST-1 TF coils, CICC. • Details of SST-1 TF coil cold test. • Quench analysis of TF magnet. • Flow changes following quench. • Predictive analysis of assembled magnet system. - Abstract: SST-1 toroidal field (TF) magnet system is comprising of sixteen superconducting modified ‘D’ shaped TF coils. During single coil test campaigns spanning from June 10, 2010 till January 24, 2011; the electromagnetic, thermal hydraulic and mechanical performances of each TF magnet have been qualified at its respective nominal operating current of 10,000 A in either two-phase or supercritical helium cooling conditions. During the current charging experiments, few quenches have initiated either as a consequence of irrecoverable normal zones or being induced in some of the TF magnets. Quench evolution in the TF coils have been analyzed in detail in order to understand the thermal hydraulic and quench propagation characteristics of the SST-1 TF magnets. The same were also simulated using 1D code Gandalf. This paper elaborates the details of the analyses and the quench simulation results. A predictive quench propagation analysis of 16 assembled TF magnets system has also been reported in this paper.

  7. Momentum-weighted conjugate gradient descent algorithm for gradient coil optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hanbing; Jesmanowicz, Andrzej; Li, Shi-Jiang; Hyde, James S

    2004-01-01

    MRI gradient coil design is a type of nonlinear constrained optimization. A practical problem in transverse gradient coil design using the conjugate gradient descent (CGD) method is that wire elements move at different rates along orthogonal directions (r, phi, z), and tend to cross, breaking the constraints. A momentum-weighted conjugate gradient descent (MW-CGD) method is presented to overcome this problem. This method takes advantage of the efficiency of the CGD method combined with momentum weighting, which is also an intrinsic property of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, to adjust step sizes along the three orthogonal directions. A water-cooled, 12.8 cm inner diameter, three axis torque-balanced gradient coil for rat imaging was developed based on this method, with an efficiency of 2.13, 2.08, and 4.12 mT.m(-1).A(-1) along X, Y, and Z, respectively. Experimental data demonstrate that this method can improve efficiency by 40% and field uniformity by 27%. This method has also been applied to the design of a gradient coil for the human brain, employing remote current return paths. The benefits of this design include improved gradient field uniformity and efficiency, with a shorter length than gradient coil designs using coaxial return paths. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A Feasibility Study. Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems with Fan Coil Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, D. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Backman, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The primary objectives of this study are to estimate potential energy savings relative to conventional ducted air distribution, and to identify equipment requirements, costs, and barriers with a focus on ductless hydronic delivery systems that utilize water-to-air terminal units in each zone. Results indicate that annual heating and cooling energy use can be reduced by up to 27% assuming replacement of the conventional 13 SEER heat pump and coil with a similarly rated air-to-water heat pump.

  9. Switching transients in a superconducting coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-01-01

    A study is made of the transients caused by the fast dump of large superconducting coils. Theoretical analysis, computer simulation, and actual measurements are used. Theoretical analysis can only be applied to the simplest of models. In the computer simulations two models are used, one in which the coil is divided into ten segments and another in which a single coil is employed. The circuit breaker that interrupts the current to the power supply, causing a fast dump, is represented by a time and current dependent conductance. Actual measurements are limited to measurements made incidental to performance tests on the MFTF Yin-yang coils. It is found that the breaker opening time is the critical factor in determining the size and shape of the transient. Instantaneous opening of the breaker causes a lightly damped transient with large amplitude voltages to ground. Increasing the opening time causes the transient to become a monopulse of decreasing amplitude. The voltages at the external terminals are determined by the parameters of the external circuit. For fast opening times the frequency depends on the dump resistor inductance, the circuit capacitance, and the amplitude on the coil current. For slower openings the dump resistor inductance and the current determine the amplitude of the voltage to ground at the terminals. Voltages to ground are less in the interior of the coil, where transients related to the parameters of the coil itself are observed

  10. Correcting coils in end magnets of accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. P. Kassab

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an empirical investigation of the correcting coils behavior used to homogenize the field distribution of the race-track microtron accelerator end magnets. These end magnets belong to the second stage of the 30.0 MeV cw electron accelerator under construction at IFUSP, the race-track microtron booster, in which the beam energy is raised from 1.97 to 5.1 MeV. The correcting coils are attached to the pole faces and are based on the inhomogeneities of the magnetic field measured. The performance of these coils, when operating the end magnets with currents that differ by ±10% from the one used in the mappings that originated the coils copper leads, is presented. For one of the magnets, adjusting conveniently the current of the correcting coils makes it possible to homogenize field distributions of different intensities, once their shapes are practically identical to those that originated the coils. For the other one, the shapes are changed and the coils are less efficient. This is related to intrinsic factors that determine the inhomogeneities. However, we obtained uniformity of 0.001% in both cases.

  11. Cool snacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Brock, Steen; Brunsø, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Young people snack and their snacking habits are not always healthy. We address the questions whether it is possible to develop a new snack product that adolescents will find attractive, even though it is based on ingredients as healthy as fruits and vegetables, and we argue that developing...... such a product requires an interdisciplinary effort where researchers with backgrounds in psychology, anthropology, media science, philosophy, sensory science and food science join forces. We present the COOL SNACKS project, where such a blend of competences was used first to obtain thorough insight into young...... people's snacking behaviour and then to develop and test new, healthier snacking solutions. These new snacking solutions were tested and found to be favourably accepted by young people. The paper therefore provides a proof of principle that the development of snacks that are both healthy and attractive...

  12. Cool visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Pictured, from left to right: Tim Izo (saxophone, flute, guitar), Bobby Grant (tour manager), George Pajon (guitar). What do the LHC and a world-famous hip-hop group have in common? They are cool! On Saturday, 1st July, before their appearance at the Montreux Jazz Festival, three members of the 'Black Eyed Peas' came on a surprise visit to CERN, inspired by Dan Brown's Angels and Demons. At short notice, Connie Potter (Head of the ATLAS secretariat) organized a guided tour of ATLAS and the AD 'antimatter factory'. Still curious, lead vocalist Will.I.Am met CERN physicist Rolf Landua after the concert to ask many more questions on particles, CERN, and the origin of the Universe.

  13. Routine phasing of coiled-coil protein crystal structures with AMPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens M. H. Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Coiled-coil protein folds are among the most abundant in nature. These folds consist of long wound α-helices and are architecturally simple, but paradoxically their crystallographic structures are notoriously difficult to solve with molecular-replacement techniques. The program AMPLE can solve crystal structures by molecular replacement using ab initio search models in the absence of an existent homologous protein structure. AMPLE has been benchmarked on a large and diverse test set of coiled-coil crystal structures and has been found to solve 80% of all cases. Successes included structures with chain lengths of up to 253 residues and resolutions down to 2.9 Å, considerably extending the limits on size and resolution that are typically tractable by ab initio methodologies. The structures of two macromolecular complexes, one including DNA, were also successfully solved using their coiled-coil components. It is demonstrated that both the ab initio modelling and the use of ensemble search models contribute to the success of AMPLE by comparison with phasing attempts using single structures or ideal polyalanine helices. These successes suggest that molecular replacement with AMPLE should be the method of choice for the crystallographic elucidation of a coiled-coil structure. Furthermore, AMPLE may be able to exploit the presence of a coiled coil in a complex to provide a convenient route for phasing.

  14. Do carotid MR surface coils affect PET quantification in PET/MR imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemink, Martin J; Eldib, Mootaz; Leiner, Tim; Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of surface coils for carotid MR imaging on PET quantification in a clinical simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanner. A cylindrical phantom was filled with a homogeneous 2L water-FDG mixture at a starting dose of 301.2MBq. Clinical PET/MR and PET/CT systems were used to acquire PET-data without a coil (reference standard) and with two carotid MRI coils (Siemens Special Purpose 8-Channel and Machnet 4-Channel Phased Array). PET-signal attenuation was evaluated with Osirix using 51 (PET/MR) and 37 (PET/CT) circular ROIs. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified for each ROI. Furthermore, SUVs of PET/MR and PET/CT were compared. For validation, a patient was scanned with an injected dose of 407.7MBq on both a PET/CT and a PET/MR system without a coil and with both coils. PET/MR underestimations were -2.2% (Siemens) and -7.8% (Machnet) for SUVmean, and -1.2% (Siemens) and -3.3% (Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively. For PET/CT, underestimations were -1.3% (Siemens) and -1.4% (Machnet) for SUVmean and -0.5% (both Siemens and Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively using no coil data as reference. Except for PET/CT SUVmax values all differences were significant. SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT with SUVmean values of 0.51-0.55 for PET/MR and 0.68-0.69 for PET/CT, respectively. The patient examination showed that median SUVmean values measured in the carotid arteries decreased from 0.97 without a coil to 0.96 (Siemens) and 0.88 (Machnet). Carotid surface coils do affect attenuation correction in both PET/MR and PET/CT imaging. Furthermore, SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT.

  15. Internal trim coils for CBA superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.A.; Aronson, S.; Cottingham, J.G.; Garber, M.; Hahn, H.; Sampson, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    In order to correct iron saturation effects and shape the beam working line, superconducting trim coils have been constructed, which operate inside the main coils. Detailed studies of mechanical properties, quench behavior, fields produced, and hysteresis have lead to the production of accelerator-quality coils generating the required-strength harmonics up to cos (7theta). These are routinely installed in CBA main magnets and operate at 80% of short sample with negligible training in an ambient field of more than 5.3T

  16. Superconducting coil development and motor demonstration: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1995-12-01

    Superconducting bismuth-cuprate wires, coils, and magnets are being produced by industry as part of a program to test the viability of using such magnets in Naval systems. Tests of prototype magnets, coils, and wires reveal progress in commercially produced products. The larger magnets will be installed in an existing superconducting homopolar motor and operated initially at 4.2K to test the performance. It is anticipated that approximately 400 Hp will be achieved by the motor. This article reports on the initial tests of the magnets, coils, and wires as well as the development program to improve their performance.

  17. CS model coil experimental log book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  18. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannotti, Maurizio [Physical Sciences, Barry University, 11300 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami Shores, FL 33161 (United States); Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, E-50009, Zaragoza, España (Spain); Ringwald, Andreas, E-mail: mgiannotti@barry.edu, E-mail: igor.irastorza@cern.ch, E-mail: jredondo@unizar.es, E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de [Theory group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  19. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  20. Dry cryomagnetic system with MgB2 coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abin, D. A.; Mineev, N. A.; Osipov, M. A.; Pokrovskii, S. V.; Rudnev, I. A.

    2017-12-01

    MgB2 may be the future superconducting wire material for industrial magnets due to it’s higher operation temperature and potentially lower cost than low temperature superconductors (LTS) have. We designed a compact cryomagnetic system with the use of MgB2. The possibility of creating a magnet with a central field of 5 T from a commercial MgB2 wire by the “react and wound” method was investigated. The magnetic system is cooled by a cryocooler through a copper bus. The magnet has a warm bore diameter of 4 cm. The design of a magnet consisting of three concentric solenoids is proposed: an internal one of high-temperature superconductor (HTS), an average of MgB2, and an external of NbTi. The operating current of the system is 100 A. Two pairs of current leads are used. A separate pair of current leads for power supplying NbTi coil allows testing of MgB2 and HTS coils in an external field. The load curves for each of the magnets are calculated.

  1. Scalable Nernst thermoelectric power using a coiled galfenol wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zihao; Codecido, Emilio A.; Marquez, Jason; Zheng, Yuanhua; Heremans, Joseph P.; Myers, Roberto C.

    2017-09-01

    The Nernst thermopower usually is considered far too weak in most metals for waste heat recovery. However, its transverse orientation gives it an advantage over the Seebeck effect on non-flat surfaces. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the scalable generation of a Nernst voltage in an air-cooled metal wire coiled around a hot cylinder. In this geometry, a radial temperature gradient generates an azimuthal electric field in the coil. A Galfenol (Fe0.85Ga0.15) wire is wrapped around a cartridge heater, and the voltage drop across the wire is measured as a function of axial magnetic field. As expected, the Nernst voltage scales linearly with the length of the wire. Based on heat conduction and fluid dynamic equations, finite-element method is used to calculate the temperature gradient across the Galfenol wire and determine the Nernst coefficient. A giant Nernst coefficient of -2.6 μV/KT at room temperature is estimated, in agreement with measurements on bulk Galfenol. We expect that the giant Nernst effect in Galfenol arises from its magnetostriction, presumably through enhanced magnon-phonon coupling. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a transverse thermoelectric generator capable of scalable output power from non-flat heat sources.

  2. Scalable Nernst thermoelectric power using a coiled galfenol wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihao Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Nernst thermopower usually is considered far too weak in most metals for waste heat recovery. However, its transverse orientation gives it an advantage over the Seebeck effect on non-flat surfaces. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the scalable generation of a Nernst voltage in an air-cooled metal wire coiled around a hot cylinder. In this geometry, a radial temperature gradient generates an azimuthal electric field in the coil. A Galfenol (Fe0.85Ga0.15 wire is wrapped around a cartridge heater, and the voltage drop across the wire is measured as a function of axial magnetic field. As expected, the Nernst voltage scales linearly with the length of the wire. Based on heat conduction and fluid dynamic equations, finite-element method is used to calculate the temperature gradient across the Galfenol wire and determine the Nernst coefficient. A giant Nernst coefficient of -2.6 μV/KT at room temperature is estimated, in agreement with measurements on bulk Galfenol. We expect that the giant Nernst effect in Galfenol arises from its magnetostriction, presumably through enhanced magnon-phonon coupling. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a transverse thermoelectric generator capable of scalable output power from non-flat heat sources.

  3. The effect of coiling temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a niobium–titanium microalloyed steel processed via thin slab casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Challa, V.S.A.; Zhou, W.H.; Misra, R.D.K.; O'Malley, R.; Jansto, S.G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the influence of coiling temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties, especially toughness, in a low carbon niobium microalloyed steel processed via thin slab casting. The objective is to elucidate the impact of coiling temperature on the nature and distribution of microstructural constituents (including different phases, precipitates, and dislocations) that contribute to variation in the strength–toughness relationship of these steels. In general, the microstructure primarily consisted of fine lath-type bainite and polygonal ferrite, and NbC, TiC and (Nb, Ti)C precipitates of size ∼2–10 nm in the matrix and at dislocations. However, the dominance of bainite and distribution of precipitates was a function of coiling temperature. The lower coiling temperature provided superior strength–toughness combination and is attributed to predominantly bainitic microstructure and uniform precipitation of NbC, TiC, and (Nb, Ti)C during the coiling process, consistent with continuous cooling transformation diagrams

  4. The effect of coiling temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a niobium–titanium microalloyed steel processed via thin slab casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challa, V.S.A.; Zhou, W.H. [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Material Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); Misra, R.D.K., E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu [Laboratory for Excellence in Advanced Steel Research, Center for Structural and Functional Materials, Institute for Material Research and Innovation, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70503 (United States); O' Malley, R. [Nucor Decatur Sheet Mill, 4301 Iverson Blvd., Trinity, AL 35673 (United States); Jansto, S.G. [CBMM North America, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We describe here the influence of coiling temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties, especially toughness, in a low carbon niobium microalloyed steel processed via thin slab casting. The objective is to elucidate the impact of coiling temperature on the nature and distribution of microstructural constituents (including different phases, precipitates, and dislocations) that contribute to variation in the strength–toughness relationship of these steels. In general, the microstructure primarily consisted of fine lath-type bainite and polygonal ferrite, and NbC, TiC and (Nb, Ti)C precipitates of size ∼2–10 nm in the matrix and at dislocations. However, the dominance of bainite and distribution of precipitates was a function of coiling temperature. The lower coiling temperature provided superior strength–toughness combination and is attributed to predominantly bainitic microstructure and uniform precipitation of NbC, TiC, and (Nb, Ti)C during the coiling process, consistent with continuous cooling transformation diagrams.

  5. An internal superconducting ''holding-coil'' for frozen spin targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutz, H.; Gehring, R.; Goertz, S.; Kraemer, D.; Meyer, W.; Reicherz, G.; Thomas, A.

    1995-01-01

    A new concept of a small superconducting holding magnet, placed inside a polarizing refrigerator, has been developed for frozen spin targets. The superconducting wire has been wound on the inner cooling shield of the vertical dilution refrigerator of the Bonn frozen spin target. The maximum field of the magnet is 0.35 T. The total thickness of the superconducting coil consisting of the wire and the copper carrier is of the order of 500 μm. Based on this concept, a frozen spin target is under construction for the measurement of the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule with polarized real photons at the Mainz microtron MAMI and the Bonn electron stretcher accelerator ELSA. ((orig.))

  6. An internal superconducting ``holding-coil`` for frozen spin targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutz, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Gehring, R. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Goertz, S. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Kraemer, D. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Meyer, W. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Reicherz, G. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Thomas, A. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

    1995-03-01

    A new concept of a small superconducting holding magnet, placed inside a polarizing refrigerator, has been developed for frozen spin targets. The superconducting wire has been wound on the inner cooling shield of the vertical dilution refrigerator of the Bonn frozen spin target. The maximum field of the magnet is 0.35 T. The total thickness of the superconducting coil consisting of the wire and the copper carrier is of the order of 500 {mu}m. Based on this concept, a frozen spin target is under construction for the measurement of the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule with polarized real photons at the Mainz microtron MAMI and the Bonn electron stretcher accelerator ELSA. ((orig.))

  7. High current superconductors for tokamak toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietz, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Conductors rated at 10,000 A for 8 T and 4.2 K are being purchased for the first large coil segment tests at ORNL. Requirements for these conductors, in addition to the high current rating, are low pulse losses, cryostatic stability, and acceptable mechanical properties. The conductors are required to have losses less than 0.4 W/m under pulsed fields of 0.5 T with a rise time of 1 sec in an ambient 8-T field. Methods of calculating these losses and techniques for verifying the performance by direct measurement are discussed. Conductors stabilized by two different cooling methods, pool boiling and forced helium flow, have been proposed. Analysis of these conductors is presented and a proposed definition and test of stability is discussed. Mechanical property requirements, tensile and compressive, are defined and test methods are discussed

  8. Flexible eddy current coil arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krampfner, Y.; Johnson, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel approach was devised to overcome certain limitations of conventional eddy current testing. The typical single-element hand-wound probe was replaced with a two dimensional array of spirally wound probe elements deposited on a thin, flexible polyimide substrate. This provides full and reliable coverage of the test area and eliminates the need for scanning. The flexible substrate construction of the array allows the probes to conform to irregular part geometries, such as turbine blades and tubing, thereby eliminating the need for specialized probes for each geometry. Additionally, the batch manufacturing process of the array can yield highly uniform and reproducible coil geometries. The array is driven by a portable computer-based eddy current instrument, smartEDDY/sup TM/, capable of two-frequency operation, and offers a great deal of versatility and flexibility due to its software-based architecture. The array is coupled to the instrument via an 80-switch multiplexer that can be configured to address up to 1600 probes. The individual array elements may be addressed in any desired sequence, as defined by the software

  9. A coil test facility for the cryogenic tests of the JT-60SA TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantant, M.; Genini, L.; Bayetti, P.; Millet, F.; Wanner, M.; Massaut, V.; Corte, A. Della; Ardelier-Desage, F.; Catherine-Dumont, V.; Dael, A.; Decool, P.; Donati, A.; Duchateau, J.L.; Garibaldi, P.; Girard, S.; Hatchressian, J.C.; Fejoz, P.; Jamotton, P.; Jourdheuil, L.; Juster, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the Broader Approach Activities, the EU will deliver to Japan the 18 superconducting coils, which constitute the JT-60SA Toroidal field magnet. These 18 coils, manufactured by France and Italy, will be cold tested before shipping to Japan. For this purpose, the European Joint Undertaking for ITER, the Development of Fusion Energy ('Fusion for Energy', F4E) and the European Voluntary Contributors are collaborating to design and set-up a coil test facility (CTF) and to perform the acceptance test of the 18 JT-60SA Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The test facility is designed to test one coil at a time at nominal current and cryogenic temperature. The test of the first coil of each manufacturer includes a quench triggered by increasing the temperature. The project is presently in the detailed design phase.

  10. Coil measurement data acquisition and curing press control system for SSC dipole magnet coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickey, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    A coil matching program, similar in theory to the methods used to match Tevatron coils, is being developed at Fermilab. Modulus of elasticity and absolute coil size will be determined at 18-inch intervals along the coils while in the coil curing press immediately following the curing process. A data acquisition system is under construction to automatically acquire and manage the large quantities of data that result. Data files will be transferred to Fermilab's VAX Cluster for long-term storage and actual coil matching. The data acquisition system will also provide the control algorithm for the curing press hydraulic system. A description of the SSC Curing Press Data Acquisition and Controls System will be reported. 20 figs

  11. Balloon-assisted coiling through a 5-French system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J. Bradley; Layton, Kennith F.; Kallmes, David F.; Cloft, Harry J.

    2007-01-01

    We present a catheter technique that utilizes a 5F system for the purpose of balloon-assisted coiling in the setting of intracranial aneurysms. A standard 5F short sheath is placed in the common femoral artery, and a 5F diagnostic catheter is placed through the sheath and used for selective vessel angiography. When endovascular intervention is pursued, the diagnostic catheter is placed in the appropriate vessel and systemic heparinization is ensured. Over an exchange length wire, the 5F vertebral catheter and 5F short sheath are exchanged for a 5F Shuttle (Cook) sheath. We then routinely place a 10, 14 or 18 microcatheter over an appropriately gauged microguidewire into the aneurysm. As needed, balloon catheters are then placed across the neck of the aneurysm for remodeling purposes. During the course of the procedure, control angiography is performed through the Shuttle sheath. Following the placement of coils, the microcatheter and balloon catheter are removed and a final biplane image is obtained via the 5F Shuttle sheath. This technique has been employed in 15 patients who required balloon-assisted coiling of an intracranial aneurysm. There were no technical difficulties or arterial access site complications from the procedures. Catheter mobility and torque were not affected, nor was the quality of our imaging. We conclude that this small-diameter system provides ample ''room'' for catheter placement and interventional treatment while reducing the known risks of postprocedural complications. Angiographic images remain excellent and are comparable to those obtained by larger catheters. (orig.)

  12. Poloidal field coil design for known plasma equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulson, C.C.; Todd, A.M.M.; Reusch, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    The technique for obtaining plasma equilibria with given boundary conditions has long been known and understood. The inverse problem of obtaining a poloidal field (PF) coil system from a given plasma equilibrium has been widely studied, however its solution has remained largely an art form. An investigation, by the writers, of this fundamentally ill-posed inverse problem has resulted in a new understanding of the requirements that solutions must satisfy. A set of interacting computer codes has been written which may be used to successfully design PF coil systems capable of supporting given plasma equilibria. It is shown that for discrete coil systems with a reasonable number of elements the standard minimization of the R M S flux error can lead to undesirable results. Examples are given to show that an additional stability requirement must be imposed on the regularization parameter to obtain correct solutions. For some equilibria, the authors find that the inverse problem admits dual solutions corresponding to two possible magnetic field configurations that fit the constraining relations on the plasma surface equally well. An additional minimization of the absolute value of the limiter flux is required to discriminate between these solutions

  13. Divertor cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Tadakazu; Hayashi, Katsumi; Handa, Hiroyuki

    1993-01-01

    Cooling water for a divertor cooling system cools the divertor, thereafter, passes through pipelines connecting the exit pipelines of the divertor cooling system and the inlet pipelines of a blanket cooling system and is introduced to the blanket cooling system in a vacuum vessel. It undergoes emission of neutrons, and cooling water in the divertor cooling system containing a great amount of N-16 which is generated by radioactivation of O-16 is introduced to the blanket cooling system in the vacuum vessel by way of pipelines, and after cooling, passes through exit pipelines of the blanket cooling system and is introduced to the outside of the vacuum vessel. Radiation of N-16 in the cooling water is decayed sufficiently with passage of time during cooling of the blanket, thereby enabling to decrease the amount of shielding materials such as facilities and pipelines, and ensure spaces. (N.H.)

  14. WORKSHOP: Beam cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Cooling - the control of unruly particles to provide well-behaved beams - has become a major new tool in accelerator physics. The main approaches of electron cooling pioneered by Gersh Budker at Novosibirsk and stochastic cooling by Simon van der Meer at CERN, are now complemented by additional ideas, such as laser cooling of ions and ionization cooling of muons

  15. Results from a model system of superconducting solenoids and phase shifting bridge for pulsed power studies for proposed tokamak EF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.; Smith, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    A matched pair of superconducting solenoids and a phase-shifting bridge circuit has been constructed to study energy storage and transfer for application to tokamak EF coils. The intrinsically stable solenoids, each with 4 H self-inductance, incorporate sufficient cooling to allow charging at several hundred volts, corresponding to B approximately equal 1 T/sec. The three-phase inductor-convertor capacitive bridge network operating at up to 150 V rms transfers energy reversibly and at controllable rates from the storage coil to the load coil

  16. Results from a model system of superconducting solenoids and phase shifting bridge for pulsed power studies for proposed tokamak EF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuja, R.E.; Kustom, R.L.; Smith, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    A matched pair of superconducting solenoids and a phase-shifting bridge circuit has been constructed to study energy storage and transfer for application to tokamak EF coils. The intrinsically stable solenoids, each with 4 H self-inductance, incorporate sufficient cooling to allow charging at several hundred volts, corresponding to B = 1 T/sec. The three-phase inductor-convertor capacitive bridge network operating at up to 150 V rms transfers energy reversibly and at controllable rates from the storage coil to the load coil

  17. 12 tesla test coil. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The Plasma Fusion Center at MIT has been charged with responsibility for the design, development, fabrication and test operation of a Niobium-3-Tin Superconducting Test Coil. Research is described on DOE's 12 tesla coil demonstration program in which several one-meter diameter superconducting test coils will be inserted and tested in DOE's High Field Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratories. The work was initiated at the start of FY 79. FY 79 saw the completion of our Preliminary Design and the initiation of three (3) subcontracts: (1) Westinghouse review of the Preliminary Design, (II) Supercon, Inc. development of a tubular copper matrix, Nb 3 Sn Superconductor and (III) Airco optimization of the LCP-W Nb 3 Sn superconductor for 12T service. In addition, Airco was charged with the production of a 1000 foot length of model 15,000A conductor. Coil winding exercises were initiated at the Everson Electric Company

  18. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1980-02-01

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the ..beta.. limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor).

  19. Advanced Singlet Oxygen Generator for a COIL

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kodymova, Jarmila; Zagidullin, M; Nikolaev, V; Svistun, M; Khvatov, N; Hruby, J; Spalek, O; Jirasek, V; Censsky, M

    2005-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Academy of Sciences as follows: The Grantee will develop new and radically different ideas for a high performance, advanced singlet oxygen generator for driving a supersonic COIL...

  20. Helium leak testing the Westinghouse LCP coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merritt, P.A.; Attaar, M.H.; Hordubay, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    The tests, equipment, and techniques used to check the Westinghouse LCP coil for coolant flow path integrity and helium leakage are unique in terms of test sensitivity and application. This paper will discuss the various types of helium leak testing done on the LCP coil as it enters different stages of manufacture. The emphasis will be on the degree of test sensitivity achieved under shop conditions, and what equipment, techniques and tooling are required to achieve this sensitivity (5.9 x 10 -8 scc/sec). Other topics that will be discussed are helium flow and pressure drop testing which is used to detect any restrictions in the flow paths, and the LCP final acceptance test which is the final leak test performed on the coil prior to its being sent for testing. The overall allowable leak rate for this coil is 5 x 10 -6 scc/sec. A general evaluation of helium leak testing experience are included

  1. Radiative MRI Coil Design Using Parasitic Scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez-Heredia, Juan D.; Avendal, Johan; Bibic, Adnan

    2018-01-01

    allows for antenna design techniques to be adapted to RF coil designs. This study proposes the use of parasitic scatterers to improve the performance of an existing 7T MRI coil called the single-sided adapted dipole (SSAD) antenna. The results reveal that scatterers arranged in a Yagi fashion can......Conventionally, radiofrequency (RF) coils used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are electrically small and designed for nearfield operation. Therefore, existing antenna design techniques are mostly irrelevant for RF coils. However, the use of higher frequencies in ultrahigh field (UHF) MRI...... be applied to reduce local specific absorption rate (SAR) maxima of a reference SSAD by 40% with only a 6% decrease in the propagated B1 + field at the tissue depth of 15 cm. The higher directivity of the proposed design also decreasing the coupling with additional elements, making this antenna...

  2. MR angiography after coiling of intracranial aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Endovascular occlusion with detachable coils has become an alternative treatment to neurosurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms over the last two decades. Its minimal invasiveness is the most important advantage of this treatment compared to clipping. The disadvantage of occlusion

  3. Tracking method of small receiver coil using MR scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onogi, Shinya; Liao, Hongen; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro; Watanabe, Sigeru

    2007-01-01

    MR guided surgery is quite effective in realizing accurate and safe minimally invasive surgery (MIS). The combination of intra-operative MRI, surgical navigation system, and surgical robot should be of practical use in the field of MIS in the future. When we use flexible endoscope type robotic manipulator, the position and the orientation of the tip point of the flexible forceps should be navigated and controlled by a robotic manipulator. However, the conventional position sensor can not be used because of the strong magnetic field and the limited workspace. We propose a novel tracking method named extended active tracking (EAT), which is based on the active tracking algorithm. EAT can measure the position and the orientation of the tracking coils synchronically. The principle of EAT is three points measurement by three series inductance. We can calculate the orientation of three coils using the measured 3-D positions of coils. In this paper, three experiments was conducted to evaluate the basic performance of the EAT. First experiment is the flip angle adjustment for the reduction of background noise, which is caused by the proton around each inductance. The experimental results shown that the inductance positions could be clearly observed without background noise at 6-deg flip angle with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal peaks. Second experiment is the reproducibility evaluation. The fluctuation of measurement position and orientation were less than 0.3 mm (SD) and 1.0 deg (SD) at various positions and orientations. And standard deviation of the distance between the inductances at various positions and orientations is less than resolution (0.78 mm). Third experiment is an accuracy evaluation. The position measurement accuracy was 0.39 mm (RMS) using an optical tracking device. The orientation measurement accuracy was 3.5 deg (RMS) when the tracking coil was rotated 30 degree. Evaluation result suggests that EAT is possible to be used inside a patient body

  4. Magnetic Test Facility - Sensor and Coil Calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    amplitude of signals induced into the sensor. 2.1.1.2 Fluxgate magnetometers Fluxgate sensors consist of a ferromagnetic core, around which drive and sense...kHz range to be measured. Fluxgate magnetometers do not have a lower limit to their fre- quency response, and hence can be used to measure...placed within a larger triaxial coil which is used in conjunction with a fluxgate magnetometer to cancel earth’s field at the cen- tre of the coil. A

  5. Quadruple Cone Coil with improved focality than Figure-8 coil in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Lee, Erik G.; Hadimani, Ravi L.; Jiles, David C.

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive therapy which uses a time varying magnetic field to induce an electric field in the brain and to cause neuron depolarization. Magnetic coils play an important role in the TMS therapy since their coil geometry determines the focality and penetration's depth of the induced electric field in the brain. Quadruple Cone Coil (QCC) is a novel coil with an improved focality when compared to commercial Figure-8 coil. The results of this newly designed QCC coil are compared with the Figure-8 coil at two different positions of the head - vertex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, over the 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. Parameters such as volume of stimulation, maximum electric, area of stimulation and location of maximum electric field are determined with the help of computer modelling of both coils. There is a decrease in volume of brain stimulated by 11.6 % and a modest improvement of 8 % in the location of maximum electric field due to QCC in comparison to the Figure-8 coil. The Carver Charitable Trust and The Galloway Foundation.

  6. Magnetic resonance dacryocystography: comparison between conventional surface coils and microscopic coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu Junior, Luiz de; Wolosker, Angela Maria Borri; Borri, Maria Lucia; Galvao Filho, Mario de Melo; Hartmann, Luiz Guilherme de Carvalho; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Castro, Claudio Campi de

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized in the evaluation of the lacrimal apparatus with some advantages over conventional dacryocystography. The present study was aimed at acquiring high resolution images utilizing microscopic coils for evaluating typical structures of the lacrimal apparatus as compared with the findings observed with conventional surface coils. Materials and methods: Five asymptomatic volunteers with no history of epiphora were submitted to high-field magnetic resonance imaging with microscopic and conventional surface coils, and STIR sequence after instillation of saline solution. The definition of normal anatomic structures of lacrimal apparatuses was compared utilizing conventional and microscopic surface coils. Based on a consensual scoring system, the mean values for each structure were calculated by two observers. Results: In 90% of cases, higher scores were attributed to images acquired with the microscopic coil. On average, a 1.17 point increase was observed in the scoring of anatomic structures imaged with the microscopic coil. Additionally, a subjective improvement was observed in the signal-to-noise ratio with the microscopic coil. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance dacryocystography with microscopic coils is the appropriate method for evaluating the lacrimal apparatus, providing images with better quality as compared with those acquired with conventional surface coils. (author)

  7. An analysis of 3D solvation structure in biomolecules: application to coiled coil serine and bacteriorhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kenji; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2010-06-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) solvation structure around coiled coil serine (Coil-Ser) and inner 3D hydration structure in bacteriorhodopsin (bR) were studied using a recently developed method named multicenter molecular Ornstein-Zernike equation (MC-MOZ) theory. In addition, a procedure for analyzing the 3D solvent distribution was proposed. The method enables us to calculate the coordination number of solvent water as well as the strength of hydrogen bonding between the water molecule and the protein. The results for Coil-Ser and bR showed very good agreement with the experimental observations.

  8. Measurement of stability of cabled conductors cooled by He I at reduced temperature, or He II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Y.H.; Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.Y.; Alcorn, J.S.

    1980-09-01

    Stability tests of cabled NbTi alloy conductor are underway at the General Atomic High Field Test Facility, in support of the Team One effort of the DOE 12 Tesla Coil Development Program. A background field of up to 10 tesla within a 20 cm bore is provided by a nested pair of 4.2 0 K bath cooled NbTi coils. An insulated bore insert tube (coldfinger) is provided in order to perform heat pulse/recovery tests of coiled samples in cooling regimes anticipated for the 1 m O.D. coil to be tested at the LLNL 12 tesla facility during FY 82. Specifically, tests are being performed in the 2.5 to 3 0 K He I, and saturated superfluid (He II) regimes. The testing apparatus, procedures, and initial results are presented

  9. Thomson's Jumping Ring over a Long Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2018-01-01

    The classic jumping ring apparatus consists of a coil with an iron core that extends out of the coil. A copper or aluminum ring placed over the iron core jumps upward when AC power is applied to the coil. In this paper we will examine a modified design of the jumping ring apparatus, called the "long-coil design." It allows the ring to…

  10. COMPASS magnetic field coils and structure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossland, R.T.; Booth, J.A.; Hayward, R.J.; Keogh, P.; Pratt, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    COMPASS is a new experimental toroidal assembly of compact design and with a wide range of physics objectives. It is required to operate either as a Tokamak or as a Reversed Field Pinch with interchangeable circular and dee-section vacuum vessels. The Toroidal field is produced by 16 rectangular coils of 4 turns with tapered conductors on the inside which nest together to form a vault to resist the centering forces. The coils are designed to produce a maximum field on axis of 2.1T which requires a current of 91 kA per turn. Two central solenoids and five pairs of coils symmetrically positioned above and below the machine equator provide the poloidal field. Both coil systems are supported form a mechanical support structure which surrounds the machine. This is primarily designed to resist out-of-plane forces on the TF coils but also acts as the base support for the PF coils and vacuum vessels. An illustration of the COMPASS Load Assembly is given and shows the D-shaped vacuum vessel, the major components and the various field windings

  11. Embroidered Coils for Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I. Newton

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging is a widely used technique for medical and materials imaging. Even though the objects being imaged are often irregularly shaped, suitable coils permitting the measurement of the radio-frequency signal in these systems are usually made of solid copper. One problem often encountered is how to ensure the coils are both in close proximity and conformal to the object being imaged. Whilst embroidered conductive threads have previously been used as antennae in mobile telecommunications applications, they have not previously been reported for use within magnetic resonance. In this paper we show that an embroidered single loop coil can be used in a commercial unilateral nuclear magnetic resonance system as an alternative to a solid copper. Data is presented showing the determination of both longitudinal (T1 and effective transverse (T2eff relaxation times for a flat fabric coil and the same coil conformed to an 8 cm diameter cylinder. We thereby demonstrate the principles required for the wider use of fabric based conformal coils within nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. [Surface coils for magnetic-resonance images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, Alfredo Odón; Amador-Baheza, Ricardo; Rojas-Jasso, Rafael; Barrios-Alvarez, Fernando Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging in Mexico, the development of this important medical imaging technology has been almost non-existing in our country. The very first surface coil prototypes for clinical applications in magnetic resonance imaging has been developed at the Center of Research in Medical Imaging and Instrumentation of the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Metropolitan Autonomous University, Campus Iztapalapa). Two surface coil prototypes were built: a) a circular-shaped coil and b) a square-shaped coil for multiple regions of the body, such as heart, brain, knee, hands, and ankles. These coils were tested on the 1.5T imager of the ABC Hospital-Tacubaya, located in Mexico City. Brain images of healthy volunteers were obtained in different orientations: sagittal, coronal, and axial. Since images showed a good-enough clinical quality for diagnosis, it is fair to say that these coil prototypes can be used in the clinical environment, and with small modifications, they can be made compatible with almost any commercial scanner. This type of development can offer new alternatives for further collaboration between the research centers and the radiology community, in the search of new applications and developments of this imaging technique.

  13. The application of micro-coil NMR probe technology to metabolomics of urine and serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, John H.; O’Connell, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing the sensitivity and throughput of NMR-based metabolomics is critical for the continued growth of this field. In this paper the application of micro-coil NMR probe technology was evaluated for this purpose. The most commonly used biofluids in metabolomics are urine and serum. In this study we examine different sample limited conditions and compare the detection sensitivity of the micro-coil with a standard 5 mm NMR probe. Sample concentration is evaluated as a means to leverage the greatly improved mass sensitivity of the micro-coil probes. With very small sample volumes, the sensitivity of the micro-coil probe does indeed provide a significant advantage over the standard probe. Concentrating the samples does improve the signal detection, but the benefits do not follow the expected linear increase and are both matrix and metabolite specific. Absolute quantitation will be affected by concentration, but an analysis of relative concentrations is still possible. The choice of the micro-coil probe over a standard tube based probe will depend upon a number of factors including number of samples and initial volume but this study demonstrates the feasibility of high-throughput metabolomics with the micro-probe platform.

  14. Impact of environmental regulations on control of copper ion concentration in the DIII-D cooling water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gootgeld, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    Tokamaks and industrial users are faced with the task of maintaining closed-loop, low conductivity, low impurity, cooling water systems. Operating these systems concentrates the impurities in the water requiring subsequent disposal. Environmental regulations are making this increasingly difficult. This paper will discuss the solution to the problem of removing and disposing of copper ions in the DIII-D low conductivity water system. Since the commissioning of the Doublet facility, the quality of the water in the 3000 gpm system that cools the DIII-D vacuum vessel coils, power supplies and auxiliary heating components has been controlled with mixed-bed ion exchangers. Low ion levels, particularly copper, are required to operate this equipment. In early 1992, the company that leases and regenerates DIII-D ion exchangers said they no longer can accept these resin beds for regeneration due to the level of copper ion on the resin. This change in policy, a change that has been adopted throughout their industry, was necessary to assure that the Metropolitan Sewerage System of the City of San Diego stays in compliance with State of California regulations and EPA-mandated national pretreatment standards and regulations. A cost effective solution was implemented which utilizes a reverse osmosis filtration system with the ion exchangers for make-up water. Levels of copper ion disposed to the sewer are in compliance with government standards. These measures have thus far proved effective in maintaining low conductivity and overall good quality cooling water. Specifically, this paper discusses DIII-D deionized cooling water quality requirements and an affective means to meet these requirements in order to be in compliance with government regulations for copper ion disposal. The problems discussed, the alternatives considered and the approach taken would be readily applicable to any deionized cooling water system containing copper where EPA standards and regulations are mandated

  15. Superior MR images with electronically tuned and decoupled surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingwersen, H.; Freisen, L.; Friedrich, A.; Kess, H.; Krause, N.; Meissner, R.; Popp, W.

    1987-01-01

    In order to gain free positioning of surface coils in linearly polarized transmitting coils, it is absolutely necessary to electronically decouple both coils. For circularly polarized transmitting coils, decoupling is necessary in any case. In addition to the decoupling circuit automatic electronic tuning of the surface coils is used to gain the bast ratio of signal to noise. This combination of electronically decoupling and tuning of the surface coils yields intrinsic patient safety concerning local power deposition as well as free positioning and easy handling at the same time. Block diagrams, circuit schemes, and MR images obtained with several different surface coils are shown

  16. Static Measurements on HTS Coils of Fully Superconducting AC Electric Machines for Aircraft Electric Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Benjamin B.; Hunker, Keith R.; Hartwig, Jason; Brown, Gerald V.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been developing the high efficiency and high-power density superconducting (SC) electric machines in full support of electrified aircraft propulsion (EAP) systems for a future electric aircraft. A SC coil test rig has been designed and built to perform static and AC measurements on BSCCO, (RE)BCO, and YBCO high temperature superconducting (HTS) wire and coils at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In this paper, DC measurements on five SC coil configurations of various geometry in zero external magnetic field are measured to develop good measurement technique and to determine the critical current (Ic) and the sharpness (n value) of the super-to-normal transition. Also, standard procedures for coil design, fabrication, coil mounting, micro-volt measurement, cryogenic testing, current control, and data acquisition technique were established. Experimentally measured critical currents are compared with theoretical predicted values based on an electric-field criterion (Ec). Data here are essential to quantify the SC electric machine operation limits where the SC begins to exhibit non-zero resistance. All test data will be utilized to assess the feasibility of using HTS coils for the fully superconducting AC electric machine development for an aircraft electric propulsion system.

  17. Performance of a 10-kJ SMES model cooled by liquid hydrogen thermo-siphon flow for ASPCS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makida, Y; Shintomi, T; Hamajima, T; Tsuda, M; Miyagi, D; Ota, N; Katsura, M; Ando, K; Takao, T; Tsujigami, H; Fujikawa, S; Hirose, J; Iwaki, K; Komagome, T

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new electrical power storage and stabilization system, called an Advanced Superconducting Power Conditioning System (ASPCS), which consists of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) and hydrogen energy storage, converged on a liquid hydrogen station for fuel cell vehicles. A small 10- kJ SMES system, in which a BSCCO coil cooled by liquid hydrogen was installed, was developed to create an experimental model of an ASPCS. The SMES coil is conductively cooled by liquid hydrogen flow through a thermo-siphon line under a liquid hydrogen buffer tank. After fabrication of the system, cooldown tests were carried out using liquid hydrogen. The SMES coil was successfully charged up to a nominal current of 200 A. An eddy current loss, which was mainly induced in pure aluminum plates pasted onto each pancake coils for conduction cooling, was also measured. (paper)

  18. Renewable Heating And Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  19. Huge opportunity for solar cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    which use different components or the same components in an alternate configuration. A number of variants are technically proven and available for commercial and industrial installations. Each variant uses standard 'off the shelf' FIVAC industry components which are available in both Australia and overseas. A typical solar cooling system is also able to supply broader energy needs of a building including space heating and hot water.

  20. Coil supporting device in a nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Hirohisa; Sasaki, Katsutoki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To slide a vacuum vessel in the nuclear fusion device and a coil within the vacuum vessel and to mount the coil within the vacuum vessel in a manner that it may not be moved by an electromagnetic force, thereby preventing stress from being produced in the coil. Structure: A coil supporting plate mounted at upper and lower parts prevents damage to an insulation of the coil, said coil being held in a U-shaped groove, and can be moved integral with the coil by the action of a roller bearing with a plurality of needle-like rollers arranged in parallel. The coil supporting plate has a plurality of projections disposed on the lower surface thereof, and flat springs are placed in the projections one over another so that the spring action exerted in the lower plate causes the coil to be resiliently bias in a direction of an electromagnetic force applied thereto and to support the coil. (Yoshino, Y.)

  1. A Flexible Nested Sodium and Proton Coil Array with Wideband Matching for Knee Cartilage MRI at 3 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan; Lakshmanan, Karthik; Madelin, Guillaume; Alon, Leeor; Chang, Gregory; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Wiggins, Graham C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We describe a 6×2 channel sodium/proton array for knee MRI at 3 Tesla. Multi-element coil arrays are desirable because of well-known signal-to-noise ratio advantages over volume and single-element coils. However, low coil-tissue coupling that is characteristic of coils operating at low frequency can make the potential gains from a phased array difficult to realize. Methods The issue of low coil-tissue coupling in the developed six channel sodium receive array was addressed by implementing 1) a mechanically flexible former to minimize coil-to-tissue distance and reduce the overall diameter of the array and 2) a wideband matching scheme that counteracts preamplifier noise degradation caused by coil coupling and a high quality factor. The sodium array was complemented with a nested proton array to enable standard MRI. Results The wideband matching scheme and tight-fitting mechanical design contributed to greater than 30% central SNR gain on the sodium module over a mono-nuclear sodium birdcage coil, while the performance of the proton module was sufficient for clinical imaging. Conclusion We expect the strategies presented in this work to be generally relevant in high density receive arrays, particularly in x-nuclei or small animal applications, or in those where the array is distant from the targeted tissue. PMID:26502310

  2. PANDA experiment and International Standard Problem for passive cooling systems for afterheat removal; PANDA-Versuch und Internationales Standardproblem zu passiven Kuehlsystemen fuer die Nachwaermeabfuhr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Aksan, N.S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. fuer Thermohydraulik

    1999-09-03

    In the context of OECD/NEA, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) is working on an International Standard Problem which is to provide information on the efficiency and use of computer program systems for passive afterheat removal systems. The PANDA test facility of PSI was designed for these investigations. A six-phase PANDA experiment provides a basis for pre-calculation and recalculation of selected phases covering a limited number of system-typical operating states and phenomena. The experiment was specified and carried out in the year under report. [Deutsch] Im Rahmen der OECD/NEA fuehrt das Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) ein Internationales Standardproblem durch, das Aufschluss ueber die Leistungsfaehigkeit und Handhabung von Computer-Programmsystemen geben soll, die im Zusammenhang mit passiven Nachwaerme-Abfuhrsystemen eingesetzt werden. Die Versuchsanlage PANDA am PSI ist speziell auf die Untersuchung derartiger Systeme ausgerichtet. Ein PANDA-Versuch in sechs Phasen liefert den teilnehmenden Organisationen die Basis fuer Voraus- und Nachrechnungen einzelner oder mehrerer Phasen, die jeweils eine begrenzte Anzahl von systemtypischen Betriebszustaenden und Phaenomenen abdecken. Im Berichtsjahr wurde der Versuch spezifiziert und gefahren. (orig.)

  3. HydroSoft coil versus HydroCoil for endovascular aneurysm occlusion study: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xinbin; Fan Yimu; Zhang Jianning

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The HydroCoil Embolic System (HES) was developed to reduce recurrences of aneurysms relative to platinum coils. But the HydroCoil Embolic System was characterized with many limitations. The manufacturer had recognized the challenge and recently a new design of hydrogel-coated coil-HydroSoft has become available in the market as the new generation HydroCoil. We reported our initial experience using HydroSoft coil versus HydroCoil in our center. Methods: 75 aneurysms embolized primarily using HydroSoft Coils from July 2008 to May 2009 were compared with 66 volume- and shape-matched aneurysms treated with HydroCoils from March 2006 to August 2008. Outcome measures included length and number of coils used, contrast volume, and length of hospital stay. During embolization, a stable framework was first established with bare coils, and hydrogel-coated coils were used subsequently to increase the packing density. Follow-up angiographic results 6 months after treatment were evaluated among some of the patients. Results: Successful coil embolization was achieved in all patients. There were no differences in average total coil length used per aneurysm. There were no differences in length of hospital stay and packing density. HydroSoft coils were more suitable using as the finishing or final coil. HydroSoft coil decreased the procedure-related retreated rates, and aneurysm packing was finished with soft, flexible HydroSoft coil and decreased the neck remnant rates. Follow-up angiography in HydroSoft-treated patients at 6 months revealed aneurysm stability without significant residual neck. Conclusions: HydroSoft coil allowed us to deploy coated coils with good packing density. A slight expansion of these coils at the neck can be expected to reduce neck remnant and potentially inhibit recurrence.

  4. Versatile fill coils: initial experience as framing coils for oblong aneurysms. A technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Toshiya; Bain, Mark; Hui, Ferdinand K

    2014-01-01

    Coil embolization of oblong aneurysms is difficult because the majority of commercially available coils are manufactured with a helical or spherical tertiary structure. While adopting framing strategies for oblong aneurysms (aspect ratio ≥ 2: 1), traditional coils may be undersized in the long axis but oversized in the short axis, resulting in increased aneurysmal wall stress, risk of re-rupture, and difficulty creating a basket that respects the aneurysmal neck. We review three cases in which versatile filling coils (VFCs) were used as the initial coils for embolization of oblong aneurysms and report coil distribution characteristics and clinical outcomes. Packing density after VFC implantation was assessed using the software AngioSuite-Neuro edition and AngioCalc. a 58-year-old woman experienced a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm (7.5 mm × 3.5 mm). A 3-6 mm × 15 cm VFC was selected as the first coil because the flexibility of its wave-loop structure facilitates framing of an irregularly shaped aneurysm. The loop portions of the structures tend to be pressed to the extremes of the aneurysmal sac by the wave component. The VFC was introduced smoothly into the aneurysmal sac without catheter kickback. We were then able to insert detachable filling coils without any adjunctive technique and achieved complete occlusion. Complete occlusion without severe complications was achieved in all three cases in our study. Average packing density after the first coil was 15.63%. VFC coils may have a specific role in framing oblong aneurysms given their complex loop-wave design, allowing spacing of the coils at the dome and neck while keeping sac stress to a minimum.

  5. Surgical management of an ACM aneurysm eight years after coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogády, P; Fellner, F; Trenkler, J; Wurm, G

    2007-04-01

    The authors present a case report on rebleeding of a medial cerebral aneurysm (MCA) eight years after complete endovascular coiling. The primarily successfully coiled MCA aneurysm showed a local regrowth which, however, was not the source of the rebleeding. The angiogram demonstrated no evidence of contrast filling of the coiled segment, but according to intraoperative findings (haematoma location, displacement of coils, evident place of rupture) there is no doubt that the coiled segment of the aneurysm was responsible for the haemorrhage.

  6. Three-axis orthogonal transceiver coil for eddy current sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, D.; Zavyalova, K.; Goncharik, M.

    2017-08-01

    We propose the new structure of three-axis transceiver magnetic-induction coil for eddy current probing. Due to the orientation of the coils, the direct signal from the transmitting coil to the receiving coil is minimized, which provided a high dynamic range. Sensitivity in all directions is provided by combining coils of different orientations. Numerical simulation and experimental studies of such a system have been carried out and confirmed the applicability of the proposed method and the mathematical model.

  7. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  8. Evaluation of a 32-channel versus a 12-channel head coil for high-resolution post-contrast MRI in giant cell arteritis (GCA) at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.franke@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Institut für Diagnostische Radiologie, Gartenstr. 28, 79098 Freiburg (Germany); Markl, Michael, E-mail: mmarkl@northwestern.edu [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University Chicago, 737 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 1600, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Heinzelmann, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.heinzelmann@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Freiburg, Killianstr. 5, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Vaith, Peter, E-mail: peter.vaith@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Bürk, Jonas, E-mail: jonas.buerk@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Langer, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.langer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Geiger, J., E-mail: julia.geiger@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Freiburg, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Children‘s Hospital Zurich, Steinwiesstr. 75, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a 32-channel head coil for the characterization of mural inflammation patterns in the superficial cranial arteries in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared to a standard 12-channel coil at 3 T MRI. 55 patients with suspected GCA underwent high resolution T1-weighted post-contrast MRI at 3 T to detect inflammation related vessel wall enhancement using both coils. To account for different time delays between contrast agent injection and sequence acquisition, the patients were divided into two cohorts: 27 patients were examined with the 32-channel coil first and 28 patients with the 12-channel coil first. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers with regard to image quality, artifact level and arteries’ inflammation according to a standardized ranking scale; furthermore signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements were performed at three locations. Identification of arteries’ inflammation was achieved with both coils with excellent inter-observer agreement (κ = 0.89 for 12-channel and κ = 0.96 for 32-channel coil). Regarding image grading, the inter-observer variability was moderate for the 12-channel (κ = 0.5) and substantial for the 32-channel coil (κ = 0.63). Significantly higher SNR and improved image quality (p < 0.01) were obtained with the 32-channel coil in either coil order. Image quality for depiction of the superficial cranial arteries was superior for the 32-channel coil. For standardized GCA diagnosis, the 12-channel coil was sufficient.

  9. Heat transfer enhancement of Al_2O_3-EG nanofluid in a car radiator with wire coil inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudarzi, K.; Jamali, H.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The purpose of this paper is heat transfer enhancement in a car radiator. • The simultaneous impacts of nanofluid EG/Al_2O_3 with wire coil inserts are studied. • Results show that the thermal performance enhancement up to 14%. • With increasing speed of cooling fan, Nusselt number at Reynolds numbers increased. - Abstract: In this experimental study, Aluminums Oxide (Al_2O_3) in Ethylene Glycol (EG) as nanofluid was used for heat transfer enhancement in car radiator together with wire coil inserts. Two wire coils inserts with different geometry and nanofluids with volume concentrations of 0.08%, 0.5% and 1% were investigated. The results indicated that the use of coils inserts enhanced heat transfer rates up to 9%. In addition, the simultaneous use of the coils inserts with the nanofluid with concentration of 0.08%, 0.5% and 1% resulted the thermal performance enhancement up to 5% as compared to the use of coils inserts alone.

  10. Development of a helical-coil double wall tube steam generator for 4S reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Yuko; Maruyama, Shigeki; Jimbo, Noboru; Hino, Takehisa; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The 4S, Super-Safe Small and Simple, is a small-sized sodium-cooled fast reactor. A fast reactor usually uses sodium as a coolant to transfer heat from core to turbine/generator system. The heat of the intermediate heat transport system and that of the water stream systems are exchanged by the steam generator (SG) tubes. If the tube failure occurs, a sodium/water reaction could be occurred. To prevent the reaction and enhance safety, a helical-coil-type double wall tube with wire mesh interlayer and continuous monitoring systems of tube failure are applied to the SG of the 4S. The development and general features of this type double wall tube were described in Ref. 1) and Ref. 2). Those paper summarized following results; The tubes studied in these references were straight type. To establish this SG, development of manufacturing method of helical-coil-type double wall tube and validation of the tube failure monitoring system are needed. In this study, three demonstration tests have been performed; welding test of the double wall tube to manufacture the tubes with 70-80m length, assembling test of the helical-coil tube, and confirmation test of the tube processing system using the fabricated helical-coil tubes. As a result, following technologies have been successfully established. (1) Development of the welding techniques for manufacturing of the helical-coil-type double wall tube with wire mesh interlayer. (2) The confirmation test for manufacturing the helical coil tube of the SG. (author)

  11. Gradient coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frese, G.; Siebold, H.

    1984-01-01

    A gradient coil system for an image-generating, nuclear magnetic resonance tomographic apparatus, particularly a zeugmatographic apparatus. The gradient coil system is arranged on a support body of rotational symmetry, illustratively a hollow cylindrical support body, having an axis which extends along the z-direction of an x, y, z coordinate system which has an origin in the center of imaging region. The gradient coil system contains two pairs of toroidal individual coils which are arranged symmetrically with respect to an x-y plane which extends through the center of the imaging region and which are arranged perpendicular to the z-axis. The direction of current flow in the individual coils of a coil pair is opposite to the direction of flow in the individual coils of the other coil pair. Moreover, further sets of coils are provided for generating field gradient Gx in the x-direction, and Gy in the y-direction. The hollow cylindrical shape of the support body on which the individual coils are arranged permit an imaging region having a substantially spherical volume with a substantially constant field gradient Gz to be achieved. Each of the coils has a predetermined linkage factor which corresponds to the product of the current flowing through the number of coil turns of the coil. Those coils which are arranged further from the plane of symmetry have a substantially larger linkage factor than the coils which are nearer to the plane of symmetry

  12. Research on the electromagnetic structure of movable coil electromagnet drive mechanism for reactor control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jige; Yian Huijie; Wu Yuanqiang; Wu Xinxin; Yu Suyuan; He Shuyan

    2007-01-01

    The movable coil electromagnet drive mechanism (MCEDM) is a new drive scheme for the reactor control rod, and it has a simple structure, good security and reliability property, etc. MCEDM with an air cooled structure has been used in the land research reactor. In order to apply MCEDM to the mobile reactor, experimental and theoretical study on the electromagnet with an oil-water cooled structure and a single magnetic flux circuit (called the type A electro-magnet) has been completed. It is proven by the experiment and theory that the oil-water cooled structure is an excellent measure to increase the coil current of MCEDM. Moreover, a type B electromagnet with an oil-water cooled structure and double magnetic flux circuits is designed to further increase the magnetic force of MCEDM. The analysis of finite element method shows that the type B electromagnet could double the saturation current of type A electro-magnet and the magnetic force of type B electromagnet is greater than that of the type A electromagnet. Moreover, it is proven that the dynamic property of type B electromagnet is better than type A electromagnet. (author)

  13. Operation of a forced two phase cooling system on a large superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Burns, W.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Gibson, G.H.; Pripstein, M.; Ross, R.R.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.; Van Slyke, H.

    1980-05-01

    This paper describes the operation of a forced two phase cooling system on a two meter diameter superconducting solenoid. The magnet is a thin high current density superconducting solenoid which is cooled by forced two phase helium in tubes around the coil. The magnet, which is 2.18 meters in diameter and 3.4 meters long, has a cold mass of 1700 kg. The two phase cooling system contains less than 300 liters of liquid helium, most of which is contained in a control dewar. This paper describes the operating characteristics of the LBL two phase forced cooling system during cooldown and warm up. The paper presents experimental data on operations of the magnet using either a helium pump or the refrigerator compressor to circulate two phase helium through the superconducting coil cooling tubes

  14. Comparison of surface coil and knee coil for evaluation of the patellar cartilage by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, M. van den; Maeseneer, M. de; Hoste, M.; Vanderdood, K.; Ridder, F. de; Osteaux, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to compare the knee coil and the surface coil for the visualisation of the patellar cartilage. Materials and methods: In 28 patients (17 women, 11 men) with an average age of 40 years (range 14-76) with knee pain MR was performed. Transverse images were obtained using a fast spin echo proton density weighted sequence on a Philips Gyroscan Intera 1.5 T clinical system. Transverse images were obtained at the level of the patellar cartilage using both the surface and the knee coil. All images were evaluated by consensus of two radiologists. They evaluated a number of quality criteria on a 4-point scale. Criteria for artefacts were also graded on a 4-point scale. Results: For the visualisation of fluid there was no significant difference between the knee coil and the surface coil (P=0.021). For all other criteria regarding image quality and presence of imaging artefacts there was a significant difference between both coils (P<0.001) with the surface coil obtaining the better result. Conclusion: The use of the surface coil in the visualisation of the patellar cartilage can be recommended at knee MR

  15. Immunogenicity of coiled-coil based drug-free macromolecular therapeutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kverka, Miloslav; Hartley, J.M.; Chu, T.W.; Yang, J.; Heidchen, R.; Kopeček, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2014), s. 5886-5896 ISSN 1616-0177 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Grant - others:NIH(US) GM095606 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : coiled-coil * enantiomers * HPMA copolymer Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  16. Golgi coiled-coil proteins contain multiple binding sites for Rab family G proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinka, Rita; Gillingham, Alison K.; Kondylis, Vangelis; Munro, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Vesicles and other carriers destined for the Golgi apparatus must be guided to the correct cisternae. Golgins, long coiled-coil proteins that localize to particular Golgi subdomains via their C termini, are candidate regulators of vesicle sorting. In this study, we report that the GRIP domain

  17. Endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms with bioactive Cerecyte coils: effects on treatment stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyik, Serdar; Yavuz, Kivilcim; Ergun, Onur; Koc, Osman; Cekirge, Saruhan [Hacettepe University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Saatci, Isil [Hacettepe University Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Hacettepe University Hospital, Interventional Neuroradiology Unit, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    The Cerecyte coils were developed to improve long-term stability of embolized cerebral aneurysms by producing an increased fibrous reaction over the neck of the aneurysms. We report our preliminary clinical experience with mid-term follow-up. Seventy-eight consecutive patients with 84 intracranial aneurysms treated exclusively with Cerecyte coils were included in this study. Forty-eight aneurysms were ruptured and 36 were incidental. Twenty-two aneurysms were small with (<10 mm) small neck (<4 mm) (SASN); 55 were small with wide neck ({>=}4 mm) (SAWN); six were large (10-25 mm) (L); and one was giant (G) (>25 mm). The embolization technique was the same with that in standard bare coiling. Immediate post-procedure angiography demonstrated complete aneurysm occlusion in 69%, neck remnant in 29.8% and incomplete occlusion in 1.2%. Follow-up angiography was obtained in 80 aneurysms in a period of time ranging from 6 months to 2 years. The overall recanalization rate was 11.3%, and the re-treatment rate was 6.3%; in the subgroup analysis, recanalization rates were 4.5% in S/S; 9.8% in S/W; and 33.3% in large aneurysms. The only giant aneurysm also showed recanalization. Procedure-related morbidity and mortality rates were 2.6% and 1.3%, respectively. Our midterm results showed a relatively low rate of recurrence compared to those reported for platinum coils with morbidity and mortality rates comparable to those with standard bare platinum coils. The efficacy of Cerecyte coils in the long term will be specifically addressed by the ongoing randomized Cerecyte coil trial. (orig.)

  18. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc.; Flanagan, Gene [Muons, Inc.

    2014-09-10

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  19. Cooling Characteristic Analysis of Transformer's Radiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jae; Yang, Si Won; Kim, Won Seok; Kweon, Ki Yeoung; Lee, Min Jea

    2007-01-01

    A transformer is a device that changes the current and voltage by electricity induced between coil and core steel, and it is composed of metals and insulating materials. In the core of the transformer, the thermal load is generated by electric loss and the high temperature can make the break of insulating. So we must cool down the temperature of transformer by external radiators. According to cooling fan's usage, there are two cooling types, OA(Oil Natural Air Natural) and FA(Oil Natural Air Forced). For this study , we used Fluent 6.2 and analyzed the cooling characteristic of radiator. we calculated 1-fin of detail modeling that is similar to honeycomb structure and multi-fin(18-fin) calculation for OA and FA types. For the sensitivity study, we have different positions(side, under) of cooling fans for forced convection of FA type. The calculation results were compared with the measurement data which obtained from 135.45/69kV ultra transformer flowrate and temperature test. The aim of the study is to assess the Fluent code prediction on the radiator calculation and to use the data for optimizing transformer radiator design

  20. Spiral MRI on a 9.4T Vertical-bore Superconducting Magnet Using Unshielded and Self-shielded Gradient Coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nao; Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-01-01

    Spiral MRI sequences were developed for a 9.4T vertical standard bore (54 mm) superconducting magnet using unshielded and self-shielded gradient coils. Clear spiral images with 64-shot scan were obtained with the self-shielded gradient coil, but severe shading artifacts were observed for the spiral-scan images acquired with the unshielded gradient coil. This shading artifact was successfully corrected with a phase-correction technique using reference scans that we developed based on eddy current field measurements. We therefore concluded that spiral imaging sequences can be installed even for unshielded gradient coils if phase corrections are performed using the reference scans. PMID:28367906

  1. Spiral MRI on a 9.4T Vertical-bore Superconducting Magnet Using Unshielded and Self-shielded Gradient Coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nao; Setoi, Ayana; Kose, Katsumi

    2018-04-10

    Spiral MRI sequences were developed for a 9.4T vertical standard bore (54 mm) superconducting magnet using unshielded and self-shielded gradient coils. Clear spiral images with 64-shot scan were obtained with the self-shielded gradient coil, but severe shading artifacts were observed for the spiral-scan images acquired with the unshielded gradient coil. This shading artifact was successfully corrected with a phase-correction technique using reference scans that we developed based on eddy current field measurements. We therefore concluded that spiral imaging sequences can be installed even for unshielded gradient coils if phase corrections are performed using the reference scans.

  2. Radiant floor cooling coupled with dehumidification systems in residential buildings: A simulation-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarrella, Angelo; De Carli, Michele; Peretti, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The floor radiant cooling in a typical apartment is analyzed. • Dehumidification devices, fan-coil and mechanical ventilation are compared. • The results are analyzed in terms of both thermal comfort and energy consumption. • The energy consumption of the dehumidifiers is higher than that of other systems. • The mechanical ventilation decreases the moisture level better than other systems. - Abstract: The development of radiant cooling has stimulated an interest in new systems based on coupling ventilation with radiant cooling. However, radiant cooling systems may cause condensation to form on an active surface under warm and humid conditions during the cooling season. This phenomenon occurs when surface temperature falls below dew point. To prevent condensation, air humidity needs to be reduced with a dehumidification device or a mechanical ventilation system. There are two main options to achieve this. The first is to use dehumidification devices that reduce humidity, but are not coupled with ventilation, i.e. devices that handle room air and leave air change to infiltrations. The second is to combine a mechanical ventilation system with dehumidifying finned coils. This study analyzes the floor radiant cooling of a typical residential apartment within a multi-storey building in three Italian climate zones by means of a detailed simulation tool. Five systems were compared in terms of both indoor thermal comfort and energy consumption: radiant cooling without dehumidification; radiant cooling with a soft dehumidification device; radiant cooling with a dehumidification device which also supplies sensible cooling; radiant cooling coupled with fan coils; and radiant cooling with a mechanical ventilation system which dehumidifies and cools

  3. 14 CFR 33.21 - Engine cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine cooling. 33.21 Section 33.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.21 Engine cooling. Engine design and...

  4. Transfer Efficiency and Cooling Cost by Thermal Loss based on Nitrogen Evaporation Method for Superconducting MAGLEV System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Y D; Kim, D W; Lee, C Y

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the feasibility of technical fusion between wireless power transfer (WPT) and superconducting technology to improve the transfer efficiency and evaluate operating costs such as refrigerant consumption. Generally, in WPT technology, the various copper wires have been adopted. From this reason, the transfer efficiency is limited since the copper wires of Q value are intrinsically critical point. On the other hand, as superconducting wires keep larger current density and relatively higher Q value, the superconducting resonance coil can be expected as a reasonable option to deliver large transfer power as well as improve the transfer ratio since it exchanges energy at a much higher rate and keeps stronger magnetic fields out. However, since superconducting wires should be cooled indispensably, the cooling cost of consumed refrigerant for resonance HTS wires should be estimated. In this study, the transmission ratios using HTS resonance receiver (Rx) coil and various cooled and noncooled copper resonance Rx coils were presented under non cooled copper antenna within input power of 200 W of 370 kHz respectively. In addition, authors evaluated cooling cost of liquid nitrogen for HTS resonance coil and various cooled copper resonance coils based on nitrogen evaporation method. (paper)

  5. Transfer Efficiency and Cooling Cost by Thermal Loss based on Nitrogen Evaporation Method for Superconducting MAGLEV System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y. D.; Kim, D. W.; Lee, C. Y.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the feasibility of technical fusion between wireless power transfer (WPT) and superconducting technology to improve the transfer efficiency and evaluate operating costs such as refrigerant consumption. Generally, in WPT technology, the various copper wires have been adopted. From this reason, the transfer efficiency is limited since the copper wires of Q value are intrinsically critical point. On the other hand, as superconducting wires keep larger current density and relatively higher Q value, the superconducting resonance coil can be expected as a reasonable option to deliver large transfer power as well as improve the transfer ratio since it exchanges energy at a much higher rate and keeps stronger magnetic fields out. However, since superconducting wires should be cooled indispensably, the cooling cost of consumed refrigerant for resonance HTS wires should be estimated. In this study, the transmission ratios using HTS resonance receiver (Rx) coil and various cooled and noncooled copper resonance Rx coils were presented under non cooled copper antenna within input power of 200 W of 370 kHz respectively. In addition, authors evaluated cooling cost of liquid nitrogen for HTS resonance coil and various cooled copper resonance coils based on nitrogen evaporation method.

  6. Analysis and experimental study of wireless power transfer with HTS coil and copper coil as the intermediate resonators system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiufang; Nie, Xinyi; Liang, Yilang; Lu, Falong; Yan, Zhongming; Wang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigated a kind of system architecture with three coils which the repeater is copper coil or HTS coil. • We simulated the different repeater system and obtained the magnetic field distribution at different distance. • We used helical coil instead of pancake coil which does not use capacitors. • HTS intermediate coil has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance than copper intermediate coil. - Abstract: Intermediate resonator (repeater) between transmitter and receiver can significantly increase the distance of wireless power transfer (WPT) and the efficiency of wireless power transfer. The wireless power transfer via strongly coupled magnetic resonances with an high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil and copper coil as intermediate resonators was presented in this paper. The electromagnetic experiment system under different conditions with different repeating coils were simulated by finite element software. The spatial distribution patterns of magnetic induction intensity at different distances were plotted. In this paper, we examined transfer characteristics with HTS repeating coil and copper repeating coil at 77 K and 300 K, respectively. Simulation and experimental results show that HTS and copper repeating coil can effectively enhance the space magnetic induction intensity, which has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance. We found that the efficiency and the distance of wireless power transfer system with an HTS coil as repeater is much higher by using of copper coil as repeater.

  7. Analysis and experimental study of wireless power transfer with HTS coil and copper coil as the intermediate resonators system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiufang [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Nie, Xinyi [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Liang, Yilang [School of Physics and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Lu, Falong [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Yan, Zhongming, E-mail: wangxiufanghappy@163.com [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China); Wang, Yu [School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • We investigated a kind of system architecture with three coils which the repeater is copper coil or HTS coil. • We simulated the different repeater system and obtained the magnetic field distribution at different distance. • We used helical coil instead of pancake coil which does not use capacitors. • HTS intermediate coil has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance than copper intermediate coil. - Abstract: Intermediate resonator (repeater) between transmitter and receiver can significantly increase the distance of wireless power transfer (WPT) and the efficiency of wireless power transfer. The wireless power transfer via strongly coupled magnetic resonances with an high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil and copper coil as intermediate resonators was presented in this paper. The electromagnetic experiment system under different conditions with different repeating coils were simulated by finite element software. The spatial distribution patterns of magnetic induction intensity at different distances were plotted. In this paper, we examined transfer characteristics with HTS repeating coil and copper repeating coil at 77 K and 300 K, respectively. Simulation and experimental results show that HTS and copper repeating coil can effectively enhance the space magnetic induction intensity, which has significant effect on improving the transmission efficiency and lengthening transmission distance. We found that the efficiency and the distance of wireless power transfer system with an HTS coil as repeater is much higher by using of copper coil as repeater.

  8. Prostate cancer: body-array versus endorectal coil MR imaging at 3 T--comparison of image quality, localization, and staging performance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmink, S.W.T.P.J.; Futterer, J.J.; Hambrock, T.; Takahashi, S.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Huisman, H.J.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Knipscheer, B.C.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively compare image quality and accuracy of prostate cancer localization and staging with body-array coil (BAC) versus endorectal coil (ERC) T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3 T, with histopathologic findings as the reference standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After

  9. RCCS Experiments and Validation for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Goon C. Park

    2007-01-01

    A reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS), an air-cooled helical coil RCCS unit immersed in the water pool, was proposed to overcome the disadvantages of the weak cooling ability of air-cooled RCCS and the complex structure of water-cooled RCCS for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). An experimental apparatus was constructed to investigate the various heat transfer phenomena in the water pool type RCCS, such as the natural convection of air inside the cavity, radiation in the cavity, the natural convection of water in the water pool and the forced convection of air in the cooling pipe. The RCCS experimental results were compared with published correlations. The CFX code was validated using data from the air-cooled portion of the RCCS. The RELAP5 code was validated using measured temperatures from the reactor vessel and cavity walls

  10. Automated de novo phasing and model building of coiled-coil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämisch, Sebastian; Lizatović, Robert; André, Ingemar

    2015-03-01

    Models generated by de novo structure prediction can be very useful starting points for molecular replacement for systems where suitable structural homologues cannot be readily identified. Protein-protein complexes and de novo-designed proteins are examples of systems that can be challenging to phase. In this study, the potential of de novo models of protein complexes for use as starting points for molecular replacement is investigated. The approach is demonstrated using homomeric coiled-coil proteins, which are excellent model systems for oligomeric systems. Despite the stereotypical fold of coiled coils, initial phase estimation can be difficult and many structures have to be solved with experimental phasing. A method was developed for automatic structure determination of homomeric coiled coils from X-ray diffraction data. In a benchmark set of 24 coiled coils, ranging from dimers to pentamers with resolutions down to 2.5 Å, 22 systems were automatically solved, 11 of which had previously been solved by experimental phasing. The generated models contained 71-103% of the residues present in the deposited structures, had the correct sequence and had free R values that deviated on average by 0.01 from those of the respective reference structures. The electron-density maps were of sufficient quality that only minor manual editing was necessary to produce final structures. The method, named CCsolve, combines methods for de novo structure prediction, initial phase estimation and automated model building into one pipeline. CCsolve is robust against errors in the initial models and can readily be modified to make use of alternative crystallographic software. The results demonstrate the feasibility of de novo phasing of protein-protein complexes, an approach that could also be employed for other small systems beyond coiled coils.

  11. Extrap with iron-cored coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1985-05-01

    In Extrap configurations there is a high average beta value with respect to the plasma confinement volume. The externally imposed magnetic field which is required for stabilization therefore comes out to have a rather moderate strength, even under expected reactor conditions. As a consequence, this field can be generated not only by conventional external conductor arrangements, but also by iron-cored coils being operated below the saturation limit. A proposal for such iron-cored coil systems is presented in this paper. As compared to conventional conductors, this has the advantage of localizing the magnetic energy of the externally imposed magnetic field mainly to the discharge vessel and the plasma volume, thereby increasing the engineering beta value substantially. Also the problems of the coil stresses and of irradiation of the coils appear to become simplified, as well as replacement of the coil system. A main limitation of this proposal is due to combination of iron core saturation with the required stabilization effect from an ion Larmor radius of sufficient relative magnitude. This limitaion requires further investigation, especially in the full-scale reactor case. Also the modifications of the field geometry by iron core shaping needs further analysis. (Author)

  12. Optimal design for MRI surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, M.; Vaquero, J.J.; Santos, A.; Pozo, F. del; Ruiz-Cabello, J.

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate the possibility of designing and constructing specific surface coils or antennae for MRI viewing of each particular tissue producing better results than those provided by a general purpose surface coil. The study was performed by the Bioengineering and Telemedicine Group of Madrid Polytechnical University and was carried out at the Pluridisciplinary Institute of the Universidad Complutense in Madrid, using a BMT-47/40 BIOSPEC resonance unit from Bruker. Surface coils were custom-designed and constructed for each region to be studied, and optimized to make the specimen excitation field as homogeneous as possible, in addition to reducing the brightness artifact. First, images were obtained of a round, water phantom measuring 50 mm in diameter, after which images of laboratory rats and rabbits were obtained. The images thus acquired were compared with the results obtained with the coil provided by the manufacturer of the equipment, and were found to be of better quality, allowing the viewing of deeper tissue for the specimen as well as reducing the brightness artifact. The construction of surface coils for viewing specific tissues or anatomical regions improves image quality. The next step in this ongoing project will be the application of these concepts to units designed for use in humans. (Author) 14 refs

  13. Critical current studies of a HTS rectangular coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Z. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Chudy, M., E-mail: Michal.chudy@stuba.sk [Graduate School of Technology Management, University of Pretoria (South Africa); Institute of Power and Applied Electrical Engineering, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia); Ruiz, H.S. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Zhang, X.; Coombs, T. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Unique square pancake coil was manufactured. • Measurements in relatively high magnetic field were performed. • Different sections of the coil were characterized. • Parts of the coil which are limiting critical current were identified. - Abstract: Nowadays, superconducting high field magnets are used in numerous applications due to their superior properties. High temperature superconductors (HTS) are usually used for production of circular pancake or racetrack coils. However different geometries of HTS coils might be required for some specific applications. In this study, the HTS coil wound on a rectangular frame was fully characterized in homogeneous DC background field. The study contains measurements of critical current angular dependencies. The critical current of the entire coil and two selected strands under different magnitudes and orientations of external magnetic fields are measured. The critical regions of the coil in different angular regimes are determined. This study brings better understanding of the in- field performance of HTS coils wound on frames with right-angles.

  14. Fabrication of the KSTAR toroidal field coil structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.H.; Sa, J.W.; Park, H.K.; Hong, K.H.; Shin, H.; Kim, H.T.; Bak, J.S.; Lee, G.S.; Kwak, J.H.; Moon, H.G.; Yoon, H.H.; Lee, J.W.; Lee, S.K.; Song, J.Y.; Nam, K.M.; Byun, S.E.; Kim, H.C.; Ha, E.T.; Ahn, H.J.; Kim, D.S.; Lee, J.S.; Park, K.H.; Hong, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    The KSTAR toroidal field (TF) coil structure is under fabrication upon completion of engineering design and prototype construction. The prototype TF coil structure has been fabricated within allowable tolerances. Encasing of the prototype TF coil (TF00) in the prototype structure has been carried out through major processes involving a coil encasing, an enclosing weld, a vacuum pressure impregnation, and an outer surface machining. During the enclosing weld of the TF00 coil structure, we have measured temperatures and stresses on the coil surface. Assembly test had been performed with the TF00 coil structure. We have chosen Type 316LN as material of the TF coil structure. We used the narrow-gap TIG welding method. Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Company (DHI) will complete the fabrication of the TF coil structure in Feb. 2006. (author)

  15. Thermo-mechanical analysis of RMP coil system for EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Songke; Ji, Xiang; Song, Yuntao; Zhang, Shanwen; Wang, Zhongwei; Sun, Youwen; Qi, Minzhong; Liu, Xufeng; Wang, Shengming; Yao, Damao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal design requirements for EAST RMP coils are summarized. • Cooling parameters based on both theoretical and numerical solutions are determined. • Compromise between thermal design and structural design is made on number of turns. • Thermo-mechanical calculations are made to validate its structural performance. - Abstract: Resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) has been proved to be an efficient approach on edge localized modes (ELMs) control, resistive wall mode (RWM) control, and error field correction (EFC), RMP coil system under design in EAST tokamak will realize the above-mentioned multi-functions. This paper focuses on the thermo-mechanical analysis of EAST RMP coil system on the basis of sensitivity analysis, both normal and off-normal working conditions are considered. The most characteristic set of coil system is chosen with a complete modelling by means of three-dimensional (3D) finite element method, thermo-hydraulic and thermal-structural performances are investigated adequately, both locally and globally. The compromise is made between thermal performance and structural design requirements, and the results indicate that the optimized design is feasible and reasonable

  16. Requirements for accuracy of superconducting coils in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K; Yanagi, N; Ji, H; Kaneko, H; Ohyabu, N; Satow, T; Morimoto, S; Yamamoto, J; Motojima, O [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Chikusa, Nagoya (Japan); LHD Design Group

    1993-01-01

    Irregular magnetic fields resonate with the rational surface of the magnetic confinement systems, form magnetic islands and ergodic layers, and destruct the plasma confinement. To avoid this confinement destruction the requirement of an accuracy of 10[sup -4] in the magnetic field is adopted as the magnetic-accuracy design criterion for the LHD machine. Following this criterion the width of the undesirable magnetic island is kept less than one tenth of the plasma radius. The irregular magnetic field from the superconducting (SC) helical and poloidal coils is produced by winding irregularity, installing irregularity, cooling-down deformations and electromagnetic deformations. The local irregularities such as feeders, layer connections, adjacent-conductor connections of the coils also produce an error field. The eddy currents on the supporting shell structure of SC coils, the cryostat, etc. are also evaluated. All irregular effects are analyzed using Fourier decomposition and field mapping methods for the LHD design, and it is confirmed that the present design of the superconducting coil system satisfies the design criterion for these field irregularities. (orig.).

  17. Electric field measurement of two commercial active/sham coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James Evan; Peterchev, Angel V

    2018-06-22

    Sham TMS coils isolate the ancillary effects of their active counterparts, but typically induce low-strength electric fields (E-fields) in the brain, which could be biologically active. We measured the E-fields induced by two pairs of commonly-used commercial active/sham coils. Approach: E-field distributions of the active and sham configurations of the Magstim 70 mm AFC and MagVenture Cool-B65 A/P coils were measured over a 7-cm-radius, hemispherical grid approximating the cortical surface. Peak E-field strength was recorded over a range of pulse amplitudes. Main results: The Magstim and MagVenture shams induce peak E-fields corresponding to 25.3% and 7.72% of their respective active values. The MagVenture sham has an E-field distribution shaped like its active counterpart. The Magstim sham induces nearly zero E-field under the coil's center, and its peak E-field forms a diffuse oval 3-7 cm from the center. Electrical scalp stimulation paired with the MagVenture sham is estimated to increase the sham E-field in the brain up to 10%. Significance: Different commercial shams induce different E-field strengths and distributions in the brain, which should be considered in interpreting outcomes of sham stimulation. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  18. Design of MgB2 Superconducting coils for the Ignitor Experiment*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, G.; Penco, R.; Berta, S.; Coppi, B.; Giunchi, G.

    2009-11-01

    A feasibility study for the adoption of MgB2 superconducting cables for the largest (about 5 m in diameter) of the poloidal field coils of the Ignitor machine is being carried out. This initiative was prompted by the progress made in the fabrication of MgB2 long cables, and related superconducting magnets of relatively large dimensions. These magnets will be cryocooled at the operating temperature of 10-15 K that is compatible with the He-gas cryogenic cooling system of Ignitor as well as with the projected superconducting current density of the MgB2 material, at the magnetic field values (˜4-5 T) in which these coils are designed to operate. The optimal cable configuration has been identified that can provide an efficient cooling of the MgB2 conductors over times compatible with the machine duty cycles. MgB2 superconductors hold the promise of becoming suitable for high field magnets by appropriate doping of the material and of replacing gradually the normal conducting coils adopted, by necessity, in high field experiments. Therefore, an appropriate R&D program on the development of improved MgB2 material and related superconducting cabling options has been undertaken, involving different institutions.

  19. Cooled Water Production System,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The invention refers to the field of air conditioning and regards an apparatus for obtaining cooled water . The purpose of the invention is to develop...such a system for obtaining cooled water which would permit the maximum use of the cooling effect of the water -cooling tower.

  20. Process fluid cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farquhar, N.G.; Schwab, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A system of heat exchangers is disclosed for cooling process fluids. The system is particularly applicable to cooling steam generator blowdown fluid in a nuclear plant prior to chemical purification of the fluid in which it minimizes the potential of boiling of the plant cooling water which cools the blowdown fluid

  1. CS model coil experimental log book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  2. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1980-02-01

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the β limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR

  3. MFTF test coil construction and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, D.N.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Leber, R.L.; Hirzel, D.G.; Johnston, J.E.; Rosdahl, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A solenoid coil, 105 cm inside the 167 cm outside diameter, has been constructed and tested to study the performance of the stabilized Nb--Ti conductor to be used in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) being built at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The insulation system of the test coil is identical to that envisioned for MFTF. Cold-weld joints were made in the conductor at the start and finish of each layer; heaters were fitted to some of these joints and also to the conductor at various locations in the winding. This paper gives details of the construction of the coil and the results of the tests carried out to determine its propagation and recovery characteristics

  4. Considerations against a force compensated coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    The cost of structural components in a large superconducting coil may well exceed the coil and cryostat cost. As a result, the idea of constructing a system composed of two different coil types assembled in such a way that the sources balance and reduce the total structural requirement is oft proposed. A suitable geometry has never been found for the fundamental reason that there can be no force compensated solution. In this paper, the general problem is presented and an analysis of the energy stored and stresses produced in the structure are described in a fundamental way. Finally, the relation between structural mass M and stored energy E, M ≥/rho/E/σ/sub w/, that is valid for all magnetic systems is developed, where /rho/ is the density of the structure and σ/sub w/ is the working stress in the structure. 12 refs., 2 figs

  5. Considerations against a force compensated coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01

    The cost of structural components in a large superconducting coil may well exceed the coil and cryostat cost. As a result, the idea of constructing a system composed of two different coil types assembled in such a way that the forces balance and reduce the total structural requirement is oft proposed. A suitable geometry has never been found for the fundamental reason that there can be no force compensated solution. In this paper, the general problem is presented and an analysis of the energy stored and stresses produced in the structure are described in a fundamental way. Finally, the relation between structural mass M and stored energy E, M ≥ /rho/E/σ/sub w/, that is valid for all magnetic systems is developed, where /rho/ is the density of the structure and σ/sub w/ is the working stress in the structure. 8 refs., 2 figs

  6. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    KAUST Repository

    Ni, Xu

    2014-11-13

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea.

  7. Isabelle dipole and quadrupole coil configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.F.; Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    The coil configurations of the ISABELLE dipole and quadrupole magnets have been reviewed and a number of improvements were suggested for incorporation into the final design. The coil designs are basically single layer multiple block approximations to cosine current distributions, wound from a high aspect ratio non-keystoned braided conductor. The blocks are separated by knife-edge wedges to maximize the quench propagation velocity. The current density variation is obtained by an appropriate distribution of the spacer turns and, to a lesser degree, by the wedge locations. The use of inert turns is necessary to minimize the peak field enhancement both in the ends and in the two dimensional section. Schemes for deriving turns distributions yielding harmonic coefficients satisfying the stringent ISABELLE tolerances on field uniformity, while allowing for simplicity in winding and taking into account quench propagation considerations, will be discussed, as well as our approach to the coil end configuration

  8. FRC translation into a compression coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Several features of the problem of FRC translation into a compression coil are considered. First, the magnitude of the guide field is calculated and found to exceed that which would be applied to a flux conserver. Second, energy conservation is applied to FRC translation from a flux conserver into a compression coil. It is found that a significant temperature decrease is required for translation to be energetically possible. The temperature change depends on the external inductance in the compression circuit. An analogous case is that of a compression region composed of a compound magnet; in this case the temperature change depends on the ratio of inner and outer coil radii. Finally, the kinematics of intermediate translation states are calculated using an ''abrupt transition'' model. It is found, in this model, that the FRC must overcome a potential hill during translation, which requires a small initial velocity

  9. Acoustic rainbow trapping by coiling up space

    KAUST Repository

    Ni, Xu; Wu, Ying; Chen, Ze-Guo; Zheng, Li-Yang; Xu, Ye-Long; Nayar, Priyanka; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    We numerically realize the acoustic rainbow trapping effect by tapping an air waveguide with space-coiling metamaterials. Due to the high refractive-index of the space-coiling metamaterials, our device is more compact compared to the reported trapped-rainbow devices. A numerical model utilizing effective parameters is also calculated, whose results are consistent well with the direct numerical simulation of space-coiling structure. Moreover, such device with the capability of dropping different frequency components of a broadband incident temporal acoustic signal into different channels can function as an acoustic wavelength division de-multiplexer. These results may have potential applications in acoustic device design such as an acoustic filter and an artificial cochlea.

  10. Cooling towers in the landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boernke, F.

    1977-01-01

    The cooling tower as a large technical construction is one of the most original industrial buildings. It sticks out as an outlandish element in our building landscape, a giant which cannot be compared with the traditional forms of technical buildings. If it is constructed as a reinforced-concrete hyperboloid, its shape goes beyond all limits of building construction. Judgment of these highly individual constructions is only possible by applying a novel standard breaking completely with tradition. This new scale of height and dimension in industrial construction, and in particular the modern cooling tower, requires painstaking care and design and adaptation to the landscape around it. (orig.) [de

  11. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  12. High voltage investigations for ITER coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, S.; Fietz, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting ITER magnets will be excited with high voltage during operation and fast discharge. Because the coils are complex systems the internal voltage distribution can differ to a large extent from the ideal linear voltage distribution. In case of fast excitations internal voltages between conductor and radial plate of a TF coil can be even higher than the terminal voltage of 3.5 kV to ground which appears during a fast discharge without a fault. Hence the determination of the transient voltage distribution is important for a proper insulation co-ordination and will provide a necessary basis for the verification of the individual insulation design and the choice of test voltages and waveforms. Especially the extent of internal overvoltages in case of failures, e. g. malfunction of discharge units and / or arcing is of special interest. Transient calculations for the ITER TF coil system have been performed for fast discharge and fault scenarios to define test voltages for ITER TF. The conductor and radial plate insulation of the ITER TF Model Coil were exposed at room temperature to test voltages derived from the results from these calculations. Breakdown appeared during the highest AC voltage step. A fault scenario for the TF fast discharge system is presented where one fault triggers a second fault, leading to considerable voltage stress. In addition a FEM model of Poloidal Field Coil 3 for the determination of the parameters of a detailed network model is presented in order to prepare detailed investigations of the transient voltage behaviour of the PF coils. (author)

  13. Soil water retention measurements using a combined tensiometer-coiled time domain reflectometry probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaz, C.M.P.; Hopmans, J.W.; Macedo, A.

    2002-01-01

    -coiled TDR probe was constructed by wrapping two copper wires (0.8 mm diam. and 35.5 cm long) along a 5-cm long porous cup of a standard tensiometer. The dielectric constant of five different soils (Oso Flaco [coarse-loamy, mixed Typic Cryorthod-fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Ustollic Haplargid], Ottawa sand [F-50...

  14. Study of electric phenomena in energy dumping of LCT coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Koichi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Nishi, Masataka; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1980-03-01

    In IEA-LCT coil, electric phenomena in energy dumping were studied analytically and experimentally. Protection resistance of the Japanese LCT coil is chosen as 0.1 Ω considering the quenching voltage, so that temperature rise of the coil is no problem. Energy dumping characteristic of the six-coil system is calculated under different conditions. It is concluded that simultaneous dumping of all the coils with the equivalent resistance values of protection is necessary. Flashover voltage tests of the model in 4.2 K liquid helium, 4.2 K gas helium and 4.2 K boiling helium show margin in practical quenching voltage of the coil. (author)

  15. Stress distributions of coils for toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Tateo; Miyamoto, Kenro.

    1976-01-01

    The stress distributions of a D shaped coil and a circular coil are computed by the finite element method. The dependences of the stress distribution on the geometrical parameters of the stress distribution on the geometrical parameters of the coils and supporting methods are examined. The maximum amount of the stress in the D shaped coil is not much smaller than that of the circular one. However, the stress distribution of the D shaped coil becomes much more uniform. The supporting method has as much effect as the geometrical parameters of the coil on the stress distribution. (auth.)

  16. Retrospective correction of bias in diffusion tensor imaging arising from coil combination mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaie, Ken; Lowe, Mark

    2017-04-01

    To quantify and retrospectively correct for systematic differences in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements due to differences in coil combination mode. Multi-channel coils are now standard among MRI systems. There are several options for combining signal from multiple coils during image reconstruction, including sum-of-squares (SOS) and adaptive combine (AC). This contribution examines the bias between SOS- and AC-derived measures of tissue microstructure and a strategy for limiting that bias. Five healthy subjects were scanned under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Each set of raw image data was reconstructed twice-once with SOS and once with AC. The diffusion tensor was calculated from SOS- and AC-derived data by two algorithms-standard log-linear least squares and an approach that accounts for the impact of coil combination on signal statistics. Systematic differences between SOS and AC in terms of tissue microstructure (axial diffusivity, radial diffusivity, mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy) were evaluated on a voxel-by-voxel basis. SOS-based tissue microstructure values are systematically lower than AC-based measures throughout the brain in each subject when using the standard tensor calculation method. The difference between SOS and AC can be virtually eliminated by taking into account the signal statistics associated with coil combination. The impact of coil combination mode on diffusion tensor-based measures of tissue microstructure is statistically significant but can be corrected retrospectively. The ability to do so is expected to facilitate pooling of data among imaging protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Zero current measurements using the Rogowski coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, J.; Jakubova, I.; Kadlec, P.; Senk, J.; Vavra, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The zero current measurements using the Rogowski coil carried out on the model of the extinguishing chamber of hv SF 6 circuit breaker with self-flow generation are presented in the paper. The time course of the post-arc current obtained by numerical integration of the measured induced voltage of the Rogowski coil gives information not only about the value of the residual current after the successful interruption but also about the current changes connected with the dynamic behaviour of the arc during its quenching. (author)

  18. Self-assembling segmented coiled tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, David W.

    2016-09-27

    Self-assembling segmented coiled tubing is a concept that allows the strength of thick-wall rigid pipe, and the flexibility of thin-wall tubing, to be realized in a single design. The primary use is for a drillstring tubular, but it has potential for other applications requiring transmission of mechanical loads (forces and torques) through an initially coiled tubular. The concept uses a spring-loaded spherical `ball-and-socket` type joint to interconnect two or more short, rigid segments of pipe. Use of an optional snap ring allows the joint to be permanently made, in a `self-assembling` manner.

  19. Multiple coil closure of isolated aortopulmonary collateral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhi Sumanta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 7-month-old girl was diagnosed to have large aortopulmonary collateral during evaluation for congestive heart failure. There was no other evidence of cardiopulmonary disease. The collateral was successfully closed with multiple coils delivered sequentially. We describe the issues associated during closure of the aortopulmonary collateral in this case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of large aortopulmonary collateral presenting with heart failure in an otherwise structurally normal heart that was closed successfully with multiple coils delivered sequentially.

  20. Superconducting Coil Winding Machine Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogiec, J. M. [Fermilab; Kotelnikov, S. [Fermilab; Makulski, A. [Fermilab; Walbridge, D. [Fermilab; Trombly-Freytag, K. [Fermilab

    2016-10-05

    The Spirex coil winding machine is used at Fermilab to build coils for superconducting magnets. Recently this ma-chine was equipped with a new control system, which al-lows operation from both a computer and a portable remote control unit. This control system is distributed between three layers, implemented on a PC, real-time target, and FPGA, providing respectively HMI, operational logic and direct controls. The system controls motion of all mechan-ical components and regulates the cable tension. Safety is ensured by a failsafe, redundant system.