WorldWideScience

Sample records for standard conditions aerosol

  1. Aerosol exposure: Concepts, criteria, standards and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, James H

    2009-01-01

    This paper places Inhaled Particles X in the context of the whole sequence of such symposia, going back to the first one in 1961. It draws together some of the essential principles that have been learned since that earlier meeting about the nature of exposure and exposure assessment and thus provides a framework by which to integrate the new knowledge presented at this latest one. In the process, the importance of understanding the formal definition of aerosol exposure is stressed, including the distinction between exposure intensity and exposure history, and how that relates to some measure of cumulative dose which, in turn, may be linked with knowledge about intrinsic toxicity, etc. This then leads to a definition of exposure standards, and the important ingredients of criteria, sampling and limit values. A summary is provided of the current set of particle size-selective criteria that have been widely agreed in the international occupational and environmental health community. Some ideas are presented about how this set might be expanded for certain applications, the important case of ultrafine aerosols being one of them.

  2. HVAC; Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning - Aerosol Duct Sealant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    climatic conditions and different air distribution systems types. Data on thermal energy and fan power was collected before and after the duct sealant...Expeditionary Warfare Center. This technology internally seals leaks in air distribution ducts by injecting a fog of aerosolized sealant particles...into a pressurized duct system. The product keeps the particles suspended within the air stream. As the duct work is pressurized, the particles

  3. Sterilization efficacy of ultraviolet irradiation on microbial aerosols under dynamic airflow by experimental air conditioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    In order to know the sterilization efficacy of ultraviolet irradiation on microbial aerosols, the size and the weight of the aerosol particles were evaluated, and these were irradiated under dynamic air flow created by an experimental air conditioning system. The experimental apparatus consisted of a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, an aerosol generator, spiral UV lamps placed around a quart glass tube, an Andersen air sampler and a vacuum pump. They were connected serially by stainless steel ducts (85 mm in diameter, 8 m in length). Six types of microbial aerosols generated from an ultrasonic nebulizer were irradiated by UV rays (wavelength 254 nm, mean density 9400 μW/cm 2 ). Their irradiation time ranged from 1.0 to 0.0625 seconds. The microbial aerosols were collected onto the trypticase soy agar (TSA) medium in the Andersen air sampler. After incubation, the number of colony forming units (CFU) were counted, and converted to particle counts. The diameter of microbial aerosol particles calculated by their log normal distribution were found to match the diameter of a single bacteria cell measured by a microscope. The sterilization efficacy of UV in standard airflow conditions (0.5 sec. irradiation) were found to be over 99.5 % in Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus subtilis (vegetative cell) and Bacillus subtilis (spore) and 67 % in Aspergillus niger (conidium). In A. niger, which was the most resistant microbe to UV irradiation, the efficacy rose up to 79 % when irradiated for 1.0 sec., and it was observed that the growth speed of the colonies was slower than that of the controls. It was thought that UV rays caused some damage to the proliferation of A. niger cells. (author)

  4. An assessment of a spiral duct centrifuge using standard and high concentration aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.D.

    1982-12-01

    The Stoeber spiral duct centrifuge has been calibrated by means of polystyrene latex microspheres for the subsequent measurement of aerosol particle size distributions. Intermediate (1 g m -3 ) ad high (100 g m -3 ) sodium chloride aerosol concentrations have been sampled by the centrifuge to determine possible limitations in the equipment. Corrections have to be made for the effect of Coriolis forces, and aerosol concentrations above 1 g m -3 should be diluted before sampling. The spiral duct centrifuge is an extremely versatile instrument for aerosol analysis, and shows a high degree of reliability when operated under well-defined conditions. (author)

  5. Fission product aerosol removal test by containment spray under accident management conditions (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Nagasaka, Hideo; Yokobori, Seiichi; Akinaga, Makoto

    2000-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the effective FP aerosol removal by containment spray under Japanese AM conditions, two system integral tests and two separate effect tests were carried out using a full-height simulation test facility. In case of PWR LOCA, aerosol concentration in the upper containment vessel decreased even under low spray flow rate. In case of BWR LOCA with water injection into RPV, the aerosol concentration in the entire vessel also decreased rapidly after aerosol supply stopping. In both cases, the removal rate estimated from the NUREG-1465 was coincided with test results. The aerosol washing effect by spray was confirmed to be predominant by conducting suppression chamber isolation test. It turned out that the effect of aerosol solubility and density on aerosol removal by spray was quite small by conducting insoluble aerosol injection test. After the modification of aerosol removal model by the spray and hygroscopic aerosol model in original MELCOR 1.8.4, calculated aerosol concentration transient in the containment vessel agreed well with the test data. (author)

  6. Aerosol microphysical effects on warm cloud in Eastern China: impacts of meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Wang, F.; Li, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles can alter the droplet size and number concentration of clouds, thereby changing the Earth's climate system. The aerosol indirect effect has been proved climatically significant after decades of research, albeit uncertain. This is partially due to the frustrating difficulty in decoupling the aerosol effect from meteorology influences on cloud properties. This study attempts to probe into the aerosol indirect effect on the warm clouds of summertime the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of eastern China and East China Sea (ECS), respectively. It is based on simultaneously observed aerosol and cloud properties from MODIS/Aqua Level 3 datasets, along with meteorological properties from NCEP Final Analyses Operational Global Analysis datasets. Statistic analysis is employed to analyze the aerosol cloud interaction, constrained by multiple meteorological conditions, such as cloud top pressure (CTP), relative humidity (RH), pressure vertical velocity (PVV) and lower tropospheric stability (LTS), expected to minimize meteorological impact. The reduction of cloud droplet radius (CDR) with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD) is revealed over ECS. In contrast, anti-Twomey effect is detected over YRD. The aerosol effects on cloud fraction (CF) are further investigated, taking CTP and RH into account. CF is found to increase more sharply over YRD than over ECS in response to aerosol enhancement, regardless of RH conditions. In addition, the horizontal extension of cloud is prone to be driven by aerosol rather than RH in the summertime over YRD. Meanwhile, CTP effect on AOD-CF is eliminated, indicating CTP make little contribution to the observed AOD-CF relationship. Also, CDR variation in response to AOD, constrained by LTS and PVV (750hPa) is analyzed. In general, aerosol tends to observe the law of Twomey's effect except for the unstable condition over land. Regarding dynamic effect, the rising atmospheric environment is subject to larger CDR than the

  7. Characterization and parameterization of aerosol cloud condensation nuclei activation under different pollution conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, H. C.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, L.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Ma, Q. L.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. W.; Wang, T. T.

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation capacity of aerosol particles in different pollution conditions, a long-term field experiment was carried out at a regional GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station in the Yangtze River Delta area of China. The homogeneity of aerosol particles was the highest in clean weather, with the highest active fraction of all the weather types. For pollution with the same visibility, the residual aerosol particles in higher relative humidity weather conditions were more externally mixed and heterogeneous, with a lower hygroscopic capacity. The hygroscopic capacity (κ) of organic aerosols can be classified into 0.1 and 0.2 in different weather types. The particles at ~150 nm were easily activated in haze weather conditions. For CCN predictions, the bulk chemical composition method was closer to observations at low supersaturations (≤0.1%), whereas when the supersaturation was ≥0.2%, the size-resolved chemical composition method was more accurate. As for the mixing state of the aerosol particles, in haze, heavy haze, and severe haze weather conditions CCN predictions based on the internal mixing assumption were robust, whereas for other weather conditions, predictions based on the external mixing assumption were more accurate. PMID:27075947

  8. Development of systematic models for aerosol agglomeration and spray removal under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajimoto, Mitsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Radionuclide behavior during various severe accident conditions has been addressed as one of the important issues to discuss environmental safety in nuclear power plants. The present paper deals with the development of analytical models and their validations for the agglomeration of multiple-component aerosol and spray removal that controls source terms to the environment of both aerosols and gaseous radionuclides during recirculation mode operation in a containment system for a light water reactor. As for aerosol agglomeration, the single collision kernel model that can cover all types of two-body collision of aerosol was developed. In addition, the dynamic model that can treat aerosol and vapor transfer leading to the equilibrium condition under the containment spray operation was developed. The validations of the present models for multiple-component aerosol growth by agglomeration were performed by comparisons with Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and AB experiments at Hanford Engineering National Laboratory (HEDL). In addition, the spray removal models were applied to the analysis of containment spray experiment (CSE) at HEDL. The results calculated by the models showed good agreements with experimental results. (author)

  9. CCN activity of secondary aerosols from terpene ozonolysis under atmospheric relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cheng; Ma, Yan; Diao, Yiwei; Yao, Lei; Zhou, Yaoyao; Wang, Xing; Zheng, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Gas-phase ozonolysis of terpenes is an important source of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol. The contribution of terpene-derived aerosols to the atmospheric cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) burden under atmospheric conditions, however, remains highly uncertain. The results obtained in previous studies under simple laboratory conditions may not be applicable to atmospheric relevant conditions. Here we present that CCN activities of aerosols from terpene ozonolysis can be significantly affected by atmospheric relevant species that can act as stabilized Criegee intermediate (SCI) or OH scavengers. Ozonolysis reactions of α-pinene, limonene, α-cedrene, and α-humulene were conducted in a 4.5 m3 collapsible fluoropolymer chamber at near-atmospheric concentrations in the presence of different OH scavengers (cyclohexane, 2-butanol, or CO) and SCI scavengers (CH3COOH, H2O, or SO2). The number size distribution and CCN activity of aerosol particles formed during ozonolysis were simultaneously determined. Additionally, particulate products were chemically analyzed by using a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical-Ionization Mass Spectrometer. Results showed that aerosol CCN activity following monoterpene ozonolysis was more sensitive to the choice of OH scavengers, while that from sesquiterpene ozonolysis was significantly affected by SCI scavengers. Combined with chemical analysis results, it was concluded that the unimolecular decomposition of CIs giving hygroscopic organic products can be largely suppressed by bimolecular reactions during sesquiterpene ozonolysis but was not significantly impacted in monoterpene ozonolysis. Our study underscores the key role of CIs in the CCN activity of terpene ozonolysis-derived aerosols. The effects of atmospheric relevant species (e.g., SO2, H2O, and CO) need to be considered when assessing the contribution of biogenic terpenes to the atmospheric CCN burden under ambient conditions.

  10. Sensitivity of volcanic aerosol dispersion to meteorological conditions: A Pinatubo case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anthony C.; Haywood, James M.; Jones, Andy; Aquila, Valentina

    2016-06-01

    Using a global climate model (Hadley Centre Global Environment Model version 2-Carbon Cycle Stratosphere ) with a well-resolved stratosphere, we test the sensitivity of volcanic aerosol plume dispersion to meteorological conditions by simulating 1 day Mount Pinatubo-like eruptions on 10 consecutive days. The dispersion of the volcanic aerosol is found to be highly sensitive to the ambient meteorology for low-altitude eruptions (16-18 km), with this variability related to anomalous anticyclonic activity along the subtropical jet, which affects the permeability of the tropical pipe and controls the amount of aerosol that is retained by the tropical reservoir. Conversely, a high-altitude eruption scenario (19-29 km) exhibits low meteorological variability. Overcoming day-to-day meteorological variability by spreading the emission over 10 days is shown to produce insufficient radiative heating to loft the aerosol into the stratospheric tropical aerosol reservoir for the low eruption scenario. This results in limited penetration of aerosol into the southern hemisphere (SH) in contrast to the SH transport observed after the Pinatubo eruption. Our results have direct implications for the accurate simulation of past/future volcanic eruptions and volcanically forced climate changes, such as Intertropical Convergence Zone displacement.

  11. Aerosol accumulation intensity and composition variations under different weather conditions in urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberga, Iveta; Bikshe, Janis; Eindorfa, Aiva

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade aerosol (PM10, PM2.5) mass and composition measurements were done in different urban environments - parallel street canyons, industrial sites and at the background level in Riga, Latvia. Effect of meteorological parameters on the accumulation and ventilation intensity was investigated in order to understand microclimatological parameters affecting aerosol pollution level and chemical composition changes. In comparison to industrial sites (shipping activities, bulk cargo, oil and naphtha processing), urban street canyon aerosol mass concentration was significantly higher, for PM10 number of daily limit exceedances are higher by factor 3.4 - 3.9 in street canyons. Exceedances of PM2.5 annual limits were identified only in street canyons as well. Precipitation intensity, wind speed, days with mist highly correlates with aerosol concentration; in average during the year about 1 - 2 % presence of calm wind days, 20 - 30 days with mist facilitate accumulation of aerosols and mitigating growing of secondary aerosols. It has been assessed that about 25 % of daily exceedances in street canyons are connected with sea salt/street sanding factor. Strong dependency of wind speed and direction were identified in winter time - low winds (0.4 - 1.7 m/s) blowing from south, south-east (cross section of the street) contributing to PM10 concentrations over 100 - 150 ug/m3. Seasonal differences in aerosol concentrations were identified as a result of recombination of direct source impact, specific meteorological and synoptical conditions during the period from January until April when usually dominates extremely high aerosol concentrations. While aerosol mass concentration levels in monitoring sites significantly differs, concentrations of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Cd, and As) are almost at the same level, even more - concentration of Cd for some years was higher in industrial area where main pollution is caused by oil processing and storage, heavy traffic

  12. Atmospheric aerosols in Amazonia and land use change: from natural biogenic to biomass burning conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Rizzo, Luciana V; Brito, Joel F; Barbosa, Henrique M J; Arana, Andrea; Sena, Elisa T; Cirino, Glauber G; Bastos, Wanderlei; Martin, Scot T; Andreae, Meinrat O

    2013-01-01

    fine mode aerosol during the dry season in this region. Aerosol light scattering and absorption coefficients at the TT34 site were low during the wet season, increasing by a factor of 5, approximately, in the dry season due to long range transport of biomass burning aerosols reaching the forest site in the dry season. Aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) ranged from 0.84 in the wet season up to 0.91 in the dry. At the PVH site, aerosol scattering coefficients were 3-5 times higher in comparison to the TT34 site, an indication of strong regional background pollution, even in the wet season. Aerosol absorption coefficients at PVH were about 1.4 times higher than at the forest site. Ground-based SSA at PVH was around 0.92 year round, showing the dominance of scattering aerosol particles over absorption, even for biomass burning aerosols. Remote sensing observations from six AERONET sites and from MODIS since 1999, provide a regional and temporal overview. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at 550 nm of less than 0.1 is characteristic of natural conditions over Amazonia. At the perturbed PVH site, AOD550 values greater than 4 were frequently observed in the dry season. Combined analysis of MODIS and CERES showed that the mean direct radiative forcing of aerosols at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) during the biomass burning season was -5.6 +/- 1.7 W m(-2), averaged over whole Amazon Basin. For high AOD (larger than 1) the maximum daily direct aerosol radiative forcing at the TOA was as high as -20 W m(-2) locally. This change in the radiation balance caused increases in the diffuse radiation flux, with an increase of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of 18-29% for high AOD. From this analysis, it is clear that land use change in Amazonia shows alterations of many atmospheric properties, and these changes are affecting the functioning of the Amazonian ecosystem in significant ways.

  13. International standard problem ISP37: VANAM M3 - A Multi compartment aerosol depletion test with hygroscopic aerosol material: comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firnhaber, M.; Kanzleiter, T.F.; Schwarz, S.; Weber, G.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents the results and assessment of the 'open' ISP37, which deals with the containment thermal-hydraulics and aerosol behavior during an unmitigated severe LWR accident with core melt-down and steam and aerosol release into the containment. Representatives of 22 organizations participated to the ISP37 using the codes CONTAIN, FIPLOC, MELCOR, RALOC, FUMO, MACRES, REMOVAL etc. The containment and aerosol behavior experiment VANAM M3 was selected as experimental comparison basis. The main phenomena investigated are the thermal behavior of a multi-compartment containment, e.g. pressure, temperature and the distribution and depletion of a soluble aerosol. The ISP37 has demonstrated that the codes used could calculate the thermal-hydraulic containment behavior in general with sufficient accuracy. But with respect to the needs of aerosol behavior analysis the accuracies, both analytical and experimental as well, for specific thermal-hydraulic variables should be improved. Although large progress has been made in the simulation of aerosol behavior in multi-compartment geometries the calculated local aerosol concentrations scatter widely. However, the aerosol source term to the environment is overestimated in general. The largest uncertainty concerning the aerosol results is caused by a limited number of thermal hydraulic variables like relative humidity, volume condensation rate and atmospheric flow rate. In some codes also a solubility model is missing

  14. Creation of device for monitoring of inhalation exposure doses in 'Ukryttia' object conditions considering submicron aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melenevskij, A.Eh.; Kravchuk, T.A.; Ushakov, I.A.

    2003-01-01

    In the conditions of air enriched with Short-Lived Aerosols (SLA), the examinations of created device ASMA sampler were conducted in order to define its ability of educing rougher fractions from aspirated aerosol compositions. It is shown that in airflow velocity intervals from 100 to 140 m/s aerodynamic diameter of an effluent fraction varies from 0.9 to 0.7 microns. The algorithm of measurement result processing of aspirated filter strata activity is described.Using the numerical modeling, the efficiency of offered procedure of relative measurements is demonstrated

  15. A CFD STUDY OF DEPOSITION OF PHARMACEUTICAL AEROSOLS UNDER DIFFERENT RESPIRATORY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. X. Augusto

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory diseases have received increasing attention in recent decades. Airway bifurcations are difficult regions to study, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD offers an alternative way of evaluating the behavior of pharmaceutical aerosols used in the treatment of respiratory disorders. In this work, particle deposition was analyzed using a three-dimensional model with four ramifications (three bifurcations, under different respiratory conditions: inhalation, exhalation, and breath holding. The main aim of the work was to verify the medical recommendation to hold one's breath during a few seconds after inhaling pharmaceutical aerosols, rather than exhaling immediately after the inhalation. The deposition of particles with 5 µm diameter was considered. The results showed that the number of aerosols collected on the airway walls was higher for the situation of breath holding, which supported the medical recommendation.

  16. Fission product aerosol removal test by containment spray under accident management conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Hideo [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yokobori, Seiichi

    1998-05-01

    This paper summarizes the test results of fission product (FP) removal by containment spray simulating accident management (AM) condition. The features of AM conditions concerning FP transport are characterized by (1) low flow spray affecting the steam condensation degradation due to larger water droplets, (2) high humidity condition due to steam generation as a result of debris cooling and (3) continual fresh water supply from outside water source. The objectives of the test program are to provide data demonstrating the effective aerosol removal by the containment spray and to provide the data for qualification of the integral system analysis code such as MELCOR. The Tests were conducted using full-height simulation containment vessels of GIRAFFE (1/720 volumetric scaling ratio) so that real FP removal phenomena was preserved as in a reactor. Vessel heat loss was compensated by heaters on the outer surface of the vessels. CsI was selected as a typical FP aerosol. Steam generated by decay heat, CsI aerosol and spray water were supplied continuously to the drywell as transient boundary conditions. A system integration test simulating BWR low pressure vessel failure sequence during about 10 hours were successfully accomplished. Even under low spray flow condition, maximum drywell pressure was kept relatively low, though it was a little bit higher than the design pressure. After spray initiation, aerosol concentration decreased rapidly in the entire region of drywell. In the upper drywell, aerosol was removed by diffusiophoresis associated with steam condensation, while in the lower drywell it was removed by impaction. By modifying the FP removal model in the MELCOR, calculated FP concentration transient as well as pressure transient agreed well with test data. (J.P.N.)

  17. Weathering of Olivine during Interaction of Sulfate Aerosols with Mars Soil under Current Climate Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, P. B.; Golden, D. C.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    Sulfur concentrations in the Mars soils are elevated above 1 wt% in nearly every location visited by landed spacecraft. This observation was first made by the Viking landers, and has been confirmed by subsequent missions. The wide distribution of sulfur in martian soils has been attributed to volcanic degassing, formation of sulfate aerosols, and later incorporation into martian soils during gravitational sedimentation. However, later discoveries of more concentrated sulfur bearing sediments by the Opportunity rover has led some to believe that sulfates may instead be a product of evaporation and aeolian redistribution. One question that has not been addressed is whether the modern surface conditions are too cold for weathering of volcanic materials by sulfate aerosols. We suggest here that mixtures of atmospheric aerosols, ice, and dust have the potential for creating small films of cryo-concentrated acidic solutions that may represent an important unexamined environment for understanding weathering processes on Mars. Laboratory experiments were conducted to simulate weathering of olivine under Mars-like conditions. The weathering rates measured in this study suggest that fine grained olivine on Mars would weather into sulfate minerals in short time periods if they are exposed to H2SO4 aerosols at temperatures at or above -40°C. In this system, the strength of the acidic solution is maximized through eutectic freezing in an environment where the silicate minerals are extremely fine grained and have high surface areas. This provides an ideal environment for olivine weathering despite the very low temperatures. The likelihood of substantial sulfur-rich volcanism on Mars and creation of abundant sulfate aerosols suggests that this process would have been important during formation of martian soils and sediments. Future work modeling sulfur release rates during volcanic eruptions and aerosol distribution over the surface will help understand how well this process

  18. Consent Codes: Upholding Standard Data Use Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie O M Dyke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic way of recording data use conditions that are based on consent permissions as found in the datasets of the main public genome archives (NCBI dbGaP and EMBL-EBI/CRG EGA.

  19. Urban air quality assessment using monitoring data of fractionized aerosol samples, chemometrics and meteorological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotova, Galina I; Tsitouridou, Roxani; Tsakovski, Stefan L; Simeonov, Vasil D

    2016-01-01

    The present article deals with assessment of urban air by using monitoring data for 10 different aerosol fractions (0.015-16 μm) collected at a typical urban site in City of Thessaloniki, Greece. The data set was subject to multivariate statistical analysis (cluster analysis and principal components analysis) and, additionally, to HYSPLIT back trajectory modeling in order to assess in a better way the impact of the weather conditions on the pollution sources identified. A specific element of the study is the effort to clarify the role of outliers in the data set. The reason for the appearance of outliers is strongly related to the atmospheric condition on the particular sampling days leading to enhanced concentration of pollutants (secondary emissions, sea sprays, road and soil dust, combustion processes) especially for ultra fine and coarse particles. It is also shown that three major sources affect the urban air quality of the location studied-sea sprays, mineral dust and anthropogenic influences (agricultural activity, combustion processes, and industrial sources). The level of impact is related to certain extent to the aerosol fraction size. The assessment of the meteorological conditions leads to defining of four downwind patterns affecting the air quality (Pelagic, Western and Central Europe, Eastern and Northeastern Europe and Africa and Southern Europe). Thus, the present study offers a complete urban air assessment taking into account the weather conditions, pollution sources and aerosol fractioning.

  20. Special aerosol sources for certification and test of aerosol radiometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Y.E.; Kuznetsov, Y.V.; Rizin, A.I.; Fertman, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the development and practical application of new radionuclide source types (Special Aerosol Sources (SAS)), that meet the international standard recommendations, which are used for certification and test of aerosol radiometers (monitors) using model aerosols of plutonium-239, strontium-yttrium-90 or uranium of natural isotope composition and certified against Union of Soviet Socialist Republics USSR national radioactive aerosol standard or by means of a reference radiometer. The original technology for source production allows the particular features of sampling to be taken into account as well as geometry and conditions of radionuclides radiation registration in the sample for the given type of radiometer. (author)

  1. Special aerosol sources for certification and test of aerosol radiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Y.E.; Kuznetsov, Y.V.; Rizin, A.I.; Fertman, D.E. (Union Research Institute of Instrumentation, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the development and practical application of new radionuclide source types (Special Aerosol Sources (SAS)), that meet the international standard recommendations, which are used for certification and test of aerosol radiometers (monitors) using model aerosols of plutonium-239, strontium-yttrium-90 or uranium of natural isotope composition and certified against Union of Soviet Socialist Republics USSR national radioactive aerosol standard or by means of a reference radiometer. The original technology for source production allows the particular features of sampling to be taken into account as well as geometry and conditions of radionuclides radiation registration in the sample for the given type of radiometer. (author).

  2. Size-dependent chemical ageing of oleic acid aerosol under dry and humidified conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Al-Kindi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A chemical reaction chamber system has been developed for the processing of oleic acid aerosol particles with ozone under two relative humidity conditions: dry and humidified to 65 %. The apparatus consists of an aerosol flow tube, in which the ozonolysis occurs, coupled to a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS and an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS which measure the evolving particle size and composition. Under both relative humidity conditions, ozonolysis results in a significant decrease in particle size and mass which is consistent with the formation of volatile products that partition from the particle to the gas phase. Mass spectra derived from the ATOFMS reveal the presence of the typically observed reaction products: azelaic acid, nonanal, oxononanoic acid and nonanoic acid, as well as a range of higher molecular weight products deriving from the reactions of reaction intermediates with oleic acid and its oxidation products. These include octanoic acid and 9- and 10-oxooctadecanoic acid, as well as products of considerably higher molecular weight. Quantitative evaluation of product yields with the ATOFMS shows a marked dependence upon both particle size association (from 0.3 to 2.1 µm diameter and relative humidity. Under both relative humidity conditions, the percentage residual of oleic acid increases with increasing particle size and the main lower molecular weight products are nonanal and oxononanoic acid. Under dry conditions, the percentage of higher molecular weight products increases with increasing particle size due to the poorer internal mixing of the larger particles. Under humidified conditions, the percentage of unreacted oleic acid is greater, except in the smallest particle fraction, with little formation of high molecular weight products relative to the dry particles. It is postulated that water reacts with reactive intermediates, competing with the processes which produce high molecular weight

  3. Demonstration of Aerosol Property Profiling by Multi-wavelength Lidar Under Varying Relative Humidity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, D.N.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Korenskii, M.; Andrews, E.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar based on a tripled Nd:YAG laser for profiling aerosol physical parameters in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) under varying conditions of relative humidity (RH) is studied. The lidar quantifies three aerosol backscattering and two extinction coefficients and from these optical data the particle parameters such as concentration, size and complex refractive index are retrieved through inversion with regularization. The column-integrated, lidar-derived parameters are compared with results from the AERONET sun photometer. The lidar and sun photometer agree well in the characterization of the fine mode parameters, however the lidar shows less sensitivity to coarse mode. The lidar results reveal a strong dependence of particle properties on RH. The height regions with enhanced RH are characterized by an increase of backscattering and extinction coefficient and a decrease in the Angstrom exponent coinciding with an increase in the particle size. We present data selection techniques useful for selecting cases that can support the calculation of hygroscopic growth parameters using lidar. Hygroscopic growth factors calculated using these techniques agree with expectations despite the lack of co-located radiosonde data. Despite this limitation, the results demonstrate the potential of multi-wavelength Raman lidar technique for study of aerosol humidification process.

  4. Cloud Microphysics and Aerosols as Drivers of Variability in Orographic Precipitation Under Atmospheric River Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, K. K.; Martin, A.; Prather, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, semi-idealized simulations of flow over a hill using a mesoscale numerical weather prediction model were used in order to study the sensitivity of simulated orographic precipitation under atmospheric river (AR) conditions to cloud microphysics and to aerosol concentration. Semi-idealized atmospheric soundings were constructed using sounding observations from AR events off of the California coast near the Sierra Nevada mountain range allowing them to be constrained by observed moisture-flux precipitation relationships. These ensembles were run using three microphysics schemes with varying complexity. An additional ensemble was run with ice nucleating aerosol concentrations representative of in-situ ice nucleating particle measurements taken during the 2015 CalWater field campaign. AR orographic precipitation simulations were shown to be heavily dependent on the microphysics scheme used. Each scheme resulted in different cloud structure and 24-hr accumulated precipitation amount. These results highlight the need for continued development of modeled microphysics and inclusion of aerosol parameterization in order to improve prediction of precipitation from atmospheric river events.

  5. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlandini von Niessen, Jan O.; Krone, Karin M.; Bings, Nicolas H., E-mail: bings@uni-mainz.de

    2014-02-01

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas–liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D{sub 3,2}) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D{sub 3,2}), within a span of 0.07–0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined. - Graphical abstract: Further characterization of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator for sample introduction in atomic spectrometry. - Highlights: • Significantly improved ICP-MS sensitivity using the DOD vs. EnyaMist. • Comparable detection limits but slightly worse short-term precision. • Superior flexibility compared with conventional/miniaturized pneumatic nebulizers. • Electrical operation conditions of the DOD influence aerosol

  6. Simulation of KAEVER experiments on aerosol behavior in a nuclear power plant containment at accident conditions with the ASTEC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on aerosol behaviour in saturated and non-saturated atmosphere, which were performed in the KAEVER experimental facility, were simulated with the severe accident computer code ASTEC CPA V1.2. The specific purpose of the work was to assess the capability of the code to model aerosol condensation and deposition in the containment of a light-water-reactor nuclear power plant at severe accident conditions, if the atmosphere saturation conditions are simulated adequately. Five different tests were first simulated with boundary conditions, obtained from the experiments. In all five tests, a non-saturated atmosphere was simulated, although, in four tests, the atmosphere was allegedly saturated. The simulations were repeated with modified boundary conditions, to obtain a saturated atmosphere in all tests. Results of dry and wet aerosol concentrations in the test vessel atmosphere for both sets of simulations are compared to experimental results. (author)

  7. Impacts of Combustion Conditions and Photochemical Processing on the Light Absorption of Biomass Combustion Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsson, J; Eriksson, A C; Nielsen, I Elbæk; Malmborg, V Berg; Ahlberg, E; Andersen, C; Lindgren, R; Nyström, R; Nordin, E Z; Brune, W H; Svenningsson, B; Swietlicki, E; Boman, C; Pagels, J H

    2015-12-15

    The aim was to identify relationships between combustion conditions, particle characteristics, and optical properties of fresh and photochemically processed emissions from biomass combustion. The combustion conditions included nominal and high burn rate operation and individual combustion phases from a conventional wood stove. Low temperature pyrolysis upon fuel addition resulted in "tar-ball" type particles dominated by organic aerosol with an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 2.5-2.7 and estimated Brown Carbon contributions of 50-70% to absorption at the climate relevant aethalometer-wavelength (520 nm). High temperature combustion during the intermediate (flaming) phase was dominated by soot agglomerates with AAE 1.0-1.2 and 85-100% of absorption at 520 nm attributed to Black Carbon. Intense photochemical processing of high burn rate flaming combustion emissions in an oxidation flow reactor led to strong formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol, with no or weak absorption. PM1 mass emission factors (mg/kg) of fresh emissions were about an order of magnitude higher for low temperature pyrolysis compared to high temperature combustion. However, emission factors describing the absorption cross section emitted per kg of fuel consumed (m(2)/kg) were of similar magnitude at 520 nm for the diverse combustion conditions investigated in this study. These results provide a link between biomass combustion conditions, emitted particle types, and their optical properties in fresh and processed plumes which can be of value for source apportionment and balanced mitigation of biomass combustion emissions from a climate and health perspective.

  8. 42 CFR 486.108 - Condition for coverage: Safety standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... indication of the production of X-rays whenever the X-ray tube is energized. The control panel includes... BY SUPPLIERS Conditions for Coverage: Portable X-Ray Services § 486.108 Condition for coverage: Safety standards. X-ray examinations are conducted through the use of equipment which is free of...

  9. Impact of surface ocean conditions and aerosol provenance on the dissolution of aerosol manganese, cobalt, nickel and lead in seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Fishwick, MP; Ussher, SJ; Sedwick, PN; Lohan, MC; Worsfold, PJ; Buck, KN; Church, TM

    2018-01-01

    © 2017. Atmospheric deposition is an important pathway by which bioactive trace metals are delivered to the surface ocean. The proportions of total aerosol trace metals that dissolve in seawater, and thus become available to biota, are not well constrained and are therefore a key uncertainty when estimating atmospheric fluxes of these elements to surface waters. The aim of this study was to elucidate the main physico-chemical controls on the dissolution of the bioactive trace metals manganese...

  10. Aerosol resuspension in the reactor cooling system of LWR's under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.; Bolado, R.; Hontanon, E.

    1991-07-01

    Aerosol resuspension from the pipes of the RCS under severe accident conditions happens when the carrier gas flow is turbulent. The origin of such phenomenon seems to be the existence of turbulent bursts in the neighbourhood of the pipe wall. These bursts are of random nature, in space and time. Three theoretical models have been found in available literature; those are: Cleaver and Yates', RESUS and Reeks' models. The first two of them are force balance models, in which particle detachment is supposed whenever aerodynamic lift or drag forces, respectively exceed adhesive forces, and the third one is an energy balance model in which resuspension happens when particle vibrational energy exceeds adhesive potential. From experimental evidence it seems that the studied phenomenon is a force balance problem and RESUS seems to be the most appropriate to it, among the available ones. Small-scale experiments have shown, as main parameters affecting resuspension, the Reynolds number of the flow, aerosol composition and initial loading per unit of area. Moreover, the resuspension rate decreases with time in all experiments where temporal measurements were taken

  11. Preparation of amino acid nanoparticles at varying saturation conditions in an aerosol flow reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raula, Janne; Lehtimäki, Matti; Karppinen, Maarit; Antopolsky, Maxim; Jiang Hua; Rahikkala, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticle formation of five amino acids, glycine, l-proline, l-valine, l-phenylalanine, and l-leucine was studied. The aim was to explore factors determining nanoparticle formation and crystallinity. The amino acid nanoparticles have been prepared at different saturation conditions in the aerosol reactor. In a condensed state, the particles were formed by droplet drying. The raise in temperature induced the sublimation of amino acids from the aerosol particles. The amino acid vapor was condensed by physical vapor deposition in a rapid cooling process. The diffusion coefficients and nucleation rates of amino acids have been calculated to understand particle formation. Upon the vapor deposition, amino acids formed crystalline nanoparticles except in the case l-phenylalanine according to X-ray diffraction. The crystal polymorph of glycine in the nanoparticles depended on the applied reactor temperature. The preference of crystallographic orientation varied in both the particle formations from condensed and vapor phase. l-Valine, l-phenylalanine, and l-leucine formed leafy-looking particles. These results could be utilized in the fabrication of nano-sized asperities on drug particle surfaces to reduce forces between particles and accordingly increase particle dispersion in dry powder inhalers.

  12. Effect of Heat Wave Conditions on Aerosol Optical Properties Derived from Satellite and Ground-Based Remote Sensing over Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona S. Stachlewska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available During an exceptionally warm September in 2016, unique and stable weather conditions contributed to a heat wave over Poland, allowing for observations of aerosol optical properties, using a variety of ground-based and satellite remote sensors. The data set collected during 11–16 September 2016 was analysed in terms of aerosol transport (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model (HYSPLIT, aerosol load model simulations (Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS, Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS, Global Environmental Multiscale-Air Quality (GEM-AQ, columnar aerosol load measured at ground level (Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET, Polish Aerosol Research Network (PolandAOD and from satellites (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, as well as with 24/7 PollyXT Raman Lidar observations at the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET site in Warsaw. Analyses revealed a single day of a relatively clean background aerosol related to an Arctic air-mass inflow, surrounded by a few days with a well increased aerosol load of differing origin: pollution transported from Germany and biomass burning from Ukraine. Such conditions proved excellent to test developed-in-house algorithms designed for near real-time aerosol optical depth (AOD derivation from the SEVIRI sensor. The SEVIRI AOD maps derived over the territory of Poland, with an exceptionally high resolution (every 15 min; 5.5 × 5.5 km2, revealed on an hourly scale, very low aerosol variability due to heat wave conditions. Comparisons of SEVIRI with NAAPS and CAMS AOD maps show strong qualitative similarities; however, NAAPS underestimates AOD and CAMS tends to underestimate it on relatively clean days (<0.2, and overestimate it for a high aerosol load (>0.4. A slight underestimation of the SEVIRI AOD is reported for pixel-to-column comparisons with AODs of several radiometers

  13. First Results of the “Carbonaceous Aerosol in Rome and Environs (CARE” Experiment: Beyond Current Standards for PM10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Costabile

    2017-12-01

    future research directions. First, we found that BC and EC mass concentration in Rome are larger than those measured in similar urban areas across Europe (the urban background mass concentration of eBC in Rome in winter being on average 2.6 ± 2.5 μ g · m − 3 , mean eBC at the peak level hour being 5.2 (95% CI = 5.0–5.5 μ g · m − 3 . Then, we discussed significant variations of carbonaceous aerosol properties occurring with time scales of minutes, and questioned on the data averaging period used in current air quality standard for PM 10 (24-h. Third, we showed that the oxidative potential induced by aerosol depends on particle size and composition, the effects of toxicity being higher with lower mass concentrations and smaller particle size. Albeit this is a preliminary analysis, findings reinforce the need for an urgent update of existing air quality standards for PM 10 and PM 2.5 with regard to particle composition and size distribution, and data averaging period. Our results reinforce existing concerns about the toxicity of carbonaceous aerosols, support the existing evidence indicating that particle size distribution and composition may play a role in the generation of this toxicity, and remark the need to consider a shorter averaging period (<1 h in these new standards.

  14. Standard Model Vacuum Stability and Weyl Consistency Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antipin, Oleg; Gillioz, Marc; Krog, Jens

    2013-01-01

    At high energy the standard model possesses conformal symmetry at the classical level. This is reflected at the quantum level by relations between the different beta functions of the model. These relations are known as the Weyl consistency conditions. We show that it is possible to satisfy them...... order by order in perturbation theory, provided that a suitable coupling constant counting scheme is used. As a direct phenomenological application, we study the stability of the standard model vacuum at high energies and compare with previous computations violating the Weyl consistency conditions....

  15. Conditional Standard Errors of Measurement for Scale Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolen, Michael J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A procedure is described for estimating the reliability and conditional standard errors of measurement of scale scores incorporating the discrete transformation of raw scores to scale scores. The method is illustrated using a strong true score model, and practical applications are described. (SLD)

  16. Secondary Organic Aerosol Production from Gasoline Vehicle Exhaust: Effects of Engine Technology, Cold Start, and Emission Certification Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunliang; Lambe, Andrew T; Saleh, Rawad; Saliba, Georges; Robinson, Allen L

    2018-02-06

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from dilute exhaust from 16 gasoline vehicles was investigated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) oxidation flow reactor during chassis dynamometer testing using the cold-start unified cycle (UC). Ten vehicles were equipped with gasoline direct injection engines (GDI vehicles) and six with port fuel injection engines (PFI vehicles) certified to a wide range of emissions standards. We measured similar SOA production from GDI and PFI vehicles certified to the same emissions standard; less SOA production from vehicles certified to stricter emissions standards; and, after accounting for differences in gas-particle partitioning, similar effective SOA yields across different engine technologies and certification standards. Therefore the ongoing, dramatic shift from PFI to GDI vehicles in the United States should not alter the contribution of gasoline vehicles to ambient SOA and the natural replacement of older vehicles with newer ones certified to stricter emissions standards should reduce atmospheric SOA levels. Compared to hot operations, cold-start exhaust had lower effective SOA yields, but still contributed more SOA overall because of substantially higher organic gas emissions. We demonstrate that the PAM reactor can be used as a screening tool for vehicle SOA production by carefully accounting for the effects of the large variations in emission rates.

  17. Conditional Wegner Estimate for the Standard Random Breather Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Täufer, Matthias; Veselić, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    We prove a conditional Wegner estimate for Schrödinger operators with random potentials of breather type. More precisely, we reduce the proof of the Wegner estimate to a scale free unique continuation principle. The relevance of such unique continuation principles has been emphasized in previous papers, in particular in recent years. We consider the standard breather model, meaning that the single site potential is the characteristic function of a ball or a cube. While our methods work for a substantially larger class of random breather potentials, we discuss in this particular paper only the standard model in order to make the arguments and ideas easily accessible.

  18. Aerosol-cloud feedbacks in a turbulent environment: Laboratory measurements representative of conditions in boundary layer clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, W. H.; Chandrakar, K. K.; Karki, S.; Kinney, G.; Shaw, R.

    2017-12-01

    Many of the climate impacts of boundary layer clouds are modulated by aerosol particles. As two examples, their interactions with incoming solar and upwelling terrestrial radiation and their propensity for precipitation are both governed by the population of aerosol particles upon which the cloud droplets formed. In turn, clouds are the primary removal mechanism for aerosol particles smaller than a few micrometers and larger than a few nanometers. Aspects of these interconnected phenomena are known in exquisite detail (e.g. Köhler theory), but other parts have not been as amenable to study in the laboratory (e.g. scavenging of aerosol particles by cloud droplets). As a complicating factor, boundary layer clouds are ubiquitously turbulent, which introduces fluctuations in the water vapor concentration and temperature, which govern the saturation ratio which mediates aerosol-cloud interactions. We have performed laboratory measurements of aerosol-cloud coupling and feedbacks, using Michigan Tech's Pi Chamber (Chang et al., 2016). In conditions representative of boundary layer clouds, our data suggest that the lifetime of most interstitial particles in the accumulation mode is governed by cloud activation - particles are removed from the Pi Chamber when they activate and settle out of the chamber as cloud droplets. As cloud droplets are removed, these interstitial particles activate until the initially polluted cloud cleans itself and all particulates are removed from the chamber. At that point, the cloud collapses. Our data also indicate that smaller particles, Dp Chamber. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-15-00203.1

  19. Characterization of biological aerosol exposure risks from automobile air conditioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Li, Mingzhen; Shen, Fangxia; Zou, Zhuanglei; Yao, Maosheng; Wu, Chang-yu

    2013-09-17

    Although use of automobile air conditioning (AC) was shown to reduce in-vehicle particle levels, the characterization of its microbial aerosol exposure risks is lacking. Here, both AC and engine filter dust samples were collected from 30 automobiles in four different geographical locations in China. Biological contents (bacteria, fungi, and endotoxin) were studied using culturing, high-throughput gene sequence, and Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) methods. In-vehicle viable bioaerosol concentrations were directly monitored using an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS) before and after use of AC for 5, 10, and 15 min. Regardless of locations, the vehicle AC filter dusts were found to be laden with high levels of bacteria (up to 26,150 CFU/mg), fungi (up to 1287 CFU/mg), and endotoxin (up to 5527 EU/mg). More than 400 unique bacterial species, including human opportunistic pathogens, were detected in the filter dusts. In addition, allergenic fungal species were also found abundant. Surprisingly, unexpected fluorescent peaks around 2.5 μm were observed during the first 5 min use of AC, which was attributed to the reaerosolization of those filter-borne microbial agents. The information obtained here can assist in minimizing or preventing the respiratory allergy or infection risk from the use of automobile AC system.

  20. Enhanced toxicity of aerosol in fog conditions in the Po Valley, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decesari, Stefano; Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Hasheminassab, Sina; Sandrini, Silvia; Gilardoni, Stefania; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Fuzzi, Sandro; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2017-06-01

    While numerous studies have demonstrated the association between outdoor exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) and adverse health effects, the actual chemical species responsible for PM toxicological properties remain a subject of investigation. We provide here reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity data for PM samples collected at a rural site in the Po Valley, Italy, during the fog season (i.e., November-March). We show that the intrinsic ROS activity of Po Valley PM, which is mainly composed of biomass burning and secondary aerosols, is comparable to that of traffic-related particles in urban areas. The airborne concentration of PM components responsible for the ROS activity decreases in fog conditions, when water-soluble species are scavenged within the droplets. Due to this partitioning effect of fog, the measured ROS activity of fog water was contributed mainly by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and secondary inorganic ions rather than by transition metals. We found that the intrinsic ROS activity of fog droplets is even greater (> 2.5 times) than that of the PM on which droplets are formed, indicating that redox-active compounds are not only scavenged from the particulate phase, but are also produced within the droplets. Therefore, even if fog formation exerts a scavenging effect on PM mass and redox-active compounds, the aqueous-phase formation of reactive secondary organic compounds can eventually enhance ROS activity of PM when fog evaporates. These findings, based on a case study during a field campaign in November 2015, indicate that a significant portion of airborne toxicity in the Po Valley is largely produced by environmental conditions (fog formation and fog processing) and not simply by the emission and transport of pollutants.

  1. Enhanced toxicity of aerosol in fog conditions in the Po Valley, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Decesari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available While numerous studies have demonstrated the association between outdoor exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM and adverse health effects, the actual chemical species responsible for PM toxicological properties remain a subject of investigation. We provide here reactive oxygen species (ROS activity data for PM samples collected at a rural site in the Po Valley, Italy, during the fog season (i.e., November–March. We show that the intrinsic ROS activity of Po Valley PM, which is mainly composed of biomass burning and secondary aerosols, is comparable to that of traffic-related particles in urban areas. The airborne concentration of PM components responsible for the ROS activity decreases in fog conditions, when water-soluble species are scavenged within the droplets. Due to this partitioning effect of fog, the measured ROS activity of fog water was contributed mainly by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC and secondary inorganic ions rather than by transition metals. We found that the intrinsic ROS activity of fog droplets is even greater (> 2.5 times than that of the PM on which droplets are formed, indicating that redox-active compounds are not only scavenged from the particulate phase, but are also produced within the droplets. Therefore, even if fog formation exerts a scavenging effect on PM mass and redox-active compounds, the aqueous-phase formation of reactive secondary organic compounds can eventually enhance ROS activity of PM when fog evaporates. These findings, based on a case study during a field campaign in November 2015, indicate that a significant portion of airborne toxicity in the Po Valley is largely produced by environmental conditions (fog formation and fog processing and not simply by the emission and transport of pollutants.

  2. Measurements Of Sub- 3nm Aerosol Particles In Tropical Rainforest Conditions - Technical Challenges And Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, D.; Alessandro, F.; Backmann, J.; Manninen, H. E.; Lehtipalo, K.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    A Particle Size Magnifier (PSM; Vanhanen et al., 2011) was used for studying the sub-3 nm aerosol particles during the second intensive observation period of the GoAmazon campaign. The PSM is using diethylene glycol (DEG) as condensing liquid, which has a low saturation vapour pressure and is hygroscopic. The high supersaturation needed for activating sub-3 nm particles is reached by mixing the sample with clean air saturated with DEG. The measurements took place in Sept-Oct, when typical temperatures at the measurement site are around 303 K, and relative humidity (RH) around 90%. Due to these challenging conditions, in combination with the hygroscopicity of the DEG, careful design and testing of the instrument was required. We developed an inlet reducing the RH at the inlet of the PSM while keeping the diffusion losses of particles in the inlet as low as possible. The inlet design is based on a sintered tube, where dry, pressurized dilution flow is added. Downstream of the sintered tube, a core sampling probe is used. The core sampling allows to sample from the center of the tube, where the highest particle concentration is, while an additional make-up flow allows for a higher sample flow rate. The RH of the ambient, dilution flow and PSM inlet flow are monitored continuously. Tests in the laboratory have shown that the RH could be reduced down to less than 30%, while the ambient RH was 90-100%. The characterization of the inlet regarding diffusion losses lead to a cut off diameter of 1.6 nm, compared to 1.3 nm without inlet. Thus, this new inlet design allows measurements of sub-3 nm particles in tropical rainforest condition.

  3. The Treatment of Pulmonary Diseases and Respiratory-Related Conditions with Inhaled (Nebulized or Aerosolized Glutathione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Prousky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduced glutathione or simply glutathione (γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine; GSH is found in the cytosol of most cells of the body. GSH in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF of the lower respiratory tract is thought to be the first line of defense against oxidative stress. Inhalation (nebulized or aerosolized is the only known method that increases GSH's levels in the ELF. A review of the literature was conducted to examine the clinical effectiveness of inhaled GSH as a treatment for various pulmonary diseases and respiratory-related conditions. This report also discusses clinical and theoretical indications for GSH inhalation, potential concerns with this treatment, its presumed mechanisms of action, optimal doses to be administered and other important details. Reasons for inhaled GSH's effectiveness include its role as a potent antioxidant, and possibly improved oxygenation and host defenses. Theoretical uses of this treatment include Farmer's lung, pre- and postexercise, multiple chemical sensitivity disorder and cigarette smoking. GSH inhalation should not be used as a treatment for primary lung cancer. Testing for sulfites in the urine is recommended prior to GSH inhalation. Minor side effects such as transient coughing and an unpleasant odor are common with this treatment. Major side effects such as bronchoconstriction have only occurred among asthma patients presumed to be sulfite-sensitive. The potential applications of inhaled GSH are numerous when one considers just how many pulmonary diseases and respiratory-related conditions are affected by deficient antioxidant status or an over production of oxidants, poor oxygenation and/or impaired host defenses. More studies are clearly warranted.

  4. Textual complexity of standard conditions used in the construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raufdeen Rameezdeen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Clearly written communication aids the understanding of construction contracts, resulting in less disputation. Past research, using opinion surveys rather than objective criteria, shows that construction contracts lack clarity and standard forms have become complex over time. The study outlined in this paper uses three objective measures of clarity developed by linguists to establish the readability of construction contracts. In addition, thirty industry professionals participated in a Cloze Test which measured the level of comprehension of clauses concerning disputes. The study verifies that contract conditions are very difficult to read, with college level reading skills needed to comprehend half of the clauses. However, the hypothesis that standard forms have become complex over time was not supported by the study. The study establishes a linear relationship between readability and comprehension, proving the hypothesis that improved readability increases the comprehension of a contract clause.

  5. Textual complexity of standard conditions used in the construction industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raufdeen Rameezdeen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Clearly written communication aids the understanding of construction contracts, resulting in less disputation. Past research, using opinion surveys rather than objective criteria, shows that construction contracts lack clarity and standard forms have become complex over time. The study outlined in this paper uses three objective measures of clarity developed by linguists to establish the readability of construction contracts. In addition, thirty industry professionals participated in a Cloze Test which measured the level of comprehension of clauses concerning disputes. The study verifies that contract conditions are very difficult to read, with college level reading skills needed to comprehend half of the clauses. However, the hypothesis that standard forms have become complex over time was not supported by the study. The study establishes a linear relationship between readability and comprehension, proving the hypothesis that improved readability increases the comprehension of a contract clause. 

  6. The effect of increase in humidity on the size and activity distributions of radon progeny laden aerosols from hydrocarbon combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Atika; Phillips, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of a humidity increase on the distributions of aerosol size and activity for hydrocarbon combustion aerosols laden with radon progeny were determined. Pre-humidification aerosol conditions were 20 0 C and 35% RH. Post-humidification aerosol conditions were 37 0 C and 100% RH, intended to simulate conditions in the human respiratory tract. Using kerosene combustion aerosols, a growth factor of 1.3 ± 0.2 (standard deviation) was found for both the aerosol median diameter and the activity median diameter. (author)

  7. Aerosol radiative effect in UV, VIS, NIR, and SW spectra under haze and high-humidity urban conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Ma, Yingying; Gong, Wei; Wang, Lunche; Xia, Xiangao; Che, Huizheng; Hu, Bo; Liu, Boming

    2017-10-01

    Aerosol properties derived from sun-photometric observations at Wuhan during a haze period were analyzed and used as input in a radiative transfer model to calculate the aerosol radiative effect (ARE) in ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS), near-infrared (NIR), and shortwave (SW) spectra. The results showed that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 440 nm increased from 0.32 under clear-air conditions to 0.85 during common haze and 1.39 during severe haze. An unusual inverse relationship was found between the Ångström exponent (AE) and AOD during the haze period at Wuhan. Under high-humidity conditions, the fine-mode median radius of aerosols increased from 0.113 μm to approximately 0.2-0.5 μm as a result of hygroscopic growth, which led to increases in the AOD and decreases in the AE simultaneously. These changes were responsible for the inverse relationship between AE and AOD at Wuhan. The surface ARE in the UV (AREUV), VIS (AREVIS), NIR (ARENIR), and SW (ARESW) spectra changed from -4.46, -25.37, -12.15, and -41.99 W/m2 under clear-air conditions to -9.48, -53.96, -29.81, and -93.25 W/m2 during common hazy days and -12.89, -80.16, -55.17, and -148.22 W/m2 during severe hazy days, respectively, and the percentages of AREUV, AREVIS, and ARENIR in ARESW changed from 11%, 61%, and 28%-9%, 54%, and 37%, respectively. Meanwhile, the ARE efficiencies (REE) in SW varied from -206.5 W/m2 under clear-air conditions to -152.94 W/m2 during the common haze period and -131.47 W/m2 during the severe haze period. The smallest decreasing rate of the REE in NIR was associated with the increase of ARENIR. The weakened REE values were related to the strong forward scattering and weak backward scattering of fine aerosol particles with increasing size resulting from hygroscopic growth, while the variation of the single scattering albedo showed less impact. Source region analysis by back trajectories and the concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) method showed that black carbon came

  8. Primary marine aerosol emissions from the Mediterranean Sea during pre-bloom and oligotrophic conditions: correlations to seawater chlorophyll a from a mesocosm study

    OpenAIRE

    Schwier , A. N.; Rose , C.; Asmi , E.; Ebling , A. M.; Landing , W. M.; Marro , S.; Pedrotti , M.-L.; Sallon , A.; Iuculano , F.; Agusti , S.; Tsiola , A.; Pitta , P.; Louis , J.; Guieu , C.; Gazeau , F.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of ocean acidification and changing water conditions on primary (and secondary) marine aerosol emissions is not well understood on a regional or a global scale. To investigate this effect as well as the indirect effect on aerosol that changing biogeochemical parameters can have, ~ 52 m3 pelagic mesocosms were deployed for several weeks in the Mediterranean Sea during both winter pre-bloom and summer oligotrophic conditions and were subjected to various levels of C...

  9. SMOG CHAMBER STUDIES OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOLS FROM IRRADIATED HYDROCARBONS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the physics and chemistry of aerosols is fundamental to evaluating health risks and developing and evaluating atmospheric models. However, as noted in a recent NRC report only about 10% of the organics in PM2.5 have been identified. A significant portion of the un...

  10. Stratospheric aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Ivanov, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol measurements can provide both spatial and temporal data of sufficient resolution to be of use in climate models. Relatively recent results from a wide range of instrument techniques for measuring stratospheric aerosol parameters are described. Such techniques include impactor sampling, lidar system sensing, filter sampling, photoelectric particle counting, satellite extinction-sensing using the sun as a source, and optical depth probing, at sites mainly removed from tropospheric aerosol sources. Some of these techniques have also had correlative and intercomparison studies. The main methods for determining the vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosols are outlined: lidar extinction measurements from satellites; impactor measurements from balloons and aircraft; and photoelectric particle counter measurements from balloons, aircraft, and rockets. The conversion of the lidar backscatter to stratospheric aerosol mass loading is referred to. Absolute measurements of total solar extinction from satellite orbits can be used to extract the aerosol extinction, and several examples of vertical profiles of extinction obtained with the SAGE satellite are given. Stratospheric mass loading can be inferred from extinction using approximate linear relationships but under restrictive conditions. Impactor sampling is essentially the only method in which the physical nature of the stratospheric aerosol is observed visually. Vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosol number concentration using impactor data are presented. Typical profiles using a dual-size-range photoelectric dustsonde particle counter are given for volcanically disturbed and inactive periods. Some measurements of the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols are also presented. Volatility measurements are described, indicating that stratospheric aerosols are composed primarily of about 75% sulfuric acid and 25% water

  11. Physical properties and concentration of aerosol particles over the Amazon tropical forest during background and biomass burning conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guyon

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the size distribution, scattering and absorption properties of Amazonian aerosols and the optical thickness of the aerosol layer under the pristine background conditions typical of the wet season, as well as during the biomass-burning-influenced dry season. The measurements were made during two campaigns in 1999 as part of the European contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA-EUSTACH. In moving from the wet to the dry season, median particle numbers were observed to increase from values comparable to those of the remote marine boundary layer (~400 cm-3 to values more commonly associated with urban smog (~4000 cm-3, due to a massive injection of submicron smoke particles. Aerosol optical depths at 500 nm increased from 0.05 to 0.8 on average, reaching a value of 2 during the dry season. Scattering and absorption coefficients, measured at 550 nm, showed a concomitant increase from average values of 6.8 and 0.4 Mm-1 to values of 91 and 10 Mm-1, respectively, corresponding to an estimated decrease in single-scattering albedo from ca. 0.97 to 0.91. The roughly tenfold increase in many of the measured parameters attests to the dramatic effect that extensive seasonal biomass burning (deforestation, pasture cleaning is having on the composition and properties of aerosols over Amazonia. The potential exists for these changes to impact on regional and global climate through changes to the extinction of solar radiation as well as the alteration of cloud properties.

  12. Evidence for the role of organics in aerosol particle formation under atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, A.; Dommen, J.; Duplissy, J.; Prevot, A.S.H.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Verheggen, B.; Riipinen, I.; Kulmala, M.; Spracklen, D.V.; Carslaw, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    New particle formation in the atmosphere is an important parameter in governing the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols. However, detailed nucleation mechanisms remain ambiguous, as laboratory data have so far not been successful in explaining atmospheric nucleation. We investigated the formation of new particles in a smog chamber simulating the photochemical formation of H2SO4 and organic condensable species. Nucleation occurs at H2SO4 concentrations similar to those found in the ambient atmosphere during nucleation events. The measured particle formation rates are proportional to the product of the concentrations of H2SO4 and an organic molecule. This suggests that only one H2SO4 molecule and one organic molecule are involved in the rate-limiting step of the observed nucleation process. Parameterizing this process in a global aerosol model results in substantially better agreement with ambient observations compared to control runs.

  13. Impacts of synoptic condition and planetary boundary layer structure on the trans-boundary aerosol transport from Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region to northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Guo, Jianping; Liu, Shuhua; Zhao, Chun; Li, Xiaolan; Zhang, Gen; Wei, Wei; Ma, Yanjun

    2018-05-01

    The northeastern China frequently experiences severe aerosol pollution in winter under unfavorable meteorological conditions. How and to what extent the meteorological factors affect the air quality there are not yet clearly understood. Thus, this study investigated the impacts of synoptic patterns on the aerosol transport and planetary boundary layer (PBL) structure in Shenyang from 1 to 3 December 2016, using surface observations, sounding measurements, satellite data, and three-dimensional simulations. Results showed that the aerosol pollution occurred in Shenyang was not only related to the local emissions, but also contributed by trans-boundary transport of aerosols from the Beiijng-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region. In the presence of the westerly and southwesterly synoptic winds, the aerosols emitted from BTH could be brought to Shenyang. From December 2 to 3, the aerosols emitted from BTH accounted for ∼20% of near-surface PM2.5 in Shenyang. In addition, the large-scale synoptic forcings could affect the vertical mixing of pollutants through modulating the PBL structure in Shenyang. The westerly and southwesterly synoptic winds not only brought the aerosols but also the warmer air masses from the southwest regions to Shenyang. The strong warm advections above PBL could enhance the already existing thermal inversion layers capping over PBL in Shenyang, leading to the suppressions of PBL. Both the trans-boundary transport of aerosols and the suppressions of PBL caused by the large-scale synoptic forcings should be partly responsible for the poor air quality in Shenyang, in addition to the high pollutant emissions. The present study revealed the physical mechanisms underlying the aerosol pollution in Shenyang, which has important implications for better forecasting and controlling the aerosols pollution.

  14. Spectroscopic study of the water-soluble organic matter isolated from atmospheric aerosols collected under different atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, Regina M.B.O.; Pio, Casimiro A.; Duarte, Armando C.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of the water-soluble organic matter from fine aerosols collected in a rural location during two different meteorological conditions (summer and autumn) was investigated by UV-vis, synchronous fluorescence (with Δλ = 20 nm), FT-IR and CPMAS- 13 C NMR spectroscopies. A seasonal variation in the concentration of total carbon, organic carbon and water-soluble organic carbon was confirmed, with higher values during the autumn and lower values during the summer season. The chemical characterisation of the water-soluble organic matter showed that both samples are dominated by a high content of aliphatic structures, carboxyl groups and aliphatic carbons single bonded to one oxygen or nitrogen atom. However, the autumn sample exhibits a higher aromatic content than the summer sample, plus signals due to carbons of phenol, ketones and methoxyl groups. These signals were attributed to lignin breakdown products which are likely to be released during wood combustion processes. The obtained results put into evidence the major contribution of biomass burning processes in domestic fireplaces during low temperature conditions into both the concentration and the bulk chemical properties of the WSOC from fine aerosols

  15. Assessment of biomass burning smoke influence on environmental conditions for multiyear tornado outbreaks by combining aerosol-aware microphysics and fire emission constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saide, Pablo E.; Thompson, Gregory; Eidhammer, Trude; da Silva, Arlindo M.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2016-09-01

    We use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) system to study the impacts of biomass burning smoke from Central America on several tornado outbreaks occurring in the U.S. during spring. The model is configured with an aerosol-aware microphysics parameterization capable of resolving aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in a cost-efficient way for numerical weather prediction (NWP) applications. Primary aerosol emissions are included, and smoke emissions are constrained using an inverse modeling technique and satellite-based aerosol optical depth observations. Simulations turning on and off fire emissions reveal smoke presence in all tornado outbreaks being studied and show an increase in aerosol number concentrations due to smoke. However, the likelihood of occurrence and intensification of tornadoes is higher due to smoke only in cases where cloud droplet number concentration in low-level clouds increases considerably in a way that modifies the environmental conditions where the tornadoes are formed (shallower cloud bases and higher low-level wind shear). Smoke absorption and vertical extent also play a role, with smoke absorption at cloud-level tending to burn-off clouds and smoke absorption above clouds resulting in an increased capping inversion. Comparing these and WRF-Chem simulations configured with a more complex representation of aerosol size and composition and different optical properties, microphysics, and activation schemes, we find similarities in terms of the simulated aerosol optical depths and aerosol impacts on near-storm environments. This provides reliability on the aerosol-aware microphysics scheme as a less computationally expensive alternative to WRF-Chem for its use in applications such as NWP and cloud-resolving simulations.

  16. Aerosolization characteristics of dry powder inhaler formulations for the excipient enhanced growth (EEG) application: effect of spray drying process conditions on aerosol performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yoen-Ju; Worth Longest, P; Hindle, Michael

    2013-02-25

    The aim of this study was to develop a spray dried submicrometer powder formulation suitable for the excipient enhanced growth (EEG) application. Combination particles were prepared using the Buchi Nano spray dryer B-90. A number of spray drying and formulation variables were investigated with the aims of producing dry powder formulations that were readily dispersed upon aerosolization and maximizing the fraction of submicrometer particles. Albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine, and poloxamer 188 were selected as a model drug, hygroscopic excipient, dispersibility enhancer and surfactant, respectively. Formulations were assessed by scanning electron microscopy and aerosol performance following aerosolization using an Aerolizer dry powder inhaler (DPI). In vitro drug deposition was studied using a realistic mouth-throat (MT) model. Based on the in vitro aerosolization results, the best performing submicrometer powder formulation consisted of albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine and poloxamer 188 in a ratio of 30:48:20:2, containing 0.5% solids in a water:ethanol (80:20%, v/v) solution which was spray dried at 70 °C. The submicrometer particle fraction (FPF(1 μm/ED)) of this final formulation was 28.3% with more than 80% of the capsule contents being emitted during aerosolization. This formulation also showed 4.1% MT deposition. The developed combination formulation delivered a powder aerosol developed for the EEG application with high dispersion efficiency and low MT deposition from a convenient DPI device platform. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Beijing Olympics as an aerosol field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermak, J.; Knutti, R.

    2009-05-01

    During the 2008 Olympic Summer Games, emission reductions were enforced in Beijing to improve air quality. Here we explore their effect on the regional aerosol load. We compare satellite-retrieved aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of that period with previous years, both in absolute terms and in a neural network approach taking into account the meteorological conditions. A statistically significant reduction of aerosol load is found in Beijing that decreases in magnitude and significance with increasing region size. Locally, the aerosol load (log(AOT)) was about 0.4 to 0.75 standard deviations below the levels expected for the prevailing meteorological situation. The small size of this effect relative to meteorological variability highlights the importance of regional aerosol transport.

  18. Measuring enzyme activities under standardized in vivo-like conditions for Systems Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, K.; Bouwman, J.; Daran-Lapujade, P.A.L.; Postmus, J.; Canelas, A.; Mensonides, F.I.C.; Orij, R.; Tuzun, I.; van der Brink, J.; Smits, G.J.; van Gulik, W.M.; Brul, S.; Heijnen, J.J.; de Winde, J.H.; Teixeira de Mattos, M.J.; Kettner, C.; Nielsen, J.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Bakker, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    Realistic quantitative models require data from many laboratories. Therefore, standardization of experimental systems and assay conditions is crucial. Moreover, standards should be representative of the in vivo conditions. However, most often, enzyme-kinetic parameters are measured under assay

  19. Measuring enzyme activities under standardized in vivo-like conditions for systems biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, Karen; Bouwman, Jildau; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; Postmus, Jarne; Canelas, Andre B.; Mensonides, Femke I. C.; Orij, Rick; Tuzun, Isil; van den Brink, Joost; Smits, Gertien J.; van Gulik, Walter M.; Brul, Stanley; de Winde, Johannes H.; de Mattos, M. J. Teixeira; Kettner, Carsten; Nielsen, Jens; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    Realistic quantitative models require data from many laboratories. Therefore, standardization of experimental systems and assay conditions is crucial. Moreover, standards should be representative of the in vivo conditions. However, most often, enzyme-kinetic parameters are measured under assay

  20. The effect of changes in humidity on the size of submicron aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.R.; Khan, A.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of humidity on inhaled aerosols in the respiratory tract is to cause an increase in particle size of up to several times if the aerosol particle is hygroscopic. The presence of ionizing radiation and air ions (for example, from uranium and radon/thoron) increases the tendency of water vapour to nucleate. The desposition of particles in the lung is enhanced by high charge density (>10 charges/particle). Radon has been reported to play an important role in the formation of sulphate and nitrate particles in the atmosphere. A detailed overview of the effect of humidity on aerosols is presented in the present work. Results of experimental measurements made on NaCl (hygroscopic) and kerosene combustion (hydrophobic) aerosols under ambient and humid conditions are reported. Initial aerosol conditions were 20 degrees C and 35% R.H. Final aerosol conditions were maintained at 37 degrees C and 100% R.H. in order to simulate the conditions inside the respiratory tract. An average growth factor of 1.9 ± 0.4 (standard deviation) was observed for the NaCl aerosol and 1.3 ± 0.2 (standard deviation) for the kerosene aerosol. For the activity size distribution, however, the NaCl aerosols were observed to grow by an average factor of only 1.2 ± 0.1 (standard deviation) whereas the kerosene aerosols grew by a factor of 1.3 ± 0.2 (standard deviation)

  1. Interdecadal changes of summer aerosol pollution in the Yangtze River Basin of China, the relative influence of meteorological conditions and the relation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jizhi; Zhang, Xiaoye; Li, Duo; Yang, Yuanqin; Zhong, Junting; Wang, Yaqiang; Che, Haochi; Che, Huizheng; Zhang, Yangmei

    2018-02-19

    Winter is a season of much concern for aerosol pollution in China, but less concern for pollution in the summertime. There are even less concern and larger uncertainty about interdecadal changes in summer aerosol pollution, relative influence of meteorological conditions, and their links to climate change. Here we try to reveal the relation among interdecadal changes in summer's most important circulation system affecting China (East Asian Summer Monsoon-EASM), an index of meteorological conditions (called PLAM, Parameter Linking Air Quality and Meteorological Elements, which is almost linearly related with aerosol pollution), and aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (M-LYR) in central eastern China during summertime since the 1960's. During the weak monsoon years, the aerosol pollution load was heavier in the M-LYR and opposite in the strong monsoon years mainly influenced by EASM and associated maintenance position of the anti-Hadley cell around 115°E. The interdecadal changes in meteorological conditions and their associated aerosol pollution in the context of such climate change have experienced four periods since the 1960's, which were a relatively large decreased period from 1961 to 1980, a large rise between 1980 and 1999, a period of slow rise or maintenance from 1999 to 2006, and a relatively rapid rise between 2006 and 2014. Among later three pollution increased periods, about 51%, 25% and 60% of the aerosol pollution change respectively come from the contribution of worsening weather conditions, which are found to be greatly affected by changes in EASM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ambient Aerosols in the Southern Hemisphere on Ascension Island during the LASIC Campaign: Biomass Burning Season versus Near Pristine Background Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, A. C.; Springston, S. R.; Watson, T. B.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Zuidema, P.; Adebiyi, A. A.; Uin, J.; Kuang, C.; Flynn, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Ascension Island is located 8 degrees South of the Equator and 15 degrees West Longitude in the middle of the South Atlantic Ocean, at least 1000 miles from any major shoreline and closest to the continent of Africa. While low Southern Hemisphere background aerosol and trace gas measurements are observed most of the year, that picture changes during the South African Biomass Burning (BB) season. BB emissions are a large source of carbon to the atmosphere via particles and gas phase species and with a potential rise in drought and extreme events in the future, these numbers are expected to increase. From approximately June-October every year, the plume of South African BB emissions, the largest BB source in the world, are advected West and are known to impact both the boundary layer and free troposphere at Ascension Island (Zuidema et al., 2016). During the U.S. DOE ARM field campaign, Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC), aerosol and trace gas measurements were collected continuously from June 2016 through October 2017 over a 1.5 year period. Two BB seasons are contrasted with the near pristine background conditions during the campaign from the ARM Aerosol Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1) and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS). Numerous direct in situ aerosol and trace gas measurements are presented, e.g. black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), PM1 and PM10 aerosol absorption and scattering, submicron non-refractory chemical composition (Organics, Sulfate, Nitrate, Ammonium, Chloride), etc. Aerosol and trace gas signatures are investigated along with backtrajectories to identify sources. Carbonaceous aerosols emitted with gas-phase CO are used to determine particulate emission ratios along with intrinsic and extrinsic aerosol properties. BC mass concentrations reach 1 µg m-3 during multiday plumes and exceed 25% of the total aerosol submicron mass concentration. Organic Aerosol (OA) to BC Ratios of 2.4 in the plume are much higher than previously

  3. 77 FR 14279 - National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Aerosol Coatings-Addition of Dimethyl...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... 13.03 Diethanolamine 111-42-2 4.05 Diethylene Glycol 111-46-6 3.55 n-Octane 111-65-9 1.11 2-Butoxy-1-Ethanol (Ethylene Glycol 111-76-2 2.90 Monobutyl Ether) Diethylene Glycol Methyl Ether (2-(2- 111-77-3 2... standards in its regulatory activities unless to do so would be inconsistent with applicable law or...

  4. Conformal Extensions of the Standard Model with Veltman Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antipin, Oleg; Mojaza, Matin; Sannino, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    the Higgs is predicted to have the experimental value of the mass equal to 126 GeV. This model also predicts the existence of one more standard model singlet scalar boson with a mass of 541 GeV and the Higgs self-coupling to emerge radiatively. We study several other PNC examples that generally predict...... a somewhat smaller mass of the Higgs to the perturbative order we have investigated them. Our results can be a useful guide when building extensions of the standard model featuring fundamental scalars....

  5. Assessment of Biomass Burning Smoke Influence on Environmental Conditions for Multi-Year Tornado Outbreaks by Combining Aerosol-Aware Microphysics and Fire Emission Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saide, Pablo E.; Thompson, Gregory; Eidhammer, Trude; Da Silva, Arlindo M.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Carmichael, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    We use the WRF system to study the impacts of biomass burning smoke from Central America on several tornado outbreaks occurring in the US during spring. The model is configured with an aerosol-aware microphysics parameterization capable of resolving aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in a cost-efficient way for numerical weather prediction (NWP) applications. Primary aerosol emissions are included and smoke emissions are constrained using an inverse modeling technique and satellite-based AOD observations. Simulations turning on and off fire emissions reveal smoke presence in all tornado outbreaks being studied and show an increase in aerosol number concentrations due to smoke. However, the likelihood of occurrence and intensification of tornadoes is higher due to smoke only in cases where cloud droplet number concentration in low level clouds increases considerably in a way that modifies the environmental conditions where the tornadoes are formed (shallower cloud bases and higher low-level wind shear). Smoke absorption and vertical extent also play a role, with smoke absorption at cloud-level tending to burn-off clouds and smoke absorption above clouds resulting in an increased capping inversion. Comparing these and WRF-Chem simulations configured with a more complex representation of aerosol size and composition and different optical properties, microphysics and activation schemes, we find similarities in terms of the simulated aerosol optical depths and aerosol impacts on near-storm environments. This provides reliability on the aerosol-aware microphysics scheme as a less computationally expensive alternative to WRFChem for its use in applications such as NWP and cloud-resolving simulations.

  6. Textual complexity of standard conditions used in the construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Raufdeen Rameezdeen; Anushi Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Clearly written communication aids the understanding of construction contracts, resulting in less disputation. Past research, using opinion surveys rather than objective criteria, shows that construction contracts lack clarity and standard forms have become complex over time. The study outlined in this paper uses three objective measures of clarity developed by linguists to establish the readability of construction contracts. In addition, thirty industry professionals participated in a Cloze ...

  7. Individual aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions below convective cloud bases in the Oman mountain region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeniuk, T. A.; Bruintjes, R. T.; Salazar, V.; Breed, D. W.; Jensen, T. L.; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-03-01

    An airborne study of cloud microphysics provided an opportunity to collect aerosol particles in ambient and updraft conditions of natural convection systems for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Particles were collected simultaneously on lacey carbon and calcium-coated carbon (Ca-C) TEM grids, providing information on particle morphology and chemistry and a unique record of the particle's physical state on impact. In total, 22 particle categories were identified, including single, coated, aggregate, and droplet types. The fine fraction comprised up to 90% mixed cation sulfate (MCS) droplets, while the coarse fraction comprised up to 80% mineral-containing aggregates. Insoluble (dry), partially soluble (wet), and fully soluble particles (droplets) were recorded on Ca-C grids. Dry particles were typically silicate grains; wet particles were mineral aggregates with chloride, nitrate, or sulfate components; and droplets were mainly aqueous NaCl and MCS. Higher numbers of droplets were present in updrafts (80% relative humidity (RH)) compared with ambient conditions (60% RH), and almost all particles activated at cloud base (100% RH). Greatest changes in size and shape were observed in NaCl-containing aggregates (>0.3 µm diameter) along updraft trajectories. Their abundance was associated with high numbers of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplets, as well as large droplet sizes in updrafts. Thus, compositional dependence was observed in activation behavior recorded for coarse and fine fractions. Soluble salts from local pollution and natural sources clearly affected aerosol-cloud interactions, enhancing the spectrum of particles forming CCN and by forming giant CCN from aggregates, thus, making cloud seeding with hygroscopic flares ineffective in this region.

  8. Response of northern hemisphere environmental and atmospheric conditions to climate changes using Greenland aerosol records from the Eemian to the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, H.

    2017-12-01

    The Northern Hemisphere experienced dramatic climate changes over the last glacial cycle, including vast ice sheet expansion and frequent abrupt climate events. Moreover, high northern latitudes during the last interglacial (Eemian) were warmer than today and may provide guidance for future climate change scenarios. However, little evidence exists regarding the environmental alterations connected to these climate changes. Using aerosol concentration records in decadal resolution from the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) over the last 128,000 years we extract quantitative information on environmental changes, including the first comparison of northern hemisphere environmental conditions between the warmer than present Eemian and the early Holocene. Separating source changes from transport effects, we find that changes in the ice concentration greatly overestimate the changes in atmospheric concentrations in the aerosol source region, the latter mirroring changes in aerosol emissions. Glacial times were characterized by a strong reduction in terrestrial biogenic emissions (only 10-20% of the early Holocene value) reflecting the net loss of vegetated area in mid to high latitudes, while rapid climate changes during the glacial had essentially no effect on terrestrial biogenic aerosol emissions. An increase in terrestrial dust emissions of approximately a factor of eight during peak glacial and cold stadial intervals indicates higher aridity and dust storm activity in Asian deserts. Glacial sea salt aerosol emissions increased only moderately (by approximately 50%), likely due to sea ice expansion, while marked stadial/interstadial variations in sea salt concentrations in the ice reflect mainly changes in wet deposition en route. Eemian ice contains lower aerosol concentrations than ice from the early Holocene, due to shortened atmospheric residence time during the warmer Eemian, suggesting that generally 2°C warmer climate in high northern latitudes did not

  9. On-site ocean horizontal aerosol extinction coefficient inversion under different weather conditions on the Bo-hai and Huang-hai Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianjiang; Xia, Min; Ge, Yinghui; Guo, Wenping; Yang, Kecheng

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the horizontal extinction characteristics under different weather conditions on the ocean surface with on-site experiments on the Bo-hai and Huang-hai Seas in the summer of 2016. An experimental lidar system is designed to collect the on-site experimental data. By aiming at the inhomogeneity and uncertainty of the horizontal aerosol in practice, a joint retrieval method is proposed to retrieve the aerosol extinction coefficients (AEC) from the raw data along the optical path. The retrieval results of both the simulated and the real signals demonstrate that the joint retrieval method is practical. Finally, the sequence observation results of the on-site experiments under different weather conditions are reported and analyzed. These results can provide the attenuation information to analyze the atmospheric aerosol characteristics on the ocean surface.

  10. Autofluorescence of atmospheric bioaerosols - Biological standard particles and the influence of environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhlker, Christopher; Huffman, J. Alex; Förster, Jan-David; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    standard bioparticles (pollen, fungal spores, and bacteria) as well as atmospherically relevant chemical substances. We addressed the sensitivity and selectivity of autofluorescence based online techniques. Moreover, we investigated the influence of environmental conditions, such as relative humidity and oxidizing agents in the atmosphere, on the autofluorescence signature of standard bioparticles. Our results will support the molecular understanding and quantitative interpretation of data obtained by real-time FBAP instrumentation [5,6]. [1] Elbert, W., Taylor, P. E., Andreae, M. O., & Pöschl, U. (2007). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 4569-4588. [2] Huffman, J. A., Treutlein, B., & Pöschl, U. (2010). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 3215-3233. [3] Pöschl, U., et al. (2010). Science, 329, 1513-1516. [4] Lakowicz, J., Principles of fluorescence spectroscopy, Plenum publishers, New York, 1999. [5] Pöhlker, C., Huffman, J. A., & Pöschl, U., (2012). Atmos. Meas. Tech., 5, 37-71. [6] Pöhlker, C., Huffman, J. A., Förster J.-D., & Pöschl, U., (2012) in preparation.

  11. Standardization of incubation conditions for hemolysis testing of biomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkelman, Sandra; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Blanton, John; van Oeveren, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Hemolysis testing is the most common method to determine the hemocompatibility properties of biomaterials. There is however no consensus on the procedures of hemolysis testing due to insufficient comparative studies on the quality of the red blood cells used and the experimental conditions of

  12. 40 CFR 147.2925 - Standard permit conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... measurement; (ii) Individual(s) who preformed the measurements; (iii) Date(s) analyses were performed; (iv) Individual(s) who performed the analyses; (v) Analytical techniques or methods used, including quality... conditions. Proper operation and maintenance also includes adequate operator staffing and training, adequate...

  13. Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration Technician. National Skill Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocational Technical Education Consortium of States, Decatur, GA.

    This guide contains information on the knowledge and skills identified by industry as essential to the job performance of heating, air-conditioning, and refrigeration technicians. It is intended to assist training providers in public and private institutions, as well as in industry, to develop and implement training that will provide workers with…

  14. Sulfur deposition changes under sulfate geoengineering conditions: quasi-biennial oscillation effects on the transport and lifetime of stratospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visioni, Daniele; Pitari, Giovanni; Tuccella, Paolo; Curci, Gabriele

    2018-02-01

    Sustained injection of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the tropical lower stratosphere has been proposed as a climate engineering technique for the coming decades. Among several possible environmental side effects, the increase in sulfur deposition deserves additional investigation. In this study we present results from a composition-climate coupled model (University of L'Aquila Composition-Chemistry Model, ULAQ-CCM) and a chemistry-transport model (Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Transport Model, GEOS-Chem), assuming a sustained lower-stratospheric equatorial injection of 8 Tg SO2 yr-1. Total S deposition is found to globally increase by 5.2 % when sulfate geoengineering is deployed, with a clear interhemispheric asymmetry (+3.8 and +10.3 % in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH), due to +2.2 and +1.8 Tg S yr-1, respectively). The two models show good consistency, both globally and on a regional scale under background and geoengineering conditions, except for S-deposition changes over Africa and the Arctic. The consistency exists with regard to time-averaged values but also with regard to monthly and interannual deposition changes. The latter is driven essentially by the variability in stratospheric large-scale transport associated with the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). Using an externally nudged QBO, it is shown how a zonal wind E shear favors aerosol confinement in the tropical pipe and a significant increase in their effective radius (+13 % with respect to W shear conditions). The net result is an increase in the downward cross-tropopause S flux over the tropics with dominant E shear conditions with respect to W shear periods (+0.61 Tg S yr-1, +42 %, mostly due to enhanced aerosol gravitational settling) and a decrease over the extratropics (-0.86 Tg S yr-1, -35 %, mostly due to decreased large-scale stratosphere-troposphere exchange of geoengineering sulfate). This translates into S-deposition changes that are significantly

  15. Primary marine aerosol emissions from the Mediterranean Sea during pre-bloom and oligotrophic conditions: correlations to seawater chlorophyll a from a mesocosm study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwier, A. N.; Rose, C.; Asmi, E.; Ebling, A. M.; Landing, W. M.; Marro, S.; Pedrotti, M.-L.; Sallon, A.; Iuculano, F.; Agusti, S.; Tsiola, A.; Pitta, P.; Louis, J.; Guieu, C.; Gazeau, F.; Sellegri, K.

    2015-07-01

    The effect of ocean acidification and changing water conditions on primary (and secondary) marine aerosol emissions is not well understood on a regional or a global scale. To investigate this effect as well as the indirect effect on aerosol that changing biogeochemical parameters can have, ~ 52 m3 pelagic mesocosms were deployed for several weeks in the Mediterranean Sea during both winter pre-bloom and summer oligotrophic conditions and were subjected to various levels of CO2 to simulate the conditions foreseen in this region for the coming decades. After seawater sampling, primary bubble-bursting aerosol experiments were performed using a plunging water jet system to test both chemical and physical aerosol parameters (10-400 nm). Comparing results obtained during pre-bloom and oligotrophic conditions, we find the same four log-normal modal diameters (18.5 ± 0.6, 37.5 ± 1.4, 91.5 ± 2.0, 260 ± 3.2 nm) describing the aerosol size distribution during both campaigns, yet pre-bloom conditions significantly increased the number fraction of the second (Aitken) mode, with an amplitude correlated to virus-like particles, heterotrophic prokaryotes, TEPs (transparent exopolymeric particles), chlorophyll a and other pigments. Organic fractions determined from kappa closure calculations for the diameter, Dp ~ 50 nm, were much larger during the pre-bloom period (64 %) than during the oligotrophic period (38 %), and the organic fraction decreased as the particle size increased. Combining data from both campaigns together, strong positive correlations were found between the organic fraction of the aerosol and chlorophyll a concentrations, heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria abundance, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. As a consequence of the changes in the organic fraction and the size distributions between pre-bloom and oligotrophic periods, we find that the ratio of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to condensation nuclei (CN) slightly decreased during the

  16. Air ions and aerosol science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammet, H.

    1996-01-01

    Collaboration between Gas Discharge and Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Electricity, and Aerosol Science is a factor of success in the research of air ions. The concept of air ion as of any carrier of electrical current through the air is inherent to Atmospheric Electricity under which a considerable statistical information about the air ion mobility spectrum is collected. A new model of air ion size-mobility correlation has been developed proceeding from Aerosol Science and joining the methods of neighboring research fields. The predicted temperature variation of the mobility disagrees with the commonly used Langevin rule for the reduction of air ion mobilities to the standard conditions. Concurrent errors are too big to be neglected in applications. The critical diameter distinguishing cluster ions and charged aerosol particles has been estimated to be 1.4 endash 1.8 nm. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Tropospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    uncertainties by "the I-beams". Only an uncertainty range rather than a best estimate is presented for direct aerosol forcing by mineral dust and for indirect aerosol forcing. An assessment of the present level of scientific understanding is indicated at the bottom of the figure (reproduced by permission of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). The importance of atmospheric aerosols to issues of societal concern has motivated much research intended to describe their loading, distribution, and properties and to develop understanding of the controlling processes to address such issues as air pollution, acid deposition, and climate influences of aerosols. However, description based wholly on measurements will inevitably be limited in its spatial and temporal coverage and in the limited characterization of aerosol properties. These limitations are even more serious for predictions of future emissions and provide motivation for concurrent theoretical studies and development of model-based description of atmospheric aerosols.An important long-range goal, which has already been partly realized, is to develop quantitative understanding of the processes that control aerosol loading, composition, and microphysical properties as well as the resultant optical and cloud-nucleating properties. An objective is to incorporate these results into chemical transport models that can be used for predictions. Such models are required, for example, to design approaches to achieve air quality standards and to assess and predict aerosol influences on climate change. Much current research is directed toward enhancing this understanding and to evaluating it by comparison of model results and observations. However, compared to gases, models involving particles are far more complex because of the need to specify additional parameters such as particle sizes and size distributions, compositions as a function of size, particle shapes, and temporal and spatial variations, including reactions that occur

  18. Aerosolization Characteristics of Dry Powder Inhaler Formulations for the Excipient Enhanced Growth (EEG) Application: Effect of Spray Drying Process Conditions on Aerosol Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Yoen-Ju; Longest, P. Worth; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a spray dried submicrometer powder formulation suitable for the excipient enhanced growth (EEG) application. Combination particles were prepared using the Buchi Nano spray dryer B-90. A number of spray drying and formulation variables were investigated with the aims of producing dry powder formulations that were readily dispersed upon aerosolization and maximizing the fraction of submicrometer particles. Albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine, and poloxame...

  19. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  20. Developmental Screening Using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire: Standardized versus Real-World Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Antonio, Marianne C.; Fenick, Ada M.; Shabanova, Veronika; Leventhal, John M.; Weitzman, Carol C.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental screens are often used in nonstandardized conditions, such as pediatric waiting rooms, despite validation under standardized conditions. We examined the reproducibility of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ), a developmental screening instrument commonly used in pediatric practices, under standardized versus nonstandardized…

  1. 24 CFR 886.113 - Physical condition standard; physical inspection requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Physical condition standard; physical inspection requirements. 886.113 Section 886.113 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... § 886.113 Physical condition standard; physical inspection requirements. (a) General. Housing used in...

  2. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    classification. The harmonization of the aerosol typing procedures is a fundamental need in aerosol studies for long-term perspectives, satellite validation, and accuracy. However, the possibilities and limits in defining a common set of aerosol types for satellite missions and ground-based measurements depends on different information content among measurement techniques and for different retrieval conditions (e.g. for low aerosol content there is smaller satellite aerosol type retrieval sensitivity), as well as different historical choices. The concept of aReference database for aerosol typing (REDAT) is developed with the specific purpose of providing a dataset suitable for the comparison of typing procedures (from ground-based, and satellite measurements) and to be used as reference dataset for the modelling community. It will also allow the definition of translating rules between the different aerosol typing nomenclature, information strongly needed for the more and more increased audience of scientific data with no scientific background, as well as policy and decision makers. Acknowledgments: The research leading to these results is partially funded by ACTRIS2 Research Infrastructure Project by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the grant agreement n. 654169.

  3. Physical metrology of aerosols; Metrologie physique des aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulaud, D.; Vendel, J. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1996-12-31

    The various detection and measuring methods for aerosols are presented, and their selection is related to aerosol characteristics (size range, concentration or mass range), thermo-hydraulic conditions (carrier fluid temperature, pressure and flow rate) and to the measuring system conditions (measuring frequency, data collection speed, cost...). Methods based on aerosol dynamic properties (inertial, diffusional and electrical methods) and aerosol optical properties (localized and integral methods) are described and their performances and applications are compared

  4. Study on generation and granulometry of a standard aerosol of CINa for use in determinations of filtration efficiency of absolute filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milla, E.

    1978-01-01

    This work has as objective the study of the conditions of generation and granulometry of an aerosol generated by atomizing with compressed a i r a solution of CINa in water in order to obtain particles, CINa cubes. The droplets of the spray formed are dried in a stream of air, acting as a carrier, inside the pipe of a bank of test filters. The granulometric analysis has been carried out by sampling in the gaseous phase. A dispersion photometer was used that yields the size spectrum of particles. The variables concerned in generation, whose influence on aerosol granulometry were analyzed are: characteristic diameter of atomizer unit, pressure of compressed air of generation, concentration of saline solution, temperature of air carrier, length of bank pipe, sampling position across a section, length of sampling duct and ratio between speeds in pipe and duct. (Author) 50 refs

  5. Metrological certification of aerosol and iodine channels in instrumentation for radiation monitoring at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Yu.E.; Ivanova, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    The method for converting the value of a volume activity unit of radioactive aerosols using the state special standard for operating measurement devices by means of aerosol sources is suggested. The sources are aerosol samples selected for a filter by means of the proper type of a detection unit or a radiometer and, thus, providing full coincidence of measurement geometry of aerosol sample activity during radiation monitoring. Application of aerosol samples permits to solve the problem of metrological certification and verification of aerosol and iodine channels of radiation safety monitoring systems under operating conditions without their dismantling and to establish the unity and correctness in the field of measurement of volume activity of 131 I aerosols at NPP

  6. Experimental determination of the attachment coefficients of atoms and ions on monodisperse aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porstendoerfer, J.; Roebig, G.; Ahmed, A.

    1979-01-01

    The attachment coefficients of 212 Pb atoms and ions were measured for aerosols in the diameter range 0.1 to 5 μm. The attachment of the Tn-decay products to the aerosol was carried out in laminar flow through a cylindrical tube. Under the same experimental conditions (but without aerosols) the diffusion coefficient of the atoms was determined. The generation of the monodisperse di-2-ethylhexyl sebacate (DEHS) aerosol was carried out by controlled condensation of vapour upon nuclei. The aerosols had standard deviations of 3 to 5%. The aerosol size distributions and concentrations were determined by means of an aerosol size spectrometer, which measured the intensity of the scattered light from single-particles or droplets. The experimental results agree well with the values of the diffusion attachment theory based on the kinetic theory of gases with the assumption of a sticking probability of the Pb atoms, S = 1. (author)

  7. The Fate and Transport of Airborne JP-4 and JP-8 Aerosol During Cold Startup

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buckman, Bradford

    1997-01-01

    ..., the amount of fuel aerosol reaching the ground, and the times and distances necessary for the aerosol concentration to fall below the hydrocarbon standard after being emitted. Physical assumptions in the model are presented, and various atmospheric conditions are simulated for comparison.

  8. Evolution of microbial aerosol behaviour in heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems--quantification of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Penicillium oxalicum viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forthomme, A; Andrès, Y; Joubert, A; Simon, X; Duquenne, P; Bemer, D; Le Coq, L

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an experimental set-up and a methodology to uniformly contaminate several filter samples with high concentrations of cultivable bacteria and fungi. An experimental set-up allows contaminating simultaneously up to four filters for range of velocities representative of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems. The test aerosol was composed of a microbial consortium of one bacterium (Staphylococcus epidermidis) and one fungus (Penicillium oxalicum) and aerosol generation was performed in wet conditions. Firstly, the experimental set-up was validated in regards to homogeneity of the air flows. The bioaerosol was also characterized in terms of number and particle size distribution using two particle counters: optical particle counter Grimm 1.109 (optical diameters) and TSI APS 3321 (aerodynamic diameters). Moreover, stabilities of the number of particles generated were measured. Finally, concentrations of cultivable microorganisms were measured with BioSamplers (SKC) downstream of the four filters.

  9. Long term measurements of submicrometer urban aerosols: statistical analysis for correlations with meteorological conditions and trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wehner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term measurements (over 4 years of particle number size distributions (submicrometer particles, 3-800 nm in diameter, trace gases (NO, NO2, and O3, and meteorological parameters (global radiation, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, etc. were taken in a moderately polluted site in the city of Leipzig (Germany. The resulting complex data set was analyzed with respect to seasonal, weekly, and diurnal variation of the submicrometer aerosol. Car traffic produced a peak in the number size distribution at around 20 nm particle diameter during morning rush hour on weekdays. A second peak at 10-15 nm particle diameter occurred around noon during summer, confirmed by high correlation between concentration of particles less than 20 nm and the global radiation. This new-particle formation at noon was correlated with the amount of global radiation. A high concentration of accumulation mode particles (between 100 and 800 nm, which are associated with large particle-surface area, might prevent this formation. Such high particle concentration in the ultrafine region (particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter was not detected in the particle mass, and thus, particle mass concentration is not suitable for determining the diurnal patterns of particles. In summer, statistical time series analysis showed a cyclic pattern of ultrafine particles with a period of one day and confirmed the correlation with global radiation. Principal component analysis (PCA revealed a strong correlation between the particle concentration for 20-800 nm particles and the NO- and NO2-concentrations, indicating the influence of combustion processes on this broad size range, in particular during winter. In addition, PCA also revealed that particle concentration depended on meteorological conditions such as wind speed and wind direction, although the dependence differed with particle size class.

  10. Russian standards and design practice of ensuring NPP reliability under severe external loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birbraer, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Russian Standards and design practice of ensuring NPP reliability under severe external loading conditions are described. The main attention is paid to the seismic design requirements. Explosions, aircraft impact, and tornado are briefly examined too (author)

  11. Some environmental considerations relating to the interaction of the solid rocket motor exhaust with the atmosphere: Predicted chemical composition of exhaust species and predicted conditions for the formation of HCl aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The exhaust products of a solid rocket motor using as propellant 14% binder, 16% aluminum, and 70% (wt) ammonium perchlorate consist of hydrogen chloride, water, alumina, and other compounds. The equilibrium and some frozen compositions of the chemical species upon interaction with the atmosphere were computed. The conditions under which hydrogen chloride interacts with the water vapor in humid air to form an aerosol containing hydrochloric acid were computed for various weight ratios of air/exhaust products. These computations were also performed for the case of a combined SRM and hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine. Regimes of temperature and relative humidity where this aerosol is expected were identified. Within these regimes, the concentration of HCL in the aerosol and weight fraction of aerosol to gas phase were plotted. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation was found to be particularly likely in cool humid weather.

  12. Final Report: Part 1. In-Place Filter Testing Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers. Part 2. Canister Filter Test Standards for Aerosol Capture Rates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Austin Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Runnels, Joel T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-02

    A portable instrument has been developed to assess the functionality of filter sand o-rings on nuclear material storage canisters, without requiring removal of the canister lid. Additionally, a set of fifteen filter standards were procured for verifying aerosol leakage and pressure drop measurements in the Los Alamos Filter Test System. The US Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for storing nuclear material in different chemical and physical forms. Specialized filters are installed into canister lids to allow gases to escape, and to maintain an internal ambient pressure while containing radioactive contaminants. Diagnosing the condition of container filters and canister integrity is important to ensure worker and public safety and for determining the handling requirements of legacy apparatus. This report describes the In-Place-Filter-Tester, the Instrument Development Plan and the Instrument Operating Method that were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the “as found” condition of unopened storage canisters. The Instrument Operating Method provides instructions for future evaluations of as-found canisters packaged with nuclear material. Customized stainless steel canister interfaces were developed for pressure-port access and to apply a suction clamping force for the interface. These are compatible with selected Hagan-style and SAVY-4000 storage canisters that were purchased from NFT (Nuclear Filter Technology, Golden, CO). Two instruments were developed for this effort: an initial Los Alamos POC (Proof-of-Concept) unit and the final Los Alamos IPFT system. The Los Alamos POC was used to create the Instrument Development Plan: (1) to determine the air flow and pressure characteristics associated with canister filter clogging, and (2) to test simulated configurations that mimicked canister leakage paths. The canister leakage scenarios included quantifying: (A) air leakage due to foreign material (i.e. dust and hair

  13. Aerosol scrubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Submerged Gravel Scrubber is an air cleaning system developed by the Department of Energy's Liquid Metal Reactor Program. The Scrubber System has been patented by the Department of Energy. This technology is being transferred to industry by the DOE. Its basic principles can be adapted for individual applications and the commercialized version can be used to perform a variety of tasks. The gas to be cleaned is percolated through a continuously washed gravel bed. The passage of the gas through the gravel breaks the stream into many small bubbles rising in a turbulent body of water. These conditions allow very highly efficient removal of aerosols from the gas

  14. Quantification of marine aerosol subgrid variability and its correlation with clouds based on high-resolution regional modeling: Quantifying Aerosol Subgrid Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Guangxing; Qian, Yun; Yan, Huiping; Zhao, Chun; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Zhang, Kai

    2017-06-16

    One limitation of most global climate models (GCMs) is that with the horizontal resolutions they typically employ, they cannot resolve the subgrid variability (SGV) of clouds and aerosols, adding extra uncertainties to the aerosol radiative forcing estimation. To inform the development of an aerosol subgrid variability parameterization, here we analyze the aerosol SGV over the southern Pacific Ocean simulated by the high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled to Chemistry. We find that within a typical GCM grid, the aerosol mass subgrid standard deviation is 15% of the grid-box mean mass near the surface on a 1 month mean basis. The fraction can increase to 50% in the free troposphere. The relationships between the sea-salt mass concentration, meteorological variables, and sea-salt emission rate are investigated in both the clear and cloudy portion. Under clear-sky conditions, marine aerosol subgrid standard deviation is highly correlated with the standard deviations of vertical velocity, cloud water mixing ratio, and sea-salt emission rates near the surface. It is also strongly connected to the grid box mean aerosol in the free troposphere (between 2 km and 4 km). In the cloudy area, interstitial sea-salt aerosol mass concentrations are smaller, but higher correlation is found between the subgrid standard deviations of aerosol mass and vertical velocity. Additionally, we find that decreasing the model grid resolution can reduce the marine aerosol SGV but strengthen the correlations between the aerosol SGV and the total water mixing ratio (sum of water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud ice mixing ratios).

  15. The SPARC Aerosol Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, P.; Thomason, L. W.; Peter, T.

    2002-05-01

    Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate (SPARC), a project of the WMO/ICSU/IOC World Climate Research Programme, was responsible for the recent SPARC Assessment of Upper Tropospheric and Stratospheric Water Vapour. SPARC has now decided to generate an analogous document for the stratospheric aerosol, using many of the measurements that have been developed in the last twenty years, but relying heavily on the SAGE II data set. The stratospheric aerosol assessment involves a large international collection of atmospheric scientists whose special area of expertise is the stratospheric aerosol. Key questions that have been identified as requiring answers include: How have aerosol properties such as surface area density varied with time? How representative are satellite-based climatologies? What is the non-volcanic bacground for stratospheric aerosol and can a trend in it be detected? How well can models reproduce observed aerosol properties? We report on the ``kickoff" workshop that was held at the CNES headquarters in Paris on November 4-6, 2001. We shall describe some of the interesting results that were based on the SAGE II data set. The assessment will be carried out by five working groups each focussing on one of the following aspects: processes, aerosol precursors, climatology, trends and modeling. The long records from SAGE II, HALOE and other space based instruments will play a prominent role in construction of a climatology. It is expected that a valuable result of this assessment will be a set of ``standard" stratospheric aerosol parameters for use by modelers.

  16. Environmental release of engineered nanomaterials from commercial tiles under standardized abrasion conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressot, Christophe; Manier, Nicolas; Pagnoux, Cécile; Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier; Morgeneyer, Martin

    2017-01-15

    The study presented here focuses on commercial antibacterial tiles whose emissivity of (nano) particles due to abrasion has yet barely been investigated. The tiles have been characterized regarding their surface properties and composition throughout their chain-of-use, i.e. from their state of commercialization until the experimental end-of-service life. In contrast to plane standard tiles, their surfaces form hilly surfaces. In the depressions, titanium dioxide is found at the surface, thus theoretically protected by the hilly areas against abrasion on the tile's surface. Furthermore, a deposition technique has been put in place by producers allowing for coating the before mentioned commercial tiles with titanium dioxide, thus being similar to those commercially available. It consists in depositing titanium dioxide on the surface, latter one allowing fixing the first. This development allows for better understanding the future options for product formulation and thus improvement with respect to particle release. The tests reveal the aerosolization from commercial antibacterial tiles of micronic and submicronic particles in the inhalable region or particles that can subjected to be released in the environment (tiles was found to be significantly higher compared to the non coated tiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Powder aerosol delivery through nasal high-flow system: In vitro feasibility and influence of process conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Tomoyuki; Tang, Patricia; Yu, Jiaqi; Finlay, Warren H; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-11-25

    We aimed to obtain fundamental information for potential pulmonary delivery of powder aerosols using a clinically-approved nasal high-flow system (AIRVO), with spray-dried mannitol (SD-Man) being a model powder. Compressed air exiting the AIRVO at set 'dispersion' air flow rates dispersed SD-Man loaded in an Osmohaler ® into a human nasal airway replica (NAR) coupled downstream to a Next Generation Impactor (NGI) running at specific 'inspiratory' flow rates. Increasing the dispersion flow rate from 30 to 60L/min increased powder deposition in the NAR from 50 to 70% of the emitted dose, while decreased the NGI deposition from 50 to 30% of the emitted dose. The inspiratory flow rate did not affect powder deposition in the NAR and NGI. In contrast, as the inspiratory flow rate was increased from 15 to 40L/min, powder recovery, emitted fraction, and fine particle fraction below 5μm (as aerosol performance indices) were increased from 90, 30 and 5% to 97, 45 and 8% of the loaded dose, respectively. The dispersion flow rate did not change the performance indices. Importantly, heating and humidification of dispersion airflow, loaded doses, and nasal cannula sizes did not greatly affect the aerosol characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. X-Ray Microspectroscopic Investigations of Remote Aerosol Composition and Changes in Aerosol Microstructure and Phase State upon Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.; Bechtel, M.; Förster, J. D.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Krüger, M. L.; Pöhlker, C.; Saturno, J.; Weigand, M.; Wiedemann, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in the Earth's climate system and hydrological cycle by scattering and absorbing sunlight and affecting the formation and development of clouds and precipitation. Our research focuses on aerosols in remote regions, in order to characterize the properties and sources of natural aerosol particles and the extent of human perturbations of the aerosol burden. The phase and mixing state of atmospheric aerosols, and particularly their hygroscopic response to relative humidity (RH) variations, is a central determinant of their atmospheric life cycle and impacts. We present an investigation using X-ray microspectroscopy on submicrometer aerosols under variable RH conditions, showing in situ changes in morphology, microstructure, and phase state upon humidity cycling. We applied Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy with Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) under variable RH conditions to standard aerosols for a validation of the experimental approach and to internally mixed aerosol particles from the Amazonian rain forest collected during periods with anthropogenic pollution. The measurements were conducted at X-ray microscopes at the synchrotron facilities Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley, USA, and BESSY II in Berlin, Germany. Upon hydration, we observed substantial and reproducible changes in microstructure of the Amazonian particles (internal mixture of secondary organic material, ammoniated sulfate, and soot), which appear as mainly driven by efflorescence and recrystallization of sulfate salts. Multiple solid and liquid phases were found to coexist, especially in intermediate humidity regimes (60-80% RH). This shows that X-ray microspectroscopy under variable RH is a valuable technique to analyze the hygroscopic response of individual ambient aerosol particles. Our initial results underline that RH changes can trigger strong particle restructuring, in agreement with previous studies on

  19. Responses in young Quercus petraea: coppices and standards under favourable and drought conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stojanović, Marko; Čater, M.; Pokorný, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 76, jan (2016), s. 127-136 ISSN 1641-1307 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0267 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : coppice * standards * comparison * photosynthetic response * quantum yield * light conditions * drought response Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.776, year: 2016

  20. Organic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN

  1. Radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radon. Fission product aerosols. Radioiodine. Tritium. Plutonium. Mass transfer of radioactive vapours and aerosols. Studies with radioactive particles and human subjects. Index. This paper explores the environmental and health aspects of radioactive aerosols. Covers radioactive nuclides of potential concern to public health and applications to the study of boundary layer transport. Contains bibliographic references. Suitable for environmental chemistry collections in academic and research libraries

  2. Aerosol Sampling Bias from Differential Electrostatic Charge and Particle Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayjock, Michael Anthony

    Lack of reliable epidemiological data on long term health effects of aerosols is due in part to inadequacy of sampling procedures and the attendant doubt regarding the validity of the concentrations measured. Differential particle size has been widely accepted and studied as a major potential biasing effect in the sampling of such aerosols. However, relatively little has been done to study the effect of electrostatic particle charge on aerosol sampling. The objective of this research was to investigate the possible biasing effects of differential electrostatic charge, particle size and their interaction on the sampling accuracy of standard aerosol measuring methodologies. Field studies were first conducted to determine the levels and variability of aerosol particle size and charge at two manufacturing facilities making acrylic powder. The field work showed that the particle mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) varied by almost an order of magnitude (4-34 microns) while the aerosol surface charge was relatively stable (0.6-0.9 micro coulombs/m('2)). The second part of this work was a series of laboratory experiments in which aerosol charge and MMAD were manipulated in a 2('n) factorial design with the percentage of sampling bias for various standard methodologies as the dependent variable. The experiments used the same friable acrylic powder studied in the field work plus two size populations of ground quartz as a nonfriable control. Despite some ill conditioning of the independent variables due to experimental difficulties, statistical analysis has shown aerosol charge (at levels comparable to those measured in workroom air) is capable of having a significant biasing effect. Physical models consistent with the sampling data indicate that the level and bipolarity of the aerosol charge are determining factors in the extent and direction of the bias.

  3. In-situ studies on volatile jet exhaust particle emissions - impacts of fuel sulfur content and environmental conditions on nuclei-mode aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, F.; Baumann, R.; Petzold, A.; Busen, R.; Schulte, P.; Fiebig, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Brock, C.A. [Denver Univ., CO (United States). Dept. of Engineering

    2000-02-01

    In-situ measurements of ultrafine aerosol particle emissions were performed at cruise altitudes behind the DLR ATTAS research jet (RR M45H M501 engines) and a B737-300 aircraft (CFM56-3B1 engines). Measurements were made 0.15-20 seconds after emission as the source aircraft burned fuel with sulfur contents (FSC) of 2.6, 56 or 118 mg kg{sup -1}. Particle size distributions of from 3 to 60 nm diameter were determined using CN-counters with varying lower size detection limits. Volatile particle concentrations in the aircraft plumes strongly increased as diameter decreased toward the sizes of large molecular clusters, illustrating that apparent particle emissions are extremely sensitive to the smallest particle size detectable by the instrument used. Environmental conditions and plume age alone could influence the number of detected ultrafine (volatile) aerosols within an order of magnitude, as well. The observed volatile particle emissions decreased nonlinearly as FSC decreased to 60 mg kg{sup -1}, reaching minimum values of about 2 x 10{sup 17} kg{sup -1} and 2 x 10{sup 16} kg{sup -1} for particles >3 nm and >5 nm, respectively. Volatile particle emissions did not change significantly as FSCs were further reduced below 60 mg kg{sup -1}. Volatile particle emissions did not differ significantly between the two studied engine types. In contrast, soot particle emissions from the modern CFM56-3B1 engines were 4-5 times less (4 x 10{sup 14} kg{sup -1}) than from the older RR M45H M501 engines (1.8 x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1}). Contrail processing has been identified as an efficient sink/quenching parameter for ultrafine particles and reduces the remaining interstitial aerosol by factors 2-10 depending on particle size.

  4. Welfare and biosecurity standards for dairy cow and pig farms: Cattle and swine rearing conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristov Slavča

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the essential elements concerning cattle and swine rearing and growing conditions were given in order to establish welfare and biosecurity standards. These elements were formed according to detailed annual investigations on 11 cattle and 5 swine farms and include relevant spatial, microclimate and hygienic conditions. In order to establish welfare standards, certain spatial conditions have higher importance, such as correct construction and maintenance of beds, pens and yards, and type and quality of materials used to build beds and walls. It is necessary to enable movement of animals in stables and yards as basic physiological and ethologic needs, according to latest scientific data. Also, optimal temperature, relative humidity and air velocity insuring have to be considered, as well as quality ventilation in order to establish and preserve optimal microclimate conditions. Also, it must be pointed out that hygiene maintenance of stable surfaces and animal bodies on a regular bases is essential. Basic principles and criteria for welfare level assessment are given in this paper. According to results obtained in previous investigations, special attention is given to possibilities to correct rearing and growing conditions in cattle and swine farms in our country. .

  5. Planck scale boundary conditions in the standard model with singlet scalar dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haba, Naoyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan); Kaneta, Kunio [Kavli IPMU (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, Ryo [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    We investigate Planck scale boundary conditions on the Higgs sector of the standard model with a gauge singlet scalar dark matter. We will find that vanishing self-coupling and Veltman condition at the Planck scale are realized with the 126 GeV Higgs mass and top pole mass, 172 GeV≲M{sub t}≲173.5 GeV, where a correct abundance of scalar dark matter is obtained with mass of 300 GeV≲m{sub S}≲1 TeV. It means that the Higgs potential is flat at the Planck scale, and this situation can not be realized in the standard model with the top pole mass.

  6. Quantum Hall resistance standard in graphene devices under relaxed experimental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopfer, F.; Ribeiro-Palau, R.; Lafont, F.; Brun-Picard, J.; Kazazis, D.; Michon, A.; Cheynis, F.; Couturaud, O.; Consejo, C.; Jouault, B.; Poirier, W.

    Large-area and high-quality graphene devices synthesized by CVD on SiC are used to develop reliable electrical resistance standards, based on the quantum Hall effect (QHE), with state-of-the-art accuracy of 1x10-9 and under an extended range of experimental conditions of magnetic field (down to 3.5 T), temperature (up to 10 K) or current (up to 0.5 mA). These conditions are much relaxed as compared to what is required by GaAs/AlGaAs standards and will enable to broaden the use of the primary quantum electrical standards to the benefit of Science and Industry for electrical measurements. Furthermore, by comparison of these graphene devices with GaAs/AlGaAs standards, we demonstrate the universality of the QHE within an ultimate uncertainty of 8.2x10-11. This suggests the exact relation of the quantized Hall resistance with the Planck constant and the electron charge, which is crucial for the new SI to be based on fixing such fundamental constants. These results show that graphene realizes its promises and demonstrates its superiority over other materials for a demanding application. Nature Nanotech. 10, 965-971, 2015, Nature Commun. 6, 6806, 2015

  7. Time-scale analysis of marine boundary layer aerosol evolution: Lagrangian case studies under clean and polluted cloudy conditions[Special issue with manuscripts related to the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), 16 June-25 July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoell, Claudia; O' Dowd, Colin [Sunderland Univ. (United Kingdom). Centre for Marine and Atmospheric Sciences; Osborne, Simon; Johnson, Doug [Defence Evaluation and Research Agency, Farnborough (United Kingdom). Met. Research Flight

    2000-04-01

    Significant changes were observed in the sub-micron aerosol size distribution during a clean and a polluted Lagrangian study of marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol and meteorological evolution during ACE-2. These changes were accompanied by significant alterations in boundary layer meteorology and structure. The clean case (LAG1) shows a reduction in the fine mode aerosol from 1050 to 750 cm{sup -3} and an increase in the accumulation mode concentration from 76 to 162 cm{sup -3} over 26 h. Dominant meteorological features during the same period comprised a reduction in boundary layer height from {approx} 1500 m to {approx} 800 m and an increase in the surface layer wind speed from 5 m s{sup -1} to 15 m s{sup -1}. A detailed time-scale analysis, based upon measured data and including processes such as coagulation, condensation, deposition, chemical processing, sea-salt flux and entrainment, suggests that the dominant loss process for fine mode aerosol is coagulation, while the enhancement of accumulation mode aerosol can be almost totally ascribed to enhanced sea-salt aerosol flux into the reduced mixed layer volume. Aerosol size distributions from the polluted Lagrangian (LAG2) indicated little growth in particle diameter, and both fine and accumulation mode were observed to decrease in concentration from 2700 to 1150 cm{sup -3} and from 670 to 430 cm{sup -3} in 26h, respectively. Dilution with cleaner free tropospheric air as the boundary layer height increased from {approx} 500 m to > 1000 m is suggested to be the primary factor relating to reduced aerosol concentrations in this case. To a smaller extent, coagulation and precipitation scavenging were calculated to be of some importance. For both Lagrangian case studies, meteorological changes, followed by physical aerosol-cloud interactions, appear to have the greatest influence on the MBL aerosol size distribution and number concentration over the given time-scale.

  8. Aerosol Hygroscopicity Measured in Pristine and Polluted Conditions During the First Year of the GoAmazon 2014/15 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, H. M.; Krüger, M. L.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Pauliquevis, T.; Brito, J.; Poeschl, U.; Andreae, M. O.; Martin, S. T.; Artaxo, P.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of aerosol particles on cloud microphysical properties, cloud cover, precipitation, and regional climate are an important aspect of the climate system. The Amazon region is particularly susceptible to changes in number-diameter distributions of the atmospheric particle population because of the low background concentrations and high water vapor levels, indicating a regime of cloud properties that is highly sensitive to aerosol microphysics. This natural regime, different from most other continental areas worldwide, is expected to be perturbed by the interaction of the Manaus urban plume with the natural the natural environment. Studying the effects of this interaction on the cloud and aerosol life cycle is the main objective of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) campaign taking place around Manaus-Brazil from January 2014 to December 2015. In this paper we compare the particle hygroscopicity calculated from measurements of size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei performed at three ground sites during the first year of the GoAmazon 2014/15 experiment. Site T3 is about 70 km downwind from Manaus experiencing urban polluted and background conditions; site T2 is just across the Rio Negro from Manaus and CCN measurements were performed there only from 15 August 2014 to 30 Jan 2015; and T0, at the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO), is a pristine site about 200 km upwind from Manaus. Our results indicate a lower hygroscopicity under polluted conditions (mean kappa values around 0.14 to 0.16) than under clean conditions (mean kappa around 0.2 to 0.3). At the clean site, it was possible to identify peaks of large sea salt particles with organic coating, while small particles seems to be purely organic. The activation fraction and hygroscopicity will be compared and discussed as a function of particle size. The mean kappa at ATTO is 0.17+-0.05 (mean of June and September) when there is no impact from long range transport from Africa or fresh soot emissions

  9. Facilitated acquisition of standard but not long delay classical eyeblink conditioning in behaviorally inhibited adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, M D; VanMeenen, K M; Servatius, R J

    2015-02-01

    Adolescence is a key age in the development of anxiety disorders. The present study assessed the relationship between behavioral inhibition, a risk factor for anxiety typified by avoidance, and acquisition of the classically conditioned eyeblink response. 168 healthy high school students (mean age 15.7 years, 54% female) were given a battery of self-report measures including the Adult Measure of Behavioural Inhibition (AMBI). The study compared acquisition of three experimental training conditions. Two groups were given paired CS-US training: standard delay of 500-ms or long delay of 1000-ms with CS overlapping and co-terminating with a 50-ms airpuff US. A third group received unpaired training of 1000-ms CS and 50-ms airpuff US. Inhibited individuals showed greater acquisition of the conditioned eyeblink response in the 500-ms CS condition, but not in the paired 1000-ms condition. No differences in spontaneous blinks or reactivity to the stimulus were evident in the 1000-ms unpaired CS condition. Results support a relationship between associative learning and anxiety vulnerability that may be mediated by cerebellar functioning in inhibited individuals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [The requirements of standard and conditions of interchangeability of medical articles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V V; Lukicheva, T I

    2013-11-01

    The article deals with possibility to apply specific approaches under evaluation of interchangeability of medical articles for laboratory analysis. The development of standardized analytical technologies of laboratory medicine and formulation of requirements of standards addressed to manufacturers of medical articles the clinically validated requirements are to be followed. These requirements include sensitivity and specificity of techniques, accuracy and precision of research results, stability of reagents' quality in particular conditions of their transportation and storage. The validity of requirements formulated in standards and addressed to manufacturers of medical articles can be proved using reference system, which includes master forms and standard samples, reference techniques and reference laboratories. This approach is supported by data of evaluation of testing systems for measurement of level of thyrotrophic hormone, thyroid hormones and glycated hemoglobin HB A1c. The versions of testing systems can be considered as interchangeable only in case of results corresponding to the results of reference technique and comparable with them. In case of absence of functioning reference system the possibilities of the Joined committee of traceability in laboratory medicine make it possible for manufacturers of reagent sets to apply the certified reference materials under development of manufacturing of sets for large listing of analytes.

  11. Reconstruction of Aerosol Concentration and Composition from Glacier Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alexander; Dällenbach, Kaspar; El-Haddad, Imad; Wendl, Isabel; Eichler, Anja; Schwikowski, Margit

    2017-04-01

    Reconstruction of the concentration and composition of natural aerosol in an undisturbed atmosphere enables the evaluation of the understanding of aerosol-climate effects, which is currently based on highly uncertain emission inventories of the biosphere under pre-industrial conditions. Understanding of the natural state of the pre-industrial atmosphere and evaluating the atmospheric perturbations by anthropogenic emissions, and their potential feedbacks, is essential for accurate model predictions of the future climate (Boucher et al., 2013). Here, we present a new approach for the chemical characterization of the organic fraction preserved in cold-glacier ice cores. From this analysis historic trends of atmospheric organic aerosols are reconstructed, allowing new insights on organic aerosol composition and mass in the pre-industrial atmosphere, which can help to improve climate models through evaluation of our current understanding of aerosol radiative effects. We present results from a proof-of-principal study, analyzing an 800 year ice core record from the Lomonosovfonna glacier ice core, drilled in 2009 in Svalbard, Norway, using a setup that has until then only been applied on offline measurements of aerosol filter extracts (Dällenbach et al., 2016): The melted ice was nebulized and dried, such that aerosols are formed from the soluble and insoluble organic and inorganic compounds that are preserved in the ice. To improve the sensitivity, the aerosol stream was then enriched by the application of an online aerosol concentrator, before the aerosol was analyzed by electron ionization within a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). We were able to demonstrate that this setup is a quantitative method toward nitrate and sulfate when internal inorganic standards of NH415NO3 and (NH4)234SO4 are added to the sample. Comparison between AMS and IC measurements of nitrate and sulfate resulted in an excellent agreement. The analysis of

  12. The properties and behavior of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol particles exposed to ammonia under dry conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, David M.; Imre, D.; Martin, Scot T.; Zelenyuk-Imre, Alla

    2017-01-01

    Chemical transformations and aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles can alter their physical and chemical properties, including particle morphology. Ammonia, one of the common atmospheric reactive constituents, can react with SOA particles, changing their properties and behavior. At low relative humidity NH3 uptake by α-pinene SOA particles appears to be limited to the particle surface, which suggests that the reacted particles might not be homogeneous and have complex morphology. Here, we present a study aimed at detailed characterization of the effect of ammonia on the composition, density, morphology, shape, and evaporation kinetics of α-pinene SOA particles. We find that a small amount of NH3 diffuses and reacts throughout the particles bulk, while most of the ammoniated products result from the reaction of NH3 with carboxylic acids on the particle surface, leading to a slight increase in particle size. We show that the reaction products form a solid semi-volatile coating that is a few nanometers thick. This solid coating prevents coagulating particles from coalescing for over two days. However, when the gas phase is diluted this semi-volatile coating evaporates in minutes, which is ensued by rapid coalescence. The ammoniated products in the particle bulk affect particles evaporation kinetics, more so for the smaller particles that contain higher fraction of ammoniated products.

  13. Synthesis of Ti Oxides at Reducing Conditions: Implications for Beamline Standards and Cosmochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K. A.; Butterworth, A. L.; Gainsforth, Z.; Jilly-Rehak, C. E.; Westphal, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    These initial experiments demonstrate the great potential for synthesizing customized compounds for use as standards, or in buffering experiments at reducing conditions. We are also investigating Cr and V oxides, as well as compounds containing these elements such as FeV2O4 and FeCr2O4. Oxygen fugacity exerts a major control on mineral major element chemistry and elemental valence of minerals in any plane-tary compositional system [1]. For Earth, Fe is multivalent ranging from nearly Fe0 at low fO2 in the deep mantle to Fe2+ to Fe3+ at high low fO2. For solar nebular and meteoritic materials fO2 ranges from near IW to 10 log fO2 units below the IW buffer [1]. Phases in CAIs, for example, contain no Fe2+, but may contain Ti4+, Ti3+, or Ti2+, and Cr3+ or Cr2+, and V3+ or V2+ [1,2,3]. De-tailed study of inclusions may reveal important differences in fO2 thus reflecting different environments in the solar nebula [4]. XANES, FEG-SEM, and TEM can reveal such variations in micro and nano samples such as Stardust and cosmic dust particles [5], but successful application to reduced conditions depends upon the availability of well characterized standards. Acquiring appropriate standards for reduced phases that contain Ti3+ or Ti2+, Cr3+ or Cr2+, and V3+ or V2+ can be a challenge. Here we report our preliminary results at synthesizing reduced Ti bearing standards, and focus on the preliminary characterization.

  14. Practical issues for testing thin film PV modules at standard test conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Marín González, Omar; Raga Arroyo, Manuela Pilar; Alonso Garcia, M. Carmen; Muñoz-García, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    Thin film photovoltaic (TF) modules have gained importance in the photovoltaic (PV) market. New PV plants increasingly use TF technologies. In order to have a reliable sample of a PV module population, a huge number of modules must be measured. There is a big variety of materials used in TF technology. Some of these modules are made of amorphous or microcrystalline silicon. Other are made of CIS or CdTe. Not all these materials respond the same under standard test conditions (STC) of power...

  15. Life quality and living standards in big cities under conditions of high-rise construction development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeeva, Elena; Averina, Tatiana; Kochetova, Larisa

    2018-03-01

    Modern urbanization processes occurring on a global scale inevitably lead to an increase in population density in large cities. People assess the state of life quality and living standards of megalopolises under conditions of high-rise construction development ambiguously. Using SWOT analysis, the authors distinguished positive and negative aspects of high-rise construction, highlighted threats to its development and its opportunities. The article considers the model of development of the city's industry and infrastructure, which enables determining the optimal volume of production by sectors and branches of city economy in order to increase its innovative, production and economic potential and business activity.

  16. Aerosol characterization during project POLINAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, D.E.; Hopkins, A.R.; Paladino, J.D.; Whitefield, P.D. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States). Cloud and Aerosol Sciences Lab.; Lilenfeld, H.V. [McDonnell Douglas Aerospace-East, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of the aerosol/particulate characterization measurements of project POLINAT (POLlution from aircraft emissions In the North ATlantic flight corridor) are: to search for aerosol/particulate signatures of air traffic emissions in the region of the North Atlantic Flight Corridor; to search for the aerosol/particulate component of large scale enhancement (`corridor effects`) of air traffic related species in the North Atlantic region; to determine the effective emission indices for the aerosol/particulate component of engine exhaust in both the near and far field of aircraft exhaust plumes; to measure the dispersion and transformation of the aerosol/particulate component of aircraft emissions as a function of ambient condition; to characterize background levels of aerosol/particulate concentrations in the North Atlantic Region; and to determine effective emission indices for engine exhaust particulates for regimes beyond the jet phase of plume expansion. (author) 10 refs.

  17. A Comparison of Three Methods for Computing Scale Score Conditional Standard Errors of Measurement. ACT Research Report Series, 2013 (7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, David; Traynor, Anne; Cui, Zhongmin; Fang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Professional standards for educational testing recommend that both the overall standard error of measurement and the conditional standard error of measurement (CSEM) be computed on the score scale used to report scores to examinees. Several methods have been developed to compute scale score CSEMs. This paper compares three methods, based on…

  18. New normative standards of conditional reasoning and the dual-source model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singmann, Henrik; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Over, David

    2014-01-01

    There has been a major shift in research on human reasoning toward Bayesian and probabilistic approaches, which has been called a new paradigm. The new paradigm sees most everyday and scientific reasoning as taking place in a context of uncertainty, and inference is from uncertain beliefs and not from arbitrary assumptions. In this manuscript we present an empirical test of normative standards in the new paradigm using a novel probabilized conditional reasoning task. Our results indicated that for everyday conditional with at least a weak causal connection between antecedent and consequent only the conditional probability of the consequent given antecedent contributes unique variance to predicting the probability of conditional, but not the probability of the conjunction, nor the probability of the material conditional. Regarding normative accounts of reasoning, we found significant evidence that participants' responses were confidence preserving (i.e., p-valid in the sense of Adams, 1998) for MP inferences, but not for MT inferences. Additionally, only for MP inferences and to a lesser degree for DA inferences did the rate of responses inside the coherence intervals defined by mental probability logic (Pfeifer and Kleiter, 2005, 2010) exceed chance levels. In contrast to the normative accounts, the dual-source model (Klauer et al., 2010) is a descriptive model. It posits that participants integrate their background knowledge (i.e., the type of information primary to the normative approaches) and their subjective probability that a conclusion is seen as warranted based on its logical form. Model fits showed that the dual-source model, which employed participants' responses to a deductive task with abstract contents to estimate the form-based component, provided as good an account of the data as a model that solely used data from the probabilized conditional reasoning task.

  19. New Normative Standards of Conditional Reasoning and the Dual-Source Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik eSingmann

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There has been a major shift in research on human reasoning towards Bayesian and probabilistic approaches, which has been called a new paradigm. The new paradigm sees most everyday and scientific reasoning as taking place in a context of uncertainty, and inference is from uncertain beliefs and not from arbitrary assumptions. In this manuscript we present an empirical test of normative standards in the new paradigm using a novel probabilized conditional reasoning task. Our results indicated that for everyday conditional with at least a weak causal connection between antecedent and consequent only the conditional probability of the consequent given antecedent contributes unique variance to predicting the probability of conditional, but not the probability of the conjunction, nor the probability of the material conditional. Regarding normative accounts of reasoning, we found significant evidence that participants' responses were confidence preserving (i.e., p-valid in the sense of Adams, 1998 for MP inferences, but not for MT inferences. Additionally, only for MP inferences and to a lesser degree for DA inferences did the rate of responses inside the coherence intervals defined by mental probability logic (Pfeifer & Kleiter, 2005, 2010 exceed chance levels. In contrast to the normative accounts, the dual-source model (Klauer, Beller, & Hütter, 2010 is a descriptive model. It posits that participants integrate their background knowledge (i.e., the type of information primary to the normative approaches and their subjective probability that a conclusion is seen as warranted based on its logical form. Model fits showed that the dual-source model, which employed participants' responses to a deductive task with abstract contents to estimate the form-based component, provided as good an account of the data as a model that solely used data from the probabilized conditional reasoning task.

  20. Sampling port for real time analysis of bioaerosol in whole body exposure system for animal aerosol model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Divey; Hopkins, Gregory W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Click, Eva M.; Lee, Sunhee; Hartings, Justin M.; Frothingham, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Multiple factors influence the viability of aerosolized bacteria. The delivery of aerosols is affected by chamber conditions (humidity, temperature, and pressure) and bioaerosol characteristics (particle number, particle size distribution, and viable aerosol concentration). Measurement of viable aerosol concentration and particle size is essential to optimize viability and lung delivery. The Madison chamber is widely used to expose small animals to infectious aerosols. Methods A multiplex sampling port was added to the Madison chamber to measure the chamber conditions and bioaerosol characteristics. Aerosols of three pathogens (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis) were generated under constant conditions and their bioaerosol characteristics were analyzed. Airborne microbes were captured using an impinger or BioSampler. The particle size distribution of airborne microbes was determined using an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Viable aerosol concentration, spray factor (viable aerosol concentration/inoculum concentration), and dose presented to the mouse were calculated. Dose retention efficiency and viable aerosol retention rate were calculated from the sampler titers to determine the efficiency of microbe retention in lungs of mice. Results B. anthracis, Y. pestis, and M. tuberculosis aerosols were sampled through the port. The count mean aerodynamic sizes were 0.98, 0.77, and 0.78 μm with geometric standard deviations of 1.60, 1.90, and 2.37, and viable aerosol concentrations in the chamber were 211, 57, and 1 colony-forming unit (CFU)/mL, respectively. Based on the aerosol concentrations, the doses presented to mice for the three pathogens were 2.5e5, 2.2e4 and 464 CFU. Discussion Using the multiplex sampling port we determined whether the animals were challenged with an optimum bioaerosol based on dose presented and respirable particle size. PMID:20849964

  1. Sampling port for real-time analysis of bioaerosol in whole body exposure system for animal aerosol model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Divey; Hopkins, Gregory W; Chen, Ching-Ju; Seay, Sarah A; Click, Eva M; Lee, Sunhee; Hartings, Justin M; Frothingham, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors influence the viability of aerosolized bacteria. The delivery of aerosols is affected by chamber conditions (humidity, temperature, and pressure) and bioaerosol characteristics (particle number, particle size distribution, and viable aerosol concentration). Measurement of viable aerosol concentration and particle size is essential to optimize viability and lung delivery. The Madison chamber is widely used to expose small animals to infectious aerosols. A multiplex sampling port was added to the Madison chamber to measure the chamber conditions and bioaerosol characteristics. Aerosols of three pathogens (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis) were generated under constant conditions and their bioaerosol characteristics were analyzed. Airborne microbes were captured using an impinger or BioSampler. The particle size distribution of airborne microbes was determined using an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Viable aerosol concentration, spray factor (viable aerosol concentration/inoculum concentration), and dose presented to the mouse were calculated. Dose retention efficiency and viable aerosol retention rate were calculated from the sampler titers to determine the efficiency of microbe retention in lungs of mice. B. anthracis, Y. pestis, and M. tuberculosis aerosols were sampled through the port. The count mean aerodynamic sizes were 0.98, 0.77, and 0.78 μm with geometric standard deviations of 1.60, 1.90, and 2.37, and viable aerosol concentrations in the chamber were 211, 57, and 1 colony-forming unit (CFU)/mL, respectively. Based on the aerosol concentrations, the doses presented to mice for the three pathogens were 2.5e5, 2.2e4 and 464 CFU. Using the multiplex sampling port we determined whether the animals were challenged with an optimum bioaerosol based on dose presented and respirable particle size. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Standardization of the energy performance of photovoltaic modules in real operating conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viganó Davide

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a PV module at STC [1] is a useful indicator for comparing the peak performance of different module types, but on its own is not sufficient to accurately predict how much energy a module will deliver in the field when subjected to a wide range of real operating conditions [2]. An Energy Rating approach has to be preferred for that aim. It is currently under development the standard series IEC 61853 on Energy Rating, for which only part 1 [3] has been issued. It describes methods to characterize the module performance as a function of irradiance and temperature. The reproducibility of the power matrix measurements obtained by the three different methods specified in the standard, namely: under natural sunlight using a tracking system; under natural sunlight without tracker; and a large area pulsed solar simulator of Class AAA were evaluated and discussed [4,5]. The work here presented is focused on the second method listed above, which explores the real working conditions for a PV device and therefore it represents the situation where Energy Rating procedures are expected to give the largest deviations from the STC predictions. The system for continuous monitoring of module performances, already implemented at ESTI, has been recently replaced with a new system having a number of improvements described in the following. The two system results have been compared showing a discrete compatibility. The two power matrices are then merged together using a weighted average and compared to those acquired with the other two remaining “ideal” systems. An interesting tendency seems to come up from this comparison, making the power rating under real operating conditions an essential procedure for energy rating purposes.

  3. Robust Road Condition Detection System Using In-Vehicle Standard Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Aguilar, Juan Jesús; Cabrera Carrillo, Juan Antonio; Guerra Fernández, Antonio Jesús; Carabias Acosta, Enrique

    2015-12-19

    The appearance of active safety systems, such as Anti-lock Braking System, Traction Control System, Stability Control System, etc., represents a major evolution in road safety. In the automotive sector, the term vehicle active safety systems refers to those whose goal is to help avoid a crash or to reduce the risk of having an accident. These systems safeguard us, being in continuous evolution and incorporating new capabilities continuously. In order for these systems and vehicles to work adequately, they need to know some fundamental information: the road condition on which the vehicle is circulating. This early road detection is intended to allow vehicle control systems to act faster and more suitably, thus obtaining a substantial advantage. In this work, we try to detect the road condition the vehicle is being driven on, using the standard sensors installed in commercial vehicles. Vehicle models were programmed in on-board systems to perform real-time estimations of the forces of contact between the wheel and road and the speed of the vehicle. Subsequently, a fuzzy logic block is used to obtain an index representing the road condition. Finally, an artificial neural network was used to provide the optimal slip for each surface. Simulations and experiments verified the proposed method.

  4. A Comprehensive Subcellular Proteomic Survey of Salmonella Grown under Phagosome-Mimicking versus Standard Laboratory Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Sanford, James A.; Park, Jea H.; Deatherage, Brooke L.; Champion, Boyd L.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2012-06-01

    Towards developing a systems-level pathobiological understanding of Salmonella enterica, we performed a subcellular proteomic analysis of this pathogen grown under standard laboratory and infection-mimicking conditions in vitro. Analysis of proteins from cytoplasmic, inner membrane, periplasmic, and outer membrane fractions yielded coverage of over 30% of the theoretical proteome. Confident subcellular location could be assigned to over 1000 proteins, with good agreement between experimentally observed location and predicted/known protein properties. Comparison of protein location under the different environmental conditions provided insight into dynamic protein localization and possible moonlighting (multiple function) activities. Notable examples of dynamic localization were the response regulators of two-component regulatory systems (e.g., ArcB, PhoQ). The DNA-binding protein Dps that is generally regarded as cytoplasmic was significantly enriched in the outer membrane for all growth conditions examined, suggestive of moonlighting activities. These observations imply the existence of unknown transport mechanisms and novel functions for a subset of Salmonella proteins. Overall, this work provides a catalog of experimentally verified subcellular protein location for Salmonella and a framework for further investigations using computational modeling.

  5. Robust Road Condition Detection System Using In-Vehicle Standard Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jesús Castillo Aguilar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of active safety systems, such as Anti-lock Braking System, Traction Control System, Stability Control System, etc., represents a major evolution in road safety. In the automotive sector, the term vehicle active safety systems refers to those whose goal is to help avoid a crash or to reduce the risk of having an accident. These systems safeguard us, being in continuous evolution and incorporating new capabilities continuously. In order for these systems and vehicles to work adequately, they need to know some fundamental information: the road condition on which the vehicle is circulating. This early road detection is intended to allow vehicle control systems to act faster and more suitably, thus obtaining a substantial advantage. In this work, we try to detect the road condition the vehicle is being driven on, using the standard sensors installed in commercial vehicles. Vehicle models were programmed in on-board systems to perform real-time estimations of the forces of contact between the wheel and road and the speed of the vehicle. Subsequently, a fuzzy logic block is used to obtain an index representing the road condition. Finally, an artificial neural network was used to provide the optimal slip for each surface. Simulations and experiments verified the proposed method.

  6. Chemical composition based aerosol optical properties according to size distribution and mixture types during smog and Asian dust events in Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yi; Um, Junshik; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Yong Pyo

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the optical properties of aerosols involved in different meteorological events, including smog and Asian dust days. Carbonaceous components and inorganic species were measured in Seoul, Korea between 25 and 31 March 2012. Based on the measurements, the optical properties of aerosols were calculated by considering composition, size distribution, and mixing state of aerosols. To represent polydisperse size distributions of aerosols, a lognormal size distribution with a wide range of geometric mean diameters and geometric standard deviations was used. For the optical property calculations, the Mie theory was used to compute single-scattering properties of aerosol particles with varying size and composition. Analysis of the sampled data showed that the water-soluble components of organic matter increased on smog days, whereas crustal elements increased on dust days. The water content significantly influenced the optical properties of aerosols during the smog days as a result of high relative humidity and an increase in the water-soluble component. The absorption coefficients depended on the aerosol mixture type and the aerosol size distributions. Therefore, to improve our knowledge on radiative impacts of aerosols, especially the regional impacts of aerosols in East Asia, accurate measurements of aerosols, such as size distribution, composition, and mixture type, under different meteorological conditions are required.

  7. Chemical Composition Based Aerosol Optical Properties According to Size Distribution and Mixture Types during Smog and Asian Dust Events in Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yi; Um, Junshik; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Yong Pyo

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated the optical properties of aerosols involved in different meteorological events, including smog and Asian dust days. Carbonaceous components and inorganic species were measured in Seoul, Korea between 25 and 31 March 2012. Based on the measurements, the optical properties of aerosols were calculated by considering composition, size distribution, and mixing state of aerosols. To represent polydisperse size distributions of aerosols, a lognormal size distribution with a wide range of geometric mean diameters and geometric standard deviations was used. For the optical property calculations, the Mie theory was used to compute single-scattering properties of aerosol particles with varying size and composition. Analysis of the sampled data showed that the water-soluble components of organic matter increased on smog days, whereas crustal elements increased on dust days. The water content significantly influenced the optical properties of aerosols during the smog days as a result of high relative humidity and an increase in the water-soluble component. The absorption coefficients depended on the aerosol mixture type and the aerosol size distributions. Therefore, to improve our knowledge on radiative impacts of aerosols, especially the regional impacts of aerosols in East Asia, accurate measurements of aerosols, such as size distribution, composition, and mixture type, under different meteorological conditions are required.

  8. Global simulations of aerosol processing in clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hoose

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available An explicit and detailed representation of in-droplet and in-crystal aerosol particles in stratiform clouds has been introduced in the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The new scheme allows an evaluation of the cloud cycling of aerosols and an estimation of the relative contributions of nucleation and collision scavenging, as opposed to evaporation of hydrometeors in the global aerosol processing by clouds. On average an aerosol particle is cycled through stratiform clouds 0.5 times. The new scheme leads to important changes in the simulated fraction of aerosol scavenged in clouds, and consequently in the aerosol wet deposition. In general, less aerosol is scavenged into clouds with the new prognostic treatment than what is prescribed in standard ECHAM5-HAM. Aerosol concentrations, size distributions, scavenged fractions and cloud droplet concentrations are evaluated and compared to different observations. While the scavenged fraction and the aerosol number concentrations in the marine boundary layer are well represented in the new model, aerosol optical thickness, cloud droplet number concentrations in the marine boundary layer and the aerosol volume in the accumulation and coarse modes over the oceans are overestimated. Sensitivity studies suggest that a better representation of below-cloud scavenging, higher in-cloud collision coefficients, or a reduced water uptake by seasalt aerosols could reduce these biases.

  9. Effect of measurement conditions on three-dimensional roughness values, and development of measurement standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre, A; Brenier, B; Raynaud, S

    2011-01-01

    Friction or corrosion behaviour, fatigue lifetime for mechanical components are influenced by their boundary and subsurface properties. The surface integrity is studied on mechanical component in order to improve the service behaviour of them. Roughness is one of the main geometrical properties, which is to be qualified and quantified. Components can be obtained using a complex process: forming, machining and treatment can be combined to realize parts with complex shape. Then, three-dimensional roughness is needed to characterize these parts with complex shape and textured surface. With contact or non-contact measurements (contact stylus, confocal microprobe, interferometer), three-dimensional roughness is quantified using the calculation of pertinent parameters defined by the international standard PR EN ISO 25178-2:2008. An analysis will identify the influence of measurement conditions on three-dimensional parameters. The purpose of this study is to analyse the variation of roughness results using contact stylus or optical apparatus. The second aim of this work is to develop a measurement standard well adapted to qualify the contact and non-contact apparatus.

  10. Standard test method for damage to contacting solid surfaces under fretting conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the studying or ranking the susceptibility of candidate materials to fretting corrosion or fretting wear for the purposes of material selection for applications where fretting corrosion or fretting wear can limit serviceability. 1.2 This test method uses a tribological bench test apparatus with a mechanism or device that will produce the necessary relative motion between a contacting hemispherical rider and a flat counterface. The rider is pressed against the flat counterface with a loading mass. The test method is intended for use in room temperature air, but future editions could include fretting in the presence of lubricants or other environments. 1.3 The purpose of this test method is to rub two solid surfaces together under controlled fretting conditions and to quantify the damage to both surfaces in units of volume loss for the test method. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.5...

  11. Effect of measurement conditions on three-dimensional roughness values, and development of measurement standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabre, A; Brenier, B [Arts et Metiers ParisTech, MecaSurf Laboratory, 2, Cours des Arts et Metiers, 13617 Aix-en-Provence (France); Raynaud, S, E-mail: agnes.fabre@ensam.eu [INSA Lyon, MIP2 Laboratory, 27 Avenue Jean Capelle, Bat Jacquard, 69100 Villeurbanne (France)

    2011-08-19

    Friction or corrosion behaviour, fatigue lifetime for mechanical components are influenced by their boundary and subsurface properties. The surface integrity is studied on mechanical component in order to improve the service behaviour of them. Roughness is one of the main geometrical properties, which is to be qualified and quantified. Components can be obtained using a complex process: forming, machining and treatment can be combined to realize parts with complex shape. Then, three-dimensional roughness is needed to characterize these parts with complex shape and textured surface. With contact or non-contact measurements (contact stylus, confocal microprobe, interferometer), three-dimensional roughness is quantified using the calculation of pertinent parameters defined by the international standard PR EN ISO 25178-2:2008. An analysis will identify the influence of measurement conditions on three-dimensional parameters. The purpose of this study is to analyse the variation of roughness results using contact stylus or optical apparatus. The second aim of this work is to develop a measurement standard well adapted to qualify the contact and non-contact apparatus.

  12. Effects of aerosols on clear-sky solar radiation in the ALADIN-HIRLAM NWP system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gleeson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The direct shortwave radiative effect of aerosols under clear-sky conditions in the Aire Limitee Adaptation dynamique Developpement InterNational – High Resolution Limited Area Model (ALADIN-HIRLAM numerical weather prediction system was investigated using three shortwave radiation schemes in diagnostic single-column experiments: the Integrated Forecast System (IFS, acraneb2 and the hlradia radiation schemes. The multi-band IFS scheme was formerly used operationally by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF whereas hlradia and acraneb2 are broadband schemes. The former is a new version of the HIRLAM radiation scheme while acraneb2 is the radiation scheme in the ALARO-1 physics package. The aim was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the numerical weather prediction (NWP system regarding aerosols and to prepare it for use of real-time aerosol information. The experiments were run with particular focus on the August 2010 Russian wildfire case. Each of the three radiation schemes accurately (within ±4 % at midday simulates the direct shortwave aerosol effect when observed aerosol optical properties are used. When the aerosols were excluded from the simulations, errors of more than +15 % in global shortwave irradiance were found at midday, with the error reduced to +10 % when standard climatological aerosols were used. An error of −11 % was seen at midday if only observed aerosol optical depths at 550 nm, and not observation-based spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors, were included in the simulations. This demonstrates the importance of using the correct aerosol optical properties. The dependency of the direct radiative effect of aerosols on relative humidity was tested and shown to be within ±6 % in this case. By modifying the assumptions about the shape of the IFS climatological vertical aerosol profile, the inherent uncertainties associated

  13. Aerosol properties and meteorological conditions in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina, during the resuspension of volcanic ash from the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciela Ulke, Ana; Torres Brizuela, Marcela M.; Raga, Graciela B.; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2016-09-01

    The eruption in June 2011 of the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex in Chile impacted air traffic around the Southern Hemisphere for several months after the initial ash emissions. The ash deposited in vast areas of the Patagonian Steppe was subjected to the strong wind conditions prevalent during the austral winter and spring experiencing resuspension over various regions of Argentina. In this study we analyze the meteorological conditions that led to the episode of volcanic ash resuspension which impacted the city of Buenos Aires and resulted in the closure of the two main airports in Buenos Aires area (Ezeiza and Aeroparque) on 16 October 2011. A relevant result is that resuspended material (volcanic ash plus dust) imprints a distinguishable feature within the atmospheric thermodynamic vertical profiles. The thermodynamic soundings show the signature of "pulses of drying" in layers associated with the presence of hygroscopic ash in the atmosphere that has already been reported in similar episodes after volcanic eruptions in other parts of the world. This particular footprint can be used to detect the probable existence of volcanic ash layers. This study also illustrates the utility of ceilometers to detect not only cloud base at airports but also volcanic ash plumes at the boundary layer and up to 7 km altitude. Aerosol properties measured in the city during the resuspension episode indicate the presence of enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the boundary layer along with spectral signatures in the measurements at the Buenos Aires AERONET site typical of ash plus dust advected towards the city. The mandatory aviation reports from the National Weather Service about airborne and deposited volcanic ash at the airport near the measurement site (Aeroparque) correlate in time with the enhanced concentrations. The presence of the resuspended material was detected by the CALIOP lidar overpassing the region. Since the dynamics of ash resuspension and

  14. Regional deposition of saline aerosols of different tonicities in normal and asthmatic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phipps, P.R.; Gonda, I.; Anderson, S.D.; Bailey, D.; Bautovich, G.

    1994-01-01

    Nonisotonic aerosols are frequently used in the diagnosis and therapy of lung disease. The purpose of this work was to study the difference in the pattern of deposition of aerosols containing aqueous solutions of different tonicities. 99m Technetium-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA)-labelled saline aerosols, with mass median aerodynamic diameter 3.7-3.8 μm and geometric standard deviation 1.4, were inhaled under reproducible breathing conditions on two occasions. Hypotonic and hypertonic solutions were used in 11 normals subjects, isotonic and hypertonic solutions in 9 asthmatics. The regional deposition was quantified by a penetration index measured with the help of a tomographic technique. There was a small but significant increase (6.7%) in the penetration index of the hypotonic as compared to the hypertonic aerosols in the normal subjects. The region that was markedly affected was the trachea. The differences in the penetration of the isotonic and hypertonic aerosols in the asthmatics appeared to be strongly dependent on the state of the airways at the time of the study. These findings can be interpreted in terms of effects of growth or shrinkage of nonisotonic aerosols, as well as of airway narrowing, on regional deposition of aerosols. Tonicity of aerosols appears to affect their deposition both through physical and physiological mechanisms. This should be taken into account when interpreting the effects of inhaled aqueous solutions of various tonicities in patients in vivo. (au) (44 refs.)

  15. Regional deposition of saline aerosols of different tonicities in normal and asthmatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phipps, P.R.; Gonda, I. (Department of Pharmacy, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia)); Anderson, S.D. (Department of Thoracic and Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown (Australia)); Bailey, D.; Bautovich, G. (Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown (Australia))

    1994-08-01

    Nonisotonic aerosols are frequently used in the diagnosis and therapy of lung disease. The purpose of this work was to study the difference in the pattern of deposition of aerosols containing aqueous solutions of different tonicities. [sup 99m]Technetium-diethyltriaminepentaacetic acid ([sup 99m]Tc-DTPA)-labelled saline aerosols, with mass median aerodynamic diameter 3.7-3.8 [mu]m and geometric standard deviation 1.4, were inhaled under reproducible breathing conditions on two occasions. Hypotonic and hypertonic solutions were used in 11 normals subjects, isotonic and hypertonic solutions in 9 asthmatics. The regional deposition was quantified by a penetration index measured with the help of a tomographic technique. There was a small but significant increase (6.7%) in the penetration index of the hypotonic as compared to the hypertonic aerosols in the normal subjects. The region that was markedly affected was the trachea. The differences in the penetration of the isotonic and hypertonic aerosols in the asthmatics appeared to be strongly dependent on the state of the airways at the time of the study. These findings can be interpreted in terms of effects of growth or shrinkage of nonisotonic aerosols, as well as of airway narrowing, on regional deposition of aerosols. Tonicity of aerosols appears to affect their deposition both through physical and physiological mechanisms. This should be taken into account when interpreting the effects of inhaled aqueous solutions of various tonicities in patients in vivo. (au) (44 refs.).

  16. Potential of select intermediate-volatility organic compounds and consumer products for secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation under relevant urban conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weihua; Li, Lijie; Chen, Chia-li; Kacarab, Mary; Peng, Weihan; Price, Derek; Xu, Jin; Cocker, David R.

    2018-04-01

    Emissions of certain low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) are considered exempt to volatile organic compounds (VOC) regulations due to their low evaporation rates. However, these compounds may still play a role in ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ozone formation. The LVP-VOCs selected for this work are categorized as intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) according to their vapor pressures and molecular formulas. In this study, the evaporation rates of 14 select IVOCs are investigated with half of them losing more than 95% of their mass in less than one month. Further, SOA and ozone formation are presented from 11 select IVOCs and 5 IVOC-containing generic consumer products under atmospherically relevant conditions using varying radical sources (NOx and/or H2O2) and a surrogate reactive organic gas (ROG) mixture. Benzyl alcohol (0.41), n-heptadecane (0.38), and diethylene glycol monobutyl ether (0.16) are determined to have SOA yields greater than 0.1 in the presence of NOx and a surrogate urban hydrocarbon mixture. IVOCs also influence ozone formation from the surrogate urban mixture by impacting radical levels and NOx availability. The addition of lab created generic consumer products has a weak influence on ozone formation from the surrogate mixture but strongly affects SOA formation. The overall SOA and ozone formation of the generic consumer products could not be explained solely by the results of the pure IVOC experiments.

  17. Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Focal Plane Array Performance Under Non-Standard Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Bruce, Carl F.; Green, Robert O.; Coles, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights a new technique that allows the Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC TCM6604A Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) Focal Plane Array (FPA) to operate at room temperature. The Teledyne MCT FPA has been a standard in Imaging Spectroscopy since its creation in the 1980's. This FPA has been used in applications ranging from space instruments such as CRISM, M3 and ARTEMIS to airborne instruments such as MaRS and the Next Generation AVIRIS Instruments1. Precise focal plane alignment is always a challenge for such instruments. The current FPA alignment process results in multiple cold cycles requiring week-long durations, thereby increasing the risk and cost of a project. These alignment cycles are necessary because optimal alignment is approached incrementally and can only be measured with the FPA and Optics at standard operating conditions, requiring a cold instrument. Instruments using this FPA are normally cooled to temperatures below 150K for the MCT FPA to properly function. When the FPA is run at higher temperatures the dark current increases saturating the output. This paper covers the prospect of warm MCT FPA operation from a theoretical and experimental perspective. We discuss the empirical models and physical laws that govern MCT material properties and predict the optimal settings that will result in the best MCT PA performance at 300K. Theoretical results are then calculated for the proposed settings. We finally present the images and data obtained using the actual system with the warm MCT FPA settings. The paper concludes by emphasizing the strong positive correlation between the measured values and the theoretical results.

  18. A seismic analysis of Korean standard PWR fuels under transition core conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeong Koo; Park, Nam Kyu; Jang, Young Ki; Kim, Jae Ik; Kim, Kyu Tae

    2005-01-01

    The PLUS7 fuel is developed to achieve higher thermal performance, burnup and more safety margin than the conventional fuel used in the Korean Standard Nuclear Plants (KSNPs) and to sustain structural integrity under increased seismic requirement in Korea. In this study, a series of seismic analysis have been performed in order to evaluate the structural integrity of fuel assemblies associated with seismic loads in the KSNPs under transition core conditions replacing the Guardian fuel, which is a resident fuel in the KSNP reactors, with the PLUS7 fuel. For the analysis, transition core seismic models have been developed, based on the possible fuel loading patterns. And the maximum impact forces on the spacer grid and various stresses acting on the fuel components have been evaluated and compared with the through-grid strength of spacer grids and the stress criteria specified in the ASME code for each fuel component, respectively. Then three noticeable parameters regarding as important parameters governing fuel assembly dynamic behavior are evaluated to clarify their effects on the fuel impact and stress response. As a result of the study, it has been confirmed that both the PLUS7 and the Guardian fuel sustain their structural integrity under the transition core condition. And when the damping ratio is constant, increasing the natural frequency of fuel assembly results in a decrease in impact force. The fuel assembly flexural stiffness has an effect increasing the stress of fuel assembly, but not the impact force. And the spacer grid stiffness is directly related with the impact force response. (author)

  19. Experimental study of the performance of intumescent coatings exposed to standard and non-standard fire conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucherini, Andrea; Giuliani, Luisa; Jomaas, Grunde

    2018-01-01

    Three different experimental setups corresponding to three different fire scenarios were used to investigate how different heating conditions and heating rates affect the behaviour of two different thin intumescent coatings (a solvent-based and a water-based paint). Coated steel samples were...... to four critical points: activation, end of reaction, binder exhaustion and steel austenitization point. The results also showed that the water-based paint performed better at low heating rates, while the tested solvent-based paint performed better at high heating rates and did not activate or provide...

  20. Carbon dioxide and ethanol release from champagne glasses, under standard tasting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Beaumont, Fabien; Bourget, Marielle; Pron, Hervé; Parvitte, Bertrand; Zéninari, Virginie; Polidori, Guillaume; Cilindre, Clara

    2012-01-01

    A simple glass of champagne or sparkling wine may seem like the acme of frivolity to most people, but in fact, it may rather be considered as a fantastic playground for any fluid physicist or physicochemist. In this chapter, results obtained concerning various steps where the CO₂ molecule plays a role (from its ingestion in the liquid phase during the fermentation process to its progressive release in the headspace above the tasting glass) are gathered and synthesized to propose a self-consistent and global overview of how gaseous and dissolved CO₂ impact champagne and sparkling wine science. Some recent investigations, conducted through laser tomography techniques, on ascending bubbles and ascending-bubble-driven flow patterns found in champagne glasses are reported, which illustrate the fine interplay between ascending bubbles and the fluid around under standard tasting conditions. The simultaneous monitoring of gaseous CO₂ and ethanol in the headspace of both a flute and a coupe filled with champagne was reported, depending on whether or not the glass shows effervescence. Both gaseous CO₂ and ethanol were found to be enhanced by the presence of ascending bubbles, thus confirming the close link between ascending bubbles, ascending-bubble-driven flow patterns, and the release of gaseous CO₂ and volatile organic compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. "Fenton-like" reactions of methylhydroperoxide and ethylhydroperoxide with Fe 2+ in liquid aerosols under tropospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, E.; Jolibois, R. Durand.; Meunier, N.; Carlier, P.; Monod, A.

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the "Fenton-like" reduction of methylhydroperoxide and ethylhydroperoxide by Fe 2+ ions in aqueous solutions, under tropospheric conditions. The rate constants obtained at 6°C and pH=2 (16±5 and 24±9 M -1 s -1, respectively) are of the same order as the rate constant of H 2O 2 reduction by Fe 2+. The major reaction products identified were the corresponding aldehydes (formaldehyde and acetaldehyde). The other identified organic products (the corresponding acids and hydroxy hydroperoxides) accounted for 87% of the consumed hydroperoxides. Between the two possible mechanisms (i.e. Fe 2++ROOH→Fe 3++OH+RO rad (M1) and Fe 2++ROOH→Fe 3++ rad OH+RO - (M2)), the experiments showed that M2 is negligible. The alkoxy (RO rad ) radicals formed in (M1) further rearrange in water solution, and react with oxygen to form peroxy radicals which decompose, leading to the formation of aldehydes. This decomposition is in competition with (i) the self-reaction forming the corresponding acids and H 2O 2, and (ii) the reaction with HO 2 radicals forming the corresponding hydroxy hydroperoxides. The atmospheric implications of these reactions are discussed.

  2. In situ measurement of the efficiency of filtration installations in the nuclear industry by the soda-fluorescein (uranin) aerosol method: AFNOR standard NFX 44.011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupoux, J.

    1981-01-01

    The in situ measurement of the efficiency of filtering installations in the French nuclear industry using the soda-fluorescein (uraniun) aerosol method is presented. A brief description and the interest of the method are discussed. Its use for the location of defects in filter elements and for in situ control of casing with tandem HEPA filter stages is described

  3. Compensation for the Effects of Ambient Conditions on the Calibration of Multi-Capillary Pressure Drop Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colard S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette draw resistance and filter pressure drop (PD are both major physical parameters for the tobacco industry. Therefore these parameters must be measured reliably. For these measurements, specific equipment calibrated with PD transfer standards is used. Each transfer standard must have a known and stable PD value, such standards usually being composed of several capillary tubes associated in parallel. However, PD values are modified by ambient conditions during calibration of such standards, i.e. by temperature and relative humidity (RH of air, and atmospheric pressure. In order to reduce the influence of these ambient factors, a simplified model was developed for compensating the effects of ambient conditions on the calibration of multi-capillary PD standards.

  4. Water uptake by biomass burning aerosol at sub- and supersaturated conditions: closure studies and implications for the role of organics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Dusek

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the CCN activity of freshly emitted biomass burning particles and their hygroscopic growth at a relative humidity (RH of 85%. The particles were produced in the Mainz combustion laboratory by controlled burning of various wood types. The water uptake at sub- and supersaturations is parameterized by the hygroscopicity parameter, κ (c.f. Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007. For the wood burns, κ is low, generally around 0.06. The main emphasis of this study is a comparison of κ derived from measurements at sub- and supersaturated conditionsG and κCCN, in order to see whether the water uptake at 85% RH can predict the CCN properties of the biomass burning particles. Differences in κGand κCCN can arise through solution non-idealities, the presence of slightly soluble or surface active compounds, or non-spherical particle shape. We find that κG and κCCN agree within experimental uncertainties (of around 30% for particle sizes of 100 and 150 nm; only for 50 nm particles is κCCN larger than κG by a factor of 2. The magnitude of this difference and its dependence on particle size is consistent with the presence of surface active organic compounds. These compounds mainly facilitate the CCN activation of small particles, which form the most concentrated solution droplets at the point of activation. The 50 nm particles, however, are only activated at supersaturations higher than 1% and are therefore of minor importance as CCN in ambient clouds. By comparison with the actual chemical composition of the biomass burning particles, we estimate that the hygroscopicity of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC fraction can be represented by a κWSOC value of approximately 0.2. The effective hygroscopicity of a typical wood burning particle can therefore be represented by a linear mixture of an inorganic component with κ ≅ 0.6, a WSOC

  5. Study on generation and granulometry of a standard aerosol of CINa for use in determinations of filtration efficiency of absolute filters; Estudio sobre la generacion y granulometria de un aerosol patron de CINa para la determinacion de eficacias filtrantes de filtros absolutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milla, E.

    1978-07-01

    This work has as objective the study of the conditions of generation and granulometry of an aerosol generated by atomizing with compressed a i r a solution of CINa in water in order to obtain particles, CINa cubes. The droplets of the spray formed are dried in a stream of air, acting as a carrier, inside the pipe of a bank of test filters. The granulometric analysis has been carried out by sampling in the gaseous phase. A dispersion photometer was used that yields the size spectrum of particles. The variables concerned in generation, whose influence on aerosol granulometry were analyzed are: characteristic diameter of atomizer unit, pressure of compressed air of generation, concentration of saline solution, temperature of air carrier, length of bank pipe, sampling position across a section, length of sampling duct and ratio between speeds in pipe and duct. (Author) 50 refs.

  6. Standardizing electrophoresis conditions: how to eliminate a major source of error in the comet assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Brunborg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the alkaline comet assay, cells are embedded in agarose, lysed, and then subjected to further processing including electrophoresis at high pH (>13. We observed very large variations of mean comet tail lengths of cell samples from the same population when spread on a glass or plastic substrate and subjected to electrophoresis. These variations might be cancelled out if comets are scored randomly over a large surface, or if all the comets are scored. The mean tail length may then be representative of the population, although its standard error is large. However, the scoring process often involves selection of 50 – 100 comets in areas selected in an unsystematic way from a large gel on a glass slide. When using our 96-sample minigel format (1, neighbouring sample variations are easily detected. We have used this system to study the cause of the comet assay variations during electrophoresis and we have defined experimental conditions which reduce the variations to a minimum. We studied the importance of various physical parameters during electrophoresis: (i voltage; (ii duration of electrophoresis; (iii electric current; (iv temperature; and (v agarose concentration. We observed that the voltage (V/cm varied substantially during electrophoresis, even within a few millimetres of distance between gel samples. Not unexpectedly, both the potential ( V/cm and the time were linearly related to the mean comet tail, whereas the current was not. By measuring the local voltage with microelectrodes a few millimetres apart, we observed substantial local variations in V/cm, and they increased with time. This explains the large variations in neighbouring sample comet tails of 25% or more. By introducing simple technology (circulation of the solution during electrophoresis, and temperature control, these variations in mean comet tail were largely abolished, as were the V/cm variations. Circulation was shown to be particularly important and optimal conditions

  7. Injury Rates in Age-Only Versus Age-and-Weight Playing Standard Conditions in American Youth Football

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Zachary Y.; Marshall, Stephen W.; Simon, Janet E.; Hayden, Ross; Snook, Erin M.; Dodge, Thomas; Gallo, Joseph A.; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.; Mensch, James; Murphy, Joseph M.; Nittoli, Vincent C.; Dompier, Thomas P.; Ragan, Brian; Yeargin, Susan W.; Parsons, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: American youth football leagues are typically structured using either age-only (AO) or age-and-weight (AW) playing standard conditions. These playing standard conditions group players by age in the former condition and by a combination of age and weight in the latter condition. However, no study has systematically compared injury risk between these 2 playing standards. Purpose: To compare injury rates between youth tackle football players in the AO and AW playing standard conditions. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Athletic trainers evaluated and recorded injuries at each practice and game during the 2012 and 2013 football seasons. Players (age, 5-14 years) were drawn from 13 recreational leagues across 6 states. The sample included 4092 athlete-seasons (AW, 2065; AO, 2027) from 210 teams (AW, 106; O, 104). Injury rate ratios (RRs) with 95% CIs were used to compare the playing standard conditions. Multivariate Poisson regression was used to estimate RRs adjusted for residual effects of age and clustering by team and league. There were 4 endpoints of interest: (1) any injury, (2) non–time loss (NTL) injuries only, (3) time loss (TL) injuries only, and (4) concussions only. Results: Over 2 seasons, the cohort accumulated 1475 injuries and 142,536 athlete-exposures (AEs). The most common injuries were contusions (34.4%), ligament sprains (16.3%), concussions (9.6%), and muscle strains (7.8%). The overall injury rate for both playing standard conditions combined was 10.3 per 1000 AEs (95% CI, 9.8-10.9). The TL injury, NTL injury, and concussion rates in both playing standard conditions combined were 3.1, 7.2, and 1.0 per 1000 AEs, respectively. In multivariate Poisson regression models controlling for age, team, and league, no differences were found between playing standard conditions in the overall injury rate (RRoverall, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.4-2.6). Rates for the other 3 endpoints were also similar (RRNTL, 1.1 [95% CI, 0

  8. 78 FR 73112 - Monitoring System Conditions-Transmission Operations Reliability Standards; Interconnection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... complement the TOP Standards, have the goal of ensuring that the bulk electric system is planned and operated... pertain to the coordinated efforts to operate the bulk electric system in a reliable manner during real... System Operating Limits (SOLs).\\5\\ The provisions in the proposed TOP Reliability Standards that require...

  9. Standard nomenclature and methods for describing the condition of pavements draft TRH 6

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curtayne, PC

    2009-01-26

    Full Text Available The need for describing the condition of pavements occurs frequently in highway engineering. Accurate descriptions are a prerequisite for establishing procedures with which to evaluate the various aspects of the pavement condition. A variety...

  10. Aerosol Direct, Indirect, Semidirect, and Surface Albedo Effects from Sector Contributions Based on the IPCC AR5 Emissions for Preindustrial and Present-day Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi

    2012-01-01

    The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas-induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, with the hope that mitigation policies could be developed to target those emitters. Understanding the net effect of multisource emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is very challenging, and this paper will clarify forcing and feedback effects by separating direct, indirect, semidirect and surface albedo effects due to aerosols. To this end, we apply the Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model including detailed aerosol microphysics to examine aerosol impacts on climate by isolating single emission sector contributions as given by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) emission data sets developed for Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5. For the modeled past 150 years, using the climate model and emissions from preindustrial times to present-day, the total global annual mean aerosol radiative forcing is -0.6 W/m(exp 2), with the largest contribution from the direct effect (-0.5 W/m(exp 2)). Aerosol-induced changes on cloud cover often depends on cloud type and geographical region. The indirect (includes only the cloud albedo effect with -0.17 W/m(exp 2)) and semidirect effects (-0.10 W/m(exp 2)) can be isolated on a regional scale, and they often have opposing forcing effects, leading to overall small forcing effects on a global scale. Although the surface albedo effects from aerosols are small (0.016 W/m(exp 2)), triggered feedbacks on top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing can be 10 times larger. Our results point out that each

  11. Zonal Aerosol Direct and Indirect Radiative Forcing using Combined CALIOP, CERES, CloudSat, and CERES Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. F.; Kato, S.; Rose, F. G.; Sun-Mack, S.

    2009-12-01

    Under the NASA Energy and Water Cycle System (NEWS) program, cloud and aerosol properties derived from CALIPSO, CloudSat, and MODIS data then matched to the CERES footprint are used for irradiance profile computations. Irradiance profiles are included in the publicly available product, CCCM. In addition to the MODIS and CALIPSO generated aerosol, aerosol optical thickness is calculated over ocean by processing MODIS radiance through the Stowe-Ignatov algorithm. The CERES cloud mask and properties algorithm are use with MODIS radiance to provide additional cloud information to accompany the actively sensed data. The passively sensed data is the only input to the standard CERES radiative flux products. The combined information is used as input to the NASA Langley Fu-Liou radiative transfer model to determine vertical profiles and Top of Atmosphere shortwave and longwave flux for pristine, all-sky, and aerosol conditions for the special data product. In this study, the three sources of aerosol optical thickness will be compared directly and their influence on the calculated and measured TOA fluxes. Earlier studies indicate that the largest uncertainty in estimating direct aerosol forcing using aerosol optical thickness derived from passive sensors is caused by cloud contamination. With collocated CALIPSO data, we are able to estimate frequency of occurrence of cloud contamination, effect on the aerosol optical thickness and direct radiative effect estimates.

  12. Intercomparison of shortwave radiative transfer schemes in global aerosol modeling: results from the AeroCom Radiative Transfer Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Randles

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examine the performance of 31 global model radiative transfer schemes in cloud-free conditions with prescribed gaseous absorbers and no aerosols (Rayleigh atmosphere, with prescribed scattering-only aerosols, and with more absorbing aerosols. Results are compared to benchmark results from high-resolution, multi-angular line-by-line radiation models. For purely scattering aerosols, model bias relative to the line-by-line models in the top-of-the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing ranges from roughly −10 to 20%, with over- and underestimates of radiative cooling at lower and higher solar zenith angle, respectively. Inter-model diversity (relative standard deviation increases from ~10 to 15% as solar zenith angle decreases. Inter-model diversity in atmospheric and surface forcing decreases with increased aerosol absorption, indicating that the treatment of multiple-scattering is more variable than aerosol absorption in the models considered. Aerosol radiative forcing results from multi-stream models are generally in better agreement with the line-by-line results than the simpler two-stream schemes. Considering radiative fluxes, model performance is generally the same or slightly better than results from previous radiation scheme intercomparisons. However, the inter-model diversity in aerosol radiative forcing remains large, primarily as a result of the treatment of multiple-scattering. Results indicate that global models that estimate aerosol radiative forcing with two-stream radiation schemes may be subject to persistent biases introduced by these schemes, particularly for regional aerosol forcing.

  13. Impact of aerosols on ice crystal size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Gu, Yu; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Li, Qinbin; Fu, Rong; Huang, Lei; Liu, Xiaohong; Shi, Xiangjun; Su, Hui; He, Cenlin

    2018-01-01

    The interactions between aerosols and ice clouds represent one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing from pre-industrial time to the present. In particular, the impact of aerosols on ice crystal effective radius (Rei), which is a key parameter determining ice clouds' net radiative effect, is highly uncertain due to limited and conflicting observational evidence. Here we investigate the effects of aerosols on Rei under different meteorological conditions using 9-year satellite observations. We find that the responses of Rei to aerosol loadings are modulated by water vapor amount in conjunction with several other meteorological parameters. While there is a significant negative correlation between Rei and aerosol loading in moist conditions, consistent with the "Twomey effect" for liquid clouds, a strong positive correlation between the two occurs in dry conditions. Simulations based on a cloud parcel model suggest that water vapor modulates the relative importance of different ice nucleation modes, leading to the opposite aerosol impacts between moist and dry conditions. When ice clouds are decomposed into those generated from deep convection and formed in situ, the water vapor modulation remains in effect for both ice cloud types, although the sensitivities of Rei to aerosols differ noticeably between them due to distinct formation mechanisms. The water vapor modulation can largely explain the difference in the responses of Rei to aerosol loadings in various seasons. A proper representation of the water vapor modulation is essential for an accurate estimate of aerosol-cloud radiative forcing produced by ice clouds.

  14. An Electronic Cigarette Vaping Machine for the Characterization of Aerosol Delivery and Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havel, Christopher M; Benowitz, Neal L; Jacob, Peyton; St Helen, Gideon

    2017-10-01

    Characterization of aerosols generated by electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is one method used to evaluate the safety of e-cigarettes. While some researchers have modified smoking machines for e-cigarette aerosol generation, these machines are either not readily available, not automated for e-cigarette testing or have not been adequately described. The objective of this study was to build an e-cigarette vaping machine that can be used to test, under standard conditions, e-liquid aerosolization and nicotine and toxicant delivery. The vaping machine was assembled from commercially available parts, including a puff controller, vacuum pump, power supply, switch to control current flow to the atomizer, three-way value to direct air flow to the atomizer, and three gas dispersion tubes for aerosol trapping. To validate and illustrate its use, the variation in aerosol generation was assessed within and between KangerTech Mini ProTank 3 clearomizers, and the effect of voltage on aerosolization and toxic aldehyde generation were assessed. When using one ProTank 3 clearomizer and different e-liquid flavors, the coefficient of variation (CV) of aerosol generated ranged between 11.5% and 19.3%. The variation in aerosol generated between ProTank 3 clearomizers with different e-liquid flavors and voltage settings ranged between 8.3% and 16.3% CV. Aerosol generation increased linearly at 3-6V across e-liquids and clearomizer brands. Acetaldehyde, acrolein, and formaldehyde generation increased markedly at voltages at or above 5V. The vaping machine that we describe reproducibly aerosolizes e-liquids from e-cigarette atomizers under controlled conditions and is useful for testing of nicotine and toxicant delivery. This study describes an electronic cigarette vaping machine that was assembled from commercially available parts. The vaping machine can be replicated by researchers and used under standard conditions to generate e-cigarette aerosols and characterize nicotine and

  15. Conditional conservatism and value relevance of financial reporting: A study in view of converging accounting standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, Maximiliaan Willem Pierre; Iatridis, George Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between conditional conservatism and value relevance in the EU and US. Specifically, it investigates whether this relationship differs under US GAAP and IFRS compliance. In addition, this study examines the trend in value relevance, conditional conservatism and

  16. [Prediction of the total Japanese cedar pollen counts based on male flower-setting conditions of standard trees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuta, Atsushi; Ukai, Kotaro; Sakakura, Yasuo; Tani, Hideshi; Matsuda, Fukiko; Yang, Tian-qun; Majima, Yuichi

    2002-07-01

    We made a prediction of the Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen counts at Tsu city based on male flower-setting conditions of standard trees. The 69 standard trees from 23 kinds of clones, planted at Mie Prefecture Science and Technology Promotion Center (Hakusan, Mie) in 1964, were selected. Male flower-setting conditions for 276 faces (69 trees x 4 points of the compass) were scored from 0 to 3. The average of scores and total pollen counts from 1988 to 2000 was analyzed. As the results, the average scores from standard trees and total pollen counts except two mass pollen-scattered years in 1995 and 2000 had a positive correlation (r = 0.914) by linear function. On the mass pollen-scattered years, pollen counts were influenced from the previous year. Therefore, the score of the present year minus that of the previous year were used for analysis. The average scores from male flower-setting conditions and pollen counts had a strong positive correlation (r = 0.994) when positive scores by taking account of the previous year were analyzed. We conclude that prediction of pollen counts are possible based on the male flower-setting conditions of standard trees.

  17. 42 CFR 433.123 - Notification of changes in system requirements, performance standards or other conditions for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification of changes in system requirements, performance standards or other conditions for approval or reapproval. 433.123 Section 433.123 Public Health... ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS STATE FISCAL ADMINISTRATION Mechanized Claims Processing and Information Retrieval...

  18. A Guide for Developing Standard Operating Job Procedures for the Sludge Conditioning & Dewatering Process Wastewater Treatment Facility. SOJP No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Carl M.

    This guide describes standard operating job procedures for the sludge conditioning and dewatering process of wastewater treatment facilities. In this process, sludge is treated with chemicals to make the sludge coagulate and give up its water more easily. The treated sludge is then dewatered using a vacuum filter. The guide gives step-by-step…

  19. Impact of aerosols on solar energy production - Scenarios from the Sahel Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Ina; Meilinger, Stefanie; Crewell, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    Solar energy is one option to serve the rising global energy demand with low environmental impact. Building an energy system with a considerable share of solar power requires long-term investment and a careful investigation of potential sites. Therefore, understanding the impacts from varying regionally and locally determined meteorological conditions on solar energy production will influence energy yield projections. Aerosols reduce global solar radiation due to absorption and scattering and therewith solar energy yields. Depending on aerosol size distribution they reduce the direct component of the solar radiation and modify the direction of the diffuse component compared to standard atmospheric conditions without aerosols. The aerosol size distribution and composition in the atmosphere is highly variable due to meteorological and land surface conditions. A quantitative assessment of aerosol effects on solar power yields and its relation to land use change is of particular interest for developing countries countries when analyzing the potential of local power production. This study aims to identify the effect of atmospheric aerosols in three different land use regimes, namely desert, urban/polluted and maritime on the tilted plane of photovoltaic energy modules. Here we focus on the Sahel zone, i.e. Niamey, Niger (13.5 N;2.1 E), located at the edge of the Sahara where also detailed measurements of the atmospheric state are available over the year 2006. Guided by observations a model chain is used to determine power yields. The atmospheric aerosol composition will be defined by using the Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) library. Direct and diffuse radiation (up- and downward component) are then calculated by the radiative transfer model libRadtran which allows to calculate the diffuse component of the radiance from different azimuth and zenith angles. Then the diffuse radiance will be analytically transformed to an east, south and west facing

  20. Conditions for vacuum stability in an S{sub 3} extension of the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, O Felix [Fac. de Cs. de la Electronica, BUAP, Apdo. Postal 542, Puebla, Pue. 72570 (Mexico); Mondragon, M [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 20-364, Mexico, D.F. 01000 (Mexico); RodrIguez-Jauregui, E, E-mail: ezequiel.rodriguez@correo.fisica.uson.m [Departamento de Fisica, UNISON, Apdo. Postal 1626, Hermosillo, Son. 83000 (Mexico)

    2009-06-01

    In this work we study the Higgs sector in the minimal S{sub 3} extension of the Standard Model. The S{sub 3} extended Standard Model, which has three Higgs doublets fields that belong to the three-dimensional reducible representation of the permutation group S{sub 3}, has naturally new phenomena: there are several Higgs bosons, charged, neutral and pseuodscalar ones, and more than one potential minimum. We analyzed the stability of the minimal S3 invariant extension of the Higgs potential and show that at tree-level, the potential minimum preserving electric charge and CP symmetries, when it exists, is the global one.

  1. 24 CFR 886.307 - Physical condition standards; physical inspection requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., subpart G. (b) Space and security. In addition to the standards in 24 CFR part 5, subpart G, the dwelling unit must have a living room, a kitchen area, and a bathroom. The dwelling unit must have at least one...) The unit shall contain suitable space to store, prepare and serve foods in a sanitary manner. A...

  2. TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — TOMS_AI_G is an aerosol related dataset derived from the Total Ozone Monitoring Satellite (TOMS) Sensor. The TOMS aerosol index arises from absorbing aerosols such...

  3. Research on a Valuation Standard and the Actual Condition About Security Management in PACS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae Ho; Son, Gi Gyeong; Kang, Hee Doo; Dong, Kyung Rae; Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2008-01-01

    This study is to prepare an evaluation standard about personal information protection and security management of a medical institution and to build up a grade standard of evaluation in PACS environment. We built up evaluation index based on 10 detailed items in four big categories (political security, technical security, data management security and physical security) by referring to ISO17799 (BS 7799), HIPPA (Health Insurance and Portability and Accountability Act of 1996) and domestic medical law. We have investigated at the thirty places where medical facility with the extracted security criteria and security evaluation index. Average score of physical security list, one of the big categories, was 18.5/20 (93%) at all medical institutions. Political security score was 18.5/30 (62%), data management security score was 12/20 (60%) and technical security score was 17.5/30 (58%). Therefore, security evaluation score was average 67 in 30 general hospitals, which was 4th level. The results showed that it is necessary to establish evaluation and management standard about personal information protection and security consciousness which are weak in PACS environment.

  4. Comparison of ESD and major organ absorbed doses of 5 year old standard guidekines and clinical exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, A Ram; Ahn, Sung Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, The Graduate School, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Ja [Dept. of Radiologic technology, Dongnam health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Pediatrics are more sensibility to radiation than adults and because they are organs that are not completely grown, they have a life expectancy that can be adversely affected by exposure. Therefore, the management of exposure dose is more important than the case of adult. The purpose of this study was to determine the suitability of the 10 year old phantom for the 5 year old pediatric's recommendation and the incident surface dose, and to measure the organ absorbed dose. This study is compared the organ absorbed dose and the entrance surface dose in the clinical conditions at 5 and 10 years old pediatric. Clinical 5 year old condition was slightly higher than recommendation condition and 10 year old condition was very high. In addition, recommendation condition ESD was found to be 43% higher than the ESD of the 5 year old group and the ESD of the 10 year old group was 126% higher than that of the 5 year old group. The recommended ESD at 5 years old and the ESD according to clinical imaging conditions were 31.6%. There was no significant difference between the 5 year old recommended exposure conditions and the organ absorbed dose due to clinical exposure conditions, but there was a large difference between the Chest and Pelvic. However, it was found that there was a remarkable difference when comparing the organ absorbed dose by 10 year clinical exposure conditions. Therefore, more detailed standard exposure dose for the recommended dose of pediatric should be studied.

  5. Mathematical analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations with non standard boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidriri, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major applications of the domain decomposition time marching algorithm is the coupling of the Navier-Stokes systems with Boltzmann equations in order to compute transitional flows. Another important application is the coupling of a global Navier-Stokes problem with a local one in order to use different modelizations and/or discretizations. Both of these applications involve a global Navier-Stokes system with nonstandard boundary conditions. The purpose of this work is to prove, using the classical Leray-Schauder theory, that these boundary conditions are admissible and lead to a well posed problem.

  6. Measurement-based J(NO2) sensitivity in a cloudless atmosphere under low aerosol loading and high solar zenith angle conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frueh, B.; Trautmann, T.

    2000-01-01

    The comparison between measured and simulated photodissociation frequencies of NO 2 , J(NO 2 ), in a cloudless atmosphere in a recent paper by Frueh et al., 2000 (Journal of Geophysical Research 105, 9843-9857) revealed an overestimation of J(NO 2 ) near ground level by model calculations compared with measurements and an underestimation in the upper part of the aerosol layer. A possible reason for the disagreement is the changing sun position during the vertical ascent. To resolve this problem we carried out a sensitivity study varying the solar zenith angle of 74 o by 1.4 o (which corresponds to the change of sun position during the vertical flight patterns). This results in a considerable deviation of J(NO 2 ) of about 10%. Further sensitivity studies on J(NO 2 ) have been done. These include realistic variations in ground albedo, humidity and aerosol properties. A variation in ground albedo from the measured value of A G = 0.023 (292-420 nm wavelength) to A G = 0 and A G = 0.05, respectively, resulted in an average J(NO 2 ) reduction and enhancement of only 2% near ground level with a slight decrease with increasing altitude. Furthermore, we compared simulations based on different relative humidity profiles with results from a dry atmosphere. Compared to the dry case the deviations of J(NO 2 ) were considerable (5-16%) although the measured aerosol concentration was very low. Moreover, we doubled the aerosol particle concentration. The maximum J(NO 2 ) deviations were in the same order of magnitude as for the relative humidity (5-16%). These changes are in the range of measurement uncertainty of J(NO 2 ) (author)

  7. Quantifying enhancement in aerosol radiative forcing during ‘extreme aerosol days’ in summer at Delhi National Capital Region, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sumant [School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Dey, Sagnik [Centre for Atmospheric Sciences, IIT Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Srivastava, Arun [School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Changes in aerosol characteristics (spectral aerosol optical depth, AOD and composition) are examined during the transition from ‘relatively clean’ to ‘extreme’ aerosol days in the summer of 2012 at Delhi National Capital Region (NCR), India. AOD smaller than 0.54 (i.e. 12-year mean AOD − 1σ) represents ‘relatively clean’ days in Delhi during the summer. ‘Extreme’ days are defined by the condition when AOD{sub 0.5} exceeds 12-year mean AOD + 1 standard deviation (σ). Mean (± 1σ) AOD increases to 1.2 ± 0.12 along with a decrease of Angstrom Exponent from 0.54 ± 0.09 to 0.22 ± 0.12 during the ‘extreme’ days. Aerosol composition is inferred by fixing the number concentrations of various individual species through iterative tweaking when simulated (following Mie theory) AOD spectrum matches with the measured one. Contribution of coarse mode dust to aerosol mass increased from 76.8% (relatively clean) to 96.8% (extreme events), while the corresponding contributions to AOD{sub 0.5} increased from 35.0% to 70.8%. Spectrally increasing single scattering albedo (SSA) and CALIPSO aerosol sub-type information support the dominant presence of dust during the ‘extreme’ aerosol days. Aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) at the top-of-the-atmosphere increases from 21.2 W m{sup −2} (relatively clean) to 56.6 W m{sup −2} (extreme), while the corresponding change in surface ADRF is from − 99.5 W m{sup −2} to − 153.5 W m{sup −2}. Coarse mode dust contributes 60.3% of the observed surface ADRF during the ‘extreme’ days. On the contrary, 0.4% mass fraction of black carbon (BC) translates into 13.1% contribution to AOD{sub 0.5} and 33.5% to surface ADRF during the ‘extreme’ days. The atmospheric heating rate increased by 75.1% from 1.7 K/day to 2.96 K/day during the ‘extreme’ days. - Graphical abstract: Deviation (in %) of aerosol properties from ‘relatively clean’ days to ‘extreme’ aerosol days. - Highlights:

  8. Standard methods for maintaining adult Apis mellifera in cages under in vitro laboratory conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, G.R.; Alaux, C.; Costa, C.; Csaki, C.; Steen, van der J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Adult honey bees are maintained in vitro in laboratory cages for a variety of purposes. For example, researchers may wish to perform experiments on honey bees caged individually or in groups to study aspects of parasitology, toxicology, or physiology under highly controlled conditions, or they may

  9. 18 CFR 4.94 - Standard terms and conditions of exemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... conditions of exemption. 4.94 Section 4.94 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT LICENSES, PERMITS, EXEMPTIONS, AND DETERMINATION OF PROJECT COSTS Exemption of Small Conduit Hydroelectric Facilities § 4.94...

  10. Comparison study of judged clinical skills competence from standard setting ratings generated under different administration conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William L; Boulet, John; Sandella, Jeanne

    2017-12-01

    When the safety of the public is at stake, it is particularly relevant for licensing and credentialing exam agencies to use defensible standard setting methods to categorize candidates into competence categories (e.g., pass/fail). The aim of this study was to gather evidence to support change to the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing-USA Level 2-Performance Evaluation standard setting design and administrative process. Twenty-two video recordings of candidates assessed for clinical competence were randomly selected from the 2014-2015 Humanistic domain test score distribution ranging from the highest to lowest quintile of performance. Nineteen panelists convened at the same site to receive training and practice prior to generating judgments of qualified or not qualified performance to each of the twenty videos. At the end of training, one panel remained onsite to complete their judgments and the second panel was released and given 1 week to observe the same twenty videos and complete their judgments offsite. The two one-sided test procedure established equivalence between panel group means at the 0.05 confidence level, controlling for rater errors within each panel group. From a practical cost-effective and administrative resource perspective, results from this study suggest it is possible to diverge from typical panel groups, who are sequestered the entire time onsite, to larger numbers of panelists who can make their judgments offsite with little impact on judged samples of qualified performance. Standard setting designs having panelists train together and then allowing those to provide judgments yields equivalent ratings and, ultimately, similar cut scores.

  11. Standard test method for determination of resistance to stable crack extension under low-constraint conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This standard covers the determination of the resistance to stable crack extension in metallic materials in terms of the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOAc), ψc and/or the crack-opening displacement (COD), δ5 resistance curve (1). This method applies specifically to fatigue pre-cracked specimens that exhibit low constraint (crack-length-to-thickness and un-cracked ligament-to-thickness ratios greater than or equal to 4) and that are tested under slowly increasing remote applied displacement. The recommended specimens are the compact-tension, C(T), and middle-crack-tension, M(T), specimens. The fracture resistance determined in accordance with this standard is measured as ψc (critical CTOA value) and/or δ5 (critical COD resistance curve) as a function of crack extension. Both fracture resistance parameters are characterized using either a single-specimen or multiple-specimen procedures. These fracture quantities are determined under the opening mode (Mode I) of loading. Influences of environment a...

  12. Standard methods for maintaining adult Apis mellifera in cages under in vitro laboratory conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Geoffrey R.; Alaux, Cedric; Costa, Cecilia; Csaki, Tamas; Doublet, Vincent; Eisenhardt, Dorothea; Fries, Ingemar; Kuhn, Rolf; McMahon, Dino P.; Medrzycki, Piotr; Murray, Tomas E.; Natsopoulou, Myrsini E.; Neumann, Peter; Oliver, Randy; Paxton, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Adult honey bees are maintained in vitro in laboratory cages for a variety of purposes. For example, researchers may wish to perform experiments on honey bees caged individually or in groups to study aspects of parasitology, toxicology, or physiology under highly controlled conditions, or they may cage whole frames to obtain newly emerged workers of known age cohorts. Regardless of purpose, researchers must manage a number of variables, ranging from selection of study subjects (e.g. honey bee...

  13. Standard methods for maintaining adult Apis mellifera in cages under in vitro laboratory conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, G.R.; Alaux, C.; Costa, C.; Csaki, C.; Steen, van der, J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Adult honey bees are maintained in vitro in laboratory cages for a variety of purposes. For example, researchers may wish to perform experiments on honey bees caged individually or in groups to study aspects of parasitology, toxicology, or physiology under highly controlled conditions, or they may cage whole frames to obtain freshly emerged workers of known age cohorts. Regardless of purpose, researchers must manage a number of variables, ranging from selection of study subjects (e.g. honey b...

  14. Standard practice for measurement of time-of-wetness on surfaces exposed to wetting conditions as in atmospheric corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a technique for monitoring time-of-wetness (TOW) on surfaces exposed to cyclic atmospheric conditions which produce depositions of moisture. 1.2 The practice is also applicable for detecting and monitoring condensation within a wall or roof assembly and in test apparatus. 1.3 Exposure site calibration or characterization can be significantly enhanced if TOW is measured for comparison with other sites, particularly if this data is used in conjunction with other site-specific instrumentation techniques. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. Standard Practice for Exposure of Cover Materials for Solar Collectors to Natural Weathering Under Conditions Simulating Operational Mode

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1995-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides a procedure for the exposure of cover materials for flat-plate solar collectors to the natural weather environment at temperatures that are elevated to approximate operating conditions. 1.2 This practice is suitable for exposure of both glass and plastic solar collector cover materials. Provisions are made for exposure of single and double cover assemblies to accommodate the need for exposure of both inner and outer solar collector cover materials. 1.3 This practice does not apply to cover materials for evacuated collectors or photovoltaics. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. Hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles over the Eastern Mediterranean: implications for regional direct radiative forcing under clean and polluted conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stock

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the effect of direct radiative forcing of aerosols in the eastern Mediterranean troposphere as a function of air mass composition, particle size distribution and hygroscopicity, and relative humidity (RH. During intensive field measurements on the island of Crete, Greece, the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric particles were determined using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA and a Hygroscopicity Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (H-DMA-APS. Similar to former studies, the H-TDMA identified three hygroscopic sub-fractions of particles in the sub-μm range: a more hygroscopic group, a less hygroscopic group and a nearly hydrophobic particle group. The average hygroscopic particle growth factors at 90 % RH were a significant function of particle mobility diameter (Dp: 1.42 (± 0.05 at 30 nm compared to 1.63 (± 0.07 at 250 nm. The H-DMA-APS identified up to three hygroscopic sub-fractions at mobility diameters of 1.0 and 1.2 μm. The data recorded between 12 August and 20 October 2005 were classified into four distinct synoptic-scale air mass types distinguishing between different regions of origin (western Mediterranean vs. the Aegean Sea as well as the degree of continental pollution (marine vs. continentally influenced. The hygroscopic properties of particles with diameter Dp≥150 nm showed the most pronounced dependency on air mass origin, with growth factors in marine air masses exceeding those in continentally influenced air masses. Particle size distributions and hygroscopic growth factors were used to calculate aerosol light scattering coefficients at ambient RH using a Mie model. A main result was the pronounced enhancement of particle scattering over the eastern Mediterranean due to hygroscopic growth, both in the marine and continentally influenced air masses. When RH reached its summer daytime values around 70

  17. Variations of aerosol optical depth and Angstrom parameters at a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solar irradiance is attenuated spectrally when passing through the earth's atmosphere and it is strongly dependent on sky conditions, cleanliness of the atmosphere, composition of aerosols and gaseous constituents. In this paper, aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent () and ...

  18. Meteorological support for aerosol radiometers: special aerosol sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Yu.E.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Fertman, D.E.

    1988-07-01

    A new method is described for transfer of the measure of unit volume activity of radioactive aerosols from the state special standard to the working instruments in the stage of regular operation. The differences from existing methods are examined. The principal distinction of the new method is the possibility of direct (rather than through the conversion factor) determination and subsequent testing of the fundamental meteorological characteristics of the instrument by means of special aerosol sources, which fosters a significant reduction in individual components of the indicated errors.

  19. Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, M.; Ichoku, C.; Leptoukh, G.

    2011-01-01

    Global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols have been extensively observed and measured using both spaceborne and ground-based instruments, especially during the last decade. Unique properties retrieved by the different instruments contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. However, some of these measurements remain underutilized, largely due to the complexities involved in analyzing them synergistically. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have established a Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS), which consistently samples and generates the spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient) of aerosol products from multiple spacebome sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Samples of satellite aerosol products are extracted over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations as well as over other locations of interest such as those with available ground-based aerosol observations. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between Level-2 aerosol observations from multiple sensors. In addition, the available well-characterized co-located ground-based data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products. This paper explains the sampling methodology and concepts used in MAPSS, and demonstrates specific examples of using MAPSS for an integrated analysis of multiple aerosol products.

  20. Calibration of aerosol radiometers. Special aerosol sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Yu.E.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Fertman, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Problems of calibration of artificial aerosol radiometry and information-measurement systems of radiometer radiation control, in particular, are considered. Special aerosol source is suggested, which permits to perform certification and testing of aerosol channels of the systems in situ without the dismantling

  1. Revisiting olfactory classical conditioning of the proboscis extension response in honey bees: a step toward standardized procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Menzel, Randolf; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Giurfa, Martin

    2012-10-15

    The honey bee Apis mellifera has emerged as a robust and influential model for the study of classical conditioning thanks to the existence of a powerful Pavlovian conditioning protocol, the olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER). In 2011, the olfactory PER conditioning protocol celebrated its 50 years since it was first introduced by Kimihisa Takeda in 1961. In this protocol, individually harnessed honey bees are trained to associate an odor with sucrose solution. The resulting olfactory learning is fast and induces robust olfactory memories that have been characterized at the behavioral, neuronal and molecular levels. Despite the success of this protocol for studying the bases of learning and memory at these different levels, innumerable procedural variants have arisen throughout the years, which render comparative analyses of behavioral performances difficult. Moreover, because even slight variations in conditioning procedures may introduce significant differences in acquisition and retention performances, we revisit olfactory PER conditioning and define here a standardized framework for experiments using this behavioral protocol. To this end, we present and discuss all the methodological steps and details necessary for successful implementation of olfactory PER conditioning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross-compliance standard Ploughing in good soil moisture conditions in soil structure protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Dell'Abate

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Researches have been carried out within the framework on the EFFICOND Project, focused at evaluating the effectiveness of the standards of Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs established for Cross Compliance implementation under EC Regulation 1782/2003. In particular the standard 3.1b deals with soil structure protection through appropriate machinery use, with particular reference to ploughing in good soil moisture conditions. The study deals with the evaluation of soil structure after tillage in tilth and no-tilth conditions at soil moisture contents other than the optimum water content for tillage. The Mean Weight Diameter (MWD of water stable aggregates was used as an indicator of tillage effectiveness. The study was carried out in the period 2008-2009 at six experimental farms belonging to Research Centres and Units of the Italian Agricultural Research Council (CRA with different pedo-climatic and cropping conditions. Farm management and data collection in the different sites were carried out by the local CRA researchers and technicians. The comparison of MWD values in tilth and no tilth theses showed statistically significant differences in most cases, depending on topsoil texture. On clay, clay loam, silty clay, and silty clay loam topsoils a general and significant increase of MWD values under no tilth conditions were observed. No significant differences were observed in silt loam and sandy loam textures, probably due to the weak soil structure of the topsoils. Moreover, ploughing in good soil moisture condition determined higher crop production and less weed development than ploughing in high soil moisture conditions.

  3. Individual particle analysis of aerosols collected under haze and non-haze conditions at a high-elevation mountain site in the North China plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Li

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The North China plain is a region with megacities and huge populations. Aerosols over the highly polluted area have a significant impact on the regional and global climate. In order to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles in elevated layers there, observations were carried out at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m a.s.l. from 19 to 28 April, 2010, when the air masses were advected from the east (phase-I: 19–21 April, from the south (phase-II: 22–25 April, and from the northwest (phase-III: 26–28 April. Individual aerosol particles were identified with transmission electron microscopy (TEM, new particle formation (NPF and growth events were monitored by a wide-range particle spectrometer, and ion concentrations in PM2.5 were analyzed. During phase-I and phase-II, haze layers caused by anthropogenic pollution were observed, and a high percentage of particles were sulfur-rich (47–49%. In phase-III, the haze disappeared due to the intrusion of cold air from the northwest, and mineral dust particles from deserts were dominant (43%. NPF followed by particle growth during daytime was more pronounced on hazy than on clear days. Particle growth during daytime resulted in an increase of particle geometric mean diameter from 10–22 nm in the morning to 56–96 nm in the evening. TEM analysis suggests that sulfuric acid and secondary organic compounds should be important factors for particle nucleation and growth. However, the presence of fine anthropogenic particles (e.g., soot, metal, and fly ash embedded within S-rich particles indicates that they could weaken NPF and enhance particle growth through condensation and coagulation. Abundant mineral particles in phase-III likely suppressed the NPF processes because they supplied sufficient area on which acidic gases or acids condensed.

  4. Aerosol optical properties observation and its relationship to meteorological conditions and emission during the Chinese National Day and Spring Festival holiday in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Che, Huizheng; Zhao, Tianliang; Zhao, Hujia; Gui, Ke; Sun, Tianze; An, Linchang; Yu, Jie; Liu, Chong; Jiang, Yongcheng; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yaqiang; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2017-11-01

    The reduction of traffic flow in downtown areas during the Chinese National Day holiday and the fireworks during the Spring Festival provide a unique opportunity for investigating the impact of urban anthropogenic activities on aerosol optical properties during these important Chinese festivals in Beijing. The National Day in 2014 and 2015 and Spring Festival in 2015 and 2016 were selected as study periods. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 440 nm increased over the all holiday periods and the average AODs during the 2015 National Day, 2015 Spring Festival and 2016 Spring Festival were about 81%, 21% and 36% higher than the background levels, respectively. The average AOD in 2014 National Day holiday was lower than background level partly influenced by precipitation event. The absorption AOD (AAOD) at 440 nm showed consistent variations with the AOD and the average AAODs during the 2015 National Day, 2015 Spring Festival and 2016 Spring Festival holidays were about 75%, 19% and 23% higher than the background level, respectively. The mean values of single scattering albedo were greater than the background level during the Spring Festival holidays, whereas the values during the National Day holiday in 2015 were lower partly due to the reduction of vehicular emissions in downtown areas. Fine- and coarse-mode particle volumes during pollution periods in holidays were 0.04-0.25 μm3 and 0.03-0.15 μm3 larger than background level, respectively. The results of potential source contribution function and concentration-weighted trajectory analyses identified the areas south of Beijing as the main source regions of PM2.5 and were responsible for the extremely high PM2.5 concentrations in Beijing during the holiday periods. The findings of this study may aid understanding the effects of human activities on aerosol optical properties over Beijing area and contribute to improving regional air quality.

  5. Field Performance versus Standard Test Condition Efficiency of Tandem Solar Cells and the Specific Case of Perovskites/Silicon Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Dupre, Olivier

    2018-01-05

    Multijunction cells may offer a cost-effective route to boost the efficiency of industrial photovoltaics. For any technology to be deployed in the field, its performance under actual operating conditions is extremely important. In this perspective, we evaluate the impact of spectrum, light intensity, and module temperature variations on the efficiency of tandem devices with crystalline silicon bottom cells with a particular focus on perovskite top cells. We consider devices with different efficiencies and calculate their energy yields using field data from Denver. We find that annual losses due to differences between operating conditions and standard test conditions are similar for single-junction and four-terminal tandem devices. The additional loss for the two-terminal tandem configuration caused by current mismatch reduces its performance ratio by only 1.7% when an optimal top cell bandgap is used. Additionally, the unusual bandgap temperature dependence of perovskites is shown to have a positive, compensating effect on current mismatch.

  6. Sources and Removal of Springtime Arctic Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, M. D.; Burkart, J.; Bozem, H.; Kunkel, D.; Schulz, H.; Hanna, S.; Aliabadi, A. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Hoor, P. M.; Herber, A. B.; Leaitch, R.; Abbatt, J.

    2017-12-01

    The sources and removal mechanisms of pollution transported to Arctic regions are key factors in controlling the impact of short-lived climate forcing agents on Arctic climate. We lack a predictive understanding of pollution transport to Arctic regions largely due to poor understanding of removal mechanisms and aerosol chemical and physical processing both within the Arctic and during transport. We present vertically resolved observations of aerosol physical and chemical properties in High Arctic springtime. While much previous work has focused on characterizing episodic events of high pollutant concentrations transported to Arctic regions, here we focus on measurements made under conditions consistent with chronic Arctic Haze, which is more representative of the pollution seasonal maximum observed at long term monitoring stations. On six flights based at Alert and Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, we observe evidence for vertical variations in both aerosol sources and removal mechanisms. With support from model calculations, we show evidence for sources of partially neutralized aerosol with higher organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon content in the middle troposphere, compared to lower tropospheric aerosol with higher amounts of acidic sulfate. Further, we show evidence for aerosol depletion relative to carbon monoxide, both in the mid-to-upper troposphere and within the Arctic Boundary Layer (ABL). Dry deposition, with relatively low removal efficiency, was responsible for aerosol removal in the ABL while ice or liquid-phase scavenging was responsible for aerosol removal at higher altitudes during transport. Overall, we find that vertical variations in both regional and remote aerosol sources, and removal mechanisms, combine with long aerosol residence times to drive the properties of springtime Arctic aerosol.

  7. A review of measurement-based assessments of the aerosol direct radiative effect and forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols affect the Earth's energy budget directly by scattering and absorbing radiation and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and, thereby, affecting cloud properties. However, large uncertainties exist in current estimates of aerosol forcing because of incomplete knowledge concerning the distribution and the physical and chemical properties of aerosols as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. In recent years, a great deal of effort has gone into improving measurements and datasets. It is thus feasible to shift the estimates of aerosol forcing from largely model-based to increasingly measurement-based. Our goal is to assess current observational capabilities and identify uncertainties in the aerosol direct forcing through comparisons of different methods with independent sources of uncertainties. Here we assess the aerosol optical depth (τ, direct radiative effect (DRE by natural and anthropogenic aerosols, and direct climate forcing (DCF by anthropogenic aerosols, focusing on satellite and ground-based measurements supplemented by global chemical transport model (CTM simulations. The multi-spectral MODIS measures global distributions of aerosol optical depth (τ on a daily scale, with a high accuracy of ±0.03±0.05τ over ocean. The annual average τ is about 0.14 over global ocean, of which about 21%±7% is contributed by human activities, as estimated by MODIS fine-mode fraction. The multi-angle MISR derives an annual average AOD of 0.23 over global land with an uncertainty of ~20% or ±0.05. These high-accuracy aerosol products and broadband flux measurements from CERES make it feasible to obtain observational constraints for the aerosol direct effect, especially over global the ocean. A number of measurement-based approaches estimate the clear-sky DRE (on solar radiation at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA to be about -5.5±0.2 Wm-2 (median ± standard error from various methods over the global ocean. Accounting for thin cirrus

  8. Total aerosol effect

    OpenAIRE

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Rotstayn, Leon; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andrew; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto A.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of precipitation formation. In former assessments of aerosol radiative forcings, these effects have not been quantified. Also, with global aerosol-climate models simulating interactively aerosols and cloud microphysical prope...

  9. Stability of left ventricular longitudinal and circumferential deformation over time and standard loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmala, Wojciech; Przewlocka-Kosmala, Monika; Sharman, James E; Schultz, Martin G; Marwick, Thomas H

    2017-09-01

    Load dependence is an important source of variation in left ventricular (LV) deformation. This impacts on the precision of information obtained from serial measurements. However, it is clinically important to distinguish actual myocardial dysfunction from changes associated with altered loading conditions. We sought to investigate the association of changes of loading parameters with changes in LV longitudinal (GLS) and circumferential (GCS) strains. Baseline and a 12-month follow-up 2D echocardiograms were performed in 191 Stage A heart failure patients with uncomplicated hypertension. These patients underwent simultaneous measurement of conventional and central blood pressures (BPs) and haemodynamic measurements by applanation tonometry. Significant, but weak correlations (r = 0.15-0.28) of LV strain parameters and their changes over the follow-up period were shown for the majority of LV afterload-associated variables, including central and brachial systolic, diastolic, and mean BPs; 24-h systolic and diastolic BPs; peak reservoir and excess pressures; central augmented pressure (CAP) and pulse pressure; augmentation index; and arterial elastance index (EaI). Central mean BP, EaI, and changes in CAP and EaI over follow-up were independent contributors to LV deformation in multivariable analysis. No improvement in the Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement and correlation coefficients was seen with LV afterload correction of GLS and GCS using central BP indices. LV longitudinal and circumferential strains in a population without apparent heart disease is relatively insusceptible to changes in LV afterload within physiological range, which, therefore, seem unlikely to be a significant confounder in repeated GLS or GCS observations. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A review of exposure conditions and possible health effects associated with aerosol and vapour from low-aromatic oil-based drilling fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, I

    1990-04-01

    This paper reviews investigations on possible health effects after inhalation of aerosol and vapour from the low-aromatic oil-based drilling fluids which have replaced the diesel-based fluids. The main advantage of the low-aromatic base oils with respect to health hazard is their lower volatility. However, some aliphatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons are distributed more efficiently to the brain than are the corresponding aromatic ones. Reducing the content of aromatic hydrocarbons becomes particularly important when the upper end of the boiling point range is sufficiently high for the base oil to contain carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). As a result of enclosure and local extract ventilation it has been possible to reduce time-weighted average concentrations of aerosol and vapour to below 100 mg m-3. Effects on the central nervous system have only been observed at higher concentrations of the actual hydrocarbons, and male rat hydrocarbon nephropathy is not considered predictive of a normal human response. Insufficient information is available on possible long-term effects of exposure to the low-aromatic oil-based drilling fluids, especially regarding carcinogenicity and changes in the lungs.

  11. On the Implementation of the IEC 61850 Standard: Will Different Manufacturer Devices Behave Similarly under Identical Conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad El Hariri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Standardization in smart grid communications is necessary to facilitate complex operations of modern power system functions. However, the strong coupling between the cyber and physical domains of the contemporary grid exposes the system to vulnerabilities and thus places more burden on standards’ developers. As such, standards need to be continuously assessed for reliability and are expected to be implemented properly on field devices. However, the actual implementation of common standards varies between vendors, which may lead to different behaviors of the devices even if present under similar conditions. The work in this paper tested the implementation of the International Electro-technical Commission’s Generic Object Oriented Substation Event GOOSE (IEC 61850 GOOSE messaging protocol on commercial Intelligent Electronic Devices (IEDs and the open source libiec61850 library—also used in commercial devices—which showed different behaviors in identical situations. Based on the test results and analysis of some features of the IEC 61850 GOOSE protocol itself, this paper proposes guidelines and recommendations for proper implementation of the standard functionalities.

  12. Trend analysis of the Aerosol Optical Thickness and Ångström Exponent derived from the global AERONET spectral observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J.; von Hoyningen-Huene, W.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    Regular aerosol observations based on well-calibrated instruments have led to a better understanding of the aerosol radiative budget on Earth. In recent years, these instruments have played an important role in the determination of the increase of anthropogenic aerosols by means of long-term studies. Only few investigations regarding long-term trends of aerosol optical characteristics (e.g. Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) and Ångström Exponent (ÅE)) have been derived from ground-based observations. This paper aims to derive and discuss linear trends of AOT (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm) and ÅE (440-870 nm) using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) spectral observations. Additionally, temporal trends of Coarse- and Fine-mode dominant AOTs (CAOT and FAOT) have been estimated by applying an aerosol classification based on accurate ÅE and Ångström Exponent Difference (ÅED). In order to take into account the fact that cloud disturbance is having a significant influence on the trend analysis of aerosols, we introduce a weighted least squares regression depending on two weights: (1) monthly standard deviation and (2) Number of Observations (NO) per month. Temporal increase of FAOTs prevails over regions dominated by emerging economy or slash-burn agriculture in East Asia and South Africa. On the other hand, insignificant or negative trends for FAOTs are detected over Western Europe and North America. Over desert regions, both increase and decrease of CAOTs are observed depending on meteorological conditions.

  13. A Two-Sinker Densimeter for Accurate Measurements of the Density of Natural Gases at Standard Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Markus; Kleinrahm, Reiner; Glos, Stefan; Wagner, Wolfgang; Span, Roland; Schley, Peter; Uhrig, Martin

    2010-05-01

    A special reference densimeter has been developed for accurate measurements of densities of natural gases and multicomponent gas mixtures at standard conditions of temperature and pressure ( T s = 273.15 K and p s = 0.101325 MPa). The densimeter covers the range from 0.7 kg · m-3 to 1.3 kg · m-3; the total measurement uncertainty in density is 0.020 % (95 % level of confidence). The measurement principle used is the two-sinker method, which is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The certified calibration laboratory of E.ON Ruhrgas AG, Germany, uses this densimeter to verify the standard densities of certified calibration gases (binary and multicomponent gas mixtures). Moreover, the densimeter is used to determine the compositions of commercially available binary gas mixtures with a small uncertainty of (0.01-0.03) mol%.

  14. ARE METHODS USED TO INTEGRATE STANDARDIZED MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS A CONDITIONING FACTOR OF THE LEVEL OF INTEGRATION? AN EMPIRICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merce Bernardo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Organizations are increasingly implementing multiple Management System Standards (M SSs and considering managing the related Management Systems (MSs as a single system.The aim of this paper is to analyze if methods us ed to integrate standardized MSs condition the level of integration of those MSs. A descriptive methodology has been applied to 343 Spanish organizations registered to, at least, ISO 9001 and ISO 14001. Seven groups of these organizations using different combinations of methods have been analyzed Results show that these organizations have a high level of integration of their MSs. The most common method used, was the process map. Organizations using a combination of different methods achieve higher levels of integration than those using a single method. However, no evidence has been found to confirm the relationship between the method used and the integration level achieved.

  15. Assessing behind armor blunt trauma (BABT) under NIJ standard-0101.04 conditions using human torso models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Andrew C; Ward, Emily E; O'Connor, James V; Roberts, Jack C

    2008-06-01

    Although soft armor vests serve to prevent penetrating wounds and dissipate impact energy, the potential of nonpenetrating injury to the thorax, termed behind armor blunt trauma, does exist. Currently, the ballistic resistance of personal body armor is determined by impacting a soft armor vest over a clay backing and measuring the resulting clay deformation as specified in National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Standard-0101.04. This research effort evaluated the efficacy of a physical Human Surrogate Torso Model (HSTM) as a device for determining thoracic response when exposed to impact conditions specified in the NIJ Standard. The HSTM was subjected to a series of ballistic impacts over the sternum and stomach. The pressure waves propagating through the torso were measured with sensors installed in the organs. A previously developed Human Torso Finite Element Model (HTFEM) was used to analyze the amount of tissue displacement during impact and compared with the amount of clay deformation predicted by a validated finite element model. All experiments and simulations were conducted at NIJ Standard test conditions. When normalized by the response at the lowest threat level (Level I), the clay deformations for the higher levels are relatively constant and range from 2.3 to 2.7 times that of the base threat level. However, the pressures in the HSTM increase with each test level and range from three to seven times greater than Level I depending on the organ. The results demonstrate the abilities of the HSTM to discriminate between threat levels, impact conditions, and impact locations. The HTFEM and HSTM are capable of realizing pressure and displacement differences because of the level of protection, surrounding tissue, and proximity to the impact point. The results of this research provide insight into the transfer of energy and pressure wave propagation during ballistic impacts using a physical surrogate and computational model of the human torso.

  16. Informing Aerosol Transport Models With Satellite Multi-Angle Aerosol Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbacher, J.; Patadia, F.; Petrenko, M.; Martin, M. Val; Chin, M.; Gaitley, B.; Garay, M.; Kalashnikova, O.; Nelson, D.; Scollo, S.

    2011-01-01

    As the aerosol products from the NASA Earth Observing System's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) mature, we are placing greater focus on ways of using the aerosol amount and type data products, and aerosol plume heights, to constrain aerosol transport models. We have demonstrated the ability to map aerosol air-mass-types regionally, and have identified product upgrades required to apply them globally, including the need for a quality flag indicating the aerosol type information content, that varies depending upon retrieval conditions. We have shown that MISR aerosol type can distinguish smoke from dust, volcanic ash from sulfate and water particles, and can identify qualitative differences in mixtures of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol components in urban settings. We demonstrated the use of stereo imaging to map smoke, dust, and volcanic effluent plume injection height, and the combination of MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depth maps to constrain wildfire smoke source strength. This talk will briefly highlight where we stand on these application, with emphasis on the steps we are taking toward applying the capabilities toward constraining aerosol transport models, planet-wide.

  17. Enhancement factors for resuspended aerosol radioactivity: Effects of topsoil disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinn, J.H.

    1991-11-01

    The enhancement factor for airborne radionuclides resuspended by wind is defined as the ratio of the activity density (Bq g -1 ) in the aerosol to the activity density in the underlying surface of contaminated soil. Enhancement factors are useful for assessment of worst-case exposure scenarios and transport conditions, and are one of the criteria for setting environmental standards for radioactivity in soil. This paper presents results of experimental studies where resuspension of 239 Pu was measured when air concentrations were equilibrated to the soil surface. Enhancement factors were observed for several types of man-made disturbances (bulldozer-blading, soil raking, vacuum-cleaning) and natural disturbances (springtime thaw, soil-drying, wildfire). For some cases, enhancement factors are compared over range of geographical locations (Bikini Atoll, California, Nevada, and South Carolina). The particle-size distributions of aerosol activity are compared to particle-size distributions of the underlying soil

  18. Protein folding: Defining a standard set of experimental conditions and a preliminary kinetic data set of two-state proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxwell, Karen L.; Wildes, D.; Zarrine-Afsar, A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent years have seen the publication of both empirical and theoretical relationships predicting the rates with which proteins fold. Our ability to test and refine these relationships has been limited, however, by a variety of difficulties associated with the comparison of folding and unfolding ...... efforts is to set uniform standards for the experimental community and to initiate an accumulating, self-consistent data set that will aid ongoing efforts to understand the folding process....... constructs. The lack of a single approach to data analysis and error estimation, or even of a common set of units and reporting standards, further hinders comparative studies of folding. In an effort to overcome these problems, we define here a consensus set of experimental conditions (25°C at pH 7.0, 50 m...... rates, thermodynamics, and structure across diverse sets of proteins. These difficulties include the wide, potentially confounding range of experimental conditions and methods employed to date and the difficulty of obtaining correct and complete sequence and structural details for the characterized...

  19. THE BECOMING OF INFORMATION CULTURE IN THE CONDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL STATE EDUCATIONAL STANDARD OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION’S IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lapina Svetlana Nikolaevna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the approaches to the definition of “information culture”, its components, the system of personal values needed to succeed in the information and professional activities, the problem of students’ information culture formation in the modern information society. The analysis of the implementation of the Federal state educational standard of vocational education in "teaching in primary schools" is held. The variable part cycles of the basic professional educational programs is distributed on the base of the local professional community’s research and additional competencies. Such subjects as “Russian language and Speech”, “The cultural world of students”, “Ethics in business communication” are introduced through the variable part of the educational standard. The general amount of hours for such subject as «Computer science, information and communication technology in the professional activity" is increased. The results of the special study reveal the level of information culture of the future primary school teachers. According to the results it can be concluded that insufficient level of information culture’s development is impossible for a successful career and self-fulfillment in the present conditions. The article proposes the directions for the formation of future primary school teachers’ information culture in the implementation of the federal state educational standard of vocational education. According to the results of this research it is possible to tell about the effectiveness of these directions’ implementation.

  20. THE BECOMING OF INFORMATION CULTURE IN THE CONDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL STATE EDUCATIONAL STANDARD OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION’S IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Светлана Николаевна Лапина

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the approaches to the definition of “information culture”, its components, the system of personal values needed to succeed in the information and professional activities, the problem of students’ information culture formation in the modern information society. The analysis of the implementation of the Federal state educational standard of vocational education in "teaching in primary schools" is held. The variable part cycles of the basic professional educational programs is distributed on the base of the local professional community’s research and additional competencies. Such subjects as “Russian language and Speech”, “The cultural world of students”, “Ethics in business communication” are introduced through the variable part of the educational standard. The general amount of hours for such subject as «Computer science, information and communication technology in the professional activity" is increased. The results of the special study reveal the level of information culture of the future primary school teachers. According to the results it can be concluded that insufficient level of information culture’s development is impossible for a successful career and self-fulfillment in the present conditions. The article proposes the directions for the formation of future primary school teachers’ information culture in the implementation of the federal state educational standard of vocational education. According to the results of this research it is possible to tell about the effectiveness of these directions’ implementation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-5-31

  1. Shallow Cumulus Sensitivity to Aerosol within a Fixed Meteorology Framework (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigel, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Shallow cumulus clouds are critically important to the global energy budget and the general circulation of the earth. These clouds occupy up to a quarter of the global cloud fraction and they play a crucial role in mixing boundary layer properties with the free troposphere. As such, shallow cumulus clouds have a large effect on the vertical thermodynamic structure of the lower atmosphere, which then directly impacts larger scale circulations. Therefore, changes to the vertical mixing rates of cumulus clouds by forcing mechanisms such as aerosol loading can result in significant consequences for the general circulation of the Earth. This study aims to isolate changes in cumulus vertical mixing by a single forcing mechanism - aerosol loading. In order to isolate aerosol induced changes in cumulus mixing that are solely due to microphysical-dynamical interactions and not from mean-state thermodynamic instability changes caused by aerosol-cloud-precipitation feedbacks, this study uses a new approach of forcing shallow cumulus clouds in large eddy simulations (LESs). Nine (9) LESs with systematic variations in aerosol concentration and model domain size are initialized with the well-studied trade cumulus regime of the Barbados Oceanographic and Meteorological Experiment (BOMEX). However, rather than using the standard BOMEX forcing functions for each of the nine (9) simulations, which can result in different mean thermodynamic states when variations in aerosol concentration are imposed, the horizontal mean states of the following four (4) model prognosed variables are held fixed: liquid potential temperature (θl), total water (qt), zonal wind (u) and meridional wind (v). This guarantees that all variations of the cloud populations and their role in mixing are strictly the result of local microphysical-dynamical changes that result from changes in aerosol concentrations and not from changes to bulk conditional instability. Results from the nine (9) simulations show

  2. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  3. Characteristics of solid aerosols produced by optical catapulting studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, F. J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2010-08-01

    Optical catapulting (OC) constitutes an effective method to transport small amounts of different materials in the form of a solid aerosol. In this report, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the analysis of those aerosols produced by OC. For this purpose, materials were catapulted using a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser. A second Q-switch Nd:YAG laser was used for LIBS analysis of the ejected particles. Data processing of aerosols was conducted using conditional data analysis. Also, the standard deviation method was used for the qualitative identification of the ejected particles. Two modes of interaction in OC (OC with focused or defocused pulses) have been evaluated and discussed. LIBS demonstrates that the distribution (spreading) of the ejected particles along the propagation axis increased as a function of the interpulse delay time. The mass density and the thickness of the target also play an important role in OC-LIBS.

  4. Growth curves and the international standard: How children's growth reflects challenging conditions in rural Timor-Leste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Phoebe R; Sanders, Katherine A; Judge, Debra S

    2018-02-01

    Population-specific growth references are important in understanding local growth variation, especially in developing countries where child growth is poor and the need for effective health interventions is high. In this article, we use mixed longitudinal data to calculate the first growth curves for rural East Timorese children to identify where, during development, deviation from the international standards occurs. Over an eight-year period, 1,245 children from two ecologically distinct rural areas of Timor-Leste were measured a total of 4,904 times. We compared growth to the World Health Organization (WHO) standards using z-scores, and modeled height and weight velocity using the SuperImposition by Translation And Rotation (SITAR) method. Using the Generalized Additive Model for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) method, we created the first growth curves for rural Timorese children for height, weight and body mass index (BMI). Relative to the WHO standards, children show early-life growth faltering, and stunting throughout childhood and adolescence. The median height and weight for this population tracks below the WHO fifth centile. Males have poorer growth than females in both z-BMI (p = .001) and z-height-for-age (p = .018) and, unlike females, continue to grow into adulthood. This is the most comprehensive investigation to date of rural Timorese children's growth, and the growth curves created may potentially be used to identify future secular trends in growth as the country develops. We show significant deviation from the international standard that becomes most pronounced at adolescence, similar to the growth of other Asian populations. Males and females show different growth responses to challenging conditions in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Standards of Conditions During Preparations for the Summer Paralympic Games Between 2004 and 2012 Assessed by Polish Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobiecka Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The quality of training conditions affects sporting success, injuries and health. The aim of the work was to present the conditions during the preparations of Polish athletes for the Summer Paralympic Games 2004-2012. The study encompassed 271 paralympians: Athens (91, Beijing (89 and London (91, competing in 13 disciplines. The research was based on a two-part questionnaire by Kłodecka-Różalska adjusted for disabled sports, and was conducted one month before each PG. Part 1 contained 20 closed-ended questions regarding conditions during preparations, while Part 2 concerned socio-demographic and sports-related data. Three levels of conditions: good, satisfactory and poor, were identified. The analysis showed that while the relationships between the athletes were good in all the preparatory periods, the co-operation with the paralympic coaches worsened. The standards of accommodation, food and sports facilities lowered. Personal orthopaedic supply was satisfactory in London; personal sporting equipment was good at all PG. The quality of medical care was the highest in London. The co-operation with physicians, physiotherapists and massage therapists was satisfactory. Consultations with the dietician were sporadic and assessed as poor. Psychological consultations were rare but satisfactory in Beijing and London. Contacts with the mass media were poor at all PG. Although combining private life, work, and education with sport was satisfactory, it was increasingly difficult to manage, particularly before London. The conditions during preparations for the PG 2004-2012 varied. Improvement was noticed only in the quality of medical care and personal orthopaedic supply.

  6. Standards of Conditions During Preparations for the Summer Paralympic Games Between 2004 and 2012 Assessed by Polish Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiecka, Joanna; Gawroński, Wojciech; Kądziołka, Marta; Kruszelnicki, Paweł; Kłodecka-Różalska, Jadwiga; Plinta, Ryszard

    2015-11-22

    The quality of training conditions affects sporting success, injuries and health. The aim of the work was to present the conditions during the preparations of Polish athletes for the Summer Paralympic Games 2004-2012. The study encompassed 271 paralympians: Athens (91), Beijing (89) and London (91), competing in 13 disciplines. The research was based on a two-part questionnaire by Kłodecka-Różalska adjusted for disabled sports, and was conducted one month before each PG. Part 1 contained 20 closed-ended questions regarding conditions during preparations, while Part 2 concerned socio-demographic and sports-related data. Three levels of conditions: good, satisfactory and poor, were identified. The analysis showed that while the relationships between the athletes were good in all the preparatory periods, the co-operation with the paralympic coaches worsened. The standards of accommodation, food and sports facilities lowered. Personal orthopaedic supply was satisfactory in London; personal sporting equipment was good at all PG. The quality of medical care was the highest in London. The co-operation with physicians, physiotherapists and massage therapists was satisfactory. Consultations with the dietician were sporadic and assessed as poor. Psychological consultations were rare but satisfactory in Beijing and London. Contacts with the mass media were poor at all PG. Although combining private life, work, and education with sport was satisfactory, it was increasingly difficult to manage, particularly before London. The conditions during preparations for the PG 2004-2012 varied. Improvement was noticed only in the quality of medical care and personal orthopaedic supply.

  7. A standardized approach for estimating the permeability of plastic films to soil fumigants under various field and environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papiernik, Sharon K; Yates, Scott R; Chellemi, Daniel O

    2011-01-01

    Minimizing atmospheric emissions of soil fumigants is critical for protecting human and environmental health. Covering the soil surface with a plastic tarp is a common approach to restrict fumigant emissions. The mass transfer of the fumigant vapors through the tarp is often the rate-limiting factor in fumigant emissions. An approach for standardizing measurements of film permeability is proposed that is based on determining the resistance (R) of films to diffusion of fumigants. Using this approach, values were determined for more than 200 film-chemical combinations under a range of temperature, relative humidity, and film handling conditions. Resistance to diffusion was specific for each fumigant/film combination, with the largest range of values observed for the fumigant chloropicrin. For each fumigant, decreased with increasing temperature. Changes in film permeability due to increases in temperature or field installation were generally less than a factor of five. For one film, values determined under conditions of very high relative humidity (approximately 100%) were at least 100 times lower than when humidity was very low (approximately 2%). This approach simplifies the selection of appropriate films for soil fumigation by providing rapid, reproducible, and precise measurements of their permeability to specific fumigants and application conditions. by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  9. Aerosols and environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth's radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  10. Status of the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of aerosols assumed to be characteristic of those generated during light water reactor (LWR) accident sequences and released into containment is being studied. Recent activities in the ORNL Aerosol Release and Transport Project include studies of (1) the thermal hydraulic conditions existing during Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) aerosol tests in steam-air environments, (2) the thermal output and aerosol mass generation rates for plasma torch aerosol generators, and (3) the influence of humidity on the shape of agglomerated aerosols of various materials. A new Aerosol-Moisture Interaction Test (AMIT) facility was prepared at the NSPP site to accommodate the aerosol shape studies; several tests with Fe 2 O 3 aerosol have been conducted. In addition to the above activities a special study was conducted to determine the suitability of the technique of aerosol production by plasma torch under the operating conditions of future tests of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. 3 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  11. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of aerosol deposition in pebble beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhosi, Margaret Msongi

    2007-12-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor is a high temperature gas cooled reactor which uses helium gas as a coolant. The reactor uses spherical graphite pebbles as fuel. The fuel design is inherently resistant to the release of the radioactive material up to high temperatures; therefore, the plant can withstand a broad spectrum of accidents with limited release of radionuclides to the environment. Despite safety features of the concepts, these reactors still contain large inventories of radioactive materials. The transport of most of the radioactive materials in an accident occurs in the form of aerosol particles. In this dissertation, the limits of applicability of existing computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT to the prediction of aerosol transport have been explored. The code was run using the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models to determine the effects of different turbulence models on the prediction of aerosol particle deposition. Analyses were performed for up to three unit cells in the orthorhombic configuration. For low flow conditions representing natural circulation driven flow, the laminar flow model was used and the results were compared with existing experimental data for packed beds. The results compares well with experimental data in the low flow regime. For conditions corresponding to normal operating of the reactor, analyses were performed using the standard k-ɛ turbulence model. From the inertial deposition results, a correlation that can be used to estimate the deposition of aerosol particles within pebble beds given inlet flow conditions has been developed. These results were converted into a dimensionless form as a function of a modified Stokes number. Based on results obtained in the laminar regime and for individual pebbles, the correlation developed for the inertial impaction component of deposition is believed to be credible. The form of the correlation developed also allows these results to be applied to pebble beds of different

  12. Aerosols and Climate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    atmosphere, aerosols have the potential to significantly influ- ence the climate. The global impact of aerosol is assessed as the change imposed on planetary radiation measured in Wm-2, which alters the global temperature. Effect of aerosols on the solar radiation (also called radiative forcing) can be broadly classified into ...

  13. Aerosols and Climate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Large warming by elevated aerosols · AERONET – Global network (NASA) · Slide 25 · Slide 26 · Slide 27 · Slide 28 · Slide 29 · Slide 30 · Slide 31 · Long-term trends - Trivandrum · Enhanced warming over Himalayan-Gangetic region · Aerosol Radiative Forcing Over India _ Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment ...

  14. Aerosols and Climate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aerosols and Climate · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Principal efforts in improving the understanding of Climate impact of aerosols - · Slide 8 · Observations of Aerosol – from space (Spatial variation) · AOD around Indian region from AVHRR · Dust absorption efficiency over Great Indian Desert from Satellite ...

  15. The Disposition of Water Supply and Demand in Cameroon: What Potential for what Standard of Living Conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumar Saidou Baba

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim/purpose - This paper attempts to appraise the potential of water resources for Cameroon and the standard of living conditions confronting people in the country. Design/methodology/approach - A simple descriptive method of data analysis is adopted using analytical tools such as percentages, tables, and means to achieve the objectives of the inquiry. Data for the study were generated from personal observations in one hand and collected from water resources literature, on the other hand. Findings - With the help of the data gathered, the paper establishes that despite the existence of abundant water resources in Cameroon the standard of living conditions of people with respect to basic needs of survival such as drinking water, improved sanitation services, and electricity supply is far below expectation. Research implications/limitations - The main implication of the study is that in spite of the surplus volume of water resources (325.96 km3 or 95.12% of annual total water resources endowment in Cameroon, the population benefits marginally from it due to the mismanagement of resources and misplacement of priorities as obtained in most sub-Saharan African countries. One limitation of this study is that the use of limited primary data in the investigation offers no room toward establishing the extent of water resources allocation to the various users of water in the country. Originality/value/contribution - The paper suggests that the government of Cameroon should encourage the population to run community basic social services projects and subsidize the activities of such ventures in kind through technical assistance or in cash.

  16. Dynamic behavior structural response and capacity evaluation of the standardized WWER-1000 nuclear power plants subjected to severe loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambriashvili, Y.K.; Krutzik, N.J.

    1993-01-01

    In order to verify the structural capacity of standardized WWER-1000 MW nuclear power plants, comprehensive static and dynamic analyses were performed in cooperation between Siemens and Atomenergoprojekt. The main goal of these investigations was to perform of a number of seismic analyses of standardized WWER-1000 reactor buildings on the basis of 13 given seismological inputs, taking into account the local soil conditions at 17 different sites defined by in-situ investigations. The analyses were based on appropriate mathematical models (equivalent beam models as well as detailed spatial surface element models) of the coupled vibrating structures (base structure, outer structure, containment, inner structure) and of the layered soil. The analyses were mainly performed using the indirect method (substructure method). Based on the results of the seismic analysis as well as the results of static analysis (pressure and temperature due to LOCA, dead weight, prestressing) an assessment was made of the seismic safety of the containment and the reactor building. Using a complex 3-dimensional model of the structure and the soil, the influence of the flexibility of the basement structure on the structural response was also studied. The structural analyses of the WWER-1000 reactor building led to the conclusion that its design accounts well for the main factors governing the dynamic behavior of the building. The assessment of the forces acting in the structures shows that the bearing capacity of the analyzed building structure corresponds to an earthquake intensity of about 0.2 g to 0.25 g

  17. Standard Practice for Exposure of Solar Collector Cover Materials to Natural Weathering Under Conditions Simulating Stagnation Mode

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for the exposure of solar collector cover materials to the natural weather environment at elevated temperatures that approximate stagnation conditions in solar collectors having a combined back and edge loss coefficient of less than 1.5 W/(m2 · °C). 1.2 This practice is suitable for exposure of both glass and plastic solar collector cover materials. Provisions are made for exposure of single and double cover assemblies to accommodate the need for exposure of both inner and outer solar collector cover materials. 1.3 This practice does not apply to cover materials for evacuated collectors, photovoltaic cells, flat-plate collectors having a combined back and edge loss coefficient greater than 1.5 W/(m2 ·° C), or flat-plate collectors whose design incorporates means for limiting temperatures during stagnation. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard t...

  18. Field characterization of the PM2.5 Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor: insights into the composition, sources, and processes of fine particles in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunjiang; Tang, Lili; Croteau, Philip L.; Favez, Olivier; Sun, Yele; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wang, Zhuang; Couvidat, Florian; Albinet, Alexandre; Zhang, Hongliang; Sciare, Jean; Prévôt, André S. H.; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2017-12-01

    A PM2.5-capable aerosol chemical speciation monitor (Q-ACSM) was deployed in urban Nanjing, China, for the first time to measure in situ non-refractory fine particle (NR-PM2.5) composition from 20 October to 19 November 2015, along with parallel measurements of submicron aerosol (PM1) species by a standard Q-ACSM. Our results show that the NR-PM2.5 species (organics, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium) measured by the PM2.5-Q-ACSM are highly correlated (r2 > 0.9) with those measured by a Sunset Lab OC  /  EC analyzer and a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA). The comparisons between the two Q-ACSMs illustrated similar temporal variations in all NR species between PM1 and PM2.5, yet substantial mass fractions of aerosol species were observed in the size range of 1-2.5 µm. On average, NR-PM1-2.5 contributed 53 % of the total NR-PM2.5, with sulfate and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) being the two largest contributors (26 and 27 %, respectively). Positive matrix factorization of organic aerosol showed similar temporal variations in both primary and secondary OAs between PM1 and PM2.5, although the mass spectra were slightly different due to more thermal decomposition on the capture vaporizer of the PM2.5-Q-ACSM. We observed an enhancement of SOA under high relative humidity conditions, which is associated with simultaneous increases in aerosol pH, gas-phase species (NO2, SO2, and NH3) concentrations and aerosol water content driven by secondary inorganic aerosols. These results likely indicate an enhanced reactive uptake of SOA precursors upon aqueous particles. Therefore, reducing anthropogenic NOx, SO2, and NH3 emissions might not only reduce secondary inorganic aerosols but also the SOA burden during haze episodes in China.

  19. Radiological/biological/aerosol removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Jeffery J

    2015-03-17

    An air filter replacement system for existing buildings, vehicles, arenas, and other enclosed airspaces includes a replacement air filter for replacing a standard air filter. The replacement air filter has dimensions and air flow specifications that allow it to replace the standard air filter. The replacement air filter includes a filter material that removes radiological or biological or aerosol particles.

  20. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robock, Alan [Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, 14 College Farm Road, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, conducting climate model experiments with standard stratospheric aerosol injection scenarios, has found that insolation reduction could keep the global average temperature constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform; the tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without geoengineering. If geoengineering were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5–10 times the rates from gradual global warming. The prospect of geoengineering working may reduce the current drive toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and there are concerns about commercial or military control. Because geoengineering cannot safely address climate change, global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt are crucial to address anthropogenic global warming.

  1. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robock, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, conducting climate model experiments with standard stratospheric aerosol injection scenarios, has found that insolation reduction could keep the global average temperature constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform; the tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without geoengineering. If geoengineering were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5–10 times the rates from gradual global warming. The prospect of geoengineering working may reduce the current drive toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and there are concerns about commercial or military control. Because geoengineering cannot safely address climate change, global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt are crucial to address anthropogenic global warming

  2. Characterization of aerosols from industrial fabrication of mixed-oxide nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Newton, G.J.; Yeh, H.C.; Edison, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    Information on the characteristics of aerosols in three industrial facilities during fabrication of uranium and plutonium mixed-oxide reactor fuels is summarized. Aerosol characterization included measurements of air concentrations particle size distributions, particle morphology, aerosol electrostatic charge characteristics and in vitro dissolution. These were the physicochemical properties considered most relevant to evaluating the consequences of potential accidents wherein aerosols might be released from their normal containment and inhaled by workers. Alpha radioactivity concentrations in air ranged about 1-15,000 nCi/l, depending on the fabrication step and facility. Particle size distributions were approximately log-normal, and activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) ranged 1.6-3.5 μm, with a geometric standard deviation of about 1.6. Electron microscopy indicated that particles were irregularly shaped agglomerates. In vitro dissolution half-times were on the order of years, with some dependence on aerosol size, temperature history and fabrication step. No unique potential exposure conditions were found in any step of the fabrication processes

  3. Observation-based estimation of aerosol-induced reduction of planetary boundary layer height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Sun, Jianning; Ding, Aijun; Wang, Minghuai; Guo, Weidong; Fu, Congbin

    2017-09-01

    Radiative aerosols are known to influence the surface energy budget and hence the evolution of the planetary boundary layer. In this study, we develop a method to estimate the aerosol-induced reduction in the planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) based on two years of ground-based measurements at a site, the Station for Observing Regional Processes of the Earth System (SORPES), at Nanjing University, China, and radiosonde data from the meteorological station of Nanjing. The observations show that increased aerosol loads lead to a mean decrease of 67.1 W m-2 for downward shortwave radiation (DSR) and a mean increase of 19.2 W m-2 for downward longwave radiation (DLR), as well as a mean decrease of 9.6 Wm-2 for the surface sensible heat flux (SHF) in the daytime. The relative variations of DSR, DLR and SHF are shown as a function of the increment of column mass concentration of particulate matter (PM2.5). High aerosol loading can significantly increase the atmospheric stability in the planetary boundary layer during both daytime and nighttime. Based on the statistical relationship between SHF and PM2.5 column mass concentrations, the SHF under clean atmospheric conditions (same as the background days) is derived. In this case, the derived SHF, together with observed SHF, are then used to estimate changes in the PBLH related to aerosols. Our results suggest that the PBLH decreases more rapidly with increasing aerosol loading at high aerosol loading. When the daytime mean column mass concentration of PM2.5 reaches 200 mg m-2, the decrease in the PBLH at 1600 LST (local standard time) is about 450 m.

  4. Aerosol behavior in the reactor containment building during severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthion, Y.; Lhiaubet, G.; Gauvain, J.

    1984-07-01

    Thermohydraulic behavior inside a PWR containment during severe accident depends on decay heat transferred to the sump water by aerosol gravitational settling and deposition. Conversely, aerosol behavior depends on thermal hydraulic conditions, especially atmosphere moisture for soluble aerosol GsI, and CsOH. Therefore, a small iterative procedure between thermo-hydraulic and aerosol calculations has been performed in order to evaluate the importance of this coupling between the two phenomena. In this paper, it is shown that with this procedure and using our codes JERICHO, RICOCHET and AEROSOLS/B1, the steam condensation on aerosols is an important phenomenon for a correct estimation of the attenuation factor of the suspended mass of aerosols in the airborne of the containment. Then, we have a more realistic assessment of the source term released by the containment

  5. PIXE analysis of atmospheric aerosol and hydrometeor particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeneveld, K.O.; Hofmann, D.; Georgii, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol and hydrometeor particles act decisively on our weather, climate and thereby on all living conditions on Earth. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis has been demonstrated to be an extremely valuable tool for quantitative and qualitative elemental analysis of aerosol particles and hydrometeors. Reliability and detection limits of PIXE are determined, including comparison with other techniques. Aerosol particles are collected on a global scale in ground stations, or by ships and by planes. Correlation between wind direction and elemental composition of atmospheric aerosols, elemental particle size distributions of the tropospheric aerosol, aerosol elemental composition in particle size fractions in the case of long range transport, transport pathways of pollution aerosol, and trace element content precipitation are discussed. Hydrometeors were studied in the form of rain, snow, fog, dew and frost. The time dependence of the melting process of snow was studied in detail, in particular the washout phenomena of impurity ions. (orig.)

  6. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Holzer-Popp

    2013-08-01

    photometer observations for the different versions of each algorithm globally (land and coastal and for three regions with different aerosol regimes. The analysis allowed for an assessment of sensitivities of all algorithms, which helped define the best algorithm versions for the subsequent round robin exercise; all algorithms (except for MERIS showed some, in parts significant, improvement. In particular, using common aerosol components and partly also a priori aerosol-type climatology is beneficial. On the other hand the use of an AATSR-based common cloud mask meant a clear improvement (though with significant reduction of coverage for the MERIS standard product, but not for the algorithms using AATSR. It is noted that all these observations are mostly consistent for all five analyses (global land, global coastal, three regional, which can be understood well, since the set of aerosol components defined in Sect. 3.1 was explicitly designed to cover different global aerosol regimes (with low and high absorption fine mode, sea salt and dust.

  7. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Griesfeller, J.; Martynenko, D.; Klüser, L.; Bevan, S.; Davies, W.; Ducos, F.; Deuzé, J. L.; Graigner, R. G.; Heckel, A.; von Hoyningen-Hüne, W.; Kolmonen, P.; Litvinov, P.; North, P.; Poulsen, C. A.; Ramon, D.; Siddans, R.; Sogacheva, L.; Tanre, D.; Thomas, G. E.; Vountas, M.; Descloitres, J.; Griesfeller, J.; Kinne, S.; Schulz, M.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-08-01

    observations for the different versions of each algorithm globally (land and coastal) and for three regions with different aerosol regimes. The analysis allowed for an assessment of sensitivities of all algorithms, which helped define the best algorithm versions for the subsequent round robin exercise; all algorithms (except for MERIS) showed some, in parts significant, improvement. In particular, using common aerosol components and partly also a priori aerosol-type climatology is beneficial. On the other hand the use of an AATSR-based common cloud mask meant a clear improvement (though with significant reduction of coverage) for the MERIS standard product, but not for the algorithms using AATSR. It is noted that all these observations are mostly consistent for all five analyses (global land, global coastal, three regional), which can be understood well, since the set of aerosol components defined in Sect. 3.1 was explicitly designed to cover different global aerosol regimes (with low and high absorption fine mode, sea salt and dust).

  8. TRAK App Suite: A Web-Based Intervention for Delivering Standard Care for the Rehabilitation of Knee Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasić, Irena; Button, Kate; Divoli, Anna; Gupta, Satyam; Pataky, Tamas; Pizzocaro, Diego; Preece, Alun; van Deursen, Robert; Wilson, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Standard care for the rehabilitation of knee conditions involves exercise programs and information provision. Current methods of rehabilitation delivery struggle to keep up with large volumes of patients and the length of treatment required to maximize the recovery. Therefore, the development of novel interventions to support self-management is strongly recommended. Such interventions need to include information provision, goal setting, monitoring, feedback, and support groups, but the most effective methods of their delivery are poorly understood. The Internet provides a medium for intervention delivery with considerable potential for meeting these needs. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a Web-based app and to conduct a preliminary review of its practicability as part of a complex medical intervention in the rehabilitation of knee disorders. This paper describes the development, implementation, and usability of such an app. An interdisciplinary team of health care professionals and researchers, computer scientists, and app developers developed the TRAK app suite. The key functionality of the app includes information provision, a three-step exercise program based on a standard care for the rehabilitation of knee conditions, self-monitoring with visual feedback, and a virtual support group. There were two types of stakeholders (patients and physiotherapists) that were recruited for the usability study. The usability questionnaire was used to collect both qualitative and quantitative information on computer and Internet usage, task completion, and subjective user preferences. A total of 16 patients and 15 physiotherapists participated in the usability study. Based on the System Usability Scale, the TRAK app has higher perceived usability than 70% of systems. Both patients and physiotherapists agreed that the given Web-based approach would facilitate communication, provide information, help recall information, improve understanding

  9. Interaction of radon progeny with atmospheric aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawska, Lidia

    1994-01-01

    The radiological health hazard due to the airborne radon progeny depends on three factors (i) radon concentration in the air, (ii) radon progeny concentration, and (iii) active particle size distribution. Conclusions as to the health hazard cannot be drawn without full understanding of the interaction mechanisms between radon progeny and atmospheric aerosols. The aim of this work was to study the interaction mechanisms between radon progeny, natural environmental aerosols and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). The experiments were performed under controlled laboratory conditions of radon concentration (1.85 and 3.70 Bq m -3 ), relative humidity (35, 50, 75 and 95%) and ETS generation. The size distribution of radioactivity carrying aerosols was measured using a wire screen diffusion battery system and size distribution of all airborne aerosols using a differential mobility particle sizer. The paper presents and discusses the results of activity size distribution and radon progeny concentration measurements for different environmental conditions. 7 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Interaction of radon progeny with atmospheric aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morawska, Lidia [Queensland Univ. of Technology, Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Centre for Medical and Health Physics

    1994-12-31

    The radiological health hazard due to the airborne radon progeny depends on three factors (i) radon concentration in the air, (ii) radon progeny concentration, and (iii) active particle size distribution. Conclusions as to the health hazard cannot be drawn without full understanding of the interaction mechanisms between radon progeny and atmospheric aerosols. The aim of this work was to study the interaction mechanisms between radon progeny, natural environmental aerosols and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). The experiments were performed under controlled laboratory conditions of radon concentration (1.85 and 3.70 Bq m{sup -3}), relative humidity (35, 50, 75 and 95%) and ETS generation. The size distribution of radioactivity carrying aerosols was measured using a wire screen diffusion battery system and size distribution of all airborne aerosols using a differential mobility particle sizer. The paper presents and discusses the results of activity size distribution and radon progeny concentration measurements for different environmental conditions. 7 refs., 2 tabs.

  11. Comparison of Gasoline Direct-Injection (GDI) and Port Fuel Injection (PFI) Vehicle Emissions: Emission Certification Standards, Cold-Start, Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Potential, and Potential Climate Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Georges; Saleh, Rawad; Zhao, Yunliang; Presto, Albert A; Lambe, Andrew T; Frodin, Bruce; Sardar, Satya; Maldonado, Hector; Maddox, Christine; May, Andrew A; Drozd, Greg T; Goldstein, Allen H; Russell, Lynn M; Hagen, Fabian; Robinson, Allen L

    2017-06-06

    Recent increases in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards have led to widespread adoption of vehicles equipped with gasoline direct-injection (GDI) engines. Changes in engine technologies can alter emissions. To quantify these effects, we measured gas- and particle-phase emissions from 82 light-duty gasoline vehicles recruited from the California in-use fleet tested on a chassis dynamometer using the cold-start unified cycle. The fleet included 15 GDI vehicles, including 8 GDIs certified to the most-stringent emissions standard, superultra-low-emission vehicles (SULEV). We quantified the effects of engine technology, emission certification standards, and cold-start on emissions. For vehicles certified to the same emissions standard, there is no statistical difference of regulated gas-phase pollutant emissions between PFIs and GDIs. However, GDIs had, on average, a factor of 2 higher particulate matter (PM) mass emissions than PFIs due to higher elemental carbon (EC) emissions. SULEV certified GDIs have a factor of 2 lower PM mass emissions than GDIs certified as ultralow-emission vehicles (3.0 ± 1.1 versus 6.3 ± 1.1 mg/mi), suggesting improvements in engine design and calibration. Comprehensive organic speciation revealed no statistically significant differences in the composition of the volatile organic compounds emissions between PFI and GDIs, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Therefore, the secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation potential of the exhaust does not depend on engine technology. Cold-start contributes a larger fraction of the total unified cycle emissions for vehicles meeting more-stringent emission standards. Organic gas emissions were the most sensitive to cold-start compared to the other pollutants tested here. There were no statistically significant differences in the effects of cold-start on GDIs and PFIs. For our test fleet, the measured 14.5% decrease in CO 2 emissions from GDIs was much greater than

  12. Analysis of shipboard aerosol optical thickness measurements from multiple sunphotometers aboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment - Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Mark A.; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Frouin, Robert; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Reynolds, R. Michael; Pietras, Christophe; Fargion, Giulietta; Quinn, Patricia; Thieuleux, Francois

    2005-01-01

    Marine sunphotometer measurements collected aboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment - Asia (ACE-Asia) are used to evaluate the ability of complementary instrumentation to obtain the best possible estimates of aerosol optical thickness and Angstrom exponent from ships at sea. A wide range of aerosol conditions, including clean maritime conditions and highly polluted coastal environments, were encountered during the ACE-Asia cruise. The results of this study suggest that shipboard hand-held sunphotometers and fast-rotating shadow-band radiometers (FRSRs) yield similar measurements and uncertainties if proper measurement protocols are used and if the instruments are properly calibrated. The automated FRSR has significantly better temporal resolution (2 min) than the hand-held sunphotometers when standard measurement protocols are used, so it more faithfully represents the variability of the local aerosol structure in polluted regions. Conversely, results suggest that the hand-held sunphotometers may perform better in clean, maritime air masses for unknown reasons. Results also show that the statistical distribution of the Angstrom exponent measurements is different when the distributions from hand-held sunphotometers are compared with those from the FRSR and that the differences may arise from a combination of factors

  13. Modeling of aerosol dynamics - Aerosol size and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyak, R.A.; Peterson, T.W.

    1980-01-01

    A mechanism for the evolution of the size and composition of an aerosol particle is investigated by developing a model that includes the transfer of gaseous pollutants to the surface of existing aerosol particles, the transfer of the pollutants across the gas-particle interface, and the reaction of dissolved species within the aerosol particle. The reaction mechanisms considered include homogeneous gas-phase and heterogeneous solution chemistry. Aerosol particles evolving within an urban plume and within power-plant and smelter plumes are studied, along with the evolution of particle size and chemical composition for regions of various relative humidities, with particular emphasis on aqueous chemistry in the low-humidity environments of the southwestern U.S. A simulation of a copper smelting complex in central Arizona indicates that all particles shrink from their original size as plume humidity approaches background relative humidity, that most secondary sulfate formation occurs in the near-plume region, and that the final particle pH is in the range 2.0-2.2 for a wide range of physical conditions

  14. 40 CFR 80.527 - Under what conditions may motor vehicle diesel fuel subject to the 15 ppm sulfur standard be...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... vehicle diesel fuel subject to the 15 ppm sulfur standard be downgraded to motor vehicle diesel fuel... Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel Standards and Requirements § 80.527 Under what conditions may motor vehicle diesel fuel subject to the 15...

  15. Evaluation of the Ross fast solution of Richards' equation in unfavourable conditions for standard finite element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crevoisier, D.; Voltz, M.; Chanzy, A.

    2009-01-01

    Ross [Ross PJ. Modeling soil water and solute transport - fast, simplified numerical solutions. Agron J 2003;95:1352-61] developed a fast, simplified method for solving Richards' equation. This non-iterative 1D approach, using Brooks and Corey [Brooks RH, Corey AT. Hydraulic properties of porous media. Hydrol. papers, Colorado St. Univ., Fort Collins: 1964] hydraulic functions, allows a significant reduction in computing time while maintaining the accuracy of the results. The first aim of this work is to confirm these results in a more extensive set of problems, including those that would lead to serious numerical difficulties for the standard numerical method. The second aim is to validate a generalisation of the Ross method to other mathematical representations of hydraulic functions. The Ross method is compared with the standard finite element model, Hydrus-1D [Simunek J, Sejna M, Van Genuchten MTh. The HYDRUS-1D and HYDRUS-2D codes for estimating unsaturated soil hydraulic and solutes transport parameters. Agron Abstr 357; 1999]. Computing time, accuracy of results and robustness of numerical schemes are monitored in 1D simulations involving different types of homogeneous soils, grids and hydrological conditions. The Ross method associated with modified Van Genuchten hydraulic functions [Vogel T, Cislerova M. On the reliability of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity calculated from the moisture retention curve. Transport Porous Media 1988:3:1-15] proves in every tested scenario to be more robust numerically, and the compromise of computing time/accuracy is seen to be particularly improved on coarse grids. Ross method run from 1.25 to 14 times faster than Hydrus-1D. (authors)

  16. Steam condensation modelling in aerosol codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunbar, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    The principal subject of this study is the modelling of the condensation of steam into and evaporation of water from aerosol particles. These processes introduce a new type of term into the equation for the development of the aerosol particle size distribution. This new term faces the code developer with three major problems: the physical modelling of the condensation/evaporation process, the discretisation of the new term and the separate accounting for the masses of the water and of the other components. This study has considered four codes which model the condensation of steam into and its evaporation from aerosol particles: AEROSYM-M (UK), AEROSOLS/B1 (France), NAUA (Federal Republic of Germany) and CONTAIN (USA). The modelling in the codes has been addressed under three headings. These are the physical modelling of condensation, the mathematics of the discretisation of the equations, and the methods for modelling the separate behaviour of different chemical components of the aerosol. The codes are least advanced in area of solute effect modelling. At present only AEROSOLS/B1 includes the effect. The effect is greater for more concentrated solutions. Codes without the effect will be more in error (underestimating the total airborne mass) the less condensation they predict. Data are needed on the water vapour pressure above concentrated solutions of the substances of interest (especially CsOH and CsI) if the extent to which aerosols retain water under superheated conditions is to be modelled. 15 refs

  17. In-cloud processes of methacrolein under simulated conditions – Part 3: Hygroscopic and volatility properties of the formed secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Monod

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The hygroscopic and volatility properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA produced from the nebulization of solutions after aqueous phase photooxidation of methacrolein was experimentally studied in a laboratory, using a Volatility-Hygroscopicity Tandem DMA (VHTDMA. The obtained SOA were 80% 100°C-volatile after 5 h of reaction and only 20% 100°C-volatile after 22 h of reaction. The Hygroscopic Growth Factor (HGF of the SOA produced from the nebulization of solutions after aqueous-phase photooxidation of methacrolein is 1.34–1.43, which is significantly higher than the HGF of SOA formed by gas-phase photooxidation of terpenes, usually found almost hydrophobic. These hygroscopic properties were confirmed for SOA formed by the nebulization of the same solutions where NaCl was added. The hygroscopic properties of the cloud droplet residuals decrease with the reaction time, in parallel with the formation of more refractory compounds. This decrease was mainly attributed to the 250°C-refractive fraction (presumably representative of the highest molecular weight compounds, which evolved from moderately hygroscopic (HGF of 1.52 to less hygroscopic (HGF of 1.36. Oligomerization is suggested as a process responsible for the decrease of both volatility and hygroscopicity with time. The NaCl seeded experiments enabled us to show that 19±4 mg L−1 of SOA was produced after 9.5 h of reaction and 41±9 mg L−1 after 22 h of in-cloud reaction. Because more and more SOA is formed as the reaction time increases, our results show that the reaction products formed during the aqueous-phase OH-oxidation of methacrolein may play a major role in the properties of residual particles upon the droplet's evaporation. Therefore, the specific physical properties of SOA produced during cloud processes should be taken into account for a global estimation of SOA and their atmospheric impacts.

  18. Scanning Mobile Lidar for Aerosol Tracking and Biological Aerosol Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tingyao; Bergant, Klemen; Filipčič, Andrej; Forte, Biagio; Gao, Fei; Stanič, Samo; Veberič, Darko; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2010-05-01

    Optical properties of non-biological aerosols containing aromatic hydrocarbons, such as industrial chemicals and engine exhausts, have already been thoroughly studied using remote sensing techniques. However, because of their complex composition and characteristics, the identification of biological aerosols, such as fungi, pollen and bacteria that are present in the environment remains a rather difficult task. The collection of information on both non-biological and biological aerosols is of great importance for understanding their interrelation, physical and chemical properties and their influence on human health and the environment. Biological and non-biological aerosols can be simultaneously detected, tracked and identified by a scanning mobile Mie-fluorescence lidar. The device developed at the University of Nova Gorica can perform azimuth and zenith angle scans with an angular resolution of 0.1°, as well as operate in both day and night-time conditions. Aerosols of biological origin are identified through the detection of the fluorescence of the amino acid tryptophan which is present in almost all substances of biological origin. In our system, the transmitter is a solid state Nd:YAG laser which is capable of simultaneous emission of light at a base wavelength of 1064 nm (IR) and its quadrupled wavelength of 266 nm (UV) at a maximum repetition rate of 10 Hz. Tryptophan contained in biological aerosols is excited by the 266 nm laser pulses and the returning fluorescence signals are detected in the spectral band centered at 295 nm. The receiver is a Newtonian telescope which uses a 300 mm parabolic mirror to direct received light into three detection channels - two elastic backscatter channels (IR and UV) and a fluorescence channel. First experiments show that the detection range of the lidar reaches 10 km in the IR channel and 3 km in the UV channel. Based on the preliminary simulations of the signal-to-noise ratio, the detection range for biological

  19. Standardize or Diversify Experimental Conditions in Ecotoxicology? A Case Study on Herbicide Toxicity to Larvae of Two Anuran Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2017-11-01

    Despite a steeply increasing number of ecotoxicological studies on the effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms, studies assessing the adequacy and reliability of different experimental approaches have remained scarce. We scrutinized effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide on larvae of two European anuran amphibians by estimating species-specific LC50 values, assessing how an additional stress factor may influence outcomes, and investigating whether replicate experiments yielded qualitatively the same results. We exposed Rana dalmatina and Bufo bufo tadpoles to two predator treatments (no predator vs. predator chemical cues) combined with varying herbicide concentrations, repeated the experiment with a subset of the experimental treatments and partly with slight modifications 1 week later and assessed survival. Our results indicated that the herbicide was moderately toxic to tadpoles. The presence of predator chemical cues did not affect the lethality of the herbicide in either species. The estimated sensitivity of R. dalmatina tadpoles varied considerably across experiments, whereas in case of B. bufo LC50 values remained very similar. Our results suggest that differences in the experimental setup may often have no influence on the measured effects of pesticides, whereas replicated experiments can deliver widely differing results in other cases, perhaps depending on the studied species, the population origin of the tested individuals, or the test conditions. This draws attention to the suggestion that strict standardization may not deliver widely applicable insights into the toxicity of contaminants and, instead, intentionally introducing variation into the design of ecotoxicological experiments and replicating entire experiments may prove highly beneficial.

  20. Zoobenthic Indicators of Environmental Condition At Great Lakes Coastal Margins Derived From Standardized Multivariate Analyses Across Anthropogenic Stress Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciborowski, J. J.; Johnson, L. B.; Gathman, J. P.; Brady, V. J.; Holland, J.; Hollenhorst, T.; Schuldt, J. A.; Host, G. E.; Richards, C.

    2005-05-01

    We used multivariate methods to derive and map multiple indices of zoobenthic community composition across anthropogenic stress gradients at Great Lakes coastal margins (shorelines - 10 m depth). We collected up to 24 benthic samples and measured environmental characteristics in each of 150 "segment sheds", ranging from minimally disturbed (=reference) to greatly modified. "K" distinct suites of co-occurring biota from minimally stressed locations were identified using cluster analysis. Discriminant function analysis identified the environmental attributes of sample locations best distinguishing each of the suites (=habitat types). Benthic community data of all samples from each habitat type (ranging across the entire stress gradient) were individually ordinated. The benthic taxa best characterizing the ends of each stress gradient were used to create a gradient-specific biotic index with a standardized scale (0=minimum, 100=maximum stress) for each habitat type, providing a stress-specific score for each sample. Contour surface analysis of mapped sample-specific scores shows the spatial pattern and limits of the overall biotic response to stress, independently of habitat type. The spatial concordance between biotic index scores and environmental stress can indicate the degree to which equivalent-to-reference conditions exist in a particular area.

  1. Global Aerosol Effect Retrieval From Passive Hyperspectral Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L. G.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols can have a significant local direct radiative effect (DRE), while the global average aerosol DRE remains highly uncertain. Modelling studies have shown that the magnitude and sign of the aerosol DRE at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) depend on the scene, especially on the albedo of the scene under the aerosol layer. It changes with cloud fraction, from large positive for overcast conditions when aerosols are present above the cloud, to large negative for clear sky ocean scenes. Observational studies, which are necessary to constrain the model studies, have been scarce. The results of modelling studies depend strongly on the assumed aerosol properties. Observational studies also need to assume aerosol type and geophysical properties to derive aerosol optical properties from radiation measurements. This introduces large uncertainties in the retrieved aerosol DRE. Furthermore, the retrieval of aerosols over clouds from passive instruments is difficult, due to the large optical thickness of clouds. Therefore, observational studies of aerosol direct and indirect effects from passive satellite instruments are invariably restricted to aerosol studies close to the cloud edges. We have developed a method to derive the aerosol DRE for smoke over clouds directly from passive satellite hyperspectral reflectance measurements, independent of aerosol micro- physical property assumptions. This allows us to assess the local aerosol DRE from passive imagery directly on a pixel to pixel basis, even over clouds. The solar radiative absorption by smoke layers is quantified using the TOA reflectance spectrum from the ultraviolet (UV) to the shortwave infrared (SWIR). UV- absorbing aerosols have a strong signature that can be detected using UV reflectance measurements. Since the aerosol extinction optical thickness decreases rapidly with increasing wavelength for smoke, the properties of the scene below the aerosol layer can be retrieved in the SWIR, where aerosol

  2. Assessment of Humidity Conditions and Trends Based on Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SEPI Over Different Climatic Regions of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghabaei S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Drought is a recurrent feature of climate that caused by deficiency of precipitation over time. Due to the rise in water demand and alarming climate change, recent year’s observer much focus on drought and drought conditions. A multiple types of deficits and relevant temporal scales can be achieved through the construction of a joint indicator that draws on information from multiple sources and will therefore enable better assessment of drought characteristics including return period, persistent and severity. The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI combines information from precipitation and temperature in the form of water surplus or deficit according to Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI. Rainfall over some regions of Iran during some resent year was below average while mean and maximum temperatures were very high during this period, as was evaporation. This would suggest that drought conditions were worse than in previous recent periods with similarly low rainfall. The main objective of this study is to assess the influences of humidity on the SPEI index and investigate its relation with SPI and Reconnaissance Drought Index (RDI over six different climatic regions in Iran. Materials and Methods: Iran has different climatic conditions which vary from desert in central part to costal wet near the Caspian Sea. In this study the selection of stations was done based on Alijani et al (2008 climatic classification. We chose 11 synoptic stations from six different climatic classes including costal wet (Rasht and Babolsar, semi mountains (Mashhad and Tabriz, mountains (Shiraz and Khoram Abad, semi-arid (Tehran and Semnan, arid (Kerman and Yazd and costal desert (Bandar Abas. The Meteorological datasets for the aforementioned stations were obtained from the Iran Meteorological Organization (IRIMO for the period 1960-2010. The compiled data included average monthly values of precipitation, minimum and maximum air

  3. Effects of relative humidity on aerosol light scattering in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zieger

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth in the ambient atmosphere. Their optical properties – especially the aerosol light scattering – are therefore strongly dependent on the ambient relative humidity (RH. In-situ light scattering measurements of long-term observations are usually performed under dry conditions (RH>30–40%. The knowledge of this RH effect is of eminent importance for climate forcing calculations or for the comparison of remote sensing with in-situ measurements. This study combines measurements and model calculations to describe the RH effect on aerosol light scattering for the first time for aerosol particles present in summer and fall in the high Arctic. For this purpose, a field campaign was carried out from July to October 2008 at the Zeppelin station in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. The aerosol light scattering coefficient σsp(λ was measured at three distinct wavelengths (λ=450, 550, and 700 nm at dry and at various, predefined RH conditions between 20% and 95% with a recently developed humidified nephelometer (WetNeph and with a second nephelometer measuring at dry conditions with an average RH<10% (DryNeph. In addition, the aerosol size distribution and the aerosol absorption coefficient were measured. The scattering enhancement factor f(RH, λ is the key parameter to describe the RH effect on σsp(λ and is defined as the RH dependent σsp(RH, λ divided by the corresponding dry σsp(RHdry, λ. During our campaign the average f(RH=85%, λ=550 nm was 3.24±0.63 (mean ± standard deviation, and no clear wavelength dependence of f(RH, λ was observed. This means that the ambient scattering coefficients at RH=85% were on average about three times higher than the dry measured in-situ scattering coefficients. The RH dependency of the recorded f(RH, λ can be well described by an empirical one-parameter equation. We used a simplified

  4. Resolving the Aerosol Piece of the Global Climate Picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Factors affecting our ability to calculate climate forcing and estimate model predictive skill include direct radiative effects of aerosols and their indirect effects on clouds. Several decades of Earth-observing satellite observations have produced a global aerosol column-amount (AOD) record, but an aerosol microphysical property record required for climate and many air quality applications is lacking. Surface-based photometers offer qualitative aerosol-type classification, and several space-based instruments map aerosol air-mass types under favorable conditions. However, aerosol hygroscopicity, mass extinction efficiency (MEE), and quantitative light absorption, must be obtained from in situ measurements. Completing the aerosol piece of the climate picture requires three elements: (1) continuing global AOD and qualitative type mapping from space-based, multi-angle imagers and aerosol vertical distribution from near-source stereo imaging and downwind lidar, (2) systematic, quantitative in situ observations of particle properties unobtainable from space, and (3) continuing transport modeling to connect observations to sources, and extrapolate limited sampling in space and time. At present, the biggest challenges to producing the needed aerosol data record are: filling gaps in particle property observations, maintaining global observing capabilities, and putting the pieces together. Obtaining the PDFs of key particle properties, adequately sampled, is now the leading observational deficiency. One simplifying factor is that, for a given aerosol source and season, aerosol amounts often vary, but particle properties tend to be repeatable. SAM-CAAM (Systematic Aircraft Measurements to Characterize Aerosol Air Masses), a modest aircraft payload deployed frequently could fill this gap, adding value to the entire satellite data record, improving aerosol property assumptions in retrieval algorithms, and providing MEEs to translate between remote-sensing optical constraints

  5. Investigation on aerosol transport in containment cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parozzi, F.; Chatzidakis, S.; Housiadas, C.; Gelain, T.; Nahas, G.; Plumecocq, W.; Vendel, J.; Herranz, L.E.; Hinis, E.; Journeau, C.; Piluso, P.; Malgarida, E.

    2005-01-01

    Under severe accident conditions, the containment leak-tightness could be threatened by energetic phenomena that could yield a release to the environment of nuclear aerosols through penetrating concrete cracks. As few data are presently available to quantify this aerosol leakage, a specific action was launched in the framework of the Santar Project of the European 6 th Framework Programme. In this context, both theoretical and experimental investigations have been managed to develop a model that can readily be applied within a code like Aster (Accident Source Term Evaluation Code). Particle diffusion, settling, turbulent deposition, diffusiophoresis and thermophoresis have been considered as deposition mechanisms inside the crack path. They have been encapsulated in numerical models set up to reproduce experiments with small tubes and capillaries and simulate the plug formation. Then, an original lagrangian approach has been used to evaluate the crack retention under typical PWR accident conditions, comparing its predictions with those given by the eulerian approach implemented in the ECART code. On the experimental side, the paper illustrates an aerosol production and measurement system developed to validate aerosol deposition models into cracks and the results that can be obtained: a series of tests were performed with monodispersed fluorescein aerosols injected into a cracked concrete sample. A key result that should be further explored refers to the high enhancement of aerosol retention that could be due to steam condensation. Recommendations concerning future experimentation are also given in the paper. (author)

  6. Aerosol filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.; Gilbert, H.

    1982-01-01

    Significant developments in high-efficiency filtration for nuclear applications are reviewed for the period 1968 to 1980. Topics of special interest include (1) factory (bench) and in-place test methods, (2) new developments in paper and filter unit construction methods, (3) vented containment air cleaning systems for liquid-metal fast breeder reactors and light-water-moderated reactors, and (4) decontamination of off-gases from nuclear waste volume-reduction processes. Standards development has been vigorously pursued during this period, but advances in filtration theory have been few. One of the significant changes likely to occur in the immediate future is adoption of the European style of high-efficiency particulate air filters instead of those which have been in service for the past three decades to obtain the benefits of having almost twice as much filter paper in the same filter cartridge

  7. Aerosol filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.; Gilbert, H.

    1981-01-01

    Significant developments in high efficiency filtration for nuclear applications are reviewed for the period 1968 to 1980. Topics of special interest include factory (bench) and in-place test methods, new developments in paper and filter unit construction methods, vented containment air cleaning systems for LMFBR and light water moderated reactors, and decontamination of offgases from nuclear waste volume reduction processes. It is noted that standards development has been vigorously pursued during this period but that advances in filtration theory have been few. One of the significant changes likely to occur in the immediate future is adoption of the European style of HEPA filters for those that have been in service for the past three decades to obtain the benefits of having almost twice as much filter paper in the same filter cartridge. 71 references

  8. PROFESSIONAL TEACHERS’ DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATIONAL COMPLEXES IN THE CONDITIONS OF INTRODUCTION OF THE FEDERAL STATE EDUCATIONAL STANDARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Sidenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RETRACTED ARTICLEThe aim of this publication is to familiarize readers with the particularities of training of school teams for the introduction of the Federal State Educational Standard (hereinafter – FSES in the initial stage and considering the features of creating a component of model, namely, program of management training to the introduction of the (FSES. The purpose of the study is to developmethodological bases of construction models of implementation of the Federal state educational standard as a system innovation.Methods. The theoretical and methodological basis of the investigation involves: concepts of motivation of work and reflexive-humanistic psychology; ideas of contextual and projective training, and also acmeological approach to continuous education of adults.Results and scientific novelty. The specifics of the program of professional development of shots for education corresponding to modern realities are described. This program assumes preparation of the school teams consisting of heads of the educational organizations, their deputies, methodologists and teachers. Adequate forms of carrying out internal and correspondence occupations with the organization of productive educational activity of listeners are selected; the complex of tasks for course and intersession occupations is developed. Training of listeners according to the developed program is based as the organizational and pedagogical cascade and cluster model combining resident instruction of the managerial personnel in the organizations of system of professional development with their innovative activity in the educational organizations. The course includes some levels: the basic, technological and organizational-activity-based. The basic level assumes development of the maintenance of FSES and development of innovative potential of listeners; technological level – technologies of conducting group work on development of FSES are mastered

  9. Marine Aerosols and Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah D; Thornton, Daniel C O

    2018-01-03

    The role of marine bioaerosols in cloud formation and climate is currently so uncertain that even the sign of the climate forcing is unclear. Marine aerosols form through direct emissions and through the conversion of gas-phase emissions to aerosols in the atmosphere. The composition and size of aerosols determine how effective they are in catalyzing the formation of water droplets and ice crystals in clouds by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles, respectively. Marine organic aerosols may be sourced both from recent regional phytoplankton blooms that add labile organic matter to the surface ocean and from long-term global processes, such as the upwelling of old refractory dissolved organic matter from the deep ocean. Understanding the formation of marine aerosols and their propensity to catalyze cloud formation processes are challenges that must be addressed given the major uncertainties associated with aerosols in climate models.

  10. Marine Aerosols and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Sarah D.; Thornton, Daniel C. O.

    2018-01-01

    The role of marine bioaerosols in cloud formation and climate is currently so uncertain that even the sign of the climate forcing is unclear. Marine aerosols form through direct emissions and through the conversion of gas-phase emissions to aerosols in the atmosphere. The composition and size of aerosols determine how effective they are in catalyzing the formation of water droplets and ice crystals in clouds by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles, respectively. Marine organic aerosols may be sourced both from recent regional phytoplankton blooms that add labile organic matter to the surface ocean and from long-term global processes, such as the upwelling of old refractory dissolved organic matter from the deep ocean. Understanding the formation of marine aerosols and their propensity to catalyze cloud formation processes are challenges that must be addressed given the major uncertainties associated with aerosols in climate models.

  11. Distribution of hydrogen within the HDR-containment under severe accident conditions. OECD standard problem. Final comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwat, H.

    1992-08-01

    The present report summarizes the results of the International Standard Problem Exercise ISP-29, based on the HDR Hydrogen Distribution Experiment E11.2. Post-test analyses are compared to experimentally measured parameters, well-known to the analysis. This report has been prepared by the Institute for Reactor Dynamics and Reactor Safety of the Technical University Munich under contract with the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) which received funding for this activity from the German Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) under the research contract RS 792. The HDR experiment E11.2 has been performed by the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in the frame of the project 'Projekt HDR-Sicherheitsprogramm' sponsored by the BMFT. Ten institutions from eight countries participated in the post-test analysis exercise which was focussing on the long-lasting gas distribution processes expected inside a PWR containment under severe accident conditions. The gas release experiment was coupled to a long-lasting steam release into the containment typical for an unmitigated small break loss-of-coolant accident. In lieu of pure hydrogen a gas mixture consisting of 15% hydrogen and 85% helium has been applied in order to avoid reaching flammability during the experiment. Of central importance are common overlay plots comparing calculated transients with measurements of the global pressure, the local temperature-, steam- and gas concentration distributions throughout the entire HDR containment. The comparisons indicate relatively large margins between most calculations and the experiment. Having in mind that this exercise was specified as an 'open post-test' analysis of well-known measured data the reasons for discrepancies between measurements and simulations were extensively discussed during a final workshop. It was concluded that analytical shortcomings as well as some uncertainties of experimental boundary conditions may be responsible for deviations

  12. Development of a Global Validation Package for Satellite Oceanic Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrieval Based on AERONET Observations and Its Application to NOAA/NESDIS Operational Aerosol Retrievals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tom X.-P.; Stowe, Larry L.; Smirnov, Alexander; Crosby, David; Sapper, John; McClain, Charles R.

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, a global validation package for satellite aerosol optical thickness retrieval using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations as ground truth is described. To standardize the validation procedure, the optimum time-space match-up window, the ensemble statistical analysis method, the best selection of AERONET channels, and the numerical scheme used to interpolate/extrapolate these observations to satellite channels have been identified through sensitivity studies. The package is shown to be a unique tool for more objective validation and intercomparison of satellite aerosol retrievals, helping to satisfy an increasingly important requirement of the satellite aerosol remote sensing community. Results of applying the package to the second-generation operational aerosol observational data (AEROBS) from the NOAA-14 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) in 1998 and to the same year aerosol observation data [Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System-Single Scanner Foodprint version 4 (CERES-SSF4)] from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS) are presented as examples of global validation. The usefulness of the package for identifying improvements to the aerosol optical thickness retrieval algorithm is also demonstrated.The principal causes of systematic errors in the current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) operational aerosol optical thickness retrieval algorithm have been identified and can be reduced significantly, if the correction and adjustment suggested from the global validation are adopted. Random error in the retrieval is identified to be a major source of error on deriving the effective Ångström wavelength exponent and may be associated with regional differences in aerosol particles, which are not accounted for in the current second-generation operational algorithm. Adjustments to the

  13. Importance of Raman Lidar Aerosol Extinction Measurements for Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zaw

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a UV Raman Lidar for aerosol extinction, and combining Microwave Radiometer derived Liquid Water Path (LWP with Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer derived Cloud Optical depth, to get cloud effective radius (Reff, we observe under certain specialized conditions, clear signatures of the Twomey Aerosol Indirect effect on cloud droplet properties which are consistent with the theoretical bounds. We also show that the measurement is very sensitive to how far the aerosol layer is from the cloud base and demonstrate that surface PM25 is far less useful. Measurements from both the DOE ARM site and new results at CCNY are presented.

  14. Analysis of aerosol agglomeration and removal mechanisms relevant to a reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, H.W.; Mulpuru, S.R.; Lindquist, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    During some Postulated accidents in a nuclear reactor, radioactive aerosols may be formed and could be released from a rupture of the primary heat transport system into the containment. The released aerosols can agglomerate and form larger aerosol particles. The airborne aerosols can be removed from containment atmosphere by deposition onto the walls and other surfaces in contact with the gas-aerosol mixture. The rate of removal of aerosols depends on the aerosol size, which, in turn, is related to the amount of agglomeration of the aerosol particles. The extent of the removal of the aerosol mass from the containment atmosphere is important in determining the potential radioactive releases to the outside atmosphere. In this paper, selected conditions have been assessed to illustrate the significance of agglomeration for situations potentially of interest in containment safety studies

  15. New satellite project Aerosol-UA: Remote sensing of aerosols in the terrestrial atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, M.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Moskalov, S.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Lukenyuk, A.; Shymkiv, A.; Udodov, E.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earth's surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  16. New Satellite Project Aerosol-UA: Remote Sensing of Aerosols in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earths surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  17. Vertical structure of aerosols and water vapor over West Africa during the African monsoon dry season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-W. Kim

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of tropospheric aerosol and water vapor transport over West Africa and the associated meteorological conditions during the AMMA SOP-0 dry season experiment, which was conducted in West Africa in January–February 2006. This study combines data from ultra-light aircraft (ULA-based lidar, airborne in-situ aerosol and gas measurements, standard meteorological measurements, satellite-based aerosol measurements, airmass trajectories, and radiosonde measurements. At Niamey (13.5° N, 2.2° E the prevailing surface wind (i.e. Harmattan was from the northeast bringing dry dusty air from the Sahara desert. High concentrations of mineral dust aerosol were typically observed from the surface to 1.5 or 2 km associated with the Saharan airmasses. At higher altitudes the prevailing wind veered to the south or southeast bringing relatively warm and humid airmasses from the biomass burning regions to the Sahel (<10° N. These elevated layers had high concentrations of biomass burning aerosol and were typically observed between altitudes of 2–5 km. Meteorological analyses show these airmasses were advected upwards over the biomass burning regions through ascent in Inter-Tropical Discontinuity (ITD zone. Aerosol vertical profiles obtained from the space-based lidar CALIOP onboard CALIPSO during January 2007 also showed the presence of dust particles (particle depolarization (δ~30%, lidar Ångström exponent (LAE<0, aerosol backscatter to extinction ratio (BER: 0.026~0.028 sr−1 at low levels (<1.5 km and biomass burning smoke aerosol (δ<10%, LAE: 0.6~1.1, BER: 0.015~0.018 sr−1 between 2 and 5 km. CALIOP data indicated that these distinct continental dust and biomass burning aerosol layers likely mixed as they advected further south over the tropical Atlantic Ocean, as indicated an intermediate values of δ (10~17%, LAE (0.16~0.18 and BER (0.0021~0.0022 sr−1.

  18. VANAM multi-compartment aerosol depletion test M2* with insoluble aerosol material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzleiter, T.

    1993-07-01

    This report presents the experimental data of VANAM experiment M2'. It was performed with an insoluble aerosol material (SnO 2 ) like the previous experiment M2 but under a modified test procedure and with an improved instrumentation. The modified test procedure of M2' which led to more distinct results, should be chosen also for the subsequent VANAM tests with other aerosol materials. The most important results are: Significantly different aerosol depletion rates in a ''dry'' steam-air atmosphere (saturated or slightly superheated conditions) or in a ''wet'' atmosphere (supersaturated conditions, fog formation). Due to diverse depletion rates, local aerosol concentration differences within the multi-compartment containment geometry develop during the experiment, reaching two orders of magnitude. (orig./HP) [de

  19. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established under Federal and State law otherwise applicable to... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the... I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Administrative Rules, Costs and Limitations § 667.274 What health...

  20. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 8, 0.08 Mechanical, Book 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    System information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet too & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards are given for plumbing, fire protection, heating, cooling, and special (drinking water cooling systems).

  1. The Impact of Statistical Adjustment on Conditional Standard Errors of Measurement in the Assessment of Physician Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Mark R.; Clauser, Brian E.; Furman, Gail E.

    2010-01-01

    The use of standardized patients to assess communication skills is now an essential part of assessing a physician's readiness for practice. To improve the reliability of communication scores, it has become increasingly common in recent years to use statistical models to adjust ratings provided by standardized patients. This study employed ordinary…

  2. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 7, 0.07 Conveying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    System information is given for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for elevators and special conveyors.

  3. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 3, 0.03 Superstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented on asset determinant factor/CAS profile codes/CAS cost process; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for beams; pre-engineered building systems; floors; roof structure; stairs; and fireproofing.

  4. Pulmonary aerosol delivery and the importance of growth dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddrell, Allen E; Lewis, David; Church, Tanya; Vehring, Reinhard; Murnane, Darragh; Reid, Jonathan P

    2017-12-01

    Aerosols are dynamic systems, responding to variations in the surrounding environmental conditions by changing in size, composition and phase. Although, widely used in inhalation therapies, details of the processes occurring on aerosol generation and during inhalation have received little attention. Instead, research has focused on improvements to the formulation of the drug prior to aerosolization and the resulting clinical efficacy of the treatment. Here, we highlight the processes that occur during aerosol generation and inhalation, affecting aerosol disposition when deposited and, potentially, impacting total and regional doses. In particular, we examine the response of aerosol particles to the humid environment of the respiratory tract, considering both the capacity of particles to grow by absorbing moisture and the timescale for condensation to occur. [Formula: see text].

  5. Retrieving aerosol in a cloudy environment: aerosol product availability as a function of spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Remer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of using satellite observations to retrieve aerosol properties in a cloudy environment is to prevent contamination of the aerosol signal from clouds, while maintaining sufficient aerosol product yield to satisfy specific applications. We investigate aerosol retrieval availability at different instrument pixel resolutions using the standard MODIS aerosol cloud mask applied to MODIS data and supplemented with a new GOES-R cloud mask applied to GOES data for a domain covering North America and surrounding oceans. Aerosol product availability is not the same as the cloud free fraction and takes into account the techniques used in the MODIS algorithm to avoid clouds, reduce noise and maintain sufficient numbers of aerosol retrievals. The inherent spatial resolution of each instrument, 0.5×0.5 km for MODIS and 1×1 km for GOES, is systematically degraded to 1×1, 2×2, 1×4, 4×4 and 8×8 km resolutions and then analyzed as to how that degradation would affect the availability of an aerosol retrieval, assuming an aerosol product resolution at 8×8 km. The analysis is repeated, separately, for near-nadir pixels and those at larger view angles to investigate the effect of pixel growth at oblique angles on aerosol retrieval availability. The results show that as nominal pixel size increases, availability decreases until at 8×8 km 70% to 85% of the retrievals available at 0.5 km, nadir, have been lost. The effect at oblique angles is to further decrease availability over land but increase availability over ocean, because sun glint is found at near-nadir view angles. Finer resolution sensors (i.e., 1×1, 2×2 or even 1×4 km will retrieve aerosols in partly cloudy scenes significantly more often than sensors with nadir views of 4×4 km or coarser. Large differences in the results of the two cloud masks designed for MODIS aerosol and GOES cloud products strongly reinforce that cloud masks must be developed with specific purposes in mind and

  6. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  7. Aerosol microphysical and radiative effects on continental cloud ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Vogel, Jonathan M.; Lin, Yun; Pan, Bowen; Hu, Jiaxi; Liu, Yangang; Dong, Xiquan; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Yung, Yuk L.; Zhang, Renyi

    2018-02-01

    Aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions represent one of the largest uncertainties in the current climate assessment. Much of the complexity arises from the non-monotonic responses of clouds, precipitation and radiative fluxes to aerosol perturbations under various meteorological conditions. In this study, an aerosol-aware WRF model is used to investigate the microphysical and radiative effects of aerosols in three weather systems during the March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observational Period campaign at the US Southern Great Plains. Three simulated cloud ensembles include a low-pressure deep convective cloud system, a collection of less-precipitating stratus and shallow cumulus, and a cold frontal passage. The WRF simulations are evaluated by several ground-based measurements. The microphysical properties of cloud hydrometeors, such as their mass and number concentrations, generally show monotonic trends as a function of cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Aerosol radiative effects do not influence the trends of cloud microphysics, except for the stratus and shallow cumulus cases where aerosol semi-direct effects are identified. The precipitation changes by aerosols vary with the cloud types and their evolving stages, with a prominent aerosol invigoration effect and associated enhanced precipitation from the convective sources. The simulated aerosol direct effect suppresses precipitation in all three cases but does not overturn the aerosol indirect effect. Cloud fraction exhibits much smaller sensitivity (typically less than 2%) to aerosol perturbations, and the responses vary with aerosol concentrations and cloud regimes. The surface shortwave radiation shows a monotonic decrease by increasing aerosols, while the magnitude of the decrease depends on the cloud type.

  8. Development of an aerosol decontamination factor evaluation method using an aerosol spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai, Taizo, E-mail: t-kanai@criepi.denken.or.jp; Furuya, Masahiro, E-mail: furuya@criepi.denken.or.jp; Arai, Takahiro, E-mail: t-arai@criepi.denken.or.jp; Nishi, Yoshihisa, E-mail: y-nishi@criepi.denken.or.jp

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Aerosol DF of each diameter is evaluable by using optical scattering method. • Outlet aerosol concentration shows exponential decay by the submergence. • This decay constant depends on the aerosol diameter. • Aerosol DF at water scrubber is described by simple equation. - Abstract: During a severe nuclear power plant accident, the release of fission products into containment and an increase in containment pressure are assumed to be possible. When the containment is damaged by excess pressure or temperature, radioactive materials are released. Pressure suppression pools, containment spray systems and a filtered containment venting system (FCVS) reduce containment pressure and reduce the radioactive release into the environment. These devices remove radioactive materials via various mechanisms. Pressure suppression pools remove radioactive materials by pool scrubbing. Spray systems remove radioactive materials by droplet−aerosol interaction. FCVS, which is installed in the exhaust system, comprises multi-scrubbers (venturi-scrubber, pool scrubbing, static mixer, metal−fiber filter and molecular sieve). For the particulate radioactive materials, its size affects the removal performance and a number of studies have been performed on the removal effect of radioactive materials. This study has developed a new means of evaluating aerosol removal efficiency. The aerosol number density of each effective diameter (light scattering equivalent diameter) is measured using an optical method, while the decontamination factor (DF) of each effective diameter is evaluated by the inlet outlet number density ratio. While the applicable scope is limited to several conditions (geometry of test section: inner diameter 500 mm × height 8.0 m, nozzle shape and air-water ambient pressure conditions), this study has developed a numerical model which defines aerosol DF as a function of aerosol diameter (d) and submergences (x).

  9. Formation of secondary organic aerosol coating on black carbon particles near vehicular emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Y. Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC emitted from incomplete combustion can result in significant impacts on air quality and climate. Understanding the mixing state of ambient BC and the chemical characteristics of its associated coatings is particularly important to evaluate BC fate and environmental impacts. In this study, we investigate the formation of organic coatings on BC particles in an urban environment (Fontana, California under hot and dry conditions using a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS. The SP-AMS was operated in a configuration that can exclusively detect refractory BC (rBC particles and their coatings. Using the −log(NOx ∕ NOy ratio as a proxy for photochemical age of air masses, substantial formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA coatings on rBC particles was observed due to active photochemistry in the afternoon, whereas primary organic aerosol (POA components were strongly associated with rBC from fresh vehicular emissions in the morning rush hours. There is also evidence that cooking-related organic aerosols were externally mixed from rBC. Positive matrix factorization and elemental analysis illustrate that most of the observed SOA coatings were freshly formed, providing an opportunity to examine SOA coating formation on rBCs near vehicular emissions. Approximately 7–20 wt % of secondary organic and inorganic species were estimated to be internally mixed with rBC on average, implying that rBC is unlikely the major condensation sink of SOA in this study. Comparison of our results to a co-located standard high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS measurement suggests that at least a portion of SOA materials condensed on rBC surfaces were chemically different from oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA particles that were externally mixed with rBC, although they could both be generated from local photochemistry.

  10. Formation of secondary organic aerosol coating on black carbon particles near vehicular emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alex K. Y.; Chen, Chia-Li; Liu, Jun; Price, Derek J.; Betha, Raghu; Russell, Lynn M.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2017-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) emitted from incomplete combustion can result in significant impacts on air quality and climate. Understanding the mixing state of ambient BC and the chemical characteristics of its associated coatings is particularly important to evaluate BC fate and environmental impacts. In this study, we investigate the formation of organic coatings on BC particles in an urban environment (Fontana, California) under hot and dry conditions using a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated in a configuration that can exclusively detect refractory BC (rBC) particles and their coatings. Using the -log(NOx / NOy) ratio as a proxy for photochemical age of air masses, substantial formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) coatings on rBC particles was observed due to active photochemistry in the afternoon, whereas primary organic aerosol (POA) components were strongly associated with rBC from fresh vehicular emissions in the morning rush hours. There is also evidence that cooking-related organic aerosols were externally mixed from rBC. Positive matrix factorization and elemental analysis illustrate that most of the observed SOA coatings were freshly formed, providing an opportunity to examine SOA coating formation on rBCs near vehicular emissions. Approximately 7-20 wt % of secondary organic and inorganic species were estimated to be internally mixed with rBC on average, implying that rBC is unlikely the major condensation sink of SOA in this study. Comparison of our results to a co-located standard high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measurement suggests that at least a portion of SOA materials condensed on rBC surfaces were chemically different from oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) particles that were externally mixed with rBC, although they could both be generated from local photochemistry.

  11. Characterization of atmospheric aerosols in Ile-de-France: Local contribution and Long range transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuesta, J.E.

    2006-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosols interact directly in a great number of processes related to climate change and public health, modifying the energy budget and partly determining the quality of the air we breathe. In my PhD, I chose to study the perturbation, if not the aggravation, of the living conditions in Ile-de-France associated to aerosol transport episodes in the free troposphere. This situation is rather frequent and still badly known. To achieve my study, I developed the observation platform 'TReSS' Transportable Remote Sensing Station, whose instruments were developed at the Laboratoire de Meteorology Dynamique by the LiMAG team. 'TReSS' consists of a new high-performance 'Mini-Lidar' and of two standard radiometers: a sun photometer and a thermal infrared radiometer. The principle of my experimental approach is the synergy of the vertical Lidar profiles and the particle size distributions over the column, obtained by the 'Almucantar' inversion of sun photometer data. The new 'Lidar and Almucantar' method characterizes the vertical distribution by layer and the optical micro-physical properties of the local and transported aerosols. Firstly, I undertook the characterization of the Paris aerosol, mainly of anthropogenic origin. Their radiative properties were analyzed in the daily and yearly scales. Then, I conducted a statistical multi-year study of transport episodes and a two-week study case, representative of a succession of desert dust intrusion in Ile-de-France. My PhD work concludes by a study on the impact of biomass burning aerosols during the heat wave on August 2003. I study the impact of the transported aerosols into the local radiative budget and the possible consequences on the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer. (author)

  12. PollyNET: a global network of automated Raman-polarization lidars for continuous aerosol profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, H.; Kanitz, T.; Engelmann, R.; Althausen, D.; Heese, B.; Komppula, M.; Preißler, J.; Tesche, M.; Ansmann, A.; Wandinger, U.; Lim, J.-H.; Ahn, J. Y.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Amiridis, V.; Marinou, E.; Seifert, P.; Hofer, J.; Skupin, A.; Schneider, F.; Bohlmann, S.; Foth, A.; Bley, S.; Pfüller, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Lihavainen, H.; Viisanen, Y.; Hooda, R. K.; Pereira, S.; Bortoli, D.; Wagner, F.; Mattis, I.; Janicka, L.; Markowicz, K. M.; Achtert, P.; Artaxo, P.; Pauliquevis, T.; Souza, R. A. F.; Sharma, V. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Beukes, J. P.; Sun, J. Y.; Rohwer, E. G.; Deng, R.; Mamouri, R. E.; Zamorano, F.

    2015-10-01

    A global vertically resolved aerosol data set covering more than 10 years of observations at more than 20 measurement sites distributed from 63° N to 52° S and 72° W to 124° E has been achieved within the Raman and polarization lidar network PollyNET. This network consists of portable, remote-controlled multiwavelength-polarization-Raman lidars (Polly) for automated and continuous 24/7 observations of clouds and aerosols. PollyNET is an independent, voluntary, and scientific network. All Polly lidars feature a standardized instrument design and apply unified calibration, quality control, and data analysis. The observations are processed in near-real time without manual intervention, and are presented online at de"target="_blank">http://polly.tropos.de. The paper gives an overview of the observations on four continents and two research vessels obtained with eight Polly systems. The specific aerosol types at these locations (mineral dust, smoke, dust-smoke and other dusty mixtures, urban haze, and volcanic ash) are identified by their Ångström exponent, lidar ratio, and depolarization ratio. The vertical aerosol distribution at the PollyNET locations is discussed on the basis of more than 55 000 automatically retrieved 30 min particle backscatter coefficient profiles at 532 nm. A seasonal analysis of measurements at selected sites revealed typical and extraordinary aerosol conditions as well as seasonal differences. These studies show the potential of PollyNET to support the establishment of a global aerosol climatology that covers the entire troposphere.

  13. Results from DEMONA aerosol experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzleiter, T.; Wolf, L.; Schoeck, W.

    1987-01-01

    In the DEMONA experiments the behavior of aerosols released into a large dry PWR containment during a core meltdown accident was investigated by means of a 640 m 3 model containment. After performance of eight experiments with quasi-single-compartment containment geometry and one multi-compartment experiment, the DEMONA project is being completed by evaluating and recalculating the measured results. Up to now, good agreement between experiment and model calculations was achieved only for simple test conditions. Adequate modeling of more complicated test conditions requires additional analytical efforts

  14. Aerosol Deposition and Solar Panel Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, W. P.; Rollings, A.; Taylor, S. J.; Parks, J.; Barnard, J.; Holmes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Passive and active solar collector farms are often located in relatively dry desert regions where cloudiness impacts are minimized. These farms may be susceptible to reduced performance due to routine or episodic aerosol deposition on collector surfaces. Intense episodes of wind blown dust deposition may negatively impact farm performance, and trigger need to clean collector surfaces. Aerosol deposition rate depends on size, morphology, and local meteorological conditions. We have developed a system for solar panel performance testing under real world conditions. Two identical 0.74 square meter solar panels are deployed, with one kept clean while the other receives various doses of aerosol deposition or other treatments. A variable load is used with automation to record solar panel maximum output power every 10 minutes. A collocated sonic anemometer measures wind at 10 Hz, allowing for both steady and turbulent characterization to establish a link between wind patterns and particle distribution on the cells. Multispectral photoacoustic instruments measure aerosol light scattering and absorption. An MFRSR quantifies incoming solar radiation. Solar panel albedo is measured along with the transmission spectra of particles collected on the panel surface. Key questions are: At what concentration does aerosol deposition become a problem for solar panel performance? What are the meteorological conditions that most strongly favor aerosol deposition, and are these predictable from current models? Is it feasible to use the outflow from an unmanned aerial vehicle hovering over solar panels to adequately clean their surface? Does aerosol deposition from episodes of nearby forest fires impact performance? The outlook of this research is to build a model that describes environmental effects on solar panel performance. Measurements from summer and fall 2015 will be presented along with insights gleaned from them.

  15. Aerosol mass loading over the marine environment of Arabian Sea ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2+. (6%). Over the marine environment of. Arabian Sea, the non-sea-salt component dominates accounting to ~76% of the total aerosol mass. The spatial variations of the various ions are examined in the light of prevailing meteorological conditions and airmass back trajectories. 1. Introduction. The impact of aerosols on the ...

  16. Study of photolytic aerosols at stratospheric pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, Patrick.

    1975-07-01

    An experimental study of photolytic aerosol formation at stratospheric pressure (60 Torr) and laboratory temperature, was carried out previous to the exact simulation of photolytic aerosol formation in real stratospheric conditions. An experimental simulation device, techniques of generation of known mixtures of inert gases with SO 2 and NOsub(x) traces at low concentration (below 1 ppm volume) and H 2 O traces (a few ppm), and techniques for the determination and counting of aerosol particles at low pressures were perfected. The following results were achieved: the rate of vapor condensation on nuclei was reduced when total pressure decreased. At low pressure the working of condensation nuclei counters and the formation of photolytic aerosols is influenced by this phenomenon. An explanation is proposed, as well as means to avoid this unpleasant effect on the working of nuclei counters at low pressure. No photolytic aerosol production was ascertained at 60 Torr when water concentration was below 100 ppm whatever the concentration of SO 2 or NOsub(x) traces. With water concentration below 1200ppm and SO 2 trace concentration below 1ppm, the aerosol particles produced could not consist of sulfuric acid drops but probably of nitrosyl sulfate acide crystals [fr

  17. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  18. Electromagnetic Scattering Analysis of Coated Conductors With Edges Using the Method of Auxiliary Sources (MAS) in Conjunction With the Standard Impedance Boundary Condition (SIBC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anastassiu, H.T.; D.I.Kaklamani, H.T.; Economou, D.P.

    2002-01-01

    A novel combination of the method of auxiliary sources (MAS) and the standard impedance boundary condition (SIBC) is employed in the analysis of transverse magnetic (TM) plane wave scattering from infinite, coated, perfectly conducting cylinders with square cross sections. The scatterer is initia......A novel combination of the method of auxiliary sources (MAS) and the standard impedance boundary condition (SIBC) is employed in the analysis of transverse magnetic (TM) plane wave scattering from infinite, coated, perfectly conducting cylinders with square cross sections. The scatterer...... efficient than the MoM/SIBC method, proving that the proposed novel combination is a powerful and advantageous computational tool....

  19. Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrenko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols have been extensively observed and measured using both spaceborne and ground-based instruments, especially during the last decade. Unique properties retrieved by the different instruments contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. However, some of these measurements remain underutilized, largely due to the complexities involved in analyzing them synergistically. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have established a Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS, which consistently samples and generates the spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient of aerosol products from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua, MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Samples of satellite aerosol products are extracted over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET locations as well as over other locations of interest such as those with available ground-based aerosol observations. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between Level-2 aerosol observations from multiple sensors. In addition, the available well-characterized co-located ground-based data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products. This paper explains the sampling methodology and concepts used in MAPSS, and demonstrates specific examples of using MAPSS for an integrated analysis of multiple aerosol products.

  20. Global estimate of aerosol direct radiative forcing from satellite measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Haywood, Jim; Reddy, M Shekar

    2005-12-22

    Atmospheric aerosols cause scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. Additional anthropogenic aerosols released into the atmosphere thus exert a direct radiative forcing on the climate system. The degree of present-day aerosol forcing is estimated from global models that incorporate a representation of the aerosol cycles. Although the models are compared and validated against observations, these estimates remain uncertain. Previous satellite measurements of the direct effect of aerosols contained limited information about aerosol type, and were confined to oceans only. Here we use state-of-the-art satellite-based measurements of aerosols and surface wind speed to estimate the clear-sky direct radiative forcing for 2002, incorporating measurements over land and ocean. We use a Monte Carlo approach to account for uncertainties in aerosol measurements and in the algorithm used. Probability density functions obtained for the direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere give a clear-sky, global, annual average of -1.9 W m(-2) with standard deviation, +/- 0.3 W m(-2). These results suggest that present-day direct radiative forcing is stronger than present model estimates, implying future atmospheric warming greater than is presently predicted, as aerosol emissions continue to decline.

  1. Aerosol in the containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, S.; Mariotti, P.

    1986-01-01

    The US program LACE (LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments), in which Italy participates together with several European countries, Canada and Japan, aims at evaluating by means of a large scale experimental activity at HEDL the retention in the pipings and primary container of the radioactive aerosol released following severe accidents in light water reactors. At the same time these experiences will make available data through which the codes used to analyse the behaviour of the aerosol in the containment and to verify whether by means of the codes of thermohydraulic computation it is possible to evaluate with sufficient accuracy variable influencing the aerosol behaviour, can be validated. This report shows and compares the results obtained by the participants in the LACE program with the aerosol containment codes NAVA 5 and CONTAIN for the pre-test computations of the test LA 1, in which an accident called containment by pass is simulated

  2. Arctic Aerosols and Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ingeborg Elbæk

    2017-01-01

    carbon, which is the most efficient aerosol to absorb radiation, is found to be one of the largest contributors to global warming. Aerosols are emitted from both anthropogenic and natural sources and the major components of atmospheric particulate matter include sulfate, organic aerosols, nitrate...... at the Villum Research Station, Station Nord in North Greenland. Laboratory studies of a conventional wood stove showed that particle emissions were strongly dependent on the intensity of burn rate. The burning cycle was divided into three phases, where the first phase, the fuel addition, resulted in short-lived...... but high emissions of levoglucosan and organic aerosols. The second phase, the intermediate phase, was dominated by black carbon and only to a minor extent organic aerosols and levoglucosan. The final burn out phase was generally represented by low concentrations of all species and overall the full cycle...

  3. A study of the attachment of thoron decay products to aerosols using an aerosol centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, V.B.; Kotrappa, P.; Bhanti, D.P.

    1980-01-01

    An aerosol centrifuge is used for the study of the attachment of thoron decay products to aerosol particles under dynamic flow conditions. The number concentration of aerosols was kept high (10 5 to 10 6 particles cm -3 ) as compared to the number of decay product atoms (10 2 to 10 3 cm -3 ) as is usually the case in a mine atmosphere. The polydispersed aerosols flow in and out of a chamber containing a steady source of thoron and the aerosols tagged with the decay products were separated into different size groups by an aerosol centrifuge (Lovelace Aerosol Particle Separator). The average activity per particle was fitted as a power function of the radius in the form of Asub(p) = aRsup(b). The average value of b was found to be 1.08 +- 0.054 for particles in the radii range 0.25 to 1.35 μm and 1.34 +- 0.12 for particles in the radii range 0.1 to 0.33 μm. (author)

  4. Modeling Photosensitized Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Laboratory and Ambient Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, William G; Rao, Yi; Dai, Hai-Lung; McNeill, V Faye

    2017-07-05

    Photosensitized reactions involving imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde (IC) have been experimentally observed to contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) growth. However, the extent of photosensitized reactions in ambient aerosols remains poorly understood and unaccounted for in atmospheric models. Here we use GAMMA 4.0, a photochemical box model that couples gas-phase and aqueous-phase aerosol chemistry, along with recent laboratory measurements of the kinetics of IC photochemistry, to analyze IC-photosensitized SOA formation in laboratory and ambient settings. Analysis of the laboratory results of Aregahegn et al. (2013) suggests that photosensitized production of SOA from limonene, isoprene, α-pinene, β-pinene, and toluene by 3 IC* occurs at or near the surface of the aerosol particle. Reactive uptake coefficients were derived from the experimental data using GAMMA 4.0. Simulations of aqueous aerosol SOA formation at remote ambient conditions including IC photosensitizer chemistry indicate less than 0.3% contribution to SOA growth from direct reactions of 3 IC* with limonene, isoprene, α-pinene, β-pinene, and toluene, and an enhancement of less than 0.04% of SOA formation from other precursors due to the formation of radicals in the bulk aerosol aqueous phase. Other, more abundant photosensitizer species, such as humic-like substances (HULIS), may contribute more significantly to aqueous aerosol SOA production.

  5. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 1, 0.01 Foundations and footings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are given for footings - spread/strip/grade beams; foundation walls; foundation dampproofing/waterproofing; excavation/backfill/ and piles & caissons.

  6. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 5, 0.05 Roofing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for built-up membrane; single- ply membrane; metal roofing systems; coated foam membrane; shingles; tiles; parapets; roof drainage system; roof specialties; and skylights.

  7. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 11, 0.11 Specialty systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for canopies; loading dock systems; tanks; domes (bulk storage, metal framing); louvers & vents; access floors; integrated ceilings; and mezzanine structures.

  8. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 6, 0.06 Interior construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for conventional and specialty partitions, toilet partitions & accessories, interior doors, paint finishes/coatings/ wall covering systems; floor finishing systems; and ceiling systems.

  9. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 12, 0.12 Sitework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are given for utility distribution systems, central heating, central cooling, electrical, utility support structures, paving roadways/walkways, and tunnels.

  10. Toxic Aerosols and Pathogenic Bioaerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    whocdscsrncs20025rev.pdf 4. Harnish, D.A., Heimbuch, B.K., Husband, M., Lumley, A., Kinney, K., Shaffer , R., Wander, J.D. Challenge of N95...Hafner. 9. Hinds, W.C. Aerosol Technology: Properties, behavior, and measurement of airborne particles. 2nd ed. 1999, New York, NY: Wiley. 10. Shaffer ...aureus, in standard F2101-07, A. 2007 12. Bergman, M.S., Zhuang, Z., Hanson, D., Heimbuch, B.K., McDonald, M.J., Palmiero, A.J., Shaffer , R.E., Harnish

  11. Preparation of an ultra-fine, slightly dispersed silver iodide aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poc, Marie-Martine

    1973-01-01

    A silver iodide aerosol was prepared under clean conditions. The method was to react iodine vapor with a silver aerosol in an inert dry atmosphere and in darkness. Great care was taken to avoid contamination from atmosphere air. The ice nucleating properties of the ultrafine AgI aerosol obtained were studied in a cloud mixing chamber: the aerosol was found to be strangely inactive. (author) [fr

  12. A study of the attachment of thoron decay products to aerosols using an aerosol centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, V.

    1979-01-01

    The physical attachment of radioactive decay products (particulate, not gas) to polydisperse fluorescein aerosal particles in two size ranges 0.1 μM-0.33 μM radius and 0.25 μM-1.35 μM radius has been studied under dynamic conditions with a view to find the fraction of thoron decay products attached to the aerosals and the particle size distribution of the host aerosols in the atmosphere of uranium mines. The experimental set-up and procedure are described. An aerosol cloud of fluorescein was introduced into a reaction chamber containing a steady source of thoron and decay products were allowed to interact and attach to the aerosols in the chamber. To simulate conditions normally encountered in uranium mining and milling operations, the concentration of aerosol particles was kept high as compared to the number of decay products. The Lovelace Aerosol Particle Separator, which is an advanced, continuous centrifugal aerosol separator, was used to sample and separate the tagged aerosols into various size groups. The radioactivity associated with each group was determined. The results show the same dependence of attachment of decay products on the size of aerosol particles as predicted by the diffusion theory proposed by Lassen and Rau (1960), even though the experimental conditions of the present study do not conform to those required to satisfy the above mentioned diffusion theory. The method employed in this work to study attachment is reproducible and simple and can be adopted in uranium and thorium mines and associated processing industries. (M.G.B.)

  13. Modelling Aerosol Dispersion in Urban Street Canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, B. K.; Jones, D. P.; Gallagher, M. W.; McFiggans, G. B.; Watkins, A. P.

    2009-04-01

    Flow patterns within an urban street canyon are influenced by various micrometeorological factors. It also represents an environment where pollutants such as aerosols accumulate to high levels due to high volumes of traffic. As adverse health effects are being attributed to exposure to aerosols, an investigation of the dispersion of aerosols within such environments is of growing importance. In particular, one is concerned with the vertical structure of the aerosol concentration, the ventilation characteristics of the street canyon and the influence of aerosol microphysical processes. Due to the inherent heterogeneity of the aerosol concentrations within the street canyon and the lack of spatial resolution of measurement campaigns, these issues are an on-going debate. Therefore, a modelling tool is required to represent aerosol dispersion patterns to provide insights to results of past measurement campaigns. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models are able to predict detailed airflow patterns within urban geometries. This capability may be further extended to include aerosol dispersion, by an Euler-Euler multiphase approach. To facilitate the investigation, a two-dimensional, multiphase CFD tool coupled with the k-epsilon turbulence model and with the capability of modelling mixed convection flow regimes arising from both wind driven flows and buoyancy effects from heated walls was developed. Assuming wind blowing perpendicularly to the canyon axis and treating aerosols as a passive scalar, an attempt will be made to assess the sensitivities of aerosol vertical structure and ventilation characteristics to the various flow conditions. Numerical studies were performed using an idealized 10m by 10m canyon to represent a regular canyon and 10m by 5m to represent a deep one. An aerosol emission source was assigned on the centerline of the canyon to represent exhaust emissions. The vertical structure of the aerosols would inform future directives regarding the

  14. Evaluation of environmental and economic effectiveness of the Cross Compliance 4.3 Standards "Maintenance of olive groves and vineyards in good vegetative conditions"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Sansone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the first observations made in three farms of the Council for Agricultural Research and Economics (CREA relating to the environmental monitoring of the standard 4.3 maintenance of olive groves and vineyards in good vegetative conditions and analysis of differential of competitiveness  for both crops.

  15. Classification of aerosol properties derived from AERONET direct sun data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Gobbi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol spectral measurements by sunphotometers can be characterized by three independent pieces of information: 1 the optical thickness (AOT, a measure of the column aerosol concentration, 2 the optical thickness average spectral dependence, given by the Angstrom exponent (α, and 3 the spectral curvature of α (δα. We propose a simple graphical method to visually convert (α, δα to the contribution of fine aerosol to the AOT and the size of the fine aerosols. This information can be used to track mixtures of pollution aerosol with dust, to distinguish aerosol growth from cloud contamination and to observe aerosol humidification. The graphical method is applied to the analysis of yearly records at 8 sites in 3 continents, characterized by different levels of pollution, biomass burning and mineral dust concentrations. Results depict the dominance of fine mode aerosols in driving the AOT at polluted sites. In stable meteorological conditions, we see an increase in the size of the fine aerosol as the pollution stagnates and increases in optical thickness. Coexistence of coarse and fine particles is evidenced at the polluted sites downwind of arid regions.

  16. Classification of aerosol properties derived from AERONET direct sun data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, G. P.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Koren, I.; Eck, T. F.

    2007-01-01

    Aerosol spectral measurements by sunphotometers can be characterized by three independent pieces of information: 1) the optical thickness (AOT), a measure of the column aerosol concentration, 2) the optical thickness average spectral dependence, given by the Angstrom exponent (α), and 3) the spectral curvature of α (δα). We propose a simple graphical method to visually convert (α, δα) to the contribution of fine aerosol to the AOT and the size of the fine aerosols. This information can be used to track mixtures of pollution aerosol with dust, to distinguish aerosol growth from cloud contamination and to observe aerosol humidification. The graphical method is applied to the analysis of yearly records at 8 sites in 3 continents, characterized by different levels of pollution, biomass burning and mineral dust concentrations. Results depict the dominance of fine mode aerosols in driving the AOT at polluted sites. In stable meteorological conditions, we see an increase in the size of the fine aerosol as the pollution stagnates and increases in optical thickness. Coexistence of coarse and fine particles is evidenced at the polluted sites downwind of arid regions.

  17. ASME N511-19XX, Standard for periodic in-service testing of nuclear air treatment, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    A draft version of the Standard is presented in this document. The Standard covers the requirements for periodic in-service testing of nuclear safety-related air treatment, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems in nuclear facilities. The Standard provides a basis for the development of test programs and does not include acceptance criteria, except in cases where the results of one test influence the performance of other tests. The Standard covers general inspection and test requirements, reference values, inspection and test requirements, generic tests, acceptance criteria, in-service test requirements, testing following an abnormal incident, corrective action requirements, and quality assurance. Mandatory appendices provide a visual inspection checklist and four test procedures. Non-mandatory appendices provide additional information and guidance on mounting frame pressure leak test procedure, corrective action, challenge gas substitute selection criteria, and test program development. 8 refs., 10 tabs

  18. 40 CFR 80.553 - Under what conditions may the small refiner gasoline sulfur standards be extended for a small...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline produced by the refinery must meet the gasoline sulfur standards under subpart H of this Part as... all succeeding compliance periods and all gasoline produced by the refinery must meet the gasoline... applicable). Upon such effective date, all gasoline produced by the refiner must meet the gasoline sulfur...

  19. 13 CFR 107.700 - Compliance with size standards in part 121 of this chapter as a condition of Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Financing of Small Businesses by... assistance and management services only to a Small Business. To determine whether an applicant is a Small... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compliance with size standards in...

  20. Estimation of Sensitivity and Specificity of Three Conditionally Dependent Diagnostic Tests in the Absence of a Gold Standard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, B.; Swildens, B.; Stegeman, J.A.; Buist, W.G.; Jong, de M.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a model to evaluate the accuracy of diagnostic tests. Data from three tests for the detection of EF-positive Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains in sows were analyzed. The data were collected in a field study in the absence of a gold standard, that is, the true disease status

  1. Individual condition, standard metabolic rate, and rearing temperature influence steelhead and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) life histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew R. Sloat; Gordon H. Reeves

    2014-01-01

    We reared juvenile Oncorhychus mykiss with low and high standard metabolic rates (SMR) under alternative thermal regimes to determine how these proximate factors influence life histories in a partially migratory salmonid fish. High SMR significantly decreased rates of freshwater maturation and increased rates of smoltification in females, but not...

  2. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 2, 0.02 Substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    System information is given for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. System assembly/component deficiencies and inspection methods are given for slabs-on-grade, columns, and column fireproofing.

  3. What is the impact of natural variability and aerosol-cloud interaction on the effective radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, S.; Stevens, B.; Mauritsen, T.

    2017-12-01

    State-of-the-art climate models have persistently shown a spread in estimates of the effective radiative forcing (ERF) associated with anthropogenic aerosol. Different reasons for the spread are known, but their relative importance is poorly understood. In this presentation we investigate the role of natural atmospheric variability, global patterns of aerosol radiative effects, and magnitudes of aerosol-cloud interaction in controlling the ERF of anthropogenic aerosol (Fiedler et al., 2017). We use the Earth system model MPI-ESM1.2 for conducting ensembles of atmosphere-only simulations and calculate the shortwave ERF of anthropogenic aerosol at the top of the atmosphere. The radiative effects are induced with the new parameterisation MACv2-SP (Stevens et al., 2017) that prescribes observationally constrained anthropogenic aerosol optical properties and an associated Twomey effect. Firstly, we compare the ERF of global patterns of anthropogenic aerosol from the mid-1970s and today. Our results suggest that such a substantial pattern difference has a negligible impact on the global mean ERF, when the natural variability of the atmosphere is considered. The clouds herein efficiently mask the clear-sky contributions to the forcing and reduce the detectability of significant anthropogenic aerosol radiative effects in all-sky conditions. Secondly, we strengthen the forcing magnitude through increasing the effect of aerosol-cloud interaction by prescribing an enhanced Twomey effect. In that case, the different spatial pattern of aerosol radiative effects from the mid-1970s and today causes a moderate change (15%) in the ERF of anthropogenic aerosol in our model. This finding lets us speculate that models with strong aerosol-cloud interactions would show a stronger ERF change with anthropogenic aerosol patterns. Testing whether the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing is model-dependent under prescribed aerosol conditions is currently ongoing work using MACv2-SP in

  4. Aid conditionalities, international Good Manufacturing Practice standards and local production rights: a case study of local production in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brhlikova, Petra; Harper, Ian; Subedi, Madhusudan; Bhattarai, Samita; Rawal, Nabin; Pollock, Allyson M

    2015-06-14

    Local pharmaceutical production has been endorsed by the WHO as a means of addressing health priorities of developing countries. However, local producers of essential medicines must comply with international pharmaceutical standards in order to be eligible to compete in donor tenders. These standards determine production rights for on-patent and off-patent medicines, and guide international procurement of medicines. We reviewed the literature on the impact of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) on local production; a gap analysis from the literature review indicated a need for further research. Over sixty interviews were conducted with people involved in the Nepali pharmaceutical production and distribution chain from 2006 to 2009 on the GMP areas of relevance: regulatory capacity, staffing, funding and training, resourcing of GMP, inspectors' interpretation of the rules and compliance. Although Nepal producers have increased their overall share of the domestic market, only the public manufacturer, Royal Drugs, focuses on medicines for public health programmes; private producers engage mainly in brand competition for private markets, not essential medicines. Nepali regulators and producers state that implementation of GMP standards is hindered by low regulatory capacity, insufficient training of staff in the industry, financial constraints and lack of investment for upgrading capital. The transition period to mandatory compliance with WHO GMP rules is lengthy. Less than half of private producers had WHO GMP in 2013. Producers are not directly affected by international harmonisation of standards as they do not export medicines and the Nepali regulator does not enforce the WHO standards strictly. Without an international GMP certificate they cannot tender for donor dependent health programmes. In Nepal, local private manufacturers focus mainly on brand competition for private consumption not essential medicines, the government preferentially procures essential

  5. Synergic use of TOMS and AERONET observations for characterization of aerosol absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.

    2003-04-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  6. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  7. Sodium oxide aerosol filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duverger de Cuy, G.

    1979-01-01

    In the scope of the sodium aerosol trapping research effort by the CEA/DSN, the retention capacity and yield were measured for very high efficiency fiberglass filters and several types of prefilters (cyclone agglomerator, fabric prefilters, water scrubbers). (author)

  8. Beijing aerosol: Atmospheric interactions and new trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinot, B.; Cachier, H.; Sciare, J.; Tong, Y.; Xin, W.; Jianhua, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Beijing aerosols are scrutinized as a case study for atmospheric interactions in a complex multi-source situation. For the first time, fine (≤ 2 μm) and coarse (≥ 2 μm) aerosols were continuously collected during a time period (20 months) long enough to capture seasonal trends of sources and interactions. Weekly samples were obtained from January 2003 to August 2004 downtown and during 9 months at two peri-urban sites. Aerosol samples were chemically characterized (black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and major ions) and dust was obtained from mass closure. Concentration data were smoothed and boundary layer height (BLH) corrected in order to better identify sources and processes. All yearlong, the coarse aerosol is dominated by dust (75%) whereas the fine mode is dominated (46%) by carbonaceous particles. Photochemistry is an intense driving force for secondary aerosol formation including secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Dust particles present a reactive surface for secondary aerosol formation from the intense anthropogenic pool of acidic gaseous precursors (SO 2 , HNO 3 , and volatile organic compounds (VOCs)). These interactions favor the formation of a very significant coarse fraction for SO 4 , NO 3 , and POM, a feature almost never encountered in developed countries. Surprisingly too is the presence of fine NH 4 NO 3 in summer. A new result is also that the winter 'heating season' appears at present of minor importance with, however, a significant component from domestic heating as traced by BC/OC. In the future, traffic is likely to dominate downtown anthropogenic emissions. Year-to-year variability in meteorological conditions is likely to influence inputs from arid regions and from regional industrial and biomass burning sources. (authors)

  9. Compact SAW aerosol generator

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, A.; Harazim, S.; Collins, D.J.; Br?nig, R.; Schmidt, H.; Menzel, S.B.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we discuss and demonstrate the principle features of surface acoustic wave (SAW) aerosol generation, based on the properties of the fluid supply, the acoustic wave field and the acoustowetting phenomena. Furthermore, we demonstrate a compact SAW-based aerosol generator amenable to mass production fabricated using simple techniques including photolithography, computerized numerical control (CNC) milling and printed circuit board (PCB) manufacturing. Using this device, we present ...

  10. Emergency protection from aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, G.A.; Chester, C.V.

    1981-07-01

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved

  11. Variations of aerosols at Izmir, Turkey determined by neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Orhan

    This paper presents analyses of airborne particulates measured during February and July 1975 at Izmir, Turkey. Izmir is an interesting site for aerosol analyses because it is one of the largest industrial and residential centers in Turkey and because it exhibits large variations in meteorological conditions. Enrichment factors for the Izmir aerosols are compared with those determined at Jungfraujoch, Switzerland and Van, Turkey. The air over Izmir is considerably more dirty in comparison to that in Jungfraujoch and Van, both of which are rated clean by international standards. The TSP amount increases when Izmir is under the influence of the Basra Low (due to long-range transport of desert dust) and when its lower atmosphere is stable.

  12. Aerosol indirect effects in a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Much of the large uncertainty in estimates of anthropogenic aerosol effects on climate arises from the multi-scale nature of the interactions between aerosols, clouds and dynamics, which are difficult to represent in conventional general circulation models (GCMs. In this study, we use a multi-scale aerosol-climate model that treats aerosols and clouds across multiple scales to study aerosol indirect effects. This multi-scale aerosol-climate model is an extension of a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF model that embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM within each vertical column of a GCM grid. The extension allows a more physically-based treatment of aerosol-cloud interactions in both stratiform and convective clouds on the global scale in a computationally feasible way. Simulated model fields, including liquid water path (LWP, ice water path, cloud fraction, shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, precipitation, water vapor, and cloud droplet number concentration are in reasonable agreement with observations. The new model performs quantitatively similar to the previous version of the MMF model in terms of simulated cloud fraction and precipitation. The simulated change in shortwave cloud forcing from anthropogenic aerosols is −0.77 W m−2, which is less than half of that (−1.79 W m−2 calculated by the host GCM (NCAR CAM5 with traditional cloud parameterizations and is also at the low end of the estimates of other conventional global aerosol-climate models. The smaller forcing in the MMF model is attributed to a smaller (3.9 % increase in LWP from preindustrial conditions (PI to present day (PD compared with 15.6 % increase in LWP in stratiform clouds in CAM5. The difference is caused by a much smaller response in LWP to a given perturbation in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations from PI to PD in the MMF (about one-third of that in CAM5, and, to a lesser extent, by a smaller relative increase in CCN

  13. Probing into the aging dynamics of biomass burning aerosol by using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Igor B.; Beekmann, Matthias; Berezin, Evgeny V.; Formenti, Paola; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2017-04-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol released into the atmosphere from open biomass burning (BB) is known to undergo considerable chemical and physical transformations (aging). However, there is substantial controversy about the nature and observable effects of these transformations. A shortage of consistent observational evidence on BB aerosol aging processes under different environmental conditions and at various temporal scales hinders development of their adequate representations in chemistry transport models (CTMs). In this study, we obtain insights into the BB aerosol dynamics by using available satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and carbon monoxide (CO). The basic concept of our method is to consider AOD as a function of the BB aerosol photochemical age (that is, the time period characterizing the exposure of BB aerosol emissions to atmospheric oxidation reactions) predicted by means of model tracers. We evaluate the AOD enhancement ratio (ER) defined as the ratio of optical depth of actual BB aerosol with respect to that of a modeled aerosol tracer that is assumed to originate from the same fires as the real BB aerosol but that is not affected by any aging processes. To limit possible effects of model transport errors, the AOD measurements are normalized to CO column amounts that are also retrieved from satellite measurements. The method is applied to the analysis of the meso- and synoptic-scale evolution of aerosol in smoke plumes from major wildfires that occurred in Siberia in summer 2012. AOD and CO retrievals from MODIS and IASI measurements, respectively, are used in combination with simulations performed with the CHIMERE CTM. The analysis indicates that aging processes strongly affected the evolution of BB aerosol in the situation considered, especially in dense plumes (with spatial average PM2. 5 concentration exceeding 100 µg m-3). For such plumes, the ER is found to increase almost 2-fold on the scale of ˜ 10 h of daytime aerosol evolution

  14. Black carbon in aerosol during BIBLE B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liley, J. Ben; Baumgardner, D.; Kondo, Y.; Kita, K.; Blake, D. R.; Koike, M.; Machida, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kawakami, S.; Shirai, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2003-02-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment (BIBLE) A and B campaigns over the tropical western Pacific during springtime deployed a Gulfstream-II aircraft with systems to measure ozone and numerous precursor species. Aerosol measuring systems included a MASP optical particle counter, a condensation nucleus (CN) counter, and an absorption spectrometer for black carbon. Aerosol volume was very low in the middle and upper troposphere during both campaigns, and during BIBLE A, there was little aerosol enhancement in the boundary layer away from urban areas. In BIBLE B, there was marked aerosol enhancement in the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere. Mixing ratios of CN in cloud-free conditions in the upper troposphere were in general higher than in the boundary layer, indicating new particle formation from gaseous precursors. High concentrations of black carbon were observed during BIBLE B, with mass loadings up to 40 μg m-3 representing as much as one quarter of total aerosol mass. Strong correlations with hydrocarbon enhancement allow the determination of a black carbon emission ratio for the fires at that time. Expressed as elemental carbon, it is about 0.5% of carbon dioxide and 6% of carbon monoxide emissions from the same fires, comparable to methane production, and greater than that of other hydrocarbons.

  15. Particle Property Data Quality Flags for the MISR Aerosol Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitley, B. J.; Kahn, R. A.; Garay, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The MISR instrument aboard the NASA Earth Observing System's Terra satellite has the unique capability to retrieve aerosol properties under favorable conditions. General aerosol type retrieval quality guidelines are provided in the MISR Data Quality Statement and related publications. The retrieved value of aerosol type is more sensitive to scene conditions than aerosol optical depth, and more difficult to validate, as there is very little coincident aerosol type validation data. Here we report on the steps we are taking to provide an aerosol-type data quality flag, to be provided with each individual retrieval result. Due to the lack of validation data for comparison, our main approach is to evaluate the self-consistency of aerosol type retrieval values for regions where particular aerosol types are known to dominate. Some factors affecting aerosol type retrieval quality that can be assessed pre-retrieval are the number of MISR cameras available, the range of scattering angles viewed, and surface conditions such as shallow water or seasonal coastal runoff. Factors that must be assessed post-retrieval include values of retrieved aerosol optical depth and the number and type of mixtures successfully passing the MISR algorithm acceptance criteria. Regional monthly plots with MISR measurements binned at 0.5 degree resolution and color-coded stratification of one or more parameters are the main tools for identifying locations and times where different aerosol types are retrieved. The statistics of individual MISR values such as mid-visible AOD, number and type of mixtures passing, number of cameras used, the range and maximum scattering angles, are studied as joint distributions on a region-by-region basis. From these, a synthesis of the self-consistency and agreement with expectation is made, effectively indicating the quality of the aerosol type constrains to the extent possible, and thresholds for assigning quality flags are assessed. Multiple-month summaries

  16. The hygroscopicity of indoor aerosol particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, L.

    1993-07-01

    A system to study the hygroscopic growth of particle was developed by combining a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) with a wetted wall reactor. This system is capable of mimicking the conditions in human respiratory tract, and measuring the particle size change due to the hygroscopic growth. The performance of the system was tested with three kinds of particles of known composition, NaCl, (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 , and (NH 4 )HS0 4 particles. The hygroscopicity of a variety of common indoor aerosol particles was studied including combustion aerosols (cigarette smoking, cooking, incenses and candles) and consumer spray products such as glass cleaner, general purpose cleaner, hair spray, furniture polish spray, disinfectant, and insect killer. Experiments indicate that most of the indoor aerosols show some hygroscopic growth and only a few materials do not. The magnitude of hygroscopic growth ranges from 20% to 300% depending on the particle size and fraction of water soluble components

  17. Aerosol-cloud interactions in mixed-phase convective clouds - Part 1: Aerosol perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miltenberger, Annette K.; Field, Paul R.; Hill, Adrian A.; Rosenberg, Phil; Shipway, Ben J.; Wilkinson, Jonathan M.; Scovell, Robert; Blyth, Alan M.

    2018-03-01

    Changes induced by perturbed aerosol conditions in moderately deep mixed-phase convective clouds (cloud top height ˜ 5 km) developing along sea-breeze convergence lines are investigated with high-resolution numerical model simulations. The simulations utilise the newly developed Cloud-AeroSol Interacting Microphysics (CASIM) module for the Unified Model (UM), which allows for the representation of the two-way interaction between cloud and aerosol fields. Simulations are evaluated against observations collected during the COnvective Precipitation Experiment (COPE) field campaign over the southwestern peninsula of the UK in 2013. The simulations compare favourably with observed thermodynamic profiles, cloud base cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC), cloud depth, and radar reflectivity statistics. Including the modification of aerosol fields by cloud microphysical processes improves the correspondence with observed CDNC values and spatial variability, but reduces the agreement with observations for average cloud size and cloud top height. Accumulated precipitation is suppressed for higher-aerosol conditions before clouds become organised along the sea-breeze convergence lines. Changes in precipitation are smaller in simulations with aerosol processing. The precipitation suppression is due to less efficient precipitation production by warm-phase microphysics, consistent with parcel model predictions. In contrast, after convective cells organise along the sea-breeze convergence zone, accumulated precipitation increases with aerosol concentrations. Condensate production increases with the aerosol concentrations due to higher vertical velocities in the convective cores and higher cloud top heights. However, for the highest-aerosol scenarios, no further increase in the condensate production occurs, as clouds grow into an upper-level stable layer. In these cases, the reduced precipitation efficiency (PE) dominates the precipitation response and no further

  18. Equipment qualification NPP in harsh environmental conditions occurring during a design basis accident (DBA), beyond design basis accident (BDBA) in accordance with international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparkin, F.M.; )

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of Equipment Qualification NPP (EQ), safety-related electrical and mechanical equipment is: reducing the probability of equipment failure common cause in connection with the harsh environmental conditions at the design and beyond design basis accidents; to demonstrate that the safety related electrical and mechanical equipment can perform their specific functions related safety in harsh environments in design and beyond design basis accidents. Presentation defines methodological bases of practical EQ in accordance with international standards used for PWR, for demonstration the performance of its safety functions, which subjected to abnormal and accident conditions, including loss of ventilation systems, breaks feed waterline, steam and cooling water main system and seismic events [ru

  19. Modification of Local Urban Aerosol Properties by Long-Range Transport of Biomass Burning Aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona S. Stachlewska

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available During August 2016, a quasi-stationary high-pressure system spreading over Central and North-Eastern Europe, caused weather conditions that allowed for 24/7 observations of aerosol optical properties by using a complex multi-wavelength PollyXT lidar system with Raman, polarization and water vapour capabilities, based at the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET network urban site in Warsaw, Poland. During 24–30 August 2016, the lidar-derived products (boundary layer height, aerosol optical depth, Ångström exponent, lidar ratio, depolarization ratio were analysed in terms of air mass transport (HYSPLIT model, aerosol load (CAMS data and type (NAAPS model and confronted with active and passive remote sensing at the ground level (PolandAOD, AERONET, WIOS-AQ networks and aboard satellites (SEVIRI, MODIS, CATS sensors. Optical properties for less than a day-old fresh biomass burning aerosol, advected into Warsaw’s boundary layer from over Ukraine, were compared with the properties of long-range transported 3–5 day-old aged biomass burning aerosol detected in the free troposphere over Warsaw. Analyses of temporal changes of aerosol properties within the boundary layer, revealed an increase of aerosol optical depth and Ångström exponent accompanied by an increase of surface PM10 and PM2.5. Intrusions of advected biomass burning particles into the urban boundary layer seem to affect not only the optical properties observed but also the top height of the boundary layer, by moderating its increase.

  20. Recent increase in aerosol loading over the Australian arid zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Mitchell

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Collocated sun photometer and nephelometer measurements at Tinga Tingana in the Australian Outback over the decade 1997–2007 show a significant increase in aerosol loading following the onset of severe drought conditions in 2002. This increase is confined to the season of dust activity, particularly September to March. In contrast, background aerosol levels during May, June and July remained stable. The enhanced aerosol loadings during the latter 5 years of the study period can be understood as a combination of dune destabilisation through loss of ephemeral vegetation and surface crust, and the changing supply of fluvial sediments to ephemeral lakes and floodplains within the Lake Eyre Basin. Major dust outbreaks are generally highly localised, although significant dust activity was observed at Tinga Tingana on 50% of days when a major event occurred elsewhere in the Lake Eyre Basin, suggesting frequent basin-wide dust mobilisation. Combined analysis of aerosol optical depth and scattering coefficient shows weak correlation between the surface and column aerosol (R2=0.24. The aerosol scale height is broadly distributed with a mode typically between 2–3 km, with clearly defined seasonal variation. Climatological analysis reveals bimodal structure in the annual cycle of aerosol optical depth, with a summer peak related to maximal dust activity, and a spring peak related to lofted fine-mode aerosol. There is evidence for an increase in near-surface aerosol during the period 2003–2007 relative to 1997–2002, consistent with an increase in dust activity. This accords with an independent finding of increasing aerosol loading over the Australian region as a whole, suggesting that rising dust activity over the Lake Eyre Basin may be a significant contributor to changes in the aerosol budget of the continent.

  1. LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program and initial test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhlestein, L.D.; Hilliard, R.K.; Bloom, G.R.; McCormack, J.D.; Rahn, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program is described. The LACE program is being performed at the Hanford Engineer Development Laboratory (operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company) and the initial tests are sponsored by EPRI. The objectives of the LACE program are: to demonstrate, at large-scale, inherent radioactive aerosol retention behavior for postulated high consequence LWR accident situations; and to provide a data base to be used for aerosol behavior . Test results from the first phase of the LACE program are presented and discussed. Three large-scale scoping tests, simulating a containment bypass accident sequence, demonstrated the extent of agglomeration and deposition of aerosols occurring in the pipe pathway and vented auxiliary building under realistic accident conditions. Parameters varied during the scoping tests were aerosol type and steam condensation

  2. Determination of HEPA Filter Efficiency With Diocthyl Pthalate Aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunawas; Ruslanto, P O; Suhariyono, G

    1996-01-01

    Ultrafine aerosol filtration by HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter has been determinated experimentally, based on the measurement of monodisperse Diocthyl Pthalate (DOP) aerosol concentration before and after passing the test filter. Using this technique, filter efficiency can be determined as a function of aerosol diameter with range from 0.017 to 0.747 um. The average efficiencies for Whatman -41 ; Whatman -42 and Whatman GF/A filters were 56.14 %; 95,74 %; and 99.65 % respectively. Gelman A Fiber Glass and Whatman membrane filter have fulfilled criterion as HEPA filter according to standard of IAEA, because of their minimum effiency of 99.90 %

  3. Standard loading controls are not reliable for Western blot quantification across brain development or in pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goasdoue, Kate; Awabdy, Doreen; Bjorkman, Stella Tracey; Miller, Stephanie

    2016-02-01

    A frequently utilized method of data quantification in Western blot analysis is comparison of the protein of interest with a house keeping gene or control protein. Commonly used proteins include β-actin, glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and α-tubulin. Various reliability issues have been raised when using this technique for data analysis-particularly when investigating protein expression changes during development and in disease states. In this study, we have demonstrated that β-actin, GAPDH, and α-tubulin are not appropriate controls in the study of development and hypoxic-ischemic induced damage in the piglet brain. We have also shown that using an in-house pooled standard, loaded on all blots is a reliable method for controlling interassay variability and data normalization in protein expression analysis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. An algorithm for hyperspectral remote sensing of aerosols: 2. Information content analysis for aerosol parameters and principal components of surface spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Weizhen; Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Reid, Jeffrey S.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes the second part of a series of investigation to develop algorithms for simultaneous retrieval of aerosol parameters and surface reflectance from the future hyperspectral and geostationary satellite sensors such as Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of POllution (TEMPO). The information content in these hyperspectral measurements is analyzed for 6 principal components (PCs) of surface spectra and a total of 14 aerosol parameters that describe the columnar aerosol volume Vtotal, fine-mode aerosol volume fraction, and the size distribution and wavelength-dependent index of refraction in both coarse and fine mode aerosols. Forward simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer are conducted for 5 surface types (green vegetation, bare soil, rangeland, concrete and mixed surface case) and a wide range of aerosol mixtures. It is shown that the PCs of surface spectra in the atmospheric window channel could be derived from the top-of-the-atmosphere reflectance in the conditions of low aerosol optical depth (AOD ≤ 0.2 at 550 nm), with a relative error of 1%. With degree freedom for signal analysis and the sequential forward selection method, the common bands for different aerosol mixture types and surface types can be selected for aerosol retrieval. The first 20% of our selected bands accounts for more than 90% of information content for aerosols, and only 4 PCs are needed to reconstruct surface reflectance. However, the information content in these common bands from each TEMPO individual observation is insufficient for the simultaneous retrieval of surface's PC weight coefficients and multiple aerosol parameters (other than Vtotal). In contrast, with multiple observations for the same location from TEMPO in multiple consecutive days, 1-3 additional aerosol parameters could be retrieved. Consequently, a self-adjustable aerosol retrieval algorithm to account for surface types, AOD conditions, and multiple-consecutive observations is recommended to derive

  5. Temporal Variability and Characterization of Aerosols across the Pakistan Region during the Winter Fog Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Fahim Khokhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fog is a meteorological/environmental phenomenon which happens across the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP and leads to significant social and economic problems, especially posing significant threats to public health and causing disruptions in air and road traffic. Meteorological stations in Pakistan provide limited information regarding fog episodes as these provide only point observations. Continuous monitoring, as well as a spatially coherent picture of fog distribution, is possible through the use of satellite observations. This study focuses on the 2012–2015 winter fog episodes over the Pakistan region using the Moderate Resolution Image Spectrometer (MODIS, the Ozone Monitoring Instrument and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO products. The main objective of the study was to map the spatial distribution of aerosols, their types, and to identify the aerosol origins during special weather conditions like fog in Pakistan. The study also included ground monitoring of particulate matter (PM concentrations, which were conducted during the 2014–2015 winter period only. Overall, this study is part of a multi-country project supported by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD, started in 2014–2015 winter period, whereby scientists from Bangladesh, India and Nepal have also conducted measurements at their respective sites. A significant correlation between MODIS (AOD and AERONET Station (AOD data from Lahore was identified. Mass concentration of PM10 at all sampling sites within Lahore city exceeded the National Environmental Quality Standards (NEQS levels on most of the occasions. Smoke and absorbing aerosol were found to be major constituents of winter fog in Pakistan. Furthermore, an extended span of winter fog was also observed in Lahore city during the winter of 2014–2015. The Vertical Feature Mask (VFM provided by CALIPSO satellite confirmed the low-lying aerosol

  6. Laboratory evaluation of a vibrating orifice monodisperse aerosol generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everitt, N.M.; Snelling, K.W.

    1985-02-01

    The Berglund-Liu vibrating orifice aerosol generator is capable of producing monodisperse particles in the diameter range 5 to 50 μm. Experiments have been carried out to set up and evaluate such a generator for the preparation of standard liquid (olive oil) and solid (methylene blue) aerosols in the size range 8 to 13 μm. Modifications have been made to the apparatus to improve its performance and increase its particle output. (author)

  7. Comparison of EHR-based diagnosis documentation locations to a gold standard for risk stratification in patients with multiple chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shelby; Wagner, Jesse; Lupulescu-Mann, Nicoleta; Ramsey, Katrina; Cohen, Aaron; Graven, Peter; Weiskopf, Nicole G; Dorr, David A

    2017-08-02

    To measure variation among four different Electronic Health Record (EHR) system documentation locations versus 'gold standard' manual chart review for risk stratification in patients with multiple chronic illnesses. Adults seen in primary care with EHR evidence of at least one of 13 conditions were included. EHRs were manually reviewed to determine presence of active diagnoses, and risk scores were calculated using three different methodologies and five EHR documentation locations. Claims data were used to assess cost and utilization for the following year. Descriptive and diagnostic statistics were calculated for each EHR location. Criterion validity testing compared the gold standard verified diagnoses versus other EHR locations and risk scores in predicting future cost and utilization. Nine hundred patients had 2,179 probable diagnoses. About 70% of the diagnoses from the EHR were verified by gold standard. For a subset of patients having baseline and prediction year data (n=750), modeling showed that the gold standard was the best predictor of outcomes on average for a subset of patients that had these data. However, combining all data sources together had nearly equivalent performance for prediction as the gold standard. EHR data locations were inaccurate 30% of the time, leading to improvement in overall modeling from a gold standard from chart review for individual diagnoses. However, the impact on identification of the highest risk patients was minor, and combining data from different EHR locations was equivalent to gold standard performance. The reviewer's ability to identify a diagnosis as correct was influenced by a variety of factors, including completeness, temporality, and perceived accuracy of chart data.

  8. Aerosols, light, and water: Measurements of aerosol optical properties at different relative humidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Daniel

    The Earth's atmosphere is composed of a large number of different gases as well as tiny suspended particles, both in solid and liquid state. These tiny particles, called atmospheric aerosols, have an immense impact on our health and on our global climate. Atmospheric aerosols influence the Earth's radiation budget both directly and indirectly. In the direct effect, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight changing the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols indirectly influence the Earth's radiation budget by modifying the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds as well as their water content and lifetime. In ambient conditions, aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth due to the influence of relative humidity (RH), scattering more light than when the particles are dry. The quantitative knowledge of the RH effect and its influence on the light scattering coefficient and, in particular, on the phase function and polarization of aerosol particles is of substantial importance when comparing ground based observations with other optical aerosol measurements techniques such satellite and sunphotometric retrievals of aerosol optical depth and their inversions. This dissertation presents the aerosol hygroscopicity experiment investigated using a novel dryer-humidifier system, coupled to a TSI-3563 nephelometer, to obtain the light scattering coefficient (sp) as a function of relative humidity (RH) in hydration and dehydration modes. The measurements were performed in Porterville, CA (Jan 10-Feb 6, 2013), Baltimore, MD (Jul 3-30, 2013), and Golden, CO (Jul 12-Aug 10, 2014). Observations in Porterville and Golden were part of the NASA-sponsored DISCOVER-AQ project. The measured sp under varying RH in the three sites was combined with ground aerosol extinction, PM2:5mass concentrations, particle composition measurements, and compared with airborne observations performed during campaigns. The enhancement factor, f(RH), defined as the ratio of sp

  9. Preferential aerosolization of bacteria in bioaerosols generated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrott, P; Turgeon, N; Gauthier-Levesque, L; Duchaine, C

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about how bacteria are aerosolized in terms of whether some bacteria will be found in the air more readily than others that are present in the source. This report describes in vitro experiments to compare aerosolization rates (also known as preferential aerosolization) of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as rod- and coccus-shaped bacteria, using two nebulization conditions. A consortium of five bacterial species was aerosolized in a homemade chamber. Aerosols generated with a commercial nebulizer and a homemade bubble-burst aerosol generator were compared. Data suggest that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was preferentially aerosolized in comparison to Moraxella catarrhalis, Lactobacillus paracasei, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus suis, independently of the method of aerosolization. Bacterial integrity of Strep. suis was more preserved compared to other bacteria studied as revealed with PMA-qPCR. We reported the design of an aerosol chamber and bubble-burst generator for the in vitro study of preferential aerosolization. In our setting, preferential aerosolization was influenced by bacterial properties instead of aerosolization mechanism. These findings could have important implications for predicting the composition of bioaerosols in various locations such as wastewater treatment plants, agricultural settings and health care settings. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Wine yeast phenomics: A standardized fermentation method for assessing quantitative traits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in enological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Margaux; Trujillo, Marine; Prodhomme, Duyên; Barbe, Jean-Christophe; Gibon, Yves; Marullo, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the set up of a small scale fermentation methodology for measuring quantitative traits of hundreds of samples in an enological context. By using standardized screw cap vessels, the alcoholic fermentation kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were measured by following their weight loss over the time. This dispositive was coupled with robotized enzymatic assays for measuring metabolites of enological interest in natural grape juices. Despite the small volume used, kinetic parameters and fermentation end products measured are similar with those observed in larger scale vats. The vessel used also offers the possibility to assay 32 volatiles compounds using a headspace solid-phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The vessel shaking applied strongly impacted most of the phenotypes investigated due to oxygen transfer occuring in the first hours of the alcoholic fermentation. The impact of grape must and micro-oxygenation was investigated illustrating some relevant genetic x environmental interactions. By phenotyping a wide panel of commercial wine starters in five grape juices, broad phenotypic correlations between kinetics and metabolic end products were evidentiated. Moreover, a multivariate analysis illustrates that some grape musts are more able than others to discriminate commercial strains since some are less robust to environmental changes. PMID:29351285

  11. Wine yeast phenomics: A standardized fermentation method for assessing quantitative traits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in enological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Emilien; Bernard, Margaux; Trujillo, Marine; Prodhomme, Duyên; Barbe, Jean-Christophe; Gibon, Yves; Marullo, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the set up of a small scale fermentation methodology for measuring quantitative traits of hundreds of samples in an enological context. By using standardized screw cap vessels, the alcoholic fermentation kinetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were measured by following their weight loss over the time. This dispositive was coupled with robotized enzymatic assays for measuring metabolites of enological interest in natural grape juices. Despite the small volume used, kinetic parameters and fermentation end products measured are similar with those observed in larger scale vats. The vessel used also offers the possibility to assay 32 volatiles compounds using a headspace solid-phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The vessel shaking applied strongly impacted most of the phenotypes investigated due to oxygen transfer occuring in the first hours of the alcoholic fermentation. The impact of grape must and micro-oxygenation was investigated illustrating some relevant genetic x environmental interactions. By phenotyping a wide panel of commercial wine starters in five grape juices, broad phenotypic correlations between kinetics and metabolic end products were evidentiated. Moreover, a multivariate analysis illustrates that some grape musts are more able than others to discriminate commercial strains since some are less robust to environmental changes.

  12. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Above Clouds from OMI Observations: Sensitivity Analysis, Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol load reaching the free troposphere is frequently located above low clouds. Most commonly observed aerosols above clouds are carbonaceous particles generally associated with biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and mineral aerosols originated in arid and semi-arid regions and transported across large distances, often above clouds. Because these aerosols absorb solar radiation, their role in the radiative transfer balance of the earth atmosphere system is especially important. The generally negative (cooling) top of the atmosphere direct effect of absorbing aerosols, may turn into warming when the light-absorbing particles are located above clouds. The actual effect depends on the aerosol load and the single scattering albedo, and on the geometric cloud fraction. In spite of its potential significance, the role of aerosols above clouds is not adequately accounted for in the assessment of aerosol radiative forcing effects due to the lack of measurements. In this paper we discuss the basis of a simple technique that uses near-UV observations to simultaneously derive the optical depth of both the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud for overcast conditions. The two-parameter retrieval method described here makes use of the UV aerosol index and reflectance measurements at 388 nm. A detailed sensitivity analysis indicates that the measured radiances depend mainly on the aerosol absorption exponent and aerosol-cloud separation. The technique was applied to above-cloud aerosol events over the Southern Atlantic Ocean yielding realistic results as indicated by indirect evaluation methods. An error analysis indicates that for typical overcast cloudy conditions and aerosol loads, the aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 54% whereas the cloud optical depth can be derived within 17% of the true value.

  13. Determination of Ergot Alkaloids: Purity and Stability Assessment of Standards and Optimization of Extraction Conditions for Cereal Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krska, R.; Berthiller, F.; Schuhmacher, R.

    2008-01-01

    considerably above 98% apart from ergocristinine (94%), ergosine (96%), and ergosinine (95%). Also discussed is the optimization of extraction conditions presented in a recently published method for the quantitation of ergot alkaloids in food samples using solid-phase extraction with primary secondary amine...... (PSA) before LC/MS/MS. Based on the results obtained from these optimization studies, a mixture of acetonitrile with ammonium carbonate buffer was used as extraction solvent, as recoveries for all analyzed ergot alkaloids were significantly higher than those with the other solvents. Different sample......-solvent ratios and extraction times showed just minor influences in extraction efficacy. Finally, the stability of the ergot alkaloids in both raw cereals and cereal-based processed food extracts was studied. According to these studies, extracts should be prepared and analyzed the same day or stored below...

  14. Granulometric determinations and inhalation dose assessment for atmospheric aerosol contaminated by 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.M.; Luciani, A.; Oliviero, L.; Donato, R.

    1996-07-01

    During the redevelopment of Brescia freight-yard a measurement campaign of atmospheric aerosol was carried out: in fact a 137 Cs ground contamination, caused by the permanence of wagons carrying iron materials contaminated by this radionuclide, had been found out. During the redevelopment phases of excavation and can filling the workers were exposed to the danger of radioactive aerosol inhalation. The aim of the measurement campaign was to test the aerosol sampling and granulometric analysis methodologies with their sensitivity related to the inhalation dose assessments. The results of both aerosuspended mass and activity, evaluated by means of a portable cascade impactor, are presented. The granulometries have been interpolated with a log normal distribution using an iterative routine minimizing the square deviation between the calculated and experimental data. The results related to the dose assessments are also presented. These evaluations have been carried out using both the granulometric information obtained and the more recent models (ICRP 66) both the total concentration data and the dose coefficients referring to the standard conditions of ICRP 68 and of the Italian law (D.Lgs. 230/95). Furthermore the significance and the reliability of the dose assessments referring to the different methodologies are discussed, also in relation to the possibility of using this sampling methodologies for other radionuclides and different exposure conditions

  15. Unveiling aerosol-cloud interactions - Part 2: Minimising the effects of aerosol swelling and wet scavenging in ECHAM6-HAM2 for comparison to satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, David; Christensen, Matthew W.; Poulsen, Caroline A.; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-11-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions (ACIs) are uncertain and the estimates of the ACI effective radiative forcing (ERFaci) magnitude show a large variability. Within the Aerosol_cci project the susceptibility of cloud properties to changes in aerosol properties is derived from the high-resolution AATSR (Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer) data set using the Cloud-Aerosol Pairing Algorithm (CAPA) (as described in our companion paper) and compared to susceptibilities from the global aerosol climate model ECHAM6-HAM2 and MODIS-CERES (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer - Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) data. For ECHAM6-HAM2 the dry aerosol is analysed to mimic the effect of CAPA. Furthermore the analysis is done for different environmental regimes. The aerosol-liquid water path relationship in ECHAM6-HAM2 is systematically stronger than in AATSR-CAPA data and cannot be explained by an overestimation of autoconversion when using diagnostic precipitation but rather by aerosol swelling in regions where humidity is high and clouds are present. When aerosol water is removed from the analysis in ECHAM6-HAM2 the strength of the susceptibilities of liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo as well as ERFaci agree much better with those of AATSR-CAPA or MODIS-CERES. When comparing satellite-derived to model-derived susceptibilities, this study finds it more appropriate to use dry aerosol in the computation of model susceptibilities. We further find that the statistical relationships inferred from different satellite sensors (AATSR-CAPA vs. MODIS-CERES) as well as from ECHAM6-HAM2 are not always of the same sign for the tested environmental conditions. In particular the susceptibility of the liquid water path is negative in non-raining scenes for MODIS-CERES but positive for AATSR-CAPA and ECHAM6-HAM2. Feedback processes like cloud-top entrainment that are missing or not well represented in the model are therefore not well

  16. THE FORMS OF EDUCATIONAL COOPERATION IN SCHOOL UNDER THE CONDITIONS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL STATE EDUCATIONAL STANDARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Puzep

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the publication is to show possibilities of implementation of requirements of the federal state educational standard (FSES for formati on of the universal educational activities (UEA during group work at lessons at comprehensive school.Methods. Theoretical methods involve analysis, comparison and generalizationmethods; empirical method of interview.Results. The main components of learning technology in cooperation and stages of technological process of group work are presented. The features of the formation of small groups are described due to the criteria of duration of a group work and the age of pupils. The possible options for the role structure of discussion groups and ways of distribution of social roles in groups are found out. The authors show the main steps of the process of group work process and organization techniques of group work of students at different stages of the lesson that allow purposefully organize the situation of communication and reflective activities. Scientific novelty. The essence of an educational cooperation as forms of group interaction of the teacher and pupils at a lesson is considered in the context of FSES of the last generation. The emergent problems in the course of the group activities organization at school are disclosed. The authors propose their own opinion on the implementation of the basic stages of group work, which are defined as a technological lesson plan. In addition, the components of a technological lesson plan include the universal learning activities forming during groupactivities which are important for the implementation of FSES requirements.Practical significance. The proposed techniques for organizing group work of pupils at different stages of the lesson and a technological lesson plan describing the universal learning activities allow teachers to effectively use technology of cooperation in education, aimed at the formation of pupils’ communicative learning activities.

  17. Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SJ Ghan; B Schmid; JM Hubbe; CJ Flynn; A Laskin; AA Zelenyuk; DJ Czizco; CN Long; G McFarquhar; J Verlinde; J Harrington; JW Strapp; P Liu; A Korolev; A McDonald; M Wolde; A Fridlind; T Garrett; G Mace; G Kok; S Brooks; D Collins; D Lubin; P Lawson; M Dubey; C Mazzoleni; M Shupe; S Xie; DD Turner; Q Min; EJ Mlawer; D Mitchell

    2007-11-01

    The ARM Climate Research Facility’s (ACRF) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP) will deploy an intensive cloud and aerosol observing system to the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale for a five week Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) during period 29 March through 30 April 2008. The deployment period is within the International Polar Year, thus contributing to and benefiting from the many ancillary observing systems collecting data synergistically. We will deploy the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft to measure temperature, humidity, total particle number, aerosol size distribution, single particle composition, concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, optical scattering and absorption, updraft velocity, cloud liquid water and ice contents, cloud droplet and crystal size distributions, cloud particle shape, and cloud extinction. In addition to these aircraft measurements, ISDAC will deploy two instruments at the ARM site in Barrow: a spectroradiometer to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius, and a tandem differential mobility analyzer to measure the aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity. By using many of the same instruments used during Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004, we will be able to contrast the arctic aerosol and cloud properties during the fall and spring transitions. The aerosol measurements can be used in cloud models driven by objectively analyzed boundary conditions to test whether the cloud models can simulate the aerosol influence on the clouds. The influence of aerosol and boundary conditions on the simulated clouds can be separated by running the cloud models with all four combinations of M-PACE and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions: M-PACE aerosol and boundary conditions, M-PACE aerosol and ISDAC boundary conditions, ISDAC aerosol and M-PACE boundary conditions, and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions. ISDAC and M-PACE boundary

  18. Stable generator of polydisperse aerosol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuška, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 32, Suppl. 1 (2001), s. S823-S824 ISSN 0021-8502. [European Aerosol Conference 2001. Leipzig, 03.09.2001-07.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4031105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : aerosol generator * fine aerosol * polydisperse aerosol Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.605, year: 2001

  19. A 10-year global gridded Aerosol Optical Thickness Reanalysis for climate and applied applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, P.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Westphal, D. L.; Campbell, J. R.; Curtis, C. A.; Hegg, D.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W.; Shi, Y.; Turk, J.

    2013-12-01

    While standalone satellite and model aerosol products see wide utilization, there is a significant need of a best-available fused product on a regular grid for numerous climate and applied applications. Remote sensing and modeling technologies have now advanced to a point where aerosol data assimilation is an operational reality at numerous centers. It is inevitable that, like meteorological reanalyses, aerosol reanalyses will see heavy use in the near future. A first long term, 2003-2012 global 1x1 degree and 6-hourly aerosol optical thickness (AOT) reanalysis product has been generated. The goal of this effort is not only for climate applications, but to generate a dataset that can be used by the US Navy to understand operationally hindering aerosol events, aerosol impacts on numerical weather prediction, and application of electro-optical technologies. The reanalysis utilizes Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) at its core and assimilates quality controlled collection 5 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD with minor corrections from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRaditometer (MISR). A subset of this product includes Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) lidar assimilation since its launch in mid-2006. Surface aerosol sources, including dust and smoke, in the aerosol model have been regionally tuned so that fine and coarse mode AOTs best match those resolve by ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The AOT difference between the model and satellite AOT is then used to adjust other aerosol processes, eg., sources, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol wet deposition is constrained with satellite-retrieved precipitation. The final AOT reanalysis is shown to exhibit good agreement with AERONET. Here we review the development of the reanalysis and consider issues particular to aerosol reanalyses that make them distinct from standard meteorological reanalyses. Considerations are also made for extending such work

  20. Columnar Aerosol Properties from Sun-and-star Photometry: Statistical Comparisons and Day-to-night Dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Daniel Perez; Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Whiteman, D. N.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the first analysis of longterm correlative day-to-night columnar aerosol optical properties. The aim is to better understand columnar aerosol dynamic from ground-based observations, which are poorly studied until now. To this end we have used a combination of sun-and-star photometry measurements acquired in the city of Granada (37.16 N, 3.60 W, 680 ma.s.l.; South-East of Spain) from 2007 to 2010. For the whole study period, mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) around 440 nm (+/-standard deviation) is 0.18 +/- 0.10 and 0.19 +/- 0.11 for daytime and nighttime, respectively, while the mean Angstr¨om exponent (alpha ) is 1.0 +/- 0.4 and 0.9 +/- 0.4 for daytime and nighttime. The ANOVA statistical tests reveal that there are no significant differences between AOD and obtained at daytime and those at nighttime. Additionally, the mean daytime values of AOD and obtained during this study period are coherent with the values obtained in the surrounding AERONET stations. On the other hand, AOD around 440 nm present evident seasonal patterns characterised by large values in summer (mean value of 0.20 +/- 0.10 both at daytime and nighttime) and low values in winter (mean value of 0.15 +/- 0.09 at daytime and 0.17 +/- 0.10 at nighttime). The Angstr¨om exponents also present seasonal patterns, but with low values in summer (mean values of 0.8 +/- 0.4 and 0.9 +/- 0.4 at dayand night-time) and relatively large values in winter (mean values of 1.2 +/- 0.4 and 1.0 +/- 0.3 at daytime and nighttime). These seasonal patterns are explained by the differences in the meteorological conditions and by the differences in the strength of the aerosol sources. To take more insight about the changes in aerosol particles between day and night, the spectral differences of the Angstrom exponent as function of the Angstr¨om exponent are also studied. These analyses reveal increases of the fine mode radius and of the fine mode contribution to AOD during nighttime, being more

  1. Attachment of gaseous fission products to aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyrme, G.

    1985-01-01

    Accidents may occur in which the integrity of fuel cladding is breached and volatile fission products are released to the containment atmosphere. In order to assess the magnitude of the subsequent radiological hazard it is necessary to know the transport behaviour of such fission products. It is frequently assumed that the fission products remain in the gaseous phase. There is a possibility, however, that they may attach themselves to particles and hence substantially modify their transport properties. This paper provides a theoretical assessment of the conditions under which gaseous fission products may be attached to aerosol particles. Specific topics discussed are: the mass transfer of a gaseous fission product to an isolated aerosol particle in an infinite medium; the rate at which the concentration of fission products in the gas phase diminishes within a container as a result of deposition on a population of particles; and the distribution of deposited fission product between different particle sizes in a log-normal distribution. It is shown that, for a given mass, small particles are more efficient for fission product attachment, and that only small concentrations of such particles may be necessary to achieve rapid attachment. Conditions under which gaseous fission products are not attached to particles are also considered, viz, the competing processes of deposition onto the containment walls and onto aerosol particles, and the possibility of the removal of aerosols from the containment by various deposition processes, or agglomeration, before attachment takes place. (author)

  2. Aerosols and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellogg, W W

    1980-01-01

    The atmospheric burden of particles, or aerosols, has been measurably increased by human activities, especially in industrialized regions and those where slash-burn agricultural practices are followed. Some of these aerosols are directly produced when fossil fuels or other materials are burned (soot, smoke, fly ash); others are the result of photochemical reactions involving organic molecules, oxides of nitrogen, and sunlight (smog); and a third source is the oxidation of sulfur dioxide, produced when sulfur-bearing fuel is burned, to sulfuric acid thereby forming sulfate particles of droplets. In all cases, the resulting aerosols scatter and absorb both solar and infrared radiation, and therefore they influence the atmospheric heat balance. The question is the way in which they influence it, and the geographical and extent of this influence.

  3. Radioactive aerosol inhalation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordoni, M.E.; Lieberman, E.

    1987-01-01

    An aerosol inhalation apparatus for supplying an aerosol mist containing radioactive tagged particles to a subject is described comprising a reusable radiation-shielding container having lid means. The contents of the container are readily accessible. A radioactive aerosol inhalation device includes first and second conduit means in the container and passing therethrough, means for communicating with an air passageway of a subject connected to the first and second conduit means externally of the container. Valve means control exhalation from the second conduit means. A nebulizer is within the container connected to the first conduit means. Means are positioned at least in part within the container and in fluid communication with the nebulizer for allowing introduction of radioactive solution from outside the container into the nebulizer

  4. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    entrainment may account for the large discrepancy in energy input for the two systems. In the third study, the temperature dependence of sea spray aerosol production is probed with the use of a highly stable temperature controlled plunging jet. Similar to previous studies, particle production increases...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  5. Standard test method for conducting friction tests of piston ring and cylinder liner materials under lubricated conditions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for conducting laboratory bench-scale friction tests of materials, coatings, and surface treatments intended for use in piston rings and cylinder liners in diesel or spark-ignition engines. The goal of this procedure is to provide a means for preliminary, cost-effective screening or evaluation of candidate ring and liner materials. A reciprocating sliding arrangement is used to simulate the contact that occurs between a piston ring and its mating liner near the top-dead-center position in the cylinder where liquid lubrication is least effective, and most wear is known to occur. Special attention is paid to specimen alignment, running-in, and lubricant condition. 1.2 This test method does not purport to simulate all aspects of a fired engine’s operating environment, but is intended to serve as a means for preliminary screening for assessing the frictional characteristics of candidate piston ring and liner material combinations in the presence of fluids that behave as u...

  6. Bifacial solar cell measurements under standard test conditions and the impact on cell-to-module loss analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jai Prakash; Chai, Jing; Hsian Saw, Min; Khoo, Yong Sheng

    2017-08-01

    Bifacial cells are conventionally measured using gold-plated chuck, which is conductive and reflective. This measurement setup does not portray the actual operating conditions of the bifacial cells in a module. The reflective chuck causes an overestimation of the current due to the cell transmittance for the infrared light. The conductive chuck creates a shorter current flow path in the rear side of the cell and causes an over inflation of the fill factor measurement. In this study, we characterize and quantitatively analyze the difference between the bifacial cell measurements on different mounting chucks and calculate the cell-to-module (CTM) loss. To characterize the optical behavior of the bifacial cell and module, we perform external quantum efficiency, reflectance and transmittance measurements. The electrical behavior of the bifacial cell is studied using in-house developed software Griddler. Using Griddler, we calculate the difference in the fill factor of the bifacial cell due to the measurement using a conductive and non-conductive chuck, and estimate the corresponding CTM resistive losses.

  7. Contribution to the standardization of the chromatographic conditions for the lipophilicity assessment of neutral and basic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giaginis, Costas [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografou, Athens 15771 (Greece); Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Athens 11527 (Greece); Theocharis, Stamatios [Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Athens 11527 (Greece); Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografou, Athens 15771 (Greece)]. E-mail: tsantili@pharm.uoa.gr

    2006-07-28

    The chromatographic conditions aiming to a better simulation of n-octanol-water partitioning using a base deactivated silica (BDS) column as stationary phase were investigated for structurally diverse basic and neutral drugs. Extrapolated retention factors log k{sub w}, determined using different methanol fractions as organic modifier, were considered as lipophilicity indices. The effect of n-decylamine and n-octanol as mobile phase additives was examined and the appropriateness of the final retention outcome to reproduce lipophilicity data was evaluated. Moreover, the influence of n-octanol on the linearity of the log k/methanol fraction relationship and on the uniformity of the retention mechanism was investigated. 1:1 correlation between log k{sub w} values and the logarithm of the distribution coefficient (log D) was established for basic drugs in presence of both n-decylamine and n-octanol as mobile phase additives. However, for neutral drugs n-decylamine proved to be a sufficient and more important factor than n-octanol.

  8. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross compliance standard Maintenance of olive groves in good vegetative condition in avoiding the deterioration of habitats and land abandonment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Santilli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The last CAP reform (Council Regulation (EC n. 1782/2003, coincided with the mandatory obligations of the principles of cross compliance, under which all compensatory payments given in the context of the former reform packages were replaced by a Single Payment Scheme (SPS, bound to fulfillment of certain requirements and minimum standards regarding the environment and animal welfare, as well as maintaining the land in good agricultural and environmental conditions. For the olive sector, where potential risks are mainly associated to the abandonment of groves in marginal areas with consequent negative environmental impact, it has been specifically established the standard 4.3 of the Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAEC which concerns the Maintenance of olive groves and vines in good vegetative conditions. This GAEC standard was formulated to ensure a minimum level of land maintenance and to avoid the deterioration of habitats. To achieve these objectives it should be considered that a good vegetative development is strictly related to the care of the soil in which the plants grow. Erosion, organic matter and soil structure decay are the most commonly identified impacts for olive orchards, 30% of which are localized in areas with difficult orographic conditions. In this sense, proper hydraulic and mechanical techniques, cover cropping, green manuring and timely pruning turns, are essential to minimize losses due to soil erosion, to limit the leaching of nutrients and to maintain the plant productivity. Furthermore, grinded pruning residues should be spread in situ and weeds, watersprouts and suckers should be periodically cut off in order to increase the atmospheric CO2 sequestration and soil organic matter (OM and to prevent wildfires risk and nutrients competition. The application of the standard 4.3 requires further investigations, because, while numerous studies have shown that pruning is essential for the production, there are

  9. Standard partial molar heat capacities and enthalpies of formation of aqueous aluminate under hydrothermal conditions from integral heat of solution measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulier, Yohann; Tremaine, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Heats of solution of NaAlO 2 (s) were measured at five temperatures up to 250 °C. • Standard molar enthalpies of solution were determined from the measured heats of solution. • Standard molar enthalpies of solution were correlated with the density model. • The density model allows us to determine the standard molar heat capacities of reaction. - Abstract: Heats of solution of sodium aluminum oxide, NaAlO 2 (s), were measured in aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions using a Tian–Calvet heat-flow calorimeter (Setaram, Model C80) with high pressure “batch cells” made of hastelloy C-276, at five temperatures from (373.15 to 523.15) K, steam saturation pressure, and concentrations from (0.02 to 0.09) mol · kg −1 . Standard molar enthalpies of solution, Δ soln H ∘ , and relative standard molar enthalpies, [H ∘ (T) − H ∘ (298.15 K)], of NaAl(OH) 4 (aq) were determined from the measured heats of solution. The results were fitted with the “density” model. The temperature dependence of Δ soln H ∘ from the model yielded the standard molar heat capacities of reaction, Δ soln C p ∘ , from which standard partial molar heat capacities for aqueous aluminate, C p ∘ [A1(OH) 4 − ,aq], were calculated. Standard partial molar enthalpies of formation, Δ f H ∘ , and entropies, S ∘ , of A1(OH) 4 − (aq) were also determined. The values for C p ∘ [A1(OH) 4 − ,aq] agree with literature data determined up to T = 413 K from enthalpy of solution and heat capacity measurements to within the combined experimental uncertainties. They are consistent with differential heat capacity measurements up to T = 573 K from Schrödle et al. (2010) [29] using the same calorimeter, but this method has the advantage that measurements could be made at much lower concentrations in the presence of an excess concentration of ligand. To our knowledge, these are the first standard partial molar heat capacities measured under hydrothermal conditions by the

  10. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

    2011-07-27

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

  11. Comparison of ambient aerosol extinction coefficients obtained from in-situ, MAX-DOAS and LIDAR measurements at Cabauw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zieger, P.; Weingartner, E.; Henzing, J.; Moerman, M.; Leeuw, G. de; Mikkilä, J.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Clémer, K.; Roozendael, M. van; Yilmaz, S.; Frieß, U.; Irie, H.; Wagner, T.; Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Apituley, A.; Wilson, K.; Baltensperger, U.

    2011-01-01

    In the field, aerosol in-situ measurements are often performed under dry conditions (relative humidity RH<30-40%). Since ambient aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth at enhanced RH, their microphysical and optical properties especially the aerosol light scattering are also strongly

  12. Joint observations of the dynamics of atmospheric aerosol by means of aerosol and Doppler lidars on the coast of Lake Baikal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhanenko, G. P.; Smalikho, I. N.; Balin, Yu. S.; Banakh, V. A.; Klemasheva, M. G.; Novoselov, M. M.; Rudi, Yu. A.; Penner, I. E.; Sukharev, A. A.; Falits, A. V.; Chen, W.-N.

    2015-11-01

    Observations of the aerosol atmosphere by means of the "LOSA-M2" aerosol Raman lidar and the "Stream Line" pulsed coherent Doppler lidar were carried out in August 2014 near village Boyarsk (Baikal Lake coast). The wind field and its impact on the stratification and dynamics of the aerosol layers in the lower troposphere were studied under various synoptic conditions. The data of simultaneous observations of wave-like motions in the boundary layer of the troposphere by two lidars are presented.

  13. Characterization of a real-time tracer for isoprene epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, W. W.; St. Clair, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of organic aerosol (OA) in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized...

  14. Sensitive detection of aerosol effect on simulated IASI spectral radiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, X.; Huang, H.-L.; Zhang, L.; Weisz, E.; Cao, X.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by radiative transfer modeling of the effects of dust (aerosol) on satellite thermal infrared radiance by many different imaging radiometers, in this article, we present the aerosol-effected satellite radiative signal changes in the top of atmosphere (TOA). The simulation of TOA radiance for Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is performed by using the RTTOV fast radiative transfer model. The model computation is carried out with setting representative geographical atmospheric models and typical default aerosol climatological models under clear sky condition. The radiative differences (in units of equivalent black body brightness temperature differences (BTDs)) between simulated radiances without consideration of the impact of aerosol (Aerosol-free) and with various aerosol models (Aerosol-modified) are calculated for the whole IASI spectrum between 3.62 and 15.5 μm. The comparisons of BTDs are performed through 11 aerosol models in 5 classified atmospheric models. The results show that the Desert aerosol model has the most significant impact on IASI spectral simulated radiances than the other aerosol models (Continental, Urban, Maritime types and so on) in Mid-latitude Summer, contributing to the mineral aerosol components contained. The value of BTDs could reach up to 1 K at peak points. The atmospheric window spectral region between 900 and 1100 cm −1 (9.09–11.11 μm) is concentrated after the investigation for the largest values of aerosol-affected radiance differences. BTDs in IASI spectral region between 645 and 1200 cm −1 occupies the largest oscillation and the major part of the whole spectrum. The IASI highest window peak-points channels (such as 9.4 and 10.2 μm) are obtained finally, which are the most sensitive ones to the simulated IASI radiance. -- Highlights: ► Sensitive study of aerosol effect on simulated IASI spectral radiance is performed. ► The aerosol components have influenced IASI spectral regions

  15. Increased ionization supports growth of aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, H.; Enghoff, M. B.; Shaviv, N. J.

    2017-01-01

    Ions produced by cosmic rays have been thought to influence aerosols and clouds. In this study, the effect of ionization on the growth of aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei is investigated theoretically and experimentally. We show that the mass-flux of small ions can constitute an important...... and find good agreement with theory. Ion-induced condensation should be of importance not just in Earth’s present day atmosphere for the growth of aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei under pristine marine conditions, but also under elevated atmospheric ionization caused by increased supernova activity....

  16. Aerosols in Northern Morocco: Input pathways and their chemical fingerprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchrif, A.; Guinot, B.; Bounakhla, M.; Cachier, H.; Damnati, B.; Baghdad, B.

    2018-02-01

    The Mediterranean basin is one of the most sensitive regions in the world regarding climate change and air quality. Deserts and marine aerosols combine with combustion aerosols from maritime traffic, large urban centers, and at a larger scale from populated industrialized regions in Europe. From Tetouan city located in the North of Morocco, we attempted to better figure out the main aerosol transport pathways and their respective aerosol load and chemical profile by examining air mass back trajectory patterns and aerosol chemical compositions from May 2011 to April 2012. The back trajectory analysis throughout the sampling period led to four clusters, for which meteorological conditions and aerosol chemical characteristics have been investigated. The most frequent cluster (CL3: 39%) corresponds to polluted air masses coming from the Mediterranean Basin, characterized by urban and marine vessels emissions out of Spain and of Northern Africa. Two other polluted clusters were characterized. One is of local origin (CL1: 22%), with a marked contribution from urban aerosols (Rabat, Casablanca) and from biomass burning aerosols. The second (CL2: 32%) defines air masses from the near Atlantic Ocean, affected by pollutants emitted from the Iberian coast. A fourth cluster (CL4: 7%) is characterized by rather clean, fast and rainy oceanic air masses, influenced during their last 24 h before reaching Tetouan by similar sources with those affecting CL2, but to a lesser extent. The chemical data show that carbonaceous species are found in the fine aerosols fraction and are generally from local primary sources (low OC/EC) rather than long-range transported. In addition to fresh traffic and maritime vessel aerosols, our results suggest the contribution of local biomass burning.

  17. Development and validation of an attenuated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae aerosol vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhi-Xin; Wei, Yan-Na; Li, Gui-Lan; Lu, Xiao-Ming; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Pharr, G Todd; Wang, Zhan-Wei; Kong, Meng; Gan, Yuan; Bai, Fang-Fang; Liu, Mao-Jun; Xiong, Qi-Yan; Wu, Xu-Su; Shao, Guo-Qing

    2013-12-27

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) causes a chronic respiratory disease with high morbidity and low mortality in swine, and has been presented as a major cause of growth retardation in the swine industry. Aerosol vaccination presents a needle free, high throughput, and efficient platform for vaccine delivery, and has been widely applied in poultry vaccination. However, aerosol vaccines have rarely been used in swine vaccination primarily because the long and curving respiratory track of swine presents a barrier for vaccine particle delivery. To develop an effective M. hyopneumoniae aerosol vaccine, three major barriers need to be overcome: to optimize particle size for aerosol delivery, to maintain the viability of mycoplasma cells in the vaccine, and to optimize the environmental conditions for vaccine delivery. In this study, an aerosol mycoplasma vaccine was successfully developed based on a conventional live attenuated M. hyopneumoniae vaccine. Specifically, the Pari LCD nebulizer was used to produce an aerosol vaccine particle size less than 5 μm; and a buffer with 5% glycerol was developed and optimized to prevent inactivation of M. hyopneumoniae caused by aerosolization and evaporation. Before nebulization, the room temperature and relative humidity were control to 20-25 °C and 70-75%, respectively, which helped maintain the viability of aerosol vaccine. Animal experiments demonstrated that this newly developed aerosol vaccine was effectively delivered to swine low respiratory track, being confirmed by nested-PCR, in situ hybridization and scanning electron microscope. Moreover, M. hyopneumoniae specific sIgA secretion was detected in the nasal swab samples at 14 days post-immunization. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a live M. hyopneumoniae aerosol vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. REFLECTION OF THE SOCIAL STANDARDS AS A CONDITION OF A SUCCESSFUL SOCIALIZATION OF THE CHILDREN WITH A HIGH CREATIVE POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina L. Leutina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the problem of reflection of social norms and its impact on the process of socialization of children with a high creative potential.Methods. Processes of socialization and reflection of social norms are considered in this article on the basis of the methodology of the system and mental activity analysis developed by G. P. Schedrovitsky, the founder of the Moscow Methodological Study Group. The article provides the comparative analysis of the adaptation and activity approach to socialization of children with a high creative potential according to such parameters as the object, socialization mechanisms, characteristics of social norms, social controls, personal controls, personal qualities, level of social mobility, and nature of the process of socialization.Results and scientific novelty. The author puts forward the thesis about irrational character and «off-limits» of judgements of the majority of social norms in a modern society, and shows distinction of social and personal regulators of a reflection of these norms. One of the main conclusions is the following: rationalisation and reflection of social norms are the important conditions of social dynamics and social development.It has been found that unconscious personal acceptance of social norms that is typical of the adaptation approach leads to two opposite results: 1 successful adaptation due to uncritical acceptance of social norms by the child, which leads to decrease in the diversity of ways of activity and specificity of its products, and, as a result, failure to realize the creative potential; 2 desocialization of the child in case of keeping the level of creative abilities and the possibility of its realization.The activity approach which is based on reflexive mechanisms represents absolutely different methodological opportunities for solving the problem of socialization of children with a high creative potential. The activity approach contributes

  19. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an antimicrobial air filter to avoid porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) aerosol transmission, after 16 months of exposure to a commercial swine environmental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, L. [Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc., St. Joseph, MO (United States); Pouliot, F.; Urizar, L. [Centre de developpement du porc du Quebec Inc., Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The effectiveness of Noveko's antimicrobial filter was evaluated after 16 months of exposure to commercial swine production. The experiment involved the use of a scaled model of a commercial swine facility consisting of 2 small chambers connected by a duct containing the filters. A 5 kg naive pig was placed in the reception chamber for a period of 6 hours after aerosolization with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Blood samples from pigs were collected before and after aerosolization to test for the presence of PRRSV RNA. Only blood samples were tested for PRRSV antibodies by IDEXX 2XR ELISA. None of the 9 pigs tested were found to be infected. The study showed that the technology used to integrate the antimicrobial agent into the filter fibers allows the filter combination to withstand extreme weather and endure commercial swine production for at least 16 months, and can maintain its effectiveness to avoid airborne transmission of PRRSV.

  20. Atmospheric aerosol system: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prospero, J.M.; Charlson, R.J.; Mohnen, V.; Jaenicke, R.; Delany, A.C.; Moyers, J.; Zoller, W.; Rahn, K.

    1983-01-01

    Aerosols could play a critical role in many processes which impact on our lives either indirectly (e.g., climate) or directly (e.g., health). However, our ability to assess these possible impacts is constrained by our limited knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of aerosols, both anthropogenic and natural. This deficiency is attributable in part to the fact that aerosols are the end product of a vast array of chemical and physical processes. Consequently, the properties of the aerosol can exhibit a great deal of variability in both time and space. Furthermore, most aerosol studies have focused on measurements of a single aerosol characteristic such as composition or size distribution. Such information is generally not useful for the assessment of impacts because the degree of impact may depend on the integral properties of the aerosol, for example, the aerosol composition as a function of particle size. In this overview we discuss recent work on atmospheric aerosols that illustrates the complex nature of the aerosol chemical and physical system, and we suggest strategies for future research. A major conclusion is that man has had a great impact on the global budgets of certain species, especially sulfur and nitrogen, that play a dominant role in the atmospheric aerosol system. These changes could conceivably affect climate. Large-scale impacts are implied because it has recently been demonstrated that natural and pollutant aerosol episodes can be propagated over great distances. However, at present there is no evidence linking anthropogenic activities with a persistent increase in aerosol concentrations on a global scale. A major problem in assessing man's impact on the atmospheric aerosol system and on global budgets is the absence of aerosol measurements in remote marine and continental areas

  1. GRIP LANGLEY AEROSOL RESEARCH GROUP EXPERIMENT (LARGE) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Langley Aerosol Research Group Experiment (LARGE) measures ultrafine aerosol number density, total and non-volatile aerosol number density, dry aerosol size...

  2. Climate and health implications of future aerosol emission scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Landry, Jean-Sébastien; Damon Matthews, H.

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols have a net cooling effect on climate and also cause adverse health effects by degrading air quality. In this global-scale sensitivity study, we used a combination of the aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ and the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model to assess the climate and health effects of aerosols emissions from three Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5) and two new (LOW and HIGH) aerosol emission scenarios derived from RCP4.5, but that span a wider spectrum of possible future aerosol emissions. All simulations had CO2 emissions and greenhouse gas forcings from RCP4.5. Aerosol forcing declined similarly in the standard RCP aerosol emission scenarios: the aerosol effective radiative forcing (ERF) decreased from -1.3 W m-2 in 2005 to between -0.1 W m-2 and -0.4 W m-2 in 2100. The differences in ERF were substantially larger between LOW (-0.02 W m-2 in 2100) and HIGH (-0.8 W m-2) scenarios. The global mean temperature difference between the simulations with standard RCP aerosol emissions was less than 0.18 °C, whereas the difference between LOW and HIGH reached 0.86 °C in 2061. In LOW, the rate of warming peaked at 0.48 °C per decade in the 2030s, whereas in HIGH it was the lowest of all simulations and never exceeded 0.23 °C per decade. Using present-day population density and baseline mortality rates for all scenarios, PM2.5-induced premature mortality was 2 371 800 deaths per year in 2010 and 525 700 in 2100 with RCP4.5 aerosol emissions; in HIGH, the premature mortality reached its maximum value of 2 780 800 deaths per year in 2030, whereas in LOW the premature mortality at 2030 was below 299 900 deaths per year. Our results show potential trade-offs in aerosol mitigation with respect to climate change and public health as ambitious reduction of aerosol emissions considerably increased warming while decreasing mortality.

  3. Particle size of radioactive aerosols generated during machine operation in high-energy proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oki, Yuichi; Kanda, Yukio; Kondo, Kenjiro; Endo, Akira

    2000-01-01

    In high-energy accelerators, non-radioactive aerosols are abundantly generated due to high radiation doses during machine operation. Under such a condition, radioactive atoms, which are produced through various nuclear reactions in the air of accelerator tunnels, form radioactive aerosols. These aerosols might be inhaled by workers who enter the tunnel just after the beam stop. Their particle size is very important information for estimation of internal exposure doses. In this work, focusing on typical radionuclides such as 7 Be and 24 Na, their particle size distributions are studied. An aluminum chamber was placed in the EP2 beam line of the 12-GeV proton synchrotron at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). Aerosol-free air was introduced to the chamber, and aerosols formed in the chamber were sampled during machine operation. A screen-type diffusion battery was employed in the aerosol-size analysis. Assuming that the aerosols have log-normal size distributions, their size distributions were obtained from the radioactivity concentrations at the entrance and exit of the diffusion battery. Radioactivity of the aerosols was measured with Ge detector system, and concentrations of non-radioactive aerosols were obtained using condensation particle counter (CPC). The aerosol size (radius) for 7 Be and 24 Na was found to be 0.01-0.04 μm, and was always larger than that for non-radioactive aerosols. The concentration of non-radioactive aerosols was found to be 10 6 - 10 7 particles/cm 3 . The size for radioactive aerosols was much smaller than ordinary atmospheric aerosols. Internal doses due to inhalation of the radioactive aerosols were estimated, based on the respiratory tract model of ICRP Pub. 66. (author)

  4. Aerosols and Climate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    exam~le, the transport of dust from Sahara desert over the. Atlantic Ocean by winds. Most of the aerosol sources are located near the Earth's surface and hence their concentration (mass per unit volume) is larger near the surface. Occasionally there may be layers aloft as well depending upon the atmospheric condi- tions.

  5. Measurement of size distribution for 220Rn progeny attached aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Guo Qiuju; Zhuo Weihai

    2008-01-01

    The size distribution of radioactive aerosols is a very important factor for evaluating the inner exposure dose contributed by radon and thoron progeny in environments. In order to measure the size distribution of thoron progeny attached radioactive aerosols, a device was developed using wire screens. The count median diameter (CMD) and the geometric standard deviation (GSD) of attached radioactive aerosols were calculated by collecting ThB and using CR-39 as detector. Field measurement results at Yangjiang City in Guangdong Province show that the CMDs distribute between 30 and 130 nm, and the GSDs are between 1.9 and 3.3. It also shows that the more humid country, the smaller CMDs, and the ventilation has great influence on the size distribution of aerosols. The CMDs of adobe house are smaller than that of the concrete houses. (authors)

  6. Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Curtis [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Springer, David [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology.

  7. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering Assessments and the Impact of City Size on Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Miranda, Guadalupe

    The general problem of urban pollution and its relation to the city population is examined in this dissertation. A simple model suggests that pollutant concentrations should scale approximately with the square root of city population. This model and its experimental evaluation presented here serve as important guidelines for urban planning and attainment of air quality standards including the limits that air pollution places on city population. The model was evaluated using measurements of air pollution. Optical properties of aerosol pollutants such as light absorption and scattering plus chemical species mass concentrations were measured with a photoacoustic spectrometer, a reciprocal nephelometer, and an aerosol mass spectrometer in Mexico City in the context of the multinational project "Megacity Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations (MILAGRO)" in March 2006. Aerosol light absorption and scattering measurements were also obtained for Reno and Las Vegas, NV USA in December 2008-March 2009 and January-February 2003, respectively. In all three cities, the morning scattering peak occurs a few hours later than the absorption peak due to the formation of secondary photochemically produced aerosols. In particular, for Mexico City we determined the fraction of photochemically generated secondary aerosols to be about 75% of total aerosol mass concentration at its peak near midday. The simple 2-d box model suggests that commonly emitted primary air pollutant (e.g., black carbon) mass concentrations scale approximately as the square root of the urban population. This argument extends to the absorption coefficient, as it is approximately proportional to the black carbon mass concentration. Since urban secondary pollutants form through photochemical reactions involving primary precursors, in linear approximation their mass concentration also should scale with the square root of population. Therefore, the scattering coefficient, a proxy for particulate matter

  8. A case study on biomass burning aerosols: effects on aerosol optical properties and surface radiation levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arola

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2006, biomass burning aerosols from eastern Europe were transported extensively to Finland, and to other parts of northern Europe. They were observed as far as in the European Arctic. In the first part of this paper, temporal and spatial evolution and transport of these biomass burning aerosols are monitored with MODIS retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD imagery at visible wavelengths (0.55 μm. Comparison of MODIS and AERONET AOD is conducted at Tõravere, Estonia. Then trajectory analyses, as well as MODIS Fire Mapper products are used to better understand the type and origin of the air masses. During the studied four-week period AOD values ranged from near zero up to 1.2 at 0.55 μm and the linear correlation between MODIS and AERONET was very high (~0.97. Temporal variability observed within this four-week period was also rather well explained by the trajectory analysis in conjunction with the fire detections produced by the MODIS Rapid Response System. In the second part of our study, the surface measurements of global and UV radiation at Jokioinen, Finland are used to study the effect of this haze episode on the levels of surface radiation. We found reductions up to 35% in noon-time surface UV irradiance (at 340 nm as compared to typical aerosol conditions. For global (total solar radiation, the reduction was always smaller, in line with the expected wavelength dependence of the aerosol effect.

  9. Influences of in-cloud aerosol scavenging parameterizations on aerosol concentrations and wet deposition in ECHAM5-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Croft

    2010-02-01

    , mid-troposphere 210Pb vertical profiles, and the geographic distribution of aerosol optical depth is found for the new diagnostic scavenging scheme compared to the prescribed scavenging fraction scheme of the standard ECHAM5-HAM. The diagnostic and prognostic schemes represent the variability of scavenged fractions particularly for submicron size aerosols, and for mixed and ice phase clouds, and are recommended in preference to the prescribed scavenging fractions method.

  10. Characterisation of aerosols produced by laser cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauvel, S.; Pilot, G.; Dinechin, G. de; Gosse, X.; Arnaud, P.

    2007-01-01

    Powerful lasers represent a promising alternative solution to traditional cutting processes used in dismantling nuclear equipments. The use of optical fibers has an unquestionable advantage when dealing with airtight workshops. A study funded by COGEMA Marcoule was undertaken by IRSN/SERAC in collaboration with GIP/GERAILP in order to characterise the aerosols emitted by the cutting of evaporators elements with a 4 kW continuous wave Nd:YAG laser. For this study, laser cutting has been carried out in a tight room of 35 m 3 connected to a particle sampling pipe. Iso-kinetic samplers allowed the measurement of the aerosol concentration. A diffusional and inertial spectrometer (SDI 2001) - an Andersen impinger coupled to a diffusion battery - provided the size distribution. An electrostatic filter used upstream a HEPA filter, itself placed before the extractor fan, collected the majority of the emitted aerosol. Its efficiency was measured and controlled throughout the experiments. The results show the influence of the cutting conditions on the characteristics of the aerosol, and allow a comparison with other cutting tools. (authors)

  11. ISS Ambient Air Quality: Updated Inventory of Known Aerosol Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marit

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft cabin air quality is of fundamental importance to crew health, with concerns encompassing both gaseous contaminants and particulate matter. Little opportunity exists for direct measurement of aerosol concentrations on the International Space Station (ISS), however, an aerosol source model was developed for the purpose of filtration and ventilation systems design. This model has successfully been applied, however, since the initial effort, an increase in the number of crewmembers from 3 to 6 and new processes on board the ISS necessitate an updated aerosol inventory to accurately reflect the current ambient aerosol conditions. Results from recent analyses of dust samples from ISS, combined with a literature review provide new predicted aerosol emission rates in terms of size-segregated mass and number concentration. Some new aerosol sources have been considered and added to the existing array of materials. The goal of this work is to provide updated filtration model inputs which can verify that the current ISS filtration system is adequate and filter lifetime targets are met. This inventory of aerosol sources is applicable to other spacecraft, and becomes more important as NASA considers future long term exploration missions, which will preclude the opportunity for resupply of filtration products.

  12. Trend analysis of aerosol optical thickness and Ångström exponent derived from the global AERONET spectral observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, J.; von Hoyningen-Huene, W.; Kokhanovsky, A. A.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.

    2012-06-01

    Regular aerosol observations based on well-calibrated instruments have led to a better understanding of the aerosol radiative budget on Earth. In recent years, these instruments have played an important role in the determination of the increase of anthropogenic aerosols by means of long-term studies. Only few investigations regarding long-term trends of aerosol optical characteristics (e.g. aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and Ångström exponent (ÅE)) have been derived from ground-based observations. This paper aims to derive and discuss linear trends of AOT (440, 675, 870, and 1020 nm) and ÅE (440-870 nm) using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) level 2.0 spectral observations. Additionally, temporal trends of coarse- and fine-mode dominant AOTs (CdAOT and FdAOT) have been estimated by applying an aerosol classification based on accurate ÅE and Ångström exponent difference (ÅED). In order to take into account the fact that cloud disturbance is having a significant influence on the trend analysis of aerosols, we introduce a weighted least squares regression depending on two weights: (1) monthly standard deviation (σt) and (2) number of observations per month (nt). Temporal increase of FdAOTs (440 nm) prevails over newly industrializing countries in East Asia (weighted trends; +6.23% yr-1 at Beijing) and active agricultural burning regions in South Africa (+1.89% yr-1 at Mongu). On the other hand, insignificant or negative trends for FdAOTs are detected over Western Europe (+0.25% yr-1 at Avignon and -2.29% yr-1 at Ispra) and North America (-0.52% yr-1 for GSFC and -0.01% yr-1 at MD_Science_Center). Over desert regions, both increase and decrease of CdAOTs (+3.37% yr-1 at Solar_Village and -1.18% yr-1 at Ouagadougou) are observed depending on meteorological conditions.

  13. Characterization of biomass burning aerosols from forest fire in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Y.; Iriana, W.; Okumura, M.; Lestari, P.; Tohno, S.; Akira, M.; Okuda, T.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass burning (forest fire, wild fire) is a major source of pollutants, generating an estimate of 104 Tg per year of aerosol particles worldwide. These particles have adverse human health effects and can affect the radiation budget and climate directly and indirectly. Eighty percent of biomass burning aerosols are generated in the tropics and about thirty percent of them originate in the tropical regions of Asia (Andreae, 1991). Several recent studies have reported on the organic compositions of biomass burning aerosols in the tropical regions of South America and Africa, however, there is little data about forest fire aerosols in the tropical regions of Asia. It is important to characterize biomass burning aerosols in the tropical regions of Asia because the aerosol properties vary between fires depending on type and moisture of wood, combustion phase, wind conditions, and several other variables (Reid et al., 2005). We have characterized PM2.5 fractions of biomass burning aerosols emitted from forest fire in Indonesia. During the dry season in 2012, PM2.5 aerosols from several forest fires occurring in Riau, Sumatra, Indonesia were collected on quartz and teflon filters with two mini-volume samplers. Background aerosols in forest were sampled during transition period of rainy season to dry season (baseline period). Samples were analyzed with several analytical instruments. The carbonaceous content (organic and elemental carbon, OC and EC) of the aerosols was analyzed by a thermal optical reflectance technique using IMPROVE protocol. The metal, inorganic ion and organic components of the aerosols were analyzed by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), ion chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. There was a great difference of chemical composition between forest fire and non-forest fire samples. Smoke aerosols for forest fires events were composed of ~ 45 % OC and ~ 2.5 % EC. On the other hand, background aerosols for baseline periods were

  14. American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) `95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The Fourteenth annual meeting of the American Association for Aerosol Research was held October 9-13, 1995 at Westin William Penn Hotel in Pittsburgh, PA. This volume contains the abstracts of the papers and poster sessions presented at this meeting, grouped by the session in which they were presented as follows: Radiation Effects; Aerosol Deposition; Collision Simulations and Microphysical Behavior; Filtration Theory and Measurements; Materials Synthesis; Radioactive and Nuclear Aerosols; Aerosol Formation, Thermodynamic Properties, and Behavior; Particle Contamination Issues in the Computer Industry; Pharmaceutical Aerosol Technology; Modeling Global/Regional Aerosols; Visibility; Respiratory Deposition; Biomass and Biogenic Aerosols; Aerosol Dynamics; Atmospheric Aerosols.

  15. Using the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo and Angstrom Exponent from AERONET to Determine Aerosol Origins and Mixing States over the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Slutsker, I.; Smirnov, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Ghauri, B.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosol mixtures—whether dominated by dust, carbon, sulfates, nitrates, sea salt, or mixtures of them—complicate the retrieval of remotely sensed aerosol properties from satellites and possibly increase the uncertainty of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Major aerosol source regions in South Asia include the Thar Desert as well as agricultural lands, Himalayan foothills, and large urban centers in and near the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Over India and Pakistan, seasonal changes in meteorology, including the monsoon (June-September), significantly affect the transport, lifetime, and type of aerosols. Strong monsoonal winds can promote long range transport of dust resulting in mixtures of dust and carbonaceous aerosols, while more stagnant synoptic conditions (e.g., November-January) can prolong the occurrence of urban/industrial pollution, biomass burning smoke, or mixtures of them over the IGP. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun/sky radiometer data are analyzed to show the aerosol optical depth (AOD) seasonality and aerosol dominant mixing states. The Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and extinction Angstrom exponent (EAE) relationship has been shown to provide sound clustering of dominant aerosol types using long term AERONET site data near known source regions [Giles et al., 2012]. In this study, aerosol type partitioning using the SSA (440 nm) and EAE (440-870 nm) relationship is further developed to quantify the occurrence of Dust, Mixed (e.g., dust and carbonaceous aerosols), Urban/Industrial (U/I) pollution, and Biomass Burning (BB) smoke. Based on EAE thresholds derived from the cluster analysis (for AOD440nm>0.4), preliminary results (2001-2010) for Kanpur, India, show the overall contributions of each dominant particle type (rounded to the nearest 10%): 10% for Dust (EAE≤0.25), 60% for Mixed (0.251.25). In the IGP, BB aerosols may have varying sizes (e.g., corresponding to 1.2India and Pakistan are also analyzed using available AERONET

  16. Evaluation of NASA Deep Blue/SOAR aerosol retrieval algorithms applied to AVHRR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Lee, J.; Carletta, N.; Chen, S.-H.; Smirnov, A.

    2017-09-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) and Satellite Ocean Aerosol Retrieval (SOAR) algorithms have previously been applied to observations from sensors like the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) to provide records of midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related quantities over land and ocean surfaces, respectively. Recently, DB and SOAR have also been applied to Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations from several platforms (NOAA11, NOAA14, and NOAA18), to demonstrate the potential for extending the DB and SOAR AOD records. This study provides an evaluation of the initial version (V001) of the resulting AVHRR-based AOD data set, including validation against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and ship-borne observations, and comparison against both other AVHRR AOD records and MODIS/SeaWiFS products at select long-term AERONET sites. Although it is difficult to distil error characteristics into a simple expression, the results suggest that one standard deviation confidence intervals on retrieved AOD of ±(0.03 + 15%) over water and ±(0.05 + 25%) over land represent the typical level of uncertainty, with a tendency toward negative biases in high-AOD conditions, caused by a combination of algorithmic assumptions and sensor calibration issues. Most of the available validation data are for NOAA18 AVHRR, although performance appears to be similar for the NOAA11 and NOAA14 sensors as well.

  17. Size distributions and chemical properties of aerosol at Ny Ålesund, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, David S.; Heintzenberg, Jost

    Physical and chemical parameters of the arctic aerosol were investigated at Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, in March and April 1989 in connection with the third Arctic Gas and Aerosol Project (AGASP III). The number size distribution of the particles was measured over the range of 0.02-1.0 μm. Filter samples were analysed for elemental composition and two integral chemical properties, hygroscopic growth and volatility, were measured. Along with the latter measurements, the distribution of these properties at specific particle sizes, i.e. the degree of internal mixing, was determined. Both clean, marine conditions and "arctic haze" episodes were included in the series of measurements. The number size distribution indicated that the aerosol was well aged based on its narrowness and the relative low concentration of nuclei mode particles. It had a number mode at 0.22 μm diameter and geometric standard deviation of 1.4. Generally the particles exhibited uniform hygroscopic growth properties, i.e. they were largely internally mixed. The growth factor was 1.45 at 90% relative humidity. Approximately 40% of the overall particulate mass was volatile at a temperature of 50°C. The volatile fraction varied form particle to particle, i.e. the particles were externally mixed with respect to volatility.

  18. Comparison of nebulised aerosol deposition in the lungs of healthy adults following oral and nasal inhalation.

    OpenAIRE

    Everard, M. L.; Hardy, J. G.; Milner, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    A standard jet nebuliser was used to generate a radiolabelled aerosol and the pattern of deposition within the airways of eight healthy adults was studied with a gamma camera. Penetration of aerosol to the lung was greatly reduced when breathing through the nose compared with mouth breathing.

  19. FRACTIONAL AEROSOL FILTRATION EFFICIENCY OF IN-DUCT VENTILATION AIR CLEANERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The filtration efficiency of ventilation air cleaners is highly particle-size dependent over the 0.01 to 3 μm diameter size range. Current standardized test methods, which determine only overall efficiencies for ambient aerosol or other test aerosols, provide data of limited util...

  20. Sources and atmospheric transformations of semivolatile organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshop, Andrew P.

    Fine atmospheric particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with increased mortality, a fact which led the EPA to promulgate a National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for PM2.5 in 1997. Organic material contributes a substantial portion of the PM2.5 mass; organic aerosols (OA) are either directly emitted (primary OA or POA) or formed via the atmospheric oxidation of volatile precursor compounds as secondary OA (SOA). The relative contributions of POA and SOA to atmospheric OA are uncertain, as are the contributions from various source classes (e.g. motor vehicles, biomass burning). This dissertation first assesses the importance of organic PM within the context of current US air pollution regulations. Most control efforts to date have focused on the inorganic component of PM. Although growing evidence strongly implicates OA, especially which from motor vehicles, in the health effects of PM, uncertain and complex source-receptor relationships for OA discourage its direct control for NAAQS compliance. Analysis of both ambient data and chemical transport modeling results indicate that OA does not play a dominant role in NAAQS violations in most areas of the country under current and likely future regulations. Therefore, new regulatory approaches will likely be required to directly address potential health impacts associated with OA. To help develop the scientific understanding needed to better regulate OA, this dissertation examined the evolution of organic aerosol emitted by combustion systems. The current conceptual model of POA is that it is non-volatile and non-reactive. Both of these assumptions were experimental investigated in this dissertation. Novel dilution measurements were carried out to investigate the gas-particle partitioning of OA at atmospherically-relevant conditions. The results demonstrate that POA from combustion sources is semivolatile. Therefore its gas-particle partitioning depends on temperature and atmospheric concentrations; heating and

  1. Chamber for Aerosol Deposition of Bioparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Roger; Kirschner, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory apparatus is depicted that is a chamber for aerosol deposition of bioparticles on surfaces of test coupons. It is designed for primary use in inoculating both flat and three-dimensional objects with approximately reproducible, uniform dispersions of bacterial spores of the genus Bacillus so that the objects could be used as standards for removal of the spores by quantitative surface sampling and/or cleaning processes. The apparatus is also designed for deposition of particles other than bacterial spores, including fungal spores, viruses, bacteriophages, and standard micron-sized beads. The novelty of the apparatus lies in the combination of a controllable nebulization system with a settling chamber large enough to contain a significant number of test coupons. Several companies market other nebulizer systems, but none are known to include chambers for deposition of bioparticles to mimic the natural fallout of bioparticles. The nebulization system is an expanded and improved version of commercially available aerosol generators that include nebulizers and drying columns. In comparison with a typical commercial aerosol generator, this system includes additional, higher-resolution flowmeters and an additional pressure regulator. Also, unlike a typical commercial aerosol generator, it includes stopcocks for separately controlling flows of gases to the nebulizer and drying column. To maximize the degree of uniformity of dispersion of bioaerosol, the chamber is shaped as an axisymmetrical cylinder and the aerosol generator is positioned centrally within the chamber and aimed upward like a fountain. In order to minimize electric charge associated with the aerosol particles, the drying column is made of aluminum, the drying column is in direct contact with an aluminum base plate, and three equally spaced Po-210 antistatic strips are located at the exit end of the drying column. The sides and top of the chamber are made of an acrylic polymer; to prevent

  2. Evaluating the Sensitivity of the Mass-Based Particle Removal Calculations for HVAC Filters in ISO 16890 to Assumptions for Aerosol Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Stephens

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available High efficiency particle air filters are increasingly being recommended for use in heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC systems to improve indoor air quality (IAQ. ISO Standard 16890-2016 provides a methodology for approximating mass-based particle removal efficiencies for PM1, PM2.5, and PM10 using size-resolved removal efficiency measurements for 0.3 µm to 10 µm particles. Two historical volume distribution functions for ambient aerosol distributions are assumed to represent ambient air in urban and rural areas globally. The goals of this work are to: (i review the ambient aerosol distributions used in ISO 16890, (ii evaluate the sensitivity of the mass-based removal efficiency calculation procedures described in ISO 16890 to various assumptions that are related to indoor and outdoor aerosol distributions, and (iii recommend several modifications to the standard that can yield more realistic estimates of mass-based removal efficiencies for HVAC filters, and thus provide a more realistic representation of a greater number of building scenarios. The results demonstrate that knowing the PM mass removal efficiency estimated using ISO 16890 is not sufficient to predict the PM mass removal efficiency in all of the environments in which the filter might be used. The main reason for this insufficiency is that the assumptions for aerosol number and volume distributions can substantially impact the results, albeit with some exceptions.

  3. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  4. Production of satellite-derived aerosol climate data records: current status of the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Gerrit; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pinnock, Simon

    2015-04-01

    and the Aerosol_cci team Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (Phase 1: 2010 -2014; Phase 2: 2014-2017) intensive work has been conducted to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors ATSR (3 algorithms), PARASOL, MERIS (3 algorithms), synergetic AATSR/SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOMOS. Whereas OMI and GOMOS were used to derive absorbing aerosol index and stratospheric extinction profiles, respectively, Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Ångström coefficient were retrieved from the other sensors. The cooperation between the project partners, including both the retrieval teams and independent validation teams, has resulted in a strong improvement of most algorithms. In particular the AATSR retrieved AOD is qualitatively similar to that from MODIS, usually taken as the standard, MISR and SeaWiFS. This conclusion has been reached form several different ways of validation of the L2 and L3 products, using AERONET sun photometer data as the common ground-truth for the application of both 'traditional' statistical techniques and a 'scoring' technique using spatial and temporal correlations. Quantitatively, the limited AATSR swath width of 500km results in a smaller amount of data. Nevertheless, the assimilation of AATSR-retrieved AOD, together with MODIS data, contributes to improving the in the ECMWF climate model results. In addition to the multi-spectral AOD, and thus the Ångström Exponent, also a per-pixel uncertainty is provided and validated. By the end of Aerosol_cci Phase 1 the ATSR algorithms have been applied to both ATSR-2 and AATSR resulting in an AOD time series of 17 years. In phase 2 this work is continued with a focus on the further improvement of the ATSR algorithms as well as those for the other instruments and algorithms, mentioned above, which in phase 1 were considered less mature. The first efforts are on the further characterization of the uncertainties and on better understanding of the

  5. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation by the interaction of hydrogen chloride with humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions in which hydrochloric acid aerosol is predicted by the interaction of hydrogen chloride gas with the water vapor in humid air are analyzed. The liquid gas phase equilibrium for the HCL-H2O system is expressed in terms of relative humidity and hydrogen chloride concentration as parts per million, units commonly used in pollution studies. Presented are the concentration (wt %) of HC1 in the aerosol and the concentration of aerosol (ppm) predicted.

  6. Smoke aerosol and its radiative effects during extreme fire event over Central Russia in summer 2010

    OpenAIRE

    N. Chubarova; Y. Nezval'; M. Sviridenkov; A. Smirnov; I. Slutsker

    2011-01-01

    Different microphysical, optical and radiative properties of aerosol were analyzed during the severe fires in summer 2010 over Central Russia using ground measurements at two AERONET sites in Moscow and Zvenigorod (Moscow suburb) and radiative measurements in Moscow. Volume aerosol size distribution in smoke conditions was shown to have a bimodal character with the significant prevalence of fine mode aerosol particles which effective radius shifted to higher values (r

  7. Physico-chemical characterization of aerosols produced by a PWR control rods vaporization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabu, B.; Pagano, C.; Tourasse, M.; Gros d'Aillon, L.; Boucenna, A.; Boulaud, D.; Dubourg, R.

    2000-01-01

    During a PWR type reactor accident, the aerosols produced by the vaporization of the control rods condition the released fission products evolution, for instance, the iodine or the tellurium. The EMAIC experiment has to characterize the aerosols emitted during the core degradation. The IPSN and EDF finances this program, realized at the CEA Grenoble. The results should allow the simulation of the aerosols source resulting from the vaporization to introduce in the ASTEC code, serious accident codes system. (A.L.B.)

  8. Effects of aerosol polydispersity on theoretical calculations of unattached fractions of radon progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandi, F.; Khan, A.; Phillips, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of unattached fractions of radon progeny require prediction of an attachment coefficient. Average attachment coefficients for aerosols of various count median diameters, CMD, and geometric standard deviations, σ/sub g/, are calculated using four different theories. These theories are: (1) the kinetic theory, (2) the diffusion theory, (3) the hybrid theory and (4) the kinetic-diffusion theory. Comparisons of the various calculated attachment coefficients are made and the implications of using either the kinetic or the diffusion theory to calculate unattached fractions for aerosols of various CMD and σg are discussed. Significant errors may arise in use of either the kinetic theory or the diffusion theory. Large and unacceptable errors arise in calculating unattached fractions of a polydisperse aerosol by characterizing the aerosol as monodisperse. Unattached fractions of RaA are calculated for two mine aerosols and a room aerosol

  9. Aerosol sampling and characterization for hazard evaluation. Progress report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scripsick, R.C.; Gray, D.C.; Tillery, M.I.; Stafford, R.G.; Romero, P.O.

    1977-04-01

    A draft Manual of Recommended Practice for Aerosol Sampling and Evaluation was completed and sent to the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance (DSSC) for review. The results of the Survey of Sampling Techniques for Defining Respirable Concentration and/or Particle Size Characteristics of Aerosols were published as LA-6087. The need for greater standardization of ERDA aerosol sampling techniques was indicated. The Aerosol Training Course was presented in 11 sessions to 85 persons. General elements of good practice were emphasized, and recommendation of specific sampling devices or procedures was avoided. A system for estimating dissolution rates of plutonium aerosols was developed. Studies indicate that plutonium aerosols found in the field have a rapid initial dissolution phase followed by a slower secondary phase. Three methods of particle sizing air samples collected on membrane filters were investigated. The most promising was a scanning electron microscope electron microprobe (SEM-EMp) method. An operating plutonium handling facility was a model for development of techniques to evaluate aerosol surveillance systems performance. Airborne contamination records were studied. The physicochemical properties of a plutonium aerosol existing in the facility were investigated in relation to plutonium handling operations. The techniques developed have indicated some areas of the aerosol surveillance system that need improvement

  10. Aerosol properties and air pollutants over an urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Sano, Itaru; Satoh, Mutsumi; Holben, Brent N.

    2006-12-01

    For a better understanding of urban aerosols, sun/sky photometry has been undertaken at the Kinki University campus in Higashi-Osaka as a NASA/AERONET station since 2002. A new instrument, the SPM-613D (Kimoto Electric), has been taking measurements at the same site since March 15, 2004. The relationship between aerosol properties obtained from radiometry with AERONET and the SPM measurements is examined. It is found that there is a linear correlation between SPM concentrations and aerosol properties, which indicates that aerosol characteristics can be estimated from SPM data, and vice versa. It is also shown that the air quality of the Higashi-Osaka site is poor due to not only the anthropogenic particles by local emissions, such as diesel vehicles and chemical industries, but also due to the dust particles coming from continental desert areas by large scale climatic conditions.

  11. Dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppae, J.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have various climate effects and adverse health effects, which both depend on the size and number concentration of the particles. Freshly-formed particles are not large enough to impact neither health nor climate and they are most susceptible to removal by collisions with larger pre-existing particles. Consequently, the knowledge of both the formation and the growth rate of particles are crucially important when assessing the health and climate effects of atmospheric new particle formation. The purpose of this thesis is to increase our knowledge of the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles with a specific interest towards the particle growth rate and processes affecting the aerosol charging state. A new model, Ion-UHMA, which simulates the dynamics of neutral and charged particles, was developed for this purpose. Simple analytical formulae that can be used to estimate the growth rate due to various processes were derived and used to study the effects of charged particles on the growth rate. It was found that the growth rate of a freshly-formed particle population due to condensation and coagulation could be significantly increased when a considerable fraction of the particles are charged. Finally, recent data-analysis methods that have been applied to the aerosol charging states obtained from the measurements were modified for a charge asymmetric framework. The methods were then tested on data obtained from aerosol dynamics simulations. The methods were found to be able to provide reasonable estimates on the growth rate and proportion of particles formed via ion-induced nucleation, provided that the growth rate is high enough and that the charged particles do not grow much more rapidly than the neutral ones. A simple procedure for estimating whether the methods are suitable for analysing data obtained in specific conditions was provided. In this thesis, the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles were studied in

  12. Modeling of Organic Effects on Aerosols Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboussat, A.; Amundson, N. R.; He, J.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2006-05-01

    Over the last two decades, a series of modules has been developed in the atmospheric modeling community to predict the phase transition, multistage growth phenomena, crystallization and evaporation of inorganic aerosols. In the same time, the water interactions of particles containing organic constituents have been recognized as an important factor for aerosol activation and cloud formation. However, the research on hygroscopicity of organic-containing aerosols, motivated by the organic effect on aerosol growth and activation, has gathered much less attention. We present here a new model (UHAERO), that is both efficient and rigorously computes phase separation and liquid-liquid equilibrium for organic particles, as well as the dynamics partitioning between gas and particulate phases, with emphasis on the role of water vapor in the gas-liquid partitioning. The model does not rely on any a priori specification of the phases present in certain atmospheric conditions. The determination of the thermodynamic equilibrium is based on the minimization of the Gibbs free energy. The mass transfer between the particle and the bulk gas phase is dynamically driven by the difference between bulk gas pressure and the gas pressure at the surface of a particle. The multicomponent phase equilibrium for a closed organic aerosol system at constant temperature and pressure and for specified feeds is the solution to the liquid-liquid equilibrium problem arising from the constrained minimization of the Gibbs free energy. A geometrical concept of phase simplex (phase separation) is introduced to characterize the thermodynamic equilibrium. The computation of the mass fluxes is achieved by coupling the thermodynamics of the organic aerosol particle and the determination of the mass fluxes. Numerical results show the efficiency of the model, which make it suitable for insertion in global three- dimensional air quality models. The Gibbs free energy is modeled by the UNIFAC model to illustrate

  13. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  14. Observational Insights into the Factors that Modulate Aerosol Impacts on Warm Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, T. S.

    2016-12-01

    A large number of modern satellite datasets provide complementary evidence of aerosol influences on the microphysical, macrophysical, and radiative properties of warm clouds. This presentation will demonstrate that these observations are now sufficiently mature and abundant to qualitatively distinguish a wide range of independent, robust aerosol signatures from transient effects that may be artifacts of the methodology or datasets adopted. In some cases, modeled and observed aerosol influences on cloud properties diverge to such a degree that we can identify model biases with some confidence. More generally, however, quantitative relationships derived from satellite datasets are subject to numerous sources of uncertainty owing to inaccurate retrieval methodologies, a lack of knowledge of aerosol nucleation rate, and the strong covariation of cloud properties, aerosol abundance, and environmental conditions. To establish the significance of new observationally-derived estimates of aerosol effects we will examine their sensitivity to uncertainties in observed aerosol and cloud properties, the source of aerosol proxy adopted, local environmental conditions, and the relative vertical placement of cloud and aerosol layers. The analysis reveals that while some aerosol signatures are robust, others depend on the specific choice of datasets employed or fail to exceed realistic noise levels imposed by uncertainties in current satellite products. For example, many relationships that are robust in specific regions at certain times of year are not universal globally. Common to all observed relationships is the fact that aerosol signatures exhibit profound sensitivity to local meteorology and cloud morphology reinforcing the notion that aerosol-cloud interactions vary significantly between scenes, even over relatively large time and space domains. The results caution against the use of universal relationships to represent aerosol-cloud interactions globally but provide a

  15. Aerosol as a player in the Arctic Amplification - an aerosol-climate model evaluation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, Jacob; Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina

    2017-04-01

    Climate warming is much more pronounced in the Arctic than in any other region on Earth - a phenomenon referred to as the "Arctic Amplification". This is closely related to a variety of specific feedback mechanisms, which relative importance, however, is not yet sufficiently understood. The local changes in the Arctic climate are far-reaching and affect for example the general atmospheric circulation and global energy transport. Aerosol particles from long-range transport and local sources play an important role in the Arctic system by modulating the energy balance (directly by interaction with solar and thermal infrared radiation and indirectly by changing cloud properties and atmospheric dynamics). The main source regions of anthropogenic aerosol are Europe and East Asia, but also local shipping and oil/gas extraction may contribute significantly. In addition, important sources are widespread, mainly natural boreal forest fires. Most of the European aerosol is transported through the lower atmospheric layers in wintertime. The Asian aerosol is transported through higher altitudes. Because of the usually pristine conditions in the Arctic even small absolute changes in aerosol concentration can have large impacts on the Arctic climate. Using global and Arctic-focused model simulations, we aim at investigating the sources and transport pathways of natural and anthropogenic aerosol to the Arctic region, as well as their impact on radiation and clouds. Here, we present first results from an aerosol-climate model evaluation study. Simulations were performed with the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6-HAM2, using three different state-of-the-art emission inventories (ACCMIP, ACCMIP + GFAS emissions for wildfires and ECLIPSE). The runs were performed in nudged mode at T63 horizontal resolution (approximately 1.8°) with 47 vertical levels for the 10-year period 2006-2015. Black carbon (BC) and sulphate (SO4) are of particular interest. BC is highly absorbing in the

  16. Acidic aerosol in urban air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, M.; Yamaoka, S.; Miyazaki, T.; Oka, M.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution and chemical composition of acidic aerosol in Osaka City were investigated. Samples were collected at five sites in the city from June to September, 1979. Acidic aerosol was determined by the acid-base titration method, sulfate ion by barium chloride turbidimetry, nitrate ion by the xylenol method, and chloride ion by the mercury thiocyanate method. The concentration of acidic aerosol at five sites ranged from 7.7 micrograms per cubic meter to 10.0 micrograms per cubic meter, but mean concentrations in the residential area were slightly higher than those in the industrial area. When acidic aerosol concentrations were compared with concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and chloride ions, a significant correlation was found between acidic aerosol and sulfate ion. The sum of the ion equivalents of the three types showed good correlation with the acidic aerosol equivalent during the whole period.

  17. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  18. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008. A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model.

    Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements.

    The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 or more orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated monoterpene (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene under low NOx conditions secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species. This analysis is based on the assumption that there were no significant reactions taking place inside the thermodenuder.

  19. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  20. The optical properties, physical properties and direct radiative forcing of urban columnar aerosols in the Yangtze River Delta, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Bingliang; Wang, Tijian; Liu, Jane; Che, Huizheng; Han, Yong; Fu, Yu; Li, Shu; Xie, Min; Li, Mengmeng; Chen, Pulong; Chen, Huimin; Yang, Xiu-qun; Sun, Jianning

    2018-02-01

    further offset for coarse aerosols (-0.33 W m-2) at the TOA. Similarly, the coarse-mode DRF contributes to only 13.3 % of the total scattering aerosols but > 33.7 % to the total absorbing aerosols. A sensitivity analysis states that aerosol DRFs are not highly sensitive to their profiles in clear-sky conditions. Most of the aerosol properties and DRFs have substantial seasonality in the western YRD. The results further reveal the contributions of each component of the different size particles to the total aerosol optical depths (AODs) and DRFs. Additionally, these results can be used to improve aerosol modelling performance and the modelling of aerosol effects in the eastern regions of China.

  1. Modelling the background aerosol climatologies (1989-2010) for the Mediterranean basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Guerrero, Pedro; Jerez, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    the Mediterranean basin indicate that the aerosol levels follow a seasonal pattern with summer maximum concentrations caused by an increased secondary activity and the lower precipitation in the area, together with the contribution of Saharan dust outbreaks. The eastern Mediterranean is characterized by higher levels of sulphate, ammonium and OM+EC compared to the western part of the basin. Nitrate presents much differentiated levels between winter (DJF) and summer (JJA) periods, with maxima during colder months in northern Italy and the Netherlands and lower levels in the warm season. This can be related to the thermal instability of the ammonium nitrate in summer ambient conditions, favouring the gas phase prevalence of nitrate. Sulphate levels at both parts of the basin increase progressively from April-May to reach maximum levels in mid-summer, due to enhanced photochemistry, low air mass renovation at regional scale, the increment of the summer mixing layer depth favouring the regional mixing of polluted air masses, and the possible higher summer contribution of marine secondary sulphate from DMS oxidation. The levels of sulphate are higher in the eastern Mediterranean and are highly correlated to ammonium levels. OM+EC concentrations are maxima in JJA in the whole basin, because of the higher formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from different natural and anthropogenic sources. Secondary peaks are usually observed in spring (MAM) and autumn (SON) and are associated with winter anticyclonic pollution episodes. For sea-salt aerosols the modelling results indicate a non-uniform behaviour in the Mediterranean basin, showing a strong seasonality and gradient. A higher concentration of marine aerosol is estimated for the western Mediterranean (Alboran Sea and Gulf of Lion) during summertime, related to the increasing sea breeze circulation over the coast, which intensifies in the mid-summer. On the eastern Mediterranean, no large differences are found

  2. Generator of fine polydisperse aerosol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuška, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 7 (2004), s. 1453-1463 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4031105; GA ČR GA203/98/0943 Grant - others:INCO COPERNICUS(BE) SUB AERO-EVK2-CT-1999-0052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : aerosol generator * polydisperse aerosol * fine aerosol Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.062, year: 2004

  3. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  4. The impacts of aerosol loading, composition, and water uptake on aerosol extinction variability in the Baltimore–Washington, D.C. region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Beyersdorf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to utilize satellite-based aerosol measurements for the determination of air quality, the relationship between aerosol optical properties (wavelength-dependent, column-integrated extinction measured by satellites and mass measurements of aerosol loading (PM2.5 used for air quality monitoring must be understood. This connection varies with many factors including those specific to the aerosol type – such as composition, size, and hygroscopicity – and to the surrounding atmosphere, such as temperature, relative humidity (RH, and altitude, all of which can vary spatially and temporally. During the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality project, extensive in situ atmospheric profiling in the Baltimore, MD–Washington, D.C. region was performed during 14 flights in July 2011. Identical flight plans and profile locations throughout the project provide meaningful statistics for determining the variability in and correlations between aerosol loading, composition, optical properties, and meteorological conditions. Measured water-soluble aerosol mass was composed primarily of ammonium sulfate (campaign average of 32 % and organics (57 %. A distinct difference in composition was observed, with high-loading days having a proportionally larger percentage of sulfate due to transport from the Ohio River Valley. This composition shift caused a change in the aerosol water-uptake potential (hygroscopicity such that higher relative contributions of inorganics increased the bulk aerosol hygroscopicity. These days also tended to have higher relative humidity, causing an increase in the water content of the aerosol. Conversely, low-aerosol-loading days had lower sulfate and higher black carbon contributions, causing lower single-scattering albedos (SSAs. The average black carbon concentrations were 240 ng m−3 in the lowest 1 km, decreasing to 35

  5. Determination and Standardization of Analytical Conditions for Dissolved Boron in Coastal Waters of East Sea in Korea by ICP-OES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Shin, M.; Yoon, C.; Lee, J.

    2005-12-01

    The analysis of metals in seawaters has been an important subject for many years. Achieving low-level detection limits as well as overcoming high matrix effect are requested in seawater analysis especially elements of interest are present in various chemical forms. Among them, boron is one of the widely distributed elements in nature and its concentrations of about 10 ppm in the Earth's crust and about 4.5 ppm in the seawater as borates. In seawater boron concentration exhibit a linear relationship to the amount of chloride ion present. Boron had been considered as one of the valuable elements to recover from seawaters for commercial use. Currently, we launched research team for the production of valuable metals from seawaters in Korea that can be used commercially. Several metals including boron were already under serious studies. In this study we aim to prepare standardized operational procedures in analysis of boron during pilot study for boron recovery as pilot recovery process. Inductively coupled plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) method is preferred for the analysis of the low levels of boron found in environmental samples such as seawater. In order to develop test method for the determination of dissolved Boron from East Sea Seawater in Korea, all soluble boron present in seawater has been tested and accuracy of measurement was checked from the sampling step. The result of analysis of boron in seawaters presents many difficult problems, ionization of from the alkali and alkaline earth metals. And the problems also exist in handling nebulizer and injector tubes in high saline solutions. The scope of this study was to determine boron which can contain up to 35psu dissolved salt. The work also included comparing various analytical methods for better accurate results in several solution conditions. Dilution, standard addition, matrix matching calibration methods was thoroughly tested differently and detailed operating conditions for using auxiliary

  6. Generation of Li combustion aerosols for animal inhalation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M D; Greenspan, B J; Briant, J K; Hoover, M D

    1986-07-01

    A system was developed for generating Li aerosols to determine the potential health hazards of postulated accidents associated with the use of Li as a fusion reactor blanket or coolant. The aerosol was generated by sweeping Ar through a stainless steel chamber filled with Li metal that was heated inductively to temperatures up to 1300 degrees C. Argon carried the Li vapor into a burning chamber where it was mixed with air. The reaction of Li vapor with air formed an intense white flame that produced typical branched-chain condensation aerosol particles. This system generated well-controlled concentrations up to 2500 mg/m3 for periods of 4 h. The mass median aeordynamic diameter of the aerosol was approximately 0.66 micron with a geometric standard deviation of 1.5. Aerosols could be generated that were greater than 96% Li2O and LiOH, LiOH.H2O, or Li2CO3 by controlling the CO2 and H2O concentrations in the supply air. The system is currently being used to investigate the acute toxicity of Li combustion aerosols in laboratory animals.

  7. Topics in current aerosol research

    CERN Document Server

    Hidy, G M

    1971-01-01

    Topics in Current Aerosol Research deals with the fundamental aspects of aerosol science, with emphasis on experiment and theory describing highly dispersed aerosols (HDAs) as well as the dynamics of charged suspensions. Topics covered range from the basic properties of HDAs to their formation and methods of generation; sources of electric charges; interactions between fluid and aerosol particles; and one-dimensional motion of charged cloud of particles. This volume is comprised of 13 chapters and begins with an introduction to the basic properties of HDAs, followed by a discussion on the form

  8. A new experimental facility for studying aerosol sampling in workplace environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauvel, S.; Witstchger, O.

    2000-01-01

    The european council directive 96/29/EURATOM requires its implementation into national regulations. This directive lays down basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiations. This directive allows to use aerosol characteristics (particle size distribution, airborne concentration, morphology and chemical composition) measured in workplace to assess the effective radiation dose of workers resulting from the intake by inhalation of airborne radionuclides. Tests of performances of instruments used for the health-related sampling of particles in workplace are usually carried out in a wind tunnel or a calm air chamber. In these test conditions, instruments are exposed to uniform wind and steady homogeneous aerosol. In a real workplace situation, these instruments are usually exposed to highly non-uniform airflows and local emissions of particles. Moreover, it is not clear how differences in airflow pattern, proximity of the localised contamination source, worker location or activity would affect the personal/static measurement ratio. The objective of our experimental work is to investigate the relevant parameters that affect the aerosol characteristics in the microenvironment of a worker (including breathing zone) and in the workplace. The first part of that study was to design and built an experimental room CEPIA (french acronym for room for studying personal and area samplers). The ventilated chamber (volume 36 m 3 ) is equipped with an air delivery system to insure different ventilation patterns and flowrates. The CEPIA chamber should offer possibilities for performing experiments in situations representing a workplace environment, with airflows and aerosol parameters well controlled and characterised. (authors)

  9. Aerosol-type retrieval and uncertainty quantification from OMI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Anu; Kolmonen, Pekka; Laine, Marko; Tamminen, Johanna

    2017-11-01

    We discuss uncertainty quantification for aerosol-type selection in satellite-based atmospheric aerosol retrieval. The retrieval procedure uses precalculated aerosol microphysical models stored in look-up tables (LUTs) and top-of-atmosphere (TOA) spectral reflectance measurements to solve the aerosol characteristics. The forward model approximations cause systematic differences between the modelled and observed reflectance. Acknowledging this model discrepancy as a source of uncertainty allows us to produce more realistic uncertainty estimates and assists the selection of the most appropriate LUTs for each individual retrieval.This paper focuses on the aerosol microphysical model selection and characterisation of uncertainty in the retrieved aerosol type and aerosol optical depth (AOD). The concept of model evidence is used as a tool for model comparison. The method is based on Bayesian inference approach, in which all uncertainties are described as a posterior probability distribution. When there is no single best-matching aerosol microphysical model, we use a statistical technique based on Bayesian model averaging to combine AOD posterior probability densities of the best-fitting models to obtain an averaged AOD estimate. We also determine the shared evidence of the best-matching models of a certain main aerosol type in order to quantify how plausible it is that it represents the underlying atmospheric aerosol conditions.The developed method is applied to Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements using a multiwavelength approach for retrieving the aerosol type and AOD estimate with uncertainty quantification for cloud-free over-land pixels. Several larger pixel set areas were studied in order to investigate the robustness of the developed method. We evaluated the retrieved AOD by comparison with ground-based measurements at example sites. We found that the uncertainty of AOD expressed by posterior probability distribution reflects the difficulty in model

  10. Aerosol-type retrieval and uncertainty quantification from OMI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kauppi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss uncertainty quantification for aerosol-type selection in satellite-based atmospheric aerosol retrieval. The retrieval procedure uses precalculated aerosol microphysical models stored in look-up tables (LUTs and top-of-atmosphere (TOA spectral reflectance measurements to solve the aerosol characteristics. The forward model approximations cause systematic differences between the modelled and observed reflectance. Acknowledging this model discrepancy as a source of uncertainty allows us to produce more realistic uncertainty estimates and assists the selection of the most appropriate LUTs for each individual retrieval.This paper focuses on the aerosol microphysical model selection and characterisation of uncertainty in the retrieved aerosol type and aerosol optical depth (AOD. The concept of model evidence is used as a tool for model comparison. The method is based on Bayesian inference approach, in which all uncertainties are described as a posterior probability distribution. When there is no single best-matching aerosol microphysical model, we use a statistical technique based on Bayesian model averaging to combine AOD posterior probability densities of the best-fitting models to obtain an averaged AOD estimate. We also determine the shared evidence of the best-matching models of a certain main aerosol type in order to quantify how plausible it is that it represents the underlying atmospheric aerosol conditions.The developed method is applied to Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI measurements using a multiwavelength approach for retrieving the aerosol type and AOD estimate with uncertainty quantification for cloud-free over-land pixels. Several larger pixel set areas were studied in order to investigate the robustness of the developed method. We evaluated the retrieved AOD by comparison with ground-based measurements at example sites. We found that the uncertainty of AOD expressed by posterior probability distribution reflects the

  11. Physicochemical Properties of Aerosols Over the Indo-Gangetic Plain, Northern India: Implications to Air-quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, K.; Sarin, M.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning, vehicular and industrials emissions of atmospheric fine-particulate matter over south and south-east Asia have led to degradation of regional air-quality, poor visibility and possible impact on regional climate change. In addition to airborne particles of primary origin, secondary aerosol formation has been recognized as a dominant process contributing to air pollution and visibility impairment over urban areas. The Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) is one of the densely populated regions in northern India where PM2.5 and PM10 mass concentrations exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) throughout the year. Aerosol chemical composition analysis suggests that carbonaceous (EC, OC) and water-soluble inorganic species (WSIS) contribute ~30-35% and ~15-20% of PM10 mass, respectively during wintertime. The formation of fog and haze, a common phenomenon observed during wintertime in the IGP, is associated with high aerosol loading from anthropogenic emission sources as well as formation of secondary aerosols via gas to particle conversion under favorable meteorological conditions. Our studies indicate that mass concentrations of EC, OC and WSOC show nearly 30% increase during fog and haze events; whereas inorganic constituents (NH4+, NO3 - and SO4 2-) are 2-3 times higher than those during clear days. The sulphur and nitrogen oxidation ratios (SOR and NOR) also exhibit significant increase suggesting possible enhancement of secondary formation of SO42- and NO3- during fog and haze events. The average WSOC/OC ratio is relatively high in the day-time samples (0.66 ± 0.11) compared to that in the night-time (0.47 ± 0.07); suggesting an increased contribution of secondary organic aerosols. This talk will discuss our understanding of optical, microphysical, CCN and cloud activation processes over northern India.

  12. Enhanced water use efficiency in global terrestrial ecosystems under increasing aerosol loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaoliang; Chen, Min; Liu, Yaling; Miralles, Diego G.; Wang, Faming

    2017-05-01

    Aerosols play a crucial role in the climate system, affecting incoming radiation and cloud formation. Based on a modelling framework that couples ecosystem processes with the atmospheric transfer of radiation, we analyze the effect of aerosols on surface incoming radiation, gross primary productivity (GPP), water losses from ecosystems through evapotranspiration (ET) and ecosystem water use efficiency (WUE, defined as GPP/ET) for 2003–2010 and validate them at global FLUXNET sites. The total diffuse radiation increases under relatively low or intermediate aerosol loadings, but decreases under more polluted conditions. We find that aerosol-induced changes in GPP depend on leaf area index, aerosol loading and cloudiness. Specifically, low and moderate aerosol loadings cause increases in GPP for all plant types, while heavy aerosol loadings result in enhancement (decrease) in GPP for dense (sparse) vegetation. On the other hand, ET is mainly negatively affected by aerosol loadings due to the reduction in total incoming radiation. Finally, WUE shows a consistent rise in all plant types under increasing aerosol loadings. Overall, the simulated daily WUE compares well with observations at 43 eddy-covariance tower sites (R2=0.84 and RMSE=0.01gC (kg H2O)-1) with better performance at forest sites. In addition to the increasing portions of diffuse light, the rise in WUE is also favored by the reduction in radiation- and heat-stress caused by the aerosols, especially for wet and hot climates.

  13. Ice nucleation in sulfuric acid/organic aerosols: implications for cirrus cloud formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Beaver

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using an aerosol flow tube apparatus, we have studied the effects of aliphatic aldehydes (C3 to C10 and ketones (C3 and C9 on ice nucleation in sulfuric acid aerosols. Mixed aerosols were prepared by combining an organic vapor flow with a flow of sulfuric acid aerosols over a small mixing time (~60 s at room temperature. No acid-catalyzed reactions were observed under these conditions, and physical uptake was responsible for the organic content of the sulfuric acid aerosols. In these experiments, aerosol organic content, determined by a Mie scattering analysis, was found to vary with the partial pressure of organic, the flow tube temperature, and the identity of the organic compound. The physical properties of the organic compounds (primarily the solubility and melting point were found to play a dominant role in determining the inferred mode of nucleation (homogenous or heterogeneous and the specific freezing temperatures observed. Overall, very soluble, low-melting organics, such as acetone and propanal, caused a decrease in aerosol ice nucleation temperatures when compared with aqueous sulfuric acid aerosol. In contrast, sulfuric acid particles exposed to organic compounds of eight carbons and greater, of much lower solubility and higher melting temperatures, nucleate ice at temperatures above aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols. Organic compounds of intermediate carbon chain length, C4-C7, (of intermediate solubility and melting temperatures nucleated ice at the same temperature as aqueous sulfuric acid aerosols. Interpretations and implications of these results for cirrus cloud formation are discussed.

  14. Jet and ultrasonic nebuliser output: use of a new method for direct measurement of aerosol output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, J H; Stenton, S C; Beach, J R; Avery, A J; Walters, E H; Hendrick, D J

    1990-10-01

    Output from jet nebulisers is calibrated traditionally by weighing them before and after nebulisation, but the assumption that the weight difference is a close measure of aerosol generation could be invalidated by the concomitant process of evaporation. A method has been developed for measuring aerosol output directly by using a solute (fluoride) tracer and aerosol impaction, and this has been compared with the traditional weight loss method for two Wright, six Turbo, and four Micro-Cirrus jet nebulisers and two Microinhaler ultrasonic nebulisers. The weight loss method overestimated true aerosol output for all jet nebulisers. The mean aerosol content, expressed as a percentage of the total weight loss, varied from as little as 15% for the Wright jet nebulisers to 54% (range 45-61%) for the Turbo and Micro-Cirrus jet nebulisers under the operating conditions used. In contrast, there was no discrepancy between weight loss and aerosol output for the ultrasonic nebulisers. These findings, along with evidence of both concentrating and cooling effects from jet nebulisation, confirm that total output from jet nebulisers contains two distinct fractions, vapour and aerosol. The vapour fraction, but not the aerosol fraction, was greatly influenced by reservoir temperature within the nebuliser; so the ratio of aerosol output to total weight loss varied considerably with temperature. It is concluded that weight loss is an inappropriate method of calibrating jet nebuliser aerosol output, and that this should be measured directly.

  15. Nucleation and growth of sulfate aerosol in coal-fired power plant plumes: sensitivity to background aerosol and meteorology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Stevens

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available New-particle formation in the plumes of coal-fired power plants and other anthropogenic sulfur sources may be an important source of particles in the atmosphere. It remains unclear, however, how best to reproduce this formation in global and regional aerosol models with grid-box lengths that are 10s of kilometers and larger. The predictive power of these models is thus limited by the resultant uncertainties in aerosol size distributions. In this paper, we focus on sub-grid sulfate aerosol processes within coal-fired power plant plumes: the sub-grid oxidation of SO2 with condensation of H2SO4 onto newly-formed and pre-existing particles. We have developed a modeling framework with aerosol microphysics in the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM, a Large-Eddy Simulation/Cloud-Resolving Model (LES/CRM. The model is evaluated against aircraft observations of new-particle formation in two different power-plant plumes and reproduces the major features of the observations. We show how the downwind plume aerosols can be greatly modified by both meteorological and background aerosol conditions. In general, new-particle formation and growth is greatly reduced during polluted conditions due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface area for H2SO4 condensation and particle coagulation. The new-particle formation and growth rates are also a strong function of the amount of sunlight and NOx since both control OH concentrations. The results of this study highlight the importance for improved sub-grid particle formation schemes in regional and global aerosol models.

  16. Nucleation and growth of sulfate aerosol in coal-fired power plant plumes: sensitivity to background aerosol and meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, R. G.; Pierce, J. R.; Brock, C. A.; Reed, M. K.; Crawford, J. H.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Huey, L. G.; Nowak, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    New-particle formation in the plumes of coal-fired power plants and other anthropogenic sulfur sources may be an important source of particles in the atmosphere. It remains unclear, however, how best to reproduce this formation in global and regional aerosol models with grid-box lengths that are 10s of kilometers and larger. The predictive power of these models is thus limited by the resultant uncertainties in aerosol size distributions. In this paper, we focus on sub-grid sulfate aerosol processes within coal-fired power plant plumes: the sub-grid oxidation of SO2 with condensation of H2SO4 onto newly-formed and pre-existing particles. We have developed a modeling framework with aerosol microphysics in the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM), a Large-Eddy Simulation/Cloud-Resolving Model (LES/CRM). The model is evaluated against aircraft observations of new-particle formation in two different power-plant plumes and reproduces the major features of the observations. We show how the downwind plume aerosols can be greatly modified by both meteorological and background aerosol conditions. In general, new-particle formation and growth is greatly reduced during polluted conditions due to the large pre-existing aerosol surface area for H2SO4 condensation and particle coagulation. The new-particle formation and growth rates are also a strong function of the amount of sunlight and NOx since both control OH concentrations. The results of this study highlight the importance for improved sub-grid particle formation schemes in regional and global aerosol models.

  17. Source identification and airborne chemical characterisation of aerosol pollution from long-range transport over Greenland during POLARCAT summer campaign 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, J.; Schneider, J.; Ancellet, G.; Quennehen, B.; Stohl, A.; Sodemann, H.; Burkhart, J. F.; Hamburger, T.; Arnold, S. R.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Borrmann, S.; Law, K. S.

    2011-10-01

    We deployed an aerosol mass spectrometer during the POLARCAT (Polar Study using Aircraft, Remote Sensing, Surface Measurements and Models, of Climate, Chemistry, Aerosols, and Transport) summer campaign in Greenland in June/July 2008 on the research aircraft ATR-42. Online size resolved chemical composition data of submicron aerosol were collected up to 7.6 km altitude in the region 60 to 71° N and 40 to 60° W. Biomass burning (BB) and fossil fuel combustion (FF) plumes originating from North America, Asia, Siberia and Europe were sampled. Transport pathways of detected plumes included advection below 700 hPa, air mass uplifting in warm conveyor belts, and high altitude transport in the upper troposphere. By means of the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, trace gas analysis of O3 and CO, particle size distributions and aerosol chemical composition 48 pollution events were identified and classified into five chemically distinct categories. Aerosol from North American BB consisted of 22% particulate sulphate, while with increasing anthropogenic and Asian influence aerosol in Asian FF dominated plumes was composed of up to 37% sulphate category mean value. Overall, it was found that the organic matter fraction was larger (85%) in pollution plumes than for background conditions (71%). Despite different source regions and emission types the particle oxygen to carbon ratio of all plume classes was around 1 indicating low-volatility highly oxygenated aerosol. The volume size distribution of out-of-plume aerosol showed markedly smaller modes than all other distributions with two Aitken mode diameters of 24 and 43 nm and a geometric standard deviation σg of 1.12 and 1.22, respectively, while another very broad mode was found at 490 nm (σg = 2.35). Nearly pure BB particles from North America exhibited an Aitken mode at 66 nm (σg = 1.46) and an accumulation mode diameter of 392 nm (σg = 1.76). An aerosol lifetime, including all processes from emission to

  18. Source identification and airborne chemical characterisation of aerosol pollution from long-range transport over Greenland during POLARCAT summer campaign 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmale

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We deployed an aerosol mass spectrometer during the POLARCAT (Polar Study using Aircraft, Remote Sensing, Surface Measurements and Models, of Climate, Chemistry, Aerosols, and Transport summer campaign in Greenland in June/July 2008 on the research aircraft ATR-42. Online size resolved chemical composition data of submicron aerosol were collected up to 7.6 km altitude in the region 60 to 71° N and 40 to 60° W. Biomass burning (BB and fossil fuel combustion (FF plumes originating from North America, Asia, Siberia and Europe were sampled. Transport pathways of detected plumes included advection below 700 hPa, air mass uplifting in warm conveyor belts, and high altitude transport in the upper troposphere. By means of the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, trace gas analysis of O3 and CO, particle size distributions and aerosol chemical composition 48 pollution events were identified and classified into five chemically distinct categories. Aerosol from North American BB consisted of 22% particulate sulphate, while with increasing anthropogenic and Asian influence aerosol in Asian FF dominated plumes was composed of up to 37% sulphate category mean value. Overall, it was found that the organic matter fraction was larger (85% in pollution plumes than for background conditions (71%. Despite different source regions and emission types the particle oxygen to carbon ratio of all plume classes was around 1 indicating low-volatility highly oxygenated aerosol. The volume size distribution of out-of-plume aerosol showed markedly smaller modes than all other distributions with two Aitken mode diameters of 24 and 43 nm and a geometric standard deviation σg of 1.12 and 1.22, respectively, while another very broad mode was found at 490 nm (σg = 2.35. Nearly pure BB particles from North America exhibited an Aitken mode at 66 nm (σg = 1.46 and an accumulation mode diameter of 392 nm (σg = 1

  19. Aerosol Indirect Effect on Warm Clouds over Eastern China Using Combined CALIOP and MODIS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianping; Wang, Fu; Huang, Jingfeng; Li, Xiaowen

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol, one of key components of the climate system, is highly variable, both temporally and spatially. It often exerts great influences on the cloud-precipitation chain processes by serving as CCN/IN, altering cloud microphysics and its life cycle. Yet, the aerosol indirect effect on clouds remains largely unknown, because the initial changes in clouds due to aerosols may be enhanced or dampened by such feedback processes as modified cloud dynamics, or evaporation of the smaller droplets due to the competition for water vapor. In this study, we attempted to quantify the aerosol effects on warm cloud over eastern China, based on near-simultaneous retrievals from MODIS/AQUA, CALIOP/CALIPSO and CPR/CLOUDSAT during the period 2006 to 2010. The seasonality of aerosol from ground-based PM10 is quite different from that estimated from MODIS AOD. This result is corroborated by lower level profile of aerosol occurrence frequency from CALIOP, indicating the significant role CALIOP could play in aerosol-cloud interaction. The combined use of CALIOP and CPR facilitate the process to exactly determine the (vertical) position of warm cloud relative to aerosol, out of six scenarios in terms of aerosol-cloud mixing status in terms of aerosol-cloud mixing status, which shows as follows: AO (Aerosol only), CO (Cloud only), SASC (Single aerosol-single cloud), SADC (single aerosol-double cloud), DASC (double aerosol-single cloud), and others. Results shows that about 54% of all the cases belong to mixed status, among all the collocated aerosol-cloud cases. Under mixed condition, a boomerang shape is observed, i.e., reduced cloud droplet radius (CDR) is associated with increasing aerosol at moderate aerosol pollution (AODthe boomerang shape varies with season. For moderate aerosol loading (AODthe effect on the droplet size for the "Mixed" cases is greater during cold season (denoted by a large slope), as compared with that during warm season. It is likely associated with an increase

  20. Size distributions of submicrometer aerosols from cooking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.S.; Lin, W.H.; Jeng, F.T. (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1993-01-01

    Although gas stove usage varies from country to country, it is still one of the major indoor combustion sources. In order to assess the health effects of using gas stoves, the physical characteristics of the particle emissions from cooking were conducted in a first-floor apartment in the Taipei area. The particle size distributions from scrambling eggs, frying chicken, and cooking soup were measured in the kitchen by a high resolution particle sizer, which could measure the particles in the size range of 0.01 [mu]m to 1 [mu]m. The concentrations of the submicrometer particles increased significantly from 15,000 cm[sup [minus]3] to 150,000 cm[sup [minus]3] during cooking. Additionally, the ultrafine particles constituted 60%--70% of the total submicron aerosols. The changes in the size distributions and the concentrations of the submicrometer aerosols before, during, and after the aerosol generations were compared. On the average, the median diameters of scrambling eggs, frying chicken, cooking soup, and of the background conditions were 40 nm, 50 nm, 30 nm, and 70 nm, respectively. Regarding the surface area-weighted size distributions, the surface median diameters of the four situations were 180 nm, 300 nm, 150 nm, and 220 nm, respectively. Furthermore, the volume median diameters in the conditions mentioned above were almost similar, namely 300--350 nm. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Aerosol sampler for analysis of fine and ultrafine aerosols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuška, Pavel; Čapka, Lukáš; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 1020 (2018), s. 123-133 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-25558S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : atmospheric aerosols * aerosol collection * chemical composition Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 4.950, year: 2016

  2. Evaluation of a radioactive aerosol surveillance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scripsick, R.C.; Stafford, R.G.; Beckman, R.J.; Tillery, M.I.; Romero, P.O.

    Measurements of the dilution of air contaminants between worker breathing zone and area air samplers were made by releasing a test aerosol in a workroom equipped with an aerosol surveillance system. The data were used to evaluate performance, and suggest improvements in design of the workroom's alarming air monitor system. It was found that a breathing zone concentration of 960 times the maximum permissible concentration in air (MPC/sub a/) for a half-hour was required to trigger alarms of the existing monitoring system under some release conditions. Alternative air monitor placement, suggested from dilution measurements, would reduce this average triggering concentration to 354 MPC/sub a/. Deployment of additional air monitors could further reduce the average triggering concentration to 241 MPC/sub a/. The relation between number of monitors and triggering concentration was studied. No significant decrease in average triggering concentration was noted for arrays containing greater than five monitors

  3. Generation of aerosols: BARC nebulizer and others

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, P.S.; Raghunath, B.

    1994-01-01

    The concern with atmospheric pollution in recent times has focused attention on aerosols, their distribution pattern after inhalation and the kinetics of their deposition and exclusion from bronchial passages. The technique of radioaerosols for lung imaging is of recent origin. The procedure was proposed as a means of estimating regional ventilation and localizing areas of airway narrowing. The technique is an alternative in the face of non-availability of radioactive gases, especially in developing countries where the cost is the major factor due to economic reasons. Now, it is beyond doubt that radioaerosol lung studies are a potentially valuable tool in the evaluation of respiratory function in health and disease, especially to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Also, the administration of a drug by aerosol inhalation provides a convenient method for the treatment of conditions affecting the respiratory system. This write-up will brief us about radioaerosol, its generation and characterisation

  4. Granulometric determinations and inhalation dose assessment for atmospheric aerosol contaminated by {sup 137}Cs; Determinazioni granulometriche e valutazioni di dose da inalazione per aerosol atmosferico contaminato da {sup 137}CS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, C.M.; Luciani, A. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `E. Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente; Oliviero, L.; Donato, R. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Saluggia, Vercelli (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1996-07-01

    During the redevelopment of Brescia freight-yard a measurement campaign of atmospheric aerosol was carried out: in fact a {sup 137}Cs ground contamination, caused by the permanence of wagons carrying iron materials contaminated by this radionuclide, had been found out. During the redevelopment phases of excavation and can filling the workers were exposed to the danger of radioactive aerosol inhalation. The aim of the measurement campaign was to test the aerosol sampling and granulometric analysis methodologies with their sensitivity related to the inhalation dose assessments. The results of both aerosuspended mass and activity, evaluated by means of a portable cascade impactor, are presented. The granulometries have been interpolated with a log normal distribution using an iterative routine minimizing the square deviation between the calculated and experimental data. The results related to the dose assessments are also presented. These evaluations have been carried out using both the granulometric information obtained and the more recent models (ICRP 66) both the total concentration data and the dose coefficients referring to the standard conditions of ICRP 68 and of the Italian law (D.Lgs. 230/95). Furthermore the significance and the reliability of the dose assessments referring to the different methodologies are discussed, also in relation to the possibility of using this sampling methodologies for other radionuclides and different exposure conditions.

  5. Temporal and spatial long-term characterizations of aerosol optical depth and its radiative effects over Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachorro, Victoria E.; Toledano, Carlos; Joao Costa, Maria; Anton, Manuel; Mateos, D.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Sorribas, M.; Baldasano, Jose M.

    A better understanding of the aerosol radiative properties is a crucial challenge for climate change studies. This study aims to provide a complete characterization of aerosol radiative effects in different spectral ranges within the shortwave (SW) solar spectrum. Six long-term datasets of aerosol properties of AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) over the Iberian Peninsula are analyzed. The aerosol load over the Iberian Peninsula shows a decrease trend between 2004 and 2012 (-0.04 per unit of aerosol optical depth per decade). Continental aerosols are identified as the main type over the peninsula, although desert dust events are phenomena registered at the six sites with a clear South-North gradient, which modulates the aerosol climatology over the analyzed area. Aerosol data are used as input in the libRadtran model to simulate ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS), near-infrared (NIR), and SW radiation. Then, the aerosol radiative effect (ARE) and aerosol forcing efficiency (AFE) can be evaluated. ARE values at the six stations differ because of the different aerosol types over each station. Considering the whole Iberian Peninsula, ARE is in the ranges: -1.1 solar radiation at the surface is observed in this period. The intra-annual ARE cycle exhibits larger values during the spring and summer months when the likelihood of high aerosol loading over the Iberian Peninsula increases. Finally, AFE exhibits a clear dependence on single scattering albedo and a weaker one on Ångström exponent. AFE is larger (in absolute value) for small and absorbing particles. The contributions of the UV, VIS, and NIR ranges to the SW efficiency vary with the aerosol types. Conditions of small particles predominance with high absorption lead to the strongest AFE values. Aerosol size determines the fractions of VIS and NIR intervals. VIS range is the dominant region for all aerosol types, although non-absorbing large particles cause a more equal contribution of both intervals. UV range shows

  6. Description of test facilities bound to the research on sodium aerosols - some significant results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolias, M.; Lafon, A.; Vidard, M.; Schaller, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    This communication is dedicated to the description of the CEA (French Atomic Energy Authority) testing located at CADARACHE and which are utilized for the study of sodium aerosols behavior. These testing loops are necessary for studying the operating of equipment such as filters, sodium vapour traps, condensers and separators. It is also possible to study the effect of characteristics parameters on formation, coagulation and carrying away of sodium aerosols in the cover gas. Sodium aerosols deposits in a vertical annular space configuration with a cold area in its upper part are also studied. Some significant results emphasize the importance of operating conditions on the formation of aerosols. (author)

  7. Aerosol effects in radiation transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binenko, V.I.; Harshvardhan, H.

    1993-01-01

    The radiative properties and effects of aerosols are assessed for the following aerosol sources: relatively clean background aerosol, dust storms and dust outbreaks, anthropogenic pollution, and polluted cloud layers. Studies show it is the submicron aerosol fraction that plays a dominant radiative role in the atmosphere. The radiative effect of the aerosol depends not only on its loading but also on the underlying surface albedo and on solar zenith angle. It is only with highly reflecting surfaces such as Arctic ice that aerosols have a warming effect. Radiometric, microphysical, mineral composition, and refractive index measurements are presented for dust and in particular for the Saharan aerosol layer (SAL). Short-wave radiative heating of the atmosphere is caused by the SAL and is due mainly to absorption. However, the SAL does not contribute significantly to the long-wave thermal radiation budget. Field program studies of the radiative effects of aerosols are described. Anthropogenic aerosols deplete the incoming solar radiation. A case field study for a regional Ukrainian center is discussed. The urban aerosol causes a cooling of metropolitan centers, compared with outlying areas, during the day, which is followed by a warming trend at night. In another study, an increase in turbidity by a factor of 3 due to increased industrialization for Mexico City is noted, together with a drop in atmospheric transmission by 10% over a 50-year period. Numerous studies are cited that demonstrate that anthropogenic aerosols affect both the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds, which in turn affect regional climate. Particles acting as cloud nuclei are considered to have the greatest indirect effect on cloud absorptivity of short-wave radiation. Satellite observations show that low-level stratus clouds contaminated by ship exhaust at sea lead to an increase in cloud albedo

  8. Comparison of aerosol extinction between lidar and SAGE II over Gadanki, a tropical station in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kulkarni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An extensive comparison of aerosol extinction has been performed using lidar and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II data over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, a tropical station in India, following coincident criteria during volcanically quiescent conditions from 1998 to 2005. The aerosol extinctions derived from lidar are higher than SAGE II during all seasons in the upper troposphere (UT, while in the lower-stratosphere (LS values are closer. The seasonal mean percent differences between lidar and SAGE II aerosol extinctions are > 100% in the UT and Ba (sr−1, the ratio between aerosol backscattering and extinction, are needed for the tropics for a more accurate derivation of aerosol extinction.

  9. An overview of the first decade of PollyNET: an emerging network of automated Raman-polarization lidars for continuous aerosol profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Holger; Kanitz, Thomas; Engelmann, Ronny; Althausen, Dietrich; Heese, Birgit; Komppula, Mika; Preißler, Jana; Tesche, Matthias; Ansmann, Albert; Wandinger, Ulla; Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marinou, Eleni; Seifert, Patric; Hofer, Julian; Skupin, Annett; Schneider, Florian; Bohlmann, Stephanie; Foth, Andreas; Bley, Sebastian; Pfüller, Anne; Giannakaki, Eleni; Lihavainen, Heikki; Viisanen, Yrjö; Hooda, Rakesh Kumar; Nepomuceno Pereira, Sérgio; Bortoli, Daniele; Wagner, Frank; Mattis, Ina; Janicka, Lucja; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Achtert, Peggy; Artaxo, Paulo; Pauliquevis, Theotonio; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Prakesh Sharma, Ved; Gideon van Zyl, Pieter; Beukes, Johan Paul; Sun, Junying; Rohwer, Erich G.; Deng, Ruru; Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Zamorano, Felix

    2016-04-01

    A global vertically resolved aerosol data set covering more than 10 years of observations at more than 20 measurement sites distributed from 63° N to 52° S and 72° W to 124° E has been achieved within the Raman and polarization lidar network PollyNET. This network consists of portable, remote-controlled multiwavelength-polarization-Raman lidars (Polly) for automated and continuous 24/7 observations of clouds and aerosols. PollyNET is an independent, voluntary, and scientific network. All Polly lidars feature a standardized instrument design with different capabilities ranging from single wavelength to multiwavelength systems, and now apply unified calibration, quality control, and data analysis. The observations are processed in near-real time without manual intervention, and are presented online at de/"target="_blank">http://polly.tropos.de/. The paper gives an overview of the observations on four continents and two research vessels obtained with eight Polly systems. The specific aerosol types at these locations (mineral dust, smoke, dust-smoke and other dusty mixtures, urban haze, and volcanic ash) are identified by their Ångström exponent, lidar ratio, and depolarization ratio. The vertical aerosol distribution at the PollyNET locations is discussed on the basis of more than 55 000 automatically retrieved 30 min particle backscatter coefficient profiles at 532 nm as this operating wavelength is available for all Polly lidar systems. A seasonal analysis of measurements at selected sites revealed typical and extraordinary aerosol conditions as well as seasonal differences. These studies show the potential of PollyNET to support the establishment of a global aerosol climatology that covers the entire troposphere.

  10. Characterization of aerosols in Beijing during severe aerosol loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Cheng, Tianhai; Gu, Xingfa; Wu, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Severe aerosol pollutions in China significantly impact radiative forcing of climate at regional and global scales. Until now, the uncertainties in net climate forcing from severe aerosol pollutions in China are substantial, largely due to the lack of detailed knowledge of radiative properties of severe aerosol pollutions. Here the characteristics of aerosols under severe aerosol pollution days (APs) in Beijing are studied by analyzing the ground-based radiance measurements during the period from 2002 to 2014. We show that the mean single scattering albedo (SSA) values increase by 0.03-0.06 (7%) in APs, and the mean asymmetry (ASY) parameter values increase by 0.03-0.04 (6%) for the four wavelengths of 440-1020 nm. The atmospheric forcing of the APs is 2 times higher than that in other days. Contrary to the RF values, the radiative forcing efficiencies in the APs are 38% lower than those in the other days. Larger values of SSA and ASY under APs represent larger presence of more scattering aerosols and irregular-sized aerosols such as dust and non-absorbing fine mode particles. These particles are also verified by the much lower radiative forcing efficiency values. Analyses are applied on the dataset of the APs over Beijing, to group them into four discrete clusters. The two fine-size absorbing aerosols show larger mean atmospheric radiative forcing values (152.5 W/m2 and 184.5 W/m2 respectively) and forcing efficiency values (83.5 W/m2 and 108.5 W/m2 respectively). The non-absorbing aerosols and coarse aerosols exert large planetary cooling (-86.7 W/m2 and -77.3 W/m2) and low atmospheric heating effect.

  11. On the Scattering Properties of Urban and Maritime Aerosols and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The scattering properties of aerosols play a dominant role in radiative energy transfer and consequently influencing the visibility and turbidity in the atmosphere. In the present attempt, calculations for scattered intensity have been made in case of urban and maritime aerosols in the varying conditions of relative humidity.

  12. Aerosol generation by oxidation and combustion of plutonium and its compounds: literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1987-09-01

    Generation of aerosols by oxidation or combustion is one of the greatest risks due to plutonium. A review is made of the most interesting documents available on this topic. Following a brief study of plutonium oxydation conditions, characteristics of aerosols generated by accidents of fires involving metallic Pu and some of its compounds are assessed. Nuclear weapons are not included in this review [fr

  13. Aerosol single scattering albedo estimated across China from a combination of ground and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon Ho Lee; Zhanqing Li; Man Sing Wong; Jinyuan Xin; Wang Yuesi; Wei Min Hao; Fengsheng Zhao

    2007-01-01

    Single scattering albedo (SSA) governs the strength of aerosols in absorbing solar radiation, but few methods are available to directly measure this important quantity. There currently exist many ground-based measurements of spectral transmittance from which aerosol optical thickness (AOT) are retrieved under clear sky conditions. Reflected radiances at the top of the...

  14. Chemical Thermodynamics of Aqueous Atmospheric Aerosols: Modeling and Microfluidic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, L.; Dutcher, C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate predictions of gas-liquid-solid equilibrium phase partitioning of atmospheric aerosols by thermodynamic modeling and measurements is critical for determining particle composition and internal structure at conditions relevant to the atmosphere. Organic acids that originate from biomass burning, and direct biogenic emission make up a significant fraction of the organic mass in atmospheric aerosol particles. In addition, inorganic compounds like ammonium sulfate and sea salt also exist in atmospheric aerosols, that results in a mixture of single, double or triple charged ions, and non-dissociated and partially dissociated organic acids. Statistical mechanics based on a multilayer adsorption isotherm model can be applied to these complex aqueous environments for predictions of thermodynamic properties. In this work, thermodynamic analytic predictive models are developed for multicomponent aqueous solutions (consisting of partially dissociating organic and inorganic acids, fully dissociating symmetric and asymmetric electrolytes, and neutral organic compounds) over the entire relative humidity range, that represent a significant advancement towards a fully predictive model. The model is also developed at varied temperatures for electrolytes and organic compounds the data for which are available at different temperatures. In addition to the modeling approach, water loss of multicomponent aerosol particles is measured by microfluidic experiments to parameterize and validate the model. In the experimental microfluidic measurements, atmospheric aerosol droplet chemical mimics (organic acids and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples) are generated in microfluidic channels and stored and imaged in passive traps until dehydration to study the influence of relative humidity and water loss on phase behavior.

  15. Uncertainty associated with convective wet removal of entrained aerosols in a global climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Croft

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainties associated with the wet removal of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases are investigated in a global aerosol-climate model (ECHAM5-HAM under a set of limiting assumptions for the wet removal of the entrained aerosols. The limiting assumptions for the wet removal of entrained aerosols are negligible scavenging and vigorous scavenging (either through activation, with size-dependent impaction scavenging, or with the prescribed fractions of the standard model. To facilitate this process-based study, an explicit representation of cloud-droplet-borne and ice-crystal-borne aerosol mass and number, for the purpose of wet removal, is introduced into the ECHAM5-HAM model. This replaces and is compared with the prescribed cloud-droplet-borne and ice-crystal-borne aerosol fraction scavenging scheme of the standard model.

    A 20% to 35% uncertainty in simulated global, annual mean aerosol mass burdens and optical depth (AOD is attributed to different assumptions for the wet removal of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases. Assumptions about the removal of aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases control modeled upper tropospheric aerosol concentrations by as much as one order of magnitude.

    Simulated aerosols entrained above convective cloud bases contribute 20% to 50% of modeled global, annual mean aerosol mass convective wet deposition (about 5% to 10% of the total dry and wet deposition, depending on the aerosol species, when including wet scavenging of those entrained aerosols (either by activation, size-dependent impaction, or with the prescribed fraction scheme. Among the simulations, the prescribed fraction and size-dependent impaction schemes yield the largest global, annual mean aerosol mass convective wet deposition (by about two-fold. However, the prescribed fraction scheme has more vigorous convective mixed-phase wet removal (by two to five-fold relative to the size-dependent impaction

  16. Variability of aerosol properties over Eastern Europe observed from ground and satellites in the period from 2003 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Goloub, P.; Dubovik, O.; Holdak, A.; Ducos, F.; Sosonkin, M.

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents some results of the study on aerosol variability in the period from 2003 to 2011 over the Eastern Europe region, with latitude ranging from 40° N to 60° N and longitude from 20° E to 50° E. The analysis was based on the POLDER/PARASOL and POLDER-2/ADEOS satellites and AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based sun photometer observations. The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of the studied area is characterized by values (referenced to 870 nm wavelength) ranging from 0.05 to 0.2, except for in the period of July-August 2010 with strong forest and peat wildfires when the AOT typical values range from 0.3 to 0.5 according to both retrievals. The analysis of seasonal dynamics of aerosol loading has revealed two AOT high value peaks. The spring peak observed in April-May is the result of solitary transportation of Saharan dust in the atmosphere over Eastern Europe, infrequent agricultural fires, transportation of sea salt aerosols by southern winds to Ukraine and Moldova from the Black and Azov seas. The autumn peak in August-September is associated with forest and peat wildfires, considerable transportation of Saharan dust and the presence of soil dust aerosols due to harvesting activity. The maximum values of AOT are observed in May 2006 (0.1-0.15), April 2009 (0.07-0.15) and August 2010 (0.2-0.5). Furthermore, the study has identified a distinct pattern of anthropogenic aerosols over the industrial areas, especially in central Ukraine and eastern Belarus as well as Moscow region in Russia. The comparison of the AOT derived by standard algorithm POLDER/PARASOL with those recomputed from AERONET inversions for fine mode particles with radius < 0.3 μm was performed over several AERONET sites. The correlation coefficients for the POLDER/AERONET AOT retrieval comparisons are equal: 0.78 for Moscow site, 0.76 - Minsk, 0.86 - Belsk, 0.81 - Moldova (period 2005-2009), 0.93 - Kyiv and 0.63 for Sevastopol sites (2008-2009). The deviations are

  17. Intercomparison of aerosol optical parameters from WALI and R-MAN510 aerosol Raman lidars in the framework of HyMeX campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boytard, Mai-Lan; Royer, Philippe; Chazette, Patrick; Shang, Xiaoxia; Marnas, Fabien; Totems, Julien; Bizard, Anthony; Bennai, Baya; Sauvage, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    The HyMeX program (Hydrological cycle in Mediterranean eXperiment) aims at improving our understanding of hydrological cycle in the Mediterranen and at a better quantification and forecast of high-impact weather events in numerical weather prediction models. The first Special Observation Period (SOP1) took place in September/October 2012. During this period two aerosol Raman lidars have been deployed at Menorca Island (Spain) : one Water-vapor and Aerosol Raman LIdar (WALI) operated by LSCE/CEA (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement/Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique) and one aerosol Raman and dual-polarization lidar (R-Man510) developed and commercialized by LEOSPHERE company. Both lidars have been continuously running during the campaign and have provided information on aerosol and cloud optical properties under various atmospheric conditions (maritime background aerosols, dust events, cirrus clouds...). We will present here the results of intercomparisons between R-Man510, and WALI aerosol lidar systems and collocated sunphotometer measurements. Limitations and uncertainties on the retrieval of extinction coefficients, depolarization ratio, aerosol optical depths and detection of atmospheric structures (planetary boundary layer height, aerosol/cloud layers) will be discussed according atmospheric conditions. The results will also be compared with theoretical uncertainty assessed with direct/inverse model of lidar profiles.

  18. Aerosol impacts on scene contrast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Piazzolla, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Stein, K.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols scatter and absorb radiation, which impacts greatly on the amount of solar radiation reaching a surface, thereby changing the amount of radiation available for heating up a target. The presence of aerosols also reduces the amount of target radiation that reaches the sensor, and

  19. Preliminary aerosol generator design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, J. F., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The design and construction of a prototype vaporization generator for highly dispersed sodium chloride aerosols is described. The aerosol generating system is to be used in the Science Simulator of the Cloud Physics Laboratory Project and as part of the Cloud Physics Laboratory payload to be flown on the shuttle/spacelab.

  20. AEROSOL VARIABILITY OBSERVED WITH RPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Altstädter

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To observe the origin, vertical and horizontal distribution and variability of aerosol particles, and especially ultrafine particles recently formed, we plan to employ the remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS Carolo-P360 "ALADINA" of TU Braunschweig. The goal of the presented project is to investigate the vertical and horizontal distribution, transport and small-scale variability of aerosol particles in the atmospheric boundary layer using RPAS. Two additional RPAS of type MASC of Tübingen University equipped with turbulence instrumentation add the opportunity to study the interaction of the aerosol concentration with turbulent transport and exchange processes of the surface and the atmosphere. The combination of different flight patterns of the three RPAS allows new insights in atmospheric boundary layer processes. Currently, the different aerosol sensors are miniaturized at the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig and together with the TU Braunschweig adapted to fit into the RPAS. Moreover, an additional meteorological payload for measuring temperature, humidity and turbulence properties is constructed by Tübingen University. Two condensation particle counters determine the total aerosol number with a different lower detection threshold in order to investigate the horizontal and vertical aerosol variability and new particle formation (aerosol particles of some nm diameter. Further the aerosol size distribution in the range from about 0.300 to ~5 μm is given by an optical particle counter.

  1. Aerosol extinction in coastal zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piazzola, J.; Kaloshin, G.; Leeuw, G. de; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2004-01-01

    The performance of electro-optical systems can be substantially affected by aerosol particles that scatter and absorb electromagnetic radiation. A few years ago, an empirical model was developed describing the aerosol size distributions in the Mediterranean coastal atmosphere near Toulon (France).

  2. Mount Saint Helens aerosol evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  3. Simulating the effects of semivolatile aerosol species on cloud formation and lifecycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkola, Harri; Kudzotsa, Innocent; Tonttila, Juha; Raatikainen, Tomi; Romakkaniemi, Sami

    2017-04-01

    The effect of aerosol has been acknowledged to cause a significant uncertainty in estimating the anthropogenic aerosol effect on climate. Research efforts on the formation and growth of atmospheric particles to sizes where they become cloud condensation nuclei have been extensive. In comparison, much less attention is given on cloud processing of particles and aerosol removal through wet deposition. However, aerosol removal processes largely dictate how well aerosol is transported from source regions. This means that in order to model the global distribution aerosol, both in vertical and horizontal, wet deposition processes have to be properly modelled. However, in large scale models, the description of wet removal and the vertical redistribution of aerosol by cloud processes is very limited. Here we present a novel aerosol-cloud model SALSA, where the aerosol properties are tracked though cloud processes including: cloud droplet activation, precipitation formation, ice nucleation, melting, and evaporation. It is a sectional model that includes separate size sections for non-activated aerosol, cloud droplets, precipitation droplets, and ice crystals. The aerosol-cloud model was coupled to a large eddy model UCLALES which simulates the boundary-layer dynamics. In this study, the model has been applied in studying the wet removal as well as interactions between clouds and semi-volatile compounds, ammonia and nitric acid. These compounds are special in the sense that they co-condense together with water during cloud activation and have been suggested to form droplets that can be considered cloud-droplet-like already in subsaturated conditions. In our model, we calculate the kinetic partitioning of ammonia and sulfate thus explicitly taking into account the effect of ammonia and nitric acid in the cloud formation. Our simulations indicate that especially in polluted conditions, these compounds significantly affect the properties of cloud droplets thus significantly

  4. Volatile properties of atmospheric aerosols during nucleation events ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    other months and standard deviation bars indicate large variations in number concentration in this month. The aerosol concentration systematically increases up to December and gradually decreases to minimum in March. The concentration is found to increase after sun- rise in all mid-point diameters (figure 3) and on.

  5. MISR Aerosol Product Attributes and Statistical Comparisons with MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David L.; Garay, Michael J.; Levy, Robert C.; Bull, Michael A.; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Paradise, Susan R.; Hansen, Earl G.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aerosol product attributes are described, including geometry and algorithm performance flags. Actual retrieval coverage is mapped and explained in detail using representative global monthly data. Statistical comparisons are made with coincident aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (ANG) retrieval results from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. The relationship between these results and the ones previously obtained for MISR and MODIS individually, based on comparisons with coincident ground-truth observations, is established. For the data examined, MISR and MODIS each obtain successful aerosol retrievals about 15% of the time, and coincident MISR-MODIS aerosol retrievals are obtained for about 6%-7% of the total overlap region. Cloud avoidance, glint and oblique-Sun exclusions, and other algorithm physical limitations account for these results. For both MISR and MODIS, successful retrievals are obtained for over 75% of locations where attempts are made. Where coincident AOD retrievals are obtained over ocean, the MISR-MODIS correlation coefficient is about 0.9; over land, the correlation coefficient is about 0.7. Differences are traced to specific known algorithm issues or conditions. Over-ocean ANG comparisons yield a correlation of 0.67, showing consistency in distinguishing aerosol air masses dominated by coarse-mode versus fine-mode particles. Sampling considerations imply that care must be taken when assessing monthly global aerosol direct radiative forcing and AOD trends with these products, but they can be used directly for many other applications, such as regional AOD gradient and aerosol air mass type mapping and aerosol transport model validation. Users are urged to take seriously the published product data-quality statements.

  6. HOT AEROSOL FIRE EXTINGUISHING AGENTS AND THE ASSOCIATED TECHNOLOGIES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSince the phase out of Halon extinguishers in the 1980s, hot aerosol fire suppression technology has gained much attention. Unlike traditional inert gas, foam, water mist and Halon fire suppression agents, hot aerosol fire extinguishing agents do not need to be driven out by pressurized gases and can extinguish class A, B, C, D and K fires at 30 to 200 g/m3. Generally, hot aerosol fire extinguishing technology has developed from a generation I oil tank suppression system to a generation III strontium salt based S-type system. S-type hot aerosol fire extinguishing technology greatly solves the corrosion problem of electrical devices and electronics compared to potassium salt based generation I & II hot aerosol fire extinguishing technology. As substitutes for Halon agents, the ODP and GWP values of hot fire extinguishing aerosols are nearly zero, but those fine aerosol particles can cause adverse health effects once inhaled by human. As for configurations of hot aerosol fire extinguishing devices, fixed or portable cylindrical canisters are the most common among generation II & III hot aerosol fire extinguishers across the world, while generation I hot aerosol fire suppression systems are integrated with the oil tank as a whole. Some countries like the U.S., Australia, Russia and China, etc. have already developed standards for manufacturing and quality control of hot aerosol fire extinguishing agents and norms for hot aerosol fire extinguishing system design under different fire protection scenarios. Coolants in hot aerosol fire suppression systems, which are responsible for reducing hot aerosol temperature to avoid secondary fire risk are reviewed for the first time. Cooling effects are generally achieved through vaporization and endothermic chemical decomposition of coolants. Finally, this review discussed areas applying generation I, II or III hot aerosol fire suppression technologies. The generation III hot aerosol fire extinguishing

  7. Comparison of Aerosol Delivery by Face Mask and Tracheostomy Collar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugis, Alaa A; Sheard, Meryl M; Fink, James B; Harwood, Robert J; Ari, Arzu

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of a tracheostomy collar, Wright mask, and aerosol mask attached to a jet nebulizer in facilitating aerosolized medication delivery to the lungs. We also compared albuterol delivery with open versus closed fenestration and determined the effect of inspiratory-expiratory ratio (I:E) on aerosol delivery. Albuterol (2.5 mg/3 mL) was administered to an in vitro model consisting of an adult teaching mannequin extrathoracic and upper airway with stoma intubated with an 8-mm fenestrated tracheostomy tube. The cuff was deflated. A collecting filter at the level of the bronchi was connected to a breathing simulator at a tidal volume of 400 mL, breathing frequency of 20 breaths/min, and I:E of 2:1 and 1:2. A jet nebulizer was operated with O2 at 8 L/min. Each interface was tested in triplicate. The flow was discontinued at the end of nebulization. For each test, the nebulizer was attached to a tracheostomy collar with the fenestration open or closed, a Wright mask, or an aerosol mask. Drug was analyzed by spectrophotometry (276 nm). A paired t test and analysis of variance were performed (P tracheostomy collar with a closed fenestration (9.4 ± 1.5%) compared with an open fenestration (7.0 ± 0.8%). The doses delivered with the Wright mask (4.1 ± 0.6%) and aerosol mask (3.5 ± 0.04%) were both less than with the tracheostomy collar under either condition (P tracheostomy collar with an open fenestration (11.6 ± 1.4%), Wright mask (7.2 ± 0.6%), and aerosol mask (6.1 ± 0.5%). In an adult tracheostomy model, the tracheostomy collar delivered more aerosol to the bronchi than the Wright or aerosol mask. An I:E of 2:1 caused greater aerosol deposition compared with an I:E of 1:2. During aerosol administration via a tracheostomy collar, closing the fenestration improved aerosol delivery. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. Aircraft Measurement of Isoprene-derived Organic Aerosol during the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) Campaign Using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Liao, J.; Welti, A.; Guo, H.; Lin, J. J.; Bougiatioti, A.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.; Holloway, J. S.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; Trainer, M.; De Gouw, J. A.; Ng, N. L.

    2014-12-01

    Isoprene is an important precursor for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation due to its large global emissions and high reactivity. Recent studies have found that isoprene SOA formation via the uptake of isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) under low NOx conditions appears to be largely affected by anthropogenic emissions and are not well understood. Here we investigate the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene SOA formation through airborne measurements above the southeastern US, which is an ideal location for this study since this area is characterized by high emissions of both anthropogenic and isoprene sources. An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was deployed aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) field campaign to characterize the non-refractory chemical composition of submicron aerosol. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis was performed on the organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra to identify patterns of organic components and various OA factors were resolved. Low-volatility Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (LV-OOA) constituted a major fraction of OA. Isoprene-derived OA was also identified in certain flights and correlated well with sulfate. This result is consistent with our recent finding from ground-based measurements in Centreville during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) field campaign that isoprene-derived OA is directly modulated by the abundance of sulfate. The vertical distribution of isoprene-derived OA will be discussed along with the timescale of the effect of sulfate on isoprene OA formation.

  9. A scattering methodology for droplet sizing of e-cigarette aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratte, Pascal; Cosandey, Stéphane; Goujon-Ginglinger, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the droplet size distribution of inhalable aerosols is important to predict aerosol deposition yield at various respiratory tract locations in human. Optical methodologies are usually preferred over the multi-stage cascade impactor for high-throughput measurements of aerosol particle/droplet size distributions. Evaluate the Laser Aerosol Spectrometer technology based on Polystyrene Sphere Latex (PSL) calibration curve applied for the experimental determination of droplet size distributions in the diameter range typical of commercial e-cigarette aerosols (147-1361 nm). This calibration procedure was tested for a TSI Laser Aerosol Spectrometer (LAS) operating at a wavelength of 633 nm and assessed against model di-ethyl-hexyl-sebacat (DEHS) droplets and e-cigarette aerosols. The PSL size response was measured, and intra- and between-day standard deviations calculated. DEHS droplet sizes were underestimated by 15-20% by the LAS when the PSL calibration curve was used; however, the intra- and between-day relative standard deviations were evaporation component, which may reduce droplet size prior a measurement is performed. Aerosol concentration was measured accurately with a maximum uncertainty of 20%. Count median diameters and mass median aerodynamic diameters of selected e-cigarette aerosols ranged from 130-191 nm to 225-293 nm, respectively, similar to published values. The LAS instrument can be used to measure e-cigarette aerosol droplet size distributions with a bias underestimating the expected value by 15-20% when using a precise PSL calibration curve. Controlled variability of DEHS size measurements can be achieved with the LAS system; however, this method can only be applied to test aerosols having a refractive index close to that of PSL particles used for calibration.

  10. A review of current knowledge concerning PM2. 5 chemical composition, aerosol optical properties and their relationships across China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a thorough knowledge of PM2. 5 chemical composition and its impact on aerosol optical properties across China, existing field studies conducted after the year 2000 are reviewed and summarized in terms of geographical, interannual and seasonal distributions. Annual PM2. 5 was up to 6 times the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS in some megacities in northern China. Annual PM2. 5 was higher in northern than southern cities, and higher in inland than coastal cities. In a few cities with data longer than a decade, PM2. 5 showed a slight decrease only in the second half of the past decade, while carbonaceous aerosols decreased, sulfate (SO42− and ammonium (NH4+ remained at high levels, and nitrate (NO3− increased. The highest seasonal averages of PM2. 5 and its major chemical components were typically observed in the cold seasons. Annual average contributions of secondary inorganic aerosols to PM2. 5 ranged from 25 to 48 %, and those of carbonaceous aerosols ranged from 23 to 47 %, both with higher contributions in southern regions due to the frequent dust events in northern China. Source apportionment analysis identified secondary inorganic aerosols, coal combustion and traffic emission as the top three source factors contributing to PM2. 5 mass in most Chinese cities, and the sum of these three source factors explained 44 to 82 % of PM2. 5 mass on annual average across China. Biomass emission in most cities, industrial emission in industrial cities, dust emission in northern cities and ship emission in coastal cities are other major source factors, each of which contributed 7–27 % to PM2. 5 mass in applicable cities. The geographical pattern of scattering coefficient (bsp was similar to that of PM2. 5, and that of aerosol absorption coefficient (bap was determined by elemental carbon (EC mass concentration and its coating. bsp in ambient condition of relative humidity (RH  =  80 % can

  11. A review of current knowledge concerning PM2. 5 chemical composition, aerosol optical properties and their relationships across China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jun; Zhang, Leiming; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Renjian

    2017-08-01

    To obtain a thorough knowledge of PM2. 5 chemical composition and its impact on aerosol optical properties across China, existing field studies conducted after the year 2000 are reviewed and summarized in terms of geographical, interannual and seasonal distributions. Annual PM2. 5 was up to 6 times the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) in some megacities in northern China. Annual PM2. 5 was higher in northern than southern cities, and higher in inland than coastal cities. In a few cities with data longer than a decade, PM2. 5 showed a slight decrease only in the second half of the past decade, while carbonaceous aerosols decreased, sulfate (SO42-) and ammonium (NH4+) remained at high levels, and nitrate (NO3-) increased. The highest seasonal averages of PM2. 5 and its major chemical components were typically observed in the cold seasons. Annual average contributions of secondary inorganic aerosols to PM2. 5 ranged from 25 to 48 %, and those of carbonaceous aerosols ranged from 23 to 47 %, both with higher contributions in southern regions due to the frequent dust events in northern China. Source apportionment analysis identified secondary inorganic aerosols, coal combustion and traffic emission as the top three source factors contributing to PM2. 5 mass in most Chinese cities, and the sum of these three source factors explained 44 to 82 % of PM2. 5 mass on annual average across China. Biomass emission in most cities, industrial emission in industrial cities, dust emission in northern cities and ship emission in coastal cities are other major source factors, each of which contributed 7-27 % to PM2. 5 mass in applicable cities. The geographical pattern of scattering coefficient (bsp) was similar to that of PM2. 5, and that of aerosol absorption coefficient (bap) was determined by elemental carbon (EC) mass concentration and its coating. bsp in ambient condition of relative humidity (RH) = 80 % can be amplified by about 1.8 times that under dry conditions

  12. Trace gas and aerosol interactions in the fully coupled model of aerosol-chemistry-climate ECHAM5-HAMMOZ: 2. Impact of heterogeneous chemistry on the global aerosol distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, L.; Bey, I.; Rast, S.; Schultz, M. G.; Stier, P.; Feichter, J.

    2008-04-01

    We use the ECHAM5-HAMMOZ aerosol-chemistry-climate model to quantify the influence of trace gas-aerosol interactions on the regional and global distributions and optical properties of aerosols for present-day conditions. The model includes fully interactive simulations of gas phase and aerosol chemistry including a comprehensive set of heterogeneous reactions. We find that as a whole, the heterogeneous reactions have only a small effect on the SO2 and sulfate burden because of competing effects. The uptake of SO2 on dust and sea salt decreases the SO2 concentrations while the decrease in OH (that results from the uptake of HO2, N2O5, and O3) tends to increase SO2 (because of reduced oxidation). The sulfate formed in sea salt aerosols from SO2 uptake accounts for 3.7 Tg(S) a-1 (5%) of the total sulfate production. Uptake and subsequent reaction of SO2 on mineral dust contributes to a small formation of sulfate (0.55 Tg(S) a-1, coating of mineral dust particles, resulting in an extra 300 Tg a-1 of dust being transferred from the insoluble to the soluble mixed modes. The burden of dust in the insoluble modes is reduced by 44%, while the total burden is reduced by 5% as a result of enhanced wet deposition efficiency. Changes in the sulfur cycle affect the H2SO4 concentrations and the condensation of H2SO4 on black carbon. Accounting for heterogeneous reactions enhances the global mean burden of hydrophobic black carbon particles by 4%. The changes in aerosol mixing state result only in a small change in the global and annual aerosol optical depth (AOD) and absorption optical depth (ABS), but have significant implications on regional and seasonal scale. For example, in the main polluted regions of the Northern Hemisphere, AOD and ABS increase by 10-30% and up to 15%, respectively, in winter.

  13. Development of an aerosol microphysical module: Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H.; Koike, M.; Kondo, Y.; Fast, J. D.; Takigawa, M.

    2014-09-01

    Number concentrations, size distributions, and mixing states of aerosols are essential parameters for accurate estimations of aerosol direct and indirect effects. In this study, we develop an aerosol module, designated the Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS), that can explicitly represent these parameters by considering new particle formation (NPF), black carbon (BC) aging, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) processes. A two-dimensional bin representation is used for particles with dry diameters from 40 nm to 10 μm to resolve both aerosol sizes (12 bins) and BC mixing states (10 bins) for a total of 120 bins. The particles with diameters between 1 and 40 nm are resolved using additional eight size bins to calculate NPF. The ATRAS module is implemented in the WRF-Chem model and applied to examine the sensitivity of simulated mass, number, size distributions, and optical and radiative parameters of aerosols to NPF, BC aging, and SOA processes over East Asia during the spring of 2009. The BC absorption enhancement by coating materials is about 50% over East Asia during the spring, and the contribution of SOA processes to the absorption enhancement is estimated to be 10-20% over northern East Asia and 20-35% over southern East Asia. A clear north-south contrast is also found between the impacts of NPF and SOA processes on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations: NPF increases CCN concentrations at higher supersaturations (smaller particles) over northern East Asia, whereas SOA increases CCN concentrations at lower supersaturations (larger particles) over southern East Asia. The application of ATRAS in East Asia also shows that the impact of each process on each optical and radiative parameter depends strongly on the process and the parameter in question. The module can be used in the future as a benchmark model to evaluate the accuracy of simpler aerosol models and examine interactions between NPF, BC aging, and SOA

  14. Development of an aerosol microphysical module: Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, H.; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka; Fast, Jerome D.; Takigawa, M.

    2014-09-30

    Number concentrations, size distributions, and mixing states of aerosols are essential parameters for accurate estimation of aerosol direct and indirect effects. In this study, we developed an aerosol module, designated Aerosol Two-dimensional bin module for foRmation and Aging Simulation (ATRAS), that can represent these parameters explicitly by considering new particle formation (NPF), black carbon (BC) aging, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) processes. A two-dimensional bin representation is used for particles with dry diameters from 40 nm to 10 µm to resolve both aerosol size (12 bins) and BC mixing state (10 bins) for a total of 120 bins. The particles with diameters from 1 to 40 nm are resolved using an additional 8 size bins to calculate NPF. The ATRAS module was implemented in the WRF-chem model and applied to examine the sensitivity of simulated mass, number, size distributions, and optical and radiative parameters of aerosols to NPF, BC aging and SOA processes over East Asia during the spring of 2009. BC absorption enhancement by coating materials was about 50% over East Asia during the spring, and the contribution of SOA processes to the absorption enhancement was estimated to be 10 – 20% over northern East Asia and 20 – 35% over southern East Asia. A clear north-south contrast was also found between the impacts of NPF and SOA processes on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations: NPF increased CCN concentrations at higher supersaturations (smaller particles) over northern East Asia, whereas SOA increased CCN concentrations at lower supersaturations (larger particles) over southern East Asia. Application of ATRAS to East Asia also showed that the impact of each process on each optical and radiative parameter depended strongly on the process and the parameter in question. The module can be used in the future as a benchmark model to evaluate the accuracy of simpler aerosol models and examine interactions between NPF, BC aging, and SOA

  15. EPA perspective on radionuclide aerosol sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karhnak, J.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is concerned with radionuclide aerosol sampling primarily at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in order to insure compliance with national air emission standards, known as NESHAPs. Sampling procedures are specified in {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Sites{close_quotes} (Subpart H). Subpart H also allows alternate procedures to be used if they meet certain requirements. This paper discusses some of the mission differences between EPA and Doe and how these differences are reflected in decisions that are made. It then describes how the EPA develops standards, considers alternate sampling procedures, and lists suggestions to speed up the review and acceptance process for alternate procedures. The paper concludes with a discussion of the process for delegation of Radionuclide NESHAPs responsibilities to the States, and responsibilities that could be retained by EPA.

  16. Atmospheric and aerosol chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeill, V. Faye; Ariya, Parisa A.; McGill Univ. Montreal, QC

    2014-01-01

    This series presents critical reviews of the present position and future trends in modern chemical research. Short and concise reports on chemistry, each written by the world renowned experts. Still valid and useful after 5 or 10 years. More information as well as the electronic version of the whole content available at: springerlink.com. Christian George, Barbara D'Anna, Hartmut Herrmann, Christian Weller, Veronica Vaida, D. J. Donaldson, Thorsten Bartels-Rausch, Markus Ammann Emerging Areas in Atmospheric Photochemistry. Lisa Whalley, Daniel Stone, Dwayne Heard New Insights into the Tropospheric Oxidation of Isoprene: Combining Field Measurements, Laboratory Studies, Chemical Modelling and Quantum Theory. Neil M. Donahue, Allen L. Robinson, Erica R. Trump, Ilona Riipinen, Jesse H. Kroll Volatility and Aging of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol. P. A. Ariya, G. Kos, R. Mortazavi, E. D. Hudson, V. Kanthasamy, N. Eltouny, J. Sun, C. Wilde Bio-Organic Materials in the Atmosphere and Snow: Measurement and Characterization V. Faye McNeill, Neha Sareen, Allison N. Schwier Surface-Active Organics in Atmospheric Aerosols.

  17. Atmospheric and aerosol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeill, V. Faye [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ariya, Parisa A. (ed.) [McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    2014-09-01

    This series presents critical reviews of the present position and future trends in modern chemical research. Short and concise reports on chemistry, each written by the world renowned experts. Still valid and useful after 5 or 10 years. More information as well as the electronic version of the whole content available at: springerlink.com. Christian George, Barbara D'Anna, Hartmut Herrmann, Christian Weller, Veronica Vaida, D. J. Donaldson, Thorsten Bartels-Rausch, Markus Ammann Emerging Areas in Atmospheric Photochemistry. Lisa Whalley, Daniel Stone, Dwayne Heard New Insights into the Tropospheric Oxidation of Isoprene: Combining Field Measurements, Laboratory Studies, Chemical Modelling and Quantum Theory. Neil M. Donahue, Allen L. Robinson, Erica R. Trump, Ilona Riipinen, Jesse H. Kroll Volatility and Aging of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol. P. A. Ariya, G. Kos, R. Mortazavi, E. D. Hudson, V. Kanthasamy, N. Eltouny, J. Sun, C. Wilde Bio-Organic Materials in the Atmosphere and Snow: Measurement and Characterization V. Faye McNeill, Neha Sareen, Allison N. Schwier Surface-Active Organics in Atmospheric Aerosols.

  18. DSMC multicomponent aerosol dynamics: Sampling algorithms and aerosol processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya

    The post-accident nuclear reactor primary and containment environments can be characterized by high temperatures and pressures, and fission products and nuclear aerosols. These aerosols evolve via natural transport processes as well as under the influence of engineered safety features. These aerosols can be hazardous and may pose risk to the public if released into the environment. Computations of their evolution, movement and distribution involve the study of various processes such as coagulation, deposition, condensation, etc., and are influenced by factors such as particle shape, charge, radioactivity and spatial inhomogeneity. These many factors make the numerical study of nuclear aerosol evolution computationally very complicated. The focus of this research is on the use of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique to elucidate the role of various phenomena that influence the nuclear aerosol evolution. In this research, several aerosol processes such as coagulation, deposition, condensation, and source reinforcement are explored for a multi-component, aerosol dynamics problem in a spatially homogeneous medium. Among the various sampling algorithms explored the Metropolis sampling algorithm was found to be effective and fast. Several test problems and test cases are simulated using the DSMC technique. The DSMC results obtained are verified against the analytical and sectional results for appropriate test problems. Results show that the assumption of a single mean density is not appropriate due to the complicated effect of component densities on the aerosol processes. The methods developed and the insights gained will also be helpful in future research on the challenges associated with the description of fission product and aerosol releases.

  19. Response of HEPA filters to simulated-accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.; Smith, P.R.; Fenton, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters have been subjected to simulated accident conditions to determine their response to abnormal operating events. Both domestic and European standard and high-capacity filters have been evaluated to determine their response to simulated fire, explosion, and tornado conditions. The HEPA filter structural limitations for tornado and explosive loadings are discussed. In addition, filtration efficiencies during these accident conditions are reported for the first time. Our data indicate efficiencies between 80% and 90% for shock loadings below the structural limit level. We describe two types of testing for ineffective filtration - clean filters exposed to pulse-entrained aerosol and dirty filters exposed to tornado and shock pulses. Efficiency and material loss data are described. Also, the resonse of standard HEPA filters to simulated fire conditions is presented. We describe a unique method of measuring accumulated combustion products on the filter. Additionally, data relating to pressure drop vs accumulated mass during plugging are reported for simulated combustion aerosols. The effects of concentration and moisture levels on filter plugging were evaluated. We are obtaining all of the above data so that mathematical models can be developed for fire, explosion, and tornado accident analysis computer codes. These computer codes can be used to assess the response of nuclear air cleaning systems to accident conditions

  20. PIXE analysis of work environment aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabayashi, Hideo; Fujimoto, Fuminori; Komaki, Kenichiro; Ootuka, Akio; Kobayashi, Koichi; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    In labor environment, the quantity of chemical substances in the air is more, and their kinds are more diversified than in general home environment. It has been well known that some substances contained in the aerosol in labor environment (floating dust in the atmosphere) such as asbestos and hexavalent chromium have the possibility of causing serious injuries such as cancer of respiratory organ. In order to identify the harmful substances to which laborers are exposed and to take the measures for removing them, it is necessary to investigate in detail into many factors related to the effect of aerosol on human bodies, such as the composition of elements, chemical condition, concentration, the particle size of dust and temporal and spatial distributions. For the purpose, sampling and analysis must be carried out so that information can be extracted as much as possible from a minute amount of sample. The particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is very effective for this application. In this paper, the development of a PIXE analysis system and the knowledge obtained by the sampling and measurement of aerosol in indoor labor environment are reported. The labor environment selected is that of the workshop of Department of Liberal Arts, University of Tokyo. Sampling, the experimental apparatus, the method of data analysis and the results of analysis are described. (Kako, I.)

  1. Modelling aerosol transfer in a ventilated room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerisson, Ph.

    2009-02-01

    When particulate radioactive contamination is likely to become airborne in a ventilated room, assessment of aerosol concentration in every point of this room is important, in order to ensure protection of operators and supervision of workspaces. Thus, a model of aerosol transport and deposition has been developed as part of a project started with IRSN, EDF and IMFT. A simplified Eulerian model, called 'diffusion-inertia model' is used for particle transport. It contains a single transport equation of aerosol concentration. The specific study of deposition on walls has permitted to develop a boundary condition approach, which determines precisely the particle flux towards the wall in the boundary layer, for any deposition regime and surface orientation.The final transport and deposition models retained have been implemented in a CFD code called Code-Saturne. These models have been validated according to literature data in simple geometries and tracing experiments in ventilated rooms, which have been carried out in 30 m 3 and 1500 m 3 laboratory rooms. (author)

  2. Size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivácsy, Z.; Molnár, Á.

    The aim of this paper is to present data about the concentration and size distribution of ions in atmospheric aerosol under slightly polluted urban conditions in Hungary. Concentration of inorganic cations (ammonium, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium), inorganic anions (sulfate, nitrate, chloride, carbonate) and organic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, formic and acetic acid) for 8 particle size range between 0.0625 and 16 μm were determined. As was the case for ammonium, sulfate and nitrate, the organic acids were mostly found in the fine particle size range. Potassium and chloride were rather uniformly distributed between fine and coarse particles. Sodium, calcium, magnesium and carbonate were practically observed in the coarse mode. The results obtained for the summer and the winter half-year were also compared. The mass concentrations were recalculated in equivalents, and the ion balance was found to be reasonable in most cases. Measurement of the pH of the aerosol extracts indicates that the aerosol is acidic in the fine mode, but alkaline in the coarse particle size range.

  3. Comparison of aerosol inhalation lung images using BARC and other nebulizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isawa, Toyoharu; Teshima, Takeo; Anazawa, Yoshiki; Miki, Makoto

    1994-01-01

    Various factors determine the site of inhaled aerosol deposition in the lungs. They are the size of aerosol the composition of carrier gas of the aerosol, the airflow rate, physico-chemical properties of the carrier gas or the aerosol, the shape and structure of the airways, and the body position during inhalation. Aerosol inhalation lung images were obtained in the same subjects using 99m Tc-human serum albumin aerosol generated by 3 different aerosol generators each producing different-sized aerosol and 2 or 3 days apart from each study. The size of aerosol produced by an ultrasonic nebulizer (Mistogen) was 1.93 Micron in activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) with its geometric standard deviation (σg) of 1.73, that by a jet nebulizer (Ultra Vent) was 1.04 micron in AMAD with its σg of 1.71, and that by our BARC nebulizer, a type of a jet nebulizer, was 0.84 micron in AMAD with its σg of 1.73. In addition Technegas was also applied to selected patients. The latter produced aerosol of less than 0.2 micron in size at the largest and the majority, say, 95% or more of the generated aerosol was less than 0.1 micron in size by electron Microscopy. Each subject inhaled aerosol in resting tidal breathing through a mouth-piece with a one way double J valve with the nose clipped in the sitting position. After inhaling approximately 2-3 mCi (74 to 111 MBq) in the thorax, four view lung images were taken: anterior, posterior, an