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Sample records for standard clinical protocols

  1. SPIRIT 2013 Statement: defining standard protocol items for clinical trials

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    An-Wen Chan

    Full Text Available The protocol of a clinical trial serves as the foundation for study planning, conduct, reporting, and appraisal. However, trial protocols and existing protocol guidelines vary greatly in content and quality. This article describes the systematic development and scope of SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials 2013, a guideline for the minimum content of a clinical trial protocol. The 33-item SPIRIT checklist applies to protocols for all clinical trials and focuses on content rather than format. The checklist recommends a full description of what is planned; it does not prescribe how to design or conduct a trial. By providing guidance for key content, the SPIRIT recommendations aim to facilitate the drafting of high-quality protocols. Adherence to SPIRIT would also enhance the transparency and completeness of trial protocols for the benefit of investigators, trial participants, patients, sponsors, funders, research ethics committees or institutional review boards, peer reviewers, journals, trial registries, policymakers, regulators, and other key stakeholders.

  2. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM)

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    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. PMID:26188274

  3. Standardizing data exchange for clinical research protocols and case report forms: An assessment of the suitability of the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM).

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    Huser, Vojtech; Sastry, Chandan; Breymaier, Matthew; Idriss, Asma; Cimino, James J

    2015-10-01

    Efficient communication of a clinical study protocol and case report forms during all stages of a human clinical study is important for many stakeholders. An electronic and structured study representation format that can be used throughout the whole study life-span can improve such communication and potentially lower total study costs. The most relevant standard for representing clinical study data, applicable to unregulated as well as regulated studies, is the Operational Data Model (ODM) in development since 1999 by the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC). ODM's initial objective was exchange of case report forms data but it is increasingly utilized in other contexts. An ODM extension called Study Design Model, introduced in 2011, provides additional protocol representation elements. Using a case study approach, we evaluated ODM's ability to capture all necessary protocol elements during a complete clinical study lifecycle in the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health. ODM offers the advantage of a single format for institutions that deal with hundreds or thousands of concurrent clinical studies and maintain a data warehouse for these studies. For each study stage, we present a list of gaps in the ODM standard and identify necessary vendor or institutional extensions that can compensate for such gaps. The current version of ODM (1.3.2) has only partial support for study protocol and study registration data mainly because it is outside the original development goal. ODM provides comprehensive support for representation of case report forms (in both the design stage and with patient level data). Inclusion of requirements of observational, non-regulated or investigator-initiated studies (outside Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation) can further improve future revisions of the standard. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Low-dose versus standard-dose CT protocol in patients with clinically suspected renal colic.

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    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Schmidlin, Franz R; Iselin, Christophe E; Becker, Christoph D

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare a low-dose abdominal CT protocol, delivering a dose of radiation close to the dose delivered by abdominal radiography, with standard-dose unenhanced CT in patients with suspected renal colic. One hundred twenty-five patients (87 men, 38 women; mean age, 45 years) who were admitted with suspected renal colic underwent both abdominal low-dose CT (30 mAs) and standard-dose CT (180 mAs). Low-dose CT and standard-dose CT were independently reviewed, in a delayed fashion, by two radiologists for the characterization of renal and ureteral calculi (location, size) and for indirect signs of renal colic (renal enlargement, pyeloureteral dilatation, periureteral or renal stranding). Results reported for low-dose CT, with regard to the patients' body mass indexes (BMIs), were compared with those obtained with standard-dose CT (reference standard). The presence of non-urinary tract-related disorders was also assessed. Informed consent was obtained from all patients. In patients with a BMI 3 mm. Low-dose CT was 100% sensitive and specific for depicting non-urinary tract-related disorders (n = 6). Low-dose CT achieves sensitivities and specificities close to those of standard-dose CT in assessing the diagnosis of renal colic, depicting ureteral calculi > 3 mm in patients with a BMI < 30, and correctly identifying alternative diagnoses.

  5. Photographing Injuries in the Acute Care Setting: Development and Evaluation of a Standardized Protocol for Research, Forensics, and Clinical Practice.

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    Bloemen, Elizabeth M; Rosen, Tony; Cline Schiroo, Justina A; Clark, Sunday; Mulcare, Mary R; Stern, Michael E; Mysliwiec, Regina; Flomenbaum, Neal E; Lachs, Mark S; Hargarten, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Photographing injuries in the acute setting allows for improved documentation as well as assessment by clinicians and others who have not personally examined a patient. This tool is important, particularly for telemedicine, tracking of wound healing, the evaluation of potential abuse, and injury research. Despite this, protocols to ensure standardization of photography in clinical practice, forensics, or research have not been published. In preparation for a study of injury patterns in elder abuse and geriatric falls, our goal was to develop and evaluate a protocol for standardized photography of injuries that may be broadly applied. We conducted a literature review for techniques and standards in medical, forensic, and legal photography. We developed a novel protocol describing types of photographs and body positioning for eight body regions, including instructional diagrams. We revised it iteratively in consultation with experts in medical photography; forensics; and elder, child, and domestic abuse. The resulting protocol requires a minimum of four photos of each injury at multiple distances with and without a ruler/color guide. To evaluate the protocol's efficacy, multiple research assistants without previous photography experience photographed injuries from a convenience sample of elderly patients presenting to a single large, urban, academic emergency department. A selection of these patients' images were then evaluated in a blinded fashion by four nontreating emergency medicine physicians and the inter-rater reliability between these physicians was calculated. Among the 131 injuries, from 53 patients, photographed by 18 photographers using this protocol, photographs of 25 injuries (10 bruises, seven lacerations, and eight abrasions) were used to assess characterization of the injury. Physicians' characterizations of the injuries were reliable for the size of the injury (κ = 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.77 to 1.00), side of the body (κ = 0.97, 95

  6. Evolutionary cognitive therapy versus standard cognitive therapy for depression: a protocol for a blinded, randomized, superiority clinical trial.

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    Giosan, Cezar; Cobeanu, Oana; Mogoase, Cristina; Muresan, Vlad; Malta, Loretta S; Wyka, Katarzyna; Szentagotai, Aurora

    2014-03-19

    Depression is estimated to become the leading cause of disease burden globally by 2030. Despite existing efficacious treatments (both medical and psychotherapeutic), a large proportion of patients do not respond to therapy. Recent insights from evolutionary psychology suggest that, in addition to targeting the proximal causes of depression (for example, targeting dysfunctional beliefs by cognitive behavioral therapy), the distal or evolutionary causes (for example, inclusive fitness) should also be addressed. A randomized superiority trial is conducted to develop and test an evolutionary-driven cognitive therapy protocol for depression, and to compare its efficacy against standard cognitive therapy for depression. Romanian-speaking adults (18 years or older) with elevated Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores (>13), current diagnosis of major depressive disorder or major depressive episode (MDD or MDE), and MDD with comorbid dysthymia, as evaluated by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID), are included in the study. Participants are randomized to one of two conditions: 1) evolutionary-driven cognitive therapy (ED-CT) or 2) cognitive therapy (CT). Both groups undergo 12 psychotherapy sessions, and data are collected at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and the 3-month follow-up. Primary outcomes are depressive symptomatology and a categorical diagnosis of depression post-treatment. This randomized trial compares the newly proposed ED-CT with a classic CT protocol for depression. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to integrate insights from evolutionary theories of depression into the treatment of this condition in a controlled manner. This study can thus add substantially to the body of knowledge on validated treatments for depression. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN64664414The trial was registered in June 2013. The first participant was enrolled on October 3, 2012.

  7. Clinical-pathological findings of otitis media and media-interna in calves and (clinical) evaluation of a standardized therapeutic protocol.

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    Bertone, I; Bellino, C; Alborali, G L; Cagnasso, A; Cagnotti, G; Dappiano, E; Lizzi, M; Miciletta, M; Ramacciotti, A; Gianella, P; D'Angelo, A

    2015-12-03

    The aims of this field trial were to describe the clinical-pathologic findings in calves with otitis media (OM) and media-interna (OMI), to evaluate, through the development of a scoring system, the effectiveness of a standardized therapeutic protocol, and to identify the causative pathogens and their possible correlation with concurrent respiratory disease. All animals underwent physical and neurological examinations at three experimental time points: at diagnosis/beginning of treatment (T0), 1 week (T1) and 2 weeks (T2) after therapy was started, respectively. Follow-up telephone interviews with animal owners were conducted 1 month later. The therapeutic protocol consisted of tulathromycin (Draxxin®; Zoetis), oxytetracycline hydrochloride (Terramicina 100®; Zoetis), and carprofen (Rimadyl®; Zoetis). Twenty-two calves were enrolled. Physical and otoscopic examination at T0 revealed monolateral and bilateral otorrhea in 16 and 6 calves, respectively, with peripheral vestibular system involvement in calves presenting with neurological signs (n = 17; 77 %). A significant improvement of clinical and neurological scores was observed in 20 (90 %) calves, a full recovery in only 1 (5 %). One calf worsened between T0 and T1 and it was removed from the study. None of the other animals showed a worsening of clinical conditions and/or required further treatments at one month follow up. Mycoplasma bovis was isolated in 89 % of the affected ears either alone or together with P. multocida (n = 5), Streptococcus spp. (n = 1), Staphylococcus spp. (n = 1), and Pseudomonas spp. (n = 1). M. bovis either alone or together with these bacteria was also isolated from the upper and/or lower respiratory tract in 19 (86 %) calves. This is the first prospective study to evaluate the effectiveness of a standardized therapeutic protocol for the treatment of OM/OMI in calves. The therapy led to clinical improvement in the majority of the calves. Persistence of mild clinical

  8. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry: protocol standardization and database expansion for rapid identification of clinically important molds.

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    Paul, Saikat; Singh, Pankaj; Rudramurthy, Shivaprakash M; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Ghosh, Anup K

    2017-12-01

    To standardize the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry protocols and expansion of existing Bruker Biotyper database for mold identification. Four different sample preparation methods (protocol A, B, C and D) were evaluated. On analyzing each protein extraction method, reliable identification and best log scores were achieved through protocol D. The same protocol was used to identify 153 clinical isolates. Of these 153, 123 (80.3%) were accurately identified by using existing database and remaining 30 (19.7%) were not identified due to unavailability in database. On inclusion of missing main spectrum profile in existing database, all 153 isolates were identified. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry can be used for routine identification of clinically important molds.

  9. Comparison of mRNA splicing assay protocols across multiple laboratories: recommendations for best practice in standardized clinical testing.

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    Whiley, Phillip J; de la Hoya, Miguel; Thomassen, Mads; Becker, Alexandra; Brandão, Rita; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Montagna, Marco; Menéndez, Mireia; Quiles, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; De Leeneer, Kim; Tenés, Anna; Montalban, Gemma; Tserpelis, Demis; Yoshimatsu, Toshio; Tirapo, Carole; Raponi, Michela; Caldes, Trinidad; Blanco, Ana; Santamariña, Marta; Guidugli, Lucia; de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Wong, Ming; Tancredi, Mariella; Fachal, Laura; Ding, Yuan Chun; Kruse, Torben; Lattimore, Vanessa; Kwong, Ava; Chan, Tsun Leung; Colombo, Mara; De Vecchi, Giovanni; Caligo, Maria; Baralle, Diana; Lázaro, Conxi; Couch, Fergus; Radice, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C; Neuhausen, Susan; Houdayer, Claude; Fackenthal, Jim; Hansen, Thomas Van Overeem; Vega, Ana; Diez, Orland; Blok, Rien; Claes, Kathleen; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Walker, Logan; Spurdle, Amanda B; Brown, Melissa A

    2014-02-01

    Accurate evaluation of unclassified sequence variants in cancer predisposition genes is essential for clinical management and depends on a multifactorial analysis of clinical, genetic, pathologic, and bioinformatic variables and assays of transcript length and abundance. The integrity of assay data in turn relies on appropriate assay design, interpretation, and reporting. We conducted a multicenter investigation to compare mRNA splicing assay protocols used by members of the ENIGMA (Evidence-Based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles) consortium. We compared similarities and differences in results derived from analysis of a panel of breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene variants known to alter splicing (BRCA1: c.135-1G>T, c.591C>T, c.594-2A>C, c.671-2A>G, and c.5467+5G>C and BRCA2: c.426-12_8delGTTTT, c.7988A>T, c.8632+1G>A, and c.9501+3A>T). Differences in protocols were then assessed to determine which elements were critical in reliable assay design. PCR primer design strategies, PCR conditions, and product detection methods, combined with a prior knowledge of expected alternative transcripts, were the key factors for accurate splicing assay results. For example, because of the position of primers and PCR extension times, several isoforms associated with BRCA1, c.594-2A>C and c.671-2A>G, were not detected by many sites. Variation was most evident for the detection of low-abundance transcripts (e.g., BRCA2 c.8632+1G>A Δ19,20 and BRCA1 c.135-1G>T Δ5q and Δ3). Detection of low-abundance transcripts was sometimes addressed by using more analytically sensitive detection methods (e.g., BRCA2 c.426-12_8delGTTTT ins18bp). We provide recommendations for best practice and raise key issues to consider when designing mRNA assays for evaluation of unclassified sequence variants.

  10. Clinical Outcome of a Prospective Case Series of Patients With Ketamine Cystitis Who Underwent Standardized Treatment Protocol.

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    Yee, Chi-hang; Lai, Pui-tak; Lee, Wai-man; Tam, Yuk-him; Ng, Chi-fai

    2015-08-01

    To assess the outcome of a prospective cohort of patients with ketamine-associated uropathy after standardized treatment. This is a prospective case series of patients with ketamine-related urologic problems. Management for the patients includes a 4-tier approach, namely anti-inflammatory or anti-cholinergic drugs, opioid analgesics or pregabalin, intravesical hyaluronic acid, and finally, surgical intervention including hydrodistension and augmentation cystoplasty. Outcome was assessed with functional bladder capacity, pelvic pain and urgency or frequency (PUF) symptom scale, and the EuroQol visual analog scale. Between December 2011 and June 2014, 463 patients presented with ketamine-associated uropathy. All were managed by the same standardized protocol. Among these patients, 319 patients came back for follow-up assessment. Overall mean follow-up duration was 10.7 ± 8.5 months. For those patients who received first-line treatment (290 patients), there was a significant improvement in PUF scores, the EuroQol visual analog scale, and functional bladder capacity. Both abstinence from ketamine usage and the amount of ketamine consumed were factors predicting the improvement of PUF scores. For those patients who required second-line oral therapy (62 patients), 42 patients (67.7%) reported improvement in symptoms. Eight patients have completed intravesical therapy. There was a significant improvement in voided volume for the patients after treatment. The study demonstrated the efficacy of managing ketamine-associated uropathy using a 4-tier approach. Both anti-inflammatory drugs and analgesics could effectively alleviate symptoms. Being abstinent from ketamine abuse and the amount of ketamine consumed have bearings on treatment response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy on pain and functioning compared to a standard exercise protocol in patients presenting with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome. A randomized controlled trial.

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    Kromer, Thilo O; de Bie, Rob A; Bastiaenen, Caroline H G

    2010-06-09

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common musculoskeletal complaint leading to significant reduction of health and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first choice of treatment although its effectiveness is still under debate. Systematic reviews in this field highlight the need for more high quality trials to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement, involving 90 participants aged 18-75. Participants are recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, general practitioners, and orthopaedic surgeons in Germany. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either individualized physiotherapy or to a standard exercise protocol using central randomization. The control group will perform the standard exercise protocol aiming to restore muscular deficits in strength, mobility, and coordination of the rotator cuff and the shoulder girdle muscles to unload the subacromial space during active movements. Participants of the intervention group will perform the standard exercise protocol as a home program, and will additionally be treated with individualized physiotherapy based on clinical examination results, and guided by a decision tree. After the intervention phase both groups will continue their home program for another 7 weeks. Outcome will be measured at 5 weeks and at 3 and 12 months after inclusion using the shoulder pain and disability index and patients' global impression of change, the generic patient-specific scale, the average weekly pain score, and patient satisfaction with treatment. Additionally, the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, the pain catastrophizing scale, and patients' expectancies of treatment effect are assessed. Participants' adherence to the protocol, use of additional treatments

  12. Effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy on pain and functioning compared to a standard exercise protocol in patients presenting with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome. A randomized controlled trial

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    de Bie Rob A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common musculoskeletal complaint leading to significant reduction of health and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first choice of treatment although its effectiveness is still under debate. Systematic reviews in this field highlight the need for more high quality trials to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement, involving 90 participants aged 18-75. Participants are recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, general practitioners, and orthopaedic surgeons in Germany. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either individualized physiotherapy or to a standard exercise protocol using central randomization. The control group will perform the standard exercise protocol aiming to restore muscular deficits in strength, mobility, and coordination of the rotator cuff and the shoulder girdle muscles to unload the subacromial space during active movements. Participants of the intervention group will perform the standard exercise protocol as a home program, and will additionally be treated with individualized physiotherapy based on clinical examination results, and guided by a decision tree. After the intervention phase both groups will continue their home program for another 7 weeks. Outcome will be measured at 5 weeks and at 3 and 12 months after inclusion using the shoulder pain and disability index and patients' global impression of change, the generic patient-specific scale, the average weekly pain score, and patient satisfaction with treatment. Additionally, the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, the pain catastrophizing scale, and patients' expectancies of treatment effect are assessed. Participants

  13. [Developing and standardizing experimental protocols using human iPS-derived cells to predict adverse drug reactions in pre-clinical safety studies].

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    Sekino, Yuko; Sato, Kaoru; Kanda, Yasunari; Ishida, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have standardized experimental protocols to evaluate the possibility of using cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) in the pre-clinical studies for the drug approval processes. Cells differentiated from hiPSC, especially cardiomyocytes, neurons and hepatocytes, are expected to be used as new pharmacological and toxicological assay tools. Current preclinical test methods have limitations for predicting clinical adverse drug reactions. This is because of the so-called 'problem of species difference'. Drug-induced arrhythmia, cognitive impairment and hepatotoxicity which can't be predicted in pre-clinical studies are major causes of the high rate attrition of new-drug candidates in clinical studies and of withdrawal of products from the market. The development of new pre-clinical test methods using cells differentiated from hiPSCs would resolve these problems, in addition to solving the issue of "the replacement, refinement and reduction (3Rs)" of animal experiments. From 2010 to 2011, we surveyed companies belonging to the Japan Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association (JPMA) and academic researchers about the usage of differentiated cells in their laboratories. We found that studies were performed using differentiated cells from different cell lines of hiPSC with laboratory-specific differentiation methods. The cells were cultured in various conditions and their activities were measured using different methods. This resulted in a variety of pharmacological responses of the cells. It is therefore impossible to compare reproducibility and ensure reliability of experiments using these cells. To utilize the cells in the drug approval processes, we need robust, standardized test methods to accurately reproduce these methods in all laboratories. We will then be able to compare and analyze the obtained results. Based on the survey, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare funded our study. In our study, we standardize

  14. Standardized radiologic protocol for the study of common coccygodynia and characteristics of the lesions observed in the sitting position. Clinical elements differentiating luxation, hypermobility, and normal mobility.

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    Maigne, J Y; Tamalet, B

    1996-11-15

    Ninety-one patients with common coccygodynia and 47 control subjects prospectively underwent dynamic radiographic imagery. To standardize the radiologic protocol to better define normal and abnormal mobility of the coccyx, and to study clinical parameters useful in classifying and differentiating the lesions. In a previous study, comparison of films taken in the sitting and standing positions allowed to individualize two distinct coccygeal lesions: luxation and hypermobility. Measurement technique was precise and reproducible, but the control group was not pain-free. No specific clinical features were described. Standing films were made first. Control subjects were healthy volunteers. The following items were recorded: presence of an initial traumatic event, elapsed time before investigation, body mass index, presence of an acute pain when passing from sitting to standing, effect of intradiscal steroid injection, and angle of the coccyx with respect to the seat. Hypermobility was defined as a flexion of more than 25 degrees, luxation by displacement of more than 25% of the coccyx. The base angle is a good predictor of the direction in which the coccyx moves when sitting. In the "luxation" group, a history of initial trauma, a shorter clinical course, pain when standing up, increased body mass index, and satisfactory results with intradiscal injection were found more frequently than in the "normal" group. The "hypermobility" group had characteristics between these two groups. Common coccygodynia is associated in 48.4% of patients with a luxation or hypermobility of the coccyx. A distinct clinical presentation was found in individuals with luxation of the coccyx.

  15. Analysis of the Implementation of Standardized Clinical Protocol «Diabetes Mellitus Type 2» by Quality Indicators in Institutions of Kyiv Region

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    V.I. Tkachenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Ukraine, a standardized clinical protocol (SCP to provide medical care in diabetes mellitus type 2 (order of the Ministry of Healthcare of Ukraine dated 21.12.2012 № 1118, which identifies 4 quality indicators, is being implemented. The objective of research — to analyze the implementation of SCP based on monitoring of quality indicators in the institutions of the Kyiv region. Materials and Methods. Technique for assessing the quality of diabetes care, one element of which is the monitoring of quality indicators specified in SCP, has been developed and applied. Collection and analysis of information was carried out by forms of primary records № 025/030 and 030/o, forms of statistical reporting № 12 and 20. Statistical analysis was performed using Excel 2007, SPSS. Results. Today, primary health care institutions in Kyiv region developed local protocols that confirms the implementation of the first quality indicator, in accordance with the desired level of the indicator value by SCP. The second indicator — the percentage of patients who were defined the level of glycated hemoglobin in the reporting period amounted to 12.2 %, which is higher than in 2012 (8.84 %, but remains low. The third quality indicator — the percentage of patients who were admitted to hospital for diabetes mellitus and its complications during the reporting period amounted to 15.01 %, while in 2012 it stood at 8.66 %. For comparison, this figure in 2007 was 9.37 %. Conclusions. The quality of care at an early stage of implementation is not enough, partly due to the lack of awareness by physicians of major provisions of the protocol, lack of equipment, the need of payment by a patient for medical services specified in the protocol, lack of doctors’ understanding of the characteristics of different types of medical and technological documents and difficulties in the development and implementation of local protocols, particularly. The obtained results are

  16. Standardized North American marsh bird monitoring protocol

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    Conway, Courtney J.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the population status of many marsh-dependent birds in North America but recent efforts have focused on collecting more reliable information and estimates of population trends. As part of that effort, a standardized survey protocol was developed in 1999 that provided guidance for conducting marsh bird surveys throughout North America such that data would be consistent among locations. The original survey protocol has been revised to provide greater clarification on many issues as the number of individuals using the protocol has grown. The Standardized North American Marsh Bird Monitoring Protocol instructs surveyors to conduct an initial 5-minute passive point-count survey followed by a series of 1-minute segments during which marsh bird calls are broadcast into the marsh following a standardized approach. Surveyors are instructed to record each individual bird from the suite of 26 focal species that are present in their local area on separate lines of a datasheet and estimate the distance to each bird. Also, surveyors are required to record whether each individual bird was detected within each 1-minute subsegment of the survey. These data allow analysts to use several different approaches for estimating detection probability. The Standardized North American Marsh Bird Monitoring Protocol provides detailed instructions that explain the field methods used to monitor marsh birds in North America.

  17. The standard treatment protocol for paracetamol poisoning may be inadequate following overdose with modified release formulation: a pharmacokinetic and clinical analysis of 53 cases.

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    Salmonson, Heléne; Sjöberg, Gunilla; Brogren, Jacob

    2018-01-01

    The use of the standard procedure for managing overdoses with immediate release (IR) paracetamol is questionable when applied to overdoses with modified release (MR) formulations. This study describes the pharmacokinetics of paracetamol and the clinical outcomes following overdoses with a MR formulation. Medical records including laboratory analyses concerning overdoses of MR paracetamol from 2009 to 2015 were collected retrospectively. Inclusion criteria were ingestion of a toxic dose, known time of intake and documented measurements of serum paracetamol and liver function tests. Graphical analysis, descriptive statistics and population pharmacokinetic modelling were used to describe data. Fifty-three cases were identified. Median age was 26 years (range 13-68), median dose was 20 g (range 10-166) and 74% were females. The pharmacokinetic analysis showed a complex, dose dependent serum versus time profile with prolonged absorption and delayed serum peak concentrations with increasing dose. Ten patients had persistently high serum levels for 24 h or more, six of them had a second peak 8-19 h after ingestion. Seven of 34 patients receiving N-acetylcysteine (NAC) within 8 h had alanine aminotransferase (ALT) above reference range. Three of them developed hepatotoxicity (ALT >1000 IU/l). The pharmacokinetic and clinical analysis showed that the standard treatment protocol, including risk assessment and NAC regimen, used for IR paracetamol poisoning not appear suitable for MR formulation. Individual and tailored treatment may be valuable but further studies are warranted to determine optimal regimen of overdoses with MR formulation.

  18. Protocols | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

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    Each reagent on the Antibody Portal has been characterized by a combination of methods specific for that antibody. To view the customized antibody methods and protocols (Standard Operating Procedures) used to generate and characterize each reagent, select an antibody of interest and open the protocols associated with their respective characterization methods along with characterization data.

  19. Estimation of radiation exposure for brain perfusion CT: standard protocol compared with deviations in protocol.

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    Hoang, Jenny K; Wang, Chu; Frush, Donald P; Enterline, David S; Samei, Ehsan; Toncheva, Greta; Lowry, Carolyn; Yoshizumi, Terry T

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the organ doses and estimate the effective dose for the standard brain perfusion CT protocol and erroneous protocols. An anthropomorphic phantom with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors was scanned on a 64-MDCT scanner. Protocol 1 used a standard brain perfusion protocol with 80 kVp and fixed tube current of 200 mA. Protocol 2 used 120 kVp and fixed tube current of 200 mA. Protocol 3 used 120 kVp with automatic tube current modulation (noise index, 2.4; minimum, 100 mA; maximum, 520 mA). Compared with protocol 1, the effective dose was 2.8 times higher with protocol 2 and 7.8 times higher with protocol 3. For all protocols, the peak dose was highest in the skin, followed by the brain and calvarial marrow. Compared with protocol 1, the peak skin dose was 2.6 times higher with protocol 2 and 6.7 times higher with protocol 3. The peak skin dose for protocol 3 exceeded 3 Gy. The ocular lens received significant scatter radiation: 177 mGy for protocol 2 and 435 mGy for protocol 3, which were 4.6 and 11.3 times the dose for protocol 1, respectively. Compared with the standard protocol, erroneous protocols of increasing the tube potential from 80 kVp to 120 kVp will lead to a three- to fivefold increase in organ doses, and concurrent use of high peak kilovoltage with incorrectly programmed tube current modulation can increase dose to organs by 7- to 11-fold. Tube current modulation with a low noise index can lead to doses to the skin and ocular lens that are close to thresholds for tissue reactions.

  20. The development of standard operating protocols for paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardwick, J.; Mencik, C.; McLaren, C.; Young, C.; Scadden, S.; Mashford, P.; McHugh, K.; Beckett, M.; Calvert, M.; Marsden, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes how the requirement for operating protocols for standard radiological practice was expanded to provide a comprehensive aide to the operator conducting a medical exposure. The protocols adopted now include justification criteria, patient preparation, radiographic technique, standard exposure charts, diagnostic reference levels and image quality criteria. In total, the protocols have been welcomed as a tool for ensuring that medical exposures are properly optimised. (author)

  1. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation: A Standardized Protocol for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

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    Rodrigo Pedraza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes present with voiding, sexual, and anorectal disturbances, which may be associated with one another, resulting in complex presentation. Thus, an integrated diagnosis and management approach may be required. Pelvic muscle rehabilitation (PMR is a noninvasive modality involving cognitive reeducation, modification, and retraining of the pelvic floor and associated musculature. We describe our standardized PMR protocol for the management of pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation Program. The diagnostic assessment includes electromyography and manometry analyzed in 4 phases: (1 initial baseline phase; (2 rapid contraction phase; (3 tonic contraction and endurance phase; and (4 late baseline phase. This evaluation is performed at the onset of every session. PMR management consists of 6 possible therapeutic modalities, employed depending on the diagnostic evaluation: (1 down-training; (2 accessory muscle isolation; (3 discrimination training; (4 muscle strengthening; (5 endurance training; and (6 electrical stimulation. Eight to ten sessions are performed at one-week intervals with integration of home exercises and lifestyle modifications. Conclusions. The PMR protocol offers a standardized approach to diagnose and manage pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes with potential advantages over traditional biofeedback, involving additional interventions and a continuous pelvic floor assessment with management modifications over the clinical course.

  2. Modifications to the Standard Sit-and-Reach Flexibility Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Laurence E.; Burke, Darren G.; Pelham, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Describes several modifications of the standard sit-and-reach flexibility protocol using a new device called the multitest flexometer (MTF). Using the MTF, researchers could take six flexibility measures beyond the stand-and-reach test. The modified protocol allowed the indirect assessment of the influence of the four major muscle groups that…

  3. Development of Standardized Material Testing Protocols for Prosthetic Liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagle, John C; Reinhall, Per G; Hafner, Brian J; Sanders, Joan E

    2017-04-01

    A set of protocols was created to characterize prosthetic liners across six clinically relevant material properties. Properties included compressive elasticity, shear elasticity, tensile elasticity, volumetric elasticity, coefficient of friction (CoF), and thermal conductivity. Eighteen prosthetic liners representing the diverse range of commercial products were evaluated to create test procedures that maximized repeatability, minimized error, and provided clinically meaningful results. Shear and tensile elasticity test designs were augmented with finite element analysis (FEA) to optimize specimen geometries. Results showed that because of the wide range of available liner products, the compressive elasticity and tensile elasticity tests required two test maxima; samples were tested until they met either a strain-based or a stress-based maximum, whichever was reached first. The shear and tensile elasticity tests required that no cyclic conditioning be conducted because of limited endurance of the mounting adhesive with some liner materials. The coefficient of friction test was based on dynamic coefficient of friction, as it proved to be a more reliable measurement than static coefficient of friction. The volumetric elasticity test required that air be released beneath samples in the test chamber before testing. The thermal conductivity test best reflected the clinical environment when thermal grease was omitted and when liner samples were placed under pressure consistent with load bearing conditions. The developed procedures provide a standardized approach for evaluating liner products in the prosthetics industry. Test results can be used to improve clinical selection of liners for individual patients and guide development of new liner products.

  4. Standardized training in nurse model travel clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofarelli, Theresa A; Ricks, Jane H; Anand, Rahul; Hale, Devon C

    2011-01-01

    International travel plays a significant role in the emergence and redistribution of major human diseases. The importance of travel medicine clinics for preventing morbidity and mortality has been increasingly appreciated, although few studies have thus far examined the management and staff training strategies that result in successful travel-clinic operations. Here, we describe an example of travel-clinic operation and management coordinated through the University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases. This program, which involves eight separate clinics distributed statewide, functions both to provide patient consult and care services, as well as medical provider training and continuing medical education (CME). Initial training, the use of standardized forms and protocols, routine chart reviews and monthly continuing education meetings are the distinguishing attributes of this program. An Infectious Disease team consisting of one medical doctor (MD) and a physician assistant (PA) act as consultants to travel nurses who comprise the majority of clinic staff. Eight clinics distributed throughout the state of Utah serve approximately 6,000 travelers a year. Pre-travel medical services are provided by 11 nurses, including 10 registered nurses (RNs) and 1 licensed practical nurse (LPN). This trained nursing staff receives continuing travel medical education and participate in the training of new providers. All nurses have completed a full training program and 7 of the 11 (64%) of clinic nursing staff serve more than 10 patients a week. Quality assurance measures show that approximately 0.5% of charts reviewed contain a vaccine or prescription error which require patient notification for correction. Using an initial training program, standardized patient intake forms, vaccine and prescription protocols, preprinted prescriptions, and regular CME, highly trained nurses at travel clinics are able to provide standardized pre-travel care to

  5. Shoulder muscle endurance: the development of a standardized and reliable protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Jean-Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder muscle fatigue has been proposed as a possible link to explain the association between repetitive arm use and the development of rotator cuff disorders. To our knowledge, no standardized clinical endurance protocol has been developed to evaluate the effects of muscle fatigue on shoulder function. Such a test could improve clinical examination of individuals with shoulder disorders. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish a reliable protocol for objective assessment of shoulder muscle endurance. Methods An endurance protocol was developed on a stationary dynamometer (Biodex System 3. The endurance protocol was performed in isotonic mode with the resistance set at 50% of each subject's peak torque as measured for shoulder external (ER and internal rotation (IR. Each subject performed 60 continuous repetitions of IR/ER rotation. The endurance protocol was performed by 36 healthy individuals on two separate occasions at least two days apart. Maximal isometric shoulder strength tests were performed before and after the fatigue protocol to evaluate the effects of the endurance protocol and its reliability. Paired t-tests were used to evaluate the reduction in shoulder strength due to the protocol, while intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC and minimal detectable change (MDC were used to evaluate its reliability. Results Maximal isometric strength was significantly decreased after the endurance protocol (P 0.84. Conclusions Changes in muscular performance observed during and after the muscular endurance protocol suggests that the protocol did result in muscular fatigue. Furthermore, this study established that the resultant effects of fatigue of the proposed isotonic protocol were reproducible over time. The protocol was performed without difficulty by all volunteers and took less than 10 minutes to perform, suggesting that it might be feasible for clinical practice. This protocol could be used to induce

  6. PCB transformer decontamination - standards and protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The proper management and disposal of transformers to reduce human and environmental exposure to PCBs, is the subject of this document issued by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME). The Council is committed to a policy of phasing out the use of all polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Canada. Since there are no national standards in Canada for the decontamination of PCB transformers, this handbook was issued to provide guidelines to promote uniform practices and to set national approaches for resource recovery and technological developments in this area. The guide describes methods for decontamination of transformers, and safe approaches for re-use, recycling and landfilling of electrical transformers that contain PCBs and their components. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  7. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  8. Clinical dosimetry in molecular radiotherapy: protocol optimization and clinical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Ludovic

    2011-01-01

    Molecular radiotherapy (mrt) consists in destructing tumour targets by radiolabelled vectors. This nuclear medicine specialty is being considered with increasing interest for example via the success achieved in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas by radioimmunotherapy. One of the keys of mrt optimization relies on the personalising of absorbed doses delivered to the patient: This is required to ascertain that irradiation is focused on tumour cells while keeping surrounding healthy tissue irradiation at an acceptable - non-toxic - level. Radiation dose evaluation in mrt requires in one hand, the spatial and temporal localization of injected radioactive sources by scintigraphic imaging, and on a second hand, the knowledge of the emitted radiation propagating media, given by CT imaging. Global accuracy relies on the accuracy of each of the steps that contribute to clinical dosimetry. There is no reference, standardized dosimetric protocol to date. Due to heterogeneous implementations, evaluation of the accuracy of the absorbed dose is a difficult task. In this thesis, we developed and evaluated different dosimetric approaches that allow us to find a relationship between the absorbed dose to the bone marrow and haematological toxicity. Besides, we built a scientific project, called DosiTest, which aims at evaluating the impact of the various step that contribute to the realization of a dosimetric study, by means of a virtual multicentric comparison based on Monte-Carlo modelling. (author) [fr

  9. Comparison of IAEA protocols for clinical electron beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotny, J.; Soukup, M.

    2002-01-01

    In most beam calibration protocols so far used in clinical practice, the method recommended for the determination of absorbed dose to water in high-energy electron beams is based on either an exposure or an air kerma calibration factor of an ionisation chamber in a C0 60 gamma-ray or 2 MV x-ray beam. These protocols are complex and the overall uncertainty in the absorbed dose to water under reference conditions is about 3-4%. The new generation of protocols, namely IAEA TRS 398, are based on absorbed dose-to-water standards in photon beams from Co 60 and accelerator beams. The possible errors in absorbed dose determination in reference conditions in practical clinical dosimetry caused by replacement of TRS 277 and TRS 381 protocols for a new TRS 398 protocol were carefully studied for clinical electron beams in energy range 6-20 MeV. All measurements were performed on Varian CLINAC 2100 C linear accelerator. The electron beam energy ranged from 6 to 20 MeV. Basically three different detectors were used for measurements: PTW Roos plane-parallel ionization chamber, calibrated PTW 30002 Farmer type, ionization, Scanditronix electron diode detector. Measurements of central axis percentage depth doses were made by diode using Wellhoefer WP700 beam scanner in 40 cm x 40 cm x 50 cm water phantom. A reference chamber or semiconductor diode mounted on electron treatment cone was used to correct beam output variations for a chamber or diode measurements during scanning. Absolute dose measurements were carried out with Roos plane-parallel chamber connected to PTW UNIDOS electrometer always for preselected number of monitor units. In a new IAEA dosimetry protocol clinical reference dosimetry for electron beam is performed at depth of d ref = 0.6R 50 - 0.1 [cm] instead of d max as in previous ones. To check the stability of electron beams for energy and to establish d ref and standard deviation for reference depth position, the depth dose curves obtained during the quality

  10. The Virtual Insect Brain protocol: creating and comparing standardized neuroanatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schindelin Johannes E

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the fly Drosophila melanogaster, new genetic, physiological, molecular and behavioral techniques for the functional analysis of the brain are rapidly accumulating. These diverse investigations on the function of the insect brain use gene expression patterns that can be visualized and provide the means for manipulating groups of neurons as a common ground. To take advantage of these patterns one needs to know their typical anatomy. Results This paper describes the Virtual Insect Brain (VIB protocol, a script suite for the quantitative assessment, comparison, and presentation of neuroanatomical data. It is based on the 3D-reconstruction and visualization software Amira, version 3.x (Mercury Inc. 1. Besides its backbone, a standardization procedure which aligns individual 3D images (series of virtual sections obtained by confocal microscopy to a common coordinate system and computes average intensities for each voxel (volume pixel the VIB protocol provides an elaborate data management system for data administration. The VIB protocol facilitates direct comparison of gene expression patterns and describes their interindividual variability. It provides volumetry of brain regions and helps to characterize the phenotypes of brain structure mutants. Using the VIB protocol does not require any programming skills since all operations are carried out at an intuitively usable graphical user interface. Although the VIB protocol has been developed for the standardization of Drosophila neuroanatomy, the program structure can be used for the standardization of other 3D structures as well. Conclusion Standardizing brains and gene expression patterns is a new approach to biological shape and its variability. The VIB protocol provides a first set of tools supporting this endeavor in Drosophila. The script suite is freely available at http://www.neurofly.de2

  11. Biocoder: A programming language for standardizing and automating biology protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthanarayanan, Vaishnavi; Thies, William

    2010-11-08

    Published descriptions of biology protocols are often ambiguous and incomplete, making them difficult to replicate in other laboratories. However, there is increasing benefit to formalizing the descriptions of protocols, as laboratory automation systems (such as microfluidic chips) are becoming increasingly capable of executing them. Our goal in this paper is to improve both the reproducibility and automation of biology experiments by using a programming language to express the precise series of steps taken. We have developed BioCoder, a C++ library that enables biologists to express the exact steps needed to execute a protocol. In addition to being suitable for automation, BioCoder converts the code into a readable, English-language description for use by biologists. We have implemented over 65 protocols in BioCoder; the most complex of these was successfully executed by a biologist in the laboratory using BioCoder as the only reference. We argue that BioCoder exposes and resolves ambiguities in existing protocols, and could provide the software foundations for future automation platforms. BioCoder is freely available for download at http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/india/projects/biocoder/. BioCoder represents the first practical programming system for standardizing and automating biology protocols. Our vision is to change the way that experimental methods are communicated: rather than publishing a written account of the protocols used, researchers will simply publish the code. Our experience suggests that this practice is tractable and offers many benefits. We invite other researchers to leverage BioCoder to improve the precision and completeness of their protocols, and also to adapt and extend BioCoder to new domains.

  12. Protocol Standards for Reporting Video Data in Academic Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Pamela A; Ignacio, Romeo C; de Moya, Marc A

    2016-04-01

    Editors of biomedical journals have estimated that a majority (40%-90%) of studies published in scientific journals cannot be replicated, even though an inherent principle of publication is that others should be able to replicate and build on published claims. Each journal sets its own protocols for establishing "quality" in articles, yet over the past 50 years, few journals in any field--especially medical education--have specified protocols for reporting the use of video data in research. The authors found that technical and industry-driven aspects of video recording, as well as a lack of standardization and reporting requirements by research journals, have led to major limitations in the ability to assess or reproduce video data used in research. Specific variables in the videotaping process (e.g., camera angle), which can be changed or be modified, affect the quality of recorded data, leading to major reporting errors and, in turn, unreliable conclusions. As more data are now in the form of digital videos, the historical lack of reporting standards makes it increasingly difficult to accurately replicate medical educational studies. Reproducibility is especially important as the medical education community considers setting national high-stakes standards in medicine and surgery based on video data. The authors of this Perspective provide basic protocol standards for investigators and journals using video data in research publications so as to allow for reproducibility.

  13. Web-based resources for clinical protocol management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookman, M A; McLaughlin, L; Burgess, S; Wolfenden, A S

    1998-11-01

    The data monitoring regulatory procedures, and administrative tasks associated with protocol management have become increasingly complex. Relational database technology and Internet-based connectivity offer resources to improve the quality and efficiency of protocol operations. At Fox Chase Cancer Center, we have developed a suite of database applications for protocol management and tracking of patient accrual. All data transactions and reporting occur through a graphical web browser interface using standard Internet technology. Security and confidentiality have been addressed through encryption, user authentication, address restriction, and database authority. Database management has been tightly integrated with protocol operations to avoid duplication of resources and effort. Data query functions also extend to other institutional resources, such as tumor registry and the hospital clinical laboratory, to further reduce the need for redundant data storage. Newer components, such as chemotherapy orders and toxicity reporting, have been incorporated in a modular fashion. Although custom software development can be expensive and time-consuming, it offers the best opportunity for successful integration with existing resources, staff, and procedures, as well as collaboration with other institutions.

  14. Industrial wireless sensor networks applications, protocols, and standards

    CERN Document Server

    Güngör, V Çagri

    2013-01-01

    The collaborative nature of industrial wireless sensor networks (IWSNs) brings several advantages over traditional wired industrial monitoring and control systems, including self-organization, rapid deployment, flexibility, and inherent intelligent processing. In this regard, IWSNs play a vital role in creating more reliable, efficient, and productive industrial systems, thus improving companies' competitiveness in the marketplace. Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks: Applications, Protocols, and Standards examines the current state of the art in industrial wireless sensor networks and outline

  15. Comparison of Bruce treadmill exercise test protocols: is ramped Bruce equal or superior to standard bruce in producing clinically valid studies for patients presenting for evaluation of cardiac ischemia or arrhythmia with body mass index equal to or greater than 30?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bires, Angela Macci; Lawson, Dori; Wasser, Thomas E; Raber-Baer, Donna

    2013-12-01

    Clinically valid cardiac evaluation via treadmill stress testing requires patients to achieve specific target heart rates and to successfully complete the cardiac examination. A comparison of the standard Bruce protocol and the ramped Bruce protocol was performed using data collected over a 1-y period from a targeted patient population with a body mass index (BMI) equal to or greater than 30 to determine which treadmill protocol provided more successful examination results. The functional capacity, metabolic equivalent units achieved, pressure rate product, and total time on the treadmill as measured for the obese patients were clinically valid and comparable to normal-weight and overweight patients (P Bruce protocol achieved more consistent results in comparison across all BMI groups in achieving 80%-85% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate. This study did not adequately establish that the ramped Bruce protocol was superior to the standard Bruce protocol for the examination of patients with a BMI equal to or greater than 30.

  16. Comparison of a new whole-body continuous-table-movement protocol versus a standard whole-body MR protocol for the assessment of multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckbach, S; Michaely, H J; Stemmer, A; Schoenberg, S O; Dinter, D J

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate a whole body (WB) continuous-table-movement (CTM) MR protocol for the assessment of multiple myeloma (MM) in comparison to a step-by-step WB protocol. Eighteen patients with MM were examined at 1.5T using a WB CTM protocol (axial T2-w fs BLADE, T1-w GRE sequence) and a step-by-step WB protocol including coronal/sagittal T1-w SE and STIR sequences as reference. Protocol time was assessed. Image quality, artefacts, liver/spleen assessability, and the ability to depict bone marrow lesions less than or greater than 1 cm as well as diffuse infiltration and soft tissue lesions were rated. Potential changes in the Durie and Salmon Plus stage and the detectability of complications were assessed. Mean protocol time was 6:38 min (CTM) compared to 24:32 min (standard). Image quality was comparable. Artefacts were more prominent using the CTM protocol (P = 0.0039). Organ assessability was better using the CTM protocol (P < 0.001). Depiction of bone marrow and soft tissue lesions was identical without a staging shift. Vertebral fractures were not detected using the CTM protocol. The new protocol allows a higher patient throughput and facilitates the depiction of extramedullary lesions. However, as long as vertebral fractures are not detectable, the protocol cannot be safely used for clinical routine without the acquisition of an additional sagittal sequence.

  17. Comparison of a new whole-body continuous-table-movement protocol versus a standard whole-body MR protocol for the assessment of multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weckbach, S.; Michaely, H.J.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Dinter, D.J.; Stemmer, A.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate a whole body (WB) continuous-table-movement (CTM) MR protocol for the assessment of multiple myeloma (MM) in comparison to a step-by-step WB protocol. Eighteen patients with MM were examined at 1.5T using a WB CTM protocol (axial T2-w fs BLADE, T1-w GRE sequence) and a step-by-step WB protocol including coronal/sagittal T1-w SE and STIR sequences as reference. Protocol time was assessed. Image quality, artefacts, liver/spleen assessability, and the ability to depict bone marrow lesions less than or greater than 1 cm as well as diffuse infiltration and soft tissue lesions were rated. Potential changes in the Durie and Salmon Plus stage and the detectability of complications were assessed. Mean protocol time was 6:38 min (CTM) compared to 24:32 min (standard). Image quality was comparable. Artefacts were more prominent using the CTM protocol (P = 0.0039). Organ assessability was better using the CTM protocol (P < 0.001). Depiction of bone marrow and soft tissue lesions was identical without a staging shift. Vertebral fractures were not detected using the CTM protocol. The new protocol allows a higher patient throughput and facilitates the depiction of extramedullary lesions. However, as long as vertebral fractures are not detectable, the protocol cannot be safely used for clinical routine without the acquisition of an additional sagittal sequence. (orig.)

  18. [Neonatal circumcision with local anesthesia. Results of a standardized protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, Alejandra; López, Pedro-Jose; Guelfand, Miguel; Zubieta, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal circumcision is a common procedure in the US and other countries, with low rates of complications in trained hands. However, it has recently been incorporated into the clinical environment in Chile. Our goal was to establish a local standardised protocol for neonatal circumcision under local anaesthesia, and evaluate the results and possible complications. A standardised prospective protocol was used on patients who underwent neonatal circumcision. The inclusion criteria were: children local anaesthesia and penile block, attrition of redundant prepuce and mucosa with Mogen® clamp, and section with scalpel. The protocol was used and evaluated from November 2005 to October 2014 by a paediatric surgeon and/or paediatric urologist trained in the technique. Complications and conditions until final discharge were analysed. The protocol was applied to 108 patients over a 9year period. The mean age at procedure was 9days (1-52). One patient (0.9%) had immediate bleeding, requiring further surgery. All patients were discharged from further medical checks at 1 month, without any other complications. The reason for the procedure was by parental request in 100% of the cases, and always for sociocultural reasons. Neonatal circumcision under local anaesthesia is a simple procedure, and has excellent results in selected patients, and with no major complications. With proper training, and adapting the initial protocol, it can be performed on an outpatient basis, without putting the neonates through the risks of general anaesthesia. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Standardized food images: A photographing protocol and image database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Lisette; van Meer, Floor; van der Laan, Laura N; Viergever, Max A; Smeets, Paul A M

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of food intake has gained much research interest because of the current obesity epidemic. For research purposes, food images are a good and convenient alternative for real food because many dietary decisions are made based on the sight of foods. Food pictures are assumed to elicit anticipatory responses similar to real foods because of learned associations between visual food characteristics and post-ingestive consequences. In contemporary food science, a wide variety of images are used which introduces between-study variability and hampers comparison and meta-analysis of results. Therefore, we created an easy-to-use photographing protocol which enables researchers to generate high resolution food images appropriate for their study objective and population. In addition, we provide a high quality standardized picture set which was characterized in seven European countries. With the use of this photographing protocol a large number of food images were created. Of these images, 80 were selected based on their recognizability in Scotland, Greece and The Netherlands. We collected image characteristics such as liking, perceived calories and/or perceived healthiness ratings from 449 adults and 191 children. The majority of the foods were recognized and liked at all sites. The differences in liking ratings, perceived calories and perceived healthiness between sites were minimal. Furthermore, perceived caloric content and healthiness ratings correlated strongly (r ≥ 0.8) with actual caloric content in both adults and children. The photographing protocol as well as the images and the data are freely available for research use on http://nutritionalneuroscience.eu/. By providing the research community with standardized images and the tools to create their own, comparability between studies will be improved and a head-start is made for a world-wide standardized food image database. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of tailored neck-shoulder pain treatment based on a decision model guided by clinical assessments and standardized functional tests. A study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björklund Martin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major problem with rehabilitation interventions for neck pain is that the condition may have multiple causes, thus a single treatment approach is seldom efficient. The present study protocol outlines a single blinded randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of tailored treatment for neck-shoulder pain. The treatment is based on a decision model guided by standardized clinical assessment and functional tests with cut-off values. Our main hypothesis is that the tailored treatment has better short, intermediate and long-term effects than either non-tailored treatment or treatment-as-usual (TAU on pain and function. We sub-sequentially hypothesize that tailored and non-tailored treatment both have better effect than TAU. Methods/Design 120 working women with minimum six weeks of nonspecific neck-shoulder pain aged 20–65, are allocated by minimisation with the factors age, duration of pain, pain intensity and disability in to the groups tailored treatment (T, non-tailored treatment (NT or treatment-as-usual (TAU. Treatment is given to the groups T and NT for 11 weeks (27 sessions evenly distributed. An extensive presentation of the tests and treatment decision model is provided. The main treatment components are manual therapy, cranio-cervical flexion exercise and strength training, EMG-biofeedback training, treatment for cervicogenic headache, neck motor control training. A decision algorithm based on the baseline assessment determines the treatment components given to each participant of T- and NT-groups. Primary outcome measures are physical functioning (Neck Disability Index and average pain intensity last week (Numeric Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes are general improvement (Patient Global Impression of Change scale, symptoms (Profile Fitness Mapping neck questionnaire, capacity to work in the last 6 weeks (quality and quantity and pressure pain threshold of m. trapezius. Primary and secondary outcomes will

  1. Standards-Based Wireless Sensor Networking Protocols for Spaceflight Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Raymond S.

    2010-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have the capacity to revolutionize data gathering in both spaceflight and terrestrial applications. WSNs provide a huge advantage over traditional, wired instrumentation since they do not require wiring trunks to connect sensors to a central hub. This allows for easy sensor installation in hard to reach locations, easy expansion of the number of sensors or sensing modalities, and reduction in both system cost and weight. While this technology offers unprecedented flexibility and adaptability, implementing it in practice is not without its difficulties. Recent advances in standards-based WSN protocols for industrial control applications have come a long way to solving many of the challenges facing practical WSN deployments. In this paper, we will overview two of the more promising candidates - WirelessHART from the HART Communication Foundation and ISA100.11a from the International Society of Automation - and present the architecture for a new standards-based sensor node for networking and applications research.

  2. Security analysis of standards-driven communication protocols for healthcare scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Massimiliano; Pugliese, Rosario; Tiezzi, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    The importance of the Electronic Health Record (EHR), that stores all healthcare-related data belonging to a patient, has been recognised in recent years by governments, institutions and industry. Initiatives like the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) have been developed for the definition of standard methodologies for secure and interoperable EHR exchanges among clinics and hospitals. Using the requisites specified by these initiatives, many large scale projects have been set up for enabling healthcare professionals to handle patients' EHRs. The success of applications developed in these contexts crucially depends on ensuring such security properties as confidentiality, authentication, and authorization. In this paper, we first propose a communication protocol, based on the IHE specifications, for authenticating healthcare professionals and assuring patients' safety. By means of a formal analysis carried out by using the specification language COWS and the model checker CMC, we reveal a security flaw in the protocol thus demonstrating that to simply adopt the international standards does not guarantee the absence of such type of flaws. We then propose how to emend the IHE specifications and modify the protocol accordingly. Finally, we show how to tailor our protocol for application to more critical scenarios with no assumptions on the communication channels. To demonstrate feasibility and effectiveness of our protocols we have fully implemented them.

  3. Improving treatment times for patients with in-hospital stroke using a standardized protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koge, Junpei; Matsumoto, Shoji; Nakahara, Ichiro; Ishii, Akira; Hatano, Taketo; Sadamasa, Nobutake; Kai, Yasutoshi; Ando, Mitsushige; Saka, Makoto; Chihara, Hideo; Takita, Wataru; Tokunaga, Keisuke; Kamata, Takahiko; Nishi, Hidehisa; Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Tsujimoto, Atsushi; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Nagata, Izumi

    2017-10-15

    Previous reports have shown significant delays in treatment of in-hospital stroke (IHS). We developed and implemented our IHS alert protocol in April 2014. We aimed to determine the influence of implementation of our IHS alert protocol. Our implementation processes comprise the following four main steps: IHS protocol development, workshops for hospital staff to learn about the protocol, preparation of standardized IHS treatment kits, and obtaining feedback in a monthly hospital staff conference. We retrospectively compared protocol metrics and clinical outcomes of patients with IHS treated with intravenous thrombolysis and/or endovascular therapy between before (January 2008-March 2014) and after implementation (April 2014-December 2016). Fifty-five patients were included (pre, 25; post, 30). After the implementation, significant reductions occurred in the median time from stroke recognition to evaluation by a neurologist (30 vs. 13.5min, pvs. 26.5min, pvs. 16min, p=0.02). The median time from first neuroimaging to endovascular therapy had a tendency to decrease (75 vs. 53min, p=0.08). There were no differences in the favorable outcomes (modified Rankin scale score of 0-2) at discharge or the incidence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage between the two periods. Our IHS alert protocol implementation saved time in treating patients with IHS without compromising safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Standardized protocol for artery-only fingertip replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntic, Rudolf F; Brooks, Darrell

    2010-09-01

    Artery-only fingertip replantation can be reliable if low-resistance flow through the replant is maintained until venous outflow is restored naturally. Injuring the tip of the replant to promote ongoing bleeding augmented with anticoagulation usually accomplishes this; however, such management results in prolonged hospitalization. In this study, we analyzed the outcomes of artery-only fingertip replantation using a standardized postoperative protocol consisting of dextran-40, heparin, and leech therapy. Between 2001 and 2008, we performed 19 artery-only fingertip replants for 17 patients. All patients had the replanted nail plate removed and received intravenous dextran-40, heparin, and aspirin to promote fingertip bleeding and vascular outflow. Anticoagulation was titrated to promote a controlled bleed until physiologic venous outflow was restored by neovascularization. We used medicinal leeches and mechanical heparin scrubbing for acute decongestion. By postoperative day 6, bleeding was no longer promoted. We initiated fluorescent dye perfusion studies to assess circulatory competence and direct further anticoagulant intervention if necessary. The absence of bleeding associated with an initial rise followed by an appropriate fall in fluorescent dye concentration would trigger a weaning of anticoagulation. All of the 19 replants survived. The average length of hospital stay was 9 days (range, 7-17 d). Eleven patients received blood transfusions. The average transfusion was 1.8 units (range, 0-9 units). All patients were happy with the decision to replant, and the cosmetic result. A protocol that promotes temporary, controlled bleeding from the fingertip is protective of artery-only replants distal to the distal interphalangeal joint until physiologic venous outflow is restored. The protocol described is both safe and reliable. The patient should be informed that such replant attempts may result in the need for transfusions and extended hospital stays, factors that

  5. Two RFID standard-based security protocols for healthcare environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picazo-Sanchez, Pablo; Bagheri, Nasour; Peris-Lopez, Pedro; Tapiador, Juan E

    2013-10-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems are widely used in access control, transportation, real-time inventory and asset management, automated payment systems, etc. Nevertheless, the use of this technology is almost unexplored in healthcare environments, where potential applications include patient monitoring, asset traceability and drug administration systems, to mention just a few. RFID technology can offer more intelligent systems and applications, but privacy and security issues have to be addressed before its adoption. This is even more dramatical in healthcare applications where very sensitive information is at stake and patient safety is paramount. In Wu et al. (J. Med. Syst. 37:19, 43) recently proposed a new RFID authentication protocol for healthcare environments. In this paper we show that this protocol puts location privacy of tag holders at risk, which is a matter of gravest concern and ruins the security of this proposal. To facilitate the implementation of secure RFID-based solutions in the medical sector, we suggest two new applications (authentication and secure messaging) and propose solutions that, in contrast to previous proposals in this field, are fully based on ISO Standards and NIST Security Recommendations.

  6. Standardization of fertilization protocols for the European eel, Anguilla anguilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butts, Ian; Sørensen, Sune Riis; Politis, Sebastian Nikitas

    2014-01-01

    Standardization of artificial fertilization protocols for the European eel, Anguilla anguilla, is a prerequisite for optimizing the use of available gametes in hatchery facilities and for conserving sperm from high quality males, which is either cryopreserved or in living gene banks. The objectives...... of this research were to provide a rapid, accurate and precise method to quantify sperm density by examining the relationship between sperm density and absorbance by use of a spectrophotometer, determine the optimal number of sperm required to fertilize eggs in a controlled setting, and explore how long eggs...... are receptive to fertilization post-stripping. Mean sperm density and absorbance at 350nm were 1.54e+10±4.95e+9sperm/mL and 1.91±0.22nm, respectively. Regression analysis demonstrated a highly significant positive relationship between sperm density and absorbance using a spectrophotometer at 350nm (R2=0.94, p

  7. Standard of Nuclear Medicine Protocols. The 3rd revision, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    This document is designed to provide `Standard of Nuclear Medicine Protocols` revised in 1994. The present revision is aimed at providing new imaging agents (e.g, Tc-99m-HMPAO, Tc-99m-ECD, Tc-99m-technegas, Tc-99m MIBI, Tc-99m-tetrofosmin, I-123-BMIPP, and I-123-MIBG) and at introducing new application of conventional imaging agents. The descriptions are given under two sections: (I) standardization of imaging and (II) protocols for imaging of various organs. Section I covers static imaging, dynamic imaging, radioisotope angiography, SPECT, and collimators. In Section II, various imaging procedures are described as follows: (1) brain imaging, (2) brain perfusion imaging, (3) cistern imaging, (4) thyroid imaging, (5) imaging for metastatic foci from thyroid carcinoma, (6) parathyroid imaging, (7) lung perfusion imaging, (8) lung inhalation imaging, (9) lung ventilation imaging, (10) myocardial imaging, (11) myocardial metabolism imaging, (12) myocardial sympathetic functional imaging, (13) imaging for acute myocardial infarction, (14) blood pool imaging of the cardiac aorta, (15) RI venography, (16) hepato-splenic imaging, (17) hepato-biliary imaging, (18) imaging for the hepatic receptor, (19) hepatic RI angiography, (20) measurement of the portal-systemic shunt, (21) splenic imaging, (22) renal imaging, (23) vesicoureteral reflux imaging, (24) adrenal cortex imaging, (25) adrenal medulla imaging, (26) bone imaging, (27) bone joint imaging, (28) bone marrow imaging, (29) tumor imaging, (30) inflammatory imaging, (31) indium-labeled blood platelet imaging, (32) salivary imaging, (33) imaging of the Meckel`s diverticulum and ectopic gastric mucosa, (34) lymph node imaging, (35) lymphatic imaging, (36) imaging of the gastrointestinal hemorrhage, (37) testiclar imaging, (38) abdominal imaging, and (39) gastrointestinal movement imaging. (N.K.).

  8. 77 FR 24427 - Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ...] Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities AGENCY: Federal Energy... Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities, Order No. 676, FERC Stats... Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities, Order No. 676-F, FERC Stats. & Regs...

  9. Improving post-stroke dysphagia outcomes through a standardized and multidisciplinary protocol: an exploratory cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Smania, Nicola; Bisoffi, Giulia; Squaquara, Teresa; Zuccher, Paola; Mazzucco, Sara

    2014-12-01

    Stroke is a major cause of dysphagia. Few studies to date have reported on standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approaches to the management of post-stroke dysphagia. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the impact of a standardized multidisciplinary protocol on clinical outcomes in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. We performed retrospective chart reviews of patients with post-stroke dysphagia admitted to the neurological ward of Verona University Hospital from 2004 to 2008. Outcomes after usual treatment for dysphagia (T- group) were compared versus outcomes after treatment under a standardized diagnostic and rehabilitative multidisciplinary protocol (T+ group). Outcome measures were death, pneumonia on X-ray, need for respiratory support, and proportion of patients on tube feeding at discharge. Of the 378 patients admitted with stroke, 84 had dysphagia and were enrolled in the study. A significantly lower risk of in-hospital death (odds ratio [OR] 0.20 [0.53-0.78]), pneumonia (OR 0.33 [0.10-1.03]), need for respiratory support (OR 0.48 [0.14-1.66]), and tube feeding at discharge (OR 0.30 [0.09-0.91]) was recorded for the T+ group (N = 39) as compared to the T- group (N = 45). The adjusted OR showed no difference between the two groups for in-hospital death and tube feeding at discharge. Use of a standardized multidisciplinary protocolized approach to the management of post-stroke dysphagia may significantly reduce rates of aspiration pneumonia, in-hospital mortality, and tube feeding in dysphagic stroke survivors. Consistent with the study's exploratory purposes, our findings suggest that the multidisciplinary protocol applied in this study offers an effective model of management of post-stroke dysphagia.

  10. Raising standards in clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohmann, C.; Canham, S.; Demotes, J.

    2017-01-01

    The nature and the purpose of the ECRIN Data Centre Certification Programme are summarised, and a very brief description is given of the underlying standards (129 in total, divided into 19 separate lists). The certification activity performed so far is described. In a pilot phase 2 centres were c...

  11. Evaluation of Dogs with Border Collie Collapse, Including Response to Two Standardized Strenuous Exercise Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Susan; Shmon, Cindy; Su, Lillian; Epp, Tasha; Minor, Katie; Mickelson, James; Patterson, Edward; Shelton, G Diane

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and metabolic variables were evaluated in 13 dogs with border collie collapse (BCC) before, during, and following completion of standardized strenuous exercise protocols. Six dogs participated in a ball-retrieving protocol, and seven dogs participated in a sheep-herding protocol. Findings were compared with 16 normal border collies participating in the same exercise protocols (11 retrieving, five herding). Twelve dogs with BCC developed abnormal mentation and/or an abnormal gait during evaluation. All dogs had post-exercise elevations in rectal temperature, pulse rate, arterial blood pH, PaO2, and lactate, and decreased PaCO2 and bicarbonate, as expected with strenuous exercise, but there were no significant differences between BCC dogs and normal dogs. Electrocardiography demonstrated sinus tachycardia in all dogs following exercise. Needle electromyography was normal, and evaluation of muscle biopsy cryosections using a standard panel of histochemical stains and reactions did not reveal a reason for collapse in 10 dogs with BCC in which these tests were performed. Genetic testing excluded the dynamin-1 related exercise-induced collapse mutation and the V547A malignant hyperthermia mutation as the cause of BCC. Common reasons for exercise intolerance were eliminated. Although a genetic basis is suspected, the cause of collapse in BCC was not determined.

  12. The impact of a new standard labor protocol on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingran; Ye, Shenglong; Tao, Liyuan; Wang, Yongqing

    2017-12-01

    To analyze the clinical outcomes following the implementation of a new standard labor procedure. This was a retrospective analysis that included a study group consisting of patients managed based on a new standard labor protocol and a control group comprising patients managed under an old standard labor protocol. The following maternal and perinatal outcomes were compared in the two groups: the indications for a cesarean section and the incidence of cesarean section, postpartum hemorrhage, fetal distress, neonatal asphyxia and pediatric intervention. We also compared the average number of days spent in the hospital, the incidence of medical disputes and hospitalization expenses. The cesarean section rates for the study and control groups were 19.29% (401/2079) and 33.53% (753/2246), respectively (P labor, fetal distress and intrapartum fever; the percentages of each indication were significantly different from those of the control group (P labor protocol reduced the cesarean section rate without negatively impacting maternal and neonatal outcomes. In practice, bed turnover and the hospital utilization rate should be better controlled, patient-doctor communication should be strengthened and the quality of obstetrical service should be improved.

  13. Data distribution architecture based on standard real time protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.; Vega, J.; Pereira, A.; Portas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Data distribution architecture (DDAR) has been designed conforming to new requirements, taking into account the type of data that is going to be generated from experiments in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The main goal of this architecture is to implement a system that is able to manage on line all data that is being generated by an experiment, supporting its distribution for: processing, storing, analysing or visualizing. The first objective is to have a distribution architecture that supports long pulse experiments (even hours). The described system is able to distribute, using real time protocol (RTP), stored data or live data generated while the experiment is running. It enables researchers to access data on line instead of waiting for the end of the experiment. Other important objective is scalability, so the presented architecture can easily grow based on actual necessities, simplifying estimation and design tasks. A third important objective is security. In this sense, the architecture is based on standards, so complete security mechanisms can be applied, from secure transmission solutions until elaborated access control policies, and it is full compatible with multi-organization federation systems as PAPI or Shibboleth.

  14. Evaluation of dose reduction versus standard dosing for maintenance of remission in patients with spondyloarthritis and clinical remission with anti-TNF (REDES-TNF): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Caridad; Gratacós, Jordi; Torres, Ferran; Avendaño, Cristina; Sanz, Jesús; Vallano, Antoni; Juanola, Xavier; de Miguel, Eugenio; Sanmartí, Raimon; Calvo, Gonzalo

    2015-08-20

    Dose reduction schedules of tumor necrosis factor antagonists (anti-TNF) as maintenance therapy in patients with spondyloarthritis are used empirically in clinical practice, despite the lack of clinical trials providing evidence for this practice. To address this issue the Spanish Society of Rheumatology (SER) and Spanish Society of Clinical Pharmacology (SEFC) designed a 3-year multicenter, randomized, open-label, controlled clinical trial (2 years for inclusion and 1 year of follow-up). The study is expected to include 190 patients with axial spondyloarthritis on stable maintenance treatment (≥4 months) with any anti-TNF agent at doses recommended in the summary of product characteristics. Patients will be randomized to either a dose reduction arm or maintenance of the dosing regimen as per the official labelling recommendations. Randomization will be stratified according to the anti-TNF agent received before study inclusion. Patient follow-up, visit schedule, and examinations will be maintained as per normal clinical practice recommendations according to SER guidelines. The study aims to test the hypothesis of noninferiority of the dose reduction strategy compared with standard treatment. The first patients were recruited in July 2012, and study completion is scheduled for the end of April 2015. The REDES-TNF study is a pragmatic clinical trial that aims to provide evidence to support a medical decision now made empirically. The study results may help inform clinical decisions relevant to both patients and healthcare decision makers. EudraCT 2011-005871-18 (21 December 2011).

  15. Incorporating ethical principles into clinical research protocols: a tool for protocol writers and ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rebecca H; Wacholtz, Mary C; Barnes, Mark; Boggs, Liam; Callery-D'Amico, Susan; Davis, Amy; Digilova, Alla; Forster, David; Heffernan, Kate; Luthin, Maeve; Lynch, Holly Fernandez; McNair, Lindsay; Miller, Jennifer E; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Van Campen, Luann; Wilenzick, Mark; Wolf, Delia; Woolston, Cris; Aldinger, Carmen; Bierer, Barbara E

    2016-04-01

    A novel Protocol Ethics Tool Kit ('Ethics Tool Kit') has been developed by a multi-stakeholder group of the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard. The purpose of the Ethics Tool Kit is to facilitate effective recognition, consideration and deliberation of critical ethical issues in clinical trial protocols. The Ethics Tool Kit may be used by investigators and sponsors to develop a dedicated Ethics Section within a protocol to improve the consistency and transparency between clinical trial protocols and research ethics committee reviews. It may also streamline ethics review and may facilitate and expedite the review process by anticipating the concerns of ethics committee reviewers. Specific attention was given to issues arising in multinational settings. With the use of this Tool Kit, researchers have the opportunity to address critical research ethics issues proactively, potentially speeding the time and easing the process to final protocol approval. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Effect of a Standardized Protocol of Antibiotic Therapy on Surgical Site Infection after Laparoscopic Surgery for Complicated Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung-Chul; Kim, Min Jeong; Lee, Bong Hwa

    Although it is accepted that complicated appendicitis requires antibiotic therapy to prevent post-operative surgical infections, consensus protocols on the duration and regimens of treatment are not well established. This study aimed to compare the outcome of post-operative infectious complications in patients receiving old non-standardized and new standard antibiotic protocols, involving either 5 or 10 days of treatment, respectively. We enrolled 1,343 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for complicated appendicitis between January 2009 and December 2014. At the beginning of the new protocol, the patients were divided into two groups; 10 days of various antibiotic regimens (between January 2009 and June 2012, called the non-standardized protocol; n = 730) and five days of cefuroxime and metronidazole regimen (between July 2012 and December 2014; standardized protocol; n = 613). We compared the clinical outcomes, including surgical site infection (SSI) (superficial and deep organ/space infections) in the two groups. The standardized protocol group had a slightly shorter operative time (67 vs. 69 min), a shorter hospital stay (5 vs. 5.4 d), and lower medical cost (US$1,564 vs. US$1,654). Otherwise, there was no difference between the groups. No differences were found in the non-standardized and standard protocol groups with regard to the rate of superficial infection (10.3% vs. 12.7%; p = 0.488) or deep organ/space infection (2.3% vs. 2.1%; p = 0.797). In patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for complicated appendicitis, five days of cefuroxime and metronidazole did not lead to more SSIs, and it decreased the medical costs compared with non-standardized antibiotic regimens.

  17. Age and gender leucocytes variances and references values generated using the standardized ONE-Study protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kverneland, Anders H.; Streitz, Mathias; Geissler, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is now accepted as an ideal technology to reveal changes in immune cell composition and function. However, it is also an error-prone and variable technology, which makes it difficult to reproduce findings across laboratories. We have recently developed a strategy to standardize whole...... blood flow cytometry. The performance of our protocols was challenged here by profiling samples from healthy volunteers to reveal age- and gender-dependent differences and to establish a standardized reference cohort for use in clinical trials. Whole blood samples from two different cohorts were....... Males and females showed different dynamics in age-dependent T cell activation and differentiation, indicating faster immunosenescence in males. Importantly, although both cohorts consisted of a small sample size, our standardized approach enabled validation of age-dependent changes with the second...

  18. Protocol for Usability Testing and Validation of the ISO Draft International Standard 19223 for Lung Ventilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Clinicians, such as respiratory therapists and physicians, are often required to set up pieces of medical equipment that use inconsistent terminology. Current lung ventilator terminology that is used by different manufacturers contributes to the risk of usage errors, and in turn the risk of ventilator-associated lung injuries and other conditions. Human factors and communication issues are often associated with ventilator-related sentinel events, and inconsistent ventilator terminology compounds these issues. This paper describes our proposed protocol, which will be implemented at the University of Waterloo, Canada when this project is externally funded. Objective We propose to determine whether a standardized vocabulary improves the ease of use, safety, and utility as it relates to the usability of medical devices, compared to legacy medical devices from multiple manufacturers, which use different terms. Methods We hypothesize that usage errors by clinicians will be lower when standardization is consistently applied by all manufacturers. The proposed study will experimentally examine the impact of standardized nomenclature on performance declines in the use of an unfamiliar ventilator product in clinically relevant scenarios. Participants will be respiratory therapy practitioners and trainees, and we propose studying approximately 60 participants. Results The work reported here is in the proposal phase. Once the protocol is implemented, we will report the results in a follow-up paper. Conclusions The proposed study will help us better understand the effects of standardization on medical device usability. The study will also help identify any terms in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Draft International Standard (DIS) 19223 that may be associated with recurrent errors. Amendments to the standard will be proposed if recurrent errors are identified. This report contributes a protocol that can be used to assess the effect of

  19. Standards for Clinical Grade Genomic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohe, Sophia L; Carter, Alexis B; Pfeifer, John D; Crawford, James M; Cushman-Vokoun, Allison; Caughron, Samuel; Leonard, Debra G B

    2015-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing performed in a clinical environment must meet clinical standards, which requires reproducibility of all aspects of the testing. Clinical-grade genomic databases (CGGDs) are required to classify a variant and to assist in the professional interpretation of clinical next-generation sequencing. Applying quality laboratory standards to the reference databases used for sequence-variant interpretation presents a new challenge for validation and curation. To define CGGD and the categories of information contained in CGGDs and to frame recommendations for the structure and use of these databases in clinical patient care. Members of the College of American Pathologists Personalized Health Care Committee reviewed the literature and existing state of genomic databases and developed a framework for guiding CGGD development in the future. Clinical-grade genomic databases may provide different types of information. This work group defined 3 layers of information in CGGDs: clinical genomic variant repositories, genomic medical data repositories, and genomic medicine evidence databases. The layers are differentiated by the types of genomic and medical information contained and the utility in assisting with clinical interpretation of genomic variants. Clinical-grade genomic databases must meet specific standards regarding submission, curation, and retrieval of data, as well as the maintenance of privacy and security. These organizing principles for CGGDs should serve as a foundation for future development of specific standards that support the use of such databases for patient care.

  20. Protocol Standardization Reveals MV Correlation to Healthy Donor BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Hexley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microvesicles (MVs are cell-derived vesicles which are of interest in a clinical setting, as they may be predictive of early signs of disease and/or of treatment progression. However, there are growing concerns about using conventional flow cytometry (cFMC for the detection and quantification of microvesicles. These concerns range from error-sources in collection through to the physical limitations of detection. Here we present a standardized method for collection and analysis which shows that the MV numbers detected by cFCM correlate to donor Body Mass Index (BMI. Although unlikely to be comprehensive, we also demonstrate how cFCM is a useful and valid tool in the analysis of MVs.

  1. 75 FR 20901 - Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ...; Order No. 676-F] Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities... practices and electronic communications for public utilities)\\1\\ to incorporate by reference business... members. \\4\\ See Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities, Order...

  2. Clinical Simulation: A Protocol for Evaluation of Mobile Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Jensen, Sanne; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    For mobile technology to be accepted at point of care in healthcare environments there is a need to demonstrate benefits whilst ameliorating the risks and challenges. To provide a standardised approach to evaluation of mobile technology a simulation protocol was developed to provide guidance for its use in healthcare environments. Simulated conditions provide the opportunity to assess intended and unintended consequences and identify potential workarounds when using technology. The protocol can also be used to demonstrate the importance of the development of digital professionalism by end-users prior to students entering the clinical practice setting. The mobile technology protocol was adapted from a health information systems protocol developed and used at the ITX Lab, Denmark for use in other simulation laboratories. Use case scenarios were developed to enable evaluation of mobile technology for mobile learning of nurses, nurse supervisors, students and patients. The scenarios can be used in a range of simulated environments including hospital bedside, outpatient clinic or community settings. A case study exemplar of a nurse and patient is included to demonstrate how the mobile technology protocol can be applied.

  3. Blockchain protocols in clinical trials: Transparency and traceability of consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchoufi, Mehdi; Porcher, Raphael; Ravaud, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trial consent for protocols and their revisions should be transparent for patients and traceable for stakeholders. Our goal is to implement a process allowing for collection of patients' informed consent, which is bound to protocol revisions, storing and tracking the consent in a secure, unfalsifiable and publicly verifiable way, and enabling the sharing of this information in real time. For that, we build a consent workflow using a trending technology called Blockchain. This is a distributed technology that brings a built-in layer of transparency and traceability. From a more general and prospective point of view, we believe Blockchain technology brings a paradigmatical shift to the entire clinical research field. We designed a Proof-of-Concept protocol consisting of time-stamping each step of the patient's consent collection using Blockchain, thus archiving and historicising the consent through cryptographic validation in a securely unfalsifiable and transparent way. For each protocol revision, consent was sought again.  We obtained a single document, in an open format, that accounted for the whole consent collection process: a time-stamped consent status regarding each version of the protocol. This document cannot be corrupted and can be checked on any dedicated public website. It should be considered a robust proof of data. However, in a live clinical trial, the authentication system should be strengthened to remove the need for third parties, here trial stakeholders, and give participative control to the peer users. In the future, the complex data flow of a clinical trial could be tracked by using Blockchain, which core functionality, named Smart Contract, could help prevent clinical trial events not occurring in the correct chronological order, for example including patients before they consented or analysing case report form data before freezing the database. Globally, Blockchain could help with reliability, security, transparency and could be a

  4. Clinical evaluation of short 6-mm implants alone, short 8-mm implants combined with osteotome sinus floor elevation and standard 10-mm implants combined with osteotome sinus floor elevation in posterior maxillae: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun-Yu; Gu, Ying-Xin; Qiao, Shi-Chong; Zhuang, Long-Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Meng; Lai, Hong-Chang

    2015-07-30

    Nowadays, short dental implants are being increasingly applied in extremely resorbed posterior regions. The recent studies have indicated that short implants present a similar success rate to conventional implants. It is assumed that short implants can avoid additional surgical morbidity and are less technically demanding. However, high-quality evidence (≥ Ib: evidence from at least one randomized controlled trial) on comparing the clinical outcome of short implants and longer implants combined with osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE) technique is limited. The proposed study is designed as a prospective single-center, three-arm parallel group, randomized controlled trial. We plan to enroll 150 patients in need of dental implant treatment in the posterior maxilla. The inclusion criteria include: age ≧ 18 years, partial edentulism in the posterior maxilla for at least 3 months from tooth loss, residual bone height ranging from 6 to 8 mm, sufficient bone width (≥ 6 mm) in the edentulous region. The patients will be divided into three groups according to a table of random numbers: group 1: short implants (6 mm) alone; group 2: short implants (8 mm) combined with osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE); group 3: standard implants (10 mm) combined with OSFE. The assignment will be concealed from the clinical operators until the beginning of implant surgery. The outcome examiners and patients will be kept blinded to the assignment. Implant survival rates, implant success rates, complications, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) measurements, marginal bone level, treatment time and patient-reported outcome (visual analogue scale for intraoperative discomfort and postoperative pain) will be recorded. Clinical re-evaluations will be performed at 12, 24, 36 and 60 months after crown placement. The results of the trial will support better decision-making for dental implant treatment in atrophic maxillary ridges. If favorable, the use of short implants may avoid adjunct

  5. A standardized clinical evaluation of phenotypic diversity in diabetic polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Joachim; Rathmell, James P; David, William S; Chad, David A; Broderick, Alithia C; Perros, Stephen G; Shin, Naomi S; Wells, Jenna L; Davis, John B; DiMaggio, Charles J; Wang, Shuang; Tate, Simon N

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is a major cause of neuropathic pain and a frequent target condition in analgesic treatment trials. Differences in the clinical symptoms and signs associated with DPN suggest distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying nerve damage and dysfunction that are likely to have therapeutic relevance. The aim of this study was to develop a tool for the bedside assessment of painful neuropathies such as DPN that captures the diversity of phenotypes. Sixty-one patients with type 2 diabetes and painful neuropathy, 19 patients with painless DPN, 25 patients with type 2 diabetes but no clinical evidence of neuropathy, and 20 healthy control subjects completed a structured interview (47 items) and a standardized physical examination (39 items). After analyzing critical features of pain and painless symptoms and examining the outcome of physical tests of sensory function, we determined principal components of the phenotypic variance among patients. Increased sensitivity to mechanical or thermal stimuli and, to a lesser extent, the sensory quality of pain or paresthesia were the most discriminating elements of DPN phenotypes. Correlation patterns of symptoms and signs indicated the involvement of functionally distinct nerve fiber populations. We combined interview questions and physical tests identifying these differences in a shortened assessment protocol that we named Standardized Evaluation of Pain and Somatosensory Function (StEPS). The protocol StEPS generates a phenotypic profile of patients with neuropathy. Separate intensity ratings for spontaneous painful symptoms and pain evoked by standard stimuli support a detailed documentation of neuropathic pain and its response to analgesic treatment.

  6. Using standard treatment protocols to manage costs and quality of hospital services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J W; Feingold, M G

    1993-06-01

    The current health care environment has made it critically important that hospital costs and quality be managed in an integrated fashion. Promised health care reforms are expected to make cost reduction and quality enhancement only more important. Traditional methods of hospital cost and quality control have largely been replaced by such approaches as practice parameters, outcomes measurement, clinical indicators, clinical paths, benchmarking, patient-centered care, and a focus on patient selection criteria. This Special Report describes an integrated process for strategically managing costs and quality simultaneously, incorporating key elements of many important new quality and cost control tools. By using a multidisciplinary group process to develop standard treatment protocols, hospitals and their medical staffs address the most important services provided within major product lines. Using both clinical and financial data, groups of physicians, nurses, department managers, financial analysts, and administrators redesign key patterns of care within their hospital, incorporating the best practices of their own and other institutions. The outcome of this process is a new, standardized set of clinical guidelines that reduce unnecessary variation in care, eliminate redundant interventions, establish clear lines of communication for all caregivers, and reduce the cost of each stay. The hospital, medical staff, and patients benefit from the improved opportunities for managed care contracting, more efficient hospital systems, consensus-based quality measures, and reductions in the cost of care. STPs offer a workable and worthwhile approach to positioning the hospital of the 1990s for operational efficiency and cost and quality competitiveness.

  7. A Standard Mutual Authentication Protocol for Cloud Computing Based Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohit, Prerna; Amin, Ruhul; Karati, Arijit; Biswas, G P; Khan, Muhammad Khurram

    2017-04-01

    Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) supports a standard platform to the patient for getting necessary medical treatment from the doctor(s) via Internet communication. Security protection is important for medical records (data) of the patients because of very sensitive information. Besides, patient anonymity is another most important property, which must be protected. Most recently, Chiou et al. suggested an authentication protocol for TMIS by utilizing the concept of cloud environment. They claimed that their protocol is patient anonymous and well security protected. We reviewed their protocol and found that it is completely insecure against patient anonymity. Further, the same protocol is not protected against mobile device stolen attack. In order to improve security level and complexity, we design a light weight authentication protocol for the same environment. Our security analysis ensures resilience of all possible security attacks. The performance of our protocol is relatively standard in comparison with the related previous research.

  8. Telemetry Transmission over Internet Protocol (TMoIP) Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Gigabit Interface Converter (GBIC)/Small Form-factor Pluggable ( SFP ) connector interfaces be included in TMoIP equipment that implements fiber optic...Description Protocol: a format for describing streaming media parameters. SEQ NUMBER Sequence Number (field name reference) SFP Small Form-factor...Ethernet over twisted pair at 1000 Mbit/sec 802.3ab Optional Notes: a. To provide user flexibility, it is recommended that support for GBIC/ SFP

  9. [Process control in acute pain management. An analysis of the degree of organization of applied standard protocols].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlenwein, J; Emons, M I; Hecke, A; Nestler, N; Przemeck, M; Bauer, M; Meißner, W; Petzke, F

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the degree of organization of different standard protocols for acute pain management, as well as the derivation and definition of typical but structurally different models. A total of 85 hospitals provided their written standardized protocols for analysis. Protocols for defined target processes from 76 hospitals and another protocol used by more than one hospital were included into the analysis. The suggested courses of action were theoretically simulated to identify and characterize process types in a multistage evaluation process. The analysis included 148 standards. Four differentiated process types were defined ("standardized order", "analgesic ladder", "algorithm", "therapy path"), each with an increasing level of organization. These four types had the following distribution: 27 % (n = 40) "standardized order", 47 % (n = 70) "analgesic ladder", 22 % (n = 33) "algorithm", 4 % (n = 5) "therapy path". Models with a higher degree of organization included more control elements, such as action and intervention triggers or safety and supervisory elements, and were also associated with a formally better access to medication. For models with a lower degree of organization, immediate courses of action were more dependent on individual decisions. Although not quantifiable, this was particularly evident when simulating downstream courses of action. Interfaces between areas of hospital activity and a cross-departmental-boundary validity were only considered in a fraction of the protocols. Concepts from clinics with a certificate in (acute) pain management were more strongly process-oriented. For children, there were proportionately more simple concepts with a lower degree of organization and less controlling elements. This is the first analysis of a large sample of standardized protocols for acute pain management focusing on the degree of organization and the possible influence on courses of action. The analysis

  10. International Standardization of the Clinical Dosimetry of Beta Radiation Brachytherapy Sources: Progress of an ISO Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    In 2004 a new work item proposal (NWIP) was accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 85 (TC85 -- Nuclear Energy), Subcommittee 2 (Radiation Protection) for the development of a standard for the clinical dosimetry of beta radiation sources used for brachytherapy. To develop this standard, a new Working Group (WG 22 - Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry and Protocols in Medical Applications) was formed. The standard is based on the work of an ad-hoc working group initiated by the Dosimetry task group of the Deutsches Insitiut für Normung (DIN). Initially the work was geared mainly towards the needs of intravascular brachytherapy, but with the decline of this application, more focus has been placed on the challenges of accurate dosimetry for the concave eye plaques used to treat ocular melanoma. Guidance is given for dosimetry formalisms, reference data to be used, calibrations, measurement methods, modeling, uncertainty determinations, treatment planning and reporting, and clinical quality control. The document is currently undergoing review by the ISO member bodies for acceptance as a Committee Draft (CD) with publication of the final standard expected by 2007. There are opportunities for other ISO standards for medical dosimetry within the framework of WG22.

  11. Epidemiological cut-off values for Flavobacterium psychrophilum MIC data generated by a standard test protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, P.; Endris, R.; Kronvall, G.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological cut-off values were developed for application to antibiotic susceptibility data for Flavobacterium psychrophilum generated by standard CLSI test protocols. The MIC values for ten antibiotic agents against Flavobacterium psychrophilum were determined in two laboratories. For five a...

  12. Comparing Short Dental Implants to Standard Dental Implants: Protocol for a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokn, Amir Reza; Keshtkar, Abbasali; Monzavi, Abbas; Hashemi, Kazem; Bitaraf, Tahereh

    2018-01-18

    Short dental implants have been proposed as a simpler, cheaper, and faster alternative for the rehabilitation of atrophic edentulous areas to avoid the disadvantages of surgical techniques for increasing bone volume. This review will compare short implants (4 to 8 mm) to standard implants (larger than 8 mm) in edentulous jaws, evaluating on the basis of marginal bone loss (MBL), survival rate, complications, and prosthesis failure. We will electronically search for randomized controlled trials comparing short dental implants to standard dental implants in the following databases: PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov with English language restrictions. We will manually search the reference lists of relevant reviews and the included articles in this review. The following journals will also be searched: European Journal of Oral Implantology, Clinical Oral Implants Research, and Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research. Two reviewers will independently perform the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment (using the Cochrane Collaboration tool) of included studies. All meta-analysis procedures including appropriate effect size combination, sub-group analysis, meta-regression, assessing publication or reporting bias will be performed using Stata (Statacorp, TEXAS) version 12.1. Short implant effectiveness will be assessed using the mean difference of MBL in terms of weighted mean difference (WMD) and standardized mean difference (SMD) using Cohen's method. The combined effect size measures in addition to the related 95% confidence intervals will be estimated by a fixed effect model. The heterogeneity of the related effect size will be assessed using a Q Cochrane test and I2 measure. The MBL will be presented by a standardized mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. The survival rate of implants, prostheses failures, and complications will be reported using a risk

  13. Variation in institutional review board responses to a standard, observational, pediatric research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbach, Jonathan; Acholonu, Uchechi; Clark, Sunday; Camargo, Carlos A

    2007-04-01

    Multicenter studies are becoming more common, and variability in local institutional review board (IRB) assessments can be problematic. To investigate the variability of IRB responses to a multicenter observational study of children presenting to emergency departments. The authors collected the original IRB applications, subsequent correspondence, and a survey assessing submission timing and response and the nature of IRB queries. The study was conducted as part of the Emergency Medicine Network (http://www.emnet-usa.org). Of 37 sites initiating the IRB process, 34 (92%) participated in this IRB-approved study. Institutional review boards returned initial applications in a median of 19 days (IQR, 11-34 d), and 91% considered the protocol to be minimal risk. Of 34 submissions, 13 required no changes, 18 received conditional approvals, and 3 were deferred. The median time from initial submission to final approval was 42 days (IQR, 27-61 d). Seven sites did not participate in patient recruitment: two had institutional issues, one obtained IRB approval too late for participation, and four sites (12%) reported that IRB hurdles contributed to their lack of participation. Nonetheless, 68% of sites that recruited patients reported that the overall experience made them more likely to participate in future multicenter research. There was substantial variation in IRB assessment of a standard protocol in this study. The burden of the application process contributed to some investigators not participating, but the majority of investigators remain enthusiastic about multicenter research. A national IRB may streamline the review process and facilitate multicenter clinical research.

  14. Impact of standard test protocols on sporicidal efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesgate, R; Rauwel, G; Criquelion, J; Maillard, J-Y

    2016-07-01

    There has been an increase in the availability of commercial sporicidal formulations. Any comparison of sporicidal data from the literature is hampered by the number of different standard tests available and the use of diverse test conditions including bacterial strains and endospore preparation. To evaluate the effect of sporicidal standard tests on the apparent activity of eight biocides against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus subtilis. The activity of eight biocidal formulations including two oxidizing agents, two aldehydes, three didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) and amine formulations, and sodium hypochlorite were evaluated using four standard sporicidal tests (BS EN 14347, BS EN13704, ASTM E2197-11, and AOAC MB-15-03) against B. subtilis (ACTC 19659) and C. difficile (NCTC 11209) spores. C. difficile spores were more susceptible to the sporicides than were B. subtilis spores, regardless of the method used. There were differences in sporicidal activity between methods at 5 min but not at 60 min exposure. DDAC and amine-based products were not sporicidal when neutralized appropriately. Neutralization validation was confirmed for these biocides using the reporting format described in the BS EN standard tests, although the raw data appear to indicate that neutralization failed. The different methods, whether based on suspension or carrier tests, produced similar sporicidal inactivation data. This study suggests that detailed neutralization validation data should be reported to ensure that neutralization of active spores is effective. Failure to do so may lead to erroneous sporicidal claims. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing impacts of roads: application of a standard assessment protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duniway, Michael C.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive management of road networks depends on timely data that accurately reflect the impacts those systems are having on ecosystem processes and associated services. In the absence of reliable data, land managers are left with little more than observations and perceptions to support management decisions of road-associated disturbances. Roads can negatively impact the soil, hydrologic, plant, and animal processes on which virtually all ecosystem services depend. The Interpreting Indicators of Rangeland Health (IIRH) protocol is a qualitative method that has been demonstrated to be effective in characterizing impacts of roads. The goal of this study were to develop, describe, and test an approach for using IIRH to systematically evaluate road impacts across large, diverse arid and semiarid landscapes. We developed a stratified random sampling approach to plot selection based on ecological potential, road inventory data, and image interpretation of road impacts. The test application on a semiarid landscape in southern New Mexico, United States, demonstrates that the approach developed is sensitive to road impacts across a broad range of ecological sites but that not all the types of stratification were useful. Ecological site and road inventory strata accounted for significant variability in the functioning of ecological processes but stratification based on apparent impact did not. Analysis of the repeatability of IIRH applied to road plots indicates that the method is repeatable but consensus evaluations based on multiple observers should be used to minimize risk of bias. Landscape-scale analysis of impacts by roads of contrasting designs (maintained dirt or gravel roads vs. non- or infrequently maintained roads) suggests that future travel management plans for the study area should consider concentrating traffic on fewer roads that are well designed and maintained. Application of the approach by land managers will likely provide important insights into

  16. 78 FR 14654 - Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ...; Order No. 676-G] Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities... practices and electronic communications for public utilities to incorporate by reference updated business... regulations at 18 CFR 38.2(a) (which establish standards for business practices and electronic communications...

  17. Standardized cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR protocols, society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance: board of trustees task force on standardized protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Raymond J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Index 1. General techniques 1.1. Stress and safety equipment 1.2. Left ventricular (LV structure and function module 1.3. Right ventricular (RV structure and function module 1.4. Gadolinium dosing module. 1.5. First pass perfusion 1.6. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE 2. Disease specific protocols 2.1. Ischemic heart disease 2.1.1. Acute myocardial infarction (MI 2.1.2. Chronic ischemic heart disease and viability 2.1.3. Dobutamine stress 2.1.4. Adenosine stress perfusion 2.2. Angiography: 2.2.1. Peripheral magnetic resonance angiography (MRA 2.2.2. Thoracic MRA 2.2.3. Anomalous coronary arteries 2.2.4. Pulmonary vein evaluation 2.3. Other 2.3.1. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathy 2.3.2. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC 2.3.3. Congenital heart disease 2.3.4. Valvular heart disease 2.3.5. Pericardial disease 2.3.6. Masses

  18. Asynchronous transfer mode and Local Area Network emulation standards, protocols, and security implications

    OpenAIRE

    Kirwin, John P.

    1999-01-01

    A complex networking technology called Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) and a networking protocol called Local Area Network Emulation (LANE) are being integrated into many naval networks without any security-driven naval configuration guidelines. No single publication is available that describes security issues of data delivery and signaling relating to the transition of Ethernet to LANE and ATM. The thesis' focus is to provide: (1) an overview and security analysis of standardized protocols ...

  19. A standard operating protocol (SOP) and minimum data set (MDS) for nursing and medical handover: considerations for flexible standardization in developing electronic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul; Wong, Ming Chao; Yee, Kwang Chien

    2009-01-01

    As part of Australia's participation in the World Health Organization, the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) is the leading federal government technical agency involved in the area of clinical handover improvement. The ACSQHC has funded a range of handover improvement projects in Australia including one at the Royal Hobart Hospital (RHH), Tasmania. The RHH project aims to investigate the potential for generalizable and transferable clinical handover solutions throughout the medical and nursing disciplines. More specifically, this project produced an over-arching minimum data set (MDS) and over-arching standardized operating protocol (SOP) based on research work on nursing and medical shift-to-shift clinical handover in general medicine, general surgery and emergency medicine. The over-arching MDS consists of five headings: situational awareness, patient identification, history and information, responsibility and tasks and accountability. The over-arching SOP has five phases: preparation; design; implementation; evaluation; and maintenance. This paper provides an overview of the project and the approach taken. It considers the implications of these standardized operating protocols and minimum data sets for developing electronic clinical handover support tools. Significantly, the paper highlights a human-centred design approach that actively involves medical and nursing staff in data collection, analysis, interpretation, and systems design. This approach reveals the dangers of info-centrism when considering electronic tools, as information emerges as the only factor amongst many others that influence the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical handover.

  20. A framework for the definition of standardized protocols for measuring upper-extremity kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxis, A; Cutti, A G; Johnson, G R; Veeger, H E J

    2009-03-01

    Increasing interest in upper extremity biomechanics has led to closer investigations of both segment movements and detailed joint motion. Unfortunately, conceptual and practical differences in the motion analysis protocols used up to date reduce compatibility for post data and cross validation analysis and so weaken the body of knowledge. This difficulty highlights a need for standardised protocols, each addressing a set of questions of comparable content. The aim of this work is therefore to open a discussion and propose a flexible framework to support: (1) the definition of standardised protocols, (2) a standardised description of these protocols, and (3) the formulation of general recommendations. Proposal of a framework for the definition of standardized protocols. The framework is composed by two nested flowcharts. The first defines what a motion analysis protocol is by pointing out its role in a motion analysis study. The second flowchart describes the steps to build a protocol, which requires decisions on the joints or segments to be investigated and the description of their mechanical equivalent model, the definition of the anatomical or functional coordinate frames, the choice of marker or sensor configuration and the validity of their use, the definition of the activities to be measured and the refinements that can be applied to the final measurements. Finally, general recommendations are proposed for each of the steps based on the current literature, and open issues are highlighted for future investigation and standardisation. Standardisation of motion analysis protocols is urgent. The proposed framework can guide this process through the rationalisation of the approach.

  1. Protocol Adherence for Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Management in the Emergency Department; a Clinical Audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Alavi-Moghaddam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although significant development in the field of medicine is achieved, sepsis is still a major issue threatening humans’ lives. This study was aimed to audit the management of severe sepsis and septic shock patients in emergency department (ED according to the present standard guidelines.Method: This is a prospective audit on approaching adult septic patients who were admitted to ED. The audit checklist was created based on the protocols of Surviving Sepsis Campaign and British Royal College recommendations. The mean knowledge score and the compliance rate of studied measures regarding standard protocols were calculated using SPSS version 21.Results: 30 emergency medicine residents were audited (63.3% male. The mean knowledge score of studied residents regarding standard guidelines were 5.07 ± 1.78 (IQR = 2 in pre education and 8.17 ± 1.31 (IQR = 85 in post education phase (p < 0.001. There was excellent compliance with standard in 4 (22% studied measures, good in 2 (11%, fair in 1 (6%, weak in 2 (11%, and poor in 9 (50%. 64% of poor compliance measures correlated to therapeutic factors. After training, score of 5 measures including checking vital signs in < 20 minute, central vein pressure measurement in < 1 hour, blood culture request, administration of vasopressor agents, and high flow O2 therapy were improved clinically, but not statistically.Conclusion: The protocol adherence in management of severe sepsis and septic shock for urine output measurement, central venous pressure monitoring, administration of inotrope agents, blood transfusion, intravenous antibiotic and hydration therapy, and high flow O2 delivery were disappointingly low. It seems training workshops and implementation of Clinical audit can improve residents’ adherence to current standard guidelines regarding severe sepsis and septic shock.

  2. Emotional assistance in thalassaemia: pilot implementation of a standard protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Veit

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to describe the creation process of standard procedures to make possible multicentre studies related to emotional aspects of thalassaemic patients, their families and caregivers; and the pilot phase of the routine implementation. The objectives defined to perform this goal are: i develop routines to assess and manage/treat emotional issues; ii adjust the ABRASTA - Brazilian Association of Thalassaemia computer system to the input of collected data and its compilation; iii conduct a pilot implementation of the routines; iv discuss the whole process and propose next steps. Forty patients were assisted following the above mentioned routines of psychological evaluation, follow-up assistance and management of specific emotional issues. Conclusions are that the routines are adequate to enable multicenter research to compare findings and develop specific interventions to Thalassaemia patients, their families and caregivers; information gathered through them is an important means of supporting medical doctors and other members of the professional team, both in the therapeutic planning and in the communication process with patients and families; finally, considering the nature of the information, psychologists and psychiatrists are the most indicated professionals to perform the assessment and the interventions related to emotional issues, due to their professional background, training and specific skills that allow a free and candid communication with the patients and their families. 本研究旨在描述标准程序的创造过程,来进行关于地中海贫血患者、其家属和照顾者情感方面可能的多中心研究;以及例程实施的试点阶段。 为实现此目的而定下的目标有: 1)制定例程评估和管理/处理情感问题;2)调整巴西地中海贫血病协会(ABRASTA)计算机系统, 输入收集到的数据并对其进行编辑;3)对例程进行试点实施;4)讨论整个过

  3. Comparing Short Dental Implants to Standard Dental Implants: Protocol for a Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokn, Amir Reza; Keshtkar, Abbasali; Monzavi, Abbas; Hashemi, Kazem

    2018-01-01

    Background Short dental implants have been proposed as a simpler, cheaper, and faster alternative for the rehabilitation of atrophic edentulous areas to avoid the disadvantages of surgical techniques for increasing bone volume. Objective This review will compare short implants (4 to 8 mm) to standard implants (larger than 8 mm) in edentulous jaws, evaluating on the basis of marginal bone loss (MBL), survival rate, complications, and prosthesis failure. Methods We will electronically search for randomized controlled trials comparing short dental implants to standard dental implants in the following databases: PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ClinicalTrials.gov with English language restrictions. We will manually search the reference lists of relevant reviews and the included articles in this review. The following journals will also be searched: European Journal of Oral Implantology, Clinical Oral Implants Research, and Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research. Two reviewers will independently perform the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment (using the Cochrane Collaboration tool) of included studies. All meta-analysis procedures including appropriate effect size combination, sub-group analysis, meta-regression, assessing publication or reporting bias will be performed using Stata (Statacorp, TEXAS) version 12.1. Results Short implant effectiveness will be assessed using the mean difference of MBL in terms of weighted mean difference (WMD) and standardized mean difference (SMD) using Cohen’s method. The combined effect size measures in addition to the related 95% confidence intervals will be estimated by a fixed effect model. The heterogeneity of the related effect size will be assessed using a Q Cochrane test and I2 measure. The MBL will be presented by a standardized mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. The survival rate of implants, prostheses failures, and

  4. Gauging megadiversity with optimized and standardized sampling protocols: A case for tropical forest spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba; Scharff, Nikolaj; Pape, Thomas; Coddington, Jonathan A; Cardoso, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing and monitoring biodiversity and assessing its drivers require accurate and comparable data on species assemblages, which, in turn, should rely on efficient and standardized field collection. Unfortunately, protocols that follow such criteria remain scarce and it is unclear whether they can be applied to megadiverse communities, whose study can be particularly challenging. Here, we develop and evaluate the first optimized and standardized sampling protocol for megadiverse communities, using tropical forest spiders as a model taxon. We designed the protocol COBRA-TF (Conservation Oriented Biodiversity Rapid Assessment for Tropical Forests) using a large dataset of semiquantitative field data from different continents. This protocol combines samples of different collecting methods to obtain as many species as possible with minimum effort (optimized) and widest applicability and comparability (standardized). We ran sampling simulations to assess the efficiency of COBRA-TF (optimized, non-site-specific) and its reliability for estimating taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional diversity, and community structure by comparing it with (1) commonly used expert-based ad hoc protocols (nonoptimized, site-specific) and (2) optimal protocols (optimized, site-specific). We then tested the performance and feasibility of COBRA-TF in the field. COBRA-TF yielded similar results as ad hoc protocols for species (observed and estimated) and family richness, phylogenetic and functional diversity, and species abundance distribution. Optimal protocols detected more species than COBRA-TF. Data from the field test showed high sampling completeness and yielded low numbers of singletons and doubletons. Optimized and standardized protocols can be as effective in sampling and studying megadiverse communities as traditional sampling, while allowing data comparison. Although our target taxa are spiders, COBRA-TF can be modified to apply to any highly diverse taxon and habitat as

  5. P-02: Echocardiography Has Low Clinical Efficacy of Libyan Screening Protocol in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaheddin Sharif

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTIONPre-participation screening has been largely accepted as a means to identify those athletes at risk of cardiovascular diseases which are responsible for sudden cardiac death. The objectives of athlete screening are to reduce injuries and prevent sudden. However, there is no single commonly adopted protocol to screen athletes. Although the European Society of Cardiology and the American Heart Association recommend the routine screening of athletes to prevent sudden death, there is significant disagreement regarding use 12 lead ECG. FIFA has recommend the inclusion of an Echocardiography (ECHO in screening protocol.PURPOSEExplore the debate regarding differences between European and the USA pre-participation screening protocol for sudden death while also considering pre-competition medical assessment protocol used by the Libyan Football Federation. To provide evidence based recommendations on the best protocol to be used for pre-participation screening, and thus to standardize the screening method.MATERIALS and METHOD1236 male athletic received a medical history, general physical examination, cardiovascular and musculoskeletal examination, 12 lead ECG, blood laboratory test, and echocardiography.FINDINGS1235 athletics were found to be eligible to participate in sport and were given a full medical clearance. One athletic was diagnosed with second degree heart block by ECG while his medical history, physical examination, echocardiograph, and blood test were normal.DISCUSSIONEchocardiography alone do did not identify pathological condition and using echocardiography is still controversial and clinically not effective in young athletesCONCLUSIONThe Screening protocol should include a combination of medical history, physical examination and ECG due to the high sensitivity found, and thus it was able to identify all athletes at risk for the disease.

  6. ACR/NEMA Digital Image Interface Standard (An Illustrated Protocol Overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, G. Robert

    1985-09-01

    The American College of Radiologists (ACR) and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) have sponsored a joint standards committee mandated to develop a universal interface standard for the transfer of radiology images among a variety of PACS imaging devicesl. The resulting standard interface conforms to the ISO/OSI standard reference model for network protocol layering. The standard interface specifies the lower layers of the reference model (Physical, Data Link, Transport and Session) and implies a requirement of the Network Layer should a requirement for a network exist. The message content has been considered and a flexible message and image format specified. The following Imaging Equipment modalities are supported by the standard interface... CT Computed Tomograpy DS Digital Subtraction NM Nuclear Medicine US Ultrasound MR Magnetic Resonance DR Digital Radiology The following data types are standardized over the transmission interface media.... IMAGE DATA DIGITIZED VOICE HEADER DATA RAW DATA TEXT REPORTS GRAPHICS OTHERS This paper consists of text supporting the illustrated protocol data flow. Each layer will be individually treated. Particular emphasis will be given to the Data Link layer (Frames) and the Transport layer (Packets). The discussion utilizes a finite state sequential machine model for the protocol layers.

  7. Telemetry Standards, IRIG Standard 106-17, Chapter 22, Network Based Protocol Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    structure, field definitions , and media access control (MAC) conventions specified in IEEE 802.3-2012, Section 1, Clauses 2, 3, and 4. Data link...support for ICMP broadcast pings. 22.3.1.2 Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) NetworkNodes that consume or forward dynamically configured IPv4...selection of the exact SSL and TLS versions to use. Certificate generation and exchanges shall be in accordance with the profile identified in RFC

  8. Protocol of the COSMIN study: COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick DL

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choosing an adequate measurement instrument depends on the proposed use of the instrument, the concept to be measured, the measurement properties (e.g. internal consistency, reproducibility, content and construct validity, responsiveness, and interpretability, the requirements, the burden for subjects, and costs of the available instruments. As far as measurement properties are concerned, there are no sufficiently specific standards for the evaluation of measurement properties of instruments to measure health status, and also no explicit criteria for what constitutes good measurement properties. In this paper we describe the protocol for the COSMIN study, the objective of which is to develop a checklist that contains COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments, including explicit criteria for satisfying these standards. We will focus on evaluative health related patient-reported outcomes (HR-PROs, i.e. patient-reported health measurement instruments used in a longitudinal design as an outcome measure, excluding health care related PROs, such as satisfaction with care or adherence. The COSMIN standards will be made available in the form of an easily applicable checklist. Method An international Delphi study will be performed to reach consensus on which and how measurement properties should be assessed, and on criteria for good measurement properties. Two sources of input will be used for the Delphi study: (1 a systematic review of properties, standards and criteria of measurement properties found in systematic reviews of measurement instruments, and (2 an additional literature search of methodological articles presenting a comprehensive checklist of standards and criteria. The Delphi study will consist of four (written Delphi rounds, with approximately 30 expert panel members with different backgrounds in clinical medicine, biostatistics, psychology, and epidemiology. The final checklist will

  9. Inter-laboratory variation in DNA damage using a standard comet assay protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Ersson, Clara; Loft, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    There are substantial inter-laboratory variations in the levels of DNA damage measured by the comet assay. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adherence to a standard comet assay protocol would reduce inter-laboratory variation in reported values of DNA damage. Fourteen laboratories ...

  10. Standard Protocol and Quality Assessment of Soil Phosphorus Speciation by P K-Edge XANES Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Florian; Prietzel, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Phosphorus (P) in soils is most often bound as phosphate to one or more of the following four elements or compounds: calcium, aluminum, iron, and soil organic matter. A promising method for direct P speciation in soils is synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the K-edge of P. However, the quality of this method is debated controversially, partly because a standard protocol for reproducible spectrum deconvolution is lacking and minor modifications of the applied deconvolution procedure can lead to considerable changes in the P speciation results. On the basis of the observation that appropriate baseline correction and edge-step normalization are crucial for correct linear combination (LC) fitting results, we established a standard protocol for the deconvolution and LC fitting of P K-edge XANES spectra. We evaluated the quality of LC fits obtained according to this standard protocol with 16 defined dilute (2 mg P g(-1)) ternary mixtures of aluminum phosphate, iron phosphate, hydroxyapatite, and phytic acid in a quartz matrix. The LC fitting results were compared with the contribution of the different P compounds to total P in the various mixtures. Compared to using a traditional LC fitting procedure, our standard protocol reduced the fitting error by 6% (absolute). However, P portions smaller than 5% should be confirmed with other methods or excluded from the P speciation results. A publicly available database of P K-edge XANES reference spectra was initiated.

  11. Protocol Adherence for Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Management in the Emergency Department; a Clinical Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi-Moghaddam, Mostafa; Anvari, Ali; Soltani Delgosha, Reaza; Kariman, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    Although significant development in the field of medicine is achieved, sepsis is still a major issue threatening humans' lives. This study was aimed to audit the management of severe sepsis and septic shock patients in emergency department (ED) according to the present standard guidelines. This is a prospective audit on approaching adult septic patients who were admitted to ED. The audit checklist was created based on the protocols of Surviving Sepsis Campaign and British Royal College recommendations. The mean knowledge score and the compliance rate of studied measures regarding standard protocols were calculated using SPSS version 21. 30 emergency medicine residents were audited (63.3% male). The mean knowledge score of studied residents regarding standard guidelines were 5.07 ± 1.78 (IQR = 2) in pre education and 8.17 ± 1.31 (IQR = 85) in post education phase (p management of severe sepsis and septic shock for urine output measurement, central venous pressure monitoring, administration of inotrope agents, blood transfusion, intravenous antibiotic and hydration therapy, and high flow O 2 delivery were disappointingly low. It seems training workshops and implementation of Clinical audit can improve residents' adherence to current standard guidelines regarding severe sepsis and septic shock.

  12. Dual-energy CT workflow: multi-institutional consensus on standardization of abdominopelvic MDCT protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavik N; Alexander, Lauren; Allen, Brian; Berland, Lincoln; Borhani, Amir; Mileto, Achille; Moreno, Courtney; Morgan, Desiree; Sahani, Dushyant; Shuman, William; Tamm, Eric; Tublin, Mitchell; Yeh, Benjamin; Marin, Daniele

    2017-03-01

    To standardize workflow for dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) involving common abdominopelvic exam protocols. 9 institutions (4 rsDECT, 1 dsDECT, 4 both) with 32 participants [average # years (range) in practice and DECT experience, 12.3 (1-35) and 4.6 (1-14), respectively] filled out a single survey (n = 9). A five-point agreement scale (0, 1, 2, 3, 4-contra-, not, mildly, moderately, strongly indicated, respectively) and utilization scale (0-not performing and shouldn't; 1-performing but not clinically useful; 2-performing but not sure if clinically useful; 3-not performing it but would like to; 4-performing and clinically useful) were used. Consensus was considered with a score of ≥2.5. Survey results were discussed over three separate live webinar sessions. 5/9 (56%) institutions exclude large patients from DECT. 2 (40%) use weight, 2 (40%) use transverse dimension, and 1 (20%) uses both. 7/9 (78%) use 50 keV for low and 70 keV for medium monochromatic reconstructed images. DECT is indicated for dual liver [agreement score (AS) 3.78; utilization score (US) 3.22] and dual pancreas in the arterial phase (AS 3.78; US 3.11), mesenteric ischemia/gastrointestinal bleeding in both the arterial and venous phases (AS 2.89; US 2.79), RCC exams in the arterial phase (AS 3.33; US 2.78), and CT urography in the nephrographic phase (AS 3.11; US 2.89). DECT for renal stone and certain single-phase exams is indicated (AS 3.00). DECT is indicated during the arterial phase for multiphasic abdominal exams, nephrographic phase for CTU, and for certain single-phase and renal stone exams.

  13. PROPOSAL OF GUIDELINE FOR CLINICAL TRIAL PROTOCOLS WITH HERBAL DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migdacelys Arboláez Estrada.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYCuba has extensive experience about herbal drugs, however only a few products get to the clinical phase of drug development. Our objective was to design new guidelines for clinical trials with herbal drugs.A detailed bibliographic search about regulatory aspects about clinical trials in Cuba and the world was done for development of the guideline. The guideline's proposed format includes: 1 Index, including the classification of the content. 2 Summary, 3 Fifteen chapters, related to the clinical trials. The guideline also propose the inclusion of annexes.A new guideline containing 15 chapters allows for writing more clear and detailed clinical trial protocols. The guideline contains the information required to guide the research staff who is interested in the validation of herbal drugs pharmacological activations from the perspective of clinical trials. RESUMEN Cuba tiene experiencia extensa sobre plantas medicinales, aunque solo algunos productos llegan a una fase clínica del desarrollo. Nuestro objetivo fué diseñar una nueva guía para ensayos clínicos con plantas medicinales.Hemos realizado una detallada búsqueda bibliográfica sobre aspectos reguladores de ensayos clínicos en Cuba y el resto del mundo para el desarrollo de la guía. El formato propuesto de la guia incluye: 1 Índice, incluyendo la clasificación de los contenidos. 2 Resumen, 3 Quince capítulos, relacionados con los ensayos clínicos. La guía también propone la inclusión de anexos.La nueva guía que contiene 15 capítulos que orientan la redacción de protocolos de ensayos clínicos más claros y más detallados. La guía contiene la información requerida para orientar al personal investigador interesado en la validación de la actividad farmacológica de las plantas medicinales desde la perspectiva de los ensayos clínicos.

  14. Wireless networking for the dental office: current wireless standards and security protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Arora, Sarika

    2004-11-15

    Digital radiography has gained immense popularity in dentistry today in spite of the early difficulty for the profession to embrace the technology. The transition from film to digital has been happening at a faster pace in the fields of Orthodontics, Oral Surgery, Endodontics, Periodontics, and other specialties where the radiographic images (periapical, bitewing, panoramic, cephalometric, and skull radiographs) are being acquired digitally, stored within a server locally, and eventually accessed for diagnostic purposes, along with the rest of the patient data via the patient management software (PMS). A review of the literature shows the diagnostic performance of digital radiography is at least comparable to or even better than that of conventional radiography. Similarly, other digital diagnostic tools like caries detectors, cephalometric analysis software, and digital scanners were used for many years for the diagnosis and treatment planning purposes. The introduction of wireless charged-coupled device (CCD) sensors in early 2004 (Schick Technologies, Long Island City, NY) has moved digital radiography a step further into the wireless era. As with any emerging technology, there are concerns that should be looked into before adapting to the wireless environment. Foremost is the network security involved in the installation and usage of these wireless networks. This article deals with the existing standards and choices in wireless technologies that are available for implementation within a contemporary dental office. The network security protocols that protect the patient data and boost the efficiency of modern day dental clinics are enumerated.

  15. A standard protocol for describing individual-based and agent-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Volker; Berger, Uta; Bastiansen, Finn; Eliassen, Sigrunn; Ginot, Vincent; Giske, Jarl; Goss-Custard, John; Grand, Tamara; Heinz, Simone K.; Huse, Geir; Huth, Andreas; Jepsen, Jane U.; Jorgensen, Christian; Mooij, Wolf M.; Muller, Birgit; Pe'er, Guy; Piou, Cyril; Railsback, Steven F.; Robbins, Andrew M.; Robbins, Martha M.; Rossmanith, Eva; Ruger, Nadja; Strand, Espen; Souissi, Sami; Stillman, Richard A.; Vabo, Rune; Visser, Ute; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    Simulation models that describe autonomous individual organisms (individual based models, IBM) or agents (agent-based models, ABM) have become a widely used tool, not only in ecology, but also in many other disciplines dealing with complex systems made up of autonomous entities. However, there is no standard protocol for describing such simulation models, which can make them difficult to understand and to duplicate. This paper presents a proposed standard protocol, ODD, for describing IBMs and ABMs, developed and tested by 28 modellers who cover a wide range of fields within ecology. This protocol consists of three blocks (Overview, Design concepts, and Details), which are subdivided into seven elements: Purpose, State variables and scales, Process overview and scheduling, Design concepts, Initialization, Input, and Submodels. We explain which aspects of a model should be described in each element, and we present an example to illustrate the protocol in use. In addition, 19 examples are available in an Online Appendix. We consider ODD as a first step for establishing a more detailed common format of the description of IBMs and ABMs. Once initiated, the protocol will hopefully evolve as it becomes used by a sufficiently large proportion of modellers.

  16. A proposed protocol for hand and table sanitizing in chiropractic clinics and education institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Marion Willard; Ramcharan, Michael; Floyd, Rod; Globe, Gary; Ndetan, Harrison; Williams, Ronald; Ivie, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective By nature, chiropractic is a hands-on profession using manipulation applied to the joints with direct skin-to-skin contacts. Chiropractic tables are designed with a face piece to accommodate the prone patient's head in a neutral position and hand rests to allow for relaxed shoulders and upper spine so treatment is facilitated. The purpose of this article is to present a proposed guideline for hand and treatment table surface sanitizing for the chiropractic profession that is evidence-based and can easily be adopted by teaching institutions and doctors in the field. Methods A review of the chiropractic literature demonstrated that pathogenic microbes are present on treatment tables in teaching clinics at multiple facilities, yet no standardized protocols exist in the United States regarding table sanitizing and hand hygiene in chiropractic clinics or education institutions. This article reviews the scientific literature on the subject by using several search engines, databases, and specific reviews of documents pertaining to the topic including existing general guidelines. Results The literature has several existing guidelines that the authors used to develop a proposed protocol for hand and table sanitizing specific to the chiropractic profession. Recommendations were developed and are presented on hand hygiene and table sanitizing procedures that could lower the risk of infection for both clinical personnel and patients in chiropractic facilities. Conclusion This article offers a protocol for hand and table sanitizing in chiropractic clinics and education institutions. The chiropractic profession should consider adoption of these or similar measures and disseminate them to teaching clinics, institutions, and private practitioners. PMID:19646384

  17. Normalization of cortical thickness measurements across different T1 magnetic resonance imaging protocols by novel W-Score standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jinyong; Yoo, Kwangsun; Lee, Peter; Kim, Chan Mi; Roh, Jee Hoon; Park, Ji Eun; Kim, Sang Joon; Seo, Sang Won; Shin, Jeong-Hyeon; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Jeong, Yong

    2017-10-01

    The use of different 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance (T1 MR) imaging protocols induces image incompatibility across multicenter studies, negating the many advantages of multicenter studies. A few methods have been developed to address this problem, but significant image incompatibility still remains. Thus, we developed a novel and convenient method to improve image compatibility. W-score standardization creates quality reference values by using a healthy group to obtain normalized disease values. We developed a protocol-specific w-score standardization to control the protocol effect, which is applied to each protocol separately. We used three data sets. In dataset 1, brain T1 MR images of normal controls (NC) and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from two centers, acquired with different T1 MR protocols, were used (Protocol 1 and 2, n = 45/group). In dataset 2, data from six subjects, who underwent MRI with two different protocols (Protocol 1 and 2), were used with different repetition times, echo times, and slice thicknesses. In dataset 3, T1 MR images from a large number of healthy normal controls (Protocol 1: n = 148, Protocol 2: n = 343) were collected for w-score standardization. The protocol effect and disease effect on subjects' cortical thickness were analyzed before and after the application of protocol-specific w-score standardization. As expected, different protocols resulted in differing cortical thickness measurements in both NC and AD subjects. Different measurements were obtained for the same subject when imaged with different protocols. Multivariate pattern difference between measurements was observed between the protocols. Classification accuracy between two protocols was nearly 90%. After applying protocol-specific w-score standardization, the differences between the protocols substantially decreased. Most importantly, protocol-specific w-score standardization reduced both univariate and multivariate differences in the images while

  18. Proposed standardization of assessment protocols for plant molluscicides for use in self-help control programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackenbury, T D

    1998-10-01

    Several candidate plant molluscicides have been identified for possible incorporation into self-help control programmes against schistosomiasis, but their full potential has yet to be realised. This has been, in the most part, due to the absence of standardized assessment and toxicity protocols, and subsequently the inability to register crude plant products in their country of origin or internationally. In an attempt to solve this dilemma, a series of protocols has been designed which will provide a useful standardized guideline for investigations into plant molluscicides, as well as precipitate moves towards the establishment of internationally accepted guidelines for the assessment of various categories of plant biopesticides. Ultimately, being able to register a crude plant extract will permit health organizations such as the World Health Organization to promote the use of such material, especially in self-help control programmes, thereby improving the health standards of rural communities.

  19. BRIDG: a domain information model for translational and clinical protocol-driven research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becnel, Lauren B; Hastak, Smita; Ver Hoef, Wendy; Milius, Robert P; Slack, MaryAnn; Wold, Diane; Glickman, Michael L; Brodsky, Boris; Jaffe, Charles; Kush, Rebecca; Helton, Edward

    2017-09-01

    It is critical to integrate and analyze data from biological, translational, and clinical studies with data from health systems; however, electronic artifacts are stored in thousands of disparate systems that are often unable to readily exchange data. To facilitate meaningful data exchange, a model that presents a common understanding of biomedical research concepts and their relationships with health care semantics is required. The Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group (BRIDG) domain information model fulfills this need. Software systems created from BRIDG have shared meaning "baked in," enabling interoperability among disparate systems. For nearly 10 years, the Clinical Data Standards Interchange Consortium, the National Cancer Institute, the US Food and Drug Administration, and Health Level 7 International have been key stakeholders in developing BRIDG. BRIDG is an open-source Unified Modeling Language-class model developed through use cases and harmonization with other models. With its 4+ releases, BRIDG includes clinical and now translational research concepts in its Common, Protocol Representation, Study Conduct, Adverse Events, Regulatory, Statistical Analysis, Experiment, Biospecimen, and Molecular Biology subdomains. The model is a Clinical Data Standards Interchange Consortium, Health Level 7 International, and International Standards Organization standard that has been utilized in national and international standards-based software development projects. It will continue to mature and evolve in the areas of clinical imaging, pathology, ontology, and vocabulary support. BRIDG 4.1.1 and prior releases are freely available at https://bridgmodel.nci.nih.gov . © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Effects of a Delphi consensus acupuncture treatment protocol on the levels of stress and vascular tone in women undergoing in-vitro fertilization: a randomized clinical trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Phy, Jennifer; Scott-Johnson, Chris; Garos, Sheila; Orlando, Jennie; Prien, Samuel; Huang, Jaou-Chen

    2017-04-04

    The variability of published acupuncture protocols for patients undergoing In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF) complicates the interpretation of data and hinders our understanding of acupuncture's impact. In 2012, an acupuncture treatment protocol developed by a Delphi consensus process was published to describe the parameters of best practice acupuncture for Assisted Reproductive Technology and future research. However, there has been no clinical trial utilizing this protocol to assess the effects of acupuncture. This study aims to assess the implementation of Dephi consensus acupuncture protocol and to examine the impact of acupuncture on stress and uterine and ovarian blood flow among women between ages 21-42 years seeking IVF. This study is a one site prospective, two-arm randomized controlled non-blind clinical trial conducted in a medical school-affiliated fertility center . Participants will be randomized 1:1 into either the acupuncture group or the standard of care (no acupuncture) group using computer generated tables. Both groups will have 3 regular clinical visits as their standard IVF care during an approximately 2 to 3 weeks window. Women who are randomized into the acupuncture group would receive three sessions based on the Delphi consensus acupuncture protocol in addition to the standard care. The first treatment will be administered between days 6 to 8 of the stimulated IVF cycle. The second session will be performed on the day of embryo transfer at least 1 h prior to the transfer. The third session will be performed within 48 h post-embryo transfer. Participants will be followed for their pregnancy test and pregnancy outcome when applicable. The outcomes stress and blood flow will be measured by a validated perceived stress scale and vasoactive molecules, respectively. Although recruitment and scheduling could be challenging at times, the Delphi consensus acupuncture protocol was implemented as planned and well-accepted by the patients. Because

  1. Clinical protocol for the management of malignant hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann-Camaiora, A; Alsina, E; Domínguez, A; Del Blanco, B; Yepes, M J; Guerrero, J L; García, A

    2017-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia is a hypermetabolic syndrome that appears in susceptible patients after exposure to certain anaesthetic drugs (succinylcholine, inhalation anaesthetics). Its incidence in Spain is 1 in 40,000 adults, with a 10% mortality rate. It is induced by an abnormal regulation of the ryanodine receptors, producing a massive release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the striate muscle. Clinical manifestations include: CO 2 increase, tachycardia, haemodynamic instability, metabolic and respiratory acidosis, profuse sweating, hyperpyrexia, CPK increase, myoglobinuria, kidney failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and ending in cardiac arrest. Dantrolene sodium is a ryanodine receptor antagonist, and inhibits the release of intracellular calcium. Definitive diagnosis is achieved by the exposure of muscle fibres to caffeine and halothane. Protocols can help guarantee a reliable and secure management when this severe event occurs. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimations of isoprenoid emission capacity from enclosure studies: measurements, data processing, quality and standardized measurement protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ü.; Kuhn, U.; Harley, P. C.; Staudt, M.; Arneth, A.; Cescatti, A.; Ciccioli, P.; Copolovici, L.; Geron, C.; Guenther, A.; Kesselmeier, J.; Lerdau, M. T.; Monson, R. K.; Peñuelas, J.

    2011-08-01

    The capacity for volatile isoprenoid production under standardized environmental conditions at a certain time (ES, the emission factor) is a key characteristic in constructing isoprenoid emission inventories. However, there is large variation in published ES estimates for any given species partly driven by dynamic modifications in ES due to acclimation and stress responses. Here we review additional sources of variation in ES estimates that are due to measurement and analytical techniques and calculation and averaging procedures, and demonstrate that estimations of ES critically depend on applied experimental protocols and on data processing and reporting. A great variety of experimental setups has been used in the past, contributing to study-to-study variations in ES estimates. We suggest that past experimental data should be distributed into broad quality classes depending on whether the data can or cannot be considered quantitative based on rigorous experimental standards. Apart from analytical issues, the accuracy of ES values is strongly driven by extrapolation and integration errors introduced during data processing. Additional sources of error, especially in meta-database construction, can further arise from inconsistent use of units and expression bases of ES. We propose a standardized experimental protocol for BVOC estimations and highlight basic meta-information that we strongly recommend to report with any ES measurement. We conclude that standardization of experimental and calculation protocols and critical examination of past reports is essential for development of accurate emission factor databases.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of Per-Protocol Time-to-Event Treatment Efficacy in Randomized Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Peter B.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Hudgens, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Assessing per-protocol treatment effcacy on a time-to-event endpoint is a common objective of randomized clinical trials. The typical analysis uses the same method employed for the intention-to-treat analysis (e.g., standard survival analysis) applied to the subgroup meeting protocol adherence criteria. However, due to potential post-randomization selection bias, this analysis may mislead about treatment efficacy. Moreover, while there is extensive literature on methods for assessing causal treatment effects in compliers, these methods do not apply to a common class of trials where a) the primary objective compares survival curves, b) it is inconceivable to assign participants to be adherent and event-free before adherence is measured, and c) the exclusion restriction assumption fails to hold. HIV vaccine efficacy trials including the recent RV144 trial exemplify this class, because many primary endpoints (e.g., HIV infections) occur before adherence is measured, and nonadherent subjects who receive some of the planned immunizations may be partially protected. Therefore, we develop methods for assessing per-protocol treatment efficacy for this problem class, considering three causal estimands of interest. Because these estimands are not identifiable from the observable data, we develop nonparametric bounds and semiparametric sensitivity analysis methods that yield estimated ignorance and uncertainty intervals. The methods are applied to RV144. PMID:24187408

  4. 42 CFR 493.1457 - Standard; Clinical consultant responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1457 Standard; Clinical consultant... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Clinical consultant responsibilities. 493...

  5. A Standardized and Reproducible Urine Preparation Protocol for Cancer Biomarkers Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Beretov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A suitable and standardized protein purification technique is essential to maintain consistency and to allow data comparison between proteomic studies for urine biomarker discovery. Ultimately, efforts should be made to standardize urine preparation protocols. The aim of this study was to develop an optimal analytical protocol to achieve maximal protein yield and to ensure that this method was applicable to examine urine protein patterns that distinguish disease and disease-free states. In this pilot study, we compared seven different urine sample preparation methods to remove salts, and to precipitate and isolate urinary proteins. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE profiles showed that the sequential preparation of urinary proteins by combining acetone and trichloroacetic acid (TCA alongside high speed centrifugation (HSC provided the best separation, and retained the most urinary proteins. Therefore, this approach is the preferred method for all further urine protein analysis.

  6. Integrating usability testing and think-aloud protocol analysis with "near-live" clinical simulations in evaluating clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alice C; Kannry, Joseph L; Kushniruk, Andre; Chrimes, Dillon; McGinn, Thomas G; Edonyabo, Daniel; Mann, Devin M

    2012-11-01

    Usability evaluations can improve the usability and workflow integration of clinical decision support (CDS). Traditional usability testing using scripted scenarios with think-aloud protocol analysis provide a useful but incomplete assessment of how new CDS tools interact with users and clinical workflow. "Near-live" clinical simulations are a newer usability evaluation tool that more closely mimics clinical workflow and that allows for a complementary evaluation of CDS usability as well as impact on workflow. This study employed two phases of testing a new CDS tool that embedded clinical prediction rules (an evidence-based medicine tool) into primary care workflow within a commercial electronic health record. Phase I applied usability testing involving "think-aloud" protocol analysis of 8 primary care providers encountering several scripted clinical scenarios. Phase II used "near-live" clinical simulations of 8 providers interacting with video clips of standardized trained patient actors enacting the clinical scenario. In both phases, all sessions were audiotaped and had screen-capture software activated for onscreen recordings. Transcripts were coded using qualitative analysis methods. In Phase I, the impact of the CDS on navigation and workflow were associated with the largest volume of negative comments (accounting for over 90% of user raised issues) while the overall usability and the content of the CDS were associated with the most positive comments. However, usability had a positive-to-negative comment ratio of only 0.93 reflecting mixed perceptions about the usability of the CDS. In Phase II, the duration of encounters with simulated patients was approximately 12 min with 71% of the clinical prediction rules being activated after half of the visit had already elapsed. Upon activation, providers accepted the CDS tool pathway 82% of times offered and completed all of its elements in 53% of all simulation cases. Only 12.2% of encounter time was spent using the

  7. 42 CFR 493.1417 - Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1417 Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications. The clinical consultant must be qualified to consult with and render opinions to the laboratory's... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications. 493...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1419 - Standard; Clinical consultant responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity Testing § 493.1419 Standard; Clinical consultant... clinical consultation to the laboratory's clients; (b) Be available to assist the laboratory's clients in... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Clinical consultant responsibilities. 493...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1455 - Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1455 Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications. The clinical consultant must be qualified to consult with and render opinions to the laboratory's... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Clinical consultant qualifications. 493...

  10. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole body PET acquisition protocol of ~45min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6-min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (6 passes x 7 bed positions, each scanned for 45sec). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares (OLS) Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of 10 different clinically

  11. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ~45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  12. Standardized Physician-Administered Patient-Centered Discharge Protocol Improves Patients' Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Jennifer W; Alter, Scott M; Shih, Richard D; Fernandez, Jimmy D; Williams, Frederick K; Paley, Richard; Benda, William; Clayton, Lisa M

    2017-05-01

    Patients are 30% less likely to be readmitted or visit the emergency department if they have a clear understanding of their discharge instructions. A standardized approach to a hospital discharge plan has not been universally implemented, however. Our goal was to increase patients' comprehension of discharge instructions by implementing a standardized patient-centered discharge planning protocol that uses a physician team member to explain these plans. This was a prospective study that included all of the patients discharged from an inpatient medical teaching service in a community-based hospital during the study period. We used two 4-week periods separated by 4 months in which training and practice with the study intervention took place. Patients' understanding of discharge instructions was assessed via a follow-up telephone call from a physician co-investigator within 1 week of each patient's discharge. Differences in patients' understanding between groups were analyzed. A total of 181 patients were enrolled, with 9 lost to follow-up. After implementation of the discharge planning protocol, a statistically significant improvement in patients' understanding was found in study subjects' knowledge of their diagnosis, the adverse effects of their medications, whom to call after discharge, and follow-up appointments. Institution of a standardized patient-centered discharge planning protocol can improve patients' understanding of several key components of their discharge process, which may lead to improved compliance with instructions and outcomes.

  13. Standard protocol for evaluation of environmental transfer factors around NPP sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, A.G.; Verma, P.C.; Rao, D.D.

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the standard procedures for evaluation of site specific environmental transfer factors around NPP sites. The scope of this document is to provide standard protocol to be followed for evaluation of environmental transfer factors around NPP sites. The studies on transfer factors are being carried out at various NPP sites under DAE-BRNS projects for evaluation of site specific transfer factors for radionuclides released from power plants. This document contains a common methodology in terms of sampling, processing, measurements and analysis of elemental/radionuclides, while keeping the site specific requirements also in place. (author)

  14. Standard protocol for conducting pre-operational environmental surveillance around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, A.G.; Verma, P.C.; Rajan, M.P.

    2009-02-01

    This document presents the standard procedures for evaluation of site specific environmental transfer factors around NPP sites. The scope of this document is to provide standard protocol to be followed for conducting pre-operational environmental surveillance around nuclear facilities. Such surveillances have been proposed to be carried out by university professionals under DAE-BRNS projects. This document contains a common methodology in terms of sampling, processing, measurements and analysis of elemental/radionuclides, while keeping the site specific requirements also in place. (author)

  15. Why standard brain-computer interface (BCI) training protocols should be changed: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeunet, Camille; Jahanpour, Emilie; Lotte, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    Objective. While promising, electroencephaloraphy based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are barely used due to their lack of reliability: 15% to 30% of users are unable to control a BCI. Standard training protocols may be partly responsible as they do not satisfy recommendations from psychology. Our main objective was to determine in practice to what extent standard training protocols impact users’ motor imagery based BCI (MI-BCI) control performance. Approach. We performed two experiments. The first consisted in evaluating the efficiency of a standard BCI training protocol for the acquisition of non-BCI related skills in a BCI-free context, which enabled us to rule out the possible impact of BCIs on the training outcome. Thus, participants (N = 54) were asked to perform simple motor tasks. The second experiment was aimed at measuring the correlations between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. The ten best and ten worst performers of the first study were recruited for an MI-BCI experiment during which they had to learn to perform two MI tasks. We also assessed users’ spatial ability and pre-training μ rhythm amplitude, as both have been related to MI-BCI performance in the literature. Main results. Around 17% of the participants were unable to learn to perform the motor tasks, which is close to the BCI illiteracy rate. This suggests that standard training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching. No correlation was found between motor tasks and MI-BCI performance. However, spatial ability played an important role in MI-BCI performance. In addition, once the spatial ability covariable had been controlled for, using an ANCOVA, it appeared that participants who faced difficulty during the first experiment improved during the second while the others did not. Significance. These studies suggest that (1) standard MI-BCI training protocols are suboptimal for skill teaching, (2) spatial ability is confirmed as impacting on MI-BCI performance, and (3) when faced

  16. An analysis of the Token Ring protocol as specified in ANSI/IEEE Standard 802.5-1985

    OpenAIRE

    Ayik, Nejdet

    1989-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. This thesis discusses the formal specification techniques for communication protocols and the ANSI/IEEE Standard 802.5 Token Ring Access Method and Physical Layer Specification. Background information on formal protocol specification and a review of the targeted standard are provided. The ambiguities that were found with the standard and solutions to some of those are presented. The study concludes that there is a growing need to find...

  17. Estimations of isoprenoid emission capacity from enclosure studies: measurements, data processing, quality and standardized measurement protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ü. Niinemets

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity for volatile isoprenoid production under standardized environmental conditions at a certain time (ES, the emission factor is a key characteristic in constructing isoprenoid emission inventories. However, there is large variation in published ES estimates for any given species partly driven by dynamic modifications in ES due to acclimation and stress responses. Here we review additional sources of variation in ES estimates that are due to measurement and analytical techniques and calculation and averaging procedures, and demonstrate that estimations of ES critically depend on applied experimental protocols and on data processing and reporting. A great variety of experimental setups has been used in the past, contributing to study-to-study variations in ES estimates. We suggest that past experimental data should be distributed into broad quality classes depending on whether the data can or cannot be considered quantitative based on rigorous experimental standards. Apart from analytical issues, the accuracy of ES values is strongly driven by extrapolation and integration errors introduced during data processing. Additional sources of error, especially in meta-database construction, can further arise from inconsistent use of units and expression bases of ES. We propose a standardized experimental protocol for BVOC estimations and highlight basic meta-information that we strongly recommend to report with any ES measurement. We conclude that standardization of experimental and calculation protocols and critical examination of past reports is essential for development of accurate emission factor databases.

  18. Template protocol for clinical trials investigating vaccines—Focus on safety elements☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhoeffer, Jan; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B.; Aldrovandi, Grace; Bachtiar, Novilia S.; Chan, Eng-Soon; Chang, Soju; Chen, Robert T.; Fernandopulle, Rohini; Goldenthal, Karen L.; Heffelfinger, James D.; Hossain, Shah; Jevaji, Indira; Khamesipour, Ali; Kochhar, Sonali; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Malkin, Elissa; Nalin, David; Prevots, Rebecca; Ramasamy, Ranjan; Sellers, Sarah; Vekemans, Johan; Walker, Kenneth B.; Wilson, Pam; Wong, Virginia; Zaman, Khalequz; Heininger, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    This document is intended as a guide to the protocol development for trials of prophylactic vaccines. The template may serve phases I–IV clinical trials protocol development to include safety relevant information as required by the regulatory authorities and as deemed useful by the investigators. This document may also be helpful for future site strengthening efforts. PMID:23499603

  19. Serial extraction protocol for partial arches in implant dentistry: principles and clinical methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, John S; Greenstein, Gary; Greenstein, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Serial extraction protocol (SEP) is a clinical technique that facilitates using natural tooth abutments to support a fixed interim resin prosthesis, while inserting a sufficient number of implants to retain a definitive fixed prosthesis. A Class 1 protocol allows all necessary implants to be placed during one surgical appointment, while a Class 2 protocol requires two or more rounds of implant installation to achieve sufficient support for a definitive fixed prosthesis. The SEP methodology can be used to restore full and partially edentulous dentitions. This article addresses rehabilitation of partial arches using an SEP protocol.

  20. Standardized clinical photography: the role of flash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariello, Angelino; Viana, Giovanni André; Osaki, Midori; Pamplona, André Luis; Höfling-Lima, Ana Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Medical photographic documentation is important for professional, research, and ethical concerns. This study analyzed the possible interference that the flash could cause on evaluation of lower eyelid cosmetic results. Standardized photographs with and without flash were taken of 10 patients with dermatochalasis. The photographs were evaluated by 3 independent observers, as before (without flash) and after (with flash) an alternative esthetic treatment of the lower eyelid. The observers rated the overall cosmetic improvement of the lower eyelid photographs on a visual analog scale. The 3 surgeons believed that there was improvement in cosmetic outcome from the first (without flash) to the second (with flash) picture. The results indicate that a simple flash addition in one of 2 consecutive photographs, taken seconds apart, could influence the impression of experienced surgeons on the final outcome of oculoplastic surgeries and may constitute a bias in observer-dependent studies.

  1. How to write a surgical clinical research protocol: literature review and practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Rachel; Schäfer, Juliane; Briel, Matthias; Bucher, Heiner C; Oertli, Daniel; Dell-Kuster, Salome

    2014-02-01

    The study protocol is the core document of every clinical research project. Clinical research in studies involving surgical interventions presents some specific challenges, which need to be accounted for and described in the study protocol. The aim of this review is to provide a practical guide for developing a clinical study protocol for surgical interventions with a focus on methodologic issues. On the basis of an in-depth literature search of methodologic literature and on some cardinal published surgical trials and observational studies, the authors provides a 10-step guide for developing a clinical study protocol in surgery. This practical guide outlines key methodologic issues important when planning an ethically and scientifically sound research project involving surgical interventions, with the ultimate goal of providing high-level evidence relevant for health care decision making in surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A feasible repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation clinical protocol in migraine prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Zardouz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This case series was conducted to determine the clinical feasibility of a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol for the prevention of migraine (with and without aura. Methods: Five patients with migraines underwent five repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions separated in 1- to 2-week intervals for a period of 2 months at a single tertiary medical center. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied to the left motor cortex with 2000 pulses (20 trains with 1s inter-train interval delivered per session, at a frequency of 10 Hz and 80% resting motor threshold. Pre- and post-treatment numerical rating pain scales were collected, and percent reductions in intensity, frequency, and duration were generated. Results: An average decrease in 37.8%, 32.1%, and 31.2% were noted in the intensity, frequency, and duration of migraines post-repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, respectively. A mean decrease in 1.9±1.0 (numerical rating pain scale ± standard deviation; range: 0.4–2.8 in headache intensity scores was noted after the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions. Conclusion: The tested repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol is a well-tolerated, safe, and effective method for migraine prevention.

  3. A feasible repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation clinical protocol in migraine prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardouz, Shawn; Shi, Lei; Leung, Albert

    2016-01-01

    This case series was conducted to determine the clinical feasibility of a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol for the prevention of migraine (with and without aura). Five patients with migraines underwent five repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions separated in 1- to 2-week intervals for a period of 2 months at a single tertiary medical center. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied to the left motor cortex with 2000 pulses (20 trains with 1s inter-train interval) delivered per session, at a frequency of 10 Hz and 80% resting motor threshold. Pre- and post-treatment numerical rating pain scales were collected, and percent reductions in intensity, frequency, and duration were generated. An average decrease in 37.8%, 32.1%, and 31.2% were noted in the intensity, frequency, and duration of migraines post-repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, respectively. A mean decrease in 1.9±1.0 (numerical rating pain scale ± standard deviation; range: 0.4-2.8) in headache intensity scores was noted after the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions. The tested repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol is a well-tolerated, safe, and effective method for migraine prevention.

  4. Multisite Semiautomated Clinical Data Repository for Duplication 15q Syndrome: Study Protocol and Early Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Oluwaseun Jessica; Smith, Ebony Jeannae; Viangteeravat, Teeradache; Huang, Eunice Y; Nagisetty, Naga Satya V Rao; Urraca, Nora; Lusk, Laina; Finucane, Brenda; Arkilo, Dimitrios; Young, Jennifer; Jeste, Shafali; Thibert, Ronald; Reiter, Lawrence T

    2017-10-18

    Chromosome 15q11.2-q13.1 duplication syndrome (Dup15q syndrome) is a rare disorder caused by duplications of chromosome 15q11.2-q13.1, resulting in a wide range of developmental disabilities in affected individuals. The Dup15q Alliance is an organization that provides family support and promotes research to improve the quality of life of patients living with Dup15q syndrome. Because of the low prevalence of this condition, the establishment of a single research repository would have been difficult and more time consuming without collaboration across multiple institutions. The goal of this project is to establish a national deidentified database with clinical and survey information on individuals diagnosed with Dup15q syndrome. The development of a multiclinic site repository for clinical and survey data on individuals with Dup15q syndrome was initiated and supported by the Dup15q Alliance. Using collaborative workflows, communication protocols, and stakeholder engagement tools, a comprehensive database of patient-centered information was built. We successfully established a self-report populating, centralized repository for Dup15q syndrome research. This repository also resulted in the development of standardized instruments that can be used for other studies relating to developmental disorders. By standardizing the data collection instruments, it allows us integrate our data with other national databases, such as the National Database for Autism Research. A substantial portion of the data collected from the questionnaires was facilitated through direct engagement of participants and their families. This allowed for a more complete set of information to be collected with a minimal turnaround time. We developed a repository that can efficiently be mined for shared clinical phenotypes observed at multiple clinic sites and used as a springboard for future clinical and basic research studies. ©Oluwaseun Jessica Ajayi, Ebony Jeannae Smith, Teeradache Viangteeravat

  5. Standardized communication protocol for BAS (IEIEJ/p); BAS hyojun interface shiyo (IEIEJ/p)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, T. [Hitachi Building System Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-10-05

    For the BEMS user, to construct his BEMS tinder the multiple vendors environment is very beneficial because he could choice the most appropriate vendor among many vendors about every subsystem for the view point of technique and cost at any time. The effective tool which makes the BEMS tinder the multiple environment possible is the BACnet protocol which had developed and been standardized by ANSI/ASHRAE of U.S.. Institute of Electrical Installation Engineers-of Japan (IEIEJ) offers IEIEJ/p based on BACnet as IEIEJ's standard which is added the function of autonomous decentralized control to enhance the BEMS reliability to fit the Japanese multiple vendors environment, In this paper I present the outline of it's specification and feature of IEIEJ/p. (author)

  6. Multiparametric multidetector computed tomography scanning on suspicion of hyperacute ischemic stroke: validating a standardized protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Torres Pacheco

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT scanning has enabled the early diagnosis of hyperacute brain ischemia. We aimed at validating a standardized protocol to read and report MDCT techniques in a series of adult patients. The inter-observer agreement among the trained examiners was tested, and their results were compared with a standard reading. No false positives were observed, and an almost perfect agreement (Kappa>0.81 was documented when the CT angiography (CTA and cerebral perfusion CT (CPCT map data were added to the noncontrast CT (NCCT analysis. The inter-observer agreement was higher for highly trained readers, corroborating the need for specific training to interpret these modern techniques. The authors recommend adding CTA and CPCT to the NCCT analysis in order to clarify the global analysis of structural and hemodynamic brain abnormalities. Our structured report is suitable as a script for the reproducible analysis of the MDCT of patients on suspicion of ischemic stroke.

  7. Effectiveness of various irrigation protocols for the removal of calcium hydroxide from artificial standardized grooves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan GOKTURK

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of laser-activated irrigation (LAI, XP-endo Finisher, CanalBrush, Vibringe, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI, and conventional syringe irrigation systems on the removal of calcium hydroxide (CH from simulated root canal irregularities. Material and Methods The root canals of one hundred and five extracted single-rooted teeth were instrumented using Reciproc rotary files up to size R40. The teeth were split longitudinally. Two of the three standard grooves were created in the coronal and apical section of one segment, and another in the middle part of the second segment. The standardized grooves were filled with CH and the root halves were reassembled. After 14 days, the specimens were randomly divided into 7 experimental groups (n=15/group. CH was removed as follows: Group 1: beveled needle irrigation; Group 2: double side-vented needle irrigation; Group 3: CanalBrush; Group 4: XP-endo Finisher; Group 5: Vibringe; Group 6: PUI; Group 7: LAI. The amount of remaining CH in the grooves was scored under a stereomicroscope at 20× magnification. Statistical evaluation was performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Bonferroni-Correction Mann–Whitney U tests. Results Groups 1 and 2 were the least efficient in eliminating CH from the grooves. Groups 6 and 7 eliminated more CH than the other protocols; however, no significant differences were found between these two groups (P>.05. Conclusions Nevertheless, none of the investigated protocols were able to completely remove all CH from all three root regions. LAI and PUI showed less residual CH than the other protocols from artificial grooves.

  8. A Standardized Shift Handover Protocol: Improving Nurses’ Safe Practice in Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Malekzadeh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For maintaining the continuity of care and improving the quality of care, effective inter-shift information communication is necessary. Any handover error can endanger patient safety. Despite the importance of shift handover, there is no standard handover protocol in our healthcare settings. Methods In this one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study conducted in spring and summer of 2011, we recruited a convenience sample of 56 ICU nurses. The Nurses’ Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist was used for data collection. The Content Validity Index and the inter-rater correlation coefficient of the checklist was 0.92 and 89, respectively. We employed the SPSS 11.5 software and the Mc Nemar and paired-samples t test for data analysis. Results: Study findings revealed that nurses’ mean score on the Safe Practice Evaluation Checklist increased significantly from 11.6 (2.7 to 17.0 (1.8 (P < 0.001. Conclusion: using a standard handover protocol for communicating patient’s needs and information improves nurses’ safe practice in the area of basic nursing care.

  9. Standards in clinical decision support: activities in health level seven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenders, Robert A; Jenders, Robert Allen; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Sailors, R Matthew

    2008-11-06

    Health Level Seven (HL7) has evolved into an international standards development organization (SDO) with a suite of standards. Prominent among these are formalisms related to clinical decision support, including the Arden Syntax, GELLO and Decision Support Service (DSS) standards. Continuing improvement in these standards and ongoing development of future decision support standards require wide participation in order to maximize their success. Accordingly, the purpose of the workshop is twofold. First, instructors will convey the latest developments regarding existing decision support standards and related efforts to develop new standards. Second, the instructors will solicit feedback so that attendees who do not participate in HL7 can have input into the standards activities of that organization. The instructors of this workshop, who are the co-chairs and/or members of the Clinical Decision Support Technical Committee of HL7, will review progress in these areas. They will present the details of the ongoing development of the extant Arden Syntax, GELLO and DSS standards. They will discuss work on current draft and proposed future standards, including the Infobutton communication and Order Set standards that are undergoing development in anticipation of certification as standards. Finally, they will solicit discussion regarding the future direction of standards development in these areas.

  10. Developing a Clinical-Grade Cryopreservation Protocol for Human Testicular Tissue and Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchiarotti, Jason; Ramos, Thomas; Howerton, Kyle; Greilach, Scott; Zaragoza, Karina; Olmstead, Marnie; Izadyar, Fariborz

    2013-01-01

    Recent work in preservation of female fertility as well as new information on the nature of spermatogonial stem cells has prompted an investigation into the possibility of an effective clinical-grade procedure for the cryopreservation of testicular cells and/or tissue. Clinical-grade reagents, validated equipment, and protocols consistent with cGTP/cGMP standards were used in developing a procedure suitable for the safe and effective cryopreservation of human testicular cells and tissues. These procedures were designed to be compliant with the relevant FDA regulations. The procedure proved to effectively cryopreserve both testicular cells and tissue. The cryopreservation of testicular tissue was comparable in most aspects we measured to the cryopreservation of isolated cells, except that the viability of the cells from cryopreserved testicular tissue was found to be significantly higher. On the other hand, cryopreservation of cells is preferred for cell analysis, quality control, and sterility testing. This study demonstrates that testicular tissue and cells from sexual reassignment patients can be successfully cryopreserved with a clinical-grade procedure and important cell populations are not only preserved but also enriched by the process. Further studies will determine whether these findings from hormone-treated patients can be generalized to other patients. PMID:23509810

  11. Evaluating Protocol Lifecycle Time Intervals in HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Dixon, Dennis; Varghese, Suresh; Cope, Marie T.; Marci, Joe; Kagan, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying efficacious interventions for the prevention and treatment of human diseases depends on the efficient development and implementation of controlled clinical trials. Essential to reducing the time and burden of completing the clinical trial lifecycle is determining which aspects take the longest, delay other stages, and may lead to better resource utilization without diminishing scientific quality, safety, or the protection of human subjects. Purpose In this study we modeled time-to-event data to explore relationships between clinical trial protocol development and implementation times, as well as identify potential correlates of prolonged development and implementation. Methods We obtained time interval and participant accrual data from 111 interventional clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2011 by NIH’s HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks. We determined the time (in days) required to complete defined phases of clinical trial protocol development and implementation. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to assess the rates at which protocols reached specified terminal events, stratified by study purpose (therapeutic, prevention) and phase group (pilot/phase I, phase II, and phase III/ IV). We also examined several potential correlates to prolonged development and implementation intervals. Results Even though phase grouping did not determine development or implementation times of either therapeutic or prevention studies, overall we observed wide variation in protocol development times. Moreover, we detected a trend toward phase III/IV therapeutic protocols exhibiting longer developmental (median 2 ½ years) and implementation times (>3years). We also found that protocols exceeding the median number of days for completing the development interval had significantly longer implementation. Limitations The use of a relatively small set of protocols may have limited our ability to detect differences across phase groupings. Some timing effects

  12. Comparison of a fast 5-min knee MRI protocol with a standard knee MRI protocol. A multi-institutional multi-reader study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Beltran, Luis S.; Garwood, Elisabeth; Burke, Christopher J.; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Benedick, Alex; Obuchowski, Nancy A.; Polster, Joshua M.; Schils, Jean; Subhas, Naveen; Chang, I. Yuan Joseph

    2018-01-01

    To compare diagnostic performance of a 5-min knee MRI protocol to that of a standard knee MRI. One hundred 3 T (100 patients, mean 38.8 years) and 50 1.5 T (46 patients, mean 46.4 years) MRIs, consisting of 5 fast, 2D multi-planar fast-spin-echo (FSE) sequences and five standard multiplanar FSE sequences, from two academic centers (1/2015-1/2016), were retrospectively reviewed by four musculoskeletal radiologists. Agreement between fast and standard (interprotocol agreement) and between standard (intraprotocol agreement) readings for meniscal, ligamentous, chondral, and bone pathology was compared for interchangeability. Frequency of major findings, sensitivity, and specificity was also tested for each protocol. Interprotocol agreement using fast MRI was similar to intraprotocol agreement with standard MRI (83.0-99.5%), with no excess disagreement (≤ 1.2; 95% CI, -4.2 to 3.8%), across all structures. Frequency of major findings (1.1-22.4% across structures) on fast and standard MRI was not significantly different (p ≥ 0.215), except more ACL tears on fast MRI (p = 0.021) and more cartilage defects on standard MRI (p < 0.001). Sensitivities (59-100%) and specificities (73-99%) of fast and standard MRI were not significantly different for meniscal and ligament tears (95% CI for difference, -0.08-0.08). For cartilage defects, fast MRI was slightly less sensitive (95% CI for difference, -0.125 to -0.01) but slightly more specific (95% CI for difference, 0.01-0.5) than standard MRI. A fast 5-min MRI protocol is interchangeable with and has similar accuracy to a standard knee MRI for evaluating internal derangement of the knee. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of a fast 5-min knee MRI protocol with a standard knee MRI protocol. A multi-institutional multi-reader study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Beltran, Luis S.; Garwood, Elisabeth; Burke, Christopher J.; Gyftopoulos, Soterios [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, New York, NY (United States); Benedick, Alex [Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Obuchowski, Nancy A. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland, OH (United States); Polster, Joshua M.; Schils, Jean; Subhas, Naveen [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chang, I. Yuan Joseph [Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To compare diagnostic performance of a 5-min knee MRI protocol to that of a standard knee MRI. One hundred 3 T (100 patients, mean 38.8 years) and 50 1.5 T (46 patients, mean 46.4 years) MRIs, consisting of 5 fast, 2D multi-planar fast-spin-echo (FSE) sequences and five standard multiplanar FSE sequences, from two academic centers (1/2015-1/2016), were retrospectively reviewed by four musculoskeletal radiologists. Agreement between fast and standard (interprotocol agreement) and between standard (intraprotocol agreement) readings for meniscal, ligamentous, chondral, and bone pathology was compared for interchangeability. Frequency of major findings, sensitivity, and specificity was also tested for each protocol. Interprotocol agreement using fast MRI was similar to intraprotocol agreement with standard MRI (83.0-99.5%), with no excess disagreement (≤ 1.2; 95% CI, -4.2 to 3.8%), across all structures. Frequency of major findings (1.1-22.4% across structures) on fast and standard MRI was not significantly different (p ≥ 0.215), except more ACL tears on fast MRI (p = 0.021) and more cartilage defects on standard MRI (p < 0.001). Sensitivities (59-100%) and specificities (73-99%) of fast and standard MRI were not significantly different for meniscal and ligament tears (95% CI for difference, -0.08-0.08). For cartilage defects, fast MRI was slightly less sensitive (95% CI for difference, -0.125 to -0.01) but slightly more specific (95% CI for difference, 0.01-0.5) than standard MRI. A fast 5-min MRI protocol is interchangeable with and has similar accuracy to a standard knee MRI for evaluating internal derangement of the knee. (orig.)

  14. Remotely-Supervised Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS for Clinical Trials: Guidelines for Technology and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh E Charvet

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is cumulative. Treatment protocols typically require multiple consecutive sessions spanning weeks or months. However, traveling to clinic for a tDCS session can present an obstacle to subjects and their caregivers. With modified devices and headgear, tDCS treatment can be administered remotely under clinical supervision, potentially enhancing recruitment, throughput, and convenience. Here we propose standards and protocols for clinical trials utilizing remotely-supervised tDCS with the goal of providing safe, reproducible and well-tolerated stimulation therapy outside of the clinic. The recommendations include: 1 training of staff in tDCS treatment and supervision, 2 assessment of the user’s capability to participate in tDCS remotely, 3 ongoing training procedures and materials including assessments of the user and/or caregiver, 4 simple and fail-safe electrode preparation techniques and tDCS headgear, 5 strict dose control for each session, 6 ongoing monitoring to quantify compliance (device preparation, electrode saturation/placement, stimulation protocol, with corresponding corrective steps as required, 7 monitoring for treatment-emergent adverse effects, 8 guidelines for discontinuation of a session and/or study participation including emergency failsafe procedures tailored to the treatment population’s level of need. These guidelines are intended to provide a minimal level of methodological rigor for clinical trials seeking to apply tDCS outside a specialized treatment center. We outline indication-specific applications (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Depression, Multiple Sclerosis, Palliative Care following these recommendations that support a standardized framework for evaluating the tolerability and reproducibility of remote-supervised tDCS that, once established, will allow for translation of tDCS clinical trials to a greater size and range of patient populations.

  15. The effect of a standardized protocol for iron supplementation to blood donors low in hemoglobin concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Karin; Bork, Nanna; Asmussen, Lisa

    2008-04-01

    Iron deficiency leading to low hemoglobin concentration (cHb) is a common problem for blood donors as well as for blood banks. A standardized protocol offering iron supplementation based on P-ferritin determination may help to reduce the problem and retain donors. This was a prospective study where 879 blood donors, presenting with cHb at or below the limit of acceptance for donation, were included. The predonation cHb result was read after donation. The donors received 50 iron tablets (JernC or Ferrochel, 100 or 25 mg elemental iron, respectively), and samples for P-ferritin, mean corpuscular volume, and control of cHb were secured. Based on a P-ferritin level of less than 60 microg per L, 20 iron tablets were offered after all following donations. Mean cHb was 7.6 mmol per L (122 g/L) and 8.2 mmol per L (132 g/L) in women and men, respectively. In 80 percent of the women and 48 percent of the men, iron stores were low (P-ferritin protocol offering iron supplementation and simple oral and written advice based on P-ferritin measurements is effective in normalizing cHb and retaining donors presenting with cHb at or below the limit of acceptance for donation.

  16. Current practices and challenges in the standardization and harmonization of clinical laboratory tests123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesper, Hubert W; Myers, Gary L; Miller, W Greg

    2016-01-01

    Effective patient care, clinical research, and public health efforts require comparability of laboratory results independent of time, place, and measurement procedure. Comparability is achieved by establishing metrological traceability, which ensures that measurement procedures measure the same quantity and that the calibration of measurement procedures is traceable to a common reference system consisting of reference methods and materials. Whereas standardization ensures traceability to the International System of Units, harmonization ensures traceability to a reference system agreed on by convention. This article provides an overview of standardization and harmonization with an emphasis on commutability as an important variable that affects testing accuracy. Commutability of reference materials is required to ensure that traceability is established appropriately and that laboratory results are comparable. The use of noncommutable reference materials leads to inaccurate results. Whereas procedures and protocols for standardizing measurements are established and have been successfully applied in efforts such as the Hormones Standardization Program of the CDC, harmonization activities require new, more complex procedures and approaches. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, together with its domestic and international partners, formed the International Consortium for Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Results to coordinate harmonization efforts. Reference systems, as well as procedures and protocols to establish traceability of clinical laboratory tests, have been established and continue to be developed by national and international groups and organizations. Serum tests of thyroid function, including those for the thyroid hormones thyroxine and triiodothyronine, are among the clinical procedures for which standardization efforts are well under way. Approaches to the harmonization of measurement procedures for serum concentrations of thyroid

  17. A standardized conjugation protocol to asses antibiotic resistance transfer between lactococcal species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampkowska, Joanna; Feld, Louise; Monaghan, Aine

    2008-01-01

    Optimal conditions and a standardized method for conjugation between two model lactococcal strains, Lactococcus lactis SH4174 (pAM beta 1-containing, erythromycin resistant donor) and L. lactis Bu2-60 (plasmid-free, erythromycin sensitive recipient), were developed and tested in a inter-laborator...... of this kind, in which a standardized protocol of conjugal mating for testing antibiotic resistance dissemination among LAB was established and validated. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......Optimal conditions and a standardized method for conjugation between two model lactococcal strains, Lactococcus lactis SH4174 (pAM beta 1-containing, erythromycin resistant donor) and L. lactis Bu2-60 (plasmid-free, erythromycin sensitive recipient), were developed and tested in a inter......-laboratory experiments involving five laboratories from different countries. The ultimate goal of the study was to assess the microbial potential of antibiotic resistance transfer among Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB). The influence of culture age (various OD values) and ratios of donor and recipient cultures as well...

  18. New multicast authentication protocol for entrusted members using advanced encryption standard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham Abdellatif Abouhogail

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Today there is a widening in digital technologies and increasing in new multimedia services like: pay-per-view TV, interactive simulations, teleconferencing. So there is an increasing demand for multicast communication. There is a number of security issues in multicast communication directly related to the specific nature of multicast. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for authenticating streamed data delivered in real-time over an insecure network, and we concentrate on the multicast authentication problem. Important requirements of multicast communication protocols are: to perform authentication in real-time, to resist packet loss and to have low communication and computation overheads. In this paper, a new multicast authentication scheme is proposed. It is suitable for real time applications. It uses the advanced encryption standard algorithm to solve the problem of entrusted members. This scheme uses the idea of the new index number each time the member sends certain block of packets in the multicast group.

  19. Optimizing Care With a Standardized Management Protocol for Patients With Infantile Spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedak, Erin M; Patel, Anup D; Heyer, Geoffrey L; Wood, Eric G; Mytinger, John R

    2015-09-01

    The primary aim of this quality improvement initiative was to increase the number of patients receiving first-line therapy (adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosteroids, vigabatrin) as the initial treatment for infantile spasms. We implemented a standardized management protocol for infantile spasms based on the best available data and expert consensus. To assess the impact of this intervention, we compared the 3-month remission rates between prestandardization (January 2009 to August 2012) and poststandardization (September 2012 to May 2014) cohorts. We found that the percentage of patients receiving first-line therapy as the initial treatment was 57% (31/54) in the prestandardization cohort and 100% (35/35) in the poststandardization cohort (P infantile spasms remission was higher poststandardization compared to prestandardization (78.8% vs 30.6%, P infantile spasms remission 3 months after diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Cranial palpation pressures used by osteopathy students: effects of standardized protocol training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegarra-Parodi, Rafael; de Chauvigny de Blot, Pierre; Rickards, Luke D; Renard, Edouard-Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Descriptions of subtle palpatory perceptions in osteopathic cranial palpation can be misperceived by students. Thus, adequate dissemination and replication of cranial palpatory techniques is challenging for osteopathy students. To evaluate the effects of standardized protocol training on cranial palpation of the frontomalar suture. Fourth-year osteopathy students from the European Center for Osteopathic Higher Education in Paris, France, were recruited and randomly divided into three groups. Students in the study group received instruction in a standardized protocol for palpatory assessment of the frontomalar suture; students in the control group did not receive instruction; and the remaining students acted as subjects. A specialized force sensor was placed on the skin covering the left frontomalar suture of each subject. Student practitioners were instructed to palpate subjects' left frontomalar suture using the customary pressure described for evaluation and treatment of somatic dysfunction of the cranium. Pressure measurements were exported to a laptop computer. Twelve students were in each group. Student practitioners' palpation pressures ranged from 0.19 to 1.12 N/cm(2), while mean palpation pressures for each test ranged from 0.27 to 0.98 N/cm(2). The mean (SD) palpation pressure in the study group and control group was 0.55 N/cm(2) (0.16 N/cm(2)) and 0.53 N/cm(2) (0.15 N/cm(2)), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in mean palpation pressures used by the two groups. Substantial variation in test performance was noted in both groups. Palpatory training was ineffective in improving student practitioners' precision of cranial palpation performance. Quantitative feedback of palpation pressures during training may improve outcomes. To our knowledge, data on palpation pressures used during osteopathic cranial manipulation have not been reported previously in the medical literature.

  1. Accelerated rehabilitation compared with a standard protocol after distal radial fractures treated with volar open reduction and internal fixation: a prospective, randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehmer, Jess L; Husband, Jeffrey B

    2014-10-01

    There are relatively few studies in the literature that specifically evaluate accelerated rehabilitation protocols for distal radial fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). The purpose of this study was to compare the early postoperative outcomes (at zero to twelve weeks postoperatively) of patients enrolled in an accelerated rehabilitation protocol with those of patients enrolled in a standard rehabilitation protocol following ORIF for a distal radial fracture. We hypothesized that patients with accelerated rehabilitation after volar ORIF for a distal radial fracture would have an earlier return to function compared with patients who followed a standard protocol. From November 2007 to November 2010, eighty-one patients with an unstable distal radial fracture were prospectively randomized to follow either an accelerated or a standard rehabilitation protocol after undergoing ORIF with a volar plate for a distal radial fracture. Both groups began with gentle active range of motion at three to five days postoperatively. At two weeks, the accelerated group initiated wrist/forearm passive range of motion and strengthening exercises, whereas the standard group initiated passive range of motion and strengthening at six weeks postoperatively. Patients were assessed at three to five days, two weeks, three weeks, four weeks, six weeks, eight weeks, twelve weeks, and six months postoperatively. Outcomes included Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) scores (primary outcome) and measurements of wrist flexion/extension, supination, pronation, grip strength, and palmar pinch. The patients in the accelerated group had better mobility, strength, and DASH scores at the early postoperative time points (zero to eight weeks postoperatively) compared with the patients in the standard rehabilitation group. The difference between the groups was both clinically relevant and statistically significant. Patients who follow an accelerated rehabilitation

  2. Towards a clinically relevant lentiviral transduction protocol for primary human CD34 hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Millington

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, in particular mobilized peripheral blood stem cells, represent an attractive target for cell and gene therapy. Efficient gene delivery into these target cells without compromising self-renewal and multi-potency is crucial for the success of gene therapy. We investigated factors involved in the ex vivo transduction of CD34(+ HSCs in order to develop a clinically relevant transduction protocol for gene delivery. Specifically sought was a protocol that allows for efficient transduction with minimal ex vivo manipulation without serum or other reagents of animal origin.Using commercially available G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood (PB CD34(+ cells as the most clinically relevant target, we systematically examined factors including the use of serum, cytokine combinations, pre-stimulation time, multiplicity of infection (MOI, transduction duration and the use of spinoculation and/or retronectin. A self-inactivating lentiviral vector (SIN-LV carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP was used as the gene delivery vehicle. HSCs were monitored for transduction efficiency, surface marker expression and cellular function. We were able to demonstrate that efficient gene transduction can be achieved with minimal ex vivo manipulation while maintaining the cellular function of transduced HSCs without serum or other reagents of animal origin.This study helps to better define factors relevant towards developing a standard clinical protocol for the delivery of SIN-LV into CD34(+ cells.

  3. Clinical and regulatory protocols for the management of impaired vision in the public health care network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayter Silva Paula

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To describe the procedures used in developing Clinical and Regulatory Protocols for primary care teams to use in the management of the most common scenarios of impaired vision in Southern Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective review of 1.333 referral forms from all primary care practitioners was performed in Ribeirão Preto city, during a 30-day period. The major ophthalmic diagnostic categories were evaluated from those referrals forms. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols development process was held afterwards and involved scientific cooperation between a university and the health care system, in the form of workshops attended by primary care practitioners and regulatory system team members composed of health care administrators, ophthalmologists, and professors of ophthalmology and social medicine. RESULTS: The management of impaired vision was chosen as the theme, since it accounted for 43.6% of the ophthalmology-related referrals from primary care providers of Ribeirão Preto. The Clinical and Regulatory Protocols developed involve distinctive diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that can be performed at the primary care level and in different health care settings. The most relevant clinical and regulatory interventions were expressed as algorithms in order to facilitate the use of the Clinical and Regulatory Protocols by health care practitioners. CONCLUSIONS: These Clinical and Regulatory Protocols could represent a useful tool for health systems with universal access, as well as for health care networks based on primary care and for regulatory system teams. Implementation of these Clinical and Regulatory Protocols can minimize the disparity between the needs of patients with impaired vision and the treatment modalities offered, resulting in a more cooperative health care network.

  4. Ankle and foot osteomyelitis: treatment protocol and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malizos, Konstantinos N; Gougoulias, Nikolaos E; Dailiana, Zoe H; Varitimidis, Sokratis; Bargiotas, Konstantinos A; Paridis, Dionysios

    2010-03-01

    A management protocol for ankle and foot osteomyelitis and the outcome in 84 patients treated in a unit with special interest in musculoskeletal infection, is presented. Patients' mean age was 50.7+/-16.5 years and mean follow-up 31.5+/-18.2 months. Systemic antibiotics were administered initially empirically, and later according to cultures. Surgical treatment included surgical debridement and bead-pouch technique, minor amputation (ray or toe), below knee amputation, and joint fusion. "Second-look" procedures were performed after 48-7h. Vascularised grafts or Ilizarov's technique were used for bone defect reconstruction. Soft tissues were managed according the 'reconstructive ladder' concept. Host-type (Cierny's classification) was A in 25, B in 53 and C in 6 patients. Seventy-six infections were chronic. Causes were: open trauma without fracture (45/84), open fractures (9/84), ORIF of closed fractures (25/84) and elective surgery (5/84). Patients underwent 3.0+/-1.5 (range 1-10) operative procedures and spent 14.8+/-12.2 (range 3-60) days in hospital. Two (host-C) patients died. Complications requiring reoperations occurred in 20/84 (2/25 host-A, 16/53 host-B, 2/6 host-C; significant difference between host-A versus host-B and -C patients, pvacuum assisted closure in 5/84 patients. Eighty-two surviving patients, including amputees, were able to mobilise independently and were satisfied with the result of treatment. Host-B and -C patients had more complications and infection recurrences and occasionally required amputations. Reconstructive procedures were performed for limb salvage in patients with soft tissue and bone defects and restoration of a functional limb was achieved. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving Adherence to Research Protocol Drug Exclusions using a Clinical Alerting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, James J.; Farnum, Lincoln; DiPatrizio, Gary E.; Goldspiel, Barry R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a general method for using the alerting function of an electronic health record (EHR) system to warn prescribers when a drug order may be in conflict with the restrictions of a patient’s research protocol. Methods We examined a sample of clinical research protocols at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to identify the frequency with which drugs were excluded by protocols. We analyzed two protocols and modeled the exclusions they contained. We then developed a data model to represent the exclusions, expanded the terminology in the NIH’s Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS) to include relevant drug concepts, and wrote a medical logic module (MLM) for the EHR to match terms for ordered drugs with the drug concepts in the protocol. Results We found that 50% of protocols in our sample included drug exclusions. Our model represented exclusion concepts and also concepts related to exemptions from the exclusions. The MLM was deployed in a test environment where it successfully detected orders for excluded drugs and delivered messages to users explaining the exclusion, providing information about the clinical setting and timing where the exclusion applies. BTRIS reports using the same terminology information were able to identify instances where protocol exceptions occurred. Conclusions Drug exclusions are frequent components of research protocols; nonadherenece to these exclusions could result in harm to subjects, erroneous study results or inefficiencies due to disqualification of research subjects. Our approach uses an MLM and a simple knowledge base, together with a controlled terminology, to provide a solution to the detection and prevention of possible protocol violations. Further work is needed to model additional aspects of the exclusions, such as timing and co-occurring conditions, to improve MLM accuracy. PMID:22195077

  6. Methodological Study to Develop Standard Operational Protocol on Oral Drug Administration for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijarania, Sunil Kumar; Saini, Sushma Kumari; Verma, Sanjay; Kaur, Sukhwinder

    2017-05-01

    To develop standard operational protocol (SOP) on oral drug administration and checklist to assess the implementation of the developed SOP. In this prospective methodological study, SOPs were developed in five phases. In the first phase, the preliminary draft of SOPs and checklists were prepared based on literature review, assessment of current practices and focus group discussion (FGD) with bedside working nurses. In the second phase, content validity was checked with the help of Delphi technique (12 experts). Total four drafts were prepared in stages and necessary modifications were made as per suggestions after each Delphi round. Fourth Delphi round was performed after conducting a pilot study. In the fourth phase, all bedside nurses were trained as per SOPs and asked to practice accordingly and observation of thirty oral drug administrations in children was done to check reliability of checklists for implementation of SOPs. In Phase-V, 7 FGDs were conducted with bedside nurses to assess the effectiveness of SOPs. The Content Validity Index (CVI) of SOP and checklists was 99.77%. Overall standardized Cronbach's alpha was calculated as 0.94. All the nurses felt that the SOP is useful. Valid and feasible SOP for drug administration to children through oral route along with valid and reliable checklist were developed. It is recommended to use this document for drug administration to children.

  7. Organizational, technical, physical and clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta; Kaźmierczak, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background Indisputably, radiotherapy has become an entirely interdisciplinary specialty. This situation requires efficient planning, verification, monitoring, quality control and constant improvement of all aspects of service delivery, referring both to patients’ (including diagnosis, prescription and method of treatment, its justification, realization and follow up) and organizational, technical and physics matters. Aim The aim of this work was to develop technical, physics and clinical quality standards for radiotherapy. This paper presents chosen standards for each of the aforementioned category. Materials and methods For the development of quality standards the comparison analysis of EU and Polish acts of law passed between 1980 and 2010 was conducted, the universal industrial ISO norm 9001:2008 referring to quality management system was reviewed. Recommendations of this norm were completed with detailed quality standards based on the author's 11 year work experience and the review of articles on quality assurance and quality control standards for radiotherapy published between 1984 and 2009 and the review of current recommendations and guidelines of American, International, European and National bodies (associations, societies, agencies such as AAPM, ESTRO, IAEA, and OECI) for quality assurance and quality management in radiotherapy. Results As a result 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: (1) organizational standards, (2) physics and technical standards and (3) clinical standards. Conclusions Proposed quality standards for radiotherapy, can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical procedures. Nevertheless standards are only of value if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:24377023

  8. Using GLOBE Plant Phenology Protocols To Meet the "National Science Education Standards."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombaugh, Ruth; Sparrow, Elena; Mal, Tarun

    2003-01-01

    Describes how high school biology teachers can use the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program protocols and data in their classrooms. Includes background information on plant phenology, an overview of GLOBE phenology protocols and materials, and implications for protocols with both deciduous trees and grasses…

  9. Is a New Protocol for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Research or Standard Therapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekking, SAS; van der Graaf, R; de Vries, Martine; Bierings, MB; van Delden, JJM; Kodish, Eric; Lantos, John

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, doctors generally develop new cancer chemotherapy for children by testing innovative chemotherapy protocols against existing protocols in prospective randomized trials. In the Netherlands, children with leukemia are treated by protocols that are agreed upon by the Dutch

  10. How to design and write a clinical research protocol in Cosmetic Dermatology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatin, Ediléia; Miot, Helio A.

    2013-01-01

    Cosmetic Dermatology is a growing subspecialty. High-quality basic science studies have been published; however, few double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trials, which are the major instrument for evidence-based medicine, have been conducted in this area. Clinical research is essential for the discovery of new knowledge, improvement of scientific basis, resolution of challenges, and good clinical practice. Some basic principles for a successful researcher include interest, availability, persistence, and honesty. It is essential to learn how to write a protocol research and to know the international and national regulatory rules. A complete clinical trial protocol should include question, background, objectives, methodology (design, variable description, sample size, randomization, inclusion and exclusion criteria, intervention, efficacy and safety measures, and statistical analysis), consent form, clinical research form, and references. Institutional ethical review board approval and financial support disclosure are necessary. Publication of positive or negative results should be an authors' commitment. PMID:23539006

  11. Increasing protocol suitability for clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vischer, Nerina; Pfeiffer, Constanze; Kealy, Jennifer; Burri, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The trial protocol is the most important document for clinical trials and describes not only the design and methodology of a study, but also all practical aspects. The suitability of the protocol has a direct impact on the execution and results of the trial. However, suitability is rarely addressed in trial practice and research. The aim of our study was to investigate protocol suitability and to identify suitability-enhancing measures for trials in sub-Saharan Africa. We used an exploratory mixed methods design. First, we interviewed 36 trial staff at different organisational levels in Ghana, Burkina Faso and Senegal. Second, we conducted an online survey among trial staff in sub-Saharan Africa to investigate trial protocol suitability based on the main themes distilled from the interviews. Protocol suitability surfaced as a prominent topic in interviews with trial staff, critiqued for its lack of clarity, implementability and adaptation to trial participants as well as to the workforce and infrastructure available. Both qualitative and quantitative investigations identified local site staff involvement in protocol development as the most helpful mean of increasing protocol suitability. Careful assessment of the local context, capacity and cultures, and ensuring that staff understand the protocol were also cited as helpful measures. Our data suggests that protocol suitability can be increased by discussing and reviewing the protocol with trial staff in advance. Involving operationally experienced staff would be most useful. For multicentre trials, we suggest that at least one trial staff member from each of the sites with the highest expected recruitment rates be involved in developing the protocol. Carefully assessing the context prior to study start is indispensable to ensuring protocol suitability and should particularly focus on the workforce and infrastructure available, as well as the needs and availability of trial participants. To allow for protocol

  12. Clinical and financial audit of diagnostic protocols for lesions of the cerebellopontine angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, I R; Gatehouse, S

    1991-03-23

    To assess the diagnostic efficiency and costs of protocols used for investigating patients with suspected lesions of the cerebellopontine angle. Prospective evaluation of tests of auditory brain stem responses and acoustic reflex thresholds, electronystagmography, and calorics. Positive test results were confirmed or refuted by high resolution computed tomography with intravenous enhancement. Single general otolaryngology clinic in a teaching hospital. 270 consecutive patients with sensorineural hearing loss requiring investigation to exclude a lesion of the cerebellopontine angle. Estimated costs of various diagnostic protocols and performance in detecting tumours of the cerebellopontine angle. Protocols including tests of auditory brain stem responses and acoustic reflex thresholds as sifting tests before computed tomography were clinically acceptable and presented considerable savings over the use of computed tomography in all patients (74,000 pounds or 84,000 pounds v 122,000 pounds). The use of electronystagmography and calorics could not be justified on clinical or financial grounds. Audiological tests of auditory brain stem responses and acoustic reflex thresholds followed by computed tomography constitute the most cost effective protocol for determining suspected lesions of the cerebellopontine angle. The cost effectiveness of diagnostic protocols should be evaluated throughout the health service.

  13. An automated standardized system for managing adverse events in clinical research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richesson, Rachel L; Malloy, Jamie F; Paulus, Kathleen; Cuthbertson, David; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2008-01-01

    Multi-site clinical protocols and clinical research networks require tools to manage and monitor adverse events (AEs). To be successful, these tools must be designed to comply with applicable regulatory requirements, reflect current data standards, international directives and advances in pharmacovigilance, and be convenient and adaptable to multiple needs. We describe an Adverse Event Data Management System (AEDAMS) that is used across multiple study designs in the various clinical research networks and multi-site studies for which we provide data and technological support. Investigators enter AE data using a standardized and structured web-based data collection form. The automated AEDAMS forwards the AE information to individuals in designated roles (investigators, sponsors, Data Safety and Monitoring Boards) and manages subsequent communications in real time, as the entire reporting, review and notification is done by automatically generated emails. The system was designed to adhere to timelines and data requirements in compliance with Good Clinical Practice (International Conference on Harmonisation E6) reporting standards and US federal regulations, and can be configured to support AE management for many types of study designs and adhere to various domestic or international reporting requirements. This tool allows AEs to be collected in a standard way by multiple distributed users, facilitates accurate and timely AE reporting and reviews, and allows the centralized management of AEs. Our design justification and experience with the system are described.

  14. Assessment of image quality of a standard and two dose-reducing protocols in paediatric pelvic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliffe, John; Frawley, Kieran; Coakley, Kerry; Cloake, John [Department of Radiology, The Royal Children' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Swanson, Cheryl E. [Department of Surgery, University of Queensland (Australia); Hafiz, Niru [Department of Child Health, The Royal Children' s Hospital, Brisbane (Australia)

    2003-03-01

    Concerns exist regarding the effect of radiation dose from paediatric pelvic CT scans and the potential later risk of radiation-induced neoplasm and teratogenic outcomes in these patients. To assess the diagnostic quality of CT images of the paediatric pelvis using either reduced mAs or increased pitch compared with standard settings. A prospective study of pelvic CT scans of 105 paediatric patients was performed using one of three protocols: (1) 31 at a standard protocol of 200 mA with rotation time of 0.75 s at 120 kVp and a pitch factor approximating 1.4; (2) 31 at increased pitch factor approaching 2 and 200 mA; and (3) 43 at a reduced setting of 100 mA and a pitch factor of 1.4. All other settings remained the same in all three groups. Image quality was assessed by radiologists blinded to the protocol used in each scan. No significant difference was found between the quality of images acquired at standard settings and those acquired at half the standard mAs. The use of increased pitch factor resulted in a higher proportion of poor images. Images acquired at 120 kVp using 75 mAs are equivalent in diagnostic quality to those acquired at 150 mAs. Reduced settings can provide useful imaging of the paediatric pelvis and should be considered as a standard protocol in these situations. (orig.)

  15. Effectiveness of a mobile cooperation intervention during the clinical practicum of nursing students: a parallel group randomized controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandell-Laine, Camilla; Saarikoski, Mikko; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Salminen, Leena; Suomi, Reima; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a study protocol for a study evaluating the effectiveness of a mobile cooperation intervention to improve students' competence level, self-efficacy in clinical performance and satisfaction with the clinical learning environment. Nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation during the clinical practicum has a vital role in promoting the learning of students. Despite an increasing interest in using mobile technologies to improve the clinical practicum of students, there is limited robust evidence regarding their effectiveness. A multicentre, parallel group, randomized, controlled, pragmatic, superiority trial. Second-year pre-registration nursing students who are beginning a clinical practicum will be recruited from one university of applied sciences. Eligible students will be randomly allocated to either a control group (engaging in standard cooperation) or an intervention group (engaging in mobile cooperation) for the 5-week the clinical practicum. The complex mobile cooperation intervention comprises of a mobile application-assisted, nursing student-nurse teacher cooperation and a training in the functions of the mobile application. The primary outcome is competence. The secondary outcomes include self-efficacy in clinical performance and satisfaction with the clinical learning environment. Moreover, a process evaluation will be undertaken. The ethical approval for this study was obtained in December 2014 and the study received funding in 2015. The results of this study will provide robust evidence on mobile cooperation during the clinical practicum, a research topic that has not been consistently studied to date. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A proposed protocol for acceptance and constancy control of computed tomography systems: a Nordic Association for Clinical Physics (NACP) work group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttner, Samuel; Bujila, Robert; Kortesniemi, Mika; Andersson, Henrik; Kull, Love; Østerås, Bjørn Helge; Thygesen, Jesper; Tarp, Ivanka Sojat

    2013-03-01

    Quality assurance (QA) of computed tomography (CT) systems is one of the routine tasks for medical physicists in the Nordic countries. However, standardized QA protocols do not yet exist and the QA methods, as well as the applied tolerance levels, vary in scope and extent at different hospitals. To propose a standardized protocol for acceptance and constancy testing of CT scanners in the Nordic Region. Following a Nordic Association for Clinical Physics (NACP) initiative, a group of medical physicists, with representatives from four Nordic countries, was formed. Based on international literature and practical experience within the group, a comprehensive standardized test protocol was developed. The proposed protocol includes tests related to the mechanical functionality, X-ray tube, detector, and image quality for CT scanners. For each test, recommendations regarding the purpose, equipment needed, an outline of the test method, the measured parameter, tolerance levels, and the testing frequency are stated. In addition, a number of optional tests are briefly discussed that may provide further information about the CT system. Based on international references and medical physicists' practical experiences, a comprehensive QA protocol for CT systems is proposed, including both acceptance and constancy tests. The protocol may serve as a reference for medical physicists in the Nordic countries.

  17. Standardizing care for high-risk patients in spine surgery: the Northwestern high-risk spine protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Ryan J; Sugrue, Patrick A; Gould, Robert W; Kallas, Peter G; Schafer, Michael F; Ondra, Stephen L; Koski, Tyler R

    2010-12-01

    Review article of current literature on the preoperative evaluation and postoperative management of patients undergoing high-risk spine operations and a presentation of a multidisciplinary protocol for patients undergoing high-risk spine operation. To provide evidence-based outline of modifiable risk factors and give an example of a multidisciplinary protocol with the goal of improving outcomes. Protocol-based care has been shown to improve outcomes in many areas of medicine. A protocol to evaluate patients undergoing high-risk procedures may ultimately improve patient outcomes. The English language literature to date was reviewed on modifiable risk factors for spine surgery. A multidisciplinary team including hospitalists, critical care physicians, anesthesiologists, and spine surgeons from neurosurgery and orthopedics established an institutional protocol to provide comprehensive care in the pre-, peri-, and postoperative periods for patients undergoing high-risk spine operations. An example of a comprehensive pre-, peri-, and postoperative high-risk spine protocol is provided, with focus on the preoperative assessment of patients undergoing high-risk spine operations and modifiable risk factors. Standardizing preoperative risk assessment may lead to better outcomes after major spine operations. A high-risk spine protocol may help patients by having dedicated physicians in multiple specialties focusing on all aspects of a patients care in the pre-, intra-, and postoperative phases.

  18. An Advanced Encryption Standard Powered Mutual Authentication Protocol Based on Elliptic Curve Cryptography for RFID, Proven on WISP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaauldin Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Information in patients’ medical histories is subject to various security and privacy concerns. Meanwhile, any modification or error in a patient’s medical data may cause serious or even fatal harm. To protect and transfer this valuable and sensitive information in a secure manner, radio-frequency identification (RFID technology has been widely adopted in healthcare systems and is being deployed in many hospitals. In this paper, we propose a mutual authentication protocol for RFID tags based on elliptic curve cryptography and advanced encryption standard. Unlike existing authentication protocols, which only send the tag ID securely, the proposed protocol could also send the valuable data stored in the tag in an encrypted pattern. The proposed protocol is not simply a theoretical construct; it has been coded and tested on an experimental RFID tag. The proposed scheme achieves mutual authentication in just two steps and satisfies all the essential security requirements of RFID-based healthcare systems.

  19. Proposal for the standardization of flow cytometry protocols to detect minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Maura Rosane Valério; Beltrame, Miriam Perlingeiro; Ferreira, Silvia Inês Alejandra Cordoba Pires; Souto, Elizabeth Xisto; Malvezzi, Mariester; Yamamoto, Mihoko

    2015-01-01

    Minimal residual disease is the most powerful predictor of outcome in acute leukemia and is useful in therapeutic stratification for acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocols. Nowadays, the most reliable methods for studying minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia are multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction. Both provide similar results at a minimal residual disease level of 0.01% of normal cells, that is, detection of one leukemic cell in up to 10,000 normal nucleated cells. Currently, therapeutic protocols establish the minimal residual disease threshold value at the most informative time points according to the appropriate methodology employed. The expertise of the laboratory in a cancer center or a cooperative group could be the most important factor in determining which method should be used. In Brazil, multiparametric flow cytometry laboratories are available in most leukemia treatment centers, but multiparametric flow cytometry processes must be standardized for minimal residual disease investigations in order to offer reliable and reproducible results that ensure quality in the clinical application of the method. The Minimal Residual Disease Working Group of the Brazilian Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation (SBTMO) was created with that aim. This paper presents recommendations for the detection of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukemia based on the literature and expertise of the laboratories who participated in this consensus, including pre-analytical and analytical methods. This paper also recommends that both multiparametric flow cytometry and polymerase chain reaction are complementary methods, and so more laboratories with expertise in immunoglobulin/T cell receptor (Ig/TCR) gene assays are necessary in Brazil. PMID:26670404

  20. A new Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network protocol to reduce cerebrospinal fluid shunt infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestle, John R W; Holubkov, Richard; Douglas Cochrane, D; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Limbrick, David D; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jerry Oakes, W; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Rozzelle, Curtis; Simon, Tamara D; Walker, Marion L; Wellons, John C; Browd, Samuel R; Drake, James M; Shannon, Chevis N; Tamber, Mandeep S; Whitehead, William E

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT In a previous report by the same research group (Kestle et al., 2011), compliance with an 11-step protocol was shown to reduce CSF shunt infection at Hydrocephalus Clinical Research Network (HCRN) centers (from 8.7% to 5.7%). Antibiotic-impregnated catheters (AICs) were not part of the protocol but were used off protocol by some surgeons. The authors therefore began using a new protocol that included AICs in an effort to reduce the infection rate further. METHODS The new protocol was implemented at HCRN centers on January 1, 2012, for all shunt procedures (excluding external ventricular drains [EVDs], ventricular reservoirs, and subgaleal shunts). Procedures performed up to September 30, 2013, were included (21 months). Compliance with the protocol and outcome events up to March 30, 2014, were recorded. The definition of infection was unchanged from the authors' previous report. RESULTS A total of 1935 procedures were performed on 1670 patients at 8 HCRN centers. The overall infection rate was 6.0% (95% CI 5.1%-7.2%). Procedure-specific infection rates varied (insertion 5.0%, revision 5.4%, insertion after EVD 8.3%, and insertion after treatment of infection 12.6%). Full compliance with the protocol occurred in 77% of procedures. The infection rate was 5.0% after compliant procedures and 8.7% after noncompliant procedures (p = 0.005). The infection rate when using this new protocol (6.0%, 95% CI 5.1%-7.2%) was similar to the infection rate observed using the authors' old protocol (5.7%, 95% CI 4.6%-7.0%). CONCLUSIONS CSF shunt procedures performed in compliance with a new infection prevention protocol at HCRN centers had a lower infection rate than noncompliant procedures. Implementation of the new protocol (including AICs) was associated with a 6.0% infection rate, similar to the infection rate of 5.7% from the authors' previously reported protocol. Based on the current data, the role of AICs compared with other infection prevention measures is unclear.

  1. Determinants of tinnitus’ impact in Quality of Life in an outpatient clinic protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magali Roggerone, [No Value

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Tinnitus is a chronic condition that can cause substantial handicap for certain patients and affects their Quality of Life. Our study focuses on Quality of Life for the tinnitus patients who participated in the protocol of an outpatient clinic established at the ENT department of

  2. Building a protocol expressway: the case of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJoynt, Terre A; Hirzallah, Muhanad A; Satele, Daniel V; Pitzen, Jason H; Alberts, Steven R; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2009-08-10

    Inconsistencies and errors resulting from nonstandard processes, together with redundancies, rework, and excess workload, lead to extended time frames for clinical trial protocol development. This results in dissatisfaction among sponsors, investigators, and staff and restricts the availability of novel treatment options for patients. A team of experts from Mayo Clinic formed, including Protocol Development Unit staff and management from the three Mayo Clinic campuses (Florida, Minnesota, and Arizona), a systems and procedures analyst, a quality office analyst, and two physician members to address the identified deficiencies. The current-state process was intensively reviewed, and improvement steps were taken to accelerate the development and approval of cancer-related clinical trials. The primary goal was to decrease the time from receipt of a new protocol through submission to an approving authority, such as the National Cancer Institute or institutional review board. Using the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control (DMAIC) framework infused with Lean waste-reduction methodologies, areas were identified for improvement, including enhancing first-time quality and processing new studies on a first-in/first-out basis. The project was successful in improving the mean turnaround time for internally authored protocols (P Lean methodologies is an effective tool to structure the definition, planning, analysis, and implementation of significant process changes.

  3. Clinical perceptions of radiation therapy undergraduate competency standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Mary-Ann; Bridge, Pete

    2014-12-01

    The multifactorial nature of clinical skills development makes assessment of undergraduate radiation therapist competence level by clinical mentors challenging. A recent overhaul of the clinical assessment strategy at Queensland University of Technology has moved away from the high-stakes Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) to encompass a more continuous measure of competence. This quantitative study aimed to gather stakeholder evidence to inform development of standards by which to measure student competence for a range of levels of progression. A simple anonymous questionnaire was distributed to all Queensland radiation therapists. The tool asked respondents to assign different levels of competency with a range of clinical tasks to different levels of student. All data were anonymous and was combined for analysis using Microsoft Excel. Feedback indicated good agreement with tasks that specified the amount of direction required and this has been incorporated into the new clinical achievements record that the students need to have signed off. Additional puzzling findings suggested higher expectations with planning tasks than with treatment-based tasks. The findings suggest that the amount of direction required by students is a valid indicator of their level and has been adopted into the clinical assessment scheme. Further work will build on this to further define standards of competency for undergraduates.

  4. Implementing Istanbul Protocol standards for forensic evidence of torture in Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Alejandro; Crosby, Sondra; Xenakis, Stephen; Iacopino, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    The Kyrgyz government declared a policy of "zero tolerance" for torture and began reforms to stop such practice, a regular occurrence in the country's daily life. This study presents the results of 10 forensic evaluations of individuals alleging torture; they represent 35% of all criminal investigations into torture for the January 2011-July 2012 period. All individuals evaluated were male with an average age of 34 years. Police officers were implicated as perpetrators in all cases. All individuals reported being subjected to threats and blunt force trauma from punches, kicks, and blows with objects such as police batons. The most common conditions documented during the evaluations were traumatic brain injury and chronic seizures. Psychological sequelae included post-traumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder, which was diagnosed in seven individuals. In all cases, the physical and psychological evidence was highly consistent with individual allegations of abuse. These forensic evaluations, which represent the first ever to be conducted in Kyrgyzstan in accordance with Istanbul Protocol standards, provide critical insight into torture practices in the country. The evaluations indicate a pattern of brutal torture practices and inadequate governmental and nongovernmental forensic evaluations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. Thromboelastometry versus standard coagulation tests versus restrictive protocol to guide blood transfusion prior to central venous catheterization in cirrhosis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Neto, Ary Serpa; do Prado, Rogerio Ruscitto; Silva, Eliezer; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Correa, Thiago Domingos

    2017-02-27

    Liver failure patients have traditionally been empirically transfused prior to invasive procedures. Blood transfusion is associated with immunologic and nonimmunologic reactions, increased risk of adverse outcomes and high costs. Scientific evidence supporting empirical transfusion is lacking, and the best approach for blood transfusion prior to invasive procedures in cirrhotic patients has not been established so far. The aim of this study is to compare three transfusion strategies (routine coagulation test-guided - ordinary or restrictive, or thromboelastometry-guided) prior to central venous catheterization in critically ill patients with cirrhosis. Design and setting: a double-blinded, parallel-group, single-center, randomized controlled clinical trial in a tertiary private hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. adults (aged 18 years or older) admitted to the intensive care unit with cirrhosis and an indication for central venous line insertion. Patients will be randomly assigned to three groups for blood transfusion strategy prior to central venous catheterization: standard coagulation tests-based, thromboelastometry-based, or restrictive. The primary efficacy endpoint will be the proportion of patients transfused with any blood product prior to central venous catheterization. The primary safety endpoint will be the incidence of major bleeding. Secondary endpoints will be the proportion of transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, platelets and cryoprecipitate; infused volume of blood products; hemoglobin and hematocrit before and after the procedure; intensive care unit and hospital length of stay; 28-day and hospital mortality; incidence of minor bleeding; transfusion-related adverse reactions; and cost analysis. This study will evaluate three strategies to guide blood transfusion prior to central venous line placement in severely ill patients with cirrhosis. We hypothesized that thromboelastometry-based and/or restrictive protocols are safe and would significantly

  6. Mindfulness for irritable bowel syndrome: protocol development for a controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garland Eric L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, a functional bowel disorder with symptoms of abdominal pain and disturbed defecation experienced by 10% of U.S. adults, results in significant disability, impaired quality of life, and health-care burden. Conventional medical care focusing on pharmacological approaches, diet, and lifestyle management has been partially effective in controlling symptoms. Behavioral treatments, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis, are promising. This paper describes an on-going feasibility study to assess the efficacy of mindfulness training, a behavioral treatment involving directing and sustaining attention to present-moment experience, for the treatment of IBS. Methods/Design The study design involves randomization of adult women with IBS according to Rome II criteria, to either an eight-week mindfulness training group (based on a Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction [MBSR] format or a previously validated IBS social-support group as an attention-control condition. The primary hypothesis is that, compared to Support Group participants, those in the Mindfulness Program will demonstrate significant improvement in IBS symptoms as measured by the IBS Symptom Severity Scale 1. Discussion 214 individuals have been screened for eligibility, of whom 148 were eligible for the study. Of those, 87 were enrolled, with 21 withdrawing after having given consent. 66 have completed or are in the process of completing the interventions. It is feasible to undertake a rigorous randomized clinical trial of mindfulness training for people with IBS, using a standardized MBSR protocol adapted for those experiencing IBS, compared to a control social-support group previously utilized in IBS studies. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT00680693

  7. BioWes-from design of experiment, through protocol to repository, control, standardization and back-tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, Petr; Soloviov, Dmytro; Barta, Antonin; Urban, Jan; Stys, Dalibor

    2016-07-15

    One of the main challenges in modern science is the amount of data produced by the experimental work; it is difficult to store, organize and share the scientific data and to extract the wealth of knowledge. Experimental method descriptions in scientific publications are often incomplete, which complicates experimental reproducibility. The proposed system was created in order to address these issues. It provides a solution for management of the experimental data and metadata to support the reproducibility. The system is implemented as a repository for experiment descriptions and experimental data. It has three main entry points: desktop application for protocol design and data processing, web interface dedicated for protocol and data management, and web-based interface for mobile devices suitable for the field experiments. The functionality of desktop client can be extended using the custom plug-ins for data extraction and data processing. The system provides several methods to support experimental reproducibility: standardized terminology support, data and metadata at a single location, standardized protocol design or protocol evolution. The system was tested in the framework of international infrastructure project AQUAEXCEL with five pilot installations at different institutes. The general testing in Tissue culture certified laboratory, Institute of complex systems and IFREMER verified the usability under different research infrastructures. The specific testing focused on the data processing modules and plug-ins demonstrated the modularity of the system for the specific conditions. The BioWes system represents experimental data as black box and therefore can handle any data type so as to provide broad usability for a variety of experiments and provide the data management infrastructure to improve the reproducibility and data sharing. The proposed system provides the tools for standard data management operations and extends the support by the standardization

  8. 466 Bee venom Immunotherapy with Standardized Extract, Two Case Comunication and Clinical Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Aristoteles Alvarez; Nieto, Leticia Hernandez; Melendez, Alvaro Pedroza

    2012-01-01

    Background Bee venom immunotherapy is a safe and effective treatment, indicated in patients with previous history of severe systemic reactions to bee venom, demonstrating succesful desensitization in more than 90% of cases with standardized extract. Currently in Mexico there is no standardized extract commercially available for treatment, despite of having high activity of beekeeping and occupational exposure with at least 17,478 registered stings per year and an annually honey production of nearly 70 tons. Methods We present the clinical progress of 2 patients with history of severe systemic reactions to bee venom and occupational exposure, both with demonstrated sensitization by specific IgE and who underwent specific immunotherapy with standardized extract (Alk-US) reaching a maintenance weekly dose of 100 mcg (PLA2) for the last 4 years. Results Both patients sufered of accidental stings after reached the maintenance dose presenting mild local reactions to stings. Both patients had very different clinical course presenting a wide variety of adverse reactions during desensitization protocol; from mild local to generalized reactions all generally well tolerated allowed to reach the maintenance dose with succesful desensitization proved by accidental exposure without severe systemic reactions. Conclusions Bee venom specific immunotherapy with standardized extract is a well tolerated and efective treatment preventing the development of life threathening reactions in sensitized patients. It is important to promote the use and availability of standardized extract in developing countries with poor safety measures and high occupational exposure.

  9. Institutional Scientific Review of Cancer Clinical Research Protocols: A Unique Requirement That Affects Activation Timelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Ning; Yan, Jingsheng; Dietrich, Martin F; Xie, Xian-Jin; Gerber, David E

    2017-12-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) requirement that clinical trials at NCI-designated cancer centers undergo institutional scientific review in addition to institutional review board evaluation is unique among medical specialties. We sought to evaluate the effect of this process on protocol activation timelines. We analyzed oncology clinical trials that underwent full board review by the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center Protocol Review and Monitoring Committee (PRMC) from January 1, 2009, through June 30, 2013. We analyzed associations between trial characteristics, PRMC decisions, protocol modifications, and process timelines using the χ 2 test, Fisher's exact test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and logistic regression. A total of 226 trials were analyzed. Of these, 77% were industry sponsored and 23% were investigator initiated. The median time from submission to PRMC approval was 55 days. The length of review was associated with trial phase, timing of approval, and number of committee changes/clarifications requested. The median process time was 35 days for those approved at first decision, 68 days for second decision, and 116 days for third decision ( P institutional scientific review of oncology clinical trials contributes substantially to protocol activation timelines. Further evaluation of this process and the value added to research quality is warranted.

  10. A standards-based clinical information system for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, F W

    1995-01-01

    To create a clinical data repository to interface the Veteran's Administration (VA) Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP) and a departmental clinical information system for the management of HIV patients. This system supports record-keeping, decision-making, reporting, and analysis. The database development was designed to overcome two impediments to successful implementations of clinical databases: (i) lack of a standard reference data model, and; (ii) lack of a universal standard for medical concept representation. Health Level Seven (HL7) is a standard protocol that specifies the implementation of interfaces between two computer applications (sender and receiver) from different vendors or sources of electronic data exchange in the health care environment. This eliminates or substantially reduces the custom interface programming and program maintenance that would otherwise be required. HL7 defines the data to be exchanged, the timing of the interchange, and the communication of errors to the application. The formats are generic in nature and must be configured to meet the needs of the two applications involved. The standard conceptually operates at the seventh level of the ISO model for Open Systems Interconnection (OSI). The OSI simply defines the data elements that are exchanged as abstract messages, and does not prescribe the exact bit stream of the messages that flow over the network. Lower level network software developed according to the OSI model may be used to encode and decode the actual bit stream. The OSI protocols are not universally implemented and, therefore, a set of encoding rules for defining the exact representation of a message must be specified. The VA has created an HL7 module to assist DHCP applications in exchanging health care information with other applications using the HL7 protocol. The DHCP HL7 module consists of a set of utility routines and files that provide a generic interface to the HL7 protocol for all DHCP applications

  11. Adoption of the children's obesity clinic's treatment (TCOCT) protocol into another Danish pediatric obesity treatment clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Most, Sebastian W; Højgaard, Birgitte; Teilmann, Grete Katrine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treating severe childhood obesity has proven difficult with inconsistent treatment results. This study reports the results of the implementation of a childhood obesity chronic care treatment protocol. METHODS: Patients aged 5 to 18 years with a body mass index (BMI) above the 99th......, but independent of baseline BMI SDS, age, co-morbidity, SES, pubertal stage, place of referral, hours of treatment per year, and mean visit interval time. CONCLUSIONS: The systematic use of the TCOCT protocol reduced the degree of childhood obesity with acceptable retention rates with a modest time...

  12. Fate of clinical research studies after ethical approval--follow-up of study protocols until publication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Blümle

    Full Text Available Many clinical studies are ultimately not fully published in peer-reviewed journals. Underreporting of clinical research is wasteful and can result in biased estimates of treatment effect or harm, leading to recommendations that are inappropriate or even dangerous.We assembled a cohort of clinical studies approved 2000-2002 by the Research Ethics Committee of the University of Freiburg, Germany. Published full articles were searched in electronic databases and investigators contacted. Data on study characteristics were extracted from protocols and corresponding publications. We characterized the cohort, quantified its publication outcome and compared protocols and publications for selected aspects.Of 917 approved studies, 807 were started and 110 were not, either locally or as a whole. Of the started studies, 576 (71% were completed according to protocol, 128 (16% discontinued and 42 (5% are still ongoing; for 61 (8% there was no information about their course. We identified 782 full publications corresponding to 419 of the 807 initiated studies; the publication proportion was 52% (95% CI: 0.48-0.55. Study design was not significantly associated with subsequent publication. Multicentre status, international collaboration, large sample size and commercial or non-commercial funding were positively associated with subsequent publication. Commercial funding was mentioned in 203 (48% protocols and in 205 (49% of the publications. In most published studies (339; 81% this information corresponded between protocol and publication. Most studies were published in English (367; 88%; some in German (25; 6% or both languages (27; 6%. The local investigators were listed as (co-authors in the publications corresponding to 259 (62% studies.Half of the clinical research conducted at a large German university medical centre remains unpublished; future research is built on an incomplete database. Research resources are likely wasted as neither health care

  13. E-health stakeholders experiences with clinical modelling and standardizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Elberg, Pia Britt; Højen, Anne Randorff

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders in e-health such as governance officials, health IT-implementers and vendors have to co-operate to achieve the goal of a future-proof interoperable e-health infrastructure. Co-operation requires knowledge on the responsibility and competences of stakeholder groups. To increase awareness on clinical modeling and standardization we conducted a workshop for Danish and a few Norwegian e-health stakeholders' and made them discuss their views on different aspects of clinical modeling using a theoretical model as a point of departure. Based on the model, we traced stakeholders' experiences. Our results showed there was a tendency that stakeholders were more familiar with e-health requirements than with design methods, clinical information models and clinical terminology as they are described in the scientific literature. The workshop made it possible for stakeholders to discuss their roles and expectations to each other.

  14. Dual trigger of triptorelin and HCG optimizes clinical outcome for high ovarian responder in GnRH-antagonist protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Saijiao; Zhou, Danni; Yin, Tailang; Xu, Wangming; Xie, Qingzhen; Cheng, Dan; Yang, Jing

    2018-01-12

    In this paper, a retrospective cohort study was conducted to the high ovarian responders in GnRH-antagonist protocols of IVF/ICSI cycles. The purpose of the study is to investigate whether dual triggering of final oocyte maturation with a combination of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) can improve the clinical outcome compared with traditional dose (10000IU) HCG trigger and low-dose (8000IU) HCG trigger for high ovarian responders in GnRH-antagonist in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI) cycles. Our study included 226 couples with high ovarian responders in GnRH-antagonist protocols of IVF/ICSI cycles. Standard dosage of HCG trigger (10000 IU of recombinant HCG) versus dual trigger (0.2 mg of triptorelin and 2000 IU of recombinant HCG) and low-dose HCG trigger (8000IU of recombinant HCG) were used for final oocyte maturation. Our main outcome measures were high quality embryo rate, the number of usable embryos, the risk of OHSS, duration of hospitalization and incidence rate of complications. Our evidence demonstrated that dual trigger is capable of preventing severe OHSS while still maintaining excellent high quality embryo rate in in high ovarian responders of GnRH-antagonist protocols.

  15. Standardized Representation of Clinical Study Data Dictionaries with CIMI Archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak K; Solbrig, Harold R; Prud'hommeaux, Eric; Pathak, Jyotishman; Jiang, Guoqian

    2016-01-01

    Researchers commonly use a tabular format to describe and represent clinical study data. The lack of standardization of data dictionary's metadata elements presents challenges for their harmonization for similar studies and impedes interoperability outside the local context. We propose that representing data dictionaries in the form of standardized archetypes can help to overcome this problem. The Archetype Modeling Language (AML) as developed by the Clinical Information Modeling Initiative (CIMI) can serve as a common format for the representation of data dictionary models. We mapped three different data dictionaries (identified from dbGAP, PheKB and TCGA) onto AML archetypes by aligning dictionary variable definitions with the AML archetype elements. The near complete alignment of data dictionaries helped map them into valid AML models that captured all data dictionary model metadata. The outcome of the work would help subject matter experts harmonize data models for quality, semantic interoperability and better downstream data integration.

  16. Network Coding to Enhance Standard Routing Protocols in Wireless Mesh Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pahlevani, Peyman; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Fitzek, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a design and simulation of a locally optimized network coding protocol, called PlayNCool, for wireless mesh networks. PlayN-Cool is easy to implement and compatible with existing routing protocols and devices. This allows the system to gain from network coding capabilities...... linear network coding to increase the usefulness of each transmission from the helpers. This paper focuses on the design details needed to make the system operate in reality and evaluating performance using ns-3 in multi-hop topologies. Our results show that the PlayNCool protocol increases the end...

  17. Concurrent training protocol for men with androgen deficiency in the aging male: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Melissa de Carvalho Souza; Leitão, Alice Erwig; Vieira, Guilherme; Moratelli, Jéssica; Boing, Leonessa; Seemann, Taysi; Guimarães, Adriana Coutinho de Azevedo

    2018-03-25

    The androgen deficiency in the aging male (ADAM) affects physical, sexual, and psychological aspects with characteristics symptoms of middle-aged men. The practice of regular physical activity and physical exercise can attenuate these symptoms. The aim of this randomized clinical trial is to propose a physical exercise protocol based on concurrent training for middle-aged men with ADAM. Randomized clinical trial with a 6-month intervention will randomly divided into two groups: experimental group (EG) and control group (CG). Four evaluations will be carried out, (1) pre-intervention; (2) in the first month of intervention; (3) in the third month of intervention; (4) post-intervention, evaluating: physical, psychological, sexual, and hormonal aspects. The intervention protocol with concurrent training will have duration of 6 months; frequency of 3 times weekly, with 60 min per session. The two-way ANOVA test will be used for the inter-group and intra-group comparisons with repeated measurements, and also Sydak's comparison test. This protocol was developed with the intent of easing the symptoms of ADAM. In addition, it is believed that the concurrent training protocol could be capable to recover hormonal, physical, psychological, and sexual aspect of middle-aged men with ADAM.

  18. Shortened screening method for phosphorus fractionation in sediments A complementary approach to the standards, measurements and testing harmonised protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Patricia; Rauret, Gemma; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose Fermin

    2004-01-01

    The SMT protocol, a sediment phosphorus fractionation method harmonised and validated in the frame of the standards, measurements and testing (SMT) programme (European Commission), establishes five fractions of phosphorus according to their extractability. The determination of phosphate extracted is carried out spectrophotometrically. This protocol has been applied to 11 sediments of different origin and characteristics and the phosphorus extracted in each fraction was determined not only by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, but also by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The use of these two determination techniques allowed the differentiation between phosphorus that was present in the extracts as soluble reactive phosphorus and as total phosphorus. From the comparison of data obtained with both determination techniques a shortened screening method, for a quick evaluation of the magnitude and importance of the fractions given by the SMT protocol, is proposed and validated using two certified reference materials

  19. CDISC standard-based electronic archiving of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Aerts, J; Semler, S C; Ohmann, C

    2009-01-01

    Our objectives were to develop, based on the analysis of archived clinical trial documents and data and on the requirements of GCP-compliant electronic archiving, a concept for legally secure and technically feasible archiving of the entire clinical trial, including the essential documents of the trial master file and the study database. Based on own experiences with CDISC, existing implementations and future developments, CDISC standards were evaluated concerning requirements for archiving clinical studies. Trial master files of a small, medium and large clinical study were analyzed to collect specifications for electronic archiving of records. Two different ways of long-term storage exist for the clinical trial archive: document-oriented archival and data archiving of the study database. The trial master file has a highly complex structure; its different parts can vary greatly in size, depending of the working style of investigators, number of patients recruited, the number of adverse event reports and the number of queries. The CDISC standard ODM is especially suited for archiving clinical trials, because among other features it contains the entire clinical trial data and full audit trail information. On the other hand SDTM is a content standard suited for data warehouses. Two recent developments in CDISC will affect the archival of studies: the further development of ODM in the area of "eCRF submission" and the use of "Electronic Source Data". The complexity and size of the trial master file requires new solutions. Though ODM provides effective means to archive the study database, it shows still deficiencies, especially for the joint archiving of data and the complex documentation of the trial master file. A concept was developed in which the ODM standard is part of an integrated archiving of the trial data and documents. ODM archiving of the study database enables long-term storage which is GCP-compliant. Archiving of documents of the trial master file in PDF

  20. Integrated monitoring: Setting new standards for the next decade of clinical trial practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Rai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The new age clinical research professional is now geared toward an "integrated monitoring" approach. A number of critical activities at the site level and at the sponsor′s organization need convergence to harness rich dividends in early study start and quick close of the study. The field monitor needs full integration to ensure standard of care, train the site in protocol, select the right site, ensure regulatory support, ensure excellent project management skills, coach, support the logistics team, manage the vendor, ensure good documentation practices, develop patient recruitment and retention, lean the applicable process, as well as ensure effective site management amongst the myriad activities assigned toward developing the drug in the clinic.

  1. Getting started with protocol for quality assurance of digital mammography in the clinical centre of Montenegro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, S; Bosmans, H; Mijovic, S

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work is (i) to work out a test procedure for quality assurance (QA) in digital mammography with newly released test equipment, including the MagicMax mam multimeter (IBA, Germany) and the anthropomorphic tissue equivalent phantom Mammo AT (IBA, Germany), and (ii) to determine whether a first digital computer radiography (CR) system in Montenegro meets the current European standards. Tested parameters were tube output (µGy mAs(-1)) and output rate (mGy s(-1)), reproducibility and accuracy of tube voltage, half value layer, reproducibility and accuracy of the AEC system, exposure control steps, image receptor's response function, image quality and printer stability test. The evaluated dosimetric quantity is the average glandular dose (AGD) as evaluated from PMMA slabs simulating breast tissue. The main findings are that QA can be organised in Montenegro. (1) All measured parameters are within the range described in European protocols except the tube voltage which deviated more than ± 1 kV. The automatic determination of the HVL was satisfactorily. AGD ranged from 0.66 to 7.02 mGy for PMMA thicknesses from 20 to 70 mm, and is in accordance with literature data. (2) The image quality score as obtained with the anthropomorphic tissue equivalent phantom Mammo AT for the CR system was similar to findings on the authors' conventional screen-film mammography. (3) In clinical practice the mammograms are printed. The CR reader produces images with a pixel size of 43.75 µm, which is compatible with the laser printer (39 µm laser spot spacing). The image processing algorithm embedded in the reader successfully processes mammograms with desirable image brightness and contrast in the printed image. The authors conclude that this first digital mammography system seems a good candidate for breast cancer screening applications. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Protocol for Bone Augmentation with Simultaneous Early Implant Placement: A Retrospective Multicenter Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fairbairn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To present a novel protocol for alveolar bone regeneration in parallel to early implant placement. Methods. 497 patients in need of extraction and early implant placement with simultaneous bone augmentation were treated in a period of 10 years. In all patients the same specific method was followed and grafting was performed utilizing in situ hardening fully resorbable alloplastic grafting materials consisting of β-tricalcium phosphate and calcium sulfate. The protocol involved atraumatic extraction, implant placement after 4 weeks with simultaneous bone augmentation, and loading of the implant 12 weeks after placement and grafting. Follow-up periods ranged from 6 months to 10 years (mean of 4 years. Results. A total of 601 postextraction sites were rehabilitated in 497 patients utilizing the novel protocol. Three implants failed before loading and three implants failed one year after loading, leaving an overall survival rate of 99.0%. Conclusions. This standardized protocol allows successful long-term functional results regarding alveolar bone regeneration and implant rehabilitation. The concept of placing the implant 4 weeks after extraction, augmenting the bone around the implant utilizing fully resorbable, biomechanically stable, alloplastic materials, and loading the implant at 12 weeks seems to offer advantages when compared with traditional treatment modalities.

  3. A Method of Managing Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in the Absence of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring: The Imaging and Clinical Examination Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnut, Randall M; Temkin, Nancy; Dikmen, Sureyya; Rondina, Carlos; Videtta, Walter; Petroni, Gustavo; Lujan, Silvia; Alanis, Victor; Falcao, Antonio; de la Fuenta, Gustavo; Gonzalez, Luis; Jibaja, Manuel; Lavarden, Arturo; Sandi, Freddy; Mérida, Roberto; Romero, Ricardo; Pridgeon, Jim; Barber, Jason; Machamer, Joan; Chaddock, Kelley

    2018-01-01

    The imaging and clinical examination (ICE) algorithm used in the Benchmark Evidence from South American Trials: Treatment of Intracranial Pressure (BEST TRIP) randomized controlled trial is the only prospectively investigated clinical protocol for traumatic brain injury management without intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. As the default literature standard, it warrants careful evaluation. We present the ICE protocol in detail and analyze the demographics, outcome, treatment intensity, frequency of intervention usage, and related adverse events in the ICE-protocol cohort. The 167 ICE protocol patients were young (median 29 years) with a median Glasgow Coma Scale motor score of 4 but with anisocoria or abnormal pupillary reactivity in 40%. This protocol produced outcomes not significantly different from those randomized to the monitor-based protocol (favorable 6-month extended Glasgow Outcome Score in 39%; 41% mortality rate). Agents commonly employed to treat suspected intracranial hypertension included low-/moderate-dose hypertonic saline (72%) and mannitol (57%), mild hyperventilation (adjusted partial pressure of carbon dioxide 30-35 mm Hg in 73%), and pressors to maintain cerebral perfusion (62%). High-dose hyperosmotics or barbiturates were uncommonly used. Adverse event incidence was low and comparable to the BEST TRIP monitored group. Although this protocol should produce similar/acceptable results under circumstances comparable to those in the trial, influences such as longer pre-hospital times and non-specialist transport personnel, plus an intensive care unit model of aggressive physician-intensive care by small groups of neurotrauma-focused intensivists, which differs from most high-resource models, support caution in expecting the same results in dissimilar settings. Finally, this protocol's ICP-titration approach to suspected intracranial hypertension (vs. crisis management for monitored ICP) warrants further study.

  4. Standard concentration infusions in paediatric intensive care: the clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Joanne; Aguado-Lorenzo, Virginia; Arenas-Lopez, Sara

    2017-05-01

    The use of standard concentrations of intravenous infusions has been advocated by international organisations to increase intravenous medication safety in paediatric and neonatal critical care. However, there is no guidance on how to identify and implement these infusions leading to great interunit variability. To identify the most appropriate clinical concentrations required by our paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) population with regard to accuracy of delivery and overall fluid allowance. Firstly a matrix was used to balance the concentration, dose and infusion volume (weight range 1.5-50 kg). Results were further refined considering: patient fluid allowance based on fluid volume targets, infusion pump accuracy and challenging each infusion against clinical scenarios requiring administration of multiple drug infusions found in PICU. Consideration was given to the standard concentrations routinely used in adults, in order to assess whether alignment with paediatrics was possible for some of the concentrations proposed. Finally a risk assessment of the infusions was conducted using the NPSA 20 tool. Twenty-five drugs identified as the most commonly used intravenous infusions in the unit. For the majority of the medicines, three weight bands of standard concentrations were necessary to cover the children's weight ranges and kept within predefined fluid requirements and accuracy of delivery. This work shows a patient focused systematic approach for defining and evaluating standardised concentrations in intensive care children. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  5. Pregnancy outcome of “delayed start” GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders: A clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aflatoonian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of poor-responding patients is still major challenge in assisted reproductive techniques (ART. Delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol is recommended to these patients, but little is known in this regards. Objective: The goal of this study was assessment of delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol in poor responders, and in vitro fertilization (IVF outcomes. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial included sixty infertile women with Bologna criteria for ovarian poor responders who were candidate for IVF. In case group (n=30, delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol administered estrogen priming followed by early follicular-phase GnRH antagonist treatment for 7 days before ovarian stimulation with gonadotropin. Control group (n=30 treated with estrogen priming antagonist protocol. Finally, endometrial thickness, the rates of oocytes maturation, , embryo formation, and pregnancy were compared between two groups. Results: Rates of implantation, chemical, clinical, and ongoing pregnancy in delayed-start cycles were higher although was not statistically significant. Endometrial thickness was significantly higher in case group. There were no statistically significant differences in the rates of oocyte maturation, embryo formation, and IVF outcomes between two groups. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between delayed-start GnRH antagonist protocol versus GnRH antagonist protocol.

  6. DXA in the assessment of subchondral bone mineral density in knee osteoarthritis--A semi-standardized protocol after systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepriano, Alexandre; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Little, Robert D; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando; Arribas, Jose María; Largo, Raquel; Branco, Jaime C; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    Subchondral bone mineral density (sBMD) contributes to the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Reliable methods to assess sBMD status may predict the response of specific OA phenotypes to targeted therapies. While dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the knee can determine sBMD, no consensus exists regarding its methodology. Construct a semi-standardized protocol for knee DXA to measure sBMD in patients with OA of the knee by evaluating the varying methodologies present in existing literature. We performed a systematic review of original papers published in PubMed and Web of Science from their inception to July 2014 using the following search terms: subchondral bone, osteoarthritis, and bone mineral density. DXA of the knee can be performed with similar reproducibility values to those proposed by the International Society for Clinical Densitometry for the hip and spine. We identified acquisition view, hip rotation, knee positioning and stabilization, ROI location and definition, and the type of analysis software as important sources of variation. A proposed knee DXA protocol was constructed taking into consideration the results of the review. DXA of the knee can be reliably performed in patients with knee OA. Nevertheless, we found substantial methodological variation across previous studies. Methodological standardization may provide a foundation from which to establish DXA of the knee as a valid tool for identification of SB changes and as an outcome measure in clinical trials of disease modifying osteoarthritic drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Development and implementation of intranasal naloxone opioid overdose response protocol at a homeless health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Chin Hwa Y; Horstman, Molly J; Williams, Brent C

    2016-01-01

    To describe the development, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of Opioid Overdose Response Protocol using intranasal (IN) naloxone in a homeless shelter. Opioid Overdose Response Protocol and training curriculum were developed using the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Opioid Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution (OEND) flow chart, the American Heart Association (AHA) simplified adult basic life support algorithm, and resources through Harms Reduction Coalition. Intranasal naloxone offers a safe and effective method for opioid reversal. To combat the rising incidence of opioid overdose, IN naloxone should be made available at homeless shelters and other facilities with high frequency of opioid overdose, including the training of appropriate staff. This project has demonstrated the effective training and implementation of an Opioid Overdose Response Protocol, based on feedback received from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) trained nonhealthcare staff. Nurse practitioners (NPs), with our focus on patient care, prevention, and education, are well suited to the deployment of this life-saving protocol. NPs are in critical positions to integrate opioid overdose prevention education and provide naloxone rescue kits in clinical practices. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  8. Summary Report Panel 1: The Need for Protocols and Standards in Research on Underwater Noise Impacts on Marine Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Christine; Ainslie, Michael A; de Jong, Christ A F; Racca, Roberto; Stocker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    As concern about anthropogenic noise and its impacts on marine fauna is increasing around the globe, data are being compared across populations, species, noise sources, geographic regions, and time. However, much of the raw and processed data are not comparable due to differences in measurement methodology, analysis and reporting, and a lack of metadata. Common protocols and more formal, international standards are needed to ensure the effectiveness of research, conservation, regulation and practice, and unambiguous communication of information and ideas. Developing standards takes time and effort, is largely driven by a few expert volunteers, and would benefit from stakeholders' contribution and support.

  9. Virtual glaucoma clinics: patient acceptance and quality of patient education compared to standard clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, Jennifer H; Austin, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Virtual glaucoma clinics allow rapid, reliable patient assessment but the service should be acceptable to patients and concordance with treatment needs to be maintained with adequate patient education. This study compares experiences and understanding of patients reviewed via the virtual clinic versus the standard clinic by way of an extended patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ). One hundred PSQs were given to consecutive patients attending glaucoma clinics in October 2013. All 135 patients reviewed via the virtual clinic from April 2013 until August 2013 were sent postal PSQs in September 2013. Data were obtained for demographics, understanding of glaucoma, their condition, satisfaction with their experience, and quality of information. Responses were analyzed in conjunction with the clinical records. Eighty-five percent of clinic patients and 63% of virtual clinic patients responded to the PSQ. The mean satisfaction score was over 4.3/5 in all areas surveyed. Virtual clinic patients' understanding of their condition was very good, with 95% correctly identifying their diagnosis as glaucoma, 83% as ocular hypertension and 78% as suspects. There was no evidence to support inferior knowledge or self-perceived understanding compared to standard clinic patients. Follow-up patients knew more about glaucoma than new patients. Over 95% of patients found our information leaflet useful. Forty percent of patients sought additional information but less than 20% used the internet for this. A substantial proportion of glaucoma pathway patients may be seen by non-medical staff supervised by glaucoma specialists via virtual clinics. Patients are accepting of this format, reporting high levels of satisfaction and non-inferior knowledge to those seen in standard clinics.

  10. Virtual glaucoma clinics: patient acceptance and quality of patient education compared to standard clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Court JH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer H Court,1 Michael W Austin1,21Department of Ophthalmology, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, Wales, UK; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Neath Port Talbot Hospital, Swansea, Wales, UKPurpose: Virtual glaucoma clinics allow rapid, reliable patient assessment but the service should be acceptable to patients and concordance with treatment needs to be maintained with adequate patient education. This study compares experiences and understanding of patients reviewed via the virtual clinic versus the standard clinic by way of an extended patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ.Patients and methods: One hundred PSQs were given to consecutive patients attending glaucoma clinics in October 2013. All 135 patients reviewed via the virtual clinic from April 2013 until August 2013 were sent postal PSQs in September 2013. Data were obtained for demographics, understanding of glaucoma, their condition, satisfaction with their experience, and quality of information. Responses were analyzed in conjunction with the clinical records.Results: Eighty-five percent of clinic patients and 63% of virtual clinic patients responded to the PSQ. The mean satisfaction score was over 4.3/5 in all areas surveyed. Virtual clinic patients’ understanding of their condition was very good, with 95% correctly identifying their diagnosis as glaucoma, 83% as ocular hypertension and 78% as suspects. There was no evidence to support inferior knowledge or self-perceived understanding compared to standard clinic patients. Follow-up patients knew more about glaucoma than new patients. Over 95% of patients found our information leaflet useful. Forty percent of patients sought additional information but less than 20% used the internet for this.Conclusion: A substantial proportion of glaucoma pathway patients may be seen by non-medical staff supervised by glaucoma specialists via virtual clinics. Patients are accepting of this format, reporting high levels of satisfaction and non

  11. A Web Resource for Standardized Benchmark Datasets, Metrics, and Rosetta Protocols for Macromolecular Modeling and Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Ó Conchúir

    Full Text Available The development and validation of computational macromolecular modeling and design methods depend on suitable benchmark datasets and informative metrics for comparing protocols. In addition, if a method is intended to be adopted broadly in diverse biological applications, there needs to be information on appropriate parameters for each protocol, as well as metrics describing the expected accuracy compared to experimental data. In certain disciplines, there exist established benchmarks and public resources where experts in a particular methodology are encouraged to supply their most efficient implementation of each particular benchmark. We aim to provide such a resource for protocols in macromolecular modeling and design. We present a freely accessible web resource (https://kortemmelab.ucsf.edu/benchmarks to guide the development of protocols for protein modeling and design. The site provides benchmark datasets and metrics to compare the performance of a variety of modeling protocols using different computational sampling methods and energy functions, providing a "best practice" set of parameters for each method. Each benchmark has an associated downloadable benchmark capture archive containing the input files, analysis scripts, and tutorials for running the benchmark. The captures may be run with any suitable modeling method; we supply command lines for running the benchmarks using the Rosetta software suite. We have compiled initial benchmarks for the resource spanning three key areas: prediction of energetic effects of mutations, protein design, and protein structure prediction, each with associated state-of-the-art modeling protocols. With the help of the wider macromolecular modeling community, we hope to expand the variety of benchmarks included on the website and continue to evaluate new iterations of current methods as they become available.

  12. Application of EARL (ResEARch 4 Life®) protocols for [18F]FDG-PET/CT clinical and research studies. A roadmap towards exact recovery coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerzyk, Marcin; Fernández-López, Rosa; Parrado-Gallego, Ángel; Pachón-Garrudo, Víctor Manuel; Chavero-Royan, José; Hevilla, Juan; Jiménez-Ortega, Elisa; Leal, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    Tumour uptake value is a critical result in [18F]FDG-PET/CT ([18F]fluorodeoxyglucose) quantitative scans such as the dose prescription for radiotherapy and oncology. The quantification is highly dependent on the protocol of acquisition and reconstruction of the image, especially in low activity tumours. During adjusting acquisition and reconstruction protocols available in our Siemens Biograph mCT scanner for EARL (ResEARch 4 Life®) [18F]FDG-PET/CT accreditation requirements, we developed reconstruction protocols which will be used in PET based radiotherapy planning able to reduce inter-/intra-institute variability in Standard Uptake Value (SUV) results, and to bring Recovery Coefficient to 1 as close as possible for Image Quality NEMA 2007 phantom. Primary and secondary tumours from two patients were assessed by four independent evaluators. The influence of reconstruction protocols on tumour clinical assessment was presented. We proposed the improvement route for EARL accredited protocols so that they may be developed in classes to take advantage of scanner possibilities. The application of optimized reconstruction protocol eliminates the need of partial volume corrections.

  13. The effect of the introduction of a standard monitoring protocol on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-07

    Mar 7, 2011 ... Background: A comprehensive approach to the control of type 2 diabetes is required to reduce mortality and morbidity. To improve ... protocol on the investigations performed on the metabolic control of type 2 diabetes at ... In 2007, following a routine notes audit, it was noted that investigations were not ...

  14. A framework for the definition of standardized protocols for measuring upper-extremity kinematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kontaxis, A.; Cutti, A.G.; Johnson, G.R.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Increasing interest in upper extremity biomechanics has led to closer investigations of both segment movements and detailed joint motion. Unfortunately, conceptual and practical differences in the motion analysis protocols used up to date reduce compatibility for post data and cross

  15. Psychometric Properties of a Standardized Observation Protocol to Quantify Pediatric Physical Therapy Actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonderer, Patrizia; Ziegler, Schirin Akhbari; Oertle, Barbara Gressbach; Meichtry, Andre; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    Purpose: Pediatric physical therapy (PPT) is characterized by heterogeneity. This blurs the evaluation of effective components of PPT. The Groningen Observation Protocol (GOP) was developed to quantify contents of PPT. This study assesses the reliability and completeness of the GOP. Methods: Sixty

  16. A Deep Learning Solution for Automatic Fetal Neurosonographic Diagnostic Plane Verification Using Clinical Standard Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqub, Mohammad; Kelly, Brenda; Papageorghiou, Aris T; Noble, J Alison

    2017-12-01

    During routine ultrasound assessment of the fetal brain for biometry estimation and detection of fetal abnormalities, accurate imaging planes must be found by sonologists following a well-defined imaging protocol or clinical standard, which can be difficult for non-experts to do well. This assessment helps provide accurate biometry estimation and the detection of possible brain abnormalities. We describe a machine-learning method to assess automatically that transventricular ultrasound images of the fetal brain have been correctly acquired and meet the required clinical standard. We propose a deep learning solution, which breaks the problem down into three stages: (i) accurate localization of the fetal brain, (ii) detection of regions that contain structures of interest and (iii) learning the acoustic patterns in the regions that enable plane verification. We evaluate the developed methodology on a large real-world clinical data set of 2-D mid-gestation fetal images. We show that the automatic verification method approaches human expert assessment. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. DIRECT PULP CAPPING IN TREATMENT OF REVERSIBLE PULPITIS IN PRIMARY TEETH- CLINICAL PROTOCOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Milcheva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The pulp of primary teeth is identical morphologically and physiologically to that of permanent teeth and it is capable to answer to pathological stimuli by producing tertiary dentin. When the inflammation of the pulp is in its reversible stage vital methods of treatment are indicated in order to stimulate the healing processes in it and protect its vitality. In Bulgaria the most popular method of treatment of inflammation diseases of the pulp in primary dentition is the mortal amputation. The biological way of treatment is not very common even in cases where there are indications for it. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to present the approbated by us protocol for application of direct pulp capping for treatment of reversible pulpitis in primary teeth. Material and methods: On the base of world experience and our contemporary meta- analysis of the researches published in the last 15 years concerning the problems of diagnostics. We determined clinical and radiographic diagnostic criteria for reversible pulpitis in primary teeth and indications for application of direct pulp capping as a method of treatment. We give clinical steps for application of the method and summarized the clinical and radiographic criteria for success after treatment. Results/conclusion: We gather all the information for applying direct pulp cappingfor treatment of reversible pulpitis in primary dentition. We offer the method of direct pulp capping as a clinical protocol “step by step” and illustrated by scheme which can be useful for students and dentists in their everyday practice.

  18. Examining clinical supervision as a mechanism for changes in practice: a research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilworth, Sophie; Higgins, Isabel; Parker, Vicki; Kelly, Brian; Turner, Jane

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the research protocol for a study exploring if and how clinical supervision facilitates change in practice relating to psychosocial aspects of care for Health Professionals, who have been trained to deliver a psychosocial intervention to adults with cancer. There is a recognized need to implement care that is in line with clinical practice guidelines for the psychosocial care of adults with cancer. Clinical supervision is recommended as a means to support Health Professionals in providing the recommended psychosocial care. A qualitative design embedded within an experimental, stepped wedge randomized control trial. The study will use discourse analysis to analyse audio-recorded data collected in clinical supervision sessions that are being delivered as one element of a large randomized control trial. The sessions will be attended primarily by nurses, but including physiotherapists, radiation therapists, occupational therapists. The Health Professionals are participants in a randomized control trial designed to reduce anxiety and depression of distressed adults with cancer. The sessions will be facilitated by psychiatrists experienced in psycho-oncology and the provision of clinical supervision. The proposed research is designed specifically to facilitate exploration of the mechanisms by which clinical supervision enables Health Professionals to deliver a brief, tailored psychosocial intervention in the context of their everyday practice. This is the first study to use discourse analysis embedded within an experimental randomized control trial to explore the mechanisms of change generated within clinical supervision by analysing the discourse within the clinical supervision sessions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Analysis of 855 upper extremity fistulas created using a standard protocol: the role of graft extension to achieve functional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Bassan J; Perez, Enrique R; Tabbara, Marwan

    2013-06-01

    The Fistula First Breakthrough Initiative (FFBI) has been one of the most important national programs to help achieve considerable improvements in the care of patients on chronic hemodialysis. FFBI has helped place guidelines to push practitioners to reduce the use of tunneled central venous catheters and to increase the rate of arteriovenous fistula use in patients requiring chronic hemodialysis access. However, despite current guidelines, no specific protocols exist for the creation and management of autogenous arteriovenous fistulas and outcomes at most centers are below national benchmarks. In this study, we examine the effectiveness of a standard protocol used at our institution for the creation of autogenous upper extremity fistulas for hemodialysis access in achieving early cannulation and early removal of tunneled dialysis catheters. Our review encompasses 855 consecutive autogenous fistulas created over a 10-year period. Our findings suggest that the use of a standard protocol for creation and management of autogenous fistulas can help increase the rate of functional accesses over national benchmarks. Additionally, extension/conversion of malfunctioning fistulas to grafts appears to be an excellent method to expedite removal of a tunneled dialysis catheter with concomitant preservation of a fistula.

  20. [Standard protocol of ALK fusion gene assessment by fluorescent in situ hybridization in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Zheng, Shan; Xie, Yong-qiang

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the standard protocol for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene assessment by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tissue specimens of NSCLC cases were retrospectively collected from Jan. 2011 to July 2012. ALK fusion gene was examined by FISH using break-apart ALK gene probes (Vysis company). The identification of ALK fusion gene was determined by fluorescent signals under a fluorescence microscope. One hundred and forty-six eligible NSCLC tumor specimens were tested for ALK fusion gene by FISH. The specimens included 110 cases (75.4%) of surgically-removed tissues, 11 cases (7.5%) of biopsy, 19 cases (13.0%) of lymph node and 6 cases (4.1%) of other metastatic tissues. The positivity of ALK fusion gene was 8.9% (13/146). The assessment of ALK fusing gene by FISH using standard protocol for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is feasible. The protocol can used to test in surgically-removed tissues, biopsies, metastatic lymph nodes and other metastastic specimens.

  1. A standardized education protocol significantly reduces traumatic injuries and syncope recurrence: an observational study in 316 patients with vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, M Ali; Mortensen, Kai; Salukhe, Tushar V; Wilke, Iris; Ortak, Michelle; Drewitz, Imke; Hoffmann, Boris; Müllerleile, Kai; Sultan, Arian; Servatius, Helge; Steven, Daniel; von Kodolitsch, Yskert; Meinertz, Thomas; Ventura, Rodolfo; Willems, Stephan

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of a non-pharmacological approach on the frequency of traumatic injuries and syncope recurrence in patients with vasovagal syncope and normal hearts. We report the experience in our syncope centre with a standardized education and teaching protocol for patients with vasovagal syncope. The treatment of vasovagal syncope is often complex and discouraging. Besides medical options, behaviour modification is a main component of therapy but has no statistical evidence to support its use. Between January 1999 and September 2006, we prospectively enrolled all patients with vasovagal syncope. The patients were counselled about the benign nature of their disease. Specific recommendations were made according to a standardized education protocol established at our syncope centre. A pre-/post-study was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of our approach on syncope recurrence and frequency of injury as the study endpoints. Complete follow-up data were available from 85% of the study population (316 of 371) after a mean time of 710 ± 286 days (mean age 50 years; standard deviation ± 18 years, 160 female). Eighty-seven patients (27.5%) had a syncope recurrence with 22 suffering an injury during syncope. During the follow-up period, the syncope burden per month was significantly reduced from 0.35 ± 0.03 at initial presentation to 0.08 ± 0.02 (Psyncope was significantly lower at the time of recurrence compared with the initial presentation (25 vs. 42%; McNemar's test P= 0.02). A standardized education protocol significantly reduces traumatic injuries and syncope recurrence in patients with vasovagal syncope.

  2. Flow Cytometric Clinical Immunomonitoring Using Peptide–MHC Class II Tetramers: Optimization of Methods and Protocol Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diahann T. S. L. Jansen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of novel strategies to induce tolerance in autoimmune and autoimmune-like conditions, clinical trials of antigen-specific tolerizing immunotherapy have become a reality. Besides safety, it will be essential to gather mechanistic data on responding CD4+ T cells to assess the effects of various immunomodulatory approaches in early-phase trials. Peptide–MHC class II (pMHCII multimers are an ideal tool for monitoring antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses in unmanipulated cells directly ex vivo. Various protocols have been published but there are reagent and assay limitations across laboratories that could hinder their global application to immune monitoring. In this methodological analysis, we compare protocols and test available reagents to identify sources of variability and to determine the limitations of the tetramer binding assay. We describe a robust pMHCII flow cytometry-based assay to quantify and phenotype antigen-specific CD4+ T cells directly ex vivo from frozen peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples, which we suggest should be tested across various laboratories to standardize immune-monitoring results.

  3. Clinical protocols for {sup 31}P MRS of the brain and their use in evaluating optic pathway gliomas in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Jan, E-mail: j.novak@bham.ac.uk [School of Cancer Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Wilson, Martin, E-mail: martin@pipegrep.co.uk [School of Cancer Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); MacPherson, Lesley, E-mail: lesley.macpherson@bch.nhs.uk [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Arvanitis, Theodoros N., E-mail: t.arvanitis@bham.ac.uk [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); School of Electronic, Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Davies, Nigel P., E-mail: nigel.davies@nhs.net [School of Cancer Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics RRPPS, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Peet, Andrew C., E-mail: a.peet@bham.ac.uk [School of Cancer Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: In vivo {sup 31}P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) measures phosphorus-containing metabolites that play an essential role in many disease processes. An advantage over {sup 1}H MRS is that total choline can be separated into phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine which have opposite associations with tumour grade. We demonstrate {sup 31}P MRS can provide robust metabolic information on an acceptable timescale to yield information of clinical importance. Methods: All MRI examinations were carried out on a 3T whole body scanner with all {sup 31}P MRS scans conducted using a dual-tuned {sup 1}H/{sup 31}P head coil. Once optimised on phantoms, the protocol was tested in six healthy volunteers (four male and two female, mean age: 25 ± 2.7). {sup 31}P MRS was then implemented on three children with optic pathway gliomas. Results: {sup 31}P MRS on volunteers showed that a number of metabolite ratios varied significantly (p < 0.05 ANOVA) across different structures of the brain, whereas PC/GPC did not. Standard imaging showed the optic pathway gliomas were enhancing on T1-weighted imaging after contrast injection and have high tCho on {sup 1}H MRS, both of which are associated with high grade lesions. {sup 31}P MRS showed the phosphocholine/glycerophosphocholine ratio to be low (<0.6) which suggests low grade tumours in keeping with their clinical behaviour and the histology of most biopsied optic pathway gliomas. Conclusion: {sup 31}P MRS can be implemented in the brain as part of a clinical protocol to provide robust measurement of important metabolites, in particular providing a greater understanding of cases where tCho is raised on {sup 1}H MRS.

  4. Blockchain protocols in clinical trials: Transparency and traceability of consent [version 3; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations, 1 not approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Benchoufi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trial consent for protocols and their revisions should be transparent for patients and traceable for stakeholders. Our goal is to implement a process allowing the collection of patients’ informed consent, which is bound to protocol revisions, storing and tracking the consent in a secure, unfalsifiable and publicly verifiable way, and enabling the sharing of this information in real time. For that, we will built a consent workflow using a rising technology called Blockchain. This is a distributed technology that brings a built-in layer of transparency and traceability. From a more general and prospective point of view, we believe Blockchain technology brings a paradigmatical shift to the entire clinical research field. We designed a Proof-of-Concept protocol consisting of time-stamping each step of the patient’s consent collection using Blockchain; thus archiving and historicising the consent through cryptographic validation in a securely unfalsifiable and transparent way. For each revision of the protocol, consent was sought again. We obtained a single document, in a standard open format, that accounted for the whole consent collection process: timestamped consent status with regards to each version of the protocol. This document cannot be corrupted, and can be checked on any dedicated public website. It should be considered as a robust proof of data. However, in a live clinical trial, the authentication system should be strengthened in order to remove the need for third parties, here the trial stakeholders, and give participative control to the peer-to-peer users. In the future, we think that the complex data flow of a clinical trial can be tracked using Blockchain, that a blockchain core functionality, named Smart Contract, could help prevent clinical trial events not to happen in the right chronological order: for example including patients before they consented or analysing case report forms data before freezing the database

  5. Summary of ongoing clinical protocols for proton and heavier-ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giap, Fantine N.; Levy, Richard P.; Giap, Huan B.

    2013-04-01

    Since 1954 when the very first patient was treated at LBNL with heavy-charged particles, some 84,000 patients in total have now been treated with protons, and another 13,000 patients have been treated with carbon and other heavier ions. During the first several decades of this endeavor, particle therapy was accessible only at a small number of programs. More recently, however, this therapy has become available at a rapidly increasing number of facilities worldwide. This expansion of the discipline has led to the development of many more clinical trials, designed to optimize particle-beam therapy and to compare the results achieved with those resulting from other treatment methods. Presently, more than 50 clinical protocols worldwide are actively involved in the effort to improve our understanding of these clinical guidelines. The purpose of this brief review is to offer a broad overview of these protocols, highlighting the specific disease categories that are now being studied using proton and/or heavier-ion therapy, and how the parameters of dose-escalation, beam conformity, and RBE modeling are being evaluated for various disease sites and stages.

  6. Applicability Evaluation of Job Standards for Diabetes Nutritional Management by Clinical Dietitian

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Young Jin; Oh, Na Gyeong; Sohn, Cheong-Min; Woo, Mi-Hye; Lee, Seung Min; Ju, Dal Lae; Seo, Jung-Sook

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate applicability of job standards for diabetes nutrition management by hospital clinical dietitians. In order to promote the clinical nutrition services, it is necessary to present job standards of clinical dietitian and to actively apply these standardized tasks to the medical institution sites. The job standard of clinical dietitians for diabetic nutrition management was distributed to hospitals over 300 beds. Questionnaire was collected from 96 clinical di...

  7. Multiparametric prostate MRI: technical conduct, standardized report and clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Matteo; Mele, Fabrizio; Garrou, Diletta; Walz, Jochen; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Russo, Filippo; Vassallo, Lorenzo; Villers, Arnauld; Emberton, Mark; Valerio, Massimo

    2018-02-01

    Multiparametric prostate MRI (mp-MRI) is an emerging imaging modality for diagnosis, characterization, staging, and treatment planning of prostate cancer (PCa). The technique, results reporting, and its role in clinical practice have been the subject of significant development over the last decade. Although mp-MRI is not yet routinely used in the diagnostic pathway, almost all urological guidelines have emphasized the potential role of mp-MRI in several aspects of PCa management. Moreover, new MRI sequences and scanning techniques are currently under evaluation to improve the diagnostic accuracy of mp-MRI. This review presents an overview of mp-MRI, summarizing the technical applications, the standardized reporting systems used, and their current roles in various stages of PCa management. Finally, this critical review also reports the main limitations and future perspectives of the technique.

  8. A protocol using coho salmon to monitor Tongass National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan standards and guidelines for fish habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.D. Bryant; Trent McDonald; R. Aho; B.E. Wright; Michelle Bourassa. Stahl

    2008-01-01

    We describe a protocol to monitor the effectiveness of the Tongass Land Management Plan (TLMP) management standards for maintaining fish habitat. The protocol uses juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in small tributary streams in forested watersheds. We used a 3-year pilot study to develop detailed methods to estimate juvenile salmonid...

  9. Establishment and intra-/inter-laboratory validation of a standard protocol of reactive oxygen species assay for chemical photosafety evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Satomi; Hosoi, Kazuhiro; Wakuri, Shinobu; Iwase, Yumiko; Yamamoto, Toshinobu; Matsuoka, Naoko; Nakamura, Kazuichi; Toda, Tsuguto; Takagi, Hironori; Osaki, Naoto; Matsumoto, Yasuhiro; Kawakami, Satoru; Seto, Yoshiki; Kato, Masashi; Yamada, Shizuo; Ohno, Yasuo; Kojima, Hajime

    2013-11-01

    A reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay was previously developed for photosafety evaluation of pharmaceuticals, and the present multi-center study aimed to establish and validate a standard protocol for ROS assay. In three participating laboratories, two standards and 42 coded chemicals, including 23 phototoxins and 19 nonphototoxic drugs/chemicals, were assessed by the ROS assay according to the standardized protocol. Most phototoxins tended to generate singlet oxygen and/or superoxide under UV-vis exposure, but nonphototoxic chemicals were less photoreactive. In the ROS assay on quinine (200 µm), a typical phototoxic drug, the intra- and inter-day precisions (coefficient of variation; CV) were found to be 1.5-7.4% and 1.7-9.3%, respectively. The inter-laboratory CV for quinine averaged 15.4% for singlet oxygen and 17.0% for superoxide. The ROS assay on 42 coded chemicals (200 µm) provided no false negative predictions upon previously defined criteria as compared with the in vitro/in vivo phototoxicity, although several false positives appeared. Outcomes from the validation study were indicative of satisfactory transferability, intra- and inter-laboratory variability, and predictive capacity of the ROS assay. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Additionality and permanence standards in California's Forest Offset Protocol: A review of project and program level implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruseva, T; Marland, E; Szymanski, C; Hoyle, J; Marland, G; Kowalczyk, T

    2017-08-01

    A key component of California's cap-and-trade program is the use of carbon offsets as compliance instruments for reducing statewide GHG emissions. Under this program, offsets are tradable credits representing real, verifiable, quantifiable, enforceable, permanent, and additional reductions or removals of GHG emissions. This paper focuses on the permanence and additionality standards for offset credits as defined and operationalized in California's Compliance Offset Protocol for U.S. Forest Projects. Drawing on a review of the protocol, interviews, current offset projects, and existing literature, we discuss how additionality and permanence standards relate to project participation and overall program effectiveness. Specifically, we provide an overview of offset credits as compliance instruments in California's cap-and-trade program, the timeline for a forest offset project, and the factors shaping participation in offset projects. We then discuss the implications of permanence and additionality at both the project and program levels. Largely consistent with previous work, we find that stringent standards for permanent and additional project activities can present barriers to participation, but also, that there may be a trade-off between project quality and quantity (i.e. levels of participation) when considering overall program effectiveness. We summarize what this implies for California's forest offset program and provide suggestions for improvements in light of potential program diffusion and policy learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Randomised clinical trial of early specialist palliative care plus standard care versus standard care alone in patients with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønvold, Mogens; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Damkier, Anette

    2017-01-01

    Palliative Care Trial (DanPaCT) (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01348048) is a multicentre randomised clinical trial comparing early referral to a specialist palliative care team plus standard care versus standard care alone. The planned sample size was 300. At five oncology departments, consecutive patients...

  12. [Food Security in Europe: comparison between the "Hygiene Package" and the British Retail Consortium (BRC) & International Food Standard (IFS) protocols].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilo, A; Parisi, S; Delia, S; Anastasi, F; Bruno, G; Laganà, P

    2009-01-01

    The birth of Hygiene Package and of the Reg. CE no 2073/2005 in the food production field signalled a change in Italy. This process started in Italy in 1997 with the legislative decree no 155 on Self-control but in reality, it was implemented in the UK in 1990 with the promulgation of the Food Safety Act. This legal act was influenced by some basic rules corresponding to the application of HACCP standards. Since 1990 the British chains of distribution (Retailers) have involved all aspects of the food line in this type of responsibility. Due to this growing awareness for a need for greater regulation, a protocol, edited by British Retail Consortium was created in 1998. This protocol acted as a "stamp" of approval for food products and it is now known as the BRC Global Food Standard. In July 2008, this protocol became effective in its fifth version. After the birth of BRC, also French and German Retailers have established a standard practically equivalent and perhaps more pertinent to safety food, that is International Food Standard (IFS). The new approach is specific to the food field and strictly applies criteria which will ensure "safety, quality and legality" of food products, similarly to ISO 22000:2005 (mainly based on BRC & IFS past experiences). New standards aim to create a sort of green list with fully "proper and fit" Suppliers only, because of comprehensible exigencies of Retailers. It is expected, as we have shown, that Auditor authorities who are responsible for ensuring that inspections are now carried out like the Hygiene Package, will find these new standards useful. The advantages of streamlining this system is that it will allow enterprises to diligently enforce food safety practices without fear of upset or legal consequence, to improve the quality (HACCP) of management & traceability system; to restrict wastes, reprocessing and withdrawal of products. However some discordances about the interpretation of certain sub-field norms (e.g., water

  13. Planning oral health and clinical discharge in primary care: the comprehensive dental care protocol outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Dantas de Almeida, Leopoldina de Fátima; Barbosa, Ailma de Souza; Nascimento Padilha, Wilton Wilney

    2015-03-01

    The dental care must be driven by preventive and curative measures that can contribute to the population's oral health promotion. To evaluate the impact of the actions proposed by a comprehensive dental care protocol (CDCP) on the oral health condition of primary care users. The sample consisted of 32 volunteers, assisted throughout the six phases proposed by the CDCP: diagnosis of dental needs; resolution of urgencies; restorative interventions; application of promotional measures; evaluation of the achieved health level; and periodic controls. Data were collected through clinical exams, which measured the simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S), gingival bleeding index (GBI) and the decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) Index, before and after the CDCP was implemented. Statistical analysis consisted of the Wilcoxon test, at 5% significance level (α = 0.05). The OHI-S and GBI indices showed a significant reduction (p 0.05), showing final values equal to 12.7 ± 9.6 and 5.6 ± 7.8, respectively. Decayed elements were fully converted into filled elements, and the final values of the decayed and filled elements were, respectively, 0.0 ± 0.0 and 7.3 ± 5.7 (p health of the population assisted by the dental services offered in primary care and this protocol seems to ft the public dental service demands. The CDCP can be useful to public dental service planning since it showed an efficient clinical outcome to the patients. We consider that this protocol should be employed in primary care oral health services in order to achieve overall upgrade, access enlargement and public oral health promotion.

  14. [Protocol for the study of bone tumours and standardization of pathology reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Isidro; Pozo, José Juan; Marcilla, David; Cruz, Julia; Tardío, Juan C; Astudillo, Aurora; Bagué, Sílvia

    Primary bone neoplasms represent a rare and heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumours. The prevalence of benign and malignant tumours varies; the latter (sarcomas) account for less than 0.2% of all malignant tumours. Primary bone neoplasms are usually diagnosed and classified according to the criteria established and published by the World Health Organization (WHO 2013). These criteria are a result of advances in molecular pathology, which complements the histopathological diagnosis. Bone tumours should be diagnosed and treated in referral centers by a multidisciplinary team including pathologists, radiologists, orthopedic surgeons and oncologists. We analyzed different national and international protocols in order to provide a guide of recommendations for the improvement of pathological evaluation and management of bone tumours. We include specific recommendations for the pre-analytical, analytical, and post-analytical phases, as well as protocols for gross and microscopic pathology. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anatomía Patológica. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumors: Standard of care, current clinical trials, and new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.

    1996-01-01

    cooperative group trials will be presented with reference to data re surgical, radiotherapeutic, and chemotherapeutic components of modern therapy. The outcome of supratentorial malignant gliomas and classical brainstem gliomas remains unacceptable; data from recent studies and planned protocols will be presented to highlight current treatment standards. The impact of tumor extent and resectability in ependymoma and craniopharyngioma will be reviewed to emphasize current practice, clinical investigations, and evolving debate regarding the role of radiation therapy and introduction of precision techniques. The rationale for recommended radiation volume(s) for intracranial germinomas will be reviewed, as well as recent data and proposed studies addressing combined chemoradiation for germ cell tumors. Recognizing the unique risk:benefit ration in treating infants and young children with both low grade and malignant brain tumors, the indications for radiation therapy, timing, and potential modifications of therapy will be highlighted

  16. Standard echocardiography versus handheld echocardiography for the detection of subclinical rheumatic heart disease: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, Lisa H; Abdullahi, Leila H; Ochodo, Eleanor A; Zühlke, Liesl J; Engel, Mark E

    2018-02-10

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a preventable and treatable chronic condition which persists in many developing countries largely affecting impoverished populations. Handheld echocardiography presents an opportunity to address the need for more cost-effective methods of diagnosing RHD in developing countries, where the disease continues to carry high rates of morbidity and mortality. Preliminary studies have demonstrated moderate sensitivity as well as high specificity and diagnostic odds for detecting RHD in asymptomatic patients. We describe a protocol for a systematic review on the diagnostic performance of handheld echocardiography compared to standard echocardiography using the 2012 World Heart Federation criteria for diagnosing subclinical RHD. Electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and EBSCOhost as well as reference lists and citations of relevant articles will be searched from 2012 to date using a predefined strategy incorporating a combination of Medical Subject Heading terms and keywords. The methodological validity and quality of studies deemed eligible for inclusion will be assessed against review specific Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 criteria and information on metrics of diagnostic accuracy and demographics extracted. Forest plots of sensitivity and specificity as well as scatter plots in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) space will be used to investigate heterogeneity. If possible, a meta-analysis will be conducted to produce summary results of sensitivity and specificity using the Hierarchical Summary ROC method. In addition, a sensitivity analysis will be conducted to investigate the effect of studies with a high risk of bias. Ethics approval is not required for this systematic review of previously published literature. The planned review will provide a summary of the diagnostic accuracy of handheld echocardiography. Results may feed into evidence-based guidelines and should the findings of this

  17. Agreements between Industry and Academia on Publication Rights: A Retrospective Study of Protocols and Publications of Randomized Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasenda, Benjamin; von Elm, Erik; You, John J.; Tomonaga, Yuki; Saccilotto, Ramon; Amstutz, Alain; Bengough, Theresa; Meerpohl, Joerg J.; Stegert, Mihaela; Olu, Kelechi K.; Tikkinen, Kari A. O.; Neumann, Ignacio; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Faulhaber, Markus; Mulla, Sohail M.; Mertz, Dominik; Akl, Elie A.; Bassler, Dirk; Busse, Jason W.; Nordmann, Alain; Gloy, Viktoria; Ebrahim, Shanil; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Sun, Xin; Vandvik, Per O.; Johnston, Bradley C.; Walter, Martin A.; Burnand, Bernard; Hemkens, Lars G.; Bucher, Heiner C.; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Briel, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about publication agreements between industry and academic investigators in trial protocols and the consistency of these agreements with corresponding statements in publications. We aimed to investigate (i) the existence and types of publication agreements in trial protocols, (ii) the completeness and consistency of the reporting of these agreements in subsequent publications, and (iii) the frequency of co-authorship by industry employees. Methods and Findings We used a retrospective cohort of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) based on archived protocols approved by six research ethics committees between 13 January 2000 and 25 November 2003. Only RCTs with industry involvement were eligible. We investigated the documentation of publication agreements in RCT protocols and statements in corresponding journal publications. Of 647 eligible RCT protocols, 456 (70.5%) mentioned an agreement regarding publication of results. Of these 456, 393 (86.2%) documented an industry partner’s right to disapprove or at least review proposed manuscripts; 39 (8.6%) agreements were without constraints of publication. The remaining 24 (5.3%) protocols referred to separate agreement documents not accessible to us. Of those 432 protocols with an accessible publication agreement, 268 (62.0%) trials were published. Most agreements documented in the protocol were not reported in the subsequent publication (197/268 [73.5%]). Of 71 agreements reported in publications, 52 (73.2%) were concordant with those documented in the protocol. In 14 of 37 (37.8%) publications in which statements suggested unrestricted publication rights, at least one co-author was an industry employee. In 25 protocol-publication pairs, author statements in publications suggested no constraints, but 18 corresponding protocols documented restricting agreements. Conclusions Publication agreements constraining academic authors’ independence are common. Journal articles seldom report on

  18. Agreements between Industry and Academia on Publication Rights: A Retrospective Study of Protocols and Publications of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Kasenda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about publication agreements between industry and academic investigators in trial protocols and the consistency of these agreements with corresponding statements in publications. We aimed to investigate (i the existence and types of publication agreements in trial protocols, (ii the completeness and consistency of the reporting of these agreements in subsequent publications, and (iii the frequency of co-authorship by industry employees.We used a retrospective cohort of randomized clinical trials (RCTs based on archived protocols approved by six research ethics committees between 13 January 2000 and 25 November 2003. Only RCTs with industry involvement were eligible. We investigated the documentation of publication agreements in RCT protocols and statements in corresponding journal publications. Of 647 eligible RCT protocols, 456 (70.5% mentioned an agreement regarding publication of results. Of these 456, 393 (86.2% documented an industry partner's right to disapprove or at least review proposed manuscripts; 39 (8.6% agreements were without constraints of publication. The remaining 24 (5.3% protocols referred to separate agreement documents not accessible to us. Of those 432 protocols with an accessible publication agreement, 268 (62.0% trials were published. Most agreements documented in the protocol were not reported in the subsequent publication (197/268 [73.5%]. Of 71 agreements reported in publications, 52 (73.2% were concordant with those documented in the protocol. In 14 of 37 (37.8% publications in which statements suggested unrestricted publication rights, at least one co-author was an industry employee. In 25 protocol-publication pairs, author statements in publications suggested no constraints, but 18 corresponding protocols documented restricting agreements.Publication agreements constraining academic authors' independence are common. Journal articles seldom report on publication agreements, and, if they do

  19. Barriers and strategies for the clinical translation of advanced orthopaedic tissue engineering protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Madry

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Research in orthopaedic tissue engineering has intensified over the last decade and new protocols continue to emerge. The clinical translation of these new applications, however, remains associated with a number of obstacles. This report highlights the major issues that impede the clinical translation of advanced tissue engineering concepts, discusses strategies to overcome these barriers, and examines the need to increase incentives for translational strategies. The statements are based on presentations and discussions held at the AO Foundation-sponsored symposium "Where Science meets Clinics 2013" held at the Congress Center in Davos, Switzerland, in September, 2013. The event organisers convened a diverse group of over one hundred stakeholders involved in clinical translation of orthopaedic tissue engineering, including scientists, clinicians, healthcare industry professionals and regulatory agency representatives. A major point that emerged from the discussions was that there continues to be a critical need for early trans-disciplinary communication and collaboration in the development and execution of research approaches. Equally importantly was the need to address the shortage of sustained funding programs for multidisciplinary teams conducting translational research. Such detailed discussions between experts contribute towards the development of a roadmap to more successfully advance the clinical translation of novel tissue engineering concepts and ultimately improve patient care in orthopaedic and trauma surgery.

  20. Barriers and strategies for the clinical translation of advanced orthopaedic tissue engineering protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madry, H; Alini, M; Stoddart, M J; Evans, C; Miclau, T; Steiner, S

    2014-05-06

    Research in orthopaedic tissue engineering has intensified over the last decade and new protocols continue to emerge. The clinical translation of these new applications, however, remains associated with a number of obstacles. This report highlights the major issues that impede the clinical translation of advanced tissue engineering concepts, discusses strategies to overcome these barriers, and examines the need to increase incentives for translational strategies. The statements are based on presentations and discussions held at the AO Foundation-sponsored symposium "Where Science meets Clinics 2013" held at the Congress Center in Davos, Switzerland, in September, 2013. The event organisers convened a diverse group of over one hundred stakeholders involved in clinical translation of orthopaedic tissue engineering, including scientists, clinicians, healthcare industry professionals and regulatory agency representatives. A major point that emerged from the discussions was that there continues to be a critical need for early trans-disciplinary communication and collaboration in the development and execution of research approaches. Equally importantly was the need to address the shortage of sustained funding programs for multidisciplinary teams conducting translational research. Such detailed discussions between experts contribute towards the development of a roadmap to more successfully advance the clinical translation of novel tissue engineering concepts and ultimately improve patient care in orthopaedic and trauma surgery.

  1. [Validation of the Italian Clinical Learning Environment Instrument (SVIAT):study protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palese, Alvisa; Destrebecq, Anne; Terzoni, Stefano; Grassetti, Luca; Altini, Pietro; Bevilacqua, Anita; Brugnolli, Anna; Benaglio, Carla; Dalponte, Adriana; De Biasio, Laura; Dimonte, Valerio; Gambacorti, Benedetta; Fasci, Adriana; Grosso, Silvia; Mansutti, Irene; Mantovan, Franco; Marognolli, Oliva; Montalti, Sandra; Nicotera, Raffaela; Perli, Serena; Randon, Giulia; Stampfl, Brigitte; Tollini, Morena; Canzan, Federica; Zannini, Lucia; Saiani, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    . Validation of the Italian Clinical Learning Environment Instrument (SVIAT): study protocol. Nursing students obtain most of their university credits in internship environments whose quality can affect their clinical learning. Several tools are available to measure the quality of the clinical learning environment (CLE) as perceived by students: these instruments developed in other countries, were validated in Italian but do not discriminate those CLEs capable (or not) to promote significant clinical learning. To validate an instrument to measure the capability of the CLE to generate clinical learning; the secondary aim is to describe the learning environments as perceived by nursing students according to individual course site and tutorial models adopted. The study will be developed in three phases: a) instrument development and pilot phase, b) validation of the psychometric properties of the instrument and c) description of the CLEs as perceived by the students including factors/item confirmed in the validation process. Expected outcomes. A large validation, with more than 8,000 participating students is expected; the construct under lying will be confirmed through exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis and will report high internal consistency; the instrument will report also a high test-retest and inter-rater reliability; in addition, the instrument will demonstrate predictive ability by discriminating those units able (or not) to activate effective learning processes.

  2. Experimental and clinical standards, and evolution of lasers in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux, B C; Roux, F X

    1996-01-01

    From initial experiments of ruby, argon and CO2 lasers on the nervous system so far, dramatic progress was made in delivery systems technology as well as in knowledge of laser-tissue interaction effects and hazards through various animal experiments and clinical experience. Most surgical effects of laser light on neural tissue and the central nervous system (CNS) are thermal lesions. Haemostasis, cutting and vaporization depend on laser emission parameters--wavelength, fluence and mode--and on the exposed tissues optical and thermal properties--water and haemoglobin content, thermal conductivity and specific heat. CO2 and Nd-YAG lasers have today a large place in the neurosurgical armamentarium, while new laser sources such as high power diode lasers will have one in the near future. Current applications of these lasers derive from their respective characteristics, and include CNS tumour and vascular malformation surgery, and stereotactic neurosurgery. Intracranial, spinal cord and intra-orbital meningiomas are the best lesions for laser use for haemostasis, dissection and tissue vaporization. Resection of acoustic neuromas, pituitary tumours, spinal cord neuromas, intracerebral gliomas and metastases may also benefit from lasers as accurate, haemostatic, non-contact instruments which reduce surgical trauma to the brain and eloquent structures such as brain stem and cranial nerves. Coagulative lasers (1.06 microns and 1.32 microns Nd-YAG, argon, or diode laser) will find an application for arteriovenous malformations and cavernomas. Any fiberoptic-guided laser will find a use during stereotactic neurosurgical procedures, including image-guided resection of tumours and vascular malformations and endoscopic tumour resection and cysts or entry into a ventricle. Besides these routine applications of lasers, laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of brain tumours are still in the experimental stage. The choice of a laser in a

  3. The Application of Standards and Recommendations to Clinical Ethics Consultation in Practice: An Evaluation at German Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schochow, Maximilian; Rubeis, Giovanni; Steger, Florian

    2017-06-01

    The executive board of the Academy for Ethics in Medicine (AEM) and two AEM working groups formulated standards and recommendations for clinical ethics consultation in 2010, 2011, and 2013. These guidelines comply with the international standards like those set by the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. There is no empirical data available yet that could indicate whether these standards and recommendations have been implemented in German hospitals. This desideratum is addressed in the present study. We contacted 1.858 German hospitals between September 2013 and January 2014. A follow-up survey was conducted between October 2014 and January 2015. The data of the initial survey and the follow-up survey were merged and evaluated. The statements of the participants were compared with the standards and recommendations. The standards of the AEM concerning the tasks of clinical ethics consultation (including ethics consultation, ethics training and the establishment of policy guidelines) are employed by a majority of participants of the study. Almost all of these participants document their consultation activities by means of protocols or entries in the patient file. There are deviations from the recommendations of the AEM working groups regarding the drafting of statutes, activity reports, and financial support. The activities of clinical ethics consultation predominantly comply with the standards of the AEM and recommendations for the documentation. The recommendations for evaluation should be improved in practice. This applies particularly for activity reports in order to evaluate the activities. Internal evaluation could take place accordingly.

  4. Psychometric Properties of a Standardized Observation Protocol to Quantify Pediatric Physical Therapy Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderer, Patrizia; Akhbari Ziegler, Schirin; Gressbach Oertle, Barbara; Meichtry, André; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2017-07-01

    Pediatric physical therapy (PPT) is characterized by heterogeneity. This blurs the evaluation of effective components of PPT. The Groningen Observation Protocol (GOP) was developed to quantify contents of PPT. This study assesses the reliability and completeness of the GOP. Sixty infant PPT sessions were video-taped. Two random samples of 10 videos were used to determine interrater and intrarater reliability using interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) with 95% confidence intervals. Completeness of GOP 2.0 was based on 60 videos. Interrater reliability of quantifying PPT actions was excellent (ICC, 0.75-1.0) in 71% and sufficient to good (ICC, 0.4-0.74) in 24% of PPT actions. Intrarater reliability was excellent in 94% and sufficient to good in 6% of PPT actions. Completeness was good for greater than 90% of PPT actions. GOP 2.0 has good reliability and completeness. After appropriate training, it is a useful tool to quantify PPT for children with developmental disorders.

  5. Reproducibility of microbial mutagenicity assays. I. Tests with Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli using a standardized protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkel, V.C.; Zeiger, E.; Brusick, D.; McCoy, E.; McGregor, D.; Mortelmans, K.; Rosenkranz, H.S.; Simmon, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    The Salmonella/microsome test developed by Ames and his coworkers has been widely used in the evaluation of chemicals for genotoxic potential. Although the value of this assay is well recognized, there have been no comprehensive studies on the interlaboratory reproducibility of the method using a standardized protocol. A program was therefore initiated to compare the results obtained in four laboratories from testing a series of coded mutagens and nonmutagens using a standardized protocol. Additional objectives of this study were to compare male Fisher 344 rat, B6C3F1 mouse, and Syrian hamster liver S-9 preparations for the activation of chemicals; to compare Aroclor 1254-induced liver S-9 from all three species with the corresponding non-induced liver S-9's; and to compare the response of Escherichia coli WP-2 uvrA with the Salmonella typhimurium tester strains recommended by Ames. Since a primary use of in vitro microbial mutagenesis tests is the identification of potential carcinogens by their mutagenicity, the authors decided to compare the animal species and strains used by the National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program (NCI/NTP) for animal carcinogenicity studies

  6. Clinical standard of neurosurgical disorder. (9) Disturbance of consciousness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Tomio

    2009-01-01

    Functional diagnosis of consciousness disturbance (CD) in acute and chronic stages is becoming more important along with the progress of morphological diagnosis by CT and MRI at the stroke and brain lesion. Here described and discussed are the definition of consciousness and unconsciousness, cause and scoring of CD by various scaling and clinical significance of the scale for therapy. The author's definition for consciousness is based on patients' self identity and orientation. The above CD is essentially caused by the increased intracranial pressure, which is evaluable by imaging as the increase is derived from the herniation by tumor or edema mainly through transtentorial (uncal, hippocampal) and/or foraminal (cerebellar tonsillar) pathways. Scaling of CD stands on three factors of validity, reliability and feasibility, of which standards of JCS (Japan coma scale) and GCS (Glasgow coma scale) have been widely employed. In discussion of merit/demerit of JCS and GCS, the author et al. have proposed a new scale ECS (emergency coma scale) with 3 levels of digit code for patient's response and behavior under CD. Therapeutic outcome is greatly affected by acute CD levels evaluable by scaling, in which awakening/alertness relates with mortality, and local symptom/consciousness, with morbidity. ECS is now globally getting around. (K.T.)

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for wound healing in diabetic rats: Varying efficacy after a clinically-based protocol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan W van Neck

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is a clinical treatment in which a patient breathes pure oxygen for a limited period of time at an increased pressure. Although this therapy has been used for decades to assist wound healing, its efficacy for many conditions is unproven and its mechanism of action is not yet fully clarified. This study investigated the effects of HBOT on wound healing using a diabetes-impaired pressure ulcer rat model. Seven weeks after streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats (n = 55, a pressure ulcer was created on dorsal skin. Subsequently, animals received HBOT during 6 weeks following a standard clinical protocol (HBOT group with varying endpoints up to 42 days post-wounding versus controls without HBOT. Capillary venous oxygen saturation (SO2 showed a significant increase in the HBOT group on day 24; however, this increase was significant at this time point only. The quantity of hemoglobin in the micro-blood vessels (rHB showed a significant decrease in the HBOT group on days 21 and 42, and showed a trend to decrease on day 31. Blood flow in the microcirculation showed a significant increase on days 17, 21 and 31 but a significant decrease on days 24 and 28. Inflammation scoring showed significantly decreased CD68 counts in the HBOT group on day 42, but not in the early stages of wound healing. Animals in the HBOT group showed a trend for an increase in mean wound breaking strength on day 42.

  8. 78 FR 45096 - Standards for Business Practices and Communication Protocols for Public Utilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    .... ] 31,309 (2010). \\13\\ Order No. 676-G, see supra n.8. 8. In Order No. 890, the Commission revisited the... the Business Practice Standards. Accordingly, NAESB set up a work project to review the existing... case, the end entity and the service provider operating the system, to authenticate the identities of...

  9. A standardized conjugation protocol to assess antibiotic resistance transfer between lactococcal species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lampkowska, J.; Feld, L.; Monaghan, A.; Toomey, N.; Schjørring, S.; Jacobsen, B.; Voet, van der H.; Andersen, S.R.; Bolton, D.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Krogfelt, K.A.; Wilcks, A.; Bardowski, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    Optimal conditions and a standardized method for conjugation between two model lactococcal strains, Lactococcus lactis SH4174 (pAMbeta1-containing, erythromycin resistant donor) and L. lactis Bu2-60 (plasmid-free, erythromycin sensitive recipient), were developed and tested in a inter-laboratory

  10. Protocol - realist and meta-narrative evidence synthesis: Evolving Standards (RAMESES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westhorp Gill

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing interest in theory-driven, qualitative and mixed-method approaches to systematic review as an alternative to (or to extend and supplement conventional Cochrane-style reviews. These approaches offer the potential to expand the knowledge base in policy-relevant areas - for example by explaining the success, failure or mixed fortunes of complex interventions. However, the quality of such reviews can be difficult to assess. This study aims to produce methodological guidance, publication standards and training resources for those seeking to use the realist and/or meta-narrative approach to systematic review. Methods/design We will: [a] collate and summarise existing literature on the principles of good practice in realist and meta-narrative systematic review; [b] consider the extent to which these principles have been followed by published and in-progress reviews, thereby identifying how rigour may be lost and how existing methods could be improved; [c] using an online Delphi method with an interdisciplinary panel of experts from academia and policy, produce a draft set of methodological steps and publication standards; [d] produce training materials with learning outcomes linked to these steps; [e] pilot these standards and training materials prospectively on real reviews-in-progress, capturing methodological and other challenges as they arise; [f] synthesise expert input, evidence review and real-time problem analysis into more definitive guidance and standards; [g] disseminate outputs to audiences in academia and policy. The outputs of the study will be threefold: 1. Quality standards and methodological guidance for realist and meta-narrative reviews for use by researchers, research sponsors, students and supervisors 2. A 'RAMESES' (Realist and Meta-review Evidence Synthesis: Evolving Standards statement (comparable to CONSORT or PRISMA of publication standards for such reviews, published in an open

  11. National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank: a standard based biospecimen and clinical data resource to enhance translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Waqas; Parwani, Anil V; Schmandt, Linda; Mohanty, Sambit K; Farhat, Ghada; Pople, Andrew K; Winters, Sharon B; Whelan, Nancy B; Schneider, Althea M; Milnes, John T; Valdivieso, Federico A; Feldman, Michael; Pass, Harvey I; Dhir, Rajiv; Melamed, Jonathan; Becich, Michael J

    2008-08-13

    Advances in translational research have led to the need for well characterized biospecimens for research. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank is an initiative which collects annotated datasets relevant to human mesothelioma to develop an enterprising biospecimen resource to fulfill researchers' need. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank architecture is based on three major components: (a) common data elements (based on College of American Pathologists protocol and National North American Association of Central Cancer Registries standards), (b) clinical and epidemiologic data annotation, and (c) data query tools. These tools work interoperably to standardize the entire process of annotation. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank tool is based upon the caTISSUE Clinical Annotation Engine, developed by the University of Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG, see http://cabig.nci.nih.gov). This application provides a web-based system for annotating, importing and searching mesothelioma cases. The underlying information model is constructed utilizing Unified Modeling Language class diagrams, hierarchical relationships and Enterprise Architect software. The database provides researchers real-time access to richly annotated specimens and integral information related to mesothelioma. The data disclosed is tightly regulated depending upon users' authorization and depending on the participating institute that is amenable to the local Institutional Review Board and regulation committee reviews. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank currently has over 600 annotated cases available for researchers that include paraffin embedded tissues, tissue microarrays, serum and genomic DNA. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank is a virtual biospecimen registry with robust translational biomedical informatics support to facilitate basic science, clinical, and translational research. Furthermore, it protects patient privacy by disclosing only

  12. National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank: A standard based biospecimen and clinical data resource to enhance translational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdivieso Federico A

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in translational research have led to the need for well characterized biospecimens for research. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank is an initiative which collects annotated datasets relevant to human mesothelioma to develop an enterprising biospecimen resource to fulfill researchers' need. Methods The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank architecture is based on three major components: (a common data elements (based on College of American Pathologists protocol and National North American Association of Central Cancer Registries standards, (b clinical and epidemiologic data annotation, and (c data query tools. These tools work interoperably to standardize the entire process of annotation. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank tool is based upon the caTISSUE Clinical Annotation Engine, developed by the University of Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid™ (caBIG™, see http://cabig.nci.nih.gov. This application provides a web-based system for annotating, importing and searching mesothelioma cases. The underlying information model is constructed utilizing Unified Modeling Language class diagrams, hierarchical relationships and Enterprise Architect software. Result The database provides researchers real-time access to richly annotated specimens and integral information related to mesothelioma. The data disclosed is tightly regulated depending upon users' authorization and depending on the participating institute that is amenable to the local Institutional Review Board and regulation committee reviews. Conclusion The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank currently has over 600 annotated cases available for researchers that include paraffin embedded tissues, tissue microarrays, serum and genomic DNA. The National Mesothelioma Virtual Bank is a virtual biospecimen registry with robust translational biomedical informatics support to facilitate basic science, clinical, and translational

  13. Standardization of 8-color flow cytometry across different flow cytometer instruments: A feasibility study in clinical laboratories in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glier, Hana; Heijnen, Ingmar; Hauwel, Mathieu; Dirks, Jan; Quarroz, Stéphane; Lehmann, Thomas; Rovo, Alicia; Arn, Kornelius; Matthes, Thomas; Hogan, Cassandra; Keller, Peter; Dudkiewicz, Ewa; Stüssi, Georg; Fernandez, Paula

    2017-07-29

    The EuroFlow Consortium developed a fully standardized flow cytometric approach from instrument settings, through antibody panel, reagents and sample preparation protocols, to data acquisition and analysis. The Swiss Cytometry Society (SCS) promoted a study to evaluate the feasibility of using such standardized measurements of 8-color data across two different flow cytometry platforms - Becton Dickinson (BD) FACSCanto II and Beckman Coulter (BC) Navios, aiming at increasing reproducibility and inter-laboratory comparability of immunophenotypic data in clinical laboratories in Switzerland. The study was performed in two phases, i.e. a learning phase (round 1) and an analytical phase (rounds 2 and 3) consisting of a total of three rounds. Overall, 10 laboratories using BD FACSCanto II (n=6) or BC Navios (n=4) flow cytometers participated. Each laboratory measured peripheral blood samples from healthy donors stained with a uniform antibody panel of reagents - EuroFlow Lymphoid Screening Tube (LST) - applying the EuroFlow standardized protocols for instrument setup and sample preparation (www.EuroFlow.org). All data files were analyzed centrally and median fluorescence intensity (MedFI) values for individual markers on defined lymphocyte subsets were recorded; variability from reference MedFI values was assessed using performance scores. Data troubleshooting and discussion of the results with the participants followed after each round at SCS meetings. The results of the learning phase demonstrated that standardized instrument setup and data acquisition are feasible in routine clinical laboratories without previous experience with EuroFlow. During the analytical phase, highly comparable data were obtained at the different laboratories using either BD FACSCanto II or BC Navios. The coefficient of variation of MedFI for 7 of 11 markers performed repeatedly below 30%. In the last study round, 89% of participants scored over 90% MedFI values within the acceptance criteria

  14. Critical sources of bacterial contamination and adoption of standard sanitary protocol during semen collection and processing in Semen Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrahas Sannat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present investigation was conducted to locate the critical sources of bacterial contamination and to evaluate the standard sanitation protocol so as to improve the hygienic conditions during collection, evaluation, and processing of bull semen in the Semen Station. Materials and Methods: The study compared two different hygienic procedures during the collection, evaluation and processing of semen in Central Semen Station, Anjora, Durg. Routinely used materials including artificial vagina (AV inner liner, cone, semen collection tube, buffer, extender/diluter, straws; and the laboratory environment like processing lab, pass box and laminar air flow (LAF cabinet of extender preparation lab, processing lab, sealing filling machine, and bacteriological lab were subjected to bacteriological examination in two phases of study using two different sanitary protocols. Bacterial load in above items/environment was measured using standard plate count method and expressed as colony forming unit (CFU. Results: Bacterial load in a laboratory environment and AV equipments during two different sanitary protocol in present investigation differed highly significantly (p<0.001. Potential sources of bacterial contamination during semen collection and processing included laboratory environment like processing lab, pass box, and LAF cabinets; AV equipments, including AV Liner and cone. Bacterial load was reduced highly significantly (p<0.001 in AV liner (from 2.33±0.67 to 0.50±0.52, cone (from 4.16±1.20 to 1.91±0.55, and extender (from 1.33±0.38 to 0 after application of improved practices of packaging, handling, and sterilization in Phase II of study. Glasswares, buffers, and straws showed nil bacterial contamination in both the phases of study. With slight modification in fumigation protocol (formalin @600 ml/1000 ft3, bacterial load was significantly decreased (p<0.001 up to 0-6 CFU in processing lab (from 6.43±1.34 to 2.86±0.59, pass box (from 12

  15. Recommended volumetric capacity definitions and protocols for accurate, standardized and unambiguous metrics for hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parilla, Philip A.; Gross, Karl; Hurst, Katherine; Gennett, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The ultimate goal of the hydrogen economy is the development of hydrogen storage systems that meet or exceed the US DOE's goals for onboard storage in hydrogen-powered vehicles. In order to develop new materials to meet these goals, it is extremely critical to accurately, uniformly and precisely measure materials' properties relevant to the specific goals. Without this assurance, such measurements are not reliable and, therefore, do not provide a benefit toward the work at hand. In particular, capacity measurements for hydrogen storage materials must be based on valid and accurate results to ensure proper identification of promising materials for further development. Volumetric capacity determinations are becoming increasingly important for identifying promising materials, yet there exists controversy on how such determinations are made and whether such determinations are valid due to differing methodologies to count the hydrogen content. These issues are discussed herein, and we show mathematically that capacity determinations can be made rigorously and unambiguously if the constituent volumes are well defined and measurable in practice. It is widely accepted that this occurs for excess capacity determinations and we show here that this can happen for the total capacity determination. Because the adsorption volume is undefined, the absolute capacity determination remains imprecise. Furthermore, we show that there is a direct relationship between determining the respective capacities and the calibration constants used for the manometric and gravimetric techniques. Several suggested volumetric capacity figure-of-merits are defined, discussed and reporting requirements recommended. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate these protocols and concepts.

  16. A Review of Offset Programs: Trading Systems, Funds, Protocols, Standards and Retailers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollmuss, Anja; Lazarus, Michael; Lee, Carrie; Polycarp, Clifford

    2008-11-15

    Carbon or greenhouse gas (GHG) offsets have long been promoted as an important element of a comprehensive climate policy approach. Offset programs can reduce the overall cost of achieving a given emission goal by enabling emission reductions to occur where costs are lower. Furthermore, offsets have the potential to deliver sustainability co-benefits, spurred through technology development and transfer, and to develop human and institutional capacity for reducing emissions in sectors and locations not included in a cap and trade or a mandatory government policy. However, offsets can pose a risk to the environmental integrity of climate actions, especially if issues surrounding additionality, permanence, leakage, quantification and verification are not adequately addressed. The challenge for policymakers is clear: to design offset programs and policies that can maximize their potential benefits while minimizing their potential risks. The goal of this review is to provide an up-to-date analysis and synthesis of the most influential offset programs and activities, to reflect on lessons learned, and thus to inform participants and designers of current and future offset programs. Our intention is to periodically update this review to stay abreast of ongoing developments, and to develop a website portal to make this information more accessible. This version targets programs that meet one or more of the following criteria: - a significant volume of credit transactions occurring or anticipated; - an established set of rules or protocols - path-breaking, novel or otherwise notable initiatives or important lessons learned

  17. Impact of using a local protocol in preoperative testing: blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mônica Loureiro; Iglesias, Antônio Carlos

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate the impact of the use of a local protocol of preoperative test requests in reducing the number of exams requested and in the occurrence of changes in surgical anesthetic management and perioperative complications. we conducted a randomized, blinded clinical trial at the Gaffrée and Guinle University Hospital with 405 patients candidates for elective surgery randomly divided into two groups, according to the practice of requesting preoperative exams: a group with non-selectively requested exams and a protocol group with exams requested according to the study protocol. Studied exams: complete blood count, coagulogram, glycemia, electrolytes, urea and creatinine, ECG and chest X-ray. Primary outcomes: changes in surgical anesthetic management caused by abnormal exams, reduction of the number of exams requested after the use of the protocol and perioperative complications. there was a significant difference (pprotocolo local de solicitações de exames pré-operatórios na redução do número de exames solicitados e na ocorrência de alterações na conduta anestésico-cirúrgica e de complicações perioperatórias. ensaio clínico randomizado, cego, realizado no Hospital Universitário Gaffrée e Guinle com 405 pacientes candidatos à operação eletiva divididos randomicamente em dois grupos segundo a prática de solicitação de exames pré-operatórios: grupo Rotina com exames solicitados de maneira não seletiva e grupo Protocolo com exames solicitados de acordo com o protocolo em estudo. Exames em estudo: hemograma, coagulograma, glicemia, eletrólitos, ureia e creatinina, ECG e radiografia de tórax. Desfechos primários: alterações na conduta anestésico-cirúrgica motivadas por exames anormais, redução do número de exames solicitados após o uso do protocolo e complicações perioperatórias. foi observada diferença significativa (pprotocolo proposto foi efetivo em eliminar um quantitativo significativo de exames complementares sem indica

  18. The inter-examiner reliability of standardized manual palpation for the identification of clinically relevant myofascial triggerpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Larsen, Anders Holsgaard

    -observer agreement of TP examination among four examiners and whether reproducibility is influenced by examiner clinical experience. Two experienced and two inexperienced clinicians each performed a standardized palpation of the upper Trapezius musculature. Each observer was asked to judge the presents....../absence of clinically relevant TP(s) using clinician global assessment (GA). A random case mix of 81 female participants was examined, 14 being asymptomatic and the remainder suffering from neck/shoulder pain. Examiners received psychomotor training and video analysis feedback provided prior to and during the study...... in order to improve protocol standardization. Kappa co-efficients were calculated for all possible examiner pairings. Good agreement was noted between the experienced pairing (κ= 0.63). Moderate levels of agreement were observed among the two mixed pairings (κ=0.35 and 0.47 respectively). However, poor...

  19. Standard protocol for demographic and epidemiological survey to be carried out for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, M.L.; Datta, D.; Singh, Jitendra; Sardhi, I.V.; Verma, P.C.

    2007-11-01

    This document presents the standard procedures for conducting demographic and epidemiological studies for nuclear facilities. These studies are required to be carried out to prepare baseline data, the impact of the facility and the risk factors for the population residing in the vicinity of facility. This document includes the basic elements of these type surveys, their methodology and statistical analysis of the data collected during demographic and epidemiological surveillance. (author)

  20. A consensus protocol for the standardization of cerebrospinal fluid collection and biobanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teunissen, C E; Petzold, A; Bennett, J L

    2009-01-01

    There is a long history of research into body fluid biomarkers in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. However, only a few biomarkers in CSF are being used in clinical practice. One of the most critical factors in CSF biomarker research is the inadequate powering of studies because...

  1. New finite element study protocol: Clinical simulation of orthodontic tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Antoine; Simon, Yohann; Goussard, Florent; Teresi, Luciano; Sansalone, Vittorio

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work was to model tooth movement in a more clinically-exact fashion, thanks to the use of new IT tools and imaging systems (cone-beam). Image segmentation and 3D reconstruction now enable us to model the anatomy realistically, while finite element (FE) analysis makes it possible to evaluate stresses and their distribution on the level of the tooth, the periodontal ligament (PDL) and the alveolar bone when a force is applied. The principle is to monitor tooth movement by obtaining optical impressions at each stage of treatment. The model corresponds to a genuine clinical situation. FE analysis is correlated with the clinically-observed displacement. The protocol remains long and complex. It nevertheless makes it possible to obtain, throughout the duration of treatment, patient-specific models that can be exploited using finite element methods. It requires further validation in more thorough studies but offers interesting prospects: precise study of induced tooth movement, distribution of stresses in the PDL, and development of a customized previsualization tool. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Implementing an intravenous insulin protocol in your practice: practical advice to overcome clinical, administrative, and financial barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Janet L; Hirsch, Irl B; Furnary, Anthony P

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the fourth most common comorbid condition among hospitalized patients, and 30% of patients undergoing open-heart surgery have diabetes. The link between hyperglycemia and poor outcome has been well described, and large clinical trials have shown that aggressive control of blood glucose with an insulin infusion can improve these outcomes. The barriers to implementing an insulin infusion protocol are numerous, despite the fact that doing so is paramount to clinical success. Barriers include safety concerns, such as fear of hypoglycemia, insufficient nursing staff to patient ratios, lack of administrative and physician support, various system and procedural issues, and resistance to change. Key steps to overcome the barriers include building support with multidisciplinary champions, involving key staff, educating staff, and administrators of the clinical and economic benefits of improving glycemic control, setting realistic goals, selecting a validated insulin infusion protocol, and internally marketing the success of the protocol.

  3. Clinical effect of catgut implantation at acupoints for allergic rhinitis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinrong; Zhang, Qinxiu; Jiang, Luyun; Li, Tao; Liu, Min; Liu, Huanxing; Wang, Xiaopei; Zhang, Fubing

    2013-01-10

    (PP) analysis will be performed. The important features of this trial include the randomization procedures, large sample, and a standardized protocol of catgut implantation at acupoints. This trial will be the first study with a high evidence level in China in order to assess the efficacy and safety of catgut implantation at acupoints in treatment of AR following a randomized, double-blind sham-controlled method. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-TRC-12002191.

  4. A fixed protocol for outpatient clinic routines in the care of patients with severe renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadimeri, Henrik; Frisenette-Fich, Carsten; Deurell, Sven-Ingemar; Svensson, Lars; Carlsson-Bjering, Lena; Fernström, Anders; Almroth, Gabriel; Melander, Stefan; Haarhaus, Mattias; Andersson, Per-Olof; Cassel, Agneta; Mauritz, Nils-Johan; Ståhl-Nilsson, Agneta; Wilske, Jan; Nordström, Kataryna; Oruda, Pavel; Eriksson, Marie; Larsson, Annelie Inghilesi; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2013-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess whether a fixed protocol, using a specially trained team, for intermediate follow-up to fulfillment of guideline targets is non-inferior to conventional follow-up in the care of uraemic patients. A secondary aim was to investigate possible impact on patient outcome. The cohort comprised 424 patients from seven centers. Inclusion criteria were either serum creatinine exceeding 200 µmol/l or calculated clearance below 30 ml/min, representing CKD 4 or 5a. Six centers followed a standardized protocol (group 1). One center provided controls (group 2). The study design was prospective and interventional. The variables measured were blood hemoglobin, bicarbonate, calcium, phosphate, intact parathyroid hormone, albumin, renal function variables, blood pressure and RAAS blockade. The number of patients achieving the set goals was analyzed as a time trend to determine if the intervention resulted in an improvement. At baseline, group 1 had significantly lower GFR and higher serum creatinine, calcium, phosphate, calcium × phosphate product and bicarbonate, lower mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressures and less use of RAAS. During the intervention, group 1 improved in the direction of guidelines for blood hemoglobin, albumin, bicarbonate and MAP. Outcome of secondary endpoints gave a risk of death of 30% in both groups, while the risk of renal replacement therapy was higher in group 1. However, the time to renal replacement therapy was significantly shorter in the intervention group, indicating that other variables than guideline achievements are important for the patient.

  5. Methodological Study to Develop Standard Operational Protocol on Intramuscular (IM, Intradermal (ID and Subcutaneous Drug Administration for Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Bijarania

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medicine administration is a major role played by registered nurses. Medicines are prescribed by the physician and dispensed by the pharmacist but responsibility for meticulous administration rests with the registered nurse. It becomes even more important when drugs are to be administered to children. Drug administration via Intramuscular (IM, Intradermal (ID and Subcutaneous route is a complex process. Errors are associated with medicine administration. Aim: The objective of this study was to develop Standard Operational Protocol (SOP for IM, ID and Subcutaneous drug administration and checklist to assess the implementation of the developed SOP. Materials and Methods: A methodological research design adapted to carry out the present study to develop standard operational protocol for IM, ID and subcutaneous drug administration for children, admitted in Advanced Paediatric Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India. The study included 58 bedside nurses and 90 observations of medicine administration procedure. Results: The Content Validity Index (CVI was prepared to assess the validity of content (items of SOPs and checklists. Over all Cronbach's-alpha values was calculated to assess the internal consistency of Items in SOPs and checklists. CVI of SOP and checklists were 98.51%, 97.83% and 99.03%. Over all Cronbach'salpha values were calculated 0.96, 0.82 and 0.95. All the nurses felt that SOPs are useful. Conclusion: Valid and feasible SOPs for drug administration in children along with valid and reliable checklists were developed. It is recommended to use this document for drug administration in children to prevent any possible error during drug administration to children.

  6. Standardization of a Protocol for Obtaining Platelet Rich Plasma from blood Donors; a Tool for Tissue Regeneration Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Lina Andrea; Escobar, Magally; Peñuela, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    To develop a protocol for obtaining autologous platelet rich plasma in healthy individuals and to determine the concentration of five major growth factors before platelet activation. This protocol could be integrated into the guidelines of good clinical practice and research in regenerative medicine. Platelet rich plasma was isolated by centrifugation from 38 healthy men and 42 women ranging from 18 to 59 years old. The platelet count and quantification of growth factors were analyzed in eighty samples, stratified for age and gender of the donor. Analyses were performed using parametric the t-test or Pearson's analysis for non-parametric distribution. P platelet counts from 1.6 to 4.9 times (mean = 2.8). There was no correlation between platelet concentration and the level of the following growth factors: VEGF-D (r = 0.009, p = 0.4105), VEGF-A (r = 0.0068, p = 0.953), PDGF subunit AA (p = 0.3618; r = 0.1047), PDGF-BB (p = 0.5936; r = 0.6095). In the same way, there was no correlation between donor gender and growth factor concentrations. Only TGF-β concentration was correlated to platelet concentration (r = 0.3163, p = 0.0175). The procedure used allowed us to make preparations rich in platelets, low in leukocytes and red blood cells, and sterile. Our results showed biological variations in content of growth factors in PRP. The factors influencing these results should be further studied.

  7. Engaging Patients and Caregivers Managing Rare Diseases to Improve the Methods of Clinical Guideline Development: A Research Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodyakov, Dmitry; Kinnett, Kathi; Grant, Sean; Lucas, Ann; Martin, Ann; Denger, Brian; Peay, Holly; Coulter, Ian; Fink, Arlene

    2017-04-28

    Clinical guidelines provide systematically developed recommendations for deciding on appropriate health care options for specific conditions and clinical circumstances. Up until recently, patients and caregivers have rarely been included in the process of developing care guidelines. This project will develop and test a new online method for including patients and their caregivers in this process using Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) care guidelines as an example. The new method will mirror and complement the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method (RAM)-the gold standard approach for conducting clinical expert panels that uses a modified Delphi format. RAM is often used in clinical guideline development to determine care appropriateness and necessity in situations where existing clinical evidence is uncertain, weak, or unavailable. To develop the new method for engaging patients and their caregivers in guideline development, we will first conduct interviews with experts on RAM, guideline development, patient engagement, and patient-centeredness and engage with Duchenne patients and caregivers to identify how RAM should be modified for the purposes of patient engagement and what rating criteria should patients and caregivers use to provide their input during the process of guideline development. Once the new method is piloted, we will test it by conducting two concurrently run patient/caregiver panels that will rate patient-centeredness of a subset of DMD care management recommendations already deemed clinically appropriate and necessary. The ExpertLens™ system-a previously evaluated online modified Delphi system that combines two rounds of rating with a round of feedback and moderated online discussions-will be used to conduct these panels. In addition to developing and testing the new engagement method, we will work with the members of our project's Advisory Board to generate a list of best practices for enhancing the level of patient and caregiver involvement in the

  8. A simple method for estimating the effective dose in dental CT. Conversion factors and calculation for a clinical low-dose protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homolka, P.; Kudler, H.; Nowotny, R.; Gahleitner, A.; Wien Univ.

    2001-01-01

    An easily appliable method to estimate effective dose including in its definition the high radio-sensitivity of the salivary glands from dental computed tomography is presented. Effective doses were calculated for a markedly dose reduced dental CT protocol as well as for standard settings. Data are compared with effective doses from the literature obtained with other modalities frequently used in dental care. Methods: Conversion factors based on the weighted Computed Tomography Dose Index were derived from published data to calculate effective dose values for various CT exposure settings. Results: Conversion factors determined can be used for clinically used kVp settings and prefiltrations. With reduced tube current an effective dose for a CT examination of the maxilla of 22 μSv can be achieved, which compares to values typically obtained with panoramic radiography (26 μSv). A CT scan of the mandible, respectively, gives 123 μSv comparable to a full mouth survey with intraoral films (150 μSv). Conclusion: For standard CT scan protocols of the mandible, effective doses exceed 600 μSv. Hence, low dose protocols for dental CT should be considered whenever feasable, especially for paediatric patients. If hard tissue diagnoses is performed, the potential of dose reduction is significant despite the higher image noise levels as readability is still adequate. (orig.) [de

  9. Risks to the fetus from diagnostic imaging during pregnancy: review and proposal of a clinical protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Mafalda; Matias, Alexandra [University of Porto, Faculty of Medicine, Porto (Portugal); Macedo, Filipe [SMIC, Porto (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    Every day, medical practitioners face the dilemma of exposing pregnant or possibly pregnant patients to radiation from diagnostic examinations. Both doctors and patients often have questions about the risks of radiation. The most vulnerable period is between the 8th and 15th weeks of gestation. Deterministic effects like pregnancy loss, congenital malformations, growth retardation and neurobehavioral abnormalities have threshold doses above 100-200 mGy. The risk is considered negligible at 50 mGy and in reality no diagnostic examination exceeds this limit. The risk of carcinogenesis is slightly higher than in the general population. Intravenous iodinated contrast is discouraged, except in highly selected patients. Considering all the possible noxious effects of radiation exposure, measures to diminish radiation are essential and affect the fetal outcome. Nonionizing procedures should be considered whenever possible and every radiology center should have its own data analysis on fetal radiation exposure. In this review, we analyze existing literature on fetal risks due to radiation exposure, producing a clinical protocol to guide safe radiation use in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  10. Optimized subtraction coronary CT angiography protocol for clinical use with short breath-holding time-initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Yuki, Hideaki; Funama, Yoshinori; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yamamuro, Megumi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Subtraction coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography (CCTA), which enables the removal of calcium and coronary stents from CCTA images, has been clinically introduced on a second-generation 320-row CT scanner. However, this technique for clinical use is not optimized. The long breath-holding time for two data acquisitions, which causes image misregistration and patient's discomfort, may limit the clinical availability of this subtraction technique. This study received approval from the institutional review board; prior informed consent to participate was obtained from all patients. We performed subtraction CCTA of five patients using the test injection method and optimized the interval time between the first (pulmonary-arterial phase) and the second (coronary-arterial phase) scans to achieve robust subtraction. The patients' breath-holding times were recorded. We compared breath-holding times between our new protocol and previous study's protocol (estimated). Mean breath-holding time in our new protocol was 18.3 ± 3.4 seconds and that in previous protocol was 29.8 ± 3.6 seconds (difference in mean breath-holding time was 11.5 seconds). Misregistration artifacts were not shown in final subtraction CCTA images. These images improved luminal visualization in the calcified lesion. Our test injection protocol can shorten the breath-holding time, which is helpful for successful subtraction CCTA imaging, potentially resulting in an increase of subtraction CCTA examinations in many institutions. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Replacing Amalgam Restorations: A Standardized Protocol Based on Analyzing Tissue Physicochemical Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decup, Franck; Epaillard, Alexandre; Chemla, Florence

    2015-12-01

    Almost 60% of operative dentistry is devoted to replacing restorations. When practitioners have to replace an amalgam restoration, they tend to opt for an adhesive restoration, as it is conservative of tooth tissues and mimics the natural appearance of teeth. Based on a literature review, the aim of this article is to determine the best tissue approach when replacing an old amalgam by a new adhesive restoration. After analyzing and understanding tissue alterations due to the amalgam corrosion process, the authors propose an analytical approach to managing the situation. Both tissue orientated and specific mechanical approaches are developed and should be implemented to carry out the optimal clinical procedure and achieve the most conservative and durable treatment.

  12. Postoperative vaginal cuff irradiation using high dose rate remote afterloading: a Phase II clinical protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, William R.; Bastin, Kenneth; Edwards, Scott A.; Buchler, Dolores A.; Stitt, Judith A.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Fowler, Jack F.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: In September 1989, a postoperative Phase II high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy protocol was started for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma. This review reports the overall survival, local control, and complication rates for the initial 63 patients treated in this Phase II study. Methods and Materials: High dose rate brachytherapy was delivered using an Iridium-192 HDR remote afterloader. Sixty-three patients were entered into the Phase II protocol, each receiving two vaginal cuff treatments 1 week apart (range 4-12 days) with vaginal ovoids (diameter 2.0-3.0 cm). No patient received adjuvant external beam radiation. A dose of 32.4 Gy in two fractions was prescribed to the ovoid surface in 63 patients. The first three patients treated at our institution received 15, 16.2, and 29 Gy, respectively, to determine acute effects. Results: At a median follow-up of 1.6 years (range 0.75-4.3 years) no patient has developed a vaginal cuff recurrence. One regional recurrence (1.6%) occurred at 1.2 years at the pelvic side wall. This patient is alive and without evidence of disease 7 months after completion of salvage irradiation, which resulted in the only vaginal stenosis (1.6%). Fourteen patients (22%) experienced vaginal apex fibrosis by physical exam, which was clinically symptomatic in four patients. Two patients reported stress incontinence; however, these symptoms were noted prior to their HDR therapy. One patient died 2.4 years after HDR therapy due to cardiovascular disease without evidence of cancer at autopsy. Conclusion: Preliminary results of our phase II HDR vaginal cuff protocol for postoperative FIGO Stage IA, Grade 3 or Stage IB, Grade 1-2 patients demonstrate that 32.4 Gy in two fractions is well tolerated by the vaginal cuff mucosa. Local control appears comparable to our prior experience and others with low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. Additional patient accrual and further follow

  13. Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Characteristics and Clinical Outcome of Patients Treated With an Intensive Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulou, Georgia; Konstantakis, Christos; Kottorοu, Anastasia; Skroubis, Georgios; Theocharis, Georgios; Theopistos, Vasileios; Triantos, Christos; Nikolopoulou, Vasiliki; Thomopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Background In recent years major advances have been made in the management of patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcome of patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (ALGIB) treated with an intensive protocol. Methods We analyzed the medical records of 528 patients with ALGIB. All patients after hemodynamic stabilization underwent colonoscopy during the first 24 h of hospitalization and capsule enteroscopy when needed. Patients with massive ongoing bleeding underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA), and when active bleeding was detected embolization was immediately performed. Results The mean age of the patients was 70.2 ± 14.6 years and 271 (51.3%) of them were men. At least one comorbidity was present in 464 patients (87.9%), cardiovascular disease in 266 (50.4%), while 158 (30%) patients were on antiplatelet drugs and 96 (18.2%) on anticoagulants. The most common causes of bleeding were diverticulosis (19.7%) and ischemic colitis (19.3%). Thirty-six patients (6.9%) had small intestinal bleeding. In 117 patients (22.2%) active bleeding or recent bleeding stigmata were found and in 82 of them (92.1%) endoscopic hemostasis was applied. Embolization was performed in 10 (1.9%) and was successful in seven (70%) cases, while surgical hemostasis was required in only six (1.1%) cases. Forty-four (8.3%) patients had a rebleeding episode, and 13 patients died with an overall mortality of 2.5%. Conclusions Management of ALGIB based on an intensive protocol is safe and effective. The bleeding source can be identified in most cases with a favorable outcome. PMID:29317943

  14. [A standardized protocol for detection of ALK protein expression and gene fusion in lung adenocarcinoma cytologic specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Wu, Xiaonan; Shi, Yuankai; Han, Xiaohong; Cheng, Gang; Li, Lin; Mu, Xinlin; Zhang, Yuhui; Cui, Di; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zaiwen; Zhu, Guangqing; Ma, Lingyun; Yang, Li; Di, Jing; Liu, Dongge

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a standardized protocol for detection of ALK protein expression and gene fusion in cytologic specimens. Lung adenocarcinoma cytologic specimens were collected from seven hospitals in Beijing city. A detection protocol for ALK protein expression and gene fusion was designed according to the results of comparative experiment. Ventana immunohistochemical (IHC) ALK(D5F3) detecting ALK protein expression was performed in 203 prepared formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cell blocks. ALK gene fusion in 98 EGFR gene wild type cytologic specimens and in 4 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BL) samples was detected by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). ALK gene fusion in the Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3) positive samples was further tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Six patients with ALK IHC-positive result were followed up to analyze the responses of crizotinib therapy. Comparative experiments: (1) Comparison of the results of 4% neutral buffered formalin fixed for different time (24 h, 48 h, 72 h) on the Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3) staining was conducted in two cases of IHC ALK positive FFPE cell blocks; (2) Comparing qRT-PCR results for ALK fusion in samples from FFPE cell blocks and cytospin prepared slides in 10 cases of lung adenocarcinoma cytologic specimens. Among the specimens examined using the standardized protocol recommended by this study, 229 cases of cytologic specimens met the diagnostic criteria of lung adenocarcinoma. Among them, 207 cases obtained ALK gene test results (by at least one method), with an ALK test ratio of 90.4% (207/229). FFPE cell blocks were successfully prepared in 203 cases, Ventana IHC ALK (D5F3) were successfully performed in all the 203 FFPE cell blocks (100%), and the ALK protein positive detection rate was 10.3% (21/203). ALK fusion was tested in 98 FFPE cytologic samples of EGFR wild types by qRT-PCR, and 96 out of 98 (97.96%) cytologic samples were

  15. Individual versus standard dose of rFSH in a mild stimulation protocol for intrauterine insemination: a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour Freiesleben, N; Lossl, K; Bogstad, J

    2009-01-01

    -stimulating hormone (rFSH) dosage nomogram. The nomogram has now been tested. METHODS: Multicentre randomized controlled trial (RCT) including 228 ovulatory patients scheduled for COS and IUI. Patients were randomized to 'individual' (50-100 IU rFSH/day, n = 113) or 'standard' (75 IU rFSH/day, n = 115) dose......' group and 21/115 (18%) in the 'standard' group and the rate of multiple gestations was 1/113 (1%) versus 5/115 (4%), P = 0.21. CONCLUSIONS: This RCT is the first to clinically test a dosage nomogram in ovulatory IUI patients' first rFSH treatment cycle. Dosing according to the nomogram was superior...

  16. The adherence/resource priming paradigm--a randomised clinical trial conducting a bonafide psychotherapy protocol for generalised anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flückiger, Christoph

    2014-02-20

    Bonafide psychotherapy is an effective treatment for generalised anxiety disorder compared to no-treatment. Rather than creating increasing numbers of new overall treatment-packets within a medical meta-model, an additional approach to investigating clinical research designs may be to increase the understanding of already effective psychotherapies. Treatment manuals and protocols allow a relatively high degree of freedom for the way therapists implement the overall treatment manuals. There is a systematic lack of knowledge on how therapists should customise these overall protocols. The present study experimentally examines three ways of conducting a bonafide psychotherapy based on a 15 session time-limited cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) protocol and their relation to the therapists' protocol adherence and treatment efficacy. This trial will investigate three different methods of customising a bonafide CBT-protocol using dyadic peer-tutoring methodology (primings). The individuals with GAD will be randomly assigned to one of three priming conditions (resource priming, supportive resource priming, or adherence priming). The participant treatment allocation will be performed randomly. Therapists will be assigned to a peer-tutoring partner and priming condition based on a mutual agreement. Treatment outcomes will be assessed at the following times: observer based in-session outcomes, session-by-session post-session outcomes, treatment outcome at post assessment and treatment outcome at 6-month follow-up. The proposed trial addresses the clinically relevant question of how to customise a bonafide psychotherapy protocol using tandem peer-tutoring methodology (three priming conditions). Through the development and testing of the proposed priming procedures, this study describes levels of adherence and how to conduct an overall treatment protocol in a more systematised way. From ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02039193.

  17. The international protocol for the dosimetry of external radiotherapy beams based on standards of absorbed dose to water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreo, P.

    2001-01-01

    An International Code of Practice (CoP, or dosimetry protocol) for external beam radiotherapy dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water has been published by the IAEA on behalf of IAEA, WHO, PAHO and ESTRO. The CoP provides a systematic and internationally unified approach for the determination of the absorbed dose to water in reference conditions with radiotherapy beams. The development of absorbed-dose-to-water standards for high-energy photons and electrons offers the possibility of reducing the uncertainty in the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams. Many laboratories already provide calibrations at the radiation quality of 60Co gamma-rays and some have extended calibrations to high-energy photon and electron beams. The dosimetry of kilovoltage x-rays, as well as that of proton and ion beams can also be based on these standards. Thus, a coherent dosimetry system based on the same formalism is achieved for practically all radiotherapy beams. The practical use of the CoP as simple. The document is formed by a set of different CoPs for each radiation type, which include detailed procedures and worksheets. All CoPs are based on ND,w chamber calibrations at a reference beam quality Qo, together with radiation beam quality correction factors kQ preferably measured directly for the user's chamber in a standards laboratory. Calculated values of kQ are provided together with their uncertainty estimates. Beam quality specifiers are 60Co, TPR20,10 (high-energy photons), R50 (electrons), HVL and kV (x-rays) and Rres (protons and ions) [es

  18. Rationale for the diabetic retinopathy clinical research network treatment protocol for center-involved diabetic macular edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Beck, Roy W; Bressler, Neil M; Browning, David J; Chalam, K V; Davis, Matthew; Ferris, Frederick L; Glassman, Adam R; Maturi, Raj K; Stockdale, Cynthia R; Topping, Trexler M

    2011-12-01

    To describe the underlying principles used to develop a web-based algorithm that incorporated intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) treatment for diabetic macular edema (DME) in a Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network (DRCR.net) randomized clinical trial. Discussion of treatment protocol for DME. Subjects with vision loss resulting from DME involving the center of the macula. The DRCR.net created an algorithm incorporating anti-VEGF injections in a comparative effectiveness randomized clinical trial evaluating intravitreal ranibizumab with prompt or deferred (≥24 weeks) focal/grid laser treatment in eyes with vision loss resulting from center-involved DME. Results confirmed that intravitreal ranibizumab with prompt or deferred laser provides superior visual acuity outcomes compared with prompt laser alone through at least 2 years. Duplication of this algorithm may not be practical for clinical practice. To share their opinion on how ophthalmologists might emulate the study protocol, participating DRCR.net investigators developed guidelines based on the algorithm's underlying rationale. Clinical guidelines based on a DRCR.net protocol. The treatment protocol required real-time feedback from a web-based data entry system for intravitreal injections, focal/grid laser treatment, and follow-up intervals. Guidance from this system indicated whether treatment was required or given at investigator discretion and when follow-up should be scheduled. Clinical treatment guidelines, based on the underlying clinical rationale of the DRCR.net protocol, include repeating treatment monthly as long as there is improvement in edema compared with the previous month or until the retina is no longer thickened. If thickening recurs or worsens after discontinuing treatment, treatment is resumed. Duplication of the approach used in the DRCR.net randomized clinical trial to treat DME involving the center of the macula with intravitreal ranibizumab may

  19. Guidelines for Standard Photography in Gross and Clinical Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Cagatay; Ertilav, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Photography has a widespread usage in medicine and anatomy. In this review, authors focused on the usage of photography in gross and clinical anatomy. Photography in gross and clinical anatomy is not only essential for accurate documentation of morphological findings but also important in sharing knowledge and experience. Photographs of cadavers…

  20. Clinical benefits of incorporating doxycycline into a canine heartworm treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, C Thomas; Myrick, Elizabeth S; Nelson, Thomas A

    2017-11-09

    The objective of heartworm treatment is to improve the clinical condition of the patient and to eliminate pre-cardiac, juvenile, and adult worm stages with minimal complications. Pulmonary thromboembolisms are an inevitable consequence of worm death and can result in severe pulmonary reactions and even death of the patient. To minimize these reactions, various treatment protocols involving melarsomine, the only adulticidal drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administrations (FDA), in conjunction with macrocyclic lactone heartworm preventives and glucocorticosteroids have been advocated. The discovery of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia in Dirofilaria immitis has led to several experimental studies examining the effects of administering doxycycline to reduce or eliminate Wolbachia organism. These studies have shown a decrease in gross and microscopic pathology of pulmonary parenchyma in experimental heartworm infections pretreated with doxycycline before melarsomine administration. Electronic medical records from a large veterinary practice in northeast Alabama were searched to identify dogs treated for heartworms with melarsomine from January 2005 through December 2012. The search was refined further to select for dogs that met the following criteria: 1) received two or three doses of ivermectin heartworm preventive prior to melarsomine injections, 2) received one injection of melarsomine followed by two injections 4 to 8 weeks later, and 3) were treated with prednisone following melarsomine injections. The dogs were then divided into those that also were treated with doxycycline 10 mg/kg BID for 4 weeks (Group A, n = 47) and those that did not receive doxycycline (Group B, n = 47). The medical notes of all 94 cases were then reviewed for comments concerning coughing, dyspnea, or hemoptysis in the history, physical exam template, or from telephone conversations with clients the week following each visit. Any dog that died within one year of treatment

  1. Clinical benefits of incorporating doxycycline into a canine heartworm treatment protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Thomas Nelson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of heartworm treatment is to improve the clinical condition of the patient and to eliminate pre-cardiac, juvenile, and adult worm stages with minimal complications. Pulmonary thromboembolisms are an inevitable consequence of worm death and can result in severe pulmonary reactions and even death of the patient. To minimize these reactions, various treatment protocols involving melarsomine, the only adulticidal drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administrations (FDA, in conjunction with macrocyclic lactone heartworm preventives and glucocorticosteroids have been advocated. The discovery of the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia in Dirofilaria immitis has led to several experimental studies examining the effects of administering doxycycline to reduce or eliminate Wolbachia organism. These studies have shown a decrease in gross and microscopic pathology of pulmonary parenchyma in experimental heartworm infections pretreated with doxycycline before melarsomine administration. Methods Electronic medical records from a large veterinary practice in northeast Alabama were searched to identify dogs treated for heartworms with melarsomine from January 2005 through December 2012. The search was refined further to select for dogs that met the following criteria: 1 received two or three doses of ivermectin heartworm preventive prior to melarsomine injections, 2 received one injection of melarsomine followed by two injections 4 to 8 weeks later, and 3 were treated with prednisone following melarsomine injections. The dogs were then divided into those that also were treated with doxycycline 10 mg/kg BID for 4 weeks (Group A, n = 47 and those that did not receive doxycycline (Group B, n = 47. The medical notes of all 94 cases were then reviewed for comments concerning coughing, dyspnea, or hemoptysis in the history, physical exam template, or from telephone conversations with clients the week following each visit. Any

  2. A review of bioreactor protocols for human neural precursor cell expansion in preparation for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghbaderani, Behnam A; Mukhida, Karim; Hong, Murray; Mendez, Ivar; Behie, Leo A

    2011-09-01

    Tissue-specific human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) can be isolated from various regions of the developing or adult central nervous system and may serve as a viable source of cells in cell replacement therapies for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. However, in order for cell replacement strategies to become a routine therapeutic option for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, hNPCs should be generated under standardized and controlled conditions. Studies over the last two decades have focused on developing cell growth media and cell handling protocols for expansion and differentiation of hNPCs in culture. Key studies have reported the development of serum-free growth media and large-scale computer-controlled suspension bioreactors that can support high cell proliferation rates (doubling times < 3 days), multipotentiality, and potential neurogenic differentiation (more than 60% neurons). Moreover, bioengineering studies have focused on controlling culture conditions in suspension bioreactors including inoculation, hydrodynamics of culture, oxygen and nutrients transfer to the cells, monitoring in situ physiological parameters using process control techniques, and expansion for extended periods of time. In addition, in vitro and in vivo characterization of hNPCs have been performed, providing information on stem/progenitor cell characteristics, cell surface analysis, and appropriate type of cells to use in transplantation studies.

  3. Determining the Optimal Protocol for Measuring an Albuminuria Class Transition in Clinical Trials in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kropelin, Tobias F.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Bilous, Rudy; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Heerspink, Hiddo J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Albuminuria class transition (normo-to micro-to macroalbuminuria) is used as an intermediate end point to assess renoprotective drug efficacy. However, definitions of such class transition vary between trials. To determine the most optimal protocol, we evaluated the approaches used in four clinical

  4. [Clinical gastroenterology--luxury or standard of service in gastroenterology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, B

    2005-12-01

    Gastroenterology is one of the important specialities in internal medicine. The reform of the training curriculum for internal medicine and the reimbursement for inpatient and outpatient services in gastroenterology threatens the existence of internal medicine and gastroenterology in Germany, too. The capacity for training in internal medicine and gastroenterology is reduced by a decrease in the number of hospital beds in academic and community training centres. The concentration on gastrointestinal endoscopy in outpatient gastroenterology will be a result of an increasing demand for gastrointestinal endoscopy services and the decreasing number of gastroenterology clinics, respectively. Therefore, clinical gastroenterology as a core service in gastroenterology will be steadily eliminated. This development will diminish clinical gastroenterology to gastrointestinal endoscopy by eliminating the clinical services for chronic gastroenterological conditions such as, e.g., IBD, chronic hepatitis, reflux disease, IBS and functional dyspepsia. In this way gastroenterology looses its central role in health care services in specialised internal medicine. In 2003 the American Gastroenterological Association position paper: "Training the Gastroenterologist of the Future: the Gastroenterology Core Curriculum" was published. It has emphasised the role of clinical gastroenterology in medical training and medical services, too. Clinical gastroenterology consists of an array of several disciplines, e.g., GI physiology, GI research, infectious diseases, hepatology, oncology and gastrointestinal endoscopy, which all contribute to the effectiveness and efficiency in health care service. Financial incentives and better prospects of leading positions for young gastroenterologists in clinical gastroenterology have to be accomplished in order to nourish clinical gastroenterology in Germany. The German Association of Gastroenterology should negotiate with the responsible authorities for

  5. SU-F-R-06: Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury Imaging, Developing a Coherent Clinical Protocol From Literature Review Through Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, D; France, E; Lambert, J; Hinkle, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Medical Physics teams can now play a critical role to help plan and provide studied approaches for traumatic brachial plexus MR imaging (tbpMRI). This is especially important for coordination with uncommon applications, since it is challenging to select the right modality, parameters, and train technologists on the essential components. For this work, we started with a review of the medical literature, performed crossover/volunteer studies to bring tbpMRI to practice with greater image QC and protocol management. Methods: To the best of our knowledge, we reviewed the known searchable domain for tbpMRI. We found 69 total articles since 2000. Articles were evaluated with our published protocol for literature management (LIMES3). Two physicists and two radiologists condensed the information from all articles into a knowledgebase. Results: The initial literature demonstrated great heterogeneity, which was a sign that this area needed greater consistency. Despite inconsistency and imprecision, we extracted the most relevant targets using our long-term experience with protocol development in MSK. We ran volunteers on six different magnets of various field strengths with multiple receiver coils, and rebuilt a coherent protocol for tbpMRI. Our radiologists rated LIMES3 work as superior. We have received referrals from the ER and have conducted four patient evaluations. Conclusion: Traumatic brachial plexus MRI has great possible benefits for patients. This work supports the complexity of tbpMRI scanning. As this is rarely performed, it requires a more diligent protocol workflow, coordination of caregivers, and education within multiple clinical departments. Choosing the correct imaging exam can be critical, as patients can have significant neuropathy and/or paralysis. The LIMES3 protocol is well liked at our institution, and forms the cornerstone of understanding for our work. Our literature management led to a better clinical protocol creation despite the diffuse

  6. SU-F-R-06: Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury Imaging, Developing a Coherent Clinical Protocol From Literature Review Through Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, D; France, E; Lambert, J; Hinkle, J [The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Medical Physics teams can now play a critical role to help plan and provide studied approaches for traumatic brachial plexus MR imaging (tbpMRI). This is especially important for coordination with uncommon applications, since it is challenging to select the right modality, parameters, and train technologists on the essential components. For this work, we started with a review of the medical literature, performed crossover/volunteer studies to bring tbpMRI to practice with greater image QC and protocol management. Methods: To the best of our knowledge, we reviewed the known searchable domain for tbpMRI. We found 69 total articles since 2000. Articles were evaluated with our published protocol for literature management (LIMES3). Two physicists and two radiologists condensed the information from all articles into a knowledgebase. Results: The initial literature demonstrated great heterogeneity, which was a sign that this area needed greater consistency. Despite inconsistency and imprecision, we extracted the most relevant targets using our long-term experience with protocol development in MSK. We ran volunteers on six different magnets of various field strengths with multiple receiver coils, and rebuilt a coherent protocol for tbpMRI. Our radiologists rated LIMES3 work as superior. We have received referrals from the ER and have conducted four patient evaluations. Conclusion: Traumatic brachial plexus MRI has great possible benefits for patients. This work supports the complexity of tbpMRI scanning. As this is rarely performed, it requires a more diligent protocol workflow, coordination of caregivers, and education within multiple clinical departments. Choosing the correct imaging exam can be critical, as patients can have significant neuropathy and/or paralysis. The LIMES3 protocol is well liked at our institution, and forms the cornerstone of understanding for our work. Our literature management led to a better clinical protocol creation despite the diffuse

  7. Multi-disciplinary clinical protocol for the diagnosis of bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Rita; Di Luciano, Carmela; Chiaramonte, Ignazio; Serra, Agostino; Bonfiglio, Marco

    2018-04-23

    The objective of this study was to examine the role of different specialists in the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), to understand changes in verbal expression and phonation, respiratory dynamics and swallowing that occurred rapidly over a short period of time. 22 patients with bulbar ALS were submitted for voice assessment, ENT evaluation, Multi-Dimensional Voice Program (MDVP), spectrogram, electroglottography, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. In the early stage of the disease, the oral tract and velopharyngeal port were involved. Three months after the initial symptoms, most of the patients presented hoarseness, breathy voice, dysarthria, pitch modulation problems and difficulties in pronunciation of explosive, velar and lingual consonants. Values of MDVP were altered. Spectrogram showed an additional formant, due to nasal resonance. Electroglottography showed periodic oscillation of the vocal folds only during short vocal cycle. Swallowing was characterized by weakness and incoordination of oro-pharyngeal muscles with penetration or aspiration. A specific multidisciplinary clinical protocol was designed to report vocal parameters and swallowing disorders that changed more quickly in bulbar ALS patients. Furthermore, the patients were stratified according to involvement of pharyngeal structures, and severity index. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Correction: PAIS: paracetamol (acetaminophen in stroke; protocol for a randomized, double blind clinical trial. [ISCRTN74418480

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kappelle L Jaap

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Paracetamol (Acetaminophen In Stroke (PAIS study is a phase III multicenter, double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of high-dose acetaminophen in patients with acute stroke. The trial compares treatment with a daily dose of 6 g acetaminophen, started within 12 hours after the onset of symptoms, with matched placebo. The purpose of this study is to assess whether treatment with acetaminophen for 3 days will result in improved functional outcome through a modest reduction in body temperature and prevention of fever. The previously planned statistical analysis based on a dichotomization of the scores on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS may not make the most efficient use of the available baseline information. Therefore, the planned primary analysis of the PAIS study has been changed from fixed dichotomization of the mRS to a sliding dichotomy analysis. Methods Instead of taking a single definition of good outcome for all patients, the definition is tailored to each individual patient's baseline prognosis on entry into the trial. Conclusion The protocol change was initiated because of both advances in statistical approaches and to increase the efficiency of the trial by improving statistical power. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials [ISCRTN74418480

  9. The Cardiology Audit and Registration Data Standards (CARDS), European data standards for clinical cardiology practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Flynn (Rachel); C. Barrett (Conor); F.G. Cosio (Francisco); A.K. Gitt (Anselm); L.C. Wallentin (Lars); P. Kearney (Peter); M. Lonergan (Moira); E. Shelley (Emer); M.L. Simoons (Maarten)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: Systematic registration of data from clinical practice is important for clinical care, local, national and international registries, and audit. Data to be collected for these different purposes should be harmonized. Therefore, during Ireland's Presidency of the European Union (EU)

  10. The influence of different contrast medium concentrations and injection protocols on quantitative and clinical assessment of FDG–PET/CT in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Frederik A., E-mail: fverburg@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Kuhl, Christiane K. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus [Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Müllerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Palmowski, Moritz [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of two different contrast medium concentrations for use in computed X-ray tomography (CT) employing two different injection protocols on positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction in combined 2-{sup 18}F-desoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in patients with a suspicion of lung cancer. Methods: 120 patients with a suspicion of lung cancer were enrolled prospectively. PET images were reconstructed with the non-enhanced and venous phase contrast CT obtained after injection of iopromide 300 mg/ml or 370 mg/ml using either a fixed-dose or a body surface area adapted injection protocol. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) and contrast enhancement (HU) were determined in the subclavian vein, ascending aorta, abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava, portal vein, liver and kidney and in the suspicious lung lesion. PET data were evaluated visually for the presence of malignancy and image quality. Results: At none of the sites a significant difference in the extent of the contrast enhancement between the four different protocols was found. However, the variability of the contrast enhancement at several anatomical sites was significantly greater in the fixed dose groups than in the BSA groups for both contrast medium concentrations. At none of the sites a significant difference was found in the extent of the SUVmax and SUVmean increase as a result of the use of the venous phase contrast enhanced CT for attenuation. Visual clinical evaluation of lesions showed no differences between contrast and non-contrast PET/CT (P = 0.32). Conclusions: Contrast enhanced CT for attenuation correction in combined PET/CT in lung cancer affects neither the clinical assessment nor image quality of the PET-images. A body surface adapted contrast medium protocol reduces the interpatient variability in contrast enhancement.

  11. Using Semantic Web technologies for the generation of domain-specific templates to support clinical study metadata standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Evans, Julie; Endle, Cory M; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2016-01-01

    The Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group (BRIDG) model is a formal domain analysis model for protocol-driven biomedical research, and serves as a semantic foundation for application and message development in the standards developing organizations (SDOs). The increasing sophistication and complexity of the BRIDG model requires new approaches to the management and utilization of the underlying semantics to harmonize domain-specific standards. The objective of this study is to develop and evaluate a Semantic Web-based approach that integrates the BRIDG model with ISO 21090 data types to generate domain-specific templates to support clinical study metadata standards development. We developed a template generation and visualization system based on an open source Resource Description Framework (RDF) store backend, a SmartGWT-based web user interface, and a "mind map" based tool for the visualization of generated domain-specific templates. We also developed a RESTful Web Service informed by the Clinical Information Modeling Initiative (CIMI) reference model for access to the generated domain-specific templates. A preliminary usability study is performed and all reviewers (n = 3) had very positive responses for the evaluation questions in terms of the usability and the capability of meeting the system requirements (with the average score of 4.6). Semantic Web technologies provide a scalable infrastructure and have great potential to enable computable semantic interoperability of models in the intersection of health care and clinical research.

  12. Testing many treatments within a single protocol over 10 years at MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL: Multi-arm, multi-stage platform, umbrella and basket protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Mahesh Kb; Sydes, Matthew R; Cafferty, Fay H; Choodari-Oskooei, Babak; Langley, Ruth E; Brown, Louise; Phillips, Patrick Pj; Spears, Melissa R; Rowley, Sam; Kaplan, Richard; James, Nicholas D; Maughan, Timothy; Paton, Nicholas; Royston, Patrick J

    2017-10-01

    There is real need to change how we do some of our clinical trials, as currently the testing and development process is too slow, too costly and too failure-prone often we find that a new treatment is no better than the current standard. Much of the focus on the development and testing pathway has been in improving the design of phase I and II trials. In this article, we present examples of new methods for improving the design of phase III trials (and the necessary lead up to them) as they are the most time-consuming and expensive part of the pathway. Key to all these methods is the aim to test many treatments and/or pose many therapeutic questions within one protocol.

  13. Changes in Body Mass Index and Lipid Profile in Psoriatic Patients After Treatment With Standard Protocol of Infliximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Amir Houshang; Mortazavi, Hossein; Balighi, Kamran; Hosseini, Mahboubeh Sadat; Azizpour, Arghavan; Hejazi, Seyyedeh Pardis; Goodarzi, Azadeh; Darvari, Seyyedeh Bahareh

    2016-09-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic and inflammatory dermatologic disease. Psoriasis may predispose to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. However, the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor in mediating this risk is controversial. Regarding frequent use of infliximab in psoriasis, and the hypothesis that anti TNF-α treatment may increase Body Mass Index (BMI) and alter lipid profile in these patients, the aim of this study was to assess changes in BMI and Lipid Profile and level of leptin in Psoriatic Patients under Treatment of Standard Protocol of Infliximab in a 24 week period. This study was accomplished as a before-after study. Twenty-seven psoriatic patients were included, and standard infliximab therapy was applied. All patients underwent 3 times of blood collection and in each session; LDL, HDL, Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Leptin, and PASI score were measured at the start of the study and at the 12th and 24th week of follow-up. Twenty-five patients consisted of 18 (72%) male and 7 (28%) female subjects were evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 36.91±13.31 years. PASI score demonstrated significant decrease after 24 weeks; however, BMI and HDL and leptin showed a significant increase during treatment. Significant negative correlation was seen between Leptin and PASI score changes (r=0.331, P=0.042). HDL and BMI had the most correlations with leptin (positive correlation) and PASI score (negative correlation). Results demonstrated a dramatic decrease in PASI, increase in BMI and HDL and increased in leptin; somewhat correlated to each other. These results suggest that patients taking infliximab should take more care of their weight and lipid profile, while on treatment.

  14. Standardization of I-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine myocardial sympathetic activity imaging: phantom calibration and clinical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Verschure, Derk O.; Okuda, Koichi; Verberne, Hein J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Myocardial sympathetic imaging with I-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (I-123-mIBG) has gained clinical momentum. Although the need for standardization of I-123-mIBG myocardial uptake has been recognized, the availability of practical clinical standardization approaches is limited. The need for

  15. Low-dose single acquisition rest {sup 99m}Tc/stress {sup 201}Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT protocol: phantom studies and clinical validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Imaging and Computer Vision, Aachen (Germany); Backus, Barbra E.; Romijn, R.Leo [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Wieczorek, Herfried [Philips Research, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Verzijlbergen, J.F. [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-03-15

    We developed and tested a single acquisition rest {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi/stress {sup 201}Tl dual isotope protocol (SDI) with the intention of improving the clinical workflow and patient comfort of myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The technical feasibility of SDI was evaluated by a series of anthropomorphic phantom studies on a standard SPECT camera. The attenuation map was created by a moving transmission line source. Iterative reconstruction including attenuation correction, resolution recovery and Monte Carlo simulation of scatter was used for simultaneous reconstruction of dual tracer distribution. For clinical evaluation, patient studies were compared to stress {sup 99m}Tc and rest {sup 99m}Tc reference images acquired in a 2-day protocol. Clinical follow-up examinations like coronary angiography (CAG) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) were included in the assessment if available. Phantom studies demonstrated the technical feasibility of SDI. Artificial lesions inserted in the phantom mimicking ischaemia could be clearly identified. In 51/53 patients, the image quality was adequate for clinical evaluation. For the remaining two obese patients with body mass index > 32 the injected {sup 201}Tl dose of 74 MBq was insufficient for clinical assessment. In answer to this the {sup 201}Tl dose was adapted for obese patients in the rest of the study. In 31 patients, SDI and {sup 99m}Tc reference images resulted in equivalent clinical assessment. Significant differences were found in 20 patients. In 18 of these 20 patients additional examinations were available. In 15 patients the diagnosis based on the SDI images was confirmed by the results of CAG or FFR. In these patients the SDI images were more accurate than the {sup 99m}Tc reference study. In three patients minor ischaemic lesions were detected by SDI but were not confirmed by CAG. In one of these cases this was probably caused by pronounced apical thinning. For two patients

  16. Flow rate calibration II: a clinical evaluation study using PanLeucoGating as a single-platform protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storie, Ian; Sawle, Alex; Whitby, Liam; Goodfellow, Karen; Granger, Vivian; Reilly, John T; Barnett, David

    2003-09-01

    CD4(+) T-lymphocyte enumeration is vital for monitoring disease progression in individuals positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and as a result, there is a need to develop cost-effective protocols that provide accuracy, precision, and affordability. Recently, PanLeucoGating has been shown to fulfill these requirements; however, although comparable to state-of-the-art single-platform protocols (SP), there is still a requirement for an accurate total white cell count. To overcome this limitation, we recently developed a flow-rate based calibration method that enables the PanLeucoGating protocol to be used as a SP approach, and in this study show that this approach can be used for CD4(+) T-lymphocyte enumeration. A total of 113 HIV samples were analyzed using three protocols: (a) state-of-the art SP bead-based method (MultiSet; predicate protocol), (b) PanLeucoGating protocol used as a dual-platform (DP) approach, and (c) the newly developed flow rate-based SP approach. We demonstrate that flow rate calibration can be achieved easily and that the method is highly comparable to the state-of-the-art SP method. A high correlation was observed between the predicate protocol and the SP PanLeucoGating approach over the whole range of CD4 counts tested (r(2) = 0.9928; bias 8 cells/microl), including the clinically relevant range (e.g., 0-200 CD4 cells/microl; bias 0 cells/microl). For batched samples, the cost of providing a CD4(+) T-lymphocyte count was reduced to approximately US $1. The SP PanLeucoGating is a cost-effective approach to CD4(+) T-lymphocyte enumeration that maintains accuracy and precision. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Dry Needling for Patients With Neck Pain: Protocol of a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattie, Eric Robert; Cleland, Joshua A; Snodgrass, Suzanne J

    2017-11-22

    . Participants will receive seven physical therapy treatments lasting 45 minutes each over a maximum of 4 weeks. The primary outcome will be disability as measured by the Neck Disability Index. Secondary outcomes include the following: pain, patient-perceived improvement, patient expectations, and successful blinding to the needling intervention. Outcome measures will be assessed at 4 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months by an assessor who is blind to the group allocation of the participants to determine the short- and long-term treatment effects. We will examine the primary aim with a two-way, repeated-measures analysis of variance with treatment group as the between-subjects variable and time as the within-subjects variable. The hypothesis of interest will be the two-way group by time interaction. An a priori alpha level of .05 will be used for all analyses. Recruitment is currently underway and is expected to be completed by the end of 2017. Data collection for long-term outcomes will occur throughout 2017 and 2018. Data analysis, preparation, and publication submission is expected to occur throughout the final three quarters of 2018. The successful completion of this trial will provide evidence to demonstrate whether dry needling is effective for the management of mechanical neck pain when used in a combined treatment approach, as is the common clinical practice. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02731014; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02731014 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6ujZgbhsq). ©Eric Robert Gattie, Joshua A Cleland, Suzanne J Snodgrass. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 22.11.2017.

  18. Validation of the Pangao PG-800B5 for clinical use and self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan; Zeng, Zhaolin; Li, Lizhi; Wan, Xiaofen; Wan, Yi

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to validate the Pangao PG-800B5 upper arm blood pressure monitor according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. A total of 33 participants, 16 men and 17 women, were included in the device evaluation. The protocol requirements were followed precisely. The mean age of the participants was 56.4±21.0 years (range 22-84 years). The mean systolic blood pressure was 143.6±25.5 mmHg (range 98-188 mmHg), the mean diastolic blood pressure was 85.7±17.2 mmHg (range 49-125 mmHg), and the mean arm circumference was 26.1±2.2 cm (range 23-32 cm). On average, the device overestimated the systolic blood pressure by 0.9±4.2 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure by 0.7±4.5 mmHg. The device passed all requirements, fulfilling the standards of the protocol. Therefore, the Pangao PG-800B5 upper arm blood pressure monitor can be recommended for clinical use and self-measurement in an adult population.

  19. An umbrella protocol for standardized data collection (SDC) in rectal cancer: a prospective uniform naming and procedure convention to support personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldolesi, Elisa; van Soest, Johan; Dinapoli, Nicola; Dekker, Andre; Damiani, Andrea; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-07-01

    Predictive models allow treating physicians to deliver tailored treatment moving from prescription by consensus to prescription by numbers. The main features of an umbrella protocol for standardizing data and procedures to create a consistent dataset useful to obtain a trustful analysis for a Decision Support System for rectal cancer are reported. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of the standard EEG in clinical psychiatry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The EEG is a commonly requested test on patients attending psychiatric services, predominantly to investigate for a possible organic brain syndrome causing behavioural changes. AIMS: To assess referrals for EEG from psychiatric services in comparison with those from other sources. We determine which clinical factors were associated with an abnormal EEG in patients referred from psychiatric sources. METHODS: A retrospective review of EEG requests in a 1-year period was performed. Analysis of referral reasons for psychiatric patients was undertaken, and outcome of patients referred from psychiatric services post-EEG was reviewed. RESULTS: One thousand four hundred and seventy EEGs were reviewed, of which 91 (6.2%) were referred from psychiatry. Neurology service referrals had detection rates of abnormal EEGs of 27%, with psychiatric referrals having the lowest abnormality detection rate of 17.6% (p < 0.1). In psychiatric-referred patients the only significant predictors found of an abnormal EEG were a known history of epilepsy (p < 0.001), being on clozapine (p < 0.05), and a possible convulsive seizure (RR = 6.51). Follow-up data of 53 patients did not reveal a significant clinical impact of EEG results on patient management. CONCLUSIONS: Many patients are referred for EEG from psychiatric sources despite a relatively low index of suspicion of an organic brain disorders, based on reasons for referral documented, with an unsurprising low clinical yield.

  1. Clinical benefits after the implementation of a multimodal perioperative protocol in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Nascimento, José Eduardo de; Salomão, Alberto Bicudo; Caporossi, Cervantes; Diniz, Breno Nadaf

    2010-01-01

    Multimodal protocol of perioperative care may enhance recovery after surgery. Based on evidence these new routines of perioperative care changed conventional prescriptions in surgery. To evaluate the results of a multimodal protocol (ACERTO protocol) in elderly patients. Non-randomized historical cohort study was performed at the surgical ward of a tertiary university hospital. One hundred seventeen patients aged 60 and older were submitted to elective abdominal operations under either conventional (n = 42; conventional group, January 2004-June 2005) or a fast-track perioperative protocol named ACERTO (n = 75; ACERTO group, July 2005-December 2007). Main endpoints were preoperative fasting time, postoperative day of re-feeding, volume of intravenous fluids, length of hospital stay and morbidity. The implantation of the ACERTO protocol was followed by a decrease in both preoperative fasting (15 [8-20] vs 4 [2-20] hours, P<0.001) and postoperative day of refeeding (1st [1st-10th] vs 0 [0-5th] PO day; P<0.01), and intravenous fluids (10.7 [2.5-57.5] vs 2.5 [0.5-82] L, P<0.001). The changing of protocols reduced the mean length of hospital stay by 4 days (6[1-43] vs 2[1-97] days; P = 0.002) and surgical site infection rate by 85.7% (19%; 8/42 vs 2.7%; 2/75, P<0.001; relative risk = 1.20; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.39). Per-protocol analysis showed that hospital stay in major operations diminished only in patients who completed the protocol (P<0.01). The implementation of multidisciplinary routines of the ACERTO protocol diminished both hospitalization and surgical site infection in elderly patients submitted to abdominal operations.

  2. [Discussion on the standard of clinical genetic testing report and the consensus of gene testing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Shen, Yiping; Gu, Weihong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yiming; Qi, Ming; Shen, Jun; Qiu, Zhengqing; Yu, Shihui; Zhou, Zaiwei; Chen, Baixue; Chen, Lei; Chen, Yundi; Cui, Huanhuan; Du, Juan; Gao, Yong; Guo, Yiran; Hu, Chanjuan; Hu, Liang; Huang, Yi; Li, Peipei; Li, Xiaorong; Li, Xiurong; Liu, Yaping; Lu, Jie; Ma, Duan; Ma, Yongyi; Peng, Mei; Song, Fang; Sun, Hongye; Wang, Liang; Wang, Dawei; Wang, Jingmin; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhengyuan; Wang, Zhinong; Wu, Jihong; Wu, Jing; Wu, Jian; Xu, Yimin; Yao, Hong; Yang, Dongsheng; Yang, Xu; Yang, Yanling; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Yulin; Zhu, Baosheng; Zeng, Sicong; Peng, Zhiyu; Huang, Shangzhi

    2018-02-10

    The widespread application of next generation sequencing (NGS) in clinical settings has enabled testing, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of genetic diseases. However, many issues have arisen in the meanwhile. One of the most pressing issues is the lack of standards for reporting genetic test results across different service providers. The First Forum on Standards and Specifications for Clinical Genetic Testing was held to address the issue in Shenzhen, China, on October 28, 2017. Participants, including geneticists, clinicians, and representatives of genetic testing service providers, discussed problems of clinical genetic testing services across in China and shared opinions on principles, challenges, and standards for reporting clinical genetic test results. Here we summarize expert opinions presented at the seminar and report the consensus, which will serve as a basis for the development of standards and guidelines for reporting of clinical genetic testing results, in order to promote the standardization and regulation of genetic testing services in China.

  3. "Heidelberg standard examination" and "Heidelberg standard procedures" - Development of faculty-wide standards for physical examination techniques and clinical procedures in undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, C; Ganschow, P; Groener, J B; Huwendiek, S; Köchel, A; Köhl-Hackert, N; Pjontek, R; Rodrian, J; Scheibe, F; Stadler, A-K; Steiner, T; Stiepak, J; Tabatabai, J; Utz, A; Kadmon, M

    2016-01-01

    The competent physical examination of patients and the safe and professional implementation of clinical procedures constitute essential components of medical practice in nearly all areas of medicine. The central objective of the projects "Heidelberg standard examination" and "Heidelberg standard procedures", which were initiated by students, was to establish uniform interdisciplinary standards for physical examination and clinical procedures, and to distribute them in coordination with all clinical disciplines at the Heidelberg University Hospital. The presented project report illuminates the background of the initiative and its methodological implementation. Moreover, it describes the multimedia documentation in the form of pocketbooks and a multimedia internet-based platform, as well as the integration into the curriculum. The project presentation aims to provide orientation and action guidelines to facilitate similar processes in other faculties.

  4. Group differences in physician responses to handheld presentation of clinical evidence: a verbal protocol analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlovic Nada J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify individual differences in physicians' needs for the presentation of evidence resources and preferences for mobile devices. Methods Within-groups analysis of responses to semi-structured interviews. Interviews consisted of using prototypes in response to task-based scenarios. The prototypes were implemented on two different form factors: a tablet style PC and a pocketPC. Participants were from three user groups: general internists, family physicians and medicine residents, and from two different settings: urban and semi-urban. Verbal protocol analysis, which consists of coding utterances, was conducted on the transcripts of the testing sessions. Statistical relationships were investigated between staff physicians' and residents' background variables, self-reported experiences with the interfaces, and verbal code frequencies. Results 47 physicians were recruited from general internal medicine, family practice clinics and a residency training program. The mean age of participants was 42.6 years. Physician specialty had a greater effect on device and information-presentation preferences than gender, age, setting or previous technical experience. Family physicians preferred the screen size of the tablet computer and were less concerned about its portability. Residents liked the screen size of the tablet, but preferred the portability of the pocketPC. Internists liked the portability of the pocketPC, but saw less advantage to the large screen of the tablet computer (F[2,44] = 4.94, p = .012. Conclusion Different types of physicians have different needs and preferences for evidence-based resources and handheld devices. This study shows how user testing can be incorporated into the process of design to inform group-based customization.

  5. Program of the University Clinic of Toxicology, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia in Treatment of Drug Addiction (Buprenorfin Treatment Protocol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonovska, Natasa; Chibishev, Andon; Babulovska, Aleksandra; Pereska, Zanina; Jurukov, Irena; Glasnovic, Marija

    2011-01-01

    The program of our Clinic includes, not only treatment of acute intoxication with opioids and other drugs, but also comprehends clinical investigations and treatment of the somatic complications of this population. For the first time in our country our Clinic offers to this population the alternative way of treatment with Buprenorfin. The Clinic started with this protocol on August 1, 2009. During a period of two years, the treatment with Buprenorfine has been initiated in 353 patients, of which 211 regularly attend the medical check ups. This model is used according to the national clinical guidelines and procedures for the use of buprenorfine in the treatment of opioid dependence The dose of this medicament depends on the evolution of the withdrawal symptoms. We have used the objective and subjective opioid withdrawal scale for the observation of these symptoms (OOWS ; SOWS – Handelsman et al 1987). This protocol starts with a complete clinical investigations, (i.e. where all patients undergo the inclusion and exclusion criteria with a written consent). Afterwards, the patients are hospitalized and start with a Buprenorfin teratment. After period of 7-10 days hospitalization they come to our Clinic, like outpatients for a regular controls. We have precise evidence for every patient who comes for control (e.g. medical record with all biochemical and toxicological screenings). All patients are recommended a tight cooperation with psychiatrists who are specialized to treat the problematic drug addictions. PMID:23678303

  6. A taxonomy of multinational ethical and methodological standards for clinical trials of therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Carol M; Wray, Nelda P; Jarman, Anna F; Kolman, Jacob M; Wenner, Danielle M; Brody, Baruch A

    2011-06-01

    If trials of therapeutic interventions are to serve society's interests, they must be of high methodological quality and must satisfy moral commitments to human subjects. The authors set out to develop a clinical-trials compendium in which standards for the ethical treatment of human subjects are integrated with standards for research methods. The authors rank-ordered the world's nations and chose the 31 with >700 active trials as of 24 July 2008. Governmental and other authoritative entities of the 31 countries were searched, and 1004 English-language documents containing ethical and/or methodological standards for clinical trials were identified. The authors extracted standards from 144 of those: 50 designated as 'core', 39 addressing trials of invasive procedures and a 5% sample (N=55) of the remainder. As the integrating framework for the standards we developed a coherent taxonomy encompassing all elements of a trial's stages. Review of the 144 documents yielded nearly 15 000 discrete standards. After duplicates were removed, 5903 substantive standards remained, distributed in the taxonomy as follows: initiation, 1401 standards, 8 divisions; design, 1869 standards, 16 divisions; conduct, 1473 standards, 8 divisions; analysing and reporting results, 997 standards, four divisions; and post-trial standards, 168 standards, 5 divisions. The overwhelming number of source documents and standards uncovered in this study was not anticipated beforehand and confirms the extraordinary complexity of the clinical trials enterprise. This taxonomy of multinational ethical and methodological standards may help trialists and overseers improve the quality of clinical trials, particularly given the globalisation of clinical research.

  7. A taxonomy of multinational ethical and methodological standards for clinical trials of therapeutic interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Carol M; Wray, Nelda P; Jarman, Anna F; Kolman, Jacob M; Wenner, Danielle M; Brody, Baruch A

    2013-01-01

    Background If trials of therapeutic interventions are to serve society’s interests, they must be of high methodological quality and must satisfy moral commitments to human subjects. The authors set out to develop a clinical-trials compendium in which standards for the ethical treatment of human subjects are integrated with standards for research methods. Methods The authors rank-ordered the world’s nations and chose the 31 with >700 active trials as of 24 July 2008. Governmental and other authoritative entities of the 31 countries were searched, and 1004 English-language documents containing ethical and/or methodological standards for clinical trials were identified. The authors extracted standards from 144 of those: 50 designated as ‘core’, 39 addressing trials of invasive procedures and a 5% sample (N=55) of the remainder. As the integrating framework for the standards we developed a coherent taxonomy encompassing all elements of a trial’s stages. Findings Review of the 144 documents yielded nearly 15 000 discrete standards. After duplicates were removed, 5903 substantive standards remained, distributed in the taxonomy as follows: initiation, 1401 standards, 8 divisions; design, 1869 standards, 16 divisions; conduct, 1473 standards, 8 divisions; analysing and reporting results, 997 standards, four divisions; and post-trial standards, 168 standards, 5 divisions. Conclusions The overwhelming number of source documents and standards uncovered in this study was not anticipated beforehand and confirms the extraordinary complexity of the clinical trials enterprise. This taxonomy of multinational ethical and methodological standards may help trialists and overseers improve the quality of clinical trials, particularly given the globalisation of clinical research. PMID:21429960

  8. Data for improvement and clinical excellence: protocol for an audit with feedback intervention in long-term care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schalm Corinne

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable evidence about the effectiveness of audit coupled with feedback, although few audit with feedback interventions have been conducted in long-term care (LTC settings to date. In general, the effects have been found to be modest at best, although in settings where there has been little history of audit and feedback, the effects may be greater, at least initially. The primary purpose of the Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence (DICE Long-Term Care project is to assess the effects of an audit with feedback intervention delivered monthly over 13 months in four LTC facilities. The research questions we addressed are: 1. What effects do feedback reports have on processes and outcomes over time? 2. How do different provider groups in LTC and home care respond to feedback reports based on data targeted at improving quality of care? Methods/design The research team conducting this study comprises researchers and decision makers in continuing care in the province of Alberta, Canada. The intervention consists of monthly feedback reports in nine LTC units in four facilities in Edmonton, Alberta. Data for the feedback reports comes from the Resident Assessment Instrument Minimum Data Set (RAI version 2.0, a standardized instrument mandated for use in LTC facilities throughout Alberta. Feedback reports consist of one page, front and back, presenting both graphic and textual information. Reports are delivered to all staff working in the four LTC facilities. The primary evaluation uses a controlled interrupted time series design both adjusted and unadjusted for covariates. The concurrent process evaluation uses observation and self-report to assess uptake of the feedback reports. Following the project phase described in this protocol, a similar intervention will be conducted in home care settings in Alberta. Depending on project findings, if they are judged useful by decision makers participating in this research

  9. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of a clinical protocol for measuring turnout in collegiate dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Amanda; Lasner, Andrea; Deu, Rajwinder; Oliphant, Seth; Johnson, Kenneth

    2018-02-02

    Reliable methods of measuring turnout in dancers and comparing active turnout (used in class) with functional (uncompensated) turnout are needed. Authors have suggested measurement techniques but there is no clinically useful, easily reproducible technique with established inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. We adapted a technique based on previous research, which is easily reproducible. We hypothesized excellent inter-rater and intra-rater reliability between experienced physical therapists (PTs) and a briefly trained faculty member from a university's department of dance. Thirty-two participants were recruited from the same dance department. Dancers' active and functional turnout was measured by each rater. We found that our technique for measuring active and functional turnout has excellent inter-rater and intra-rater reliability when performed by two experienced PTs and by one briefly trained university-level dance faculty member. For active turnout, inter-rater reliability was 0.78 among all raters and 0.82 among only the PT raters; intra-rater reliability was 0.82 among all raters and 0.85 among only the PT raters. For functional turnout, inter-rater reliability was 0.86 among all raters and 0.88 among only the PT raters; intra-rater reliability was 0.87 among all raters and 0.88 among only the PT raters. The measurement technique described provides a standardized protocol with excellent inter-rater and intra-rater reliability when performed by experienced PTs or by a briefly trained university-level dance faculty member.

  10. Sample size determinations in original research protocols for randomised clinical trials submitted to UK research ethics committees: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Timothy; Berger, Ursula; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2013-03-21

    To assess the completeness of reporting of sample size determinations in unpublished research protocols and to develop guidance for research ethics committees and for statisticians advising these committees. Review of original research protocols. Unpublished research protocols for phase IIb, III, and IV randomised clinical trials of investigational medicinal products submitted to research ethics committees in the United Kingdom during 1 January to 31 December 2009. Completeness of reporting of the sample size determination, including the justification of design assumptions, and disagreement between reported and recalculated sample size. 446 study protocols were reviewed. Of these, 190 (43%) justified the treatment effect and 213 (48%) justified the population variability or survival experience. Only 55 (12%) discussed the clinical importance of the treatment effect sought. Few protocols provided a reasoned explanation as to why the design assumptions were plausible for the planned study. Sensitivity analyses investigating how the sample size changed under different design assumptions were lacking; six (1%) protocols included a re-estimation of the sample size in the study design. Overall, 188 (42%) protocols reported all of the information to accurately recalculate the sample size; the assumed withdrawal or dropout rate was not given in 177 (40%) studies. Only 134 of the 446 (30%) sample size calculations could be accurately reproduced. Study size tended to be over-estimated rather than under-estimated. Studies with non-commercial sponsors justified the design assumptions used in the calculation more often than studies with commercial sponsors but less often reported all the components needed to reproduce the sample size calculation. Sample sizes for studies with non-commercial sponsors were less often reproduced. Most research protocols did not contain sufficient information to allow the sample size to be reproduced or the plausibility of the design assumptions to

  11. The Role of Standardized Patient and Trainer Training in Quality Assurance for a High-Stakes Clinical Skills Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail E. Furman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available For over 30 years, medical educators have used standardized patients (SPs, laypersons trained to portray a patient case in a realistic manner, to teach and to assess clinical skills. All medical schools in the US have SP programs in place, and the US and Canada require national examinations using SPs to assess the competency of those wishing to obtain licensure to practice medicine in these countries. To ensure a valid and reliable examination, unwanted variance that can be introduced by SP performance must be addressed. The goal of SP training is to imbue the SP with the characteristics, mannerisms and history of a real patient so that the portrayal is consistent and accurate. The challenge is to ensure consistent portrayal of each case with sufficient realism to elicit the expected clinical performance and to ensure standardized SP performance across multiple examinees. This paper considers the quality assurance methods applied to training the SP trainers and the protocols used to train the SPs, to ensure that the SP performances are sufficiently accurate and standardized, and that the evaluators completing the checklists and scales used for scoring do so correctly and consistently.

  12. Standardized Patients Provide a Reliable Assessment of Athletic Training Students' Clinical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Jarriel, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Providing students reliable objective feedback regarding their clinical performance is of great value for ongoing clinical skill assessment. Since a standardized patient (SP) is trained to consistently portray the case, students can be assessed and receive immediate feedback within the same clinical encounter; however, no research, to our…

  13. Verification of a Proposed Clinical Electroacoustic Test Protocol for Personal Digital Modulation Receivers Coupled to Cochlear Implant Sound Processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Erika L; Sousa, Rhonda; Wannagot, Shannon

    Guidelines established by the AAA currently recommend behavioral testing when fitting frequency modulated (FM) systems to individuals with cochlear implants (CIs). A protocol for completing electroacoustic measures has not yet been validated for personal FM systems or digital modulation (DM) systems coupled to CI sound processors. In response, some professionals have used or altered the AAA electroacoustic verification steps for fitting FM systems to hearing aids when fitting FM systems to CI sound processors. More recently steps were outlined in a proposed protocol. The purpose of this research is to review and compare the electroacoustic test measures outlined in a 2013 article by Schafer and colleagues in the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology titled "A Proposed Electroacoustic Test Protocol for Personal FM Receivers Coupled to Cochlear Implant Sound Processors" to the AAA electroacoustic verification steps for fitting FM systems to hearing aids when fitting DM systems to CI users. Electroacoustic measures were conducted on 71 CI sound processors and Phonak Roger DM systems using a proposed protocol and an adapted AAA protocol. Phonak's recommended default receiver gain setting was used for each CI sound processor manufacturer and adjusted if necessary to achieve transparency. Electroacoustic measures were conducted on Cochlear and Advanced Bionics (AB) sound processors. In this study, 28 Cochlear Nucleus 5/CP810 sound processors, 26 Cochlear Nucleus 6/CP910 sound processors, and 17 AB Naida CI Q70 sound processors were coupled in various combinations to Phonak Roger DM dedicated receivers (25 Phonak Roger 14 receivers-Cochlear dedicated receiver-and 9 Phonak Roger 17 receivers-AB dedicated receiver) and 20 Phonak Roger Inspiro transmitters. Employing both the AAA and the Schafer et al protocols, electroacoustic measurements were conducted with the Audioscan Verifit in a clinical setting on 71 CI sound processors and Phonak Roger DM systems to

  14. Randomised social-skills training and parental training plus standard treatment versus standard treatment of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder - The SOSTRA trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Per

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD are hyperactive and impulsive, cannot maintain attention, and have difficulties with social interactions. Medical treatment may alleviate symptoms of ADHD, but seldom solves difficulties with social interactions. Social-skills training may benefit ADHD children in their social interactions. We want to examine the effects of social-skills training on difficulties related to the children's ADHD symptoms and social interactions. Methods/Design The design is randomised two-armed, parallel group, assessor-blinded trial. Children aged 8-12 years with a diagnosis of ADHD are randomised to social-skills training and parental training plus standard treatment versus standard treatment alone. A sample size calculation estimated that at least 52 children must be included to show a 4-point difference in the primary outcome on the Conners 3rd Edition subscale for 'hyperactivity-impulsivity' between the intervention group and the control group. The outcomes will be assessed 3 and 6 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure is ADHD symptoms. The secondary outcome is social skills. Tertiary outcomes include the relationship between social skills and symptoms of ADHD, the ability to form attachment, and parents' ADHD symptoms. Discussion We hope that the results from this trial will show that the social-skills training together with medication may have a greater general effect on ADHD symptoms and social and emotional competencies than medication alone. Trial registration ClinicalTrials (NCT: NCT00937469

  15. Randomised social-skills training and parental training plus standard treatment versus standard treatment of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder - the SOSTRA trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storebø, Ole Jakob; Pedersen, Jesper; Skoog, Maria; Thomsen, Per Hove; Winkel, Per; Gluud, Christian; Simonsen, Erik

    2011-01-21

    Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are hyperactive and impulsive, cannot maintain attention, and have difficulties with social interactions. Medical treatment may alleviate symptoms of ADHD, but seldom solves difficulties with social interactions. Social-skills training may benefit ADHD children in their social interactions. We want to examine the effects of social-skills training on difficulties related to the children's ADHD symptoms and social interactions. The design is randomised two-armed, parallel group, assessor-blinded trial. Children aged 8-12 years with a diagnosis of ADHD are randomised to social-skills training and parental training plus standard treatment versus standard treatment alone. A sample size calculation estimated that at least 52 children must be included to show a 4-point difference in the primary outcome on the Conners 3rd Edition subscale for 'hyperactivity-impulsivity' between the intervention group and the control group. The outcomes will be assessed 3 and 6 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure is ADHD symptoms. The secondary outcome is social skills. Tertiary outcomes include the relationship between social skills and symptoms of ADHD, the ability to form attachment, and parents' ADHD symptoms. We hope that the results from this trial will show that the social-skills training together with medication may have a greater general effect on ADHD symptoms and social and emotional competencies than medication alone. ClinicalTrials (NCT): NCT00937469.

  16. INTERDISCIPLINARY PROTOCOL OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL, BEHAVIORAL AND CLINICAL ASSESSMENTS FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH INATTENTION AND HYPERACTIVITY COMPLAINTS

    OpenAIRE

    Carreiro, Luiz Renato Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a protocol developed for the investigation of signs of inattention and hyperactivity in children and adolescents, considering the behavioral, neuropsychological and clinical aspects. The first stage is a telephone triage. Further, the assessment consists of a face-to-face screening in which a behavioral inventory (BPM) is filled, and neuropsychological tests (IQ estimated by the Wisc-III and CPT-II Test) are performed. If there are indicators of inattention and hyperacti...

  17. Evaluation of patient-reported outcome protocol content and reporting in UK cancer clinical trials: the EPiC study qualitative protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retzer, Ameeta; Keeley, Thomas; Ahmed, Khaled; Armes, Jo; Brown, Julia M; Calman, Lynn; Copland, Chris; Efficace, Fabio; Gavin, Anna; Glaser, Adam; Greenfield, Diana M; Lanceley, Anne; Taylor, Rachel M; Velikova, Galina; Brundage, Michael; Mercieca-Bebber, Rebecca; King, Madeleine T; Calvert, Melanie; Kyte, Derek

    2018-02-03

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly included within cancer clinical trials. If appropriately collected, analysed and transparently reported, these data might provide invaluable evidence to inform patient care. However, there is mounting indication that the design and reporting of PRO data in cancer trials may be suboptimal. This programme of research will establish via three interlinked studies whether these findings are applicable to UK cancer trials, and if so, how to best enhance the way PROs are assessed, managed and reported in clinical trials. This study will explore with key stakeholders factors that influence optimal PRO protocol content, implementation and reporting and make recommendations for training and guidance. Semistructured interviews will be conducted with members of key stakeholder groups. The purposive sample of up to 48 participants will include: (1) trial chief investigators, trial management group members, statisticians and research nurses of cancer trials including primary or secondary PRO recruited via the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Clinical Studies Group and Consumer Liaison Group and the UK Clinical Research Collaboration Registered UK Clinical Trial Unit Network; (2) NCRI Consumer Liaison Group members; (3) international experts in PRO oncology trial design; and (4) journal editors and funding bodies. Data will be analysed using directed thematic analysis employing a coding frame and modified as analysis progresses. Formal triangulation of coding and member checking will be employed to enhance credibility. This study was approved by the University of Birmingham Ethics Committee (Ref: ERN_17-0085). Findings will be disseminated via conference presentations, peer-reviewed journals, patient groups and social media (@CPROR_UoB; http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/cpror). CRD42016036533. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial

  18. Sepsis and Critical Illness Research Center investigators: protocols and standard operating procedures for a prospective cohort study of sepsis in critically ill surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Tyler J; Mira, Juan C; Ozrazgat-Baslanti, Tezcan; Ghita, Gabriella L; Wang, Zhongkai; Stortz, Julie A; Brumback, Babette A; Bihorac, Azra; Segal, Mark S; Anton, Stephen D; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Mohr, Alicia M; Efron, Philip A; Moldawer, Lyle L; Moore, Frederick A; Brakenridge, Scott C

    2017-08-01

    Sepsis is a common, costly and morbid cause of critical illness in trauma and surgical patients. Ongoing advances in sepsis resuscitation and critical care support strategies have led to improved in-hospital mortality. However, these patients now survive to enter state of chronic critical illness (CCI), persistent low-grade organ dysfunction and poor long-term outcomes driven by the persistent inflammation, immunosuppression and catabolism syndrome (PICS). The Sepsis and Critical Illness Research Center (SCIRC) was created to provide a platform by which the prevalence and pathogenesis of CCI and PICS may be understood at a mechanistic level across multiple medical disciplines, leading to the development of novel management strategies and targeted therapies. Here, we describe the design, study cohort and standard operating procedures used in the prospective study of human sepsis at a level 1 trauma centre and tertiary care hospital providing care for over 2600 critically ill patients annually. These procedures include implementation of an automated sepsis surveillance initiative, augmentation of clinical decisions with a computerised sepsis protocol, strategies for direct exportation of quality-filtered data from the electronic medical record to a research database and robust long-term follow-up. This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, approved by the University of Florida Institutional Review Board and is actively enrolling subjects. Dissemination of results is forthcoming. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. ART Outcomes in GnRH Antagonist Protocol (Flexible) and Long GnRH Agonist Protocol during Early Follicular Phase in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Sara; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Zafardoust, Simin; Badenush, Bita; Fatemi, Farnaz; Nazari, Fattane; Kamali, Koorosh; Mohammadzade, Afsaneh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since increased LH in the early follicular phase in PCOS patients especially in GnRH antagonist protocol could be associated with reduced oocyte quality and pregnancy and impared implantation. The current study was conducted to determine ART outcomes in GnRH antagonist protocol (flexible) and long GnRH agonist protocol and compare them with adding GnRH antagonist in GnRH antagonist (flexible) protocol during early follicular phase in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing ICSI. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 150 patients with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing ICSI were enrolled from 2012 to 2014 and randomly assigned to receive either GnRH antagonist protocol during early and late follicular phase or GnRH antagonist protocol (flexible) or long GnRH agonist protocol. The clinical and laboratory pregnancy in three groups was determined and compared. In this context, the chi-square and Fisher's exact test and ANOVA were used for data analysis. Statistical significance was defined as p<0.05. Results: There was no statistically significant difference with respect to chemical pregnancy and clinical pregnancy between the three groups. Also, other indices such as number and quality of oocytes and embryos were alike. Conclusion: Totally, according to our results, GnRH antagonist protocol during early and late follicular phase and GnRH antagonist protocol (flexible) and long GnRH agonist protocol in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing ICSI are similarly effective and use of each one based on patients' condition and physicians' opinion could be considered. PMID:26913233

  20. Clinical Image Evaluation of Film Mammograms in Korea: Comparison with the ACR Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwak, Yeon Joo; Kim, Hye Jung; Kwak, Jin Young; Son, Eun Ju; Ko, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jin Hwa; Lim, Hyo Soon; Lee, You Jin; Park, Ji Won; Shin, Kyung Min; Jang, Yun-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is to compare the overall quality of film mammograms taken according to the Korean standards with the American College of Radiology (ACR) standard for clinical image evaluation and to identify means of improving mammography quality in Korea. Four hundred and sixty eight sets of film mammograms were evaluated with respect to the Korean and ACR standards for clinical image evaluation. The pass and failure rates of mammograms were compared by medical facility types. Average scores in each category of the two standards were evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify an optimal Korean standard pass mark by taking the ACR standard as the reference standard. 93.6% (438/468) of mammograms passed the Korean standard, whereas only 80.1% (375/468) passed the ACR standard (p < 0.001). Non-radiologic private clinics had the lowest pass rate (88.1%: Korean standard, 71.8%: ACR standard) and the lowest total score (76.0) by the Korean standard. Average scores of positioning were lowest (19.3/29 by the Korean standard and 3.7/5 by the ACR standard). A cutoff score of 77.0 for the Korean standard was found to correspond to a pass level when the ACR standard was applied. We suggest that tighter regulations, such as, raising the Korean pass mark, subtracting more for severe deficiencies, or considering a very low scores in even a single category as failure, are needed to improve the quality of mammography in Korea

  1. Clinical practice guidelines: 2004 standards, options and recommendations for the management of patient with adenocarcinoma of the stomach - radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ychou, M.; Duffour, J.; Lemanski, C.; Masson, B.; Gory-Delabaere, G.; Bosquet, L.; Blanc, P.; Giovannini, M.; Monge, G.; Guillemin, F.; Marchal, F.; Conroy, T.; Merrouche, Y.; Adenis, A.; Bosset, J.F.; Bouche, O.; Pezet, D.; Triboulet, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Context. - The 'Standards, Options and Recommendations' (SOR) project, started in 1993, is a collaboration between the Federation of French Cancer Centers (FNCLCC), the 20 French regional cancer centers, and specialists from French Public Universities, General Hospitals and Private Clinics. The main objective is the development of clinical practice guidelines to improve the quality of health care and the outcome of cancer patients. Objectives. - To elaborate clinical practice guidelines for patients with stomach adenocarcinoma. These recommendations cover the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of these tumors. Methods. - The methodology is based on a literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary group of experts, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. The Standards, Options and Recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Results. - Adjuvant radiation therapy alone is not a standard treatment for patients with stomach adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy is not a standard treatment for patients with stage II or III stomach adenocarcinoma R0, with D1 or D2 lymphadenectomy who have undergone surgery. Following surgical resection, adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy should be proposed to patients without de-nutrition with a lymphadenectomy < D1 (fewer than 15 lymph nodes examined) and those with T3 and/or N+ tumours following the protocol used in the MacDonald trials (SWOG-9008) (Level of evidence B1). Adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy can be administered to patients without de-nutrition with D1 or D2 lymphadenectomy and with involvement of regional lymph nodes (N2 or N3). (authors)

  2. LHCb: FPGA based data-flow injection module at 10 Gbit/s reading data from network exported storage and using standard protocols

    CERN Multimedia

    Lemouzy, B; Garnier, J-C

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the LHCb readout upgrade is to speed up the DAQ to 40 MHz. Such a DAQ system will certainly employ 10 Gigabit or similar technologies and might also need new networking protocols such as a customized, light-weight TCP or more specialised protocols. A test module is being implemented, which integrates in the existing LHCb infrastructure. It is a multiple 10-Gigabit traffic generator, driven by a Stratix IV FPGA, which is flexibile enough to either generate LHCb's raw data packets internally or read them from external storage via the network. For reading the data we have implemented a light-weight industry standard protocol ATA over Ethernet (AoE) and we present an outlook of using a filesystem on these network-exported disk-drivers.

  3. Economic comparison of common treatment protocols and J5 vaccination for clinical mastitis in dairy herds using optimized culling decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, J A; Cha, E; Johnson, S K; Welcome, F L; Kristensen, A R; Gröhn, Y T

    2016-05-01

    This study used an existing dynamic optimization model to compare costs of common treatment protocols and J5 vaccination for clinical mastitis in US dairy herds. Clinical mastitis is an infection of the mammary gland causing major economic losses in dairy herds due to reduced milk production, reduced conception, and increased risk of mortality and culling for infected cows. Treatment protocols were developed to reflect common practices in dairy herds. These included targeted therapy following pathogen identification, and therapy without pathogen identification using a broad-spectrum antimicrobial or treating with the cheapest treatment option. The cost-benefit of J5 vaccination was also estimated. Effects of treatment were accounted for as changes in treatment costs, milk loss due to mastitis, milk discarded due to treatment, and mortality. Following ineffective treatments, secondary decisions included extending the current treatment, alternative treatment, discontinuing treatment, and pathogen identification followed by recommended treatment. Average net returns for treatment protocols and vaccination were generated using an existing dynamic programming model. This model incorporates cow and pathogen characteristics to optimize management decisions to treat, inseminate, or cull cows. Of the treatment protocols where 100% of cows received recommended treatment, pathogen-specific identification followed by recommended therapy yielded the highest average net returns per cow per year. Out of all treatment scenarios, the highest net returns were achieved with selecting the cheapest treatment option and discontinuing treatment, or alternate treatment with a similar spectrum therapy; however, this may not account for the full consequences of giving nonrecommended therapies to cows with clinical mastitis. Vaccination increased average net returns in all scenarios. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Standardizing clinical trials workflow representation in UML for international site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Elias Cesar Araujo; Jayanti, Madhav Kishore; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Kozan, Andreia M O; Rodrigues, Maria J; Shah, Jatin; Loures, Marco R; Patil, Sunita; Payne, Philip; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2010-11-09

    With the globalization of clinical trials, a growing emphasis has been placed on the standardization of the workflow in order to ensure the reproducibility and reliability of the overall trial. Despite the importance of workflow evaluation, to our knowledge no previous studies have attempted to adapt existing modeling languages to standardize the representation of clinical trials. Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a computational language that can be used to model operational workflow, and a UML profile can be developed to standardize UML models within a given domain. This paper's objective is to develop a UML profile to extend the UML Activity Diagram schema into the clinical trials domain, defining a standard representation for clinical trial workflow diagrams in UML. Two Brazilian clinical trial sites in rheumatology and oncology were examined to model their workflow and collect time-motion data. UML modeling was conducted in Eclipse, and a UML profile was developed to incorporate information used in discrete event simulation software. Ethnographic observation revealed bottlenecks in workflow: these included tasks requiring full commitment of CRCs, transferring notes from paper to computers, deviations from standard operating procedures, and conflicts between different IT systems. Time-motion analysis revealed that nurses' activities took up the most time in the workflow and contained a high frequency of shorter duration activities. Administrative assistants performed more activities near the beginning and end of the workflow. Overall, clinical trial tasks had a greater frequency than clinic routines or other general activities. This paper describes a method for modeling clinical trial workflow in UML and standardizing these workflow diagrams through a UML profile. In the increasingly global environment of clinical trials, the standardization of workflow modeling is a necessary precursor to conducting a comparative analysis of international clinical trials

  5. A clinical trial protocol to treat massive Africanized honeybee (Apis mellifera) attack with a new apilic antivenom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Alexandre Naime; Boyer, Leslie; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe; Medolago, Natalia Bronzatto; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Paixão, Ariane Gomes; Poli, João Paulo Vasconcelos; Mendes, Mônica Bannwart; Dos Santos, Lucilene Delazari; Ferreira, Rui Seabra; Barraviera, Benedito

    2017-01-01

    Envenomation caused by multiple stings from Africanized honeybees Apis mellifera constitutes a public health problem in the Americas. In 2015, the Brazilian Ministry of Health reported 13,597 accidents (incidence of seven cases per 100,000 inhabitants) with 39 deaths (lethality of 0.25%). The toxins present in the venom, which include melittin and phospholipase A 2 , cause lesions in diverse organs and systems that may be fatal. As there has been no specific treatment to date, management has been symptomatic and supportive only. In order to evaluate the safety and neutralizing capacity of a new apilic antivenom, as well as to confirm its lowest effective dose, a clinical protocol was developed to be applied in a multicenter, non-randomized and open phase I/II clinical trial. Twenty participants with more than five stings, aged more than 18 years, of both sexes, who have not previously received the heterologous serum against bee stings, will be included for 24 months. The proposed dose was based on the antivenom neutralizing capacity and the number of stings. Treatment will be administered only in a hospital environment and the participants will be evaluated for a period up to 30 days after discharge for clinical and laboratory follow-up. This protocol, approved by the Brazilian regulatory agencies for ethics (National Commission for Ethics on Research - CONEP) and sanitation (National Health Surveillance Agency - ANVISA), is a guideline constituted by specific, adjuvant, symptomatic and complementary treatments, in addition to basic orientations for conducting a clinical trial involving heterologous sera. This is the first clinical trial protocol designed specifically to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and safety of a new antivenom against stings from the Africanized honeybee Apis mellifera . The results will support future studies to confirm a new treatment for massive bee attack that has a large impact on public health in the Americas.

  6. Performance Comparison of Wireless Sensor Network Standard Protocols in an Aerospace Environment: ISA100.11a and ZigBee Pro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Raymond S.; Barton, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Standards-based wireless sensor network (WSN) protocols are promising candidates for spacecraft avionics systems, offering unprecedented instrumentation flexibility and expandability. Ensuring reliable data transport is key, however, when migrating from wired to wireless data gathering systems. In this paper, we conduct a rigorous laboratory analysis of the relative performances of the ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a protocols in a representative crewed aerospace environment. Since both operate in the 2.4 GHz radio frequency (RF) band shared by systems such as Wi-Fi, they are subject at times to potentially debilitating RF interference. We compare goodput (application-level throughput) achievable by both under varying levels of 802.11g Wi-Fi traffic. We conclude that while the simpler, more inexpensive ZigBee Pro protocol performs well under moderate levels of interference, the more complex and costly ISA100.11a protocol is needed to ensure reliable data delivery under heavier interference. This paper represents the first published, rigorous analysis of WSN protocols in an aerospace environment that we are aware of and the first published head-to-head comparison of ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a.

  7. Development of standardized bioassay protocols for the toxicity assessment of waste, manufactured products, and effluents in Latin America: Venezuela, a Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriquez-Grau, J.

    1993-01-01

    The present status of the toxicity assessment of industrial products in Latin America is well below North America/EC standards. As an example, most of Latin America regulatory laws regarding effluent discharge are still based upon concentration limits of certain major pollutants, and BOD/COD measurements; no reference is made to the necessity of aquatic bioassay toxicity data. Aware of this imperative need, the Venezuelan Petroleum Industry (PDVSA), through its R ampersand D Corporative branch (INTEVEP) gave priority to the development of standardized acute/sublethal toxicity test protocols as sound means of evaluating their products and wastes. Throughout this presentation, the Venezuelan case will be studied, showing strategies undertaken to accelerate protocol development. Results will show the assessment of 14 different protocols encompassing a variety of species of aquatic/terrestrial organisms, and a series of toxicity test endpoints including mortality, reproductive, biological and immunological measurements, most of which are currently in use or being developed. These protocols have already yielded useful results in numerous cases where toxicity assessment was required, including evaluations of effluent, oil dispersants, drilling fluids, toxic wastes, fossil fuels and newly developed products. The Venezuelan case demonstrates that the integration of Industry, Academia and Government, which is an essential part of SETAC's philosophy, is absolutely necessary for the successful advancement of environmental scientific/regulatory issues

  8. Radiographic assessment of alignment following TKA: outline of a standardized protocol and assessment of a newly devised trigonometric method of analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Vikram; De Steiger, Richard; Lowe, Adrian

    2010-05-01

    An important determinant of long-term outcomes following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is post-operative alignment as measured on radiographs. Thus far, radiographs have been measured using the goniometer method (GM) and no standard protocol has been followed. The aim of this prospective study was to: (i) outline a protocol for radiographic measurement following TKA; and (ii) compare the accuracy of the traditional GM with a new trigonometric method (TM) of radiographic analysis. A protocol for the measurement of alignment on radiographs following TKA was outlined in detail with step-by-step instructions. A new TM of angle measurement was also delineated. Alignment was measured on 51 post-operative TKA radiographs. A single angle was chosen and measured by two observers using both the GM and TM. The TM had a precision of 1.06 degrees compared with 1.5 degrees using the GM. The standard deviation of the TM was significantly smaller than the GM (P= 0.033). The intra-class correlation coefficient of the TM was 0.94 versus 0.90 for the GM. The study detailed a protocol for the measurement of axial alignment of the limbs and components following TKA, and provided evidence that a newer TM of angle measurement was superior in terms of precision and intra-rater reliability in comparison with the traditional method.

  9. Elaboration and assessment of clinical protocols to support the evaluation of stand-to-sit activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Junkes Cunha

    Full Text Available Introduction Evaluation of sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit activities is used by physical therapists in patients with neurological and musculoskeletal disorders. Sit-to-stand activity presents different descriptions of phases and movements; however the phases of stand-to-sit activity have not been established yet.Objectives To describe the movements during stand-to-sit activity and create an evaluation protocol.Materials and methods Stand-to-sit activity was described on anterior and lateral views based on the observation of 27 healthy subjects. The body segments chosen to analyze were feet, ankles, knees, hips, pelvis, trunk, spine, upper limbs, head and cervical spine. The movements of body segments were described as adduction and abduction, eversion and inversion, valgus and varus, neutral position and asymmetry. The protocol was assessed with questionnaires answered by 12 physiotherapists experts in the area.Results Stand-to-sit activity was divided in 4 phases: 1- "Neutral position", 2- "Pre-squat", 3- "Squat" and 4- "Stabilization". Two models of protocols were developed considering 5 body segments to the anterior view and 7 segments for the lateral view.Conclusion Stand-to-sit activity was described in 4 phases with sequential movements of each body segment. These protocols allow physiotherapists to identify unusual movements of body segments during the stand-to-sit activity.

  10. Digital protocol for reference-based guided surgery and immediate loading: a prospective clinical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tahmaseb, A.; de Clerck, R.; Aartman, I.; Wismeijer, D.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the performance of a computer-aided three-dimensional planning protocol in combination with previously inserted reference mini-implants and CAD/CAM technology to restore completely edentulous patients. The study evaluated implant and superstructure survival in a prospective

  11. Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for chronic pain caused by gonarthrosis: A study protocol of an ongoing multi-centre randomised controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN27450856

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krämer Jürgen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlled clinical trials produced contradictory results with respect to a specific analgesic effect of acupuncture. There is a lack of large multi-centre acupuncture trials. The German Acupuncture Trial represents the largest multi-centre study of acupuncture in the treatment of chronic pain caused by gonarthrosis up to now. Methods 900 patients will be randomised to three treatment arms. One group receives verum acupuncture, the second sham acupuncture, and the third conservative standard therapy. The trial protocol is described with eligibility criteria, detailed information on the treatment definition, blinding, endpoints, safety evaluation, statistical methods, sample size determination, monitoring, legal aspects, and the current status of the trial. Discussion A critical discussion is given regarding the considerations about standardisation of the acupuncture treatment, the choice of the control group, and the blinding of patients and observers.

  12. Standardizing Clinical Document Names Using the HL7/LOINC Document Ontology and LOINC Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Elizabeth S; Melton, Genevieve B; Engelstad, Mark E; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2010-11-13

    The standardization of clinical document names is an essential first step towards the optimal use, management, and exchange of documents within and across institutions. The HL7/LOINC Document Ontology (DO) is an existing and evolving document standard developed to provide consistent naming of clinical documents and to guide the creation of LOINC codes for clinical notes. The goal of this study was to explore the feasibility and challenges of mapping local clinical document names from two institutions into the five axes of the DO and then to leverage this mapping for identifying specific LOINC codes. The results indicate that the DO is either adequate or too broad for representing a majority of the document names and that there are LOINC codes available for one- to two-thirds of the names. Through this mapping process, granularity and other issues were revealed that will be valuable for guiding next steps towards effective standardization of clinical document names.

  13. The Performance of Standardized Patients in Portraying Clinical Scenarios in Speech-Language Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne E.; Davidson, Bronwyn J.; Theodoros, Deborah G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Standardized patients (SPs) are frequently included in the clinical preparation of students in the health sciences. An acknowledged benefit of using SPs is the opportunity to provide a standardized method by which students can demonstrate and develop their competency. Relatively little is known, however, about the capacity of SPs to…

  14. The Electronic Patient Record and Second Generation Clinical Databases: Problems of Standards and Nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Brian D.

    1991-01-01

    Three principles of classification are stressed in the development of electronic dental patient records and clinical databases: (1) the classification must have a suitable organizing principle; (2) use must be made of standard terminology; and (3) there must be standard operational criteria. (DB)

  15. Standardization of a protocol to obtain genomic DNA for the quantification of 5mC in epicormics buds of Tectona grandis L.

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Quiala; Luis Valledor; Rodrigo Hazbun; Raúl Barbón; Manuel de Feria; Maité Chávez

    2008-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out with the objective of defining an extraction and purification method that it provided deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) appropriate to determine the percentage of 5mC in the genomic DNA of epicormics buds of Tectona grandis L. During the standardization of the protocol four methods were compared: 1 -classic based on saline shock solution with CTAB (hexadecil trimetil ammonium bromide), 2 - Kit of extraction of DNA plants DNeasy Plant Mini Kit (QIAGEN) accor...

  16. Automation in an Addiction Treatment Research Clinic: Computerized Contingency Management, Ecological Momentary Assessment, and a Protocol Workflow System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Lin, Jia-Ling; Mezghanni, Mustapha; Epstein, David H.; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2009-01-01

    Issues A challenge in treatment research is the necessity of adhering to protocol and regulatory strictures while maintaining flexibility to meet patients’ treatment needs and accommodate variations among protocols. Another challenge is the acquisition of large amounts of data in an occasionally hectic environment, along with provision of seamless methods for exporting, mining, and querying the data. Approach We have automated several major functions of our outpatient treatment research clinic for studies in drug abuse and dependence. Here we describe three such specialized applications: the Automated Contingency Management (ACM) system for delivery of behavioral interventions, the Transactional Electronic Diary (TED) system for management of behavioral assessments, and the Protocol Workflow System (PWS) for computerized workflow automation and guidance of each participant’s daily clinic activities. These modules are integrated into our larger information system to enable data sharing in real time among authorized staff. Key Findings ACM and TED have each permitted us to conduct research that was not previously possible. In addition, the time to data analysis at the end of each study is substantially shorter. With the implementation of the PWS, we have been able to manage a research clinic with an 80-patient capacity having an annual average of 18,000 patient-visits and 7,300 urine collections with a research staff of five. Finally, automated data management has considerably enhanced our ability to monitor and summarize participant-safety data for research oversight. Implications and conclusion When developed in consultation with end users, automation in treatment-research clinics can enable more efficient operations, better communication among staff, and expansions in research methods. PMID:19320669

  17. Glenoid version by CT scan: an analysis of clinical measurement error and introduction of a protocol to reduce variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunt, Fabian van de [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pearl, Michael L.; Lee, Eric K.; Peng, Lauren; Didomenico, Paul [Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Recent studies have challenged the accuracy of conventional measurements of glenoid version. Variability in the orientation of the scapula from individual anatomical differences and patient positioning, combined with differences in observer measurement practices, have been identified as sources of variability. The purpose of this study was to explore the utility and reliability of clinically available software that allows manipulation of three-dimensional images in order to bridge the variance between clinical and anatomic version in a clinical setting. Twenty CT scans of normal glenoids of patients who had proximal humerus fractures were measured for version. Four reviewers first measured version in a conventional manner (clinical version), measurements were made again (anatomic version) after employing a protocol for reformatting the CT data to align the coronal and sagittal planes with the superior-inferior axis of the glenoid, and the scapular body, respectively. The average value of clinical retroversion for all reviewers and all subjects was -1.4 (range, -16 to 21 ), as compared to -3.2 (range, -21 to 6 ) when measured from reformatted images. The mean difference between anatomical and clinical version was 1.9 ± 5.6 but ranged on individual measurements from -13 to 26 . In no instance did all four observers choose the same image slice from the sequence of images. This study confirmed the variation in glenoid version dependent on scapular orientation previously identified in other studies using scapular models, and presents a clinically accessible protocol to correct for scapular orientation from the patient's CT data. (orig.)

  18. Effective reduction of fluoroscopy duration by using an advanced electroanatomic-mapping system and a standardized procedural protocol for ablation of atrial fibrillation: 'the unleaded study'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Sven; Sticherling, Christian; Reichlin, Tobias; Pavlovic, Nikola; Mühl, Aline; Schaer, Beat; Osswald, Stefan; Kühne, Michael

    2015-11-01

    It is recommended to keep exposure to ionizing radiation as low as reasonably achievable. The aim of this study was to determine whether fluoroscopy-free mapping and ablation using a standardized procedural protocol is feasible in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). Sixty consecutive patients were analysed: Thirty consecutive patients undergoing PVI using Carto3 were treated using a standardized procedural fluoroscopy protocol with X-ray being disabled after transseptal puncture (Group 1) and compared with a set of previous 30 consecutive patients undergoing PVI without a specific recommendation regarding the use of fluoroscopy (Group 2). The main outcome measures were the feasibility of fluoroscopy-free mapping and ablation, total fluoroscopy time, total dose area product (DAP), and procedure time. Sixty patients (age 60 ± 10 years, 73% male, ejection fraction 0.55 ± 0.09, left atrium 42 ± 8 mm) were included. In Group 1, total fluoroscopy time was 4.2 (2.6-5.6) min and mapping and ablation during PVI without using fluoroscopy was feasible in 29 of 30 patients (97%). In Group 2, total fluoroscopy time was 9.3 (6.4-13.9) min (P fluoroscopy after transseptal puncture using a standardized procedural protocol is feasible in almost all patients and is associated with markedly decreased total fluoroscopy duration and DAP. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of accelerated diagnostic protocol in a chest pain center compared with routine care of patients with chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Elad; Reuveni, Haim; Shlomo, Nir; Gerber, Yariv; Beigel, Roy; Narodetski, Michael; Eldar, Michael; Or, Jacob; Hod, Hanoch; Shamiss, Arie; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in patients presenting with acute chest pain the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of an accelerated diagnostic protocol utilizing contemporary technology in a chest pain unit versus routine care in an internal medicine department. Hospital and 90-day course were prospectively studied in 585 consecutive low-moderate risk acute chest pain patients, of whom 304 were investigated in a designated chest pain center using a pre-specified accelerated diagnostic protocol, while 281 underwent routine care in an internal medicine ward. Hospitalization was longer in the routine care compared with the accelerated diagnostic protocol group (pdiagnostic protocol patients (98%) vs. 57 (20%) routine care patients underwent non-invasive testing, (pdiagnostic imaging testing was performed in 125 (44%) and 26 (9%) patients in the routine care and accelerated diagnostic protocol patients, respectively (pdiagnostic protocol patients compared with those receiving routine care was associated with a lower incidence of readmissions for chest pain [8 (3%) vs. 24 (9%), pdiagnostic protocol remained a predictor of lower acute coronary syndromes and readmissions after propensity score analysis [OR = 0.28 (CI 95% 0.14-0.59)]. Cost per patient was similar in both groups [($2510 vs. $2703 for the accelerated diagnostic protocol and routine care group, respectively, (p = 0.9)]. An accelerated diagnostic protocol is clinically superior and as cost effective as routine in acute chest pain patients, and may save time and resources.

  20. Sunscreen compliance with regional clinical practice guidelines and product labeling standards in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Matthias E; Mathy, Joanna E; Kenealy, John; Mathy, Jon A

    2016-03-01

    INTRODUCTION For general practitioners, practice nurses and community pharmacists in New Zealand, a core duty is to educate patients about sun protection. We aimed to evaluate compliance of locally available sunscreens with regional clinical practice guidelines and sunscreen labelling standards, to assist clinicians in advising consumers on sunscreen selection. METHODS We audited all sunscreens available at two Auckland stores for three New Zealand sunscreen retailers. We then assessed compliance with accepted regional clinical practice guidelines for sun protection from the New Zealand Guidelines Group. We further assessed compliance with regional Australia/New Zealand consumer standards for sunscreen labelling. RESULTS All sunscreens satisfied clinical guidelines for broad-spectrum protection, and 99% of sunscreens met or exceeded clinical guidelines for minimal Sun Protection Factor. Compliance with regional standardized labelling guidelines is voluntary in New Zealand and 27% of audited sunscreens were not fully compliant with SPF labelling standards. DISCUSSION Sunscreens were generally compliant with clinical guidelines for minimal sun protection. However there was substantial noncompliance with regional recommendations for standardized sunscreen labelling. Primary health care clinicians should be aware that this labelling noncompliance may mislead patients into thinking some sunscreens offer more sun protection than they do. Mandatory compliance with the latest regional labelling standards would simplify sunscreen selection by New Zealand consumers. KEYWORDS Sunscreen; Sun Protection Factor; SPF; Skin Neoplasms; Melanoma; Skin Cancer Prevention.

  1. Data for improvement and clinical excellence: protocol for an audit with feedback intervention in home care and supportive living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Kimberly D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although considerable evidence exists about the effectiveness of audit coupled with feedback, very few audit-with-feedback interventions have been done in either home care or supportive living settings to date. With little history of audit and feedback in home care or supportive living there is potential for greater effects, at least initially. This study extends the work of an earlier study designed to assess the effects of an audit-with-feedback intervention. It will be delivered quarterly over a one-year period in seven home care offices and 11 supportive living sites. The research questions are the same as in the first study but in a different environment. They are as follows: 1. What effects do feedback reports have on processes and outcomes over time? 2. How do different provider groups in home care and supportive living sites respond to feedback reports based on quality indicator data? Methods The research team conducting this study includes researchers and decision makers in continuing care in the province of Alberta, Canada. The intervention consists of quarterly feedback reports in 19 home care offices and supportive living sites across Alberta. Data for the feedback reports are based on the Resident Assessment Instrument Home Care tool, a standardized instrument mandated for use in home care and supportive living environments throughout Alberta. The feedback reports consist of one page, printed front and back, presenting both graphic and textual information. Reports are delivered to all employees working in each site. The primary evaluation uses a controlled interrupted time-series design, both adjusted and unadjusted for covariates. The concurrent process evaluation includes observation, focus groups, and self-reports to assess uptake of the feedback reports. The project described in this protocol follows a similar intervention conducted in our previous study, Data for Improvement and Clinical Excellence

  2. A comparative analysis of quality management standards for contract research organisations in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; McAdam, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    This article compares and contrasts the main quality standards in the highly regulated pharmaceutical industry with specific focus on Good Clinical Practice (GCP), the standard for designing, conducting, recording and reporting clinical trials involving human participants. Comparison is made to ISO quality standards, which can be applied to all industries and types of organisation. The study is then narrowed to that of contract research organisations (CROs) involved in the conduct of clinical trials. The paper concludes that the ISO 9000 series of quality standards can act as a company-wide framework for quality management within such organisations by helping to direct quality efforts on a long-term basis without any loss of compliance. This study is valuable because comparative analysis in this domain is uncommon.

  3. Standard requirements for GCP-compliant data management in multinational clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohmann, Christian; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Canham, Steve

    2011-01-01

    A recent survey has shown that data management in clinical trials performed by academic trial units still faces many difficulties (e.g. heterogeneity of software products, deficits in quality management, limited human and financial resources and the complexity of running a local computer centre......). Unfortunately, no specific, practical and open standard for both GCP-compliant data management and the underlying IT-infrastructure is available to improve the situation. For that reason the "Working Group on Data Centres" of the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) has developed...... a standard specifying the requirements for high quality GCP-compliant data management in multinational clinical trials....

  4. Validation of the Andon KD595 for clinical use and self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ning; Zhang, Xuezhong; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Hongye

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper arm blood pressure monitor Andon KD595 for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were sequentially measured in 33 participants using the standard mercury sphygmomanometer and the Andon KD595 device. Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for analysis. The KD595 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and the observers within a range of 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 72/99, 93/99, and 96/99, respectively, for SBP and 72/99, 96/99, and 99/99, respectively, for DBP. The device also achieved the targets in part 2 of the validation study. A total of 28 and 25 participants had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required≥24) for SBP and DBP, respectively. The number of participants without device-observer difference within 5 mmHg was two for SBP and two for DBP (required≤3). The Andon upper arm blood pressure monitor KD595 has passed the International Protocol requirements and it can be recommended for clinical use and self-measurement in adults.

  5. Validation of the Andon KD5031 for clinical use and self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ning; Zhang, Xuezhong; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Hongye

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper arm blood pressure (BP) monitor Andon KD5031 for home BP monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were sequentially measured in 33 participants using the standard mercury sphygmomanometer and the Andon KD5031 device. Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for analysis. The KD5031 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and the observers within a range of 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 66/99, 93/99, and 98/99, respectively, for SBP and 72/99, 94/99, and 99/99, respectively, for DBP. The device also achieved the targets in part 2 of the validation study. Twenty-six participants for both SBP and DBP had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required ≥24). The number of participants without a device-observer difference within 5 mmHg was one for SBP and three for DBP (required ≤3). The Andon upper arm BP monitor KD5031 has passed the International Protocol requirements, and it can be recommended for clinical use and self-measurement in adults.

  6. The impact of using an intraoperative goal directed fluid therapy protocol on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing total pancreatectomy and islet cell autotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagar, Matthew K; Magnuson, Josh; Liu, Patty T; Kirchner, Varvara; Wilhelm, Joshua J; Freeman, Martin L; Bellin, Melena D; Pruett, Timothy L; Beilman, Gregory J; Dunn, Ty B

    Patients undergoing total pancreatectomy and islet cell autotransplant (TPIAT) for treatment of pancreatitis are at risk for complications of over and under resuscitation. We hypothesized that using a goal directed fluid therapy (GDFT) protocol might impact clinical outcomes. A consecutive series of adult patients undergoing TPIAT were managed intraoperatively using either standard fluid therapy (SFT, n = 44) or GDFT (n = 23) as part of a pilot study between January 2013 and May 2015. Patient characteristics, intraoperative, and postoperative data were recorded prospectively, then retrospectively analyzed for differences between the groups. The GDFT group had lower total fluid resuscitation (3,240 cc vs 5,173 cc, p < 0.0001) and transfusion requirements (1.0 cc/kg vs 3.3 cc/kg, p = 0.050) compared to the SFT group. The pre to postop nadir hemoglobin change was significantly less for GDFT (4.2 vs 5.1 gm/dl, p = 0.021) despite less transfusion. Compared to SFT, using an intraoperative GDFT protocol in TPIAT patients was associated with significantly decreased intraoperative fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion and less postoperative dilutional anemia, without any difference in complications of underresuscitation. This pilot study suggests that GDFT is likely safe and further investigation is warranted. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analytical validation of a standardized scoring protocol for Ki67: phase 3 of an international multicenter collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Samuel C Y; Nielsen, Torsten O; Zabaglo, Lila; Arun, Indu; Badve, Sunil S; Bane, Anita L; Bartlett, John M S; Borgquist, Signe; Chang, Martin C; Dodson, Andrew; Enos, Rebecca A; Fineberg, Susan; Focke, Cornelia M; Gao, Dongxia; Gown, Allen M; Grabau, Dorthe; Gutierrez, Carolina; Hugh, Judith C; Kos, Zuzana; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Lin, Ming-Gang; Mastropasqua, Mauro G; Moriya, Takuya; Nofech-Mozes, Sharon; Osborne, C Kent; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique M; Piper, Tammy; Sakatani, Takashi; Salgado, Roberto; Starczynski, Jane; Viale, Giuseppe; Hayes, Daniel F; McShane, Lisa M; Dowsett, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    Pathological analysis of the nuclear proliferation biomarker Ki67 has multiple potential roles in breast and other cancers. However, clinical utility of the immunohistochemical (IHC) assay for Ki67 immunohistochemistry has been hampered by unacceptable between-laboratory analytical variability. The International Ki67 Working Group has conducted a series of studies aiming to decrease this variability and improve the evaluation of Ki67. This study tries to assess whether acceptable performance can be achieved on prestained core-cut biopsies using a standardized scoring method. Sections from 30 primary ER+ breast cancer core biopsies were centrally stained for Ki67 and circulated among 22 laboratories in 11 countries. Each laboratory scored Ki67 using three methods: (1) global (4 fields of 100 cells each); (2) weighted global (same as global but weighted by estimated percentages of total area); and (3) hot-spot (single field of 500 cells). The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), a measure of interlaboratory agreement, for the unweighted global method (0.87; 95% credible interval (CI): 0.81–0.93) met the prespecified success criterion for scoring reproducibility, whereas that for the weighted global (0.87; 95% CI: 0.7999–0.93) and hot-spot methods (0.84; 95% CI: 0.77–0.92) marginally failed to do so. The unweighted global assessment of Ki67 IHC analysis on core biopsies met the prespecified criterion of success for scoring reproducibility. A few cases still showed large scoring discrepancies. Establishment of external quality assessment schemes is likely to improve the agreement between laboratories further. Additional evaluations are needed to assess staining variability and clinical validity in appropriate cohorts of samples. PMID:28721378

  8. A protocol for classifying normal- and flat-arched foot posture for research studies using clinical and radiographic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several clinical and radiological methods available to classify foot posture in research, however there is no clear strategy for selecting the most appropriate measurements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a foot screening protocol to distinguish between participants with normal- and flat-arched feet who would then subsequently be recruited into a series of laboratory-based gait studies. Methods The foot posture of ninety-one asymptomatic young adults was assessed using two clinical measurements (normalised navicular height and arch index and four radiological measurements taken from antero-posterior and lateral x-rays (talus-second metatarsal angle, talo-navicular coverage angle, calcaneal inclination angle and calcaneal-first metatarsal angle. Normative foot posture values were taken from the literature and used to recruit participants with normal-arched feet. Data from these participants were subsequently used to define the boundary between normal- and flat-arched feet. This information was then used to recruit participants with flat-arched feet. The relationship between the clinical and radiographic measures of foot posture was also explored. Results Thirty-two participants were recruited to the normal-arched study, 31 qualified for the flat-arched study and 28 participants were classified as having neither normal- or flat-arched feet and were not suitable for either study. The values obtained from the two clinical and four radiological measurements established two clearly defined foot posture groups. Correlations among clinical and radiological measures were significant (p r = 0.24 to 0.70. Interestingly, the clinical measures were more strongly associated with the radiographic angles obtained from the lateral view. Conclusion This foot screening protocol provides a coherent strategy for researchers planning to recruit participants with normal- and flat-arched feet. However, further research is

  9. Comprehensive small animal imaging strategies on a clinical 3 T dedicated head MR-scanner; adapted methods and sequence protocols in CNS pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepu R Pillai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small animal models of human diseases are an indispensable aspect of pre-clinical research. Being dynamic, most pathologies demand extensive longitudinal monitoring to understand disease mechanisms, drug efficacy and side effects. These considerations often demand the concomitant development of monitoring systems with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: This study attempts to configure and optimize a clinical 3 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner to facilitate imaging of small animal central nervous system pathologies. The hardware of the scanner was complemented by a custom-built, 4-channel phased array coil system. Extensive modification of standard sequence protocols was carried out based on tissue relaxometric calculations. Proton density differences between the gray and white matter of the rodent spinal cord along with transverse relaxation due to magnetic susceptibility differences at the cortex and striatum of both rats and mice demonstrated statistically significant differences. The employed parallel imaging reconstruction algorithms had distinct properties dependent on the sequence type and in the presence of the contrast agent. The attempt to morphologically phenotype a normal healthy rat brain in multiple planes delineated a number of anatomical regions, and all the clinically relevant sequels following acute cerebral ischemia could be adequately characterized. Changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability following ischemia-reperfusion were also apparent at a later time. Typical characteristics of intra-cerebral haemorrhage at acute and chronic stages were also visualized up to one month. Two models of rodent spinal cord injury were adequately characterized and closely mimicked the results of histological studies. In the employed rodent animal handling system a mouse model of glioblastoma was also studied with unequivocal results. CONCLUSIONS: The implemented customizations including extensive

  10. Development of software for clinical protocols in nuclear medicine. Final report for the period 21 November 1994 - 21 November 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd-Pokropek, A.

    1996-01-01

    After two technical contracts of IAEA, a portable image processing software (PIP) has been developed and some clinical protocols for nuclear medicine studies with IBM PCs which are connected to analogue gamma cameras. In addition, a suitable front end for driving some PC/gamma camera interface cards have been successfully tested and extended. The on-line help facilities and the user interface within PIP was remarkably improved, for medical physicists as developers as well as for technologists as users for routine studies

  11. Relationships of clinical protocols and reconstruction kernels with image quality and radiation dose in a 128-slice CT scanner: Study with an anthropomorphic and water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Krauss, B.; Banckwitz, R.; Maentele, W.; Bauer, R.W.; Vogl, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Research highlights: ► Clinical protocol, reconstruction kernel, reconstructed slice thickness, phantom diameter or the density of material it contains directly affects the image quality of DSCT. ► Dual energy protocol shows the lowest DLP compared to all other protocols examined. ► Dual-energy fused images show excellent image quality and the noise is same as that of single- or high-pitch mode protocol images. ► Advanced CT technology improves image quality and considerably reduce radiation dose. ► An important finding is the comparatively higher DLP of the dual-source high-pitch protocol compared to other single- or dual-energy protocols. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of scanning parameters (clinical protocols), reconstruction kernels and slice thickness with image quality and radiation dose in a DSCT. Materials and methods: The chest of an anthropomorphic phantom was scanned on a DSCT scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition flash) using different clinical protocols, including single- and dual-energy modes. Four scan protocols were investigated: 1) single-source 120 kV, 110 mA s, 2) single-source 100 kV, 180 mA s, 3) high-pitch 120 kV, 130 mA s and 4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140 kV, eff.mA s 89, 76. The automatic exposure control was switched off for all the scans and the CTDIvol selected was in between 7.12 and 7.37 mGy. The raw data were reconstructed using the reconstruction kernels B31f, B80f and B70f, and slice thicknesses were 1.0 mm and 5.0 mm. Finally, the same parameters and procedures were used for the scanning of water phantom. Friedman test and Wilcoxon-Matched-Pair test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The DLP based on the given CTDIvol values showed significantly lower exposure for protocol 4, when compared to protocol 1 (percent difference 5.18%), protocol 2 (percent diff. 4.51%), and protocol 3 (percent diff. 8.81%). The highest change in Hounsfield Units was observed with dual

  12. Establishment of quality assessment standard for mammographic equipment: evaluation of phantom and clinical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Hoon; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Chung, Soo Young

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a quality standard for mammographic equipment Korea and to eventually improve mammographic quality in clinics and hospitals throughout Korea by educating technicians and clinic personnel. For the phantom test and on site assessment, we visited 37 sites and examined 43 sets of mammographic equipment. Items that were examined include phantom test, radiation dose measurement, developer assessment, etc. The phantom images were assessed visually and by optical density measurements. For the clinical image assessment, clinical images from 371 sites were examined following the new Korean standard for clinical image evaluation. The items examined include labeling, positioning, contrast, exposure, artifacts, collimation among others. Quality standard of mammographic equipment was satisfied in all equipment on site visits. Average mean glandular dose was 114.9 mRad. All phantom image test scores were over 10 points (average, 10.8 points). However, optical density measurements were below 1.2 in 9 sets of equipment (20.9%). Clinical image evaluation revealed appropriate image quality in 83.5%, while images from non-radiologist clinics were adequate in 74.6% (91/122), which was the lowest score of any group. Images were satisfactory in 59.0% (219/371) based on evaluation by specialists following the new Korean standard for clinical image evaluation. Satisfactory images had a mean score of 81.7 (1 S.D. =8.9) and unsatisfactory images had a mean score of 61.9 (1 S.D = 11). The correlation coefficient between the two observers was 0.93 (ρ < 0.01) in 49 consecutive cases. The results of the phantom tests suggest that optical density measurements should be performed as part of a new quality standard for mammographic equipment. The new clinical evaluation criteria that was used in this study can be implemented with some modifications for future mammography quality control by the Korean government

  13. The Dysphagia in Stroke Protocol Reduces Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients with Dysphagia Following Acute Stroke: a Clinical Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sarah E; Miles, Anna; Fink, John N; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2018-03-30

    Cough reflex testing has been evaluated as a component of the clinical swallowing assessment as a means of identifying patients at risk of aspiration during swallowing. A previous study by our research group found good sensitivity and specificity of the cough reflex test for identifying patients at risk of aspiration post-stroke, yet its use did not decrease pneumonia rates, contrary to previous reports. The aim of this study was to expand on our earlier work by implementing a clinical management protocol incorporating cough reflex testing within the same healthcare setting and compare patient outcomes to those from the original study and to evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with acute stroke who were managed using the Dysphagia in Stroke Protocol (DiSP). Secondarily, to compare those outcomes to historical data prior to implementation of the DiSP. This clinical audit measured outcomes from 284 patients with acute stroke managed per the DiSP, which guides use of videofluoroscopic swallowing study and patient management based on clinical exam with cough reflex testing. Data from our previous trial were included for comparison of pre- and post-DiSP patient outcomes. Data collection took place between November 2012 and April 2016 at four urban hospitals within New Zealand. Following implementation of the DiSP, the rate of aspiration pneumonia (10%) was substantially lower than the pre-DiSP rate (28%), with no pneumonia readmissions within 3 months. Pneumonia-related mortality was unchanged. By 3 months, 81% of the patients were on a normal diet and 67% had returned home, compared to pre-DiSP outcomes of 55% and 55% respectively. Previous work has suggested that simply implementing cough reflex testing in dysphagia management may not be sufficient to improve patient outcomes. The present study adds to this picture by suggesting that the true variable of influence may be the way in which the results of the test are applied to patient care. There is a strong case

  14. A protocol for classifying normal- and flat-arched foot posture for research studies using clinical and radiographic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murley, George S; Menz, Hylton B; Landorf, Karl B

    2009-07-04

    There are several clinical and radiological methods available to classify foot posture in research, however there is no clear strategy for selecting the most appropriate measurements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a foot screening protocol to distinguish between participants with normal- and flat-arched feet who would then subsequently be recruited into a series of laboratory-based gait studies. The foot posture of ninety-one asymptomatic young adults was assessed using two clinical measurements (normalised navicular height and arch index) and four radiological measurements taken from antero-posterior and lateral x-rays (talus-second metatarsal angle, talo-navicular coverage angle, calcaneal inclination angle and calcaneal-first metatarsal angle). Normative foot posture values were taken from the literature and used to recruit participants with normal-arched feet. Data from these participants were subsequently used to define the boundary between normal- and flat-arched feet. This information was then used to recruit participants with flat-arched feet. The relationship between the clinical and radiographic measures of foot posture was also explored. Thirty-two participants were recruited to the normal-arched study, 31 qualified for the flat-arched study and 28 participants were classified as having neither normal- or flat-arched feet and were not suitable for either study. The values obtained from the two clinical and four radiological measurements established two clearly defined foot posture groups. Correlations among clinical and radiological measures were significant (p foot screening protocol provides a coherent strategy for researchers planning to recruit participants with normal- and flat-arched feet. However, further research is required to determine whether foot posture variations in the sagittal, transverse or both planes provide the best descriptor of the flat foot.

  15. Nutritional adequacy of a novel human milk fortifier from donkey milk in feeding preterm infants: study protocol of a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, Alessandra; Bertino, Enrico; Tonetto, Paola; Peila, Chiara; Cresi, Francesco; Arslanoglu, Sertac; Moro, Guido E; Spada, Elena; Milani, Silvano; Giribaldi, Marzia; Antoniazzi, Sara; Conti, Amedeo; Cavallarin, Laura

    2018-01-09

    Fortification of human milk is a standard practice for feeding very low birth weight infants. However, preterm infants often still experience suboptimal growth and feeding intolerance. New fortification strategies and different commercially available fortifiers have been developed. Commercially available fortifiers are constituted by a blend of ingredients from different sources, including plant oils and bovine milk proteins, thus presenting remarkable differences in the quality of macronutrients with respect to human milk. Based on the consideration that donkey milk has been suggested as a valid alternative for children allergic to cow's milk proteins, due to its biochemical similarity to human milk, we hypothesized that donkey milk could be a suitable ingredient for developing an innovative human milk fortifier. The aim of the study is to evaluate feeding tolerance, growth and clinical short and long-term outcomes in a population of preterm infants fed with a novel multi-component fortifier and a protein concentrate derived from donkey milk, in comparison to an analogous population fed with traditional fortifier and protein supplement containing bovine milk proteins. The study has been designed as a randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical trial. Infants born groups, and the two diets were designed to be isoproteic and isocaloric. Weight, length and head circumference are measured; feeding tolerance is assessed by a standardized protocol. The occurrence of sepsis, necrotizing enterocolitis and adverse effects are monitored. This is the first clinical study investigating the use of a human milk fortifier derived from donkey milk for the nutrition of preterm infants. If donkey milk derived products will be shown to improve the feeding tolerance or either of the clinical, metabolic, neurological or auxological outcomes of preterm infants, it would be an absolute innovation in the field of feeding practices for preterm infants. ISRCTN - ISRCTN70022881 .

  16. Full-mouth disinfection as a therapeutic protocol for type-2 diabetic subjects with chronic periodontitis: twelve-month clinical outcomes: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Vanessa R; Lima, Jadson A; Miranda, Tamires S; Gonçalves, Tiago E D; Figueiredo, Luciene C; Faveri, Marcelo; Duarte, Poliana M

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the clinical effects of chlorhexidine (CHX) application in a full-mouth disinfection (FMD) protocol in poorly controlled type-2 diabetic subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis. Thirty-eight subjects were randomly assigned into FMD group (n=19): full-mouth scaling and root planing (FMSRP) within 24 h + local application of CHX gel + CHX rinses for 60 days or Control group (n = 19): FMSRP within 24 h + local application of placebo gel + placebo rinses for 60 days. Clinical parameters, glycated haemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose were assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months post-therapies. All clinical parameters improved significantly at 3, 6 and 12 months post-therapies for both groups (p clinical parameters, and glycemic condition at any time-point (p > 0.05). The treatments did not differ with respect to clinical parameters, including the primary outcome variable (i.e. changes in clinical attachment level in deep pockets), for up to 12 months post-treatments. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Standardized exchange of clinical documents--towards a shared care paradigm in glaucoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdsen, F; Müller, S; Jablonski, S; Prokosch, H-U

    2006-01-01

    The exchange of medical data from research and clinical routine across institutional borders is essential to establish an integrated healthcare platform. In this project we want to realize the standardized exchange of medical data between different healthcare institutions to implement an integrated and interoperable information system supporting clinical treatment and research of glaucoma. The central point of our concept is a standardized communication model based on the Clinical Document Architecture (CDA). Further, a communication concept between different health care institutions applying the developed document model has been defined. With our project we have been able to prove that standardized communication between an Electronic Medical Record (EMR), an Electronic Health Record (EHR) and the Erlanger Glaucoma Register (EGR) based on the established conceptual models, which rely on CDA rel.1 level 1 and SCIPHOX, could be implemented. The HL7-tool-based deduction of a suitable CDA rel.2 compliant schema showed significant differences when compared with the manually created schema. Finally fundamental requirements, which have to be implemented for an integrated health care platform, have been identified. An interoperable information system can enhance both clinical treatment and research projects. By automatically transferring screening findings from a glaucoma research project to the electronic medical record of our ophthalmology clinic, clinicians could benefit from the availability of a longitudinal patient record. The CDA as a standard for exchanging clinical documents has demonstrated its potential to enhance interoperability within a future shared care paradigm.

  18. Routine clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance in paediatric and adult congenital heart disease: patients, protocols, questions asked and contributions made

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinoff Stefan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD has become routine clinical practice. However, existing CMR protocols focus predominantly on patients with ischemic heart disease, and information is limited on the types of patient with CHD who benefit from CMR investigation, and in what ways. Therefore the aim of this study was to answer the questions: What type of patients were studied by CMR in a centre specializing in paediatric and adult CHD management? What questions were asked, which protocols were used and were the questions successfully answered? To answer these questions, we conducted a cohort study of all 362 patients that received routine clinical CMR during 2007 at the Department of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease at the Deutsches Herzzentrum München. Results Underlying diagnosis was in 33% Fallot's tetralogy, 17% aortic coarctation, 8% Ebstein's disease, 6% Marfan's disease, 4% single ventricle with Fontan-like circulation, and 32% others. Median age was 26 years (7 days – 75 years. Ventricular volumes were assessed in 67% of the patients; flow in 74%; unknown anatomy only in 9%; specific individual morphology of known anatomy in 83%; myocardial fibrosis in 8%; stress-induced myocardial perfusion defects in 1%. Only in 3% of the cases the question could not be fully answered. Conclusion Contrary to common belief, routine CMR of patients with CHD was not requested to address global anatomical questions so much as to clarify specific questions of morphology and function of known anatomy. The CMR protocols used differed markedly from those widely used in patients with ischemic heart disease.

  19. MAGnesium-oral supplementation to reduce PAin in patients with severe PERipheral arterial occlusive disease: the MAG-PAPER randomised clinical trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Monica Aida; Zappa, Sergio; Minelli, Cosetta; Bonardelli, Stefano; Lamberti, Laura; Bisighini, Luca; Zangrandi, Marta; Turin, Maddalena; Rizzo, Francesco; Rizzolo, Andrea; Latronico, Nicola

    2015-12-16

    Magnesium exerts analgaesic effects in several animal pain models, as well as in patients affected by acute postoperative pain and neuropathic chronic pain. There is no evidence that magnesium can modulate pain in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). We describe the protocol of a single-centre randomised double-blind clinical trial aimed at assessing the efficacy of oral magnesium supplementation in controlling severe pain in patients with advanced PAOD. Adult patients affected by PAOD at stages III and IV of Lèriche-Fontaine classification, who are opioid-naïve, and who have been admitted to our Acute Pain Service for intractable pain, will be eligible. Patients will be randomised to the control group, treated with standard therapy (oxycodone and pregabalin) plus placebo for 2 weeks, or to the experimental group (standard therapy plus magnesium oxide). Patients will be evaluated on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 14; the following information will being collected: daily oxycodone dose; average and maximum pain (Numerical Rating Scale); pain relief (Pain Relief Scale); characteristics of the pain (Neuropathic Pain Scale); impact of pain on the patient's daily activities (Brief Pain Inventory). The primary outcome will be oxycodone dosage needed to achieve satisfactory analgaesia on day 14. Secondary outcomes will be pain relief on day 2, time needed to achieve satisfactory analgaesia and time needed to achieve a pain reduction of 50%. A sample size calculation was performed for the primary outcome, which estimated a required sample size of 150 patients (75 per group). Ethical approval of the study protocol has been obtained from Comitato Etico Provinciale di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. Trial results will be disseminated through scientific journal manuscripts and scientific conference presentations. NCT02455726. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of the standardized ultrasound protocol for assessing subacromial structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs Kjær, Birgitte; Ellegaard, Karen; Wieland, Ina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: US-examinations related to shoulder impingement (SI) often vary due to methodological differences, examiner positions, transducers, and recording parameters. Reliable US protocols for examination of different structures related to shoulder impingement are therefore needed. OBJECTIVES...... of the supraspinatus tendon (SUPRA) and subacromial subdeltoid (SASD) bursa in two imaging positions, and the acromial humeral distance (AHD) in one position. Additionally, agreement on dynamic impingement (DI) examination was performed. The intra- and inter-rater reliability was carried out on the same day...

  1. Minimum reporting standards for clinical research on groin pain in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Thorborg, Kristian; Khan, Karim M

    2015-01-01

    are provided in relation to: (1) study methodology, (2) study participants and injury history, (3) clinical examination, (4) clinical assessment and (5) radiology. Adherence to these minimum reporting standards will strengthen the quality and transparency of research conducted on groin pain in athletes......Groin pain in athletes is a priority area for sports physiotherapy and sports medicine research. Heterogeneous studies with low methodological quality dominate research related to groin pain in athletes. Low-quality studies undermine the external validity of research findings and limit the ability...... to generalise findings to the target patient population. Minimum reporting standards for research on groin pain in athletes are overdue. We propose a set of minimum reporting standards based on best available evidence to be utilised in future research on groin pain in athletes. Minimum reporting standards...

  2. Assessment of Adverse Events in Protocols, Clinical Study Reports, and Published Papers of Trials of Orlistat: A Document Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Bennekou Schroll

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how adverse events are summarised and reported in trials, as detailed information is usually considered confidential. We have acquired clinical study reports (CSRs from the European Medicines Agency through the Freedom of Information Act. The CSRs describe the results of studies conducted as part of the application for marketing authorisation for the slimming pill orlistat. The purpose of this study was to study how adverse events were summarised and reported in study protocols, CSRs, and published papers of orlistat trials.We received the CSRs from seven randomised placebo controlled orlistat trials (4,225 participants submitted by Roche. The CSRs consisted of 8,716 pages and included protocols. Two researchers independently extracted data on adverse events from protocols and CSRs. Corresponding published papers were identified on PubMed and adverse event data were extracted from this source as well. All three sources were compared. Individual adverse events from one trial were summed and compared to the totals in the summary report. None of the protocols or CSRs contained instructions for investigators on how to question participants about adverse events. In CSRs, gastrointestinal adverse events were only coded if the participant reported that they were "bothersome," a condition that was not specified in the protocol for two of the trials. Serious adverse events were assessed for relationship to the drug by the sponsor, and all adverse events were coded by the sponsor using a glossary that could be updated by the sponsor. The criteria for withdrawal due to adverse events were in one case related to efficacy (high fasting glucose led to withdrawal, which meant that one trial had more withdrawals due to adverse events in the placebo group. Finally, only between 3% and 33% of the total number of investigator-reported adverse events from the trials were reported in the publications because of post hoc filters, though six of

  3. Clinical evaluation in advanced practice nursing education: using standardized patients in Health Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Susanne W; Adamo, Graceanne; Padden, Diane; Ricciardi, Richard; Graziano, Marjorie; Levine, Eugene; Hawkins, Richard

    2002-05-01

    Clinical education is critically important because competency in practice ultimately will determine the future of advanced practice nursing. Skills taught in Health Assessment, the first in a series of clinical courses, exposed students to tools that form the basis on which other competencies are built. The availability of standardized patients, people who participate in enacting a simulated but seemingly "real life" clinical encounter in a realistic clinical setting for the benefit of student learning and/or evaluation, made this instructional development project possible. The underlying assumption of this project was that clinical advanced practice nursing student education is enhanced by using an authentic clinical environment, known as a simulation center, with standardized patients and by using one or more evaluation techniques with multiple evaluators (i.e., peer, self, faculty, standardized patient). The student clinical experience was expected to improve and overall learning to increase by this method. This improvement was reflected at the end-of-course evaluations and in the quality of the final videotaped physical examination, which was superior to previous years. Student and faculty satisfaction with this teaching-learning process exceeded all expectations.

  4. The evaluation of complex clinical trial protocols: resources available to research ethics committees and the use of clinical trial registries--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homedes, Núria; Ugalde, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    To assess the potential role of clinical trial (CT) registries and other resources available to research ethics committees (RECs) in the evaluation of complex CT protocols in low-income and middle-income countries. Using a case study approach, the authors examined the decision-making process of a REC in Argentina and its efforts to use available resources to decide on a complex protocol. We also analysed the information in the USA and other CT registries and consulted 24 CT experts in seven countries. Information requested by the Argentinean REC from other national RECs and ethics' experts was not useful to verify the adequacy of the REC's decision whether or not to approve the CT. The responses from the national regulatory agency and the sponsor were not helpful either. The identification of international resources that could assist was beyond the REC's capability. The information in the USA and other CT registries is limited, and at times misleading; and its accuracy is not verified by register keepers. RECs have limited access to experts and institutions that could assist them in their deliberations. Sponsors do not always answer RECs' request for information to properly conduct the ethical and methodological assessment of CT protocols. The usefulness of the CT registries is curtailed by the lack of appropriate codes and by data errors. Information about reasons for rejection, withdrawal or suspension of the trial should be included in the registries. Establishing formal channels of communication among national and foreign RECs and with independent international reference centres could strengthen the ethical review of CT protocols. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Publication trends of study protocols in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Tiago S; Colquhoun, Heather L

    2017-09-04

    Growing evidence points for the need to publish study protocols in the health field. To observe whether the growing interest in publishing study protocols in the broader health field has been translated into increased publications of rehabilitation study protocols. Observational study using publication data and its indexation in PubMed. Not applicable. Not applicable. PubMed was searched with appropriate combinations of Medical Subject Headings up to December 2014. The effective presence of study protocols was manually screened. Regression models analyzed the yearly growth of publications. Two-sample Z-tests analyzed whether the proportion of Systematic Reviews (SRs) and Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) among study protocols differed from that of the same designs for the broader rehabilitation research. Up to December 2014, 746 publications of rehabilitation study protocols were identified, with an exponential growth since 2005 (r2=0.981; p<0.001). RCT protocols were the most common among rehabilitation study protocols (83%), while RCTs were significantly more prevalent among study protocols than among the broader rehabilitation research (83% vs. 35.8%; p<0.001). For SRs, the picture was reversed: significantly less common among study protocols (2.8% vs. 9.3%; p<0.001). Funding was more often reported by rehabilitation study protocols than the broader rehabilitation research (90% vs. 53.1%; p<0.001). Rehabilitation journals published a significantly lower share of rehabilitation study protocols than they did for the broader rehabilitation research (1.8% vs.16.7%; p<0.001). Identifying the reasons for these discrepancies and reverting unwarranted disparities (e.g. low rate of publication for rehabilitation SR protocols) are likely new avenues for rehabilitation research and its publication. SRs, particularly those aggregating RCT results, are considered the best standard of evidence to guide rehabilitation clinical practice; however, that standard can be improved

  6. Brazilian Samba Protocol for Individuals With Parkinson's Disease: A Clinical Non-Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Ana Cristina; Andrade, Alexandro; Swarowsky, Alessandra; Guimarães, Adriana Coutinho De Azevedo

    2017-07-04

    In the 10 most populated countries in the world, Parkinson's disease (PD) affects more than 5 million individuals. Despite optimal treatment options already developed for the disease, concomitant involvement of other areas of health care plays an important role in complementing the treatment. From this perspective, dancing can be viewed as a non-drug alternative that can reduce falls by improving some motor skills, such as mobility, balance, gait, and posture, and can also improve the overall quality of life. Brazilian samba promotes improvement in motor and non-motor symptoms in individuals with PD, providing a new treatment option for this population. The main objective of this quasi-experimental study is to provide a 12-week samba protocol (2x/week) for individuals with PD and to compare its effects with the group without intervention. The hypothesis is that the Brazilian samba protocol will promote improvement in primary (motor) and secondary (non-motor) outcomes in individuals with PD. The sample will be selected at random from individuals diagnosed with PD in the city of Florianopolis (SC, Brazil). Sample size calculation was performed with the G*Power 3.1.9.2 software, with 0.447 effect size, at 5% significance level, power of 0.9, and test and sample loss of 20%. This yielded 60 individuals divided between the intervention and control groups. The questionnaires will be filled out before and after the dance intervention. The data collection for the control group will be held simultaneously to the intervention group. The classes will last for 1 hour, twice a week in the evening for 12 weeks, and all classes will be divided into warm-up, main part, and relaxation. Two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures and Sidak post-hoc comparison test will be used for a comparative analysis of the final results of the control group with the experimental group and of the within-group changes between pre- and postintervention period. We expect to complete follow

  7. Methodological aspects of clinical trials in tinnitus: A proposal for an international standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, Michael; Azevedo, Andréia; Baguley, David; Bauer, Carol; Cacace, Anthony; Coelho, Claudia; Dornhoffer, John; Figueiredo, Ricardo; Flor, Herta; Hajak, Goeran; van de Heyning, Paul; Hiller, Wolfgang; Khedr, Eman; Kleinjung, Tobias; Koller, Michael; Lainez, Jose Miguel; Londero, Alain; Martin, William H.; Mennemeier, Mark; Piccirillo, Jay; De Ridder, Dirk; Rupprecht, Rainer; Searchfield, Grant; Vanneste, Sven; Zeman, Florian; Langguth, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is a common condition with a high burden of disease. While many different treatments are used in clinical practice, the evidence for the efficacy of these treatments is low and the variance of treatment response between individuals is high. This is most likely due to the great heterogeneity of tinnitus with respect to clinical features as well as underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. There is a clear need to find effective treatment options in tinnitus, however, clinical trials differ substantially with respect to methodological quality and design. Consequently, the conclusions that can be derived from these studies are limited and jeopardize comparison between studies. Here, we discuss our view of the most important aspects of trial design in clinical studies in tinnitus and make suggestions for an international methodological standard in tinnitus trials. We hope that the proposed methodological standard will stimulate scientific discussion and will help to improve the quality of trials in tinnitus. PMID:22789414

  8. Providing support to nursing students in the clinical environment: a nursing standard requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carina; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2016-10-01

    This discussion paper poses the question 'What enables or deters Registered Nurses to take up their professional responsibility to support undergraduate nursing students through the provision of clinical education?'. Embedded within many nursing standards are expectations that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to undergraduate nursing students undertaking clinical placements. Expectations within nursing standards that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to nursing students are important because nursing students depend on Registered Nurses to help them to become competent practitioners. Contributing factors that enable and deter Registered Nurses from fulfilling this expectation to support nursing students in their clinical learning include; workloads, preparedness for the teaching role, confidence in teaching and awareness of the competency requirement to support students. Factors exist which can enable or deter Registered Nurses from carrying out the licence requirement to provide clinical education and support to nursing students.

  9. Clinical utility of a complete diagnostic protocol for the ocular evaluation of free-living raptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labelle, Amber L; Whittington, Julia K; Breaux, Carrie B; Labelle, Philippe; Mitchell, Mark A; Zarfoss, Mitzi K; Schmidt, Stephanie A; Hamor, Ralph E

    2012-01-01

      To describe a protocol for the examination of free-living raptors and report the ophthalmic examination findings of seven raptor species native to central Illinois, namely the barred owl, Cooper's hawk, eastern screech owl, great horned owl, American kestrel, red-tailed hawk, and turkey vulture and to determine if the findings relative to visual prognosis affected eligibility for future release.   Seventy-nine free-living raptors.   Under manual restraint, complete ophthalmic examination including slit-lamp biomicroscopy and indirect funduscopy, applanation tonometry, rebound tonometry, ocular morphometrics, B-mode ultrasound, and electroretinography (ERG) were performed on each bird. Histopathology of enucleated globes was performed after euthanasia or death in selected cases.   The examination protocol was easily performed using manual restraint alone on all birds. Ocular lesions were detected in 48.1% of birds, with 47.3% affected unilaterally and 52.6% affected bilaterally. Ocular lesions were considered to be vision threatening in 29.0% of the unilaterally affected birds and 29.0% of the bilaterally affected birds. The most common case outcomes were discharge from hospital to rehabilitation facility (45.6%) followed by euthanasia (43.0%). The presence of an ocular lesion or a vision-threatening ocular lesion was not significantly associated with outcome. Reference ranges are reported for B-mode ultrasound, ocular morphometrics, and horizontal corneal diameter in all species.   Complete ophthalmic examination can be supplemented by the use of ocular morphometrics, ultrasound, and ERG in the manually restrained raptor. These advanced diagnostic techniques may be useful in developing more objective criteria for evaluating eligibility for release following rehabilitation of free-living birds of prey. © 2011 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  10. [The challenges of standardization in clinical diagnostic laboratories of medical organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V V

    2013-04-01

    The generalized data concerning the conditions of application of regulations of national standards in clinical diagnostic laboratories of medical organizations is presented. The primary information was provided by 14 regions of 6 federal administrative okrugs of Russia. The causes of challenges of application of requirements of standards are presented. They are mostly related with insufficient financial support, lacking of manpower, difficulties with reagents supply, inadequate technical maintenance of devices and absence of support of administration of medical organizations. The recommendations are formulated concerning the necessity of publishing the document of Minzdrav of Russia to determine the need in application of standards in laboratory practice.

  11. Co-Designing Mobile Apps to Assist in Clinical Nursing Education: A Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Mobile applications (apps) to train health professionals is gaining momentum as the benefits of mobile learning (mLearning) are becoming apparent in complex clinical environments. However, most educational apps are generic, off-the-shelf pieces of software that do not take into consideration the unique needs of nursing students. The proposed study will apply a user-centred design process to create a tailored mobile app for nursing students to learn and apply clinical skills in practice. The app will be piloted and evaluated to understand how nursing students use mobile technology in clinical settings to support their learning and educational needs.

  12. Effects of standard training in the use of closed-circuit televisions in visually impaired adults: design of a training protocol and a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Reading problems are frequently reported by visually impaired persons. A closed-circuit television (CCTV) can be helpful to maintain reading ability, however, it is difficult to learn how to use this device. In the Netherlands, an evidence-based rehabilitation program in the use of CCTVs was lacking. Therefore, a standard training protocol needed to be developed and tested in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to provide an evidence-based training program in the use of this device. Methods/Design To develop a standard training program, information was collected by studying literature, observing training in the use of CCTVs, discussing the content of the training program with professionals and organizing focus and discussion groups. The effectiveness of the program was evaluated in an RCT, to obtain an evidence-based training program. Dutch patients (n = 122) were randomized into a treatment group: normal instructions from the supplier combined with training in the use of CCTVs, or into a control group: instructions from the supplier only. The effect of the training program was evaluated in terms of: change in reading ability (reading speed and reading comprehension), patients' skills to operate the CCTV, perceived (vision-related) quality of life and tasks performed in daily living. Discussion The development of the CCTV training protocol and the design of the RCT in the present study may serve as an example to obtain an evidence-based training program. The training program was adjusted to the needs and learning abilities of individual patients, however, for scientific reasons it might have been preferable to standardize the protocol further, in order to gain more comparable results. Trial registration http://www.trialregister.nl, identifier: NTR1031 PMID:20219120

  13. Determinants of successful clinical networks: the conceptual framework and study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haines Mary

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical networks are increasingly being viewed as an important strategy for increasing evidence-based practice and improving models of care, but success is variable and characteristics of networks with high impact are uncertain. This study takes advantage of the variability in the functioning and outcomes of networks supported by the Australian New South Wales (NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation's non-mandatory model of clinical networks to investigate the factors that contribute to the success of clinical networks. Methods/Design The objective of this retrospective study is to examine the association between external support, organisational and program factors, and indicators of success among 19 clinical networks over a three-year period (2006-2008. The outcomes (health impact, system impact, programs implemented, engagement, user perception, and financial leverage and explanatory factors will be collected using a web-based survey, interviews, and record review. An independent expert panel will provide judgements about the impact or extent of each network's initiatives on health and system impacts. The ratings of the expert panel will be the outcome used in multivariable analyses. Following the rating of network success, a qualitative study will be conducted to provide a more in-depth examination of the most successful networks. Discussion This is the first study to combine quantitative and qualitative methods to examine the factors that contribute to the success of clinical networks and, more generally, is the largest study of clinical networks undertaken. The adaptation of expert panel methods to rate the impacts of networks is the methodological innovation of this study. The proposed project will identify the conditions that should be established or encouraged by agencies developing clinical networks and will be of immediate use in forming strategies and programs to maximise the effectiveness of such networks.

  14. Determinants of successful clinical networks: the conceptual framework and study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Mary; Brown, Bernadette; Craig, Jonathan; D'Este, Catherine; Elliott, Elizabeth; Klineberg, Emily; McInnes, Elizabeth; Middleton, Sandy; Paul, Christine; Redman, Sally; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2012-03-13

    Clinical networks are increasingly being viewed as an important strategy for increasing evidence-based practice and improving models of care, but success is variable and characteristics of networks with high impact are uncertain. This study takes advantage of the variability in the functioning and outcomes of networks supported by the Australian New South Wales (NSW) Agency for Clinical Innovation's non-mandatory model of clinical networks to investigate the factors that contribute to the success of clinical networks. The objective of this retrospective study is to examine the association between external support, organisational and program factors, and indicators of success among 19 clinical networks over a three-year period (2006-2008). The outcomes (health impact, system impact, programs implemented, engagement, user perception, and financial leverage) and explanatory factors will be collected using a web-based survey, interviews, and record review. An independent expert panel will provide judgements about the impact or extent of each network's initiatives on health and system impacts. The ratings of the expert panel will be the outcome used in multivariable analyses. Following the rating of network success, a qualitative study will be conducted to provide a more in-depth examination of the most successful networks. This is the first study to combine quantitative and qualitative methods to examine the factors that contribute to the success of clinical networks and, more generally, is the largest study of clinical networks undertaken. The adaptation of expert panel methods to rate the impacts of networks is the methodological innovation of this study. The proposed project will identify the conditions that should be established or encouraged by agencies developing clinical networks and will be of immediate use in forming strategies and programs to maximise the effectiveness of such networks.

  15. Participation of nurses in the execution of clinical research protocol about technological innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, Luciane Patrícia Andreani; Scheeren, Eduardo Mendonça; Cubas, Marcia Regina

    2015-01-01

    AbstractOBJECTIVETo report the nurse's experience of inclusion in interdisciplinary clinical study about technological innovation, involving people with spinal cord injury.METHODDescriptive experience report. The empirical support was based on notes about perspectives and practice of clinical research, with a multi-professional nursing, physical education, physiotherapy and engineering staff.RESULTThe qualification includes the elaboration of the document for the Ethics Committee, familiariza...

  16. Reference standard space hippocampus labels according to the European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium-Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative harmonized protocol: Utility in automated volumetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Dominik; Bocchetta, Martina; Preboske, Gregory M; Boccardi, Marina; Grothe, Michel J

    2017-08-01

    A harmonized protocol (HarP) for manual hippocampal segmentation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has recently been developed by an international European Alzheimer's Disease Consortium-Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative project. We aimed at providing consensual certified HarP hippocampal labels in Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) standard space to serve as reference in automated image analyses. Manual HarP tracings on the high-resolution MNI152 standard space template of four expert certified HarP tracers were combined to obtain consensual bilateral hippocampus labels. Utility and validity of these reference labels is demonstrated in a simple atlas-based morphometry approach for automated calculation of HarP-compliant hippocampal volumes within SPM software. Individual tracings showed very high agreement among the four expert tracers (pairwise Jaccard indices 0.82-0.87). Automatically calculated hippocampal volumes were highly correlated (r L/R  = 0.89/0.91) with gold standard volumes in the HarP benchmark data set (N = 135 MRIs), with a mean volume difference of 9% (standard deviation 7%). The consensual HarP hippocampus labels in the MNI152 template can serve as a reference standard for automated image analyses involving MNI standard space normalization. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Call for standardized definitions of osteoarthritis and risk stratification for clinical trials and clinical use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a heterogeneous disorder. The goals of this review are (1) To stimulate use of standardized nomenclature for OA that could serve as building blocks for describing OA and defining OA phenotypes, in short to provide unifying disease concepts for a heterogeneous disorder; and (2......) To stimulate establishment of ROAD (Risk of OA Development) and ROAP (Risk of OA Progression) tools analogous to the FRAX™ instrument for predicting risk of fracture in osteoporosis; and (3) To stimulate formulation of tools for identifying disease in its early preradiographic and/or molecular stages - REDI...... (Reliable Early Disease Identification). Consensus around more sensitive and specific diagnostic criteria for OA could spur development of disease modifying therapies for this entity that has proved so recalcitrant to date. We fully acknowledge that as we move forward, we expect to develop more...

  18. Call for standardized definitions of osteoarthritis and risk stratification for clinical trials and clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M; Karsdal, M A; Lohmander, L S

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a heterogeneous disorder. The goals of this review are (1) To stimulate use of standardized nomenclature for OA that could serve as building blocks for describing OA and defining OA phenotypes, in short to provide unifying disease concepts for a heterogeneous disorder; and (2) To stimulate establishment of ROAD (Risk of OA Development) and ROAP (Risk of OA Progression) tools analogous to the FRAX™ instrument for predicting risk of fracture in osteoporosis; and (3) To stimulate formulation of tools for identifying disease in its early preradiographic and/or molecular stages - REDI (Reliable Early Disease Identification). Consensus around more sensitive and specific diagnostic criteria for OA could spur development of disease modifying therapies for this entity that has proved so recalcitrant to date. We fully acknowledge that as we move forward, we expect to develop more sophisticated definitions, terminology and tools. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Brazilian Samba Protocol for Individuals With Parkinson’s Disease: A Clinical Non-Randomized Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background In the 10 most populated countries in the world, Parkinson's disease (PD) affects more than 5 million individuals. Despite optimal treatment options already developed for the disease, concomitant involvement of other areas of health care plays an important role in complementing the treatment. From this perspective, dancing can be viewed as a non-drug alternative that can reduce falls by improving some motor skills, such as mobility, balance, gait, and posture, and can also improve the overall quality of life. Brazilian samba promotes improvement in motor and non-motor symptoms in individuals with PD, providing a new treatment option for this population. Objective The main objective of this quasi-experimental study is to provide a 12-week samba protocol (2x/week) for individuals with PD and to compare its effects with the group without intervention. The hypothesis is that the Brazilian samba protocol will promote improvement in primary (motor) and secondary (non-motor) outcomes in individuals with PD. Methods The sample will be selected at random from individuals diagnosed with PD in the city of Florianopolis (SC, Brazil). Sample size calculation was performed with the G*Power 3.1.9.2 software, with 0.447 effect size, at 5% significance level, power of 0.9, and test and sample loss of 20%. This yielded 60 individuals divided between the intervention and control groups. The questionnaires will be filled out before and after the dance intervention. The data collection for the control group will be held simultaneously to the intervention group. The classes will last for 1 hour, twice a week in the evening for 12 weeks, and all classes will be divided into warm-up, main part, and relaxation. Two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures and Sidak post-hoc comparison test will be used for a comparative analysis of the final results of the control group with the experimental group and of the within-group changes between pre- and postintervention period

  20. A quality control program within a clinical trial Consortium for PCR protocols to detect Plasmodium species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Steve M.; Mayor, Alfredo; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Kenguele, Hilaire M.; Ouédraogo, Smaïla; Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue; Mkali, Happy; Mwangoka, Grace; Valecha, Neena; Singh, Jai Prakash Narayan; Clark, Martha A.; Verweij, Jaco J.; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela; Macete, Eusebio; Menendez, Clara; Cisteró, Pau; Njie, Fanta; Affara, Muna; Otieno, Kephas; Kariuki, Simon; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Meshnick, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria parasite infections that are only detectable by molecular methods are highly prevalent and represent a potential transmission reservoir. The methods used to detect these infections are not standardized, and their operating characteristics are often unknown. We designed a proficiency panel of

  1. The impact of protein extraction protocols on the performance of currently available MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for identification of mycobacterial clinical isolates cultured in liquid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Su; Choi, Soon Hee; Hwang, Sang Mee; Hong, Yun Ji; Kim, Taek Soo; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Kim, Eui-Chong

    2016-09-01

    Protein extraction step is particularly important for identification of mycobacterial isolates by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) because of its thick and solid cell wall. This study compared the performance of MALDI-TOF MS for identification of mycobacterial clinical isolates cultured in liquid media between heating-based protocol and non-heating protocol. Clinical mycobacterial isolates cultured in liquid media were prospectively analyzed. Reference identification was real-time PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism. The specimens prepared by heating protocol and non-heating protocol were tested using MALDI Biotyper (Bruker Daltonics, Bremen, Germany) and Vitek MS (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France), respectively. Among the 206 clinical specimens prepared by heating method, identification rates were 90.3% and 60.7% in MALDI Biotyper and Vitek MS, respectively. Identification accuracy of MALDI Biotyper and Vitek MS was 100% for the isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium fortuitum. Among the 121 clinical specimens prepared by non-heating method, identification rate for MALDI Biotyper and Vitek MS were 61.2% and 69.4%, respectively. Identification accuracy of MALDI Biotyper/Vitek MS were 92.9%/94.1% for MTBC, 92.9%/100% for M. avium, 90%/100% for M. intracellulare, 100%/100% for M. abscessus and 100%/100% for M. fortuitum. The performance of MALDI-TOF MS for identification of mycobacterial clinical isolates is affected by protein extraction protocol. For best performance, protein extraction protocol should be chosen considering the MALDI-TOF MS system. In the present study, heating protocol with MALDI Biotyper system showed reliable identification results for mycobacterial clinical isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinically significant discrepancies between sleep problems assessed by standard clinical tools and actigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjersti Marie Blytt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep disturbances are widespread among nursing home (NH patients and associated with numerous negative consequences. Identifying and treating them should therefore be of high clinical priority. No prior studies have investigated the degree to which sleep disturbances as detected by actigraphy and by the sleep-related items in the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory – Nursing Home version (NPI-NH provide comparable results. Such knowledge is highly needed, since both questionnaires are used in clinical settings and studies use the NPI-NH sleep item to measure sleep disturbances. For this reason, insight into their relative (disadvantages is valuable. Method Cross-sectional study of 83 NH patients. Sleep was objectively measured with actigraphy for 7 days, and rated by NH staff with the sleep items in the CSDD and the NPI-NH, and results were compared. McNemar's tests were conducted to investigate whether there were significant differences between the pairs of relevant measures. Cohen's Kappa tests were used to investigate the degree of agreement between the pairs of relevant actigraphy, NPI-NH and CSDD measures. Sensitivity and specificity analyses were conducted for each of the pairs, and receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves were designed as a plot of the true positive rate against the false positive rate for the diagnostic test. Results Proxy-raters reported sleep disturbances in 20.5% of patients assessed with NPI-NH and 18.1% (difficulty falling asleep, 43.4% (multiple awakenings and 3.6% (early morning awakenings of patients had sleep disturbances assessed with CSDD. Our results showed significant differences (p<0.001 between actigraphy measures and proxy-rated sleep by the NPI-NH and CSDD. Sensitivity and specificity analyses supported these results. Conclusions Compared to actigraphy, proxy-raters clearly underreported NH patients' sleep disturbances as assessed

  3. Quality standards for DNA sequence variation databases to improve clinical management under development in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bennetts

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the routine nature of comparing sequence variations identified during clinical testing to database records, few databases meet quality requirements for clinical diagnostics. To address this issue, The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA in collaboration with the Human Genetics Society of Australasia (HGSA, and the Human Variome Project (HVP is developing standards for DNA sequence variation databases intended for use in the Australian clinical environment. The outputs of this project will be promoted to other health systems and accreditation bodies by the Human Variome Project to support the development of similar frameworks in other jurisdictions.

  4. European AIDS Clinical Society Standard of Care meeting on HIV and related coinfections: The Rome Statements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mussini, C.; Antinori, A.; Bhagani, S.; Branco, T.; Brostrom, M.; Dedes, N.; Bereczky, T.; Girardi, E.; Gökengin, D.; Horban, A.; Lacombe, K.; Lundgren, J. D.; Mendao, L.; Mocroft, A.; Oprea, C.; Porter, K.; Podlekareva, D.; Battegay, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Mulcahy, Fiona; Geretti, Anna Maria; Clumeck, Nathan; Reiss, Peter; Arribas, Jose; Gatell, Jose; Katlama, Christine; Pozniak, Anton; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Youle, Mike; Friis-Møller, Nina; Rusconi, Stefano; Behrens, Georg; de Wit, Stéphane; Furrer, Hansjakob; Wensing, Annemarie; John Gill, M.; Letendre, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the 1st European AIDS Clinical Society meeting on Standard of Care in Europe was to raise awareness of the European scenario and come to an agreement on actions that could be taken in the future. Data-driven presentations were given on specific topics followed by interactive panel

  5. European AIDS Clinical Society Standard of Care meeting on HIV and related coinfections : The Rome Statements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mussini, C.; Antinori, A.; Bhagani, S.; Branco, T.; Brostrom, M.; Dedes, N.; Bereczky, T.; Girardi, E.; Gökengin, D.; Horban, A.; Lacombe, K.; Lundgren, J. D.; Mendao, L.; Mocroft, A.; Oprea, C.; Porter, K.; Podlekareva, D.; Battegay, M.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Mulcahy, Fiona; Geretti, Anna Maria; Clumeck, Nathan; Reiss, Peter; Arribas, Jose; Gatell, Jose; Katlama, Christine; Pozniak, Anton; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Youle, Mike; Friis-Møller, Nina; Rusconi, Stefano; Behrens, Georg; De Wit, Stéphane; Furrer, Hansjakob; Wensing, Annemarie|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30817724X; John Gill, M.; Letendre, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the 1st European AIDS Clinical Society meeting on Standard of Care in Europe was to raise awareness of the European scenario and come to an agreement on actions that could be taken in the future. Methods: Data-driven presentations were given on specific topics followed

  6. Standardized Patient Encounters Improved Athletic Training Students' Confidence in Clinical Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kirk J.; Jarriel, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Researchers have reported that interacting with standardized patients (SPs) is a worthwhile and realistic experience for athletic training (AT) students. These encounters enhance students' interviewing skills, confidence as a clinician, clinical skill development, and interpersonal communication. Objective: To determine how SP encounters…

  7. European AIDS Clinical Society Second Standard of Care Meeting, Brussels 16-17 November 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Wit, S; Battegay, M; D'Arminio Monforte, A

    2018-01-01

    The European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) organized a second meeting on Standard of Care in Europe on November 16-17 th, 2016. The aims of the meeting were to discuss and propose actions on three topics, namely: Adherence to guidelines for treatment initiation, treatment monitoring and outcomes, ...

  8. Effect of back school protocol on the referral rate of patients with low back pain to an industrial physiotherapy clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Odebiyi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Back schools are educational programmes originally developed in a work place (Volvo factory in Sweden for patients with back pain, to enable them to manage their own back problems better. ‘Back school’ was originally aimed at modifying the behaviours of patients with low back pain (LBP, with the view to prevent relapses. In an effort to encourage and stimulate the use of ‘back school’ among health workers in Nigeria, this study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of a back school protocol in a Soap Making Industry in Lagos, Nigeria. One hundred and ten (110 workers of a Soap Making Industry in Lagos, Nigeria,  participated in this study. A pre-test, post-test experimental design was employed. The participants were divided into two groups - office workers and factory workers for the purpose of the training in the content of the back school protocol. The ‘back school’ consisted of classroom teaching and the use of two videotapes titled “lifting technique” and “back pain”. Data on demographic information, knowledge of back structures and back care were collected using a questionnaire with closed ended questions, which was completed before, immediately after and 8 weeks after the administrations of the contents of the back school protocol (Akinpelu and Odebiyi, 2004. The records of the factory’s clinic were also reviewed for the 12-months before and 12 months after the study. The mean values of the participants’ age, height, weight and body mass index (BMI were 36.60 ± 9.10 years, 1.65 ± 0.10 m,69.13 ± 7.70 kg and 25.40 ± 3.30 kg/m2 respectively. The results showed that the 12-months prevalence of low back pain (LBP among the workers was 71%. The result also showed that over 50% of the participants never had any  information or lesson on back care, and those that had some form of information obtained it by chance. There was 23% reduction in referral for care of back pain 12 months after the administration of the back

  9. Dose reduction with iterative reconstruction: Optimization of CT protocols in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffier, J; Macri, F; Larbi, A; Fernandez, A; Khasanova, E; Pereira, F; Mekkaoui, C; Beregi, J P

    2015-05-01

    To create an adaptable and global approach for optimizing MDCT protocols by evaluating the influence of acquisition parameters and Iterative Reconstruction (IR) on dose reduction and image quality. MDCT acquisitions were performed on quality image phantom by varying kVp, mAs, and pitch for the same collimation. The raw data were reconstructed by FBP and Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) with different reconstruction kernel and thickness. A total of 4032 combinations of parameters were obtained. Indices of quality image (image noise, NCT, CNR, SNR, NPS and MTF) were analyzed. We developed a software in order to facilitate the optimization between dose reduction and image quality. Its outcomes were verified on an adult anthropomorphic phantom. Dose reduction resulted in the increase of image noise and the decrease of SNR and CNR. The use of IR improved these indices for the same dose without affecting NCT and MTF. The image validation was performed by the anthropomorphic phantom. The software proposed combinations of parameters to reduce doses while keeping indices of the image quality adequate. We observed a CTDIvol reduction between -44% and -83% as compared to the French diagnostic reference levels (DRL) for different anatomical localization. The software developed in this study may help radiologists in selecting adequate combinations of parameters that allows to obtain an appropriate image with dose reduction. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The Suspected CANcer (SCAN) pathway: protocol for evaluating a new standard of care for patients with non-specific symptoms of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Brian D; Oke, Jason; Friedemann Smith, Claire; Phillips, Julie-Ann; Lee, Jennifer; Abel, Lucy; Kelly, Sadie; Gould, Isabella; Mackay, Toni; Kaveney, Zoe; Anthony, Suzie; Hayles, Shelley; Lasserson, Daniel; Gleeson, Fergus

    2018-01-21

    Cancer survival in England lags behind most European countries, due partly to lower rates of early stage diagnosis. We report the protocol for the evaluation of a multidisciplinary diagnostic centre-based pathway for the investigation of 'low-risk but not no-risk' cancer symptoms called the Suspected CANcer (SCAN) pathway. SCAN is a new standard of care being implemented in Oxfordshire; one of a number of pathways implemented during the second wave of the Accelerate, Coordinate, Evaluate (ACE) programme, an initiative which aims to improve England's cancer survival rates through establishing effective routes to early diagnosis. To evaluate SCAN, we are collating a prospective database of patients referred onto the pathway by their general practitioner (GP). Patients aged over 40 years, with non-specific symptoms such as weight loss or fatigue, who do not meet urgent cancer referral criteria or for whom symptom causation remains unclear after investigation via other existing pathways, can be referred to SCAN. SCAN provides rapid CT scanning, laboratory testing and clinic review within 2 weeks. We will follow all patients in the primary and secondary care record for at least 2 years. The data will be used to understand the diagnostic yield of the SCAN pathway in the short term (28 days) and the long term (2 years). Routinely collected primary and secondary care data from patients not referred to SCAN but with similar symptoms will also be used to evaluate SCAN. We will map the routes to diagnosis for patients referred to SCAN to assess cost-effectiveness. Acceptability will be evaluated using patient and GP surveys. The Oxford Joint Research Office Study Classification Group has judged this to be a service evaluation and so outside of research governance. The results of this project will be disseminated by peer-reviewed publication and presentation at conferences. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018

  11. Safety of a clinical surveillance protocol with 3- and 6-week warfarin prophylaxis after total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, W M; Jimenez, M L; Bailie, D S; Wall, R; Branson, J

    2001-07-01

    The charts of 1869 patients were reviewed for the occurrence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism after total hip or knee arthroplasty. Prophylaxis consisted of 3 (group 1; n=1235) or 6 (group 2; n=634) weeks low-dose warfarin, pneumatic compression boots worn by patients in the hospital, mobilization on the first postoperative day, and a clinical surveillance protocol. Venous ultrasound or ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy (V/Q) was performed only if patients became symptomatic. patients. Twenty-three (1.8%) patients were positive for DVT. Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed on 25 patients, and 5 (0.4%) patients were positive for pulmonary embolism. In group 2, 117 patients were evaluated for DVT, and 19 (3%) patients had positive results determined by ultrasound. Twenty-five patients were evaluated with V/Q and only 1 (0.16%) patient was positive for pulmonary embolism. No patient developed a fatal pulmonary embolism or postphlebitic syndrome. This prophylaxis protocol is an efficient and cost-effective method for the prevention of significant events after surgery.

  12. College of American Pathologists' laboratory standards for next-generation sequencing clinical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Nazneen; Zhao, Qin; Bry, Lynn; Driscoll, Denise K; Funke, Birgit; Gibson, Jane S; Grody, Wayne W; Hegde, Madhuri R; Hoeltge, Gerald A; Leonard, Debra G B; Merker, Jason D; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Palicki, Linda A; Robetorye, Ryan S; Schrijver, Iris; Weck, Karen E; Voelkerding, Karl V

    2015-04-01

    The higher throughput and lower per-base cost of next-generation sequencing (NGS) as compared to Sanger sequencing has led to its rapid adoption in clinical testing. The number of laboratories offering NGS-based tests has also grown considerably in the past few years, despite the fact that specific Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988/College of American Pathologists (CAP) laboratory standards had not yet been developed to regulate this technology. To develop a checklist for clinical testing using NGS technology that sets standards for the analytic wet bench process and for bioinformatics or "dry bench" analyses. As NGS-based clinical tests are new to diagnostic testing and are of much greater complexity than traditional Sanger sequencing-based tests, there is an urgent need to develop new regulatory standards for laboratories offering these tests. To develop the necessary regulatory framework for NGS and to facilitate appropriate adoption of this technology for clinical testing, CAP formed a committee in 2011, the NGS Work Group, to deliberate upon the contents to be included in the checklist. Results . -A total of 18 laboratory accreditation checklist requirements for the analytic wet bench process and bioinformatics analysis processes have been included within CAP's molecular pathology checklist (MOL). This report describes the important issues considered by the CAP committee during the development of the new checklist requirements, which address documentation, validation, quality assurance, confirmatory testing, exception logs, monitoring of upgrades, variant interpretation and reporting, incidental findings, data storage, version traceability, and data transfer confidentiality.

  13. Certifying a university ENT clinic using the ISO 9001:2000 international standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, Matthias; Helbig, Silke; Kahla-Witzsch, Heike A; Kroll, Tobias; May, Angelika

    2010-01-01

    Against statutory duties to introduce quality management systems, the increased importance of this subject has led to numerous activities in various public health institutions. Following the International Standardization Organization (ISO 9001:2000) prerequisites, Frankfurt Goethe University Hospital ENT clinic staff introduced a quality management system. This paper aims to investigate this process. Designing, planning and implementing the quality management system is described. Under the supervision of an executive quality management board, clinic quality goals were defined. Thereafter, several quality management teams performed an actual state analysis as well as developing and realising improvement proposals. Finally a quality management manual containing binding standards and working instructions concerning all patient care, research and teaching aspects was written. Successful certification by a neutral body ascertained that the clinic's quality management system conformed to current national and international standards while restructuring and reform improved procedural efficiency. The paper shows that mplementing the quality management system requires considerable effort but patients as well as staff profit considerably from the innovation. On the whole, the positive impact on structure and workflow in a specialist clinic predominates. Therefore, implementing a quality management system in all the clinic's wards and departments is recommended.

  14. Brief strategic therapy for obsessive–compulsive disorder: a clinical and research protocol of a one-group observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrabissa, Giada; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Gibson, Padraic; Boardman, Donald; Gori, Alessio; Castelnuovo, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling psychopathology. The mainstay of treatment includes cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) and medication management. However, individual suffering, functional impairments as well as the direct and indirect costs associated with the disease remain substantial. New treatment programmes are necessary and the brief strategic therapy (BST) has recently shown encouraging results in clinical practice but no quantitative study has as yet been conducted. Methods and analysis The clinical effectiveness of the OCD-specific BST protocol will be evaluated in a one-group observational study. Participants will be sequentially recruited from a state community psychotherapy clinic in Dublin, Ireland. Outcome measures will be the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II). Data will be collected at baseline, at treatment termination and at 3 month follow-up. The statistical significance of the post-treatment effect will be assessed by the paired-sample Student t test, while clinical significance will be evaluated by means of the equivalence testing method, which will be also used to assess the maintenance of effect at follow-up. Ethics/dissemination The present study is approved by the Hesed House Ethics Board in Dublin. Findings will enhance the evidence-based knowledge about the clinical effectiveness of BST in treating OCD symptoms, prior to assessing its efficacy in a randomised and controlled clinical trial, and will be disseminated through publication in peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations. PMID:27013594

  15. A scheme for the audit of scientific and technological standards in clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.; Jarritt, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Audit is the process whereby the quality of a service is monitored and optimised. It forms an essential component of the quality assurance process, whether by self-assessment or by external peer review. In the UK the British Nuclear Medicine Society (BNMS) has undertaken external organisational audit of departments providing clinical nuclear medicine services. This work aimed to develop a more thorough and service specific process for the audit of scientific and technological standards in nuclear medicine. Materials and Methods: The audit process has been implemented using written audit documents to facilitate the audit procedure. A questionnaire forms part of the formal documentation for audit of the scientific and technical standards of a clinical service. Scientific and technical standards were derived from a number of sources including legal requirements, regulatory obligations, notes for guidance, peer reviewed publications and accepted good clinical practice (GCP). Results: The audit process graded the standards of an individual department according to legal or safety requirements (Grade A), good practice (Grade B) and desirable aspects of service delivery (Grade C). The standards have been allocated into eight main categories. These are: Instrumentation; Software and data protection; Electrical Safety; Mechanical Safety; Workstation Safety; The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH); Radiation Protection; Scientific and Technical staffing levels. During the audit visit a detailed inspection of clinical and laboratory areas and department written documentation is also necessary to validate the data obtained. Conclusion: The printed scheme now provides a means for external audit or self-assessment. There should be evidence of a well-organised and safe environment for both patients and staff. Health and Safety legislation requires written local rules and these records should be available to demonstrate the standard of service provision. Other

  16. The need for international standardization in clinical beta dosimetry for brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quast, U.; Boehm, J.; Kaulich, T.W.

    2002-01-01

    Beta radiation has found increasing interest in radiotherapy. Besides the curative treatment of small and medium-sized intraocular tumors by means of ophthalmic beta radiation plaques, intravascular brachytherapy has proven to successfully overcome the severe problem of restenosis after interventional treatment of arterial stenosis in coronaries and peripheral vessels in many clinical trials with a large number of patients. Prior to initiating procedures applying beta radiation in radiotherapy, however, there is a common need to specify methods for the determination and specification of the absorbed dose to water or tissue and their spatial distributions. The IAEA-TECDOC-1274 Calibration of photon and beta ray sources used in brachytherapy (2002) is a help for photon brachytherapy calibration. But, for beta seed and line sources, IAEA recommends well type ionization chambers as working standards which are far from measuring absorbed dose to water of the radiation clinically used. Although the application of such working standards seems to be more precise, large errors can occur when the medical physicist has to convert the calibration data to absorbed dose to water of the beta radiation emitted. The user must believe that the source is equally activated and that the manufacturer did not change the design and construction of the source encapsulation. With the DGMP Report 16 (2001) Guidelines for medical physical aspects of intravascular brachytherapy a very detailed code of practice is given, especially for the calibration and clinical dosimetry of intravascular beta radiation sources. As there is a global need for standardization in clinical dosimetry for intravascular brachytherapy utilizing beta radiation, the DIN-NAR, the German committee on standardization in radiology, task group dosimetry, has initiated an international adhoc working group for a new ISO work item proposal on the standardization of procedures in clinical dosimetry to guarantee reliable

  17. Participation of nurses in the execution of clinical research protocol about technological innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Patrícia Andreani Cabral

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVETo report the nurse's experience of inclusion in interdisciplinary clinical study about technological innovation, involving people with spinal cord injury.METHODDescriptive experience report. The empirical support was based on notes about perspectives and practice of clinical research, with a multi-professional nursing, physical education, physiotherapy and engineering staff.RESULTThe qualification includes the elaboration of the document for the Ethics Committee, familiarization among the members of staff and with the studied topic, and also an immersion into English. The nurse's knowledge gave support to the uptake of participants and time adequacy for data collection, preparation and assistance of the participants during the intervention and after collection. Nursing theories and processes have contributed to reveal risky diagnoses and the plan of care. It was the nurse's role to monitor the risk of overlapping methodological strictness to the human aspect. The skills for the clinical research must be the object of learning, including students in multidisciplinary researches.CONCLUSIONTo qualify the nurse for clinical research and to potentialize its caregiver essence, some changes are needed in the educational system, professional behavior, attitude and educational assistance.

  18. Exploring a New Simulation Approach to Improve Clinical Reasoning Teaching and Assessment: Randomized Trial Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennaforte, Thomas; Moussa, Ahmed; Loye, Nathalie; Charlin, Bernard; Audétat, Marie-Claude

    2016-02-17

    Helping trainees develop appropriate clinical reasoning abilities is a challenging goal in an environment where clinical situations are marked by high levels of complexity and unpredictability. The benefit of simulation-based education to assess clinical reasoning skills has rarely been reported. More specifically, it is unclear if clinical reasoning is better acquired if the instructor's input occurs entirely after or is integrated during the scenario. Based on educational principles of the dual-process theory of clinical reasoning, a new simulation approach called simulation with iterative discussions (SID) is introduced. The instructor interrupts the flow of the scenario at three key moments of the reasoning process (data gathering, integration, and confirmation). After each stop, the scenario is continued where it was interrupted. Finally, a brief general debriefing ends the session. System-1 process of clinical reasoning is assessed by verbalization during management of the case, and System-2 during the iterative discussions without providing feedback. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Simulation with Iterative Discussions versus the classical approach of simulation in developing reasoning skills of General Pediatrics and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine residents. This will be a prospective exploratory, randomized study conducted at Sainte-Justine hospital in Montreal, Qc, between January and March 2016. All post-graduate year (PGY) 1 to 6 residents will be invited to complete one SID or classical simulation 30 minutes audio video-recorded complex high-fidelity simulations covering a similar neonatology topic. Pre- and post-simulation questionnaires will be completed and a semistructured interview will be conducted after each simulation. Data analyses will use SPSS and NVivo softwares. This study is in its preliminary stages and the results are expected to be made available by April, 2016. This will be the first study to explore a new

  19. Exploring the clinically orientated roles of the general practice receptionist: a systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Burrows

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The receptionist is the focal point of the practice, undertaking an array of clinically orientated roles such as triaging patients for GP consultations or managing repeat prescribing. However, the full nature and extent of the receptionist’s clinical activities is unknown as are the implications for patients. The aim of the proposed review is to explore the nature of the receptionist’s clinical roles, their extent and their implications for patients. In doing so, we will highlight any gaps in the evidence base which future research may explore. Methods The databases Medline/PubMed, Ovid, Cinahl, ASSIA, Cochrane, EMBASE and Science Direct will be searched for relevant literature. We will look at both qualitative and quantitative research on GP receptionists, based within primary care to explore their roles within the primary care team, the clinically relevant roles they undertake, the extent of these roles and any implications these roles might have. No limits are placed on the date or place of publication; however, only research published in English will be included. Screening, quality assessments and data extraction will be carried out by two reviewers, who are not blinded to study characteristics. Analysis follows a four-stage method, established by Whittemore and Knafl (2005. Discussion The review will explore existing research covering the clinically orientated roles of the GP receptionist. The findings of the review will be important for healthcare professionals and academics working within primary healthcare. It will highlight and for the first time synthesise research relating to the complex and essential work of the GP receptionist. Our findings will inform the direction and focus of further research, as gaps in the knowledge base will be uncovered. Systematic review registration PROSPERO registration no: CRD42016048957 .

  20. Exploring the clinically orientated roles of the general practice receptionist: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Michael; Gale, Nicola; Greenfield, Sheila; Litchfield, Ian

    2017-10-23

    The receptionist is the focal point of the practice, undertaking an array of clinically orientated roles such as triaging patients for GP consultations or managing repeat prescribing. However, the full nature and extent of the receptionist's clinical activities is unknown as are the implications for patients. The aim of the proposed review is to explore the nature of the receptionist's clinical roles, their extent and their implications for patients. In doing so, we will highlight any gaps in the evidence base which future research may explore. The databases Medline/PubMed, Ovid, Cinahl, ASSIA, Cochrane, EMBASE and Science Direct will be searched for relevant literature. We will look at both qualitative and quantitative research on GP receptionists, based within primary care to explore their roles within the primary care team, the clinically relevant roles they undertake, the extent of these roles and any implications these roles might have. No limits are placed on the date or place of publication; however, only research published in English will be included. Screening, quality assessments and data extraction will be carried out by two reviewers, who are not blinded to study characteristics. Analysis follows a four-stage method, established by Whittemore and Knafl (2005). The review will explore existing research covering the clinically orientated roles of the GP receptionist. The findings of the review will be important for healthcare professionals and academics working within primary healthcare. It will highlight and for the first time synthesise research relating to the complex and essential work of the GP receptionist. Our findings will inform the direction and focus of further research, as gaps in the knowledge base will be uncovered. PROSPERO registration no: CRD42016048957 .

  1. Low-value clinical practices in injury care: a scoping review protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynne; Boukar, Khadidja Malloum; Tardif, Pier-Alexandre; Stelfox, Henry T; Champion, Howard; Cameron, Peter; Gabbe, Belinda; Yanchar, Natalie; kortbeek, John; Lauzier, François; Légaré, France; Archambault, Patrick; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Preventable injuries lead to 200 000 hospital stays, 60 000 disabilities, and 13 000 deaths per year in Canada with direct costs of $20 billion. Overall, potentially unnecessary medical interventions are estimated to consume up to 30% of healthcare resources and may expose patients to avoidable harm. However, little is known about overuse for acute injury care. We aim to identify low-value clinical practices in injury care. Methods and analysis We will perform a scoping review of peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed literature to identify research articles, reviews, recommendations and guidelines that identify at least one low-value clinical practice specific to injury populations. We will search Medline, EMBASE, COCHRANE central, and BIOSIS/Web of Knowledge databases, websites of government agencies, professional societies and patient advocacy organisations, thesis holdings and conference proceedings. Pairs of independent reviewers will evaluate studies for eligibility and extract data from included articles using a prepiloted and standardised electronic data abstraction form. Low-value clinical practices will be categorised using an extension of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality conceptual framework and data will be presented using narrative synthesis. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required as original data will not be collected. This study will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal, international scientific meetings, and to knowledge users through clinical and healthcare quality associations. This review will contribute new knowledge on low-value clinical practices in acute injury care. Our results will support the development indicators to measure resource overuse and inform policy makers on potential targets for deadoption in injury care. PMID:28706101

  2. SCISSOR-Spinal Cord Injury Study on Small molecule-derived Rho inhibition: a clinical study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Marcel A; Liebscher, Thomas; Watzlawick, Ralf; Martus, Peter; Laufer, Stefan; Blex, Christian; Schindler, Ralf; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J; Knüppel, Sven; Kreutzträger, Martin; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Niedeggen, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-07-26

    The approved analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and indometacin block the small GTPase RhoA, a key enzyme that impedes axonal sprouting after axonal damage. Inhibition of the Rho pathway in a central nervous system-effective manner requires higher dosages compared with orthodox cyclooxygenase-blocking effects. Preclinical studies on spinal cord injury (SCI) imply improved motor recovery after ibuprofen/indometacin-mediated Rho inhibition. This has been reassessed by a meta-analysis of the underlying experimental evidence, which indicates an overall effect size of 20.2% regarding motor outcome achieved after ibuprofen/indometacin treatment compared with vehicle controls. In addition, ibuprofen/indometacin may also limit sickness behaviour, non-neurogenic systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), neuropathic pain and heterotopic ossifications after SCI. Consequently, 'small molecule'-mediated Rho inhibition after acute SCI warrants clinical investigation. Protocol of an investigator-initiated clinical open-label pilot trial on high-dose ibuprofen treatment after acute traumatic, motor-complete SCI. A sample of n=12 patients will be enrolled in two cohorts treated with 2400 mg/day ibuprofen for 4 or 12 weeks, respectively. The primary safety end point is an occurrence of serious adverse events, primarily gastroduodenal bleedings. Secondary end points are pharmacokinetics, feasibility and preliminary effects on neurological recovery, neuropathic pain and heterotopic ossifications. The primary safety analysis is based on the incidence of severe gastrointestinal bleedings. Additional analyses will be mainly descriptive and casuistic. The clinical trial protocol was approved by the responsible German state Ethics Board, and the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices. The study complies with the Declaration of Helsinki, the principles of Good Clinical Practice and all further applicable regulations. This safety and pharmacokinetics trial

  3. SCISSOR—Spinal Cord Injury Study on Small molecule-derived Rho inhibition: a clinical study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Marcel A; Liebscher, Thomas; Watzlawick, Ralf; Martus, Peter; Laufer, Stefan; Blex, Christian; Schindler, Ralf; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J; Knüppel, Sven; Kreutzträger, Martin; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Niedeggen, Andreas; Schwab, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The approved analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and indometacin block the small GTPase RhoA, a key enzyme that impedes axonal sprouting after axonal damage. Inhibition of the Rho pathway in a central nervous system-effective manner requires higher dosages compared with orthodox cyclooxygenase-blocking effects. Preclinical studies on spinal cord injury (SCI) imply improved motor recovery after ibuprofen/indometacin-mediated Rho inhibition. This has been reassessed by a meta-analysis of the underlying experimental evidence, which indicates an overall effect size of 20.2% regarding motor outcome achieved after ibuprofen/indometacin treatment compared with vehicle controls. In addition, ibuprofen/indometacin may also limit sickness behaviour, non-neurogenic systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), neuropathic pain and heterotopic ossifications after SCI. Consequently, ‘small molecule’-mediated Rho inhibition after acute SCI warrants clinical investigation. Methods and analysis Protocol of an investigator-initiated clinical open-label pilot trial on high-dose ibuprofen treatment after acute traumatic, motor-complete SCI. A sample of n=12 patients will be enrolled in two cohorts treated with 2400 mg/day ibuprofen for 4 or 12 weeks, respectively. The primary safety end point is an occurrence of serious adverse events, primarily gastroduodenal bleedings. Secondary end points are pharmacokinetics, feasibility and preliminary effects on neurological recovery, neuropathic pain and heterotopic ossifications. The primary safety analysis is based on the incidence of severe gastrointestinal bleedings. Additional analyses will be mainly descriptive and casuistic. Ethics and dissemination The clinical trial protocol was approved by the responsible German state Ethics Board, and the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices. The study complies with the Declaration of Helsinki, the principles of Good Clinical Practice and all further

  4. The utilization of Clinical Protocols and Therapeutic Guidelines and the rationalization of judicialization for the right to health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Seixas Duarte

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the adoption of the Clinical Protocols and Therapeutic Guidelines (CPTGs as an objective measure to be used by the courts in cases where the purpose is to offer positive benefits in terms of realization of the right to health. Such a benchmark can assist the judge in the task of deciding the legal situation of medication supplies, guaranteeing the prevalence of rationality as outlined in the formulation of related public policies and, consequently, the use of technical-political arguments in the distribution of healthcare goods and resources. However, this is not an absolute parameter, and the content of the CPTGs may be questioned, even judicially. With this, judicial action is used as an instrument of democratization and social control among public choices, which can impact health policy itself.

  5. Implant Mandibular Overdentures Retained by Immediately Loaded Implants: A 1-Year Randomized Trial Comparing the Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes Between Mini Dental Implants and Standard-Sized Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygogiannis, Kostas; Aartman, Irene Ha; Parsa, Azin; Tahmaseb, Ali; Wismeijer, Daniel

    The aim of this 1-year randomized trial was to evaluate and compare the clinical and radiographic performance of four immediately loaded mini dental implants (MDIs) and two immediately loaded standard-sized tissue-level (STL) implants, placed in the interforaminal region of the mandible and used to retain mandibular overdentures (IODs) in completely edentulous patients. A total of 50 completely edentulous patients wearing conventional maxillary dentures and complaining about insufficient retention of their mandibular dentures were divided into two groups; 25 patients received four MDIs and 25 patients received two STL implants. The marginal bone loss (MBL) at the mesial and distal sides of each implant was assessed by means of standardized intraoral radiographs after a period of 1 year. Implant success and survival rates were also calculated. Immediate loading was possible for all patients in the first group. In the second group, an immediate loading protocol could not be applied for 10 patients. These patients were treated with a delayed loading protocol. A mean MBL of 0.42 ± 0.56 mm for the MDIs and 0.54 ± 0.49 mm for the immediately loaded STL implants was recorded at the end of the evaluation period. There was no statistically significant difference between the MDIs and the immediately loaded STL implants. Two MDIs failed, resulting in a survival rate of 98%. The success rate was 91%. For the immediately loaded conventional implants, the survival rate was 100% and the success rate 96.7% after 1 year of function. However, in 10 patients, the immediate loading protocol could not be followed. Considering the limitations of this short-term clinical study, immediate loading of four unsplinted MDIs or two splinted STL implants to retain mandibular overdentures seems to be a feasible treatment option. The marginal bone level changes around the MDIs were well within the clinically acceptable range.

  6. The modified 2VO ischemia protocol causes cognitive impairment similar to that induced by the standard method, but with a better survival rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cechetti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (2VO in the rat has been established as a valid experimental model to investigate the effects of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion on cognitive function and neurodegenerative processes. Our aim was to compare the cognitive and morphological outcomes following the standard 2VO procedure, in which there is concomitant artery ligation, with those of a modified protocol, with a 1-week interval between artery occlusions to avoid an abrupt reduction of cerebral blood flow, as assessed by animal performance in the water maze and damage extension to the hippocampus and striatum. Male Wistar rats (N = 47 aged 3 months were subjected to chronic hypoperfusion by permanent bilateral ligation of the common carotid arteries using either the standard or the modified protocol, with the right carotid being the first to be occluded. Three months after the surgical procedure, rat performance in the water maze was assessed to investigate long-term effects on spatial learning and memory and their brains were processed in order to estimate hippocampal volume and striatal area. Both groups of hypoperfused rats showed deficits in reference (F(8,172 = 7.0951, P < 0.00001 and working spatial memory [2nd (F(2,44 = 7.6884, P < 0.001, 3rd (F(2,44 = 21.481, P < 0.00001 and 4th trials (F(2,44 = 28.620, P < 0.0001]; however, no evidence of tissue atrophy was found in the brain structures studied. Despite similar behavioral and morphological outcomes, the rats submitted to the modified protocol showed a significant increase in survival rate, during the 3 months of the experiment (P < 0.02.

  7. Standardizing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D data from four Nordic population samples using the Vitamin D Standardization Program protocols: Shedding new light on vitamin D status in Nordic individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the distributions of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations in representative population samples is critical for the quantification of vitamin D deficiency as well as for setting dietary reference values and food-based strategies for its prevention. Such data for the E...... standardization. In conclusion, standardization of serum 25(OH)D concentrations is absolutely necessary in order to compare serum 25(OH)D concentrations across different study populations, which is needed to quantify and prevent vitamin D deficiency.......Knowledge about the distributions of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations in representative population samples is critical for the quantification of vitamin D deficiency as well as for setting dietary reference values and food-based strategies for its prevention. Such data...... for the European Union are of variable quality making it difficult to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency across member states. As a consequence of the widespread, method-related differences in measurements of serum 25(OH)D concentrations, the Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) developed...

  8. Dependency of image quality on acquisition protocol and image processing in chest tomosynthesis-a visual grading study based on clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadidi, Masoud; Båth, Magnus; Nyrén, Sven

    2018-04-09

    To compare the quality of images obtained with two different protocols with different acquisition time and the influence from image post processing in a chest digital tomosynthesis (DTS) system. 20 patients with suspected lung cancer were imaged with a chest X-ray equipment with tomosynthesis option. Two examination protocols with different acquisition times (6.3 and 12 s) were performed on each patient. Both protocols were presented with two different image post-processing (standard DTS processing and more advanced processing optimised for chest radiography). Thus, 4 series from each patient, altogether 80 series, were presented anonymously and in a random order. Five observers rated the quality of the reconstructed section images according to predefined quality criteria in three different classes. Visual grading characteristics (VGC) was used to analyse the data and the area under the VGC curve (AUC VGC ) was used as figure-of-merit. The 12 s protocol and the standard DTS processing were used as references in the analyses. The protocol with 6.3 s acquisition time had a statistically significant advantage over the vendor-recommended protocol with 12 s acquisition time for the classes of criteria, Demarcation (AUC VGC = 0.56, p = 0.009) and Disturbance (AUC VGC = 0.58, p image processing, the VGC analysis showed a small but statistically significant advantage for the standard DTS processing over the more advanced processing for the classes of criteria Demarcation (AUC VGC = 0.45, p = 0.017) and Disturbance (AUC VGC = 0.43, p = 0.005). A similar value of AUC VGC was found also for the class Structure (0.46), but it could not be statistically separated from 0.5 (p = 0.31). The study indicates that the protocol with 6.3 s acquisition time yields slightly better image quality than the vender-recommended protocol with acquisition time 12 s for several anatomical structures. Furthermore, the standard gradation processing  (the vendor-recommended post

  9. Yoga for Health Care in Korea: A Protocol for Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiae Choi

    2016-08-01

    Sixteen electronic databases will be searched from the inception of the study until January 2016. All clinical evidences that evaluate any type of yoga and any type of control in individuals with any type of condition will be eligible. The methodological quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized clinical trials and the Newcastle–Ottawa scale for nonrandomized studies. Two authors will independently assess each study for eligibility and the risk of bias, and then they will extract the data. With its extensive, unbiased search of the Korean literature from various databases without any language restrictions, this systematic review will be useful for both practitioners in the field of yoga research as well as for patients.

  10. The Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT): protocol for a cluster randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie, Wilma S.; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; Hollingsworth, Kieren G.; Adamson, Ashley; Sniehotta, Falko F.; McCombie, Louise; Brosnahan, Naomi; Ross, Hazel; Mathers, John C.; Peters, Carl; Thom, George; Barnes, Alison; Kean, Sharon; McIlvenna, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite improving evidence-based practice following clinical guidelines to optimise drug therapy, Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) still exerts a devastating toll from vascular complications and premature death. Biochemical remission of T2DM has been demonstrated with weight loss around 15kg following bariatric surgery and in several small studies of non-surgical energy-restriction treatments. The non-surgical Counterweight-Plus programme, running in Primary Care where obesity and T2DM are r...

  11. Development of Acupuncture and Moxibustion Protocol in a Clinical Trial for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasi, Joyce K.; Capili, Bernadette; Chang, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine encompasses many different practices, most notably acupuncture and moxibustion. Traditionally, these modalities are used in combination to augment treatment but seldom are they tested together in clinical studies. Numerous acupuncture studies have been conducted in Asia, Europe, and the United States but there have been few randomized controlled trials utilizing moxibustion outside of East Asia. Limited studies have described the use of a moxibustion control or pl...

  12. Methods for objectively assessing clinical masticatory performance: protocol for a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Elgestad Stjernfeldt, Per; W?rdh, Inger; Trulsson, Mats; Fax?n Irving, Gerd; Bostr?m, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background Chewing and masticatory function constitutes one of the most important oral health factors that affect quality of life, especially in older individuals. Little consensus currently exists regarding ways to objectively assess clinical masticatory performance (in this context, performance refers an individual?s objective ability to mix or comminute food bolus). That said, many methods were developed to assess masticatory performance. Consequently, systematic review of the literature w...

  13. Protocolized versus non-protocolized weaning for reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill adult patients (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    Blackwood, Bronagh; Alderdice, Fiona; Burns, Karen EA; Cardwell, Chris R; Lavery, Gavin; O'Halloran, Peter

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reducing weaning time is desirable in minimizing potential complications from mechanical ventilation. Standardized weaning protocols are purported to reduce time spent on mechanical ventilation. However, evidence supporting their use in clinical practice is inconsistent. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of protocolized weaning from mechanical ventilation on the total duration of mechanical ventilation for critically ill adults; ascertain differences between protocolized and non-p...

  14. Concordance of mutation detection in circulating tumor DNA in early clinical trials using different blood collection protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B.; Madsen, Mette; Jonson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    in a clinical setting. Here we investigate the concordance between standard blood collection for molecular analysis using immediate separation of plasma, compared to the use of collection tubes allowing for delayed processing. Methods: In this study, we measured the fractional abundance of tumor specific...... patients with advanced solid cancers enrolled in early clinical trials. Results: Concordance in the fractional abundance of mutations in ctDNA isolated from blood collected in either K3EDTA or BCT tubes from patients with different solid cancers was observed. Conclusions: This study indicates that BCT...... mutations (BRAF p.V600E and PIK3CA p.H1047R) in ctDNA isolated from blood samples collected in either cell-stabilizing Cell-Free DNA BCT tubes (delayed processing within 72 hours) or standard K3EDTA tubes (immediate processing within 15 minutes). Twenty-five blood sample pairs (EDTA/BCT) were collected from...

  15. Clinical grade purification and expansion of NK cell products for an optimized manufacturing protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eKoehl

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic Natural Killer (NK cells are used for adoptive immunotherapy after stem cell transplantation. In order to overcome technical limitations in NK cell purification and activation, the following study investigates the impact of different variables on NK cell recovery, cytotoxicity and T cell depletion during GMP-grade NK cell selection. 40 NK cell products were derived from 54 unstimulated donor leukaphereses using immunomagnetic CD3 T-cell depletion, followed by a CD56 cell enrichment step. For T cell depletion, either the depletion 2.1 program in single or double procedure (D2.1 1depl, n=18; D2.1 2depl, n=13 or the faster depletion 3.1 (D3.1, n=9 was used on the CliniMACS instrument. 17 purified NK cell products were activated in vitro by IL-2 for 12 days. The whole process resulted in a median number of 7.59x10e8 CD56+CD3- cells with both purity and viability of 94%, respectively. The T-cell depletion was significantly better using D2.1 1depl/2depl compared to D3.1 (log 4.6/log 4.9 vs. log 3.7; p<0.01 and double procedure in two stages led always to residual T cells below 0.1%. In contrast D3.1 was superior to D2.1 1depl/2depl with regard to recovery of CD56+CD3- NK cells (68% vs 41%/38%. Concomitant monocytes and especially IL-2 activation led to increased NK cell activity against malignant target cells compared to unstimulated NK cells, which correlated with both up-regulation of natural cytotoxicity receptors and intracellular signaling. Overall, wide variations in the NK cell expansion rate and the distribution of NK cell subpopulations were found. In conclusion, our results indicate that GMP-grade purification of NK cells might be improved by a sequential processing of T cell depletion program D2.1 and D3.1. In addition NK cell expansion protocols need to be further optimized.

  16. A standardized SOA for clinical data interchange in a cardiac telemonitoring environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzarata, Roberta; Vergari, Fabio; Cinotti, Tullio Salmon; Giacomini, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Care of chronic cardiac patients requires information interchange between patients' homes, clinical environments, and the electronic health record. Standards are emerging to support clinical information collection, exchange and management and to overcome information fragmentation and actors delocalization. Heterogeneity of information sources at patients' homes calls for open solutions to collect and accommodate multidomain information, including environmental data. Based on the experience gained in a European Research Program, this paper presents an integrated and open approach for clinical data interchange in cardiac telemonitoring applications. This interchange is supported by the use of standards following the indications provided by the national authorities of the countries involved. Taking into account the requirements provided by the medical staff involved in the project, the authors designed and implemented a prototypal middleware, based on a service-oriented architecture approach, to give a structured and robust tool to congestive heart failure patients for their personalized telemonitoring. The middleware is represented by a health record management service, whose interface is compliant to the healthcare services specification project Retrieve, Locate and Update Service standard (Level 0), which allows communication between the agents involved through the exchange of Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 documents. Three performance tests were carried out and showed that the prototype completely fulfilled all requirements indicated by the medical staff; however, certain aspects, such as authentication, security and scalability, should be deeply analyzed within a future engineering phase.

  17. Study of Optimal Replacement of Thyroxine in the ElDerly (SORTED): protocol for a mixed methods feasibility study to assess the clinical utility of lower dose thyroxine in elderly hypothyroid patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Scott; Pearce, Simon; Ryan, Vicky; Rapley, Tim; Ingoe, Lorna; Razvi, Salman

    2013-03-22

    The population of the UK is ageing. There is compelling evidence that thyroid stimulating hormone distribution levels increase with age. Currently, in UK clinical practice elderly hypothyroid patients are treated with levothyroxine to lower their thyroid stimulating hormone levels to a standard non-age-related range. Evidence suggests that mortality is negatively associated with thyroid stimulating hormone levels. We report the protocol of a feasibility study working towards a full-scale randomized controlled trial to test whether lower dose levothyroxine has beneficial cardiovascular outcomes in the oldest old. SORTED is a mixed methods study with three components: SORTED A: A feasibility study of a dual-center single-blinded randomized controlled trial of elderly hypothyroid patients currently treated with levothyroxine. Patients will be recruited from 20 general practices and two hospital trust endocrine units in Northumberland, Tyne and Wear. Target recruitment of 50 elderly hypothyroid patients currently treated with levothyroxine, identified in both primary and secondary care settings. Reduced dose of levothyroxine to achieve an elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone (target range 4.1 to 8.0 mU/L) versus standard levothyroxine replacement (target range 0.4 to 4.0 mU/L). Using random permuted blocks, in a ratio of 1:1, randomization will be carried out by Newcastle Clinical Trials Unit. Study feasibility (recruitment and retention rates and medication compliance), acceptability of the trial design, assessment of mobility and falls risk, and change in cardiovascular risk factors. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews to understand patients' willingness to take part in a randomized controlled trial and participants' experience of the intervention. Retrospective cohort study of 400 treated hypothyroid patients aged 80 years or over registered in 2008 in primary care practices, studying their 4-year cardiovascular outcomes to inform the power of SORTED

  18. Postimplant Dosimetry Using a Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Engine: A New Clinical Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier, Jean-Francois; D'Amours, Michel; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte; Martin, Andre-Guy; Vigneault, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To use the Monte Carlo (MC) method as a dose calculation engine for postimplant dosimetry. To compare the results with clinically approved data for a sample of 28 patients. Two effects not taken into account by the clinical calculation, interseed attenuation and tissue composition, are being specifically investigated. Methods and Materials: An automated MC program was developed. The dose distributions were calculated for the target volume and organs at risk (OAR) for 28 patients. Additional MC techniques were developed to focus specifically on the interseed attenuation and tissue effects. Results: For the clinical target volume (CTV) D 90 parameter, the mean difference between the clinical technique and the complete MC method is 10.7 Gy, with cases reaching up to 17 Gy. For all cases, the clinical technique overestimates the deposited dose in the CTV. This overestimation is mainly from a combination of two effects: the interseed attenuation (average, 6.8 Gy) and tissue composition (average, 4.1 Gy). The deposited dose in the OARs is also overestimated in the clinical calculation. Conclusions: The clinical technique systematically overestimates the deposited dose in the prostate and in the OARs. To reduce this systematic inaccuracy, the MC method should be considered in establishing a new standard for clinical postimplant dosimetry and dose-outcome studies in a near future

  19. Validity Evidence and Scoring Guidelines for Standardized Patient Encounters and Patient Notes From a Multisite Study of Clinical Performance Examinations in Seven Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon Soo; Hyderi, Abbas; Heine, Nancy; May, Win; Nevins, Andrew; Lee, Ming; Bordage, Georges; Yudkowsky, Rachel

    2017-11-01

    To examine validity evidence of local graduation competency examination scores from seven medical schools using shared cases and to provide rater training protocols and guidelines for scoring patient notes (PNs). Between May and August 2016, clinical cases were developed, shared, and administered across seven medical schools (990 students participated). Raters were calibrated using training protocols, and guidelines were developed collaboratively across sites to standardize scoring. Data included scores from standardized patient encounters for history taking, physical examination, and PNs. Descriptive statistics were used to examine scores from the different assessment components. Generalizability studies (G-studies) using variance components were conducted to estimate reliability for composite scores. Validity evidence was collected for response process (rater perception), internal structure (variance components, reliability), relations to other variables (interassessment correlations), and consequences (composite score). Student performance varied by case and task. In the PNs, justification of differential diagnosis was the most discriminating task. G-studies showed that schools accounted for less than 1% of total variance; however, for the PNs, there were differences in scores for varying cases and tasks across schools, indicating a school effect. Composite score reliability was maximized when the PN was weighted between 30% and 40%. Raters preferred using case-specific scoring guidelines with clear point-scoring systems. This multisite study presents validity evidence for PN scores based on scoring rubric and case-specific scoring guidelines that offer rigor and feedback for learners. Variability in PN scores across participating sites may signal different approaches to teaching clinical reasoning among medical schools.

  20. Standard requirements for GCP-compliant data management in multinational clinical trials

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ohmann, Christian

    2011-03-22

    Abstract Background A recent survey has shown that data management in clinical trials performed by academic trial units still faces many difficulties (e.g. heterogeneity of software products, deficits in quality management, limited human and financial resources and the complexity of running a local computer centre). Unfortunately, no specific, practical and open standard for both GCP-compliant data management and the underlying IT-infrastructure is available to improve the situation. For that reason the "Working Group on Data Centres" of the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) has developed a standard specifying the requirements for high quality GCP-compliant data management in multinational clinical trials. Methods International, European and national regulations and guidelines relevant to GCP, data security and IT infrastructures, as well as ECRIN documents produced previously, were evaluated to provide a starting point for the development of standard requirements. The requirements were produced by expert consensus of the ECRIN Working group on Data Centres, using a structured and standardised process. The requirements were divided into two main parts: an IT part covering standards for the underlying IT infrastructure and computer systems in general, and a Data Management (DM) part covering requirements for data management applications in clinical trials. Results The standard developed includes 115 IT requirements, split into 15 separate sections, 107 DM requirements (in 12 sections) and 13 other requirements (2 sections). Sections IT01 to IT05 deal with the basic IT infrastructure while IT06 and IT07 cover validation and local software development. IT08 to IT015 concern the aspects of IT systems that directly support clinical trial management. Sections DM01 to DM03 cover the implementation of a specific clinical data management application, i.e. for a specific trial, whilst DM04 to DM12 address the data management of trials across the unit

  1. Alzheimer’s disease multiple intervention trial (ADMIT: study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callahan Christopher M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the current lack of disease-modifying therapies, it is important to explore new models of longitudinal care for older adults with dementia that focus on improving quality of life and delaying functional decline. In a previous clinical trial, we demonstrated that collaborative care for Alzheimer’s disease reduces patients’ neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as caregiver stress. However, these improvements in quality of life were not associated with delays in subjects’ functional decline. Trial design Parallel randomized controlled clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Participants A total of 180 community-dwelling patients aged ≥45 years who are diagnosed with possible or probable Alzheimer’s disease; subjects must also have a caregiver willing to participate in the study and be willing to accept home visits. Subjects and their caregivers are enrolled from the primary care and geriatric medicine practices of an urban public health system serving Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Interventions All patients receive best practices primary care including collaborative care by a dementia care manager over two years; this best practices primary care program represents the local adaptation and implementation of our prior collaborative care intervention in the urban public health system. Intervention patients also receive in-home occupational therapy delivered in twenty-four sessions over two years in addition to best practices primary care. The focus of the occupational therapy intervention is delaying functional decline and helping both subjects and caregivers adapt to functional impairments. The in-home sessions are tailored to the specific needs and goals of each patient-caregiver dyad; these needs are expected to change over the course of the study. Objective To determine whether best practices primary care plus home-based occupational therapy delays functional decline among patients with Alzheimer’s disease compared

  2. Development and reproducibility evaluation of a Monte Carlo-based standard LINAC model for quality assurance of multi-institutional clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Muhammad Nauman; Takegawa, Hideki; Takashina, Masaaki; Numasaki, Hodaka; Suga, Masaki; Anetai, Yusuke; Kurosu, Keita; Koizumi, Masahiko; Teshima, Teruki

    2014-11-01

    Technical developments in radiotherapy (RT) have created a need for systematic quality assurance (QA) to ensure that clinical institutions deliver prescribed radiation doses consistent with the requirements of clinical protocols. For QA, an ideal dose verification system should be independent of the treatment-planning system (TPS). This paper describes the development and reproducibility evaluation of a Monte Carlo (MC)-based standard LINAC model as a preliminary requirement for independent verification of dose distributions. The BEAMnrc MC code is used for characterization of the 6-, 10- and 15-MV photon beams for a wide range of field sizes. The modeling of the LINAC head components is based on the specifications provided by the manufacturer. MC dose distributions are tuned to match Varian Golden Beam Data (GBD). For reproducibility evaluation, calculated beam data is compared with beam data measured at individual institutions. For all energies and field sizes, the MC and GBD agreed to within 1.0% for percentage depth doses (PDDs), 1.5% for beam profiles and 1.2% for total scatter factors (Scps.). Reproducibility evaluation showed that the maximum average local differences were 1.3% and 2.5% for PDDs and beam profiles, respectively. MC and institutions' mean Scps agreed to within 2.0%. An MC-based standard LINAC model developed to independently verify dose distributions for QA of multi-institutional clinical trials and routine clinical practice has proven to be highly accurate and reproducible and can thus help ensure that prescribed doses delivered are consistent with the requirements of clinical protocols. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  3. Performance Comparison of Wireless Sensor Network Standard Protocols in an Aerospace Environment: ISA100.11a and ZigBee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Raymond S.; Barton, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) can provide a substantial benefit in spacecraft systems, reducing launch weight and providing unprecedented flexibility by allowing instrumentation capabilities to grow and change over time. Achieving data transport reliability on par with that of wired systems, however, can prove extremely challenging in practice. Fortunately, much progress has been made in developing standard WSN radio protocols for applications from non-critical home automation to mission-critical industrial process control. The relative performances of candidate protocols must be compared in representative aerospace environments, however, to determine their suitability for spaceflight applications. In this paper, we will present the results of a rigorous laboratory analysis of the performance of two standards-based, low power, low data rate WSN protocols: ZigBee Pro and ISA100.11a. Both are based on IEEE 802.15.4 and augment that standard's specifications to build complete, multi-hop networking stacks. ZigBee Pro targets primarily the home and office automation markets, providing an ad-hoc protocol that is computationally lightweight and easy to implement in inexpensive system-on-a-chip components. As a result of this simplicity, however, ZigBee Pro can be susceptible to radio frequency (RF) interference. ISA100.11a, on the other hand, targets the industrial process control market, providing a robust, centrally-managed protocol capable of tolerating a significant amount of RF interference. To achieve these gains, a coordinated channel hopping mechanism is employed, which entails a greater computational complexity than ZigBee and requires more sophisticated and costly hardware. To guide future aerospace deployments, we must understand how well these standards relatively perform in analog environments under expected operating conditions. Specifically, we are interested in evaluating goodput -- application level throughput -- in a representative crewed environment

  4. Study of the behavior of radiation detectors for mammography in standard beams using a clinical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreira, Jacqueline Sales

    2014-01-01

    A mammogram is the x-ray of the breast that allows early detection of cancer, by being able to show lesions in very small early stage. But to get an early and reliable diagnosis is necessary that the mammography unit is calibrated and working properly, otherwise there may be a loss in image produced, may lead to a false diagnosis, and possible harm to the patient. So it is important to control these devices, especially in relation to the radiation produced by them. In this project, we propose a study of the behavior of ionization chambers for mammography calibrated beam patterns in a clinical system (Philips-VMI mammography, Graph Mammo AF, which operates a range of 20 to 35 kV) from Instruments Calibration Laboratory at IPEN-CNEN/SP, with the aim of determining parameters correction approaching conditions calibration conditions for clinical use. Measurements of the parameters of the beams set in mammography using simulators acrylic specially developed for these measurements were performed in order to establish a new protocol for calibration of the ionization chambers in a clinical system rather than the industrial system, or as a complement to this. (author)

  5. Development and validation of an internationally-standardized, high-resolution capillary gel-based electrophoresis PCR-ribotyping protocol for Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren N Fawley

    Full Text Available PCR-ribotyping has been adopted in many laboratories as the method of choice for C. difficile typing and surveillance. However, issues with the conventional agarose gel-based technique, including inter-laboratory variation and interpretation of banding patterns have impeded progress. The method has recently been adapted to incorporate high-resolution capillary gel-based electrophoresis (CE-ribotyping, so improving discrimination, accuracy and reproducibility. However, reports to date have all represented single-centre studies and inter-laboratory variability has not been formally measured or assessed. Here, we achieved in a multi-centre setting a high level of reproducibility, accuracy and portability associated with a consensus CE-ribotyping protocol. Local databases were built at four participating laboratories using a distributed set of 70 known PCR-ribotypes. A panel of 50 isolates and 60 electronic profiles (blinded and randomized were distributed to each testing centre for PCR-ribotype identification based on local databases generated using the standard set of 70 PCR-ribotypes, and the performance of the consensus protocol assessed. A maximum standard deviation of only ±3.8bp was recorded in individual fragment sizes, and PCR-ribotypes from 98.2% of anonymised strains were successfully discriminated across four ribotyping centres spanning Europe and North America (98.8% after analysing discrepancies. Consensus CE-ribotyping increases comparability of typing data between centres and thereby facilitates the rapid and accurate transfer of standardized typing data to support future national and international C. difficile surveillance programs.

  6. Establishing a clinical phenotype for cachexia in end stage kidney disease - study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Joanne; Noble, Helen R; Adamson, Gary; Davenport, Andrew; Farrington, Ken; Fouque, Denis; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Mallett, John; McKeaveney, C; Porter, S; Seres, David S; Shields, Joanne; Slee, Adrian; Witham, Miles D; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2018-02-13

    Surveys using traditional measures of nutritional status indicate that muscle wasting is common among persons with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Up to 75% of adults undergoing maintenance dialysis show some evidence of muscle wasting. ESKD is associated with an increase in inflammatory cytokines and can result in cachexia, with the loss of muscle and fat stores. At present, only limited data are available on the classification of wasting experienced by persons with ESKD. Individuals with ESKD often exhibit symptoms of anorexia, loss of lean muscle mass and altered energy expenditure. These symptoms are consistent with the syndrome of cachexia observed in other chronic diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. While definitions of cachexia have been developed for some diseases, such as cardiac failure and cancer, no specific cachexia definition has been established for chronic kidney disease. The importance of developing a definition of cachexia in a population with ESKD is underscored by the negative impact that symptoms of cachexia have on quality of life and the association of cachexia with a substantially increased risk of premature mortality. The aim of this study is to determine the clinical phenotype of cachexia specific to individuals with ESKD. A longitudinal study which will recruit adult patients with ESKD receiving haemodialysis attending a Regional Nephrology Unit within the United Kingdom. Patients will be followed 2 monthly over 12 months and measurements of weight; lean muscle mass (bioelectrical impedance, mid upper arm muscle circumference and tricep skin fold thickness); muscle strength (hand held dynamometer), fatigue, anorexia and quality of life collected. We will determine if they experience (and to what degree) the known characteristics associated with cachexia. Cachexia is a debilitating condition associated with an extremely poor outcome. Definitions of cachexia in chronic illnesses are required

  7. Efficacy and safety of a booster dose of influenza vaccination in solid organ transplant recipients, TRANSGRIPE 1-2: study protocol for a multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Rosso-Fernández, Clara; Roca, Cristina; Aydillo, Teresa A; Gavaldà, Joan; Moreno, Asunción; Montejo, Jose M; Torre-Cisneros, Julian; Fariñas, M Carmen; Fortun, Jesus; Sabé, Nuria; Muñoz, Patricia; Blanes-Julia, Marino; Suárez-Benjumea, Alejandro; López-Medrano, Francisco; Pérez-Romero, Pilar; Cordero, Elisa

    2014-08-28

    Despite administration of annual influenza vaccination, influenza-associated complications in transplant recipients continue to be an important cause of hospitalization and death. Although influenza vaccination has been proven to be the most effective measure to reduce influenza infection after transplantation, transplant recipients are still vulnerable to influenza infections, with lower serological responses to vaccination compared to the general population. In order to assess the efficacy and safety of an alternative immunization scheme for solid organ transplant recipients, the TRANSGRIPE1-2 Study Group aimed to test a booster dose administration 5 weeks after the standard vaccination. The primary objective of this trial was to compare short-term and long-term neutralizing antibody immunogenicity of a booster dose of influenza vaccination to the standard single-dose immunization scheme. Secondary objectives included the evaluation of the efficacy and/or safety, cellular immune response, incidence of influenza infection, graft rejection, retransplant and mortality rates. This phase III, randomized, controlled, open-label clinical trial was conducted between October 2012 and December 2013 in 12 Spanish public referral hospitals. Solid organ transplant recipients (liver, kidney, heart or lung), older than 16 years of age more than 30 days after transplantation were eligible to participate. Patients (N = 514) were stratified 1:1 by center, type of organ and time after transplantation and who either received the standard single dose (n = 257) or were treated according to a novel influenza vaccination schedule comprising the administration of a booster dose 5 weeks after standard vaccination (n = 254). Seroconversion rates were measured as a determinant of protection against influenza (main outcome). Efficacy and safety outcomes were followed until 1 year after influenza vaccination with assessment of short-term (0, 5, 10 and 15 weeks) and long-term (12 months

  8. Influence of societal and practice contexts on health professionals’ clinical reasoning: a scoping study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Annie; Levasseur, Mélanie; Freeman, Andrew; Mullins, Gary; Quénec'hdu, Suzanne; Lalonde, Louise; Gagnon, Michaël; Lacasse, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In a context of constrained resources, the efficacy of interventions is a pivotal aim of healthcare systems worldwide. Efficacy of healthcare interventions is highly compromised if clinical reasoning (CR), the process that practitioners use to plan, direct, perform and reflect on client care, is not optimal. The CR process of health professionals is influenced by the institutional dimension (ie, legal, regulatory, administrative and organisational aspects) of their societal and practice contexts. Although several studies have been conducted with respect to the institutional dimension influencing health professionals’ CR, no clear integration of their results is yet available. The aim of this study is to synthesise and disseminate current knowledge on the influence of the institutional dimension of contexts on health professionals’ CR. Methods and analysis A scoping study of the scientific literature from January 1980 to March 2013 will be undertaken to summarise and disseminate research findings about the influence of the institutional dimension on CR. Numerous databases (n=18) from three relevant fields (healthcare, health law and politics and management) will be searched. Extended search strategies will include the manual search of bibliographies, health-related websites, public registries and journals of interest. Data will be collected and analysed using a thematic chart and content analysis. A systematic multidisciplinary team approach will allow optimal identification of relevant studies, as well as effective and valid content analysis and dissemination of the results. Discussion This scoping study will provide a rigorous, accurate and up-to-date synthesis of existing knowledge regarding: (1) those aspects of the institutional dimension of health professionals’ societal and practice contexts that impact their CR and (2) how these aspects influence health professionals’ CR. Through the synergy of a multidisciplinary research team from a

  9. The Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT): protocol for a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Wilma S; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Adamson, Ashley; Sniehotta, Falko F; McCombie, Louise; Brosnahan, Naomi; Ross, Hazel; Mathers, John C; Peters, Carl; Thom, George; Barnes, Alison; Kean, Sharon; McIlvenna, Yvonne; Rodrigues, Angela; Rehackova, Lucia; Zhyzhneuskaya, Sviatlana; Taylor, Roy; Lean, Mike E J

    2016-02-16

    Despite improving evidence-based practice following clinical guidelines to optimise drug therapy, Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) still exerts a devastating toll from vascular complications and premature death. Biochemical remission of T2DM has been demonstrated with weight loss around 15kg following bariatric surgery and in several small studies of non-surgical energy-restriction treatments. The non-surgical Counterweight-Plus programme, running in Primary Care where obesity and T2DM are routinely managed, produces >15 kg weight loss in 33% of all enrolled patients. The Diabetes UK-funded Counterpoint study suggested that this should be sufficient to reverse T2DM by removing ectopic fat in liver and pancreas, restoring first-phase insulin secretion. The Diabetes Remission Clinical Trial (DiRECT) was designed to determine whether a structured, intensive, weight management programme, delivered in a routine Primary Care setting, is a viable treatment for achieving durable normoglycaemia. Other aims are to understand the mechanistic basis of remission and to identify psychological predictors of response. Cluster-randomised design with GP practice as the unit of randomisation: 280 participants from around 30 practices in Scotland and England will be allocated either to continue usual guideline-based care or to add the Counterweight-Plus weight management programme, which includes primary care nurse or dietitian delivery of 12-20weeks low calorie diet replacement, food reintroduction, and long-term weight loss maintenance. Main inclusion criteria: men and women aged 20-65 years, all ethnicities, T2DM 0-6years duration, BMI 27-45 kg/m(2). Tyneside participants will undergo Magnetic Resonance (MR) studies of pancreatic and hepatic fat, and metabolic studies to determine mechanisms underlying T2DM remission. Co-primary endpoints: weight reduction ≥ 15 kg and HbA1c service strategy. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN03267836 . Date of Registration 20/12/2013.

  10. Falls and mobility in Parkinson's disease: protocol for a randomised controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Anna T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although physical therapy and falls prevention education are argued to reduce falls and disability in people with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, this has not yet been confirmed with a large scale randomised controlled clinical trial. The study will investigate the effects on falls, mobility and quality of life of (i movement strategy training combined with falls prevention education, (ii progressive resistance strength training combined with falls prevention education, (iii a generic life-skills social program (control group. Methods/Design People with idiopathic Parkinson's disease who live at home will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of three groups. Each person shall receive therapy in an out-patient setting in groups of 3-4. Each group shall be scheduled to meet once per week for 2 hours for 8 consecutive weeks. All participants will also have a structured 2 hour home practice program for each week during the 8 week intervention phase. Assessments will occur before therapy, after the 8 week therapy program, and at 3 and 12 months after the intervention. A falls calendar will be kept by each participant for 12 months after outpatient therapy. Consistent with the recommendations of the Prevention of Falls Network Europe group, three falls variables will be used as the primary outcome measures: the number of fallers, the number of multiple fallers and the falls rate. In addition to quantifying falls, we shall measure mobility, activity limitations and quality of life as secondary outcomes. Discussion This study has the potential to determine whether outpatient movement strategy training combined with falls prevention education or progressive resistance strength training combined with falls prevention education are effective for reducing falls and improving mobility and life quality in people with Parkinson's disease who live at home. Trial registration Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR

  11. [Standardized management of acupuncture-moxibustion clinic in Singapore General Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shu-Li; Tan, Kian Hian; Ong, Biauw Chi; Lim, Shih hui; Yong, Yang; Seah, Cheng Ngee; Huang, Youyi; Han, Seong Ng

    2014-02-01

    The standardized management of acupuncture-moxibustion in Singapore General Hospital is introduced. With gradual improvement of outpatient infrastructure, re-training of medical staff, strict disinfection of manipulation, periodical inspection of medical instruments, unified management of writing, saving and processing in medical records and public education of TCM knowledge, a standardized management system in accordance with modernized hospital is gradually established. As a result, efficiency and quality of clinical treatment is continuously increasing. From April of 1998 to December of 2012, a total of 74 654 times of treatment were performed, and treatment amount per day is gradually increased. The unusual condition of acupuncture is avoided. Periodical strict inspection of joint committee authenticated by domestic and overseas medical health organization is repeatedly passed and accepted. Additionally, three clinical researches funded by Singapore Health-care Company are still in progress in acupuncture-moxibustion department.

  12. [Effect of standardized PICC training and management on the clinical effect and complication of catheterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinghui; Tang, Siyuan; He, Lianxiang; Chen, Wenfeng; Jiang, Pinglan; Hu, Yuanping; Chen, Hua

    2014-06-01

    To determine the clinical effect of standardized training and management of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) and catheter-related complications. A total of 610 patients were divided into a control group and an observation group, the control group (n=300) were catheterized by trainees who received "short-term intensive training", the observation group (n=310) by "system standardized training and management". The clinical efficacy of catheterization and the rate of catheter-related complications were compared. There was significant difference in the one-time puncture success rate, one-time cannulation success rate, the time for operation and the pain score between the 2 groups (all PPICC training and management can improve the effect of catheterization and reduce the incidence of PICC-related complication.

  13. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial for Reducing Arthritis Fatigue by clinical Teams (RAFT) using cognitive-behavioural approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, S; Ambler, N; Almeida, C; Blair, P S; Choy, E; Dures, E; Hammond, A; Hollingworth, W; Kirwan, J; Plummer, Z; Rooke, C; Thorn, J; Tomkinson, K; Pollock, J

    2015-08-06

    will be submitted to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, Clinical Commissioning Groups and all UK rheumatology departments. 52709998; Protocol v3 09.02.2015. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment for Depression (iSPOT-D, a randomized clinical trial: rationale and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinically useful treatment moderators of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD have not yet been identified, though some baseline predictors of treatment outcome have been proposed. The aim of iSPOT-D is to identify pretreatment measures that predict or moderate MDD treatment response or remission to escitalopram, sertraline or venlafaxine; and develop a model that incorporates multiple predictors and moderators. Methods/Design The International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment - in Depression (iSPOT-D is a multi-centre, international, randomized, prospective, open-label trial. It is enrolling 2016 MDD outpatients (ages 18-65 from primary or specialty care practices (672 per treatment arm; 672 age-, sex- and education-matched healthy controls. Study-eligible patients are antidepressant medication (ADM naïve or willing to undergo a one-week wash-out of any non-protocol ADM, and cannot have had an inadequate response to protocol ADM. Baseline assessments include symptoms; distress; daily function; cognitive performance; electroencephalogram and event-related potentials; heart rate and genetic measures. A subset of these baseline assessments are repeated after eight weeks of treatment. Outcomes include the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (primary and self-reported depressive symptoms, social functioning, quality of life, emotional regulation, and side-effect burden (secondary. Participants may then enter a naturalistic telephone follow-up at weeks 12, 16, 24 and 52. The first half of the sample will be used to identify potential predictors and moderators, and the second half to replicate and confirm. Discussion First enrolment was in December 2008, and is ongoing. iSPOT-D evaluates clinical and biological predictors of treatment response in the largest known sample of MDD collected worldwide. Trial registration International Study to Predict Optimised Treatment - in Depression (iSPOT-D ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier

  15. Aflibercept, bevacizumab or ranibizumab for diabetic macular oedema: recent clinically relevant findings from DRCR.net Protocol T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Sophie; Bressler, Neil M

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to provide clinically relevant findings from the DRCR.net Protocol T, a multicentre randomized clinical trial comparing intravitreous aflibercept, repackaged (compounded) bevacizumab and ranibizumab for vision-impairing centre-involved diabetic macular oedema (DME). At 1 year, all three antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drugs, on average, improved visual acuity. There was no difference among drugs in mean change in visual acuity from baseline among eyes with baseline Snellen equivalent visual acuity of 20/32 to 20/40, whereas aflibercept yielded superior vision outcomes among eyes with baseline visual acuity of 20/50 to 20/320. At 2 years, aflibercept remained superior, on average, to bevacizumab, but not ranibizumab, among eyes with baseline visual acuity of 20/50 to 20/320. Over 2 years, in post-hoc area-under-the-curve analysis, aflibercept vision outcomes were superior to bevacizumab or ranibizumab among these eyes. All three drugs had comparable ocular and systemic safety profiles. The substantial cost differential between aflibercept and bevacizumab raises challenges when safety and efficacy are at odds with cost-effectiveness results. When initial visual acuity loss is mild, there are no apparent differences, on average, among aflibercept, bevacizumab and ranibizumab for treating DME. When visual acuity loss is moderate or worse, aflibercept is more likely to improve visual acuity.

  16. Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Trine Ammentorp; Birkelund, Regner; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Title: Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology. Authors: Ph.d. student, Trine A. Gregersen. Trine.gregersen@rsyd.dk. Department of Oncology. Health Services Research Unit Lillebaelt Hospital / IRS University of Southern Denmark. Professor, Regner...... Analyzing field notes: • How to write useful field notes? • How to analyze field notes systematically? • Using Nvivo when analyzing field notes and interviews?...

  17. Standardization of Data for Clinical Use and Research in Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Noonan, Vanessa K

    2016-01-01

    for use in SCI clinical practice and research. Reporting of SCI data is likewise standardized. Data elements are continuously updated and developed using an open and transparent process. There are ongoing internal, as well as external review processes, where all interested parties are encouraged...... to participate. The purpose of this review paper is to provide an overview of the initiatives to standardize data including the International Spinal Cord Society's International SCI Data Sets and the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Common Data Elements......Increased survival after spinal cord injury (SCI) worldwide has enhanced the need for quality data that can be compared and shared between centers, countries, as well as across research studies, to better understand how best to prevent and treat SCI. Such data should be standardized and be able...

  18. Conventional and advanced implant treatment in the type II diabetic patient: surgical protocol and long-term clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Georges; Younan, Roland; Azar, Pierre; Sleilati, Ghassan

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effect of type-2 diabetes on implant survival and complication rate. Prospective study enrolling type-2 diabetic patients suffering from edentulism, having a mean perioperative HbA1c level of 7.2%, and compliant with a maintenance program. All the patients underwent dental and periodontal examinations and had laboratory testing for HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, blood lipids, and microalbuminuria. Nondiabetic patients matched for implant treatment indication served as controls. The influence of clinical diabetes-related factors and periodontal parameters (Plaque Index, bleeding on probing, probing depth) on implant survival were assessed via univariate then multivariate methods. Forty-five diabetic patients, followed for 1 to 12 years, mean age 64.7 years, received 255 implants: 143 following a classical protocol and 112 in cases of sinus floor elevation, immediate loading, and guided bone regeneration. Forty-five nondiabetic control patients received 244 implants: 142 following a classical protocol and 102 in cases of advanced surgery. Implant survival following conventional or advanced implant therapy was not statistically different between the well-controlled (HbA1c diabetic group was 97.2% (control 98.8%) and was not significantly different for age, gender, diabetes duration, smoking, or type of hypoglycemic therapy. The mean peri-implant bone loss was 0.41 +/- 0.58 mm (control, 0.49 +/- 0.64 mm). PI and BOP fairly correlated with postoperative complications. HbA1c was the only multivariate independent factor affecting the complication rate (P = .04). No statistically significant difference was found for patients (P = .81) or for implants (P = .66) for the advanced surgery cases or the conventional approach in diabetic patients compared to nondiabetic patients.

  19. WE-F-BRB-01: The Power of Ontologies and Standardized Terminologies for Capturing Clinical Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, P.

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in informatics in radiotherapy are opening up opportunities to improve our ability to assess treatment plans. Models on individualizing patient dose constraints from prior patient data and shape relationships have been extensively researched and are now making their way into commercial products. New developments in knowledge based treatment planning involve understanding the impact of the radiation dosimetry on the patient. Akin to radiobiology models that have driven intensity modulated radiotherapy optimization, toxicity and outcome predictions based on treatment plans and prior patient experiences may be the next step in knowledge based planning. In order to realize these predictions, it is necessary to understand how the clinical information can be captured, structured and organized with ontologies and databases designed for recall. Large databases containing radiation dosimetry and outcomes present the opportunity to evaluate treatment plans against predictions of toxicity and disease response. Such evaluations can be based on dose volume histogram or even the full 3-dimensional dose distribution and its relation to the critical anatomy. This session will provide an understanding of ontologies and standard terminologies used to capture clinical knowledge into structured databases; How data can be organized and accessed to utilize the knowledge in planning; and examples of research and clinical efforts to incorporate that clinical knowledge into planning for improved care for our patients. Learning Objectives: Understand the role of standard terminologies, ontologies and data organization in oncology Understand methods to capture clinical toxicity and outcomes in a clinical setting Understand opportunities to learn from clinical data and its application to treatment planning Todd McNutt receives funding from Philips, Elekta and Toshiba for some of the work presented

  20. Innovating cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs in an era of successful standard of care therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole

    2017-11-01

    Evolving cystic fibrosis 'standards of care' have influenced recent cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs for new therapies; care additions/improvements will require innovative trial designs to maximize feasibility and efficacy detection. Three cystic fibrosis therapeutic areas (pulmonary exacerbations, Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections, and reduced cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] protein function) differ with respect to the duration for which recognized 'standards of care' have been available. However, developers of new therapies in all the three areas are affected by similar challenges: standards of care have become so strongly entrenched that traditional placebo-controlled studies in cystic fibrosis populations likely to benefit from newer therapies have become less and less feasible. Today, patients/clinicians are more likely to entertain participation in active-comparator trial designs, that have substantial challenges of their own. Foremost among these are the selection of 'valid' active comparator(s), estimation of a comparator's current clinical efficacy (required for testing noninferiority hypotheses), and effective blinding of commercially available comparators. Recent and future cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs will have to creatively address this collateral result of successful past development of effective cystic fibrosis therapies: patients and clinicians are much less likely to accept simple, placebo-controlled studies to evaluate future therapies.

  1. GENetic and clinical Predictors Of treatment response in Depression: the GenPod randomised trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donovan Michael

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most effective pharmacological treatments for depression inhibit the transporters that reuptake serotonin (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors – SSRIs and noradrenaline (Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors – NaRIs into the presynaptic terminal. There is evidence to suggest that noradrenaline and serotonin enhancing drugs work through separate mechanisms to produce their clinical antidepressant action. Although most of the current evidence suggests there is little difference in overall efficacy between SSRIs and NaRIs, there are patients who respond to one class of compounds and not another. This suggests that treatment response could be predicted by genetic and/or clinical characteristics. Firstly, this study aims to investigate the influence of a polymorphism (SLC6A4 in the 5HT transporter in altering response to SSRI medication. Secondly, the study will investigate whether those with more severe depression have a better response to NaRIs than SSRIs. Methods/design The GenPod trial is a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. GPs referred patients aged between 18–74 years presenting with a new episode of depression, who did not have any medical contraindications to antidepressant medication and who had no history of psychosis or alcohol/substance abuse. Patients were interviewed to ascertain their suitability for the study. Eligible participants (with a primary diagnosis of depression according to ICD10 criteria and a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score > 14 were randomised to receive one of two antidepressant treatments, either the SSRI Citalopram or the NaRI Reboxetine, stratified according to severity. The final number randomised to the trial was 601. Follow-up assessments took place at 2, 6 and 12 weeks following randomisation. Primary outcome was measured at 6 weeks by the BDI. Outcomes will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis and will use multiple regression models to compare treatments

  2. The Development of a Clinically Relevant Sleep Modification Protocol for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M; Beebe, Dean; Levine-Donnerstein, Deborah; Frye, Sara S; Bluez, Grai P; Quan, Stuart F

    2016-06-01

    Findings from type 2 diabetes research indicate that sleep is both a predictor of onset and a correlate of disease progression. However, the role sleep plays in glucose regulation and daytime functioning in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has not been systematically investigated. Nonetheless, preliminary findings have supported that various sleep parameters are strongly correlated to health-related and neurobehavioral outcomes in youth with T1DM. This suggests that improving sleep might reduce morbidity. A critical step in developing evidence-based guidelines regarding sleep in diabetes management is to first determine that sleep modification in natural settings is possible (i.e., instructing youth to have a healthy sleep opportunity leads to more total sleep time) and that an increased sleep duration impacts disease and psychosocial outcomes in these youth. This article describes the background, design, and feasibility of an ongoing randomized clinical trial that aims to examine if increasing sleep relative to youth's own sleep routines affects glucose control and daytime functioning.

  3. Current protocols in the generation of pluripotent stem cells: theoretical, methodological and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad B Swelstad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Brad B Swelstad, Candace L KerrInstitute for Cell Engineering, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MA, USAAbstract: Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from various embryonic, fetal and adult sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and parthenogenic ESCs (pESCs are derived from the embryo proper while embryonic germ cells (EGCs, embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs, and germ-line stem cells (GSC are produced from germ cells. ECCs were the first pluripotent stem cell lines established from adult testicular tumors while EGCs are generated in vitro from primordial germ cells (PGCs isolated in late embryonic development. More recently, studies have also demonstrated the ability to produce GSCs from adult germ cells, known as spermatogonial stem cells. Unlike ECCs, the source of GSCs are normal, non-cancerous adult tissue. The study of these unique cell lines has provided information that has led to the ability to reprogram somatic cells into an ESC-like state. These cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, have been derived from a number of human fetal and adult origins. With the promises pluripotent stem cells bring to cell-based therapies there remain several considerations that need to be carefully studied prior to their clinical use. Many of these issues involve understanding key factors regulating their generation, including those which define pluripotency. In this regard, the following article discusses critical aspects of pluripotent stem cell derivation and current issues about their therapeutic potential.Keywords: pluripotency, stem cells, derivation, human

  4. Comparison of standard fusion with a "topping off" system in lumbar spine surgery: a protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaulhausen Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusion of lumbar spine segments is a well-established therapy for many pathologies. The procedure changes the biomechanics of the spine. Initial clinical benefits may be outweighed by ensuing damage to the adjacent segments. Various surgical devices and techniques have been developed to prevent this deterioration. "Topping off" systems combine rigid fusion with a flexible pedicle screw system to prevent adjacent segment disease (ASD. To date, there is no convincing evidence that these devices provide any patient benefits. Methods/Design The study is designed as a randomized, therapy-controlled trial in a clinical care setting at a university hospital. Patients presenting to the outpatient clinic with degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis will be assessed against study inclusion and exclusion criteria. After randomization, the control group will undergo conventional fusion. The intervention group will undergo fusion with a supplemental flexible pedicle screw system to protect the adjacent segment ("topping off". Follow-up examination will take place immediately after treatment during hospital stay, after 6 weeks, and then after 6, 12, 24 and 36 months. Subsequently, ongoing assessments will be performed annually. Outcome measurements will include quality of life and pain assessments using questionnaires (SF-36™, ODI, COMI. In addition, clinical and radiologic ASD, work-related disability, and duration of work disability will be assessed. Inpatient and 6-month mortality, surgery-related data (e.g., intraoperative complications, blood loss, length of incision, surgical duration, postoperative complications, adverse events, and serious adverse events will be documented and monitored throughout the study. Cost-effectiveness analysis will also be provided. Discussion New hybrid systems might improve the outcome of lumbar spine fusion. To date, there is no convincing published data on effectiveness or safety of these

  5. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  6. Comparability of the expanded WMS-III standardization protocol to the published WMS-III among right and left temporal lobectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, R C; Chelune, G J; Naugle, R I

    2000-11-01

    We examined whether differences between the expanded standardization protocol (SP) used to derive norms for the final published version (PB) of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III; Wechsler, 1997a) would result in differences on the Primary Indexes in a neurologic sample. Specifically, we examined the comparability of the performances of 63 patients with temporal lobectomy (TL) who were administered either the expanded SP protocol (n = 33: 22 left TL and 11 right TL) or the PB battery (n = 30: 11 left TL and 19 right TL). Patients who were administered the SP or PB were comparable in terms of age, sex, education, seizure duration, postsurgical seizure status, and Full Scale IQ. Postoperative intervals were significantly longer for the SP group, although correlational analyses demonstrated no significant relationship between postoperative follow-up interval and WMS-III performance. A series of t tests revealed no significant differences on any of the eight Primary Index scores between patients taking the two versions of the WMS-III for either left or right TL groups. Furthermore, repeated measures analyses of variance failed to show significant differences on modality-specific memory scores between the SP and PB for the left and right TL groups. The current study indicates that temporal lobectomy patients obtained comparable scores on the two versions of the WMS-III.

  7. Passive movement therapy in patients with moderate to severe paratonia; study protocol of a randomised clinical trial (ISRCTN43069940

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bie Rob A

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paratonia, a form of hypertonia, is associated with loss of mobility and with the development of contractures especially in the late stages of the dementia. Passive movement therapy (PMT currently is the main physiotherapeutic intervention. General doubt about the beneficial effects of this widely used therapy necessitates a randomised clinical trial (RCT to study the efficacy of PMT on the severity of paratonia and on the improvement of daily care. Methods/Design A RCT with a 4-week follow-up period. Patients with dementia (according to the DSM-IV-TR Criteria and moderate to severe paratonia are included in the study after proxy consent. By means of computerised and concealed block randomisation (block-size of 4 patients are included in one of two groups. The first group receives PMT, the second group receives usual care without PMT. PMT is given according to a protocol by physical therapist three times a week for four weeks in a row. The severity of paratonia (Modified Ashworth scale, the severity of the dementia (Global Deterioration Scale, the clinical improvement (Clinical Global Impressions, the difficulty in daily care (Patient Specific Complaints and the experienced pain in daily care of the participant (PACSLAC-D is assessed by assessors blind to treatment allocation at baseline, after 6 and 12 treatments. Success of the intervention is defined as a significant increase of decline on the modified Ashworth scale. The 'proportion of change' in two and four weeks time on this scale will be analysed. Also a multiple logistic regression analysis using declined/not declined criteria as dependent variable with correction for relevant confounders (e.g. stage of dementia, medication, co-morbidity will be used. Discussion This study is the first RCT of this size to gain further insight on the effect of passive movement therapy on the severity of paratonia. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN43069940

  8. A Pilot Curriculum to Integrate Standardized Patient Simulation into Clinical Pastoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rami A; Damore, Deborah R; Viti, Joseph F; Hughes, Patrick G; Miesle, Rebecca; Ataya, Ramsey; Atkinson, S Scott; Gable, Brad

    2016-06-01

    We describe a novel means of experiential learning for clinical pastoral care residents using standardized patient (SP) simulations. A prospective cohort study involving 7 clinical pastoral care residents was performed. All residents underwent 2 verbatim SP sessions and 2 simulation sessions. After all sessions, residents completed a self-evaluation. Faculty completed an evaluation and then provided a debriefing session to all residents. Performance ratings were globally higher on simulated scenarios when compared to the verbatim sessions. More research in the field of pastoral care is needed to validate the learned professional skills that enhance a comprehensive training program through the use of medical simulation, verbatim reports, and clinical pastoral education (CPE) competencies. Medical simulation provides a promising teaching methodology for the training of CPE residents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Natural language processing systems for capturing and standardizing unstructured clinical information: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimeyer, Kory; Foster, Matthew; Pandey, Abhishek; Arya, Nina; Halford, Gwendolyn; Jones, Sandra F; Forshee, Richard; Walderhaug, Mark; Botsis, Taxiarchis

    2017-09-01

    We followed a systematic approach based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses to identify existing clinical natural language processing (NLP) systems that generate structured information from unstructured free text. Seven literature databases were searched with a query combining the concepts of natural language processing and structured data capture. Two reviewers screened all records for relevance during two screening phases, and information about clinical NLP systems was collected from the final set of papers. A total of 7149 records (after removing duplicates) were retrieved and screened, and 86 were determined to fit the review criteria. These papers contained information about 71 different clinical NLP systems, which were then analyzed. The NLP systems address a wide variety of important clinical and research tasks. Cer